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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "type nickel metal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
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1

Revêtements métalliques : Dépôts électrolytiques de nickel Metallic coatings : Electrodeposited coatings of nickel  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Revêtements métalliques : Dépôts électrolytiques de nickel Metallic coatings : Electrodeposited coatings of nickel

International Organization for Standardization. Geneva

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

Identification of a new pseudo-binary hydroxide during calendar corrosion of (La, Mg)2Ni7-type hydrogen storage alloys for Nickel-Metal Hydride batteries  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

hydrogen storage alloys for Nickel-Metal Hydride batteries J. Monnier 1 , H. Chen 1 , S. Joiret2,3 , J-MH batteries have been extensively studied during calendar storage and cycling [6-8]. In these alloys To improve the performances of Nickel-Metal Hydride batteries, an important step is the understanding

Boyer, Edmond

3

Metallic coatings: autocatalytic (electroless) nickel-phosphorus alloy coatings: specification and test methods  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Metallic coatings: autocatalytic (electroless) nickel-phosphorus alloy coatings: specification and test methods

International Organization for Standardization. Geneva

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

Effect of gold-nickel metallization microstructure on fluxless soldering  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Gold plating is used in the microelectronics industry to maintain the wettability of metal substrates. The nature of wetting during soldering of gold plated metals is discussed, and the results of experiments on the fluxless wettability and oxidation of gold plated nickel are described. The results suggest that electrodeposition of a thin gold plate (0.14 [mu]m) and the concurrent reduction of nickel oxide produce a gold-nickel system which will wet without flux. Oxidation of nickel was observed to occur via nickel out-diffusion and by direct exposure of the substrate through pinhole plating defects. Auger chemical analysis indicates that pinholes do not produce oxidation of the surrounding substrate area. 20 refs., 10 figs.

Cinque, R.B.; Morris, J.W. Jr. (Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States) Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States))

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

Recycle Batteries CSM recycles a variety of battery types including automotive, sealed lead acid, nickel  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

metal hydride and lithium ion batteries. The use of these batteries is increasing as a green, nickel metal hydride and lithium ion batteries. Please contact EHS if you need an accumulation containerRecycle Batteries CSM recycles a variety of battery types including automotive, sealed lead acid

6

Filler metal alloy for welding cast nickel aluminide alloys  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A filler metal alloy used as a filler for welding cast nickel aluminide alloys contains from about 15 to about 17 wt. % chromium, from about 4 to about 5 wt. % aluminum, equal to or less than about 1.5 wt. % molybdenum, from about 1 to about 4.5 wt. % zirconium, equal to or less than about 0.01 wt. % yttrium, equal to or less than about 0.01 wt. % boron and the balance nickel. The filler metal alloy is made by melting and casting techniques such as are melting the components of the filler metal alloy and cast in copper chill molds. 3 figs.

Santella, M.L.; Sikka, V.K.

1998-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

7

Filler metal alloy for welding cast nickel aluminide alloys  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A filler metal alloy used as a filler for welding east nickel aluminide alloys contains from about 15 to about 17 wt. % chromium, from about 4 to about 5 wt. % aluminum, equal to or less than about 1.5 wt. % molybdenum, from about 1 to about 4.5 wt. % zirconium, equal to or less than about 0.01 wt. % yttrium, equal to or less than about 0.01 wt. % boron and the balance nickel. The filler metal alloy is made by melting and casting techniques such as are melting the components of the filler metal alloy and east in copper chill molds.

Santella, Michael L. (Knoxville, TN); Sikka, Vinod K. (Oak Ridge, TN)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

Inhalation carcinogenicity study with nickel metal powder in Wistar rats  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Epidemiological studies of nickel refinery workers have demonstrated an association between increased respiratory cancer risk and exposure to certain nickel compounds (later confirmed in animal studies). However, the lack of an association found in epidemiological analyses for nickel metal remained unconfirmed for lack of robust animal inhalation studies. In the present study, Wistar rats were exposed by whole-body inhalation to 0, 0.1, 0.4, and 1.0 mg Ni/m{sup 3} nickel metal powder (MMAD = 1.8 {mu}m, GSD = 2.4 {mu}m) for 6 h/day, 5 days/week for up to 24 months. A subsequent six-month period without exposures preceded the final euthanasia. High mortality among rats exposed to 1.0 mg Ni/m{sup 3} nickel metal resulted in the earlier termination of exposures in this group. The exposure level of 0.4 mg Ni/m{sup 3} was established as the MTD for the study. Lung alterations associated with nickel metal exposure included alveolar proteinosis, alveolar histiocytosis, chronic inflammation, and bronchiolar-alveolar hyperplasia. No increased incidence of neoplasm of the respiratory tract was observed. Adrenal gland pheochromocytomas (benign and malignant) in males and combined cortical adenomas/carcinomas in females were induced in a dose-dependent manner by the nickel metal exposure. The incidence of pheochromocytomas was statistically increased in the 0.4 mg Ni/m{sup 3} male group. Pheochromocytomas appear to be secondary to the lung toxicity associated with the exposure rather than being related to a direct nickel effect on the adrenal glands. The incidence of cortical tumors among 0.4 mg Ni/m{sup 3} females, although statistically higher compared to the concurrent controls, falls within the historical control range; therefore, in the present study, this tumor is of uncertain relationship to nickel metal exposure. The lack of respiratory tumors in the present animal study is consistent with the findings of the epidemiological studies.

Oller, Adriana R. [NiPERA, 2605 Meridian Parkway, Suite 200, Durham, NC 27713 (United States)], E-mail: aoller@nipera.org; Kirkpatrick, Daniel T.; Radovsky, Ann [WIL Research Laboratories, LLC, 1407 George Road, Ashland, OH 44805 8946 (United States); Bates, Hudson K. [NiPERA, 2605 Meridian Parkway, Suite 200, Durham, NC 27713 (United States)

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

Hydridable material for the negative electrode in a nickel-metal hydride storage battery  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A monophase hydridable material for the negative electrode of a nickel-metal hydride storage battery with a "Lave's phase" structure of hexagonal C14 type (MgZn.sub.2) has the general formula: Zr.sub.1-x Ti.sub.x Ni.sub.a Mn.sub.b Al.sub.c Co.sub.d V.sub.e where ##EQU1##

Knosp, Bernard (Neuilly-sur-Seine, FR); Bouet, Jacques (Paris, FR); Jordy, Christian (Dourdan, FR); Mimoun, Michel (Neuilly-sur-Marne, FR); Gicquel, Daniel (Lanorville, FR)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Ductile filler metal alloys for welding nickel aluminide alloys  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Nickel aluminum alloys are welded utilizing a nickel based alloy containing zirconium but substantially free of titanium and niobium which reduces the tendency to crack.

Santella, Michael L. (Knoxville, TN); McNabb, Jeffrey D. (Lenoir City, TN); Sikka, Vinod K. (Oak Ridge, TN)

2003-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

11

Sulfur resistance of Group VIII transition metal promoted nickel catalysts for synthesis gas methanation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SULFUR RESISTANCE OF GROUP VIII TRANSITION METAL PROMOTED NICKEL CATALYSTS FOR SYNTHESIS GAS METHANATION A Thesis by KELLEE HALL HAMLIN Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas AgrM University in partial fulfillment of the requirement...: Aydin Akger n (Chairman of Co 'ttee) Ahme M. Gadalla (Member) Michael . Rosynek (Member) aries D. Holland . ( ead of Department) May 1986 ABSTRACT Sulfur Resistance of Group VIII Transition Metal Promoted Nickel Catalysts For Synthesis Gas...

Hamlin, Kellee Hall

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

12

Method for inhibiting alkali metal corrosion of nickel-containing alloys  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Structural components of nickel-containing alloys within molten alkali metal systems are protected against corrosion during the course of service by dissolving therein sufficient aluminum, silicon, or manganese to cause the formation and maintenance of a corrosion-resistant intermetallic reaction layer created by the interaction of the molten metal, selected metal, and alloy.

DeVan, Jackson H. (Oak Ridge, TN); Selle, James E. (Westminster, CO)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Electrodepositionof Metal Alloyand Mixed Oxide Films Usinga Single-PrecursorTetranuclearCopper-NickelComplex  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Compositionally uniform mixed metals, metal oxides, and alloys are used extensively as corrosion protective and catalysts. I-~For example, nickel-containing oxides and alloys are used for oxidative protection of very. Although Cu-Ni alloy deposition has been stud- ied for many years, none of the previous approaches has led

Kounaves, Samuel P.

14

Experimental determination of equilibrium nickel isotope fractionation between metal and silicate from 500 C  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Experimental determination of equilibrium nickel isotope fractionation between metal and silicate.04& between equilibrated bulk silicate Earth and chondrites, indicating that Ni isotopes are not likely- lation process involving a well-mixed silicate reservoir. Ã? 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. 1

Manning, Craig

15

Paste Type Nickel Electrode Containing Compound And At Least One Other Element  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention provides a paste type nickel electrode for a storage cell having an alkaline electrolyte, the electrode comprising a current collector and a paste containing a nickel-based hydroxide and an oxidized compound of cobalt syncrystallized with at least one other element, wherein said hydroxide forms a first powder and wherein said compound forms a second powder distinct from said first powder, said powders being mixed mechanically within said paste.

Bernard, Patrick (Massy, FR); Bertrand, Fran.cedilla.oise (Ris Orangis, FR); Simonneau, Olivier (Dourdan, FR)

1999-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

16

The effects of soil type and chemical treatment on nickel speciation in refinery enriched soils  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The effects of soil type and chemical treatment on nickel speciation in refinery enriched soils Aerial deposition of Ni from a refinery in Port Colborne, Ontario, Canada has resulted in the enrichment in vegetable crops grown in the vicinity of the refinery. Conversely, dolomitic lime- stone additions resulted

17

Diastereoselective nickel-catalyzed reductive coupling of alkynes and aldehydes and application towards the B-type amphidinolides  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The application of recently developed stereoselective nickel-catalyzed reductive coupling reactions of alkynes and aldehydes to the synthesis of complex natural product targets was explored. The "B-Type" amphidinolides ...

Ndubaku, Chudi O

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Experimental Design for Evaluation of Co-extruded Refractory Metal/Nickel Base Superalloy Joints  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Prior to the restructuring of the Prometheus Program, the NRPCT was tasked with delivering a nuclear space reactor. Potential NRPCT nuclear space reactor designs for the Prometheus Project required dissimilar materials to be in contact with each other while operating at extreme temperatures under irradiation. As a result of the high reactor core temperatures, refractory metals were the primary candidates for many of the reactor structural and cladding components. They included the tantalum-base alloys ASTAR-811C and Ta-10W, the niobium-base alloy FS-85, and the molybdenum base alloys Moly 41-47.5 Rhenium. The refractory metals were to be joined to candidate nickel base alloys such as Haynes 230, Alloy 617, or Nimonic PE 16 either within the core if the nickel-base alloys were ultimately selected to form the outer core barrel, or at a location exterior to the core if the nickel-base alloys were limited to components exterior to the core. To support the need for dissimilar metal joints in the Prometheus Project, a co-extrusion experiment was proposed. There are several potential methods for the formation of dissimilar metal joints, including explosive bonding, friction stir welding, plasma spray, inertia welding, HIP, and co-extrusion. Most of these joining methods are not viable options because they result in the immediate formation of brittle intermetallics. Upon cooling, intermetallics form in the weld fusion zone between the joined metals. Because brittle intermetallics do not form during the initial bonding process associated with HIP, co-extrusion, and explosive bonding, these three joining procedures are preferred for forming dissimilar metal joints. In reference to a Westinghouse Astronuclear Laboratory report done under a NASA sponsored program, joints that were fabricated between similar materials via explosive bonding had strengths that were directly affected by the width of the diffusion barrier. It was determined that the diffusion zone should not exceed a critical thickness (0.0005 in.). A diffusion barrier that exceeded this thickness would likely fail. The joint fabrication method must therefore mechanically bond the two materials causing little or no interdiffusion upon formation. Co-extrusion fits this description since it forms a mechanical joint between two materials by using heat and pressure. The two materials to be extruded are first assembled and sealed within a co-extrusion billet which is subsequently heated and then extruded through a die. For a production application, once the joint is formed, it is dejacketed to remove the outer canister. The remaining piece consists of two materials bonded together with a thin diffusion barrier. Therefore, the long-term stability of the joint is determined primarily by the kinetics of interdiffusion reaction between the two materials. An experimental design for co-extrusion of refractory metals and nickel-based superalloys was developed to evaluate this joining process and determine the long-term stability of the joints.

ME Petrichek

2005-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

19

Current status of environmental, health, and safety issues of nickel metal-hydride batteries for electric vehicles  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report identifies important environment, health, and safety issues associated with nickel metal-hydride (Ni-MH) batteries and assesses the need for further testing and analysis. Among the issues discussed are cell and battery safety, workplace health and safety, shipping requirements, and in-vehicle safety. The manufacture and recycling of Ni-MH batteries are also examined. This report also overviews the ``FH&S`` issues associated with other nickel-based electric vehicle batteries; it examines venting characteristics, toxicity of battery materials, and the status of spent batteries as a hazardous waste.

Corbus, D.; Hammel, C.J.; Mark, J.

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Preparation of Mesoporous Silica Templated Metal Nanowire Films on Foamed Nickel Substrates  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A method has been developed for the formation of high surface area nanowire films on planar and three-dimensional metal electrodes. These nanowire films are formed via electrodeposition into a mesoporous silica film. The mesoporous silica films are formed by a sol-gel process using Pluronic tri-block copolymers to template mesopore formation on both planar and three-dimensional metal electrodes. Surface area increases of up to 120-fold have been observed in electrodes containing a templated film when compared to the same types of electrodes without the templated film.

Campbell, Roger [University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa; Kenik, Edward A [ORNL; Bakker, Martin [University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa; Havrilla, George [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Montoya, Velma [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Shamsuzzoha, Mohammed [University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "type nickel metal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Schottky barrier height reduction for holes by Fermi level depinning using metal/nickel oxide/silicon contacts  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We report the experimental demonstration of Fermi level depinning using nickel oxide (NiO) as the insulator material in metal-insulator-semiconductor (M-I-S) contacts. Using this contact, we show less than 0.1?eV barrier height for holes in platinum/NiO/silicon (Pt/NiO/p-Si) contact. Overall, the pinning factor was improved from 0.08 (metal/Si) to 0.26 (metal/NiO/Si). The experimental results show good agreement with that obtained from theoretical calculation. NiO offers high conduction band offset and low valence band offset with Si. By reducing Schottky barrier height, this contact can be used as a carrier selective contact allowing hole transport but blocking electron transport, which is important for high efficiency in photonic applications such as photovoltaics and optical detectors.

Islam, Raisul, E-mail: raisul@stanford.edu; Shine, Gautam; Saraswat, Krishna C. [Department of Electrical Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States)

2014-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

22

Relating metal binding to DNA binding in the nickel regulatory protein NikR  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The concentration of transition metals within the cell must be tightly regulated. If the concentration of a given transition metal is too low the cell may not be able to perform life-sustaining processes, while high levels ...

Phillips, Christine M. (Christine Marie)

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Contaminated nickel scrap processing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The DOE will soon choose between treating contaminated nickel scrap as a legacy waste and developing high-volume nickel decontamination processes. In addition to reducing the volume of legacy wastes, a decontamination process could make 200,000 tons of this strategic metal available for domestic use. Contaminants in DOE nickel scrap include {sup 234}Th, {sup 234}Pa, {sup 137}Cs, {sup 239}Pu (trace), {sup 60}Co, U, {sup 99}Tc, and {sup 237}Np (trace). This report reviews several industrial-scale processes -- electrorefining, electrowinning, vapormetallurgy, and leaching -- used for the purification of nickel. Conventional nickel electrolysis processes are particularly attractive because they use side-stream purification of process solutions to improve the purity of nickel metal. Additionally, nickel purification by electrolysis is effective in a variety of electrolyte systems, including sulfate, chloride, and nitrate. Conventional electrorefining processes typically use a mixed electrolyte which includes sulfate, chloride, and borate. The use of an electrorefining or electrowinning system for scrap nickel recovery could be combined effectively with a variety of processes, including cementation, solvent extraction, ion exchange, complex-formation, and surface sorption, developed for uranium and transuranic purification. Selected processes were reviewed and evaluated for use in nickel side-stream purification. 80 refs.

Compere, A.L.; Griffith, W.L.; Hayden, H.W.; Johnson, J.S. Jr.; Wilson, D.F.

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Perfluorodiethoxymethane on nickel and nickel oxide surfaces  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The interaction of perfluorodiethoxymethane with a nickel single crystal, Ni(100); a nickel crystal with chemisorbed oxygen, Ni(100)-c(2x2)O; and a nickel crystal with nickel oxide crystallites, NiO(100) is investigated in an ultra high vacuum environment using thermal desorption spectroscopy and high resolution electron energy loss spectroscopy. Nickel, a component of hard disk drives and stainless steel, is used to represent metal surfaces in these {open_quotes}real{close_quotes} systems. Perfluorodiethoxymethane is used in this study as a model compound of industrial perfluoropolyether lubricants. These lubricants are known for their exceptional stability, except in the presence of metals. Perfluorodiethoxymethane contains the acetal group (-OCF{sub 2}O-), believed to be particularly vulnerable to attack in the presence of Lewis acids. Since the surfaces studied show increasing Lewis acidity at the nickel atom sites, one might expect to see increasing decomposition of perfluorodiethoxymethane due to acidic attack of the acetal group. No decomposition of perfluorodiethoxymethane is observed on the clean Ni(100) surface, while more research is needed to determine whether a small decomposition pathway is observed on the oxygenated surfaces, or whether sample impurities are interfering with results. The strength of the bonding of perfluorodiethoxymethane to the surface is found to increase as the nickel atoms sites become more acidic in moving from Ni(100) to Ni (100)-c(2x2)O to NiO (100).

Jacobson, J.

1994-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

25

Low-temperature CVD of iron, cobalt, and nickel nitride thin films from bis[di(tert-butyl)amido]metal(II) precursors and ammonia  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Thin films of late transition metal nitrides (where the metal is iron, cobalt, or nickel) are grown by low-pressure metalorganic chemical vapor deposition from bis[di(tert-butyl)amido]metal(II) precursors and ammonia. These metal nitrides are known to have useful mechanical and magnetic properties, but there are few thin film growth techniques to produce them based on a single precursor family. The authors report the deposition of metal nitride thin films below 300?°C from three recently synthesized M[N(t-Bu){sub 2}]{sub 2} precursors, where M?=?Fe, Co, and Ni, with growth onset as low as room temperature. Metal-rich phases are obtained with constant nitrogen content from growth onset to 200?°C over a range of feedstock partial pressures. Carbon contamination in the films is minimal for iron and cobalt nitride, but similar to the nitrogen concentration for nickel nitride. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy indicates that the incorporated nitrogen is present as metal nitride, even for films grown at the reaction onset temperature. Deposition rates of up to 18?nm/min are observed. The film morphologies, growth rates, and compositions are consistent with a gas-phase transamination reaction that produces precursor species with high sticking coefficients and low surface mobilities.

Cloud, Andrew N.; Abelson, John R., E-mail: abelson@illinois.edu [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 201 Materials Science and Engineering Building, 1304 W. Green St., Urbana, Illinois 61801 (United States); Davis, Luke M.; Girolami, Gregory S., E-mail: girolami@scs.illinois.edu [School of Chemical Sciences, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 600 S. Mathews Ave., Urbana, Illinois 61801 (United States)

2014-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

26

Benchmark Analysis of Subcritical Noise Measurements on a Nickel-Reflected Plutonium Metal Sphere  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Subcritical experiments using californium source-driven noise analysis (CSDNA) and Feynman variance-to-mean methods were performed with an alpha-phase plutonium sphere reflected by nickel shells, up to a maximum thickness of 7.62 cm. Both methods provide means of determining the subcritical multiplication of a system containing nuclear material. A benchmark analysis of the experiments was performed for inclusion in the 2010 edition of the International Handbook of Evaluated Criticality Safety Benchmark Experiments. Benchmark models have been developed that represent these subcritical experiments. An analysis of the computed eigenvalues and the uncertainty in the experiment and methods was performed. The eigenvalues computed using the CSDNA method were very close to those calculated using MCNP5; however, computed eigenvalues are used in the analysis of the CSDNA method. Independent calculations using KENO-VI provided similar eigenvalues to those determined using the CSDNA method and MCNP5. A slight trend with increasing nickel-reflector thickness was seen when comparing MCNP5 and KENO-VI results. For the 1.27-cm-thick configuration the MCNP eigenvalue was approximately 300 pcm greater. The calculated KENO eigenvalue was about 300 pcm greater for the 7.62-cm-thick configuration. The calculated results were approximately the same for a 5-cm-thick shell. The eigenvalues determined using the Feynman method are up to approximately 2.5% lower than those determined using either the CSDNA method or the Monte Carlo codes. The uncertainty in the results from either method was not large enough to account for the bias between the two experimental methods. An ongoing investigation is being performed to assess what potential uncertainties and/or biases exist that have yet to be properly accounted for. The dominant uncertainty in the CSDNA analysis was the uncertainty in selecting a neutron cross-section library for performing the analysis of the data. The uncertainty in the Feynman method was equally shared between the uncertainties in fitting the data to the Feynman equations and the neutron multiplicity of 239Pu. Material and geometry uncertainties in the benchmark experiment were generally much smaller than uncertainties in the analysis methods.

John D. Bess; Jesson Hutchinson

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Electrochromic nickel oxide simultaneously doped with lithium and a metal dopant  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An electrochromic device comprising a counter electrode layer comprised of lithium metal oxide which provides a high transmission in the fully intercalated state and which is capable of long-term stability, is disclosed. Methods of making an electrochromic device comprising such a counter electrode are also disclosed.

Gillaspie, Dane T; Weir, Douglas G

2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

X-ray absorption spectroscopy study of the local structure of heavy metal ions incorporated into electrodeposited nickel oxide films  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The incorporation of heavy metal ions into simulated corrosion films has been investigated using spectroscopic and electrochemical techniques. The films were formed by electrodeposition of the appropriate oxide (hydroxide) onto a graphite substrate. Synchrotron X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) was used to determine the structure and composition of the host oxide film, as well as the local structure of the impurity ion. Results on the incorporation of Ce and Sr into surface films of Ni(OH){sub 2} and NiOOH are reported. Cathodically deposited Ni(OH){sub 2} was found to be mainly in the alpha form while anodically prepared NiOOH showed the presence of Ni{sup +2} and Ni{sup +4}. Cerium incorporated into Ni(OH){sub 2} exists as mixed Ce{sup +3} and Ce{sup +4} phases; a Ce{sup +4} species was found when Ce was codeposited with NiOOH. The structure of the Ce{sup +4} phase in anodic films appears similar to a Ce(OH){sub 4} standard. However, XAS, X-ray diffraction, and laser Raman measurements indicate that the latter chemical formulation is probably incorrect and that the material is really a disordered form of hydrous cerium oxide. The local structure of this material is similar to CeO{sub 2} but has much higher structural disorder. The significance of this finding on the question of the structure of Ce-based corrosion inhibitors in aluminum oxide films is pointed out. Moreover, the authors found it possible to form pure Ce oxide (hydroxide) films on graphite by both cathodic and anodic electrodeposition; their structures have also been elucidated. Strontium incorporated into nickel oxide films consists of Sr{sup +2} which is coordinated to oxygen atoms and is likely to exist as small domains of coprecipitated material.

Balasubramanian, M.; Melendres, C.A. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Chemical Technology Div.] [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Chemical Technology Div.; Mansour, A.N. [Naval Surface Warfare Center, Bethesda, MD (United States). Carderock Div.] [Naval Surface Warfare Center, Bethesda, MD (United States). Carderock Div.

1999-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Advanced nickel-metal hydride cell development. Final report, September 1993--March 1996  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Inert gas atomization using metal hydride alloys for a Ni/MH{sub x}cell was studied. Atomization of the alloys was demonstrated on a small production scale up to batch size of several kg. Relative performance of the atomized and nonatomized alloys was investigated for the electrode material in a Ni/MH{sub x} cell. The study included effects of charge-discharge rates, temperature, and particle size on cell voltage (polarization) and specific capacity. Results show that the specific capacity of the present atomized alloys was apprecialy smaller than that of the nonatomized powder, especially for initial cycles. Full activation of the atomized alloys oftentook several hundreds of cycles. However, no appreciable difference in discharge rate capability was observed with R10 and R12 alloys. Chemical compositions were indistinguishable, although the oxygen contents of the atomized alloys were always higher. Effects of Ni and Cu coating on alloy performance were studied after electroless coating; the coatings noticeably improved the electrode rate capability for all the alloys. The electrode polarization was esecially improved, but not the cycle life. Further studies are needed.

Lim, Hong S.

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Ductility and chemical reactions at the interface between nickel and magnesium oxide single crystals.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??An investigation was conducted on the interaction between nickel metal and single crystals of magnesium oxide. The nickel was cleaned with purified hydrogen gas at… (more)

Hasselman, Didericus Petrus Hermannus

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

E-Print Network 3.0 - alb2-type transition-metal diborides Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

alb2-type transition-metal diborides Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: alb2-type transition-metal diborides Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >>...

32

Formation of Nickel Silicide from Direct-Liquid-Injection Chemical-Vapor-Deposited Nickel Nitride Films  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Published April 28, 2010. Metal silicides such as TiSi2 and CoSi2 have been commonly used as the contactsFormation of Nickel Silicide from Direct-Liquid-Injection Chemical-Vapor-Deposited Nickel Nitride as the intermediate for subsequent conversion into nickel silicide NiSi , which is a key material for source, drain

33

Inhibition of nickel precipitation by organic ligands  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Wastewaters from electroplating are very complex due to the composition of the plating baths. A nickel plating bath typically consists of a nickel source (nickel chloride or nickel sulfate), complexing agents to solubilize nickel ions controlling their concentration in the solution, buffering agents to maintain pH, brighteners to improve brightness of the plated metal, stabilizers (inhibitors) to prevent undesired reactions, accelerators to enhance speed of reactions, wetting agents to reduce surface tension at the metal surface, and reducing agents (only for electroless nickel plating) to supply electrons for reduction of the nickel. Alkaline precipitation is the most common method of recovering nickel from wastewaters. However, organic constituents found in the wastewaters can mask or completely inhibit the precipitation of nickel. The objective of this study was to conduct an equilibrium study to explore the inhibition behavior of various organic ligands on nickel precipitation. This will lay the groundwork for development of technologies efficacious in the treatment of complexed nickel. The organic ligands used in this study are EDTA, triethanolamine (TEA), gluconate, and tartrate.

Hu, H.L.; Nikolaidis, N.P.; Grasso, D. [Univ. of Connecticut, Storrs, CT (United States)

1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Metal-sulfur type cell having improved positive electrode  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An novel metal-sulfur type cell operable at a temperature of 200.degree. C. or less with an energy density of 150 Whrs/Kg or better is disclosed characterized by an organo-sulfur cathode formed from an organic-sulfur compound having the general formula, in its charged state, of (R(S).sub.y).sub.n wherein y=1 to 6; n=2 to 20; and R is one or more different aliphatic or aromatic organic moieties having 1 to 20 carbon atoms, which may include one or more oxygen, sulfur, or nitrogen heteroatoms when R comprisises one of more aromatic rings, or one or more oxygen, sulfur, nitrogen, or fluorine atoms associtated with the chain when R comprises an aliphatic chain, wherein the aliphatic group may be linear or branched, saturated or unsaturated, and wherein either the aliphatic chain or the aromatic ring may have substituted groups thereon.

Dejonghe, Lutgard C. (Berkeley, CA); Visco, Steven J. (Berkeley, CA); Mailhe, Catherine C. (Berkeley, CA); Armand, Michel B. (St. Martin D'Uriage, FR)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Nickel aluminide alloys with improved weldability  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Weldable nickel aluminide alloys which are essentially free, if not entirely free, of weld hot cracking are provided by employing zirconium concentrations in these alloys of greater than 2.6 wt. % or sufficient to provide a substantial presence of Ni--Zr eutectic phase in the weld so as to prevent weld hot cracking. Weld filler metals formed from these so modified nickel aluminide alloys provide for crack-free welds in previously known nickel aluminide alloys.

Santella, Michael L. (Knoxville, TN); Goodwin, Gene M. (Lenior City, TN)

1995-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

36

In situ X-ray absorption fine structure studies of foreign metal ions in nickel hydrous oxide electrodes in alkaline electrolytes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Aspects of the structural and electronic properties of hydrous oxide films of composite (9:1) Ni/Co and (9:1) Ni/Fe, prepared by electrodeposition, have been examined in alkaline electrolytes using in situ X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS). An analysis of the X-ray absorption near the edge structure (XANES) and extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) for the Co and Fe K-edges of these composite hydrous oxides revealed that, regardless of the oxidation state of nickel sites in the films, the guest metal ions are present as Co[sup 3+] and Fe[sup 3+] and that the cobalt-oxygen distance d(Co-O) = 1.9 [+-] 0.02 [angstrom] and d(Fe-O) = 1.92 [+-] 0.02 [angstrom]. The latter values are in excellent agreement with d(Me-O) (Me = Co or Fe) in CoOOH and [beta]- and [gamma]-FeOOH, respectively, determined by conventional X-ray diffraction. Two clearly defined Me-Ni first coordination shells could be observed in the Fourier transforms (FT) of the K-edge EXAFS of the guest metal recorded at a potential at which both Ni[sup 2+] and Ni[sup 3+] sites are expected to be present. 28 refs., 10 figs., 3 tabs.

Kim, Sunghyun; Tryk, D.A.; Scherson, D. (Case Western Reserve Univ., Cleveland, OH (United States)); Antonio, M.R. (Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)); Carr, R. (Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lab., CA (United States))

1994-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

37

Formation of Nickel Silicide from Direct-liquid-injection Chemical-vapor-deposited Nickel Nitride Films  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Smooth, continuous, and highly conformal nickel nitride (NiN{sub x}) films were deposited by direct liquid injection (DLI)-chemical vapor deposition (CVD) using a solution of bis(N,N{prime}-di-tert-butylacetamidinato)nickel(II) in tetrahydronaphthalene as the nickel (Ni) source and ammonia (NH{sub 3}) as the coreactant gas. The DLI-CVD NiNx films grown on HF-last (100) silicon and on highly doped polysilicon substrates served as the intermediate for subsequent conversion into nickel silicide (NiSi), which is a key material for source, drain, and gate contacts in microelectronic devices. Rapid thermal annealing in the forming gas of DLI-CVD NiNx films formed continuous NiSi films at temperatures above 400 C. The resistivity of the NiSi films was 15{mu}{Omega} cm, close to the value for bulk crystals. The NiSi films have remarkably smooth and sharp interfaces with underlying Si substrates, thereby producing contacts for transistors with a higher drive current and a lower junction leakage. Resistivity and synchrotron X-ray diffraction in real-time during annealing of NiNx films showed the formation of a NiSi film at about 440 C, which is morphologically stable up to about 650 C. These NiSi films could find applications in future nanoscale complementary metal oxide semiconductor devices or three-dimensional metal-oxide-semiconductor devices such as Fin-type field effect transistors for the 22 nm technology node and beyond.

Li, Z.; Gordon, R; Li, H; Shenai, D; Lavoie, C

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Primary Water Stress Corrosion Cracks in Nickel Alloy Dissimilar Metal Welds: Detection and Sizing Using Established and Emerging Nondestructive Examination Techniques  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission has established the Program to Assess the Reliability of Emerging Nondestructive Techniques (PARENT) as a follow-on to the international cooperative Program for the Inspection of Nickel Alloy Components (PINC). The goal of PINC was to evaluate the capabilities of various nondestructive evaluation (NDE) techniques to detect and characterize surface-breaking primary water stress corrosion cracks in dissimilar-metal welds (DMW) in bottom-mounted instrumentation (BMI) penetrations and small-bore (?400-mm diameter) piping components. A series of international blind round-robin tests were conducted by commercial and university inspection teams. Results from these tests showed that a combination of conventional and phased-array ultrasound techniques provided the highest performance for flaw detection and depth sizing in dissimilar metal piping welds. The effective detection of flaws in BMIs by eddy current and ultrasound shows that it may be possible to reliably inspect these components in the field. The goal of PARENT is to continue the work begun in PINC and apply the lessons learned to a series of open and blind international round-robin tests that will be conducted on a new set of piping components including large-bore (?900-mm diameter) DMWs, small-bore DMWs, and BMIs. Open round-robin testing will engage universities and industry worldwide to investigate the reliability of emerging NDE techniques to detect and accurately size flaws having a wide range of lengths, depths, orientations, and locations. Blind round-robin testing will invite testing organizations worldwide, whose inspectors and procedures are certified by the standards for the nuclear industry in their respective countries, to investigate the ability of established NDE techniques to detect and size flaws whose characteristics range from easy to very difficult to detect and size. This paper presents highlights of PINC and reports on the plans and progress for PARENT round-robin tests.

Braatz, Brett G.; Cumblidge, Stephen E.; Doctor, Steven R.; Prokofiev, Iouri

2012-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

39

Microstructural, mechanical and weldability assessments of the dissimilar welds between ??- and ??-strengthened nickel-base superalloys  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Dissimilar welding of ??- and ??-strengthened nickel-base superalloys has been investigated to identify the relationship between the microstructure of the welds and the resultant mechanical and weldability characteristics. ??-Strengthened nickel-base Alloy 500 and ??-strengthened nickel-base Alloy 718 were used for dissimilar welding. Gas tungsten arc welding operations were utilized for performing the autogenous dissimilar welding. Alloy 500 and Alloy 718 base metals showed various types of phases, carbides, intermetallics and eutectics in their microstructure. The results for Alloy 500 weld metal showed severe segregation of titanium to the interdendritic regions. The Alloy 718 weld metal compositional analysis confirmed the substantial role of Nb in the formation of low-melting eutectic-type morphologies which can reduce the weldability. The microstructure of dissimilar weld metal with dilution level of 65% wt.% displayed semi-developed dendritic structure. The less segregation and less formation of low-melting eutectic structures caused to less susceptibility of the dissimilar weld metal to the solidification cracking. This result was confirmed by analytic modeling achievements. Dissolution of ??-Ni{sub 3}Nb precipitations took place in the Alloy 718 heat-affected zone leading to sharp decline of the microhardness in this region. Remelted and resolidified regions were observed in the partially-melted zone of Alloy 500 and Alloy 718. Nevertheless, no solidification and liquation cracking happened in the dissimilar welds. Finally, this was concluded that dissimilar welding of ??- and ??-strengthened nickel-base superalloys can successfully be performed. - Highlights: • Dissimilar welding of ??- and ??-strengthened nickel-base superalloys is studied. • Microstructural, mechanical and weldability aspects of the welds are assessed. • Microstructure of welds, bases and heat-affected zones is characterized in detail. • The type, morphology and distribution of the phases are thoroughly investigated. • Dissimilar welding is successfully performed without occurrence of any hot cracks.

Naffakh Moosavy, Homam, E-mail: homam_naffakh@iust.ac.ir [School of Metallurgy and Materials Engineering, Iran University of Science and Technology (IUST), Tehran 16846-13114 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Aboutalebi, Mohammad-Reza; Seyedein, Seyed Hossein [School of Metallurgy and Materials Engineering, Iran University of Science and Technology (IUST), Tehran 16846-13114 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Mapelli, Carlo [Dipartimento di Meccanica, Politecnico di Milano, Via La Massa 34, Milan 20156 (Italy)

2013-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

40

Modeling of a Nickel-Hydrogen Cell Phase Reactions in the Nickel Active Material  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

submitted July 6, 2000; revised manuscript received February 18, 2001. The nickel-hydrogen battery has been the primary energy storage device in aerospace applications for more than two decades. Com- pared to the newly developed high-energy-density batteries, e.g., the nickel-metal hydride battery and the lithium-ion battery

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "type nickel metal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Electroless nickel recycling via electrodialysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Electroless nickel is widely used in the metal finishing industry as a coating. It plates evenly on a variety of surfaces and replicates or enhances the surface finish. It has high hardness and good corrosion resistance and machinability. However, its bath life is limited and it has a tendency to spontaneously plate out on the tank and associated equipment. These problems add to the cost per unit component plated. Also, expensive waste treatment is required before users can dispose of the spent solution. Electroless nickel`s limited bath life is inherent in its chemical make-up. Using hypophosphite as the reducing agent for the nickel ion generates by-products of nickel metal and orthophosphite. When the level of orthophosphite in the solution reaches a high concentration, the reaction slows and finally stops. The bath must be disposed of, and its treatment and replacement costs are high. Metal salts have a tendency to plate out because of the dissolved solids present, and this also makes it necessary to discard the bath. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) has conducted a study of an electrodialysis process that can reduce both chemical purchases and disposal costs. Electrodialysis employs a membrane, deionized water, and an electromotive potential to separate the orthophosphite and other dissolved solids from the nickel ions. With the aid of the electromotive potential, the dissolved solids migrate across the membrane from the process solution into the water in the recycling unit`s holding cell. This migration lowers the total dissolved solids (TDS) in the process solution and improves plating performance. The dialysis process makes it possible to reuse the bath many times without disposal.

Steffani, C.; Meltzer, M.

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

p-Type semiconducting nickel oxide as an efficiency-enhancing anodal interfacial layer in bulk heterojunction solar cells  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention, in one aspect, relates to a solar cell. In one embodiment, the solar cell includes an anode, a p-type semiconductor layer formed on the anode, and an active organic layer formed on the p-type semiconductor layer, where the active organic layer has an electron-donating organic material and an electron-accepting organic material.

Irwin, Michael D; Buchholz, Donald B; Marks, Tobin J; Chang, Robert P. H.

2014-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

43

Effect of the composition of polypyrrole substrate on the electrodeposition of copper and nickel  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Electrodeposition of copper and nickel on a variety of substrates including conductive polymer films with two different compositions has been studied. The enhancement of the copper and nickel electrodeposition rate was observed for composite polypyrrole films with cation-exchange properties in comparison to undoped polypyrrole films with anion-exchange properties. Significant enhancement of the nickel electrodeposition rate on both types of conductive polymer vs. the bare gold electrode was also found. An explanation of these effects is presented. An electrochemical quartz crystal microbalance (EQCM) with 10 MHz AT-cut piezoelectrodes was used in this study. Use of the EQCM technique allowed for simultaneous monitoring of voltamperometric and resonance frequency vs. potential or time characteristics. The thickness of electropolymerized polypyrrole films as well as the amounts of electrodeposited metals were controlled by monitoring the EQCM resonant frequency. The nucleation density has been determined from scanning electron microscope experiments.

Hepel, M.; Chen, Y.M.; Stephenson, R. [State Univ. of New York, Potsdam, NY (United States). Dept. of Chemistry

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Determination of Primordial Metallicity and Mixing in the Type IIP Supernova 1993W  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present the results of a large grid of synthetic spectra and compare them to early spectroscopic observations of SN 1993W. This supernova was discovered close to its explosion date and at a recession velocity of 5400 km/s is located in the Hubble flow. We focus here on two early spectra that were obtained approximately 5 and 9 days after explosion. We parameterize the outer supernova envelope as a power-law density profile in homologous expansion. In order to extract information on the value of the parameters a large number of models was required. We show that very early spectra combined with detailed models can provide constraints on the value of the power law index, the ratio of hydrogen to helium in the surface of the progenitor, the progenitor metallicity and the amount of radioactive nickel mixed into the outer envelope of the supernova. The spectral fits reproduce the observed spectra exceedingly well. The spectral results combined with the early photometry predict that the explosion date was 4.7 {+-} 0.7 days before the first spectrum was obtained. The ability to obtain the metallicity from early spectra make SN IIP attractive probes of chemical evolution in the universe and by showing that we have the ability to pin down the parameters of the progenitor and mixing during the supernova explosion, it is likely to make SN IIP useful cosmological distance indicators which are at the same time complementary to SNe Ia.

Baron, E.; Nugent, Peter E.; Branch, David; Hauschildt, Peter H.; Turatto, M.; Cappellaro, E.

2002-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

45

High temperature low-cycle fatigue of friction welded joints - type 304-304 stainless steel and alloy 718-718 nickel base superalloy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper assesses the high-temperature low-cycle fatigue of the Type 304 stainless steel and Alloy 718 superalloy friction-welded joints. Strain controlled low-cycle fatigue tests for 304-304 and 718-718 friction-welded specimens were carried out at 923 K in air to obtain the fatigue strength of the joints. These materials were selected as the cyclic hardening and softening materials, respectively. The 304-304 welded specimens showed inferior fatigue strength in comparison with the base metal while the 718-718 specimens exhibited fatigue strength equivalent to that of the base metal. The difference in the fatigue strength between the two materials is discussed from the viewpoint of the cyclic deformation behavior and strain reduction at weld interface.

Wakai, T. (Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corp., Ibaraki (Japan). Oarai Engineering Center); Sakane, M.; Ohnami, M. (Ritsumeikan Univ., Kyoto (Japan). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering); Okita, K. (Hyogo Prefectural Inst. of Industrial Research, Miki (Japan). Technical Center for Machinery and Metals); Fukuchi, Y. (Hyogo Prefectural Inst. of Industrial Research, Kobe (Japan))

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

Amorphous metal alloy and composite  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Amorphous metal alloys of the iron-chromium and nickel-chromium type have excellent corrosion resistance and high temperature stability and are suitable for use as a protective coating on less corrosion resistant substrates. The alloys are stabilized in the amorphous state by one or more elements of titanium, zirconium, hafnium, niobium, tantalum, molybdenum, and tungsten. The alloy is preferably prepared by sputter deposition.

Wang, Rong (Richland, WA); Merz, Martin D. (Richland, WA)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

THE IMPACT OF METALLICITY ON THE RATE OF TYPE Ia SUPERNOVAE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The metallicity of a star strongly affects both its evolution and the properties of the stellar remnant that results from its demise. It is generally accepted that stars with initial masses below {approx}8 M{sub Sun} leave behind white dwarfs and that some sub-population of these lead to Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia). However, it is often tacitly assumed that metallicity has no effect on the rate of SNe Ia. We propose that a consequence of the effects of metallicity is to significantly increase the SN Ia rate in lower-metallicity galaxies, in contrast to previous expectations. This is because lower-metallicity stars leave behind higher-mass white dwarfs, which should be easier to bring to explosion. We first model SN Ia rates in relation to galaxy masses and ages alone, finding that the elevation in the rate of SNe Ia in lower-mass galaxies measured by Lick Observatory SN Search is readily explained. However, we then see that models incorporating this effect of metallicity agree just as well. Using the same parameters to estimate the cosmic SN Ia rate, we again find good agreement with data up to z Almost-Equal-To 2. We suggest that this degeneracy warrants more detailed examination of host galaxy metallicities. We discuss additional implications, including for hosts of high-z SNe Ia, the SN Ia delay time distribution, super-Chandrasekhar SNe, and cosmology.

Kistler, Matthew D. [California Institute of Technology, Mail Code 350-17, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Stanek, K. Z.; Kochanek, Christopher S.; Thompson, Todd A. [Center for Cosmology and Astro-Particle Physics, Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Prieto, Jose L. [Carnegie Observatories, 813 Santa Barbara Street, Pasadena, CA 91101 (United States)

2013-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

48

Metal-insulator-semiconductor structures on p-type GaAs with low interface state density  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Metal-insulator-semiconductor structures on p-type GaAs with low interface state density Zhi Chen properties of in situ deposited Si3N4 /Si/p-GaAs metal-insulator-semiconductor structures have been offered by a low gate leakage technology in GaAs, such as metal insulator structures, func- tional Ga

Chen, Zhi

49

Nickel-catalyzed coupling reactions and synthetic studies toward ent-dioxepandehydrothyrsiferol via an epoxide-opening cascade  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Nickel-Catalyzed Coupling Reactions. Nickel-catalyzed allene--aldehyde coupling and alkene--aldehyde coupling represent two methods of preparing allylic alcohols. Most asymmetric transition metal-catalyzed methods of ...

Ng, Sze-Sze

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

METALLICITY DIFFERENCES IN TYPE Ia SUPERNOVA PROGENITORS INFERRED FROM ULTRAVIOLET SPECTRA  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Two ''twin'' Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia), SNe 2011by and 2011fe, have extremely similar optical light-curve shapes, colors, and spectra, yet have different ultraviolet (UV) continua as measured in Hubble Space Telescope spectra and measurably different peak luminosities. We attribute the difference in the UV continua to significantly different progenitor metallicities. This is the first robust detection of different metallicities for SN Ia progenitors. Theoretical reasoning suggests that differences in metallicity also lead to differences in luminosity. SNe Ia with higher progenitor metallicities have lower {sup 56}Ni yields and lower luminosities for the same light-curve shape. SNe 2011by and 2011fe have different peak luminosities ({Delta}M{sub V} Almost-Equal-To 0.6 mag), which correspond to different {sup 56}Ni yields: M{sub 11fe}({sup 56}Ni) / M{sub 11by}({sup 56}Ni) = 1.7{sup +0.7}{sub -0.5}. From theoretical models that account for different neutron-to-proton ratios in progenitors, the differences in {sup 56}Ni yields for SNe 2011by and 2011fe imply that their progenitor stars were above and below solar metallicity, respectively. Although we can distinguish progenitor metallicities in a qualitative way from UV data, the quantitative interpretation in terms of abundances is limited by the present state of theoretical models.

Foley, Ryan J.; Kirshner, Robert P. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States)

2013-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

51

Dissimilar-weld failure analysis and development. Comparative behavior of similar and dissimilar welds. Final report. [Welds of 2-1/4Cr-1Mo to 2-1/4Cr-1Mo using 2-1/4Cr-1Mo filler material; and austenitic to ferritic steel welds made by fusion welding alloy-800H to 2-1/4Cr-1Mo using nickel base filler metal ERNiCr-3  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The 593/sup 0/C (1100/sup 0/F) stress rupture behavior of similar metal welds (SMWs) and dissimilar metal welds (DMWs) was investigated under cyclic load and cyclic temperature conditions to provide insight into the question, ''Why do DMWs fail sooner than SMWs in the fossil fuel boilers.'' The weld joints of interest were an all ferritic steel SMW made by fusion welding 2-1/4Cr-1Mo to 2-1/4Cr-1Mo using 2-1/4Cr-1Mo filler metal and an austenitic to ferritic steel DMW made by fusion welding Alloy-800H to 2-1/4Cr-1Mo using a nickel base filler metal ERNiCr-3. The stress rupture behavior obtained on cross weld specimens was similar for both types of welds with only a 20% reduction in rupture life for the DMW. For rupture times less than 1500 hours, failures occurred in the 2-1/4Cr-1Mo base metal whereas, for rupture times greater than 1500 hours, failures occurred in the 2-1/4Cr-1Mo heat affected zone (HAZ). The HAZ failures exhibited a more brittle appearance than the base metal failures for both types of welds and it appears that the life of both joints was limited by the stress rupture properties of the HAZ. These results support the hypothesis that increased residual stresses due to abrupt changes in hardness (strength) of metals involved are the major contributors to the reduction in life of DMWs as compared to SMWs. 10 refs., 15 figs., 7 tabs.

Busboom, H.; Ring, P.J.

1986-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Precipitation of sigma and chi phases in ?-ferrite of Type 316FR weld metals  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The decomposition behavior and kinetics of ?-ferrite are examined using aging treatments between 873 and 1073 K for Type 316FR stainless steel weld metals with different solidification modes (316FR AF, 316FR FA). The dominant precipitates are sigma, chi, and secondary austenite nucleated at ?-ferrite/austenite interfaces or in the interior of the ferrite grains. These precipitates consume all the ferrite during isothermal aging in both 316FR AF and FA weld metals. Differences in the precipitation behavior (precipitation initiation time and precipitation speed) between weld metals can be explained by i) the degree of Cr and Mo microsegregation within ?-ferrite or austenite near ferrite and ii) the nucleation sites induced due to the solidification mode (AF or FA), such as the ferrite amount. For both weld materials, a Johnson–Mehl-type equation can express the precipitation behavior of the sigma + chi phases and quantitatively predict the behavior at the service-exposure temperatures of a fast breed reactor. - Highlights: • Precipitation of ? and ? phase in Type 316FR welds (two solidification modes) • Different precipitation behaviors: precipitation initiation time and growth speed • Johnson-Mehl–type equation is the most applicable to the precipitation behaviors • Precipitation behaviors are predicted under service conditions of FBRs.

Chun, Eun Joon, E-mail: ejchun@mapse.eng.osaka-u.ac.jp [Division of Materials and Manufacturing Science, Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka University, 2-1 Yamada-oka, Suita-shi, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Baba, Hayato [Division of Materials and Manufacturing Science, Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka University, 2-1 Yamada-oka, Suita-shi, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Nishimoto, Kazutoshi [Department of the Application of Nuclear Technology, Fukui University of Technology, Gakuen 3-6-1, Fukui-shi, Fukui 910-8505 (Japan); Saida, Kazuyoshi [Division of Materials and Manufacturing Science, Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka University, 2-1 Yamada-oka, Suita-shi, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan)

2013-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

53

Bellows-Type Accumulators for Liquid Metal Loops of Space Reactor Power Systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In many space nuclear power systems, the primary and/or secondary loops use liquid metal working fluids, and require accumulators to accommodate the change in the liquid metal volume and maintain sufficient subcooling to avoid boiling. This paper developed redundant and light-weight bellows-type accumulators with and without a mechanical spring, and compared the operating condition and mass of the accumulators for different types of liquid metal working fluids and operating temperatures: potassium, NaK-78, sodium and lithium loops of a total capacity of 50 liters and nominal operating temperatures of 840 K, 860 K, 950 K and 1340 K, respectively. The effects of using a mechanical spring and different structural materials on the design, operation and mass of the accumulators are also investigated. The structure materials considered include SS-316, Hastelloy-X, C-103 and Mo-14Re. The accumulator without a mechanical spring weighs 23 kg and 40 kg for a coolant subcooling of 50 K and 100 K, respectively, following a loss of the fill gas. The addition of a mechanical spring comes with a mass penalty, in favor of higher redundancy and maintaining a higher liquid metal subcooling.

Tournier, Jean-Michel; El-Genk, Mohamed S. [Institute for Space and Nuclear Power Studies, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM 87131 (United States); Chemical and Nuclear Engineering Department, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM 87131 (United States)

2006-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

54

Low-Metallicity Inhibition of Type Ia Supernovae and Galactic and Cosmic Chemical Evolution  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We introduce a metallicity dependence of Type Ia supernova (SN Ia) rate into the Galactic and cosmic chemical evolution models. In our SN Ia progenitor scenario, the accreting white dwarf (WD) blows a strong wind to reach the Chandrasekhar mass limit. If the iron abundance of the progenitors is as low as [Fe/H] 1-2, SNe Ia can be found only in the environments where the timescale of metal enrichment is sufficiently short as in starburst galaxies and ellipticals. The low-metallicity inhibition of SNe Ia can shed new light on the following issues: 1) The limited metallicity range of the SN Ia progenitors would imply that ``evolution effects'' are relatively small for the use of high redshift SNe Ia to determine the cosmological parameters. 2) WDs of halo populations are poor producers of SNe Ia, so that the WD contribution to the halo mass is not constrained from the iron abundance in the halo. 3) The abundance patterns of globular clusters and field stars in the Galactic halo lack of SN Ia signatures in spite of their age difference of several Gyrs, which can be explained by the low-metallicity inhibition of SNe Ia. 4) It could also explain why the SN Ia contamination is not seen in the damped Ly\\alpha systems for over a wide range of redshift.

Chiaki Kobayashi; Takuji Tsujimoto; Ken'ich Nomoto; Izumi Hachisu; Mariko Kato

1998-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

55

Dimensionality-induced insulator-metal crossover in layered nickelates La{sub n+1}Ni{sub n}O{sub 2n+2} (n = 2, 3, and ?)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Low-valence layered nickelates are a structural analog to the superconducting cuprates and possess interesting properties. In this work, we have systematically studied the electronic structure of La{sub n+1}Ni{sub n}O{sub 2n+2} using first-principles calculations. Our results reveal that the Ni-3d 3z{sup 2} ? r{sup 2} orbital state is active and evolves from discrete molecular levels to a continuous solid band and its filling varies as the dimensionality (or n) increases. The two-dimensional (2D) La{sub 3}Ni{sub 2}O{sub 6} and La{sub 4}Ni{sub 3}O{sub 8} are thus found to have a molecular insulating state. In contrast, the 3D LaNiO{sub 2} is metallic and its 3z{sup 2} ? r{sup 2} band surprisingly becomes 3D due to the Ni-La hybridization, and the La-5d xy orbital also forms a 2D metallic band. Therefore, La{sub n+1}Ni{sub n}O{sub 2n+2} is a dimensionality-controlled insulator-metal crossover system.

Liu, Ting; Jia, Ting; Zhang, Xiaoli [Key Laboratory of Materials Physics, Institute of Solid State Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031 (China)] [Key Laboratory of Materials Physics, Institute of Solid State Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031 (China); Wu, Hua, E-mail: wuh@fudan.edu.cn [Laboratory for Computational Physical Sciences (MOE), State Key Laboratory of Surface Physics, and Department of physics, Fudan University, Shanghai 200433 (China)] [Laboratory for Computational Physical Sciences (MOE), State Key Laboratory of Surface Physics, and Department of physics, Fudan University, Shanghai 200433 (China); Zeng, Zhi, E-mail: zzeng@theory.issp.ac.cn [Key Laboratory of Materials Physics, Institute of Solid State Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031 (China) [Key Laboratory of Materials Physics, Institute of Solid State Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031 (China); Hefei National Laboratory for Physical Sciences at Microscale, Department of Physics, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei 230026 (China); Lin, H. Q. [Beijing Computational Science Research Center, Beijing 100084 (China)] [Beijing Computational Science Research Center, Beijing 100084 (China); Li, X. G. [Hefei National Laboratory for Physical Sciences at Microscale, Department of Physics, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei 230026 (China)] [Hefei National Laboratory for Physical Sciences at Microscale, Department of Physics, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei 230026 (China)

2014-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

56

Nickel assisted healing of defective graphene S. Karoui,1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

nickel or transition-metal-carbide surfaces can pro- duce thin graphitic layers.5 However, for the most of graphene grown from a metallic substrate is investigated using tight-binding Monte Carlo simulations and 1000 C, using metallic substrates (such as Co, Ni, Ir, Ru) that catalyze the decomposition

Boyer, Edmond

57

Structural transformation of nickel hydroxide films during anodic oxidation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The transformation of anodically formed nickel hydroxide/oxy-hydroxide electrodes has been investigated. A mechanism is proposed for the anodic oxidation reaction, in which the reaction interface between the reduced and oxidized phases of the electrode evolves in a nodular topography that leads to inefficient utilization of the active electrode material. In the proposed nodular transformation model for the anodic oxidation reaction, nickel hydroxide is oxidized to nickel oxy-hydroxide in the region near the metal substrate. Since the nickel oxy-hydroxide is considerably more conductive than the surrounding nickel hydroxide, as further oxidation occurs, nodular features grow rapidly to the film/electrolyte interface. Upon emerging at the electrolyte interface, the reaction boundary between the nickel hydroxide and oxy-hydroxide phases spreads laterally across the film/electrolyte interface, creating an overlayer of nickel oxy-hydroxide and trapping uncharged regions of nickel hydroxide within the film. The nickel oxy-hydroxide overlayer surface facilitates the oxygen evolution side reaction. Scanning tunneling microscopy of the electrode in its charged state revealed evidence of 80 {endash} 100 Angstrom nickel oxy-hydroxide nodules in the nickel hydroxide film. In situ spectroscopic ellipsometer measurements of films held at various constant potentials agree quantitatively with optical models appropriate to the nodular growth and subsequent overgrowth of the nickel oxy-hydroxide phase. A two-dimensional, numerical finite difference model was developed to simulate the current distribution along the phase boundary between the charged and uncharged material. The model was used to explore the effects of the physical parameters that govern the electrode behavior. The ratio of the conductivities of the nickel hydroxide and oxy-hydroxide phases was found to be the dominant parameter in the system.

Crocker, R.W.; Muller, R.H.

1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Structural and electrochemical properties of nanostructured nickel silicides by reduction and silicification of high-surface-area nickel oxide  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Graphical abstract: Nanostructured nickel silicides have been synthesized by reduction and silification of high-surface-area nickel oxide, and exhibited remarkably like-noble metal property, lower electric resistivity, and ferromagnetism at room temperature. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer NiSi{sub x} have been prepared by reduction and silification of high-surface-area NiO. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The structure of nickel silicides changed with increasing reaction temperature. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Si doping into nickel changed the magnetic properties of metallic nickel. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer NiSi{sub x} have remarkably lower electric resistivity and like-noble metal property. -- Abstract: Nanostructured nickel silicides have been prepared by reduction and silicification of high-surface-area nickel oxide (145 m{sup 2} g{sup -1}) produced via precipitation. The prepared materials were characterized by nitrogen adsorption, X-ray diffraction, thermal analysis, FT-IR spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, magnetic and electrochemical measurements. The nickel silicide formation involves the following sequence: NiO (cubic) {yields} Ni (cubic) {yields} Ni{sub 2}Si (orthorhombic) {yields} NiSi (orthorhombic) {yields} NiSi{sub 2} (cubic), with particles growing from 13.7 to 21.3 nm. The nickel silicides are ferromagnetic at room temperature, and their saturation magnetization values change drastically with the increase of Si content. Nickel silicides have remarkably low electrical resistivity and noble metal-like properties because of a constriction of the Ni d band and an increase of the electronic density of states. The results suggest that such silicides are promising candidates as inexpensive yet functional materials for applications in electrochemistry as well as catalysis.

Chen, Xiao [Laboratory of Advanced Materials and Catalytic Engineering, State Key Laboratory of Fine Chemicals, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China)] [Laboratory of Advanced Materials and Catalytic Engineering, State Key Laboratory of Fine Chemicals, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China); Zhang, Bingsen [Department of Inorganic Chemistry, Fritz Haber Institute of the Max Planck Society (Germany)] [Department of Inorganic Chemistry, Fritz Haber Institute of the Max Planck Society (Germany); Li, Chuang; Shao, Zhengfeng [Laboratory of Advanced Materials and Catalytic Engineering, State Key Laboratory of Fine Chemicals, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China)] [Laboratory of Advanced Materials and Catalytic Engineering, State Key Laboratory of Fine Chemicals, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China); Su, Dangsheng [Department of Inorganic Chemistry, Fritz Haber Institute of the Max Planck Society (Germany)] [Department of Inorganic Chemistry, Fritz Haber Institute of the Max Planck Society (Germany); Williams, Christopher T. [Department of Chemical Engineering, Swearingen Engineering Center, University of South Carolina (United States)] [Department of Chemical Engineering, Swearingen Engineering Center, University of South Carolina (United States); Liang, Changhai, E-mail: changhai@dlut.edu.cn [Laboratory of Advanced Materials and Catalytic Engineering, State Key Laboratory of Fine Chemicals, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China)] [Laboratory of Advanced Materials and Catalytic Engineering, State Key Laboratory of Fine Chemicals, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China)

2012-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

59

Monolithic Nickel (II) Oxide Aerogels Using an Organic Epoxide: The Importance of the Counter Ion  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The synthesis and characterization of nickel (II) oxide aerogel materials prepared using the epoxide addition method is described. The addition of the organic epoxide propylene oxide to an ethanolic solution of NiCl{sub 2} 6H{sub 2}O resulted in the formation of an opaque light green monolithic gel and subsequent drying with supercritical CO{sub 2} gave a monolithic aerogel material of the same color. This material has been characterized using powder X-ray diffraction, electron microscopy, elemental analysis, and nitrogen adsorption/desorption analysis. The results indicate that the nickel (II) oxide aerogel has very low bulk density (98 kg/m{sup 3} ({approx}98 %porous)), high surface area (413 m{sup 2}/g), and has a particulate-type aerogel microstructure made up of very fine spherical particles with an open porous network. By comparison, a precipitate of Ni{sub 3}(NO{sub 3}){sub 2}(OH){sub 4} is obtained when the same preparation is attempted with the common Ni(NO{sub 3}){sub 2} 6H{sub 2}O salt as the precursor. The implications of the difference of reactivity of the two different precursors are discussed in the context of the mechanism of gel formation via the epoxide addition method. The synthesis of nickel (II) oxide aerogel, using the epoxide addition method, is especially unique in our experience. It is our first example of the successful preparation of a metal oxide aerogel using a metal divalent metal ion and may have implications for the application of this method to the preparation of aerogels or nanoparticles of other divalent metal oxides. To our knowledge this is the first report of a monolithic pure nickel (II) oxide aerogel materials.

Gash, A E; Satcher, J H; Simpson, R L

2004-01-13T23:59:59.000Z

60

Fabrication of nickel microbump on aluminum using electroless nickel plating  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Fabrication of nickel microbumps on an aluminum electrode using a nickel displacement and a direct nickel plating process was investigated. Electroless nickel plating reaction with hypophosphite as a reducing agent was not initiated on the aluminum substrate, because aluminum does not have catalytic action on the oxidation of hypophosphite. Accordingly, nickel was initially deposited on the aluminum using nickel displacement plating for the initiation of the electroless plating. Nickel bumps on the aluminum electrode were fabricated by treatment of the nickel displacement plating followed by electroless nickel plating. Nickel microbumps also can be formed on the aluminum electrode without the displacement plating process. Activation of the aluminum surface is an indispensable process to initiate electroless nickel plating. Uniform bumps 20 {micro}m wide and 15 {micro}m high with good configuration were obtained by direct nickel plating after being activated with dimethyl amine borane.

Watanabe, H.; Honma, H. [Kanto Gakuin Univ., Yokohama, Kanagawa (Japan). Faculty of Engineering

1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "type nickel metal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Fly ash enhanced metal removal process  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The primary objective of the study was to evaluate the effectiveness of fly ashes from local thermal power plants in the removal of cadmium, nickel, chromium, lead, and copper from aqueous waste streams. Physical and chemical characteristics of fly ashes were determined, batch isotherm studies were conducted. A practical application of using fly ash in treating spent electroless nickel (EN) plating baths by modified conventional precipitation or solid enhanced metal removal process (SEMR) was investigated. In addition to nickel the EN baths also contains completing agents such as ammonium citrate and succinic acid reducing agents such as phosphate and hypophosphite. SEMR experiments were conducted at different pHs, fly ash type and concentrations, and settling times.

Nonavinakere, S. [Plexus Scientific Corp., Annapolis, MD (United States); Reed, B.E. [West Virginia Univ., Morgantown, WV (United States). Dept. of Civil Engineering

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

62

Combination nickel foam expanded nickel screen electrical connection supports for solid oxide fuel cells  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A solid oxide fuel assembly is made, wherein rows (14, 25) of fuel cells (17, 19, 21, 27, 29, 31), each having an outer interconnection (20) and an outer electrode (32), are disposed next to each other with corrugated, electrically conducting expanded metal mesh member (22) between each row of cells, the corrugated mesh (22) having top crown portions and bottom portions, where the top crown portion (40) have a top bonded open cell nickel foam (51) which contacts outer interconnections (20) of the fuel cells, said mesh and nickel foam electrically connecting each row of fuel cells, and where there are no more metal felt connections between any fuel cells.

Draper, Robert; Prevish, Thomas; Bronson, Angela; George, Raymond A.

2007-01-02T23:59:59.000Z

63

A comparative evaluation of low-cycle fatigue behavior of type 316LN base metal, 316 weld metal, and 316LN/316 weld joint  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A comparative evaluation of the low-cycle fatigue (LCF) behavior of type 316LN base metal, carried out at 773 and 873 K. Total strain-controlled LCF tests were conducted at a constant strain rate of 3 {times} 10{sup {minus}3} s{sup {minus}1} with strain amplitudes in the range {+-}0.20 to {+-}1.0 pct. Weld pads with single V and double V configuration were prepared by the shielded metal-arc welding (SMAW) process using 316 electrodes for weld-metal and weld-joint specimens. Optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) of the untested and tested samples were carried out to elucidate the deformation and the fracture behavior. The cyclic stress response of the base metal shows a very rapid hardening to a maximum stress followed by a saturated stress response. Weld metal undergoes a relatively short initial hardening followed by a gradual softening regime. Weld joints exhibit an initial hardening and a subsequent softening regime at all strain amplitudes, except at low strain amplitudes where a saturation regime is noticed. The initial hardening observed in base metal has been attributed to interaction between dislocations and solute atoms/complexes and cyclic saturation to saturation in the number density of slip bands. The 18-8 group of austenitic stainless steels, such as AISI type 316, 304, and their modified grades, finds applications as structural material for various components of the liquid-metal-cooled fast breeder reactor (LMFBR).

Valsan, M.; Sundararaman, D.; Sankara Rao, K.B.; Mannan, S.L. [Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Tamil Nadu (India)

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

An electrochemical route for making porous nickel oxide electrochemical capacitors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Porous nickel oxide films were prepared by electrochemically precipitating nickel hydroxide and heating the hydroxide in air at 300 C. The resulting nickel oxide films behave as an electrochemical capacitor with a specific capacitance of 59 F/g electrode material. These nickel oxide films maintain high utilization at high rates of discharge (i.e., high power density) and have excellent cycle life. Porous cobalt oxide films were also synthesized. Although the specific capacitances of these films are approximately one-fifth that of the nickel oxide films, the results demonstrate the versatility of fabricating a wide range of porous metal oxide films using this electrochemical route for use in capacitor applications. Electrochemical capacitors have generated wide interest in recent years for use in high power applications (e.g., in a hybrid electric vehicle, where they are expected to work in conjunction with a conventional battery).

Srinivasan, V.; Weidner, J.W. [Univ. of South Carolina, Columbia, SC (United States). Dept. of Chemical Engineering

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Kinetic model of catalytic oxidation of carbon monoxide on nickel  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A mechanism is proposed for describing the previous disclosed multiplicity of equilibrium states in the oxidation of carbon monoxide on metallic nickel. In contrast to the known mechanism for oxidation of CO on platinum metals it includes a nonlinear stage of carbon monoxide adsorption and a linear stage of oxygen adsorption. A kinetic model has been obtained and stage velocity constants have been found, providing a basis for obtaining a quantitative agreement between the calculated and experimental relations between the reaction velocity and the reagent concentrations. Opinions are stated in relation to the causes for evolution of the CO oxidation reaction from platinum metals to nickel.

Pyatnitskii, Yu.I.; Ostapyuk, V.A.

1986-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Waste water treatment and metal recovery  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Waste water treatment and metal recovery Nickel catalysts for hydrogen production Nickel and single versions of which contained cobalt, chromium, carbon, molybdenum, tungsten, and nickel. In 1911 and 1912% on their stainless steel production. The company paid sizable dividends to its owners until it was dissolved

Braun, Paul

67

On the role of mass-transport in electrodeposition of nickel-iron alloys  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Despite the extensive use of nickel-iron, the mechanism of codeposition is not well understood. The interactions occurring during codeposition are such that nickel deposition is inhibited in the presence of iron, and the resulting alloy deposit has a much higher iron to nickel ratio than the electrolyte. This type of interactive deposition is an example of what has been termed anomalous codeposition, which is also used in describing electrodeposition of iron group elements (iron, cobalt, and nickel) with each other, or with zinc, tin, lead, and cadmium. In Chapter 2 of this thesis, a critical review of the literature is presented. Various interpretations and proposed mechanisms for the anomalous deposition of the iron-group alloys, particularly nickel-iron, is discussed. The major objectives of this review are to provide unambiguous definitions for various codeposition schemes, including the anomalous deposition itself, reflect on some of the more widely accepted hypothesis describing this phenomenon, and summarize the more recent results of other investigators in the field. To elucidate the electrodeposition mechanism of magnetic alloys, a mathematical model is developed in Chapter 3. The model is applied to a rotating disk electrode system, with well understood hydrodynamics, and incorporates homogeneous reactions of metal-hydroxide complexes. In Chapter 4, the model is further used to investigate the effect of buffering agents which are commonly used in electroplating baths. Our understanding of the mechanism of electrode processes depends on the accurate measurement of these concentrations. The interfacial value of pH is particularly important for electrodeposition of the iron-group alloys. In Chapters 5 and 6, an in-situ nonintrusive technique for surface pH measurement is investigated by theoretical and experimental methods.

Hessami, S.; Tobias, C.W.

1990-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Metallic glass composition  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A metallic glass alloy that is either iron-based or nickel-based or based on a mixture of iron and nickel, containing lesser amounts of elements selected from the group boron, silicon carbon and phosphorous to which is added an amount of a ductility enhancing element selected from the group cerium, lanthanum, praseodymium and neodymium sufficient to increase ductility of the metallic glass upon annealing.

Kroeger, Donald M. (Knoxville, TN); Koch, Carl C. (Raleigh, NC)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Respiration of metal (hydr)oxides by Shewanella and Geobacter: a key role for multihaem c-type cytochromes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Dissimilatory reduction of metal (e.g. Fe, Mn) (hydr)oxides represents a challenge for microorganisms, as their cell envelopes are impermeable to metal (hydr)oxides that are poorly soluble in water. To overcome this physical barrier, the Gram-negative bacteria Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 and Geobactersulfurreducens have developed electron transfer (ET) strategies that require multihaem c-type cytochromes (c-Cyts). In S. oneidensis MR-1, multihaem c-Cyts CymA and MtrA are believed to transfer electrons from the inner membrane quinone/quinol pool through the periplasm to the outer membrane. The type II secretion system of S. oneidensis MR-1 has been implicated in the reduction of metal (hydr)oxides, most likely by translocating decahaem c-Cyts MtrC and OmcA across outer membrane to the surface of bacterial cells where they form a protein complex. The extracellular MtrC and OmcA can directly reduce solid metal (hydr)oxides. Likewise, outer membrane multihaem c-Cyts OmcE and OmcS of G. sulfurreducens are suggested to transfer electrons from outer membrane to type IV pili that are hypothesized to relay the electrons to solid metal (hydr)oxides. Thus, multihaem c-Cyts play critical roles in S. oneidensis MR-1-and G. sulfurreducens-mediated dissimilatory reduction of solid metal (hydr)oxides by facilitating ET across the bacterial cell envelope.

Shi, Liang; Squier, Thomas C.; Zachara, John M.; Fredrickson, Jim K.

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Thermoelectric material including a multiple transition metal-doped type I clathrate crystal structure  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A thermoelectric material includes a multiple transition metal-doped type I clathrate crystal structure having the formula A.sub.8TM.sub.y.sub.1.sup.1TM.sub.y.sub.2.sup.2 . . . TM.sub.y.sub.n.sup.nM.sub.zX.sub.46-y.sub.1.sub.-y.sub.2.sub.- . . . -y.sub.n.sub.-z. In the formula, A is selected from the group consisting of barium, strontium, and europium; X is selected from the group consisting of silicon, germanium, and tin; M is selected from the group consisting of aluminum, gallium, and indium; TM.sup.1, TM.sup.2, and TM.sup.n are independently selected from the group consisting of 3d, 4d, and 5d transition metals; and y.sub.1, y.sub.2, y.sub.n and Z are actual compositions of TM.sup.1, TM.sup.2, TM.sup.n, and M, respectively. The actual compositions are based upon nominal compositions derived from the following equation: z=8q.sub.A-|.DELTA.q.sub.1|y.sub.1-|.DELTA.q.sub.2|y.sub.2- . . . -|.DELTA.q.sub.n|y.sub.n, wherein q.sub.A is a charge state of A, and wherein .DELTA.q.sub.1, .DELTA.q.sub.2, .DELTA.q.sub.n are, respectively, the nominal charge state of the first, second, and n-th TM.

Yang, Jihui (Lakeshore, CA); Shi, Xun (Troy, MI); Bai, Shengqiang (Shanghai, CN); Zhang, Wenqing (Shanghai, CN); Chen, Lidong (Shanghai, CN); Yang, Jiong (Shanghai, CN)

2012-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

71

Influences on the oceanic biogeochemical cycling of the hybrid-type metals, cobalt, iron, and manganese  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Trace metal cycling is one of many processes that influence ocean ecosystem dynamics. Cobalt, iron, and manganese are redox active trace metal micro-nutrients with oceanic distributions that are influenced by both biological ...

Noble, Abigail Emery

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

E-Print Network 3.0 - active filler metal Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

. The dissolution of the base metal in the liquid filler metal could eventually shift the eutectic point, however... -temperature brazing with nickel-based filler ... Source:...

73

The Behaviour of Base Metals in Arc-Type Magmatic-Hydrothermal Systems Insights from Merapi Volcano,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

zone stratovolcanoes provide important windows on the magmatic-hydrothermal processes at playThe Behaviour of Base Metals in Arc-Type Magmatic- Hydrothermal Systems ­ Insights from Merapi systems include a shallow magmatic reservoir (the porphyry stock), an overlying hydrothermal cell, its

Barnes, Sarah-Jane

74

A comprehensive review on the hydro metallurgical process for the production of nickel and copper powders by hydrogen reduction  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Production of nickel and copper powders from leach solutions and other aqueous streams by hydrogen reduction under pressure has been reviewed in the present paper. By optimising the optimum process condition, powders or composite materials of required specification could be produced from different types of acidic and alkaline solutions by coating nickel or copper powders on the secondary materials such as graphite, tungsten carbide and aluminium. The paper also highlights the kinetics of reduction and the use of various inorganic and organic additives to improve the quality of the powder on bench and commercial scale. Effect of various experimental factors such as pH of the solution, concentration of metals, particle size and nature of additives, operating condition of autoclave, etc. on the rate of reduction and quality of powder are also discussed.

Agrawal, A. [Non Ferrous Process Group, National Metallurgical Laboratory, Jamshedpur 831007 (India)]. E-mail: archana@nmlindia.com; Kumar, V. [Non Ferrous Process Group, National Metallurgical Laboratory, Jamshedpur 831007 (India); Pandey, B.D. [Non Ferrous Process Group, National Metallurgical Laboratory, Jamshedpur 831007 (India); Sahu, K.K. [Non Ferrous Process Group, National Metallurgical Laboratory, Jamshedpur 831007 (India)

2006-04-13T23:59:59.000Z

75

Beyond Conventional Cathode Materials for Li-ion Batteries and Na-ion Batteries Nickel fluoride conversion materials and P2 type Na-ion intercalation cathodes /  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

active material for Li-ion battery, Fe2OF4. ElectrochemistryIron Fluoride, in a Li Ion Battery: A Solid-State NMR, X-raymaterials for Li-ion battery……………………………133 8.2. P2 type

Lee, Dae Hoe

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

888Metal and silicate particles including nanoparticles are present in electronic cigarette cartomizer fluid and aserosol.   

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Metal and Silicate Particles Including Nanoparticles Areiron, nickel, aluminum, and silicate and nanoparticles (,100The presence of metal and silicate particles in cartomizer

Talbot, Prue

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Nickel-cobalt alloy nanosheets obtained from reductive hydrothermal-treatment of nickel-cobalt hydroxide carbonate  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer An anionic layered material, nickel-cobalt hydroxide carbonate was synthesized. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Reductive hydrothermal-treatment of the layered precursor produced an alloy. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The alloy is a bimetallic nanostructured nickel-cobalt and a soft magnet material. -- Abstract: Nickel-cobalt hydroxide carbonate, a layered material was synthesized by the co-precipitation method using urea as precipitant agent. This anionic layered material with hexagonal structure is constructed from nickel and cobalt ions within the layers and carbonate anions between the layers. Nickel-cobalt alloy with pure cubic phase was obtained by a reductive hydrothermal-treatment of the layered precursor. Powder X-ray diffraction pattern and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy confirmed the formation of the initial layered material and its metallic alloy product. That is, the nickel-cobalt alloy has really produced via a wet chemical route for the first time. Magnetic measurement revealed that the alloy sample is a soft magnet material.

Ghotbi, Mohammad Yeganeh, E-mail: yeganehghotbi@gmail.com [Nanomaterials and Nanotechnology Program, Ceramic Engineering Department, Faculty of Engineering, Malayer University, Malayer (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Jolagah, Ali; Afrasiabi, Hasan-ali [Nanomaterials and Nanotechnology Program, Ceramic Engineering Department, Faculty of Engineering, Malayer University, Malayer (Iran, Islamic Republic of)] [Nanomaterials and Nanotechnology Program, Ceramic Engineering Department, Faculty of Engineering, Malayer University, Malayer (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

2012-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

78

Attack polish for nickel-base alloys and stainless steels  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A chemical attack polish and polishing procedure for use on metal surfaces such as nickel base alloys and stainless steels is described. The chemical attack polich comprises FeNO/sub 3/, concentrated CH/sub 3/COOH, concentrated H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ and H/sub 2/O. The polishing procedure includes saturating a polishing cloth with the chemical attack polish and submicron abrasive particles and buffing the metal surface.

Not Available

1980-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

79

Method of polishing nickel-base alloys and stainless steels  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A chemical attack polish and polishing procedure for use on metal surfaces such as nickel base alloys and stainless steels. The chemical attack polish comprises Fe(NO.sub.3).sub.3, concentrated CH.sub.3 COOH, concentrated H.sub.2 SO.sub.4 and H.sub.2 O. The polishing procedure includes saturating a polishing cloth with the chemical attack polish and submicron abrasive particles and buffing the metal surface.

Steeves, Arthur F. (Schenectady, NY); Buono, Donald P. (Schenectady, NY)

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Attack polish for nickel-base alloys and stainless steels  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A chemical attack polish and polishing procedure for use on metal surfaces such as nickel base alloys and stainless steels. The chemical attack polish comprises Fe(NO.sub.3).sub.3, concentrated CH.sub.3 COOH, concentrated H.sub.2 SO.sub.4 and H.sub.2 O. The polishing procedure includes saturating a polishing cloth with the chemical attack polish and submicron abrasive particles and buffing the metal surface.

Steeves, Arthur F. (Schenectady, NY); Buono, Donald P. (Schenectady, NY)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "type nickel metal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Review of metallic surface treatments for corrosion mitigation. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Innovative metallic surface treatments for corrosion protection of facility systems and components were reviewed, including plasma spraying, electroless nickel plating, and ion plating. The work is part of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers effort to find coatings with properties superior to conventional polymeric types. The three methods were judged for adhesion, corrosion and erosion resistance, rust mitigation, and possible use in electromagnetic shielding. A brief description of physics is given for these methods along with case studies documenting their performance. Such metallic treatments may be a cost-effective, long-term corrosion protection alternative to traditional polymeric coatings, depending on component design and purpose.

Hock, V.F.; Rigsbee, J.M.; Boy, J.H.

1984-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Infiltration of nickel into alumina compact by electrodeposition  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Ni metal was electrodeposited into pores of an alumina compact in the aqueous solution of nickel nitrate/urea/ethylene glycol/ammonium sulfate. The Ni{sup 2+} ions in pores of the alumina compact deposited in proportion to t{sup 0.45}-t{sup 0.61} of deposition time (t) on Au electrode sputtered on the alumina surface. The deposition rate of Ni was higher for direct current than pulsed current Nickel grew dendritically in the alumina pores.

Hirata, Yoshihiro; Kyoda, Hideharu; Iwamoto, Takayuki [Kagoshima Univ. (Japan)

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

CO2/oxalate Cathodes as Safe and Efficient Alternatives in High Energy Density Metal-Air Type Rechargeable Batteries  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present theoretical analysis on why and how rechargeable metal-air type batteries can be made significantly safer and more practical by utilizing CO2/oxalate conversions instead of O2/peroxide or O2/hydroxide ones, in the positive electrode. Metal-air batteries, such as the Li-air one, may have very large energy densities, comparable to that of gasoline, theoretically allowing for long range all-electric vehicles. There are, however, still significant challenges, especially related to the safety of their underlying chemistries, the robustness of their recharging and the need of supplying high purity O2 from air to the battery. We point out that the CO2/oxalate reversible electrochemical conversion is a viable alternative of the O2-based ones, allowing for similarly high energy density and almost identical voltage, while being much safer through the elimination of aggressive oxidant peroxides and the use of thermally stable, non-oxidative and environmentally benign oxalates instead.

Nemeth, Karoly

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Support and crystallite effects in CO hydrogenation on nickel  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The adsorption and reaction of carbon monoxide and hydrogen were studied on seven alumina-supported catalysts containing 0.5-23% nickel, four silica-supported catalysts containing 2.7-15% nickel, and 2.8 and 15% nickel on titanium oxide. On the silica and alumina-supported catalysts, hydrogen adsorption, per cent reduction of metal, carbon monoxide/hydrogen adsorption ratio, and methane yield increased with increasing metal dispersion, the methane turnover number decreased with increasing metal dispersion, and the carbon monoxide turnover number was not affected by dispersion. Hydrogen adsorption was suppressed by the titanium dioxide support. The suppression of hydrogen adsorption and the activity for carbon monoxide hydrogenation decreased as a function of support in the order TiO/sub 2/ > Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ > SiO/sub 2/ and apparently depended on the strength of the electronic interaction of support and metal. The selectivity shifted to higher hydrocarbons as the metal dispersion increased and as the carbon monoxide/hydrogen adsorption ratio increased. Effects of preparation method are also reported.

Bartholomew, C.H.; Pannell, R.B.; Butler, J.L.

1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

PROSPECTING IN LATE-TYPE DWARFS: A CALIBRATION OF INFRARED AND VISIBLE SPECTROSCOPIC METALLICITIES OF LATE K AND M DWARFS SPANNING 1.5 dex  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Knowledge of late K and M dwarf metallicities can be used to guide planet searches and constrain planet formation models. However, the determination of metallicities of late-type stars is difficult because visible wavelength spectra of their cool atmospheres contain many overlapping absorption lines, preventing the measurement of equivalent widths. We present new methods, and improved calibrations of existing methods, to determine metallicities of late K and M dwarfs from moderate resolution (1300 < R < 2000) visible and infrared spectra. We select a sample of 112 wide binary systems that contain a late-type companion to a solar-type primary star. Our sample includes 62 primary stars with previously published metallicities, as well as 50 stars with metallicities determined from our own observations. We use our sample to empirically determine which features in the spectrum of the companion are best correlated with the metallicity of the primary. We find {approx_equal}120 features in K and M dwarf spectra that are useful for predicting metallicity. We derive metallicity calibrations for different wavelength ranges, and show that it is possible to get metallicities reliable to <0.10 dex using either visible, J-, H-, or K-band spectra. We find that the most accurate metallicities derived from visible spectra requires the use of different calibrations for early-type (K5.5-M2) and late-type (M2-M6) dwarfs. Our calibrations are applicable to dwarfs with metallicities of -1.04 < [Fe/H] <+0.56 and spectral types from K7 to M5. Lastly, we use our sample of wide binaries to test and refine existing calibrations to determine M dwarf metallicities. We find that the {zeta} parameter, which measures the ratio of TiO can CaH bands, is correlated with [Fe/H] for super-solar metallicities, and {zeta} does not always correctly identify metal-poor M dwarfs. We also find that existing calibrations in the K and H bands are quite reliable for stars with [Fe/H] >-0.5, but are less useful for more metal-poor stars.

Mann, Andrew W.; Hilton, Eric J. [Institute for Astronomy, University of Hawai'i, 2680 Woodlawn Dr, Honolulu, HI 96822 (United States); Brewer, John M. [Department of Astronomy, Yale University, New Haven, CT 06511 (United States); Gaidos, Eric [Department of Geology and Geophysics, University of Hawai'i, 1680 East-West Road, Honolulu, HI 96822 (United States); Lepine, Sebastien [Department of Astrophysics, American Museum of Natural History, New York, NY 10024 (United States)

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Dispersion enhanced metal/zeolite catalysts  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Dispersion stabilized zeolite supported metal catalysts are provided as bimetallic catalyst combinations. The catalyst metal is in a reduced zero valent form while the dispersion stabilizer metal is in an unreduced ionic form. Representative catalysts are prepared from platinum or nickel as the catalyst metal and iron or chromium dispersion stabilizer.

Sachtler, W.M.H.; Tzou, M.S.; Jiang, H.J.

1987-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

87

INVESTIGATING THE POTENTIAL DILUTION OF THE METAL CONTENT OF HOT GAS IN EARLY-TYPE GALAXIES BY ACCRETED COLD GAS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The measured emission-weighted metal abundance of the hot gas in early-type galaxies has been known to be lower than theoretical expectations for 20 years. In addition, both X-ray luminosity and metal abundance vary significantly among galaxies of similar optical luminosities. This suggests some missing factors in the galaxy evolution process, especially the metal enrichment process. With Chandra and XMM-Newton, we studied 32 early-type galaxies (kT {approx}< 1 keV) covering a span of two orders of L{sub X,gas}/L{sub K} to investigate these missing factors. Contrary to previous studies that X-ray faint galaxies show extremely low Fe abundance ({approx}0.1 Z{sub Sun }), nearly all galaxies in our sample show an Fe abundance at least 0.3 Z{sub Sun }, although the measured Fe abundance difference between X-ray faint and X-ray bright galaxies remains remarkable. We investigated whether this dichotomy of hot gas Fe abundances can be related to the dilution of hot gas by mixing with cold gas. With a subset of 24 galaxies in this sample, we find that there is virtually no correlation between hot gas Fe abundances and their atomic gas content, which disproves the scenario that the low metal abundance of X-ray faint galaxies might be a result of the dilution of the remaining hot gas by pristine atomic gas. In contrast, we demonstrate a negative correlation between the measured hot gas Fe abundance and the ratio of molecular gas mass to hot gas mass, although it is unclear what is responsible for this apparent anti-correlation. We discuss several possibilities including that externally originated molecular gas might be able to dilute the hot gas metal content. Alternatively, the measured hot gas Fe abundance may be underestimated due to more complex temperature and abundance structures and even a two-temperature model might be insufficient to reflect the true value of the emission weighted mean Fe abundance.

Su, Yuanyuan; Irwin, Jimmy A., E-mail: ysu@crimson.ua.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Alabama, Box 870324, Tuscaloosa, AL 35487 (United States)

2013-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

88

Synthesis of Graphene Layers from Metal-Carbon Melts: Nucleation and Growth Kinetics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

both stable graphite and metal stable carbide formation. ForCarbide Eutectic in Nickel-Carbon Alloys The Physics of Metals andcarbide transition As it was explained in section 1.2 in some of metal-

Amini, Shaahin

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Complexation effects in the electrodeposition of nickel-iron alloys  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The nickel-iron alloy electrodeposition system exhibits a phenomenon known as anomalous codeposition, where the less noble metal (Fe) deposits preferentially to the more noble metal (Ni). One explanation for this behavior is that ferrous hydroxide adsorbs to the surface of the electrode and inhibits the electrodeposition of the nickel. This mechanism is being tested through the use of {open_quotes}selective{close_quotes} complexing agents for Ni{sup 2+}, Fe{sup 2+} and Fe{sup 3+}. The complexation behavior of these ions with acetate, chloroacetate,and aminoacetate ions is being characterized by potentiometric titration and polarographic measurements. The effect of these complexants on the electrodeposition of the alloys is also being studied.

Huynh, T.; Harris, T. [Univ. of Tulsa, OK (United States)

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Complexation effects in the electrodeposition of nickel-zinc alloys  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The nickel-zinc alloy electrodeposition system exhibits a phenomenon known as anomalous codeposition, where the less noble metal (Zn) deposits preferentially to the more noble metal (Ni). One explanation for this behavior is that zinc hydroxide adsorbs to the surface of the electrode and inhibits the electrodeposition of the nickel. This mechanism is being tested through the use of {open_quotes}selective{close_quotes} complexing agents for Ni{sup 2+} and Zn{sup 2+}. The complexation behavior of these ions with citrate, aspartate and pyrophosphate ions is being characterized by potentiometric titration and polarographic measurements. The effect of these complexants on the electrodeposition of the alloys is also being studied.

Melville, A.; Harris, T. [Univ. of Tulsa, OK (United States)

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Biosorption of Lead and Nickel by Biomass of Marine Algae  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Biosorption of Lead and Nickel by Biomass of Marine Algae Z.R. Holan and B. Volesky" Department 22, 1993 Screening tests of different marine algae biomass types revealed a high passive biosorptive uptake of lead up to 270 mg Pb/g of biomass in some brown marine algae. Members of the order Fucales

Volesky, Bohumil

92

Thermally tolerant multilayer metal membrane  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A composite metal membrane including a first metal layer of a Group IVB or Group VB metal sandwiched between two layers of a Group VIIIB metal selected from the group consisting of palladium, platinum, nickel, rhodium, iridium, cobalt, and alloys thereof, and a non-continuous layer of a metal chalcogenide upon one layer of the Group VIIIB metal is disclosed together with a process for the recovery of hydrogen from a gaseous mixture using such a composite membrane and a process for forming such a composite metal membrane.

Dye, Robert C. (Los Alamos, NM); Snow, Ronny C. (Los Alamos, NM)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Boronization of nickel and nickel clad materials for potential use in polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A new low-cost, nickel clad bipolar plate concept is currently being developed for use in polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells. Reported in this paper are the details of a powder-pack boronization process that would be used to establish a passivation layer on the electrolyte exposed surfaces of the bipolar plate in the final stage of manufacture. Results from energy dispersive X-ray analysis, X-ray diffraction, and scanning electron microscopy indicate that under moderate boronization conditions a homogeneous Ni3B layer grows on the exposed surfaces of the nickel clad material, the thickness of which depends on the time and temperature of boronization according to a Wagner-type scale growth relationship. At higher temperatures and longer reaction times, a Ni2B overlayer forms on top of the Ni3B during boronization.

Weil, K. Scott; Kim, Jin Yong Y.; Xia, Gordon; Coleman, J. E.; Yang, Z Gary

2006-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

94

JOURNAL OF MICROELECTROMECHANICAL SYSTEMS, VOL. 13, NO. 5, OCTOBER 2004 791 Electroplated Metal Microstructures Embedded  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of multiwafer, MEMS devices. [1276] Index Terms--Copper, encapsulation, micromachining, nickel alloys, permalloy metallization of electroplated materials in polymer micromolds [9]. Electrodeposition has proven

95

Magnetism in metal-organic capsules  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Nickel and cobalt seamed metal-organic capsules have been isolated and studied using structural, magnetic and computational approaches. Antiferromagnetic exchange in the Ni capsule results from coordination environments enforced by the capsule framework.

Atwood, Jerry L.; Brechin, Euan K; Dalgarno, Scott J.; Inglis, Ross; Jones, Leigh F.; Mossine, Andrew; Paterson, Martin J.; Power, Nicholas P.; Teat, Simon J.

2010-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

96

Metal Dusting of Heat-Resistant Alloys  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Metal dusting leads to disintegration of such alloys as iron and nickel-based into a “dust” of particulate metal, metal carbide, carbon, and/or oxide. It occurs in strongly carburising environments at 400-900°C. Literature survey has shown...

Al-Meshari, Abdulaziz I

97

Method Of Bonding A Metal Connection To An Electrode Including A Core Having A Fiber Or Foam Type Structure For An Electrochemical Cell, An  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method of bonding a metal connection to an electrode including a core having a fiber or foam-type structure for an electrochemical cell, in which method at least one metal strip is pressed against one edge of the core and is welded thereto under compression, wherein, at least in line with the region in which said strip is welded to the core, which is referred to as the "main core", a retaining core of a type analogous to that of the main core is disposed prior to the welding.

Loustau, Marie-Therese (Bordeaux, FR); Verhoog, Roelof (Bordeaux, FR); Precigout, Claude (Lormont, FR)

1996-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

98

A plant growth-promoting bacterium that decreases nickel toxicity in seedlings  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A plant growth-promoting bacterium, Kluyvera ascorbata SUD165, that contained high levels of heavy metals was isolated from soil collected near Sudbury, Ontario, Canada. The bacterium was resistant to the toxic effects of Ni{sup 2+}, Pb{sup 2+}, Zn{sup 2+}, and CrO{sub 4}{sup {minus}}, produced a siderophore(s), and displayed 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid deaminase activity. Canola seeds inoculated with this bacterium and then grown under gnotobiotic conditions in the presence of high concentrations of nickel chloride were partially protected against nickel toxicity. In addition, protection by the bacterium against nickel toxicity was evident in pot experiments with canola and tomato seeds. The presence of K. ascorbata SUD165 had no measurable influence on the amount of nickel accumulated per milligram (dry weight) of either roots or shoots of canola plants. Therefore, the bacterial plant growth-promoting effect in the presence of nickel was probably not attributable to the reduction of nickel uptake by seedlings. Rather, it may reflect the ability of the bacterium to lower the level of stress ethylene induced by the nickel.

Burd, G.I.; Dixon, D.G.; Glick, B.R. [Univ. of Waterloo, Ontario (Canada). Dept. of Biology

1998-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

High Dispersion Spectroscopy of Solar-type Superflare Stars. I. Temperature, Surface Gravity, Metallicity, and $v \\sin i$  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We conducted high dispersion spectroscopic observations of 50 superflare stars with Subaru/HDS, and measured the stellar parameters of them. These 50 targets were selected from the solar-type (G-type main sequence) superflare stars that we had discovered from the Kepler photometric data. As a result of these spectroscopic observations, we found that more than half (34 stars) of our 50 targets have no evidence of binary system. We then estimated effective temperature ($T_{\\rm{eff}}$), surface gravity ($\\log g$), metallicity ([Fe/H]), and projected rotational velocity ($v\\sin i$) of these 34 superflare stars on the basis of our spectroscopic data. The accuracy of our estimations is higher than that of Kepler Input Catalog (KIC) values, and the differences between our values and KIC values ($(\\Delta T_{\\rm{eff}})_{\\rm{rms}} \\sim 219$K, $(\\Delta \\log g)_{\\rm{rms}} \\sim 0.37$ dex, and $(\\Delta\\rm{[Fe/H]})_{\\rm{rms}} \\sim 0.46$ dex) are comparable to the large uncertainties and systematic differences of KIC values ...

Notsu, Yuta; Maehara, Hiroyuki; Notsu, Shota; Shibayama, Takuya; Nogami, Daisaku; Shibata, Kazunari

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Electron screening in nickel  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In order to further investigate electron screening phenomenon we studied proton induced nuclear reactions over an energy range from 1.35 to 3.08 MeV for different environments: Ni metal and NiO insulator. The measurements were based on observation of the {gamma}-ray yields of {sup 59,61,63,64,65}Cu and {sup 58,60,62}Ni. Also, we have studied the decay of {sup 61}Cu produced in the reaction {sup 60}Ni(p,{gamma}), in order to find a possible decay rate perturbation by atomic electrons and found a small difference in half-life for metallic compared to oxide environment, respectively. The present results clearly show that the metallic environment affects the fusion reactions at low energy and that it might also affect the decay rate.

Gajevic, Jelena; Lipoglavsek, Matej; Petrovic, Toni; Pelicon, Primoz [Jozef Stefan Institute, Jamova cesta 39, Ljubljana (Slovenia); Jozef Stefan Institute, Jamova cesta 39, Ljubljana (Slovenia) and Cosylab d.d, Teslova ulica 30, Ljubljana (Slovenia); Jozef Stefan Institute, Jamova cesta 39, Ljubljana (Slovenia)

2012-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "type nickel metal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Neutron diffraction studies of nickel-containing perovskite oxide catalysts exposed to autothermal reforming environments.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Six nickel-containing perovskite oxides (La{sub 1-x}Sr{sub x})M{sub 0.9}Ni{sub 0.1}O{sub 3{+-}{delta}}, where x = 0 or 0.2 and M = Cr, Fe, or Mn were used to catalyze the autothermal reforming of isooctane (C{sub 8}H{sub 18}) into a hydrogen-rich gas during short-term tests at 700 C. To determine the phase stability of the samples in the reducing environment of the reforming reactor, characterization studies of the as-prepared and tested perovskite samples were conducted using powder X-ray diffraction, powder neutron diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, and scanning electron microscopy. We determined that the reducing conditions of the microreactor caused metallic nickel to form in all six compositions. However, the extent of the nickel loss from the perovskite lattices varied: the chromium-containing compositions lost the least nickel, compared to the manganese- and iron-containing compositions, and the strontium-free compositions lost more nickel than their strontium-containing analogs. Five of the six perovskite compositions tested showed no breakdown of the perovskite lattice despite the loss of nickel from the B-sites, producing only the third example of a B-cation-deficient, 3d transition-metal-containing perovskite.

Mawdsley, J. R.; Vaughey, J. T.; Krause, T. R.; Chemical Sciences and Engineering Division

2009-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

102

Electron screening in nickel  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In order to investigate the interplay between nuclei and their surroundings we studied proton induced nuclear reactions over an energy range from 1.35 to 3.08 MeV for different environments: Ni metal and NiO insulator. The measurements were based on observation of the {gamma}-ray yields of {sup 59,61,63,64,65}Cu and {sup 58,60,62}Ni. The presented results clearly show that the metallic environment affects the fusion reactions at low energies.

Gajevic, Jelena; Lipoglavsek, Matej; Petrovic, Toni; Pelicon, Primoz [Jozef Stefan Institute, Jamova cesta 39, Ljubljana (Slovenia); Jozef Stefan Institute, Jamova cesta 39, Ljubljana (Slovenia) and Cosylab d.d, Teslova ulica 30, Ljubljana (Slovenia); Jozef Stefan Institute, Jamova cesta 39, Ljubljana (Slovenia)

2012-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

103

Elemental composition of nickel silicide layers using thermal and fast neutrons  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Metal silicides are important contact materials used in the manufacture of semiconductor devices. The presence of impurities has been observed to alter or control the formation of the silicide during fabrication and to influence critically the thermal and electrical performance characteristics of the metal-semiconductor interface. The purpose of this investigation has been to use neutron activation analysis (NAAA), relying on both thermal and fast neutrons, to determine relative concentrations of nickel and impurity elements in nickel silicide/silicon systems. 5 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

McGuire, S.C.; Wong, K.; Silcox, J. (Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY (United States))

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Research, development, and demonstration of nickel-zinc batteries for electric vehicle propulsion. Annual report for 1980  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Progress in the development of nickel-zinc batteries for electric vehicles is reported. Information is presented on nickel electrode preparation and testing; zinc electrode preparation with additives and test results; separator development and the evaluation of polymer-blend separator films; sealed Ni-Zn cells; and the optimization of electric vehicle-type Ni-Zn cells. (LCL)

Not Available

1981-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Nickel crystallite thermometry during methanation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A magnetic method to measure the average temperature of superparamagnetic nickel crystallites has been applied during CO methanation. The method takes advantage of the temperature dependence of the low field magnetization of such catalysts; however, the adsorption of carbon monoxide and the formation of surface carbon species complicate the interpretation of results. Calibrations to account for temperature change and the adsorption of reactants are described. The calibration for the effects of CO is based on the assumption that the interaction of CO with nickel is the same for methanation and disproportionation. Interphase heat transfer calculations based on the thermometric data compare favorably with previous results from ethane hyrogenolysis, and give no indication of microscopic temperature differences between the nickel crystallites and support.

Ludlow, D.K.; Cale, T.S.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Microcompression of nanocrystalline nickel B. E. Schuster  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

on electrodeposited nanocrystalline nickel a material system where the grain size is much smaller than the specimenMicrocompression of nanocrystalline nickel B. E. Schuster Department of Mechanical Engineering of face-centered-cubic nanocrystalline nickel nano-Ni have been closely examined in recent years

Wei, Qiuming

107

PROBING THE LOW-REDSHIFT STAR FORMATION RATE AS A FUNCTION OF METALLICITY THROUGH THE LOCAL ENVIRONMENTS OF TYPE II SUPERNOVAE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Type II supernovae (SNe) can be used as a star formation tracer to probe the metallicity distribution of global low-redshift star formation. We present oxygen and iron abundance distributions of Type II SN progenitor regions that avoid many previous sources of bias. Because iron abundance, rather than oxygen abundance, is of key importance for the late stage evolution of the massive stars that are the progenitors of core-collapse supernovae, and because iron enrichment lags oxygen enrichment, we find a general conversion from oxygen abundance to iron abundance. The distributions we present here are the best yet observational standard of comparison for evaluating how different classes of supernovae depend on progenitor metallicity. We spectroscopically measure the gas-phase oxygen abundance near a representative subsample of the hosts of Type II SNe from the first-year Palomar Transient Factory (PTF) SN search, using a combination of Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) spectra near the SN location (9 hosts) and new longslit spectroscopy (25 hosts). The median metallicity of these 34 hosts at or near the SN location is 12+log(O/H) = 8.65, with a median error of 0.09. The median host galaxy stellar mass from fits to SDSS photometry is 10{sup 9.9} M{sub Sun }. They do not show a systematic offset in metallicity or mass from a redshift-matched sample of the MPA/JHU value-added catalog. In contrast to previous SN host metallicity studies, this sample is drawn from a single survey. It is also drawn from an areal rather than a targeted survey, so SNe in the lowest-mass galaxies are not systematically excluded. Indeed, the PTF SN search has a slight bias toward following up transients in low mass galaxies. The progenitor region metallicity distribution we find is statistically indistinguishable from the metallicity distribution of Type II SN hosts found by targeted surveys and by samples from multiple surveys with different selection functions. Using the relationship between iron and oxygen abundances found for Milky Way disk, bulge, and halo stars, we translate our distribution of Type II SN environments as a function of oxygen abundance into an estimate of the iron abundance, since iron varies more steeply than oxygen. We find that though this sample spans only 0.65 dex in oxygen abundance, the gap between the iron and oxygen abundance is 50% wider at the low-metallicity end of our sample than at the high-metallicity end.

Stoll, R.; Stanek, K. Z.; Pogge, R. W. [Department of Astronomy, Ohio State University, 140 West 18th Avenue, Columbus, OH 43210-1173 (United States); Prieto, J. L. [Department of Astrophysical Sciences, Princeton University, 4 Ivy Lane, Peyton Hall, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States)

2013-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

108

Metal-ceramic joint assembly  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A metal-ceramic joint assembly in which a brazing alloy is situated between metallic and ceramic members. The metallic member is either an aluminum-containing stainless steel, a high chromium-content ferritic stainless steel or an iron nickel alloy with a corrosion protection coating. The brazing alloy, in turn, is either an Au-based or Ni-based alloy with a brazing temperature in the range of 9500 to 1200.degree. C.

Li, Jian (New Milford, CT)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Intercrystalline density on nanocrystalline nickel  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Most methods currently available for the synthesis of nanostructured materials result in considerable residual porosity. Studies concerned with the novel structures and properties of these materials are thus compromised by the intrinsically high levels of porosity. As recently shown by Kristic et al., porosity can have a significant effect on fundamental materials properties such as Young`s modulus. One of the most promising techniques for the production of fully dense nanocrystalline materials is electrodeposition. In the present work, the residual porosity and density of nanostructured nickel produced by the electrodeposition method is assessed and discussed in light of the intrinsic intercrystalline density of nickel.

Haasz, T.R.; Aust, K.T. [Univ. of Toronto, Ontario (Canada). Dept. of Metallurgy and Materials Science] [Univ. of Toronto, Ontario (Canada). Dept. of Metallurgy and Materials Science; Palumbo, G. [Ontario Hydro Research Div., Toronto, Ontario (Canada)] [Ontario Hydro Research Div., Toronto, Ontario (Canada); El-Sherik, A.M.; Erb, U. [Queen`s Univ., Kingston, Ontario (Canada). Dept. of Materials and Metallurgical Engineering] [Queen`s Univ., Kingston, Ontario (Canada). Dept. of Materials and Metallurgical Engineering

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Homogeneous Precipitation of Nickel Hydroxide Powders  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Precipitation and characterization of nickel hydroxide powders were investigated. A comprehensive precipitation model incorporating the metal ion hydrolysis, complexation and precipitation reactions was developed for the production of the powders with urea precipitation method. Model predictions on Ni{sup 2+} precipitation rate were confirmed with precipitation experiments carried out at 90 C. Experimental data and model predictions were in remarkable agreement. Uncertainty in the solubility product data of nickel hydroxides was found to be the large contributor to the error. There were demonstrable compositional variations across the particle cross-sections and the growth mechanism was determined to be the aggregation of primary crystallites. This implied that there is a change in the intercalate chemistry of the primary crystallites with digestion time. Predicted changes in the concentrations of simple and complex ions in the solution support the proposed mechanism. The comprehensive set of hydrolysis reactions used in the model described above allows the investigation of other systems provided that accurate reaction constants are available. the fact that transition metal ions like Ni{sup 2+} form strong complexes with ammonia presents a challenge in the full recovery of the Ni{sup 2+}. On the other hand, presence of Al{sup 3+} facilitates the complete precipitation of Ni{sup 2+} in about 3 hours of digestion. A challenge in their predictive modeling studies had been the fact that simultaneous incorporation of more than one metal ion necessitates a different approach than just using the equilibrium constants of hydrolysis, complexation and precipitation reactions. Another limitation of using equilibrium constants is that the nucleation stage of digestion, which is controlled mainly by kinetics, is not fully justified. A new program released by IBM Almaden Research Center (Chemical Kinetics Simulator{trademark}, Version 1.01) lets the user change the order of kinetic components of a reaction which was set to stoichiometric constant with which the species appear in the reaction in KINSIM by default. For instance, in the case of LDH precipitation, the new program allows to change the order of species in the reactions associated with Al{sup 3+} and let the Ni{sup 2+} reactions take over. This could be carried on iteratively until a good fit between the experimental data and the predictions were observed. However for such studies availability of accurate equilibrium constants (especially for the solubility products for the solid phase) is a prerequisite.

Bora Mavis

2003-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

111

Iron aluminides and nickel aluminides as materials for chemical air separation  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention is directed to a chemical air separation process using a molten salt solution of alkali metal nitrate and nitrite wherein the materials of construction of the containment for the process are chosen from intermetallic alloys of nickel and/or iron aluminide wherein the aluminum content is 28 atomic percent or greater to impart enhanced corrosion resistance.

Kang, D.

1991-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

112

Iron aluminides and nickel aluminides as materials for chemical air separation  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention is directed to a chemical air separation process using a molten salt solution of alkali metal nitrate and nitrite wherein the materials of construction of the containment for the process are chosen from intermetallic alloys of nickel and/or iron aluminide wherein the aluminum content is 28 atomic percent or greater to impart enhanced corrosion resistance.

Kang, Doohee (Macungie, PA)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Unanticipated potential cancer risk near metal recycling facilities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Metal recycling is an important growing industry. Prior to this study, area sources consisting of metal recycling facilities fell in a category of limited regulatory scrutiny because of assumed low levels of annual emissions. Initiating with community complaints of nuisance from smoke, dust and odor, the Houston Department of Health and Human Services (HDHHS) began a monitoring program outside metal recycler facilities and found metal particulates in outdoor ambient air at levels which could pose a carcinogenic human health risk. In a study of five similar metal recycler facilities which used a torch cutting process, air downwind and outside the facility was sampled for eight hours between 6 and 10 times each over 18 months using a mobile laboratory. Ten background locations were also sampled. Iron, manganese, copper, chromium, nickel, lead, cobalt, cadmium and mercury were detected downwind of the metal recyclers at frequencies ranging from 100% of the time for iron to 2% of the time for mercury. Of these metals, chromium, nickel, lead, cobalt, cadmium and mercury were not detected in any sample in the background. Two pairs of samples were analyzed for total chromium and hexavalent chromium to establish a ratio of the fraction of hexavalent chromium in total chromium. This fraction was used to estimate hexavalent chromium at all locations. The carcinogenic risk posed to a residential receptor from metal particulate matter concentrations in the ambient air attributed to the metal recyclers was estimated from each of the five facilities in an effort to rank the importance of this source and inform the need for further investigation. The total risk from these area sources ranged from an increased cancer risk of 1 in 1,000,000 to 6 in 10,000 using the 95th upper confidence limit of the mean of the carcinogenic metal particulate matter concentration, assuming the point of the exposure is the sample location for a residential receptor after accounting for wind direction and the number of shifts that could operate a year. Further study is warranted to better understand the metal air pollution levels in the community and if necessary, to evaluate the feasibility of emission controls and identify operational improvements and best management practices for this industry. This research adds two new aspects to the literature: identification of types and magnitude of metal particulate matter air pollutants associated with a previously unrecognized area source, metal recyclers and their potential risk to health. -- Highlights: • Air monitoring study in response to community complaints found metal contamination. • Metal recyclers found to potentially pose cancer from metal particulates • Chromium, nickel, cobalt and cadmium samples were detected in five metal recyclers. • These metals were not detected in background air samples. • Estimated increased cancer risk ranges from 1 in 1,000,000 to 8 in 10,000.

Raun, Loren, E-mail: raun@rice.edu [Department of Statistics, MS 138, Rice University, P.O. Box 1892, Houston, TX 77251-1892 (United States)] [Department of Statistics, MS 138, Rice University, P.O. Box 1892, Houston, TX 77251-1892 (United States); Pepple, Karl, E-mail: pepple.karl@epa.gov [State and Local Programs Group, Air Quality Policy Division, Office of Air Quality Planning and Standards, Policy, Analysis, and Communications Staff, Mail Drop C404-03, U.S. EPA, Research Triangle Park, NC 27711 (United States)] [State and Local Programs Group, Air Quality Policy Division, Office of Air Quality Planning and Standards, Policy, Analysis, and Communications Staff, Mail Drop C404-03, U.S. EPA, Research Triangle Park, NC 27711 (United States); Hoyt, Daniel, E-mail: hoyt.daniel@epa.gov [Air Surveillance Section, US EPA, Region 6, 6EN-AS, 1445 Ross Avenue, Dallas, TX 75202-2733 (United States)] [Air Surveillance Section, US EPA, Region 6, 6EN-AS, 1445 Ross Avenue, Dallas, TX 75202-2733 (United States); Richner, Donald, E-mail: Donald.Richner@houstontx.gov [Houston Department of Health and Human Services, Bureau of Pollution Control and Prevention, 7411 Park Place Blvd., Houston, TX 77087 (United States)] [Houston Department of Health and Human Services, Bureau of Pollution Control and Prevention, 7411 Park Place Blvd., Houston, TX 77087 (United States); Blanco, Arturo, E-mail: arturo.blanco@houstontx.gov [Pollution Control and Prevention, Environmental Health Division, Houston Department of Health and Human Services, 7411 Park Place Blvd., Houston, TX 77087 (United States)] [Pollution Control and Prevention, Environmental Health Division, Houston Department of Health and Human Services, 7411 Park Place Blvd., Houston, TX 77087 (United States); Li, Jiao, E-mail: jiao.li@rice.edu [Wiess School of Natural Science, Rice University, 6100 Main St., Houston, TX 77005 (United States)] [Wiess School of Natural Science, Rice University, 6100 Main St., Houston, TX 77005 (United States)

2013-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

114

Experiences with polishing electroless nickel  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

During recent years the bureaucracy has become increasingly rigid in demanding a mechanical observance of the minimum bid specified on the simplest terms. Qualifications of the vendor and specifications of the product are increasingly viewed as attempts to thwart the progress of the process toward minimum quality, Any such qualification or specification must be justified as to not only reasonableness but necessity. This provides the purpose of this paper, to record forever the existence of the wild dingleberry and to disclose its habits with respect to laps and the marvelous effects it has on the emotional state of the lappers. Among metal polishers, the term dingleberry refers to a type of nodule or wartlike structure sometimes seen in isolation and occasionally in considerable profusion particularly in chemically plated surfaces. 2 refs.

Brown, N.J.; Taylor, J.S.; Fuchs, B.A.

1991-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

INTEGRAL FIELD SPECTROSCOPY OF SUPERNOVA EXPLOSION SITES: CONSTRAINING THE MASS AND METALLICITY OF THE PROGENITORS. II. TYPE II-P AND II-L SUPERNOVAE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Thirteen explosion sites of Type II-P and II-L supernovae (SNe) in nearby galaxies have been observed using integral field spectroscopy, enabling both spatial and spectral study of the explosion sites. We used the properties of the parent stellar population of the coeval SN progenitor star to derive its metallicity and initial mass. The spectrum of the parent stellar population yields estimates of metallicity via the strong-line method and age via a comparison with simple stellar population models. These metallicity and age parameters are adopted for the progenitor star. Age, or lifetime of the star, was used to derive the initial (zero-age main sequence) mass of the star using comparisons with stellar evolution models. With this technique, we were able to determine the metallicities and initial masses of the SN progenitors in our sample. Our results indicate that some Type II SN progenitors may have been stars with masses comparable to those of SN Ib/c progenitors.

Kuncarayakti, Hanindyo; Maeda, Keiichi [Kavli Institute for the Physics and Mathematics of the Universe (WPI), Todai Institutes for Advanced Study, University of Tokyo, 5-1-5 Kashiwanoha, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8583 (Japan); Doi, Mamoru; Morokuma, Tomoki; Hashiba, Yasuhito [Institute of Astronomy, Graduate School of Science, University of Tokyo, 2-21-1 Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-0015 (Japan); Aldering, Greg [Physics Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Arimoto, Nobuo [National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, 2-21-1 Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-0015 (Japan); Pereira, Rui [CNRS/IN2P3, Institut de Physique Nucleaire de Lyon, 4 Rue Enrico Fermi, F-69622 Villeurbanne Cedex (France); Usuda, Tomonori, E-mail: hanindyo.kuncarayakti@ipmu.jp [Subaru Telescope, National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, 650 North A'ohoku Place, Hilo, HI 96720 (United States)

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Icosahedral structure in hydrogenated cobalt and nickel clusters  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Reactions with ammonia and with water are used to probe the geometrical structures of cobalt and nickel clusters that are saturated with hydrogen. Ammonia saturation experiments allow the determination of the number of primary NH{sub 3} binding sites on cluster surfaces, and this number shows a repeated minimization to values of 12 for many cluster sizes in the 50- to 200-atom size region. These sizes correspond to closed shells and subshells of icosahedra, suggesting that the ammoniated clusters have metal frameworks with icosahedral structure. The equilibrium reaction of the hydrogenated clusters with a single water molecule shows a pattern of local maxima in the cluster--water binding energy, with the maxima in most cases coming at clusters having one metal atom more than those showing minima in ammonia binding. This correlation suggests that nonammoniated clusters likewise have icosahedral structure, and is consistent with the nature of the metal--water interaction. Some of the larger clusters do not show clear evidence for icosahedral structure at room temperature, although they begin to do so at elevated temperature. Annealing experiments suggest that many of these clusters are icosahedral in their most stable configuration at room temperature, although the 147-atom nickel cluster is not. In general, hydrogenation enhances the icosahedral features in the ammonia and water binding patterns compared to those seen for bare clusters, and extends the cluster size region over which icosahedral structure is evident.

Klots, T.D.; Winter, B.J.; Parks, E.K.; Riley, S.J. (Chemistry Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois (USA))

1991-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

117

Growth of Nanoscale Nickel Ferrite on Carbonaceous Matrix- A Novel Method of Turning Harmful Particulates into a Functional Nanocomposite: An XAFS Study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Particulate matter (PM) emission from residual oil combustion typically consists of carbonaceous material accompanied by inorganic matter notably transition metal sulfates. Often a minor sulfide form is found in the coarse fraction while an oxide form is more common in the fine and ultrafine fractions. A composite comprising of nanoscale nickel ferrite dispersed on carbonaceous matrix has been obtained following liberation of metal sulfates from the fine PM - a novel method of turning harmful particulates into a functional nanocomposite without the need for elaborate preparation using expensive precursors. The nickel ferrite content in the composite varies with the Fe/Ni ratio in particulate, fuel type, and combustion condition. Such variation may lead to the composite exhibiting diverse physical behaviors. Detailed structure and cation distribution in dispersed ferrite have been studied using Fe and Ni K-edges XAFS spectroscopy. Peaks are identified in the radial structure function with specific atom pair correlations within the spinel ferrite from which the relative occupancy of the cations in the octahedral and tetrahedral sites can be discerned. The results show that Ni(II) has strong preference for the octahedral site, while Fe(III) prefers both sites which is consistent with that of an inverted spinel ferrite.

Pattanaik, S.; Huggins, F; Huffman, G

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Evaluation of nickel flash smelting through piloting and simulation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An extensive study of the nickel flash smelting process has been undertaken. It is aimed at the optimization of the burner design to improve the smelting performance and to increase the throughput of the rebuilt furnace. A design-based mathematical model was developed to simulate the operation of the four burners and the reaction shaft of the flash furnace at Western Mining Corporation Ltd.`s Kalgoorlie Nickel Smelter. A modified single burner version of the model was validated against data obtained from the pilot plant at the Pyrometallurgical Research Centre (PRC) of the Sumitomo Metal Mining Co.`s Toyo Smelter. The approach taken involved experimental measurements of key process parameters in the pilot plant and detailed numerical simulation of the fluid flow, heat transfer, and combustion in the entire burner-shaft complex. Several burner designs have been tested experimentally at the pilot plant and theoretically through computer simulation. The main outcome of the study was the development of an experimentally validated mathematical model of the flash smelter providing a new powerful design tool. The insight gained about the process from the application of this tool led to the design of a more efficient nickel flash smelting process.

Varnas, S.R.; Koh, P.T.L. [CSIRO, Clayton, Victoria (Australia). Div. of Minerals; Kemori, N. [Sumitomo Metal Mining Co., Ehime (Japan)

1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Templated synthesis of nickel nanoparticles: Toward heterostructured nanocomposites for efficient hydrogen storage  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The world is currently facing an energy and environmental crisis for which new technologies are needed. Development of cost-competitive materials for catalysis and hydrogen storage on-board motor vehicles is crucial to lead subsequent generations into a more sustainable and energy independent future. This thesis presents work toward the scalable synthesis of bimetallic heterostructures that can enable hydrogen to compete with carbonaceous fuels by meeting the necessary gravimetric and volumetric energy densities and by enhancing hydrogen sorption/desorption kinetics near ambient temperatures and pressures. Utilizing the well-known phenomenon of hydrogen spillover, these bimetallic heterostructures could work by lowering the activation energy for hydrogenation and dehydrogenation of metals. Herein, we report a novel method for the scalable synthesis of silica templated zero-valent nickel particles (Ni?SiO{sub 2}) that hold promise for the synthesis of nickel nanorods for use in bimetallic heterostructures for hydrogen storage. Our synthesis proceeds by chemical reduction of a nickel-hydrazine complex with sodium borohydride followed by calcination under hydrogen gas to yield silica encapsulated nickel particles. Transmission electron microscopy and powder X-ray diffraction were used to characterize the general morphology of the resultant nanocapsules as well as the crystalline phases of the incorporated Ni{sup 0} nanocrystals. The structures display strong magnetic behavior at room temperature and preliminary data suggests nickel particle size can be controlled by varying the amount of nickel precursor used in the synthesis. Calcination under different environments and TEM analysis provides evidence for an atomic migration mechanism of particle formation. Ni?SiO{sub 2} nanocapsules were used as seeds to induce heterogeneous nucleation and subsequent growth within the nanocapsule via electroless nickel plating. Nickel nanoparticle growth occurs under high temperature alkaline conditions, however silica nanocapsule integrity is not maintained due to the incompatibility of silica with the growth conditions. Silica nanocapsule integrity is maintained under low temperature neutral conditions, but nickel particle growth is not observed. Through FTIR and UV/Vis analysis, we show the degree of crosslinking and condensation increases in calcined silica compared to as-synthesized silica. We propose the increased density of the silica nanocapsule hinders mass transfer of the bulky nickel precursor complex from solution and onto the surface of the “catalytic” zero-valent nickel seed within the nanocapsule cavity. Decreasing the density of the silica nanocapsule can be achieved through co-condensation of tetraethylorthosilicate with an alkyl functionalized silane followed by calcination to remove the organic component or by chemical etching in alkaline solution, but will not be addressed in this thesis.

Nelson, Nicholas Cole [Ames Laboratory

2013-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

120

Metal articles having ultrafine particles dispersed therein  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This patent describes a metal article of manufacture. It comprises: a metal selected from the group consisting of copper, silver, gold, lead, tin, nickel, zinc, cobalt, antimony, bismuth, iron, cadmium, chromium, germanium, gallium, selenium, tellurium, mercury, tungsten arsenic, manganese, iridium, indium, ruthenium, rhenium, rhodium, molybdenum, palladium, osmium and platinum; and a plurality of ultrafine particles.

Alexander, G.B.; Nadkarni, R.A.

1992-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "type nickel metal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Silicon and Nickel Enrichment in Planet-Host Stars: Observations and Implications for the Core-Accretion Theory of Planet Formation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present evidence that stars with planets exhibit statistically significant silicon and nickel enrichment over the general metal-rich population. We also present simulations which predict silicon enhancement of planet hosts within the context of the core-accretion hypothesis for giant planet formation. Because silicon and oxygen are both alpha elements, [Si/Fe] traces [O/Fe], so the silicon enhancement in planet hosts predicts that these stars are oxygen-rich as well. We present new numerical simulations of planet formation by core accretion that establish the timescale on which a Jovian planet reaches rapid gas accretion, t_rga, as a function of solid surface density sigma_solid: (t_rga / 1 Myr) = (sigma_solid / 25.0 g cm^{-2})^{-1.44}. This relation enables us to construct Monte Carlo simulations that predict the fraction of star-disk systems that form planets as a function of [Fe/H], [Si/Fe], disk mass, outer disk radius and disk lifetime. Our simulations reproduce both the known planet-metallicity correlation and the planet-silicon correlation reported in this paper. The simulations predict that 16% of Solar-type stars form Jupiter-mass planets, in agreement with 12% predicted from extrapolation of the observed planet frequency-semimajor axis distribution. Although a simple interpretation of core accretion predicts that the planet-silicon correlation should be much stronger than the planet-nickel correlation, we observe the same degree of silicon and nickel enhancement in planet hosts. If this result persists once more planets have been discovered, it might indicate a complexity in the chemistry of planet formation beyond the simple accumulation of solids in the core accretion theory.

Sarah E. Robinson; Gregory Laughlin; Peter Bodenheimer; Debra Fischer

2006-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

122

Precipitates Suppress Mobility Of Metals in Soil and Water  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and water with hazardous metals ­ such as cadmium, copper, lead, and nickel ­ is a national environ- mental increased over time. This increase may be due to activi- ties at industries like tanneries and smelters

Sparks, Donald L.

123

Electrochemical, Structural and Surface Characterization of Nickel...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Electrochemical, Structural and Surface Characterization of NickelZirconia Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Anodes in Coal Gas Containing Electrochemical, Structural and Surface...

124

Atomic, electronic and magnetic structure of graphene/iron and nickel interfaces: theory and experiment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

First-principles calculations of the effect of carbon coverage on the atomic, electronic and magnetic structure of nickel and iron substrates demonstrate insignificant changes in the interatomic distances and magnetic moments on the atoms of the metallic substrates. The coverage of the iron surface by mono- and few-layer graphene induces significant changes in the orbital occupancies and exchange interactions between the layers in contrast to the case of a nickel substrate for which changes in the orbital ordering and exchange interactions are much smaller. Experimental measurements demonstrate the presence of ferromagnetic fcc-iron in Fe@C nanoparticles and the superparamagnetic behavior of Ni@C nanoparticles.

Boukhvalov, D W; Uimin, M A; Korolev, A V; Yermakov, A Ye

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Electroless (autocatalytic) nickel-cobalt thin films as solar control coatings  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper describes the deposition of nickel-cobalt-phosphorus coatings by the electroless deposition technique for use as solar control coatings in architectural glazing of buildings. Electroless deposition is characterized by the autocatalytic deposition of a metal/alloy from an aqueous solution of its ions by interaction with a chemical reducing agent. The reducing agent provides electrons for the metal ions to be neutralized. The reduction is initiated by the catalyzed surface of the substrate and continued by the self catalytic activity of the deposited metal/alloy as long as the substrate is immersed in the electroless bath and operating conditions are maintained. Electroless nickel-cobalt-phosphorus thin films were deposited from a solution containing 15 g/l nickel sulphate, 5 g/l cobalt sulphate, 60 g/l ammonium citrate and 25 g/l sodium hypophosphite operating at 30 C, at a pH of 9.5 for two minutes. Electroless nickel-cobalt-phosphorus coatings are found to satisfy the basic requirements of solar control coatings. Autocatalytic deposition technique offers the possibilities of producing large area coatings with low capital investment, stability and good adhesion to glass substrates.

John, S.; Srinivasan, K.N.; Selvam, M. [Central Electrochemical Research Inst., Tamilnadu (India); Anuradha, S.; Rajendran, S. [Alagappa Univ., Tamilnadu (India). Dept. of Physics

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

126

Metallic glass composition. [That does not embrittle upon annealing  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

This patent pertains to a metallic glass alloy that is either iron-based or nickel-based or based on a mixture of iron and nickel, containing lesser amounts of elements selected from the group boron, silicon, carbon and phosphorous to which is added an amount of a ductility-enhancing element selected from the group cerium, lanthanum, praseodymium and neodymium sufficient to increase ductility of the metallic glass upon annealing.

Kroeger, D.M.; Koch, C.C.

1984-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

127

Conflicting Roles Of Nickel In Controlling Cathode Performance...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Conflicting Roles Of Nickel In Controlling Cathode Performance In Lithium-ion Batteries. Conflicting Roles Of Nickel In Controlling Cathode Performance In Lithium-ion Batteries....

128

Comprehensive Thermodynamics of Nickel Hydride Bis(Diphosphine...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Thermodynamics of Nickel Hydride Bis(Diphosphine) Complexes: A Predictive Model through Computations. Comprehensive Thermodynamics of Nickel Hydride Bis(Diphosphine) Complexes: A...

129

Biosensors Based on Carbon Nanotubes/Nickel Hexacyanoferrate...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Biosensors Based on Carbon NanotubesNickel HexacyanoferrateGlucose Oxidase Nanocomposites. Biosensors Based on Carbon NanotubesNickel HexacyanoferrateGlucose Oxidase...

130

Electrodeposition From Acidic Solutions of Nickel Bis(benzenedithiolat...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

From Acidic Solutions of Nickel Bis(benzenedithiolate) Produces a Hydrogen-Evolving Ni-S Film on Glassy Carbon Electrodeposition From Acidic Solutions of Nickel...

131

Conformational Dynamics and Proton Relay Positioning in Nickel...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Dynamics and Proton Relay Positioning in Nickel Catalysts for Hydrogen Production and Oxidation. Conformational Dynamics and Proton Relay Positioning in Nickel Catalysts for...

132

Twelve Year Study of Underground Corrosion of Activated Metals  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The subsurface radioactive disposal facility located at the U.S. Department of Energy’s Idaho site contains neutron-activated metals from non-fuel nuclear-reactor-core components. A long-term corrosion study is being conducted to obtain site-specific corrosion rates to support efforts to more accurately estimate the transfer of activated elements in an arid vadose zone environment. The study uses non-radioactive metal coupons representing the prominent neutron-activated material buried at the disposal location, namely, two types of stainless steels, welded stainless steel, welded nickel-chromium steel alloy, zirconium alloy, beryllium, and aluminum. Additionally, carbon steel (the material used in cask disposal liners and other disposal containers) and duplex stainless steel (high-integrity containers) are also included in the study. This paper briefly describes the test program and presents the corrosion rate results through twelve years of underground exposure.

M. Kay Adler Flitton; Timothy S. Yoder

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Subcritical Noise Measurements with a Nickel-Reflected Plutonium Sphere  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Subcritical measurements were conducted with an a-phase plutonium sphere reflected by nickel hemishells using the 252Cf Source-Driven Noise Analysis (CSDNA) method to provide criticality safety benchmark data. Measured configurations included a bare plutonium sphere as well as the plutonium sphere reflected by the following nickel thicknesses: 1.27, 2.54, 3.81, 5.08, and 7.62 cm. A certain ratio of spectral quantities was measured for each configuration which varies linearly with the keff of the system. In addition, two types of Monte Carlo calculations were employed: a modified version of MCNP to calculate the ratio of spectral quantities and a KCODE calculation. From the measured and computed quantities the multiplication of each configuration can be approximated. A comprehensive uncertainty analysis was then performed that includes uncertainties in the geometry and materials present in the system in addition to the uncertainties in the method and nuclear data.

Jesson D. Hutchinson; John D. Bess

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Braze material for joining ceramic to metal and ceramic to ceramic surfaces and joined ceramic to metal and ceramic to ceramic article  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An improved active metal braze filler material is provided in which the coefficient of thermal expansion of the braze filler is more closely matched with that of the ceramic and metal, or two ceramics, to provide ceramic to metal, or ceramic to ceramic, sealed joints and articles which can withstand both high temperatures and repeated thermal cycling without failing. The braze filler material comprises a mixture of a material, preferably in the form of a powder, selected from the group consisting of molybdenum, tungsten, silicon carbide and mixtures thereof, and an active metal filler material selected from the group consisting of alloys or mixtures of nickel and titanium, alloys or mixtures of nickel and zirconium, alloys or mixtures of nickel, titanium, and copper, alloys or mixtures of nickel, titanium, and zirconium, alloys or mixtures of niobium and nickel, alloys or mixtures of niobium and zirconium, alloys or mixtures of niobium and titanium, alloys or mixtures of niobium, titanium, and nickel, alloys or mixtures of niobium, zirconium, and nickel, and alloys or mixtures of niobium, titanium, zirconium, and nickel. The powder component is selected such that its coefficient of thermal expansion will effect the overall coefficient of thermal expansion of the braze material so that it more closely matches the coefficients of thermal expansion of the ceramic and metal parts to be joined. 3 figures.

Hunt, T.K.; Novak, R.F.

1991-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

135

Braze material for joining ceramic to metal and ceramic to ceramic surfaces and joined ceramic to metal and ceramic to ceramic article  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An improved active metal braze filler material is provided in which the coefficient of thermal expansion of the braze filler is more closely matched with that of the ceramic and metal, or two ceramics, to provide ceramic to metal, or ceramic to ceramic, sealed joints and articles which can withstand both high temperatures and repeated thermal cycling without failing. The braze filler material comprises a mixture of a material, preferably in the form of a powder, selected from the group consisting of molybdenum, tungsten, silicon carbide and mixtures thereof, and an active metal filler material selected from the group consisting of alloys or mixtures of nickel and titanium, alloys or mixtures of nickel and zirconium, alloys or mixtures of nickel, titanium, and copper, alloys or mixtures of nickel, titanium, and zirconium, alloys or mixtures of niobium and nickel, alloys or mixtures of niobium and zirconium, alloys or mixtures of niobium and titanium, alloys or mixtures of niobium, titanium, and nickel, alloys or mixtures of niobium, zirconium, and nickel, and alloys or mixtures of niobium, titanium, zirconium, and nickel. The powder component is selected such that its coefficient of thermal expansion will effect the overall coefficient of thermal expansion of the braze material so that it more closely matches the coefficients of thermal expansion of the ceramic and metal parts to be joined.

Hunt, Thomas K. (Ann Arbor, MI); Novak, Robert F. (Farmington Hills, MI)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

X-ray absorption spectroscopic studies of the active sites of nickel- and copper-containing metalloproteins  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) is a useful tool for obtaining structural and chemical information about the active sites of metalloproteins and metalloenzymes. Information may be obtained from both the edge region and the extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) or post-edge region of the K-edge X-ray absorption spectrum of a metal center in a compound. The edge contains information about the valence electronic structure of the atom that absorbs the X-rays. It is possible in some systems to infer the redox state of the metal atom in question, as well as the geometry and nature of ligands connected to it, from the features in the edge in a straightforward manner. The EXAFS modulations, being produced by the backscattering of the ejected photoelectron from the atoms surrounding the metal atom, provide, when analyzed, information about the number and type of neighbouring atoms, and the distances at which they occur. In this thesis, analysis of both the edge and EXAFS regions has been used to gain information about the active sites of various metalloproteins. The metalloproteins studied were plastocyanin (Pc), laccase and nickel carbon monoxide dehydrogenase (Ni CODH). Studies of Cu(I)-imidazole compounds, related to the protein hemocyanin, are also reported here.

Tan, G.O.

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Biodegradation of orthodontic appliances and their effects on the blood level of nickel and chromium. Master's thesis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Austenitic stainless steels containing approximately 18 percent chromium and 8 percent nickel for orthodontic bands, brackets and wires is universally used in orthodontic practices. With the introduction of nickel-titanium alloys as orthodontic archwires in the 1970's an additional source of patient exposure to metal corrosion products has been introduced. Since the oral environment is particularly ideal for the biodegradation of metals due to its ionic, thermal, microbiologic and enzymatic properties some level of patient exposure to the corrosion products of these alloys is assured.

Barrett, R.D.

1990-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

The Fate of Heavy Metals in Highway Stormwater Runoff: The Characterization of a Bioretention Basin in the Midwest  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The usual wear of automobiles and road surfaces deposits numerous environmental pollutants on roadways and parking lots, including heavy metals such as copper, zinc, lead, nickel and cadmium. During rainfall and snow events, these metals are washed...

Lacy, Sarah

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Parasitic corrosion resistant anode for use in metal/air or metal/O.sub.2 cells  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A consumable metal anode which is used in refuelable electrochemical cells and wherein at least a peripheral edge portion of the anode is protected against a corrosive alkaline environment of the cell by the application of a thin metal coating, the coating being formed of metals such as nickel, silver, and gold.

Joy, Richard W. (Santa Clara, CA); Smith, David F. (Boulder Creek, CA)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Parasitic corrosion-resistant anode for use in metal/air or metal/O/sub 2/ cells  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A consumable metal anode is described which is used in refuelable electrochemical cells and wherein at least a peripheral edge portion of the anode is protected against a corrosive alkaline environment of the cell by the application of a thin metal coating, the coating being formed of metals such as nickel, silver, and gold.

Joy, R.W.; Smith, D.F.

1982-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "type nickel metal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Electroless plating of graphite with copper and nickel  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Decommissioning in the European Union of gas-cooled nuclear reactors using graphite as the moderator will generate a large amount of irradiated graphite as waste. Graphite is a radioactive waste of relatively low activity and consequently the options considered for the management of the waste may include: (i) incineration, (ii) ocean bed disposal, (iii) deep geological disposal, and (iv) shallow land burial. In case the last is the selected mode, an appropriate conditioning procedure is necessary before final disposal, by covering the graphite with a material avoiding or reducing the emission of radionuclides to its surrounding. This work analyses the possibility of conditioning graphite pieces (with a large proportion of pores of different sizes up to 100 {micro}m) with a metal coating of copper or nickel produced by electroless plating, with the aim of completely isolating the graphite from its surrounding. Electroless plating with copper results in a very large proportion of pores filled or covered, but a fraction of the pores remain in the graphite, which decreases with increasing thickness of metal deposit. Furthermore, the copper plating is permeable to liquids and consequently the graphite does not become completely isolated from the surrounding. The percentage of porosity filled or covered by nickel deposits is similar to copper, but they are not permeable to liquids, at least when the thickness is relatively high, and consequently the access of the liquids to the graphite is rather limited. However, when electroless plating with copper is followed by nickel deposition the graphite becomes isolated from the exterior.

Caturla, F.; Molina, F.; Molina-Sabio, M.; Rodriguez-Reinoso, F. [Univ. de Alicante (Spain). Dept. de Quimica Inorganica; Esteban, A. [CIEMAT, Madrid (Spain)

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Hard metal composition  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A composition of matter having a Rockwell A hardness of at least 85 is formed from a precursor mixture comprising between 3 and 10 wt % boron carbide and the remainder a metal mixture comprising from 70 to 90% tungsten or molybdenum, with the remainder of the metal mixture comprising nickel and iron or a mixture thereof. The composition has a relatively low density of between 7 and 14 g/cc. The precursor is preferably hot pressed to yield a composition having greater than 100% of theoretical density.

Sheinberg, H.

1983-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

143

Hard metal composition  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A composition of matter having a Rockwell A hardness of at least 85 is formed from a precursor mixture comprising between 3 and 10 weight percent boron carbide and the remainder a metal mixture comprising from 70 to 90 percent tungsten or molybdenum, with the remainder of the metal mixture comprising nickel and iron or a mixture thereof. The composition has a relatively low density of between 7 to 14 g/cc. The precursor is preferably hot pressed to yield a composition having greater than 100% of theoretical density.

Sheinberg, Haskell (Los Alamos, NM)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Structural, Spectroscopic, And Theoretical Elucidation of a Redox-Active Pincer-Type Ancillary Applied in Catalysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Pincer-type ligands are believed to be very robust scaffolds that can support multifarious functionalities as well as highly reactive metal motifs applied in organometallic chemistry, especially in the realm of catalysis. In this paper, we describe the redox and, therefore, noninnocent behavior of a PNP (PNP{sup -} = N[2-P(CHMe{sub 2}){sub 2}-4-methylphenyl]{sub 2}) pincer ancillary bound to nickel. A combination of structural, spectroscopic, and theoretical techniques suggests that this type of framework can house an electron hole when coordinated to Ni(II).

Adhikari, D.; Mossin, S.; Basuli, F.; Huffman, J.C.; Szilagyi, R.K.; Meyer, K.; Mindiola, D.J.

2009-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

145

Strength of semiconductors, metals, and ceramics evaluated by a microscopic cleavage model with Morse-type and Lennard-Jones-type interaction  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An improved microscopic cleavage model, based on a Morse-type and Lennard-Jones-type interaction instead of the previously employed half-sine function, is used to determine the maximum cleavage strength for the brittle materials diamond, tungsten, molybdenum, silicon, GaAs, silica, and graphite. The results of both interaction potentials are in much better agreement with the theoretical strength values obtained by ab initio calculations for diamond, tungsten, molybdenum, and silicon than the previous model. Reasonable estimates of the intrinsic strength are presented for GaAs, silica, and graphite, where first principles values are not available.

Hess, Peter [Institute of Physical Chemistry, University of Heidelberg, Im Neuenheimer Feld 253, D-69120 Heidelberg (Germany)

2014-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

146

The structure of nickel clusters  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The reactions of nickel clusters with ammonia and with water are used to probe cluster geometrical structure. Ammonia uptake experiments allow the determination of the number of preferred binding sites on cluster surfaces. This number shows pronounced minima in the 50- to 116- atom size range for many of the cluster sizes that appear as magic numbers in mass spectra of rare gas clusters. Since these magic numbers arise from closings of shells and subshells of the Mackay icosahedra, the correlation suggests that ammoniated nickel clusters in this size region also have icosahedral structure. Similar structure is found for ammoniated clusters smaller than {similar to}30 atoms, but is not seen for room temperature clusters in the vicinity of the third shell closing at 147 atoms. Icosahedral features do appear for the larger clusters at elevated temperatures. For many clusters above 50 atoms, prolonged exposure to ammonia causes a conversion from the icosahedral structure to some other structure that binds more ammonia molecules, and often the two structures are seen together. The equilibrium reaction of a single water molecule with the bare clusters probes the strength of the cluster--water bond. Enhanced water adsorption is often seen for clusters one atom larger than those showing minima in ammonia uptake, suggesting that these bare clusters likewise have icosahedral structure. The reasons for minima in ammonia uptake and maxima in water binding are discussed.

Parks, E.K.; Winter, B.J.; Klots, T.D.; Riley, S.J. (Chemistry Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (US))

1991-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Initiation of electroless nickel plating on copper, palladium-activated copper, gold, and platinum  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The catalytic activity of copper, palladium-activated copper, gold, and platinum for electro-oxidation of hypophosphite and electroless nickel plating was investigated in an ammoniacal solution of pH 8.8 at 50/sup 0/C by potential measurements and linear sweep voltammetry from -0.3 to -0.92V vs. SCE. Early stages of nickel plating on copper-palladium substrates were studied by scanning electron microscopy in conjunction with EDAX. It was found that palladium-activated copper and gold were catalytically active in the entire range of potentials examined; copper was active below -0.6 platinum was not active at all. Small amounts of electrolytically deposited nickel considerably increased the electro-oxidation rate of hypophosphite on copper, gold, and palladium. TEM examinations showed that activation of copper in a PdCl/sub 2//HCl solution resulted in the deposition of palladium in the form of separate patches. Electroless nickel deposition on copper substrates with separate palladium spots took place on copper and palladium independently of each other. The deposition on palladium was faster than that on copper. It was concluded that the activation of copper substrates around palladium spots occurred solely through a spontaneous potential shift, induced by electro-oxidation of hypophosphite on the palladium spots. It was suggested that small amounts of one metal synergistically enhanced the catalytic activity of the other metals.

Flis, J.; Duquette, D.J.

1984-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

The effect of iron dilution on strength of nickel/steel and Monel/steel welds  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The weld strength, as a function of iron content, for nickel/steel and Monel/steel welds was determined. Samples were prepared using a Gas Metal Arc (GMAW) automatic process to weld steel plate together with nickel or Monel to produce a range of iron contents typical of weld compositions. Tensile specimens of each iron content were tested to obtain strength and ductility measurements for that weld composition. Data indicate that at iron contents of less than 20% iron in a nickel/steel weld, the weld fails at the weld interface, due to a lack of fusion. Between 20% and 35% iron, the highest iron dilution that could be achieved in a nickel weld, the welds were stronger than the steel base metal. This indicates that a minimum amount of iron dilution (20%) is necessary for good fusion and optimum strength. On the other hand for Monel/steel welds, test results showed that the welds had good strength and integrity between 10% and 27% iron in the weld. Above 35% iron, the welds have less strength and are more brittle. The 35% iron content also corresponds to the iron dilution in Monel welds that has been shown to produce an increase in corrosion rate. This indicates that the iron dilution in Monel welds should be kept below 35% iron to maximize both the strength and corrosion resistance. 2 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs.

Fout, S.L.; Wamsley, S.D.

1983-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

149

Aspects of electroless nickel plating on molybdenum  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A process for depositing an adherent coating of an electroless nickel-phosphorus alloy on molybdenum was developed. The required pretreatment processes included an anodic etch in a chromic acid-nitric acid solution, an anodic etch in a phosphonic acid solution, and an oxide stripping step in a chromic acid-nitric acid solution. Initiation of the electroless nickel plating was accomplished through a series of strikes in the nickel bath. Scale up from laboratory parts to large components involved optimization of parameters such as pretreat time, current density, anode to cathode ratio and strike time.

Mikkola, R.D.; Daugherty, C.E.; Harris, G.E.; Neff, W.A.; Owens, W.W.

1984-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

INTEGRAL FIELD SPECTROSCOPY OF SUPERNOVA EXPLOSION SITES: CONSTRAINING THE MASS AND METALLICITY OF THE PROGENITORS. I. TYPE Ib AND Ic SUPERNOVAE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Integral field spectroscopy of 11 Type Ib/Ic supernova (SN Ib/Ic) explosion sites in nearby galaxies has been obtained using UH88/SNIFS and Gemini-N/GMOS. The use of integral field spectroscopy enables us to obtain both spatial and spectral information about the explosion site, enabling the identification of the parent stellar population of the SN progenitor star. The spectrum of the parent population provides metallicity determination via strong-line method and age estimation obtained via comparison with simple stellar population models. We adopt this information as the metallicity and age of the SN progenitor, under the assumption that it was coeval with the parent stellar population. The age of the star corresponds to its lifetime, which in turn gives the estimate of its initial mass. With this method we were able to determine both the metallicity and initial (zero-age main sequence) mass of the progenitor stars of SNe Ib and Ic. We found that on average SN Ic explosion sites are more metal-rich and younger than SN Ib sites. The initial mass of the progenitors derived from parent stellar population age suggests that SN Ic has more massive progenitors than SN Ib. In addition, we also found indication that some of our SN progenitors are less massive than {approx}25 M{sub Sun }, indicating that they may have been stars in a close binary system that have lost their outer envelope via binary interactions to produce SNe Ib/Ic, instead of single Wolf-Rayet stars. These findings support the current suggestions that both binary and single progenitor channels are in effect in producing SNe Ib/Ic. This work also demonstrates the power of integral field spectroscopy in investigating SN environments and active star-forming regions.

Kuncarayakti, Hanindyo; Maeda, Keiichi [Kavli Institute for the Physics and Mathematics of the Universe (WPI), Todai Institutes for Advanced Study, The University of Tokyo, 5-1-5 Kashiwanoha, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8583 (Japan); Doi, Mamoru; Morokuma, Tomoki; Hashiba, Yasuhito [Institute of Astronomy, Graduate School of Science, The University of Tokyo, 2-21-1 Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-0015 (Japan); Aldering, Greg [Physics Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Arimoto, Nobuo [National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, 2-21-1 Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-0015 (Japan); Pereira, Rui [CNRS/IN2P3, Institut de Physique Nucleaire de Lyon, 4 Rue Enrico Fermi, F-69622 Villeurbanne Cedex (France); Usuda, Tomonori, E-mail: hanindyo.kuncarayakti@ipmu.jp [Subaru Telescope, National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, 650 North A'ohoku Place, Hilo, HI 96720 (United States)

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Kinetics of methanation on nickel catalysts  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Extensive steady-state and transient measurements of the disproportionation of carbon monoxide, the hydrogenation of deposited carbon, and methanation of carbon monoxide were performed over 2 and 10% nickel on silica support. The results indicated that the methanation of carbon monoxide involves competitively adsorbed species; that the reaction is nearly zero order in carbon monoxide at 0.1-0.5 atm CO and 1 atm H/sub 2/, but negative at higher CO partial pressures and that it becomes less negative with increasing temperature or increasing hydrogen pressure; and that the reaction order with respect to hydrogen changes from 0.5 to 1.0 with increasing CO pressure and decreasing H/sub 2/ pressure. A reaction mechanism is proposed which consists of the molecular adsorption of CO, the dissociative adsorption of H/sub 2/, dissociation of the surface CO species, and reaction of two adsorbed hydrogen atoms with the oxygen; and a multistep hydrogenation and desorption process for the adsorbed carbon. The dissociation and reaction of adsorbed CO is probably the rate-limiting step. The kinetic behavior is best represented with the assumption of a heterogeneous catalyst surface, containing three types of sites of widely varying activity.

Ho, S.V.; Harriott, P.

1980-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Elastic moduli of nickel and iron aluminides  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ELASTIC MODULI OF NICKEL AND IRON ALUMINIDES A Thesis by SREEDHAR MAN JIGANI Submitted to the Oifice of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1993... Major Subject: Mechanical Engineering ELASTIC MODULI OF NICKEL AND IRON ALUMINIDES A Thesis by SREEDHAR MAN JIGANI Submitted to Texas AkM University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE Approved...

Manjigani, Sreedhar

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

153

Ligand effects on the X-ray absorption of a nickel porphyrin complex: a simulation study  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.elsevier.com/locate/chemphys #12;where W l PP stands for the atomic absorption spectrum for the lth site: W l PP ¼ 1 2 1 X2 x R ZLigand effects on the X-ray absorption of a nickel porphyrin complex: a simulation study Luke Abstract We present a simulation of the X-ray absorption near-edge spectrum (XANES) of the metal porphyrin

Mukamel, Shaul

154

Effect of modifier Pd metal on hydrocracking of polyaromatic compounds over Ni-loaded Y-type zeolite and its application as hydrodesulfurization catalysts  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Coal tar obtained from coal carbonization is a treasure of polyaromatic hydrocarbons, where more than 400 kinds of aromatic compounds are found to be contained. The development of new catalysts being able to convert these aromatics into mono or diaromatic compounds is one of objectives for utilization of polyaromatics. Hydrocracking of polyaromatic compounds is believed to proceed via formation of terminal-naphthenic ring of starting aromatic compounds, followed by cleavage of the naphthenic ring to produce alkylated aromatic compounds which has less numbers of ring than starting aromatics. Accordingly, hydrogenation of aromatic rings and cracking of resulting naphthenic rings are key steps of hydrocracking reaction, so that dual functional catalysts such as metal-supported acid catalysts are considered to be one of the best catalysts. Zeolite has controlled pore structures and strong acidity enough to crack naphthenic rings, being characteristics in exchanging metal species with ease. We have been studying the hydrocracking of polyaromatic compounds over Ni-loaded zeolite catalysts (ZSM-5, mordenite, and Y-type) and found the fact that pore size of zeolite exerts an interesting effect on product distribution. We also conducted computer-simulation for diffusion phenomena of the polyaromatic hydrocarbons in the pore of these zeolites and found that diffusion ability of the substrate affects strongly the product distributions Recently we found that modifying of Ni-loaded Y-type zeolite by Pd-loading enhanced hydrocracking ability of the catalyst. In this report, we would like to refer to the results of both hydrocracking reaction of pyrene and hydrodesulfurization of dibenzothiophene using Pd-modified Ni-loaded Y-type zeolite.

Wada, Takema; Murata, Satoru; Nomura, Masakatsu [Osaka Univ. (Japan)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

155

In situ atomic force microscopy imaging of electroprecipitated nickel hydrous oxide films in alkaline electrolytes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In situ atomic force microscopy images of nickel hydrous oxide films electrodeposited on the basal plane of highly oriented pyrolytic graphite in alkaline electrolytes have shown that a stepwise oxidation leads to irreversible formation of wide crevices throughout the material. Upon subsequent stepwise reduction, the gaps close leaving a hairline type crack which follows the profile of the crevice. These potential induced structural rearrangements have been attributed to stresses induced by differences in the densities of the nickel hydrous oxide in the two oxidation states. 9 refs., 5 figs.

Chen, R.; Mo, Y.; Scherson, D.A. (Case Western Reserve Univ., Cleveland, OH (United States))

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Weldability and microstructure development in nickel-base superalloys  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The integrity of nickel-base superalloy single-crystal welds depends on the weld cracking tendency, weld metal dendrite selection process, stray crystal formation, and macro- and microstructure development. These phenomena have been investigated in commercial nickel-base superalloy single crystal welds. During electron beam and laser beam welding, transverse and longitudinal weld cracking occurred. However, the weld cracking tendency was reduced with preheating. Most of the dendritic growth pattern development in these welds can be explained by a geometric model. However, the welds also contained misoriented stray crystals, which were frequently associated with weld cracks. The formation of stray crystals was related to thermal and constitutional supercooling effects. Fine-scale elemental partitioning between {gamma} and {gamma}{prime} phase was measured with atom-probe field-ion microscopy. Marked differences in partitioning characteristics in two welds were observed and are related to differences in cooling rates. In this paper, the modeling tools available to describe the above are reviewed.

David, S.A.; Babu, S.S.; Vitek, J.M.

1997-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Development of a metal hydride electrode waste treatment process  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Manufacturing residues of metal hydride electrodes for nickel - metal hydride batteries were chemically processed to recover the metal part and heat treated for the organic part. Chemical recovery yielded Ni-Co alloy after electrolysis of the solution and hydroxides of other metal, mainly rare earths. The organic part, pyrolyzed at 700 C, led to separation between carbon and fluorinated matter. Infrared coupling at the output of the pyrolysis furnace was used to identify the pyrolysis gases.

Bianco, J.C.; Martin, D.; Ansart, F.; Castillo, S.

1999-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Study of electroless nickel plating of ceramic particles  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the production of aluminum-based metal matrix composites (MMC), the wettability of the reinforcement particulates by the matrix is an important factor. The manufacture of MMC reinforced with alumina particles require the use of specialized fabrication techniques such as rheocasting in order to achieve effective particle incorporation. Several surface treatments have been applied to alumina and other reinforcement particulates in order to modify particle wettability. The aim of this study was to investigate the deposition of Ni-P onto several ceramic particulate surfaces without the use of the conventional sensitization and activation steps. This nickel plating treatment, had the potential to improve the incorporation of alumina particles in aluminum melts, with respect to MMC formation by the plasma transferred arc (PTA) surfacing process.

Deuis, R.L.; Subramanian, C.; Strafford, K.N.; Arora, P. [Univ. of South Australia (Australia)] [Univ. of South Australia (Australia); Yellup, J.M. [CSIRO, Woodville North, South Australia (Australia). Div. of Manufacturing Technology] [CSIRO, Woodville North, South Australia (Australia). Div. of Manufacturing Technology

1995-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

159

Crystallographic studies of the metal-responsive transcription factor NikR  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Metal ion homeostasis is critical to the survival of all cells, because requirements for these essential nutrients must be balanced with their toxicity when present at elevated concentrations. Regulation of nickel ...

Schreiter, Eric R. (Eric Robert)

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Electrodeposition of nickel-iron alloys: Regular codeposition induced by the presence of ethylenediamine  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The nickel-iron alloy electrodeposition system typically exhibits a phenomenon known as {open_quotes}anomalous codeposition{close_quotes}, where the less noble metal (Fe) deposits preferentially to the more noble metal (Ni). The addition of ethylenediamine to the bath changes the electrodeposition toward {open_quotes}regular codeposition{close_quotes}, i.e. less Fe and more Ni am found in the deposit. The impact of various electrodeposition parameters, including the concentrations of ferrous ion and ethylenediamine and the pH of the bath, on this change in behavior will be presented.

St. Clair, J.; Harris, T. [Univ. of Tulsa, OK (United States)

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "type nickel metal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Inspection of Nickel Alloy Welds: Results from Five Year International Program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission established and coordinated the international Program for the Inspection of Nickel alloy Components (PINC). The goal of PINC was to evaluate the capabilities of various nondestructive examination (NDE) techniques to detect and characterize primary water stress corrosion cracking (PWSCC) in dissimilar metal welds. Round-robin results showed that a combination of conventional and phased-array ultrasound provide the highest performance for flaw detection and depth sizing in dissimilar metal piping welds. The effective detection of flaws in bottom-mounted instrumentation penetrations by eddy current and ultrasound shows that it may be possible to reliably inspect these components in the field.

Prokofiev, Iouri; Cumblidge, Stephen E.; Doctor, Steven R.

2011-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

162

Removal of arsenic, vanadium and/or nickel compounds from spent catecholated polymer  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Described is a process for removing arsenic, vanadium, and/or nickel from petroliferous derived liquids by contacting said liquid at an elevated temperature with a divinylbenzene-crosslinked polystyrene having catechol ligands anchored thereon. For vanadium and nickel removal an amine, preferably a diamine is included. Also, described is a process for regenerating spent catecholated polystyrene by removal of the arsenic, vanadium, and/or nickel bound to it from contacting petroliferous liquid as described above and involves: treating the spent polymer containing any vanadium and/or nickel with an aqueous acid to achieve an acid pH; and, separating the solids from the liquid; and then treating said spent catecholated polystyrene, at a temperature in the range of about 20.degree. to 100.degree. C. with an aqueous solution of at least one carbonate and/or bicarbonate of ammonium, alkali and alkaline earth metals, said solution having a pH between about 8 and 10; and, separating the solids and liquids from each other. Preferably the regeneration treatment of arsenic containing catecholated polymer is in two steps wherein the first step is carried out with an aqueous alcoholic carbonate solution containing lower alkyl alcohol, and, the steps are repeated using a bicarbonate.

Fish, Richard H. (Berkeley, CA)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Removal of arsenic, vanadium, and/or nickel compounds from petroliferous liquids  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Described is a process for removing arsenic, vanadium, and/or nickel from petroliferous derived liquids (shale oil, SRC, etc.) by contacting said liquid at an elevated temperature with a divinylbenzene-crosslinked polystyrene having catechol ligands anchored thereon. For vanadium and nickel removal an amine, preferably a diamine is included. Also, described is a process for regenerating spent catecholated polystyrene by removal of the arsenic, vanadium, and/or nickel bound to it from contacting petroliferous liquid as described above and involves: treating the spent polymer containing any vanadium and/or nickel with an aqueous acid to achieve an acid pH; and, separating the solids from the liquid; and then treating said spent catecholated polystyrene, at a temperature in the range of about 20/sup 0/ to 100/sup 0/C with an aqueous solution of at least one carbonate and/or bicarbonate of ammonium, alkali and alkaline earth metals, said solution having a pH between about 8 and 10; and, separating the solids and liquids from each other. Preferably the regeneration treatment of arsenic containing catecholated polymer is in two steps wherein the first step is carried out with an aqueous alcoholic carbonate solution containing lower alkyl alcohol, and, the steps are repeated using a bicarbonate.

Fish, R.H.

1985-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

164

Removal of arsenic, vanadium and/or nickel compounds from spent catecholated polymer  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Described is a process for removing arsenic, vanadium, and/or nickel from petroliferous derived liquids by contacting said liquid at an elevated temperature with a divinylbenzene-crosslinked polystyrene having catechol ligands anchored thereon. For vanadium and nickel removal an amine, preferably a diamine is included. Also, described is a process for regenerating spent catecholated polystyrene by removal of the arsenic, vanadium, and/or nickel bound to it from contacting petroliferous liquid as described above and involves: treating the spent polymer containing any vanadium and/or nickel with an aqueous acid to achieve an acid pH; and, separating the solids from the liquid; and then treating said spent catecholated polystyrene, at a temperature in the range of about 20 to 100 C with an aqueous solution of at least one carbonate and/or bicarbonate of ammonium, alkali and alkaline earth metals, said solution having a pH between about 8 and 10; and, separating the solids and liquids from each other. Preferably the regeneration treatment of arsenic containing catecholated polymer is in two steps wherein the first step is carried out with an aqueous alcoholic carbonate solution containing lower alkyl alcohol, and, the steps are repeated using a bicarbonate.

Fish, R.H.

1987-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

165

Removal of arsenic, vanadium, and/or nickel compounds from petroliferous liquids  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Described is a process for removing arsenic, vanadium, and/or nickel from petroliferous derived liquids by contacting said liquid at an elevated temperature with a divinylbenzene-crosslinked polystyrene having catechol ligands anchored thereon. For vanadium and nickel removal an amine, preferably a diamine is included. Also, described is a process for regenerating spent catecholated polystyrene by removal of the arsenic, vanadium, and/or nickel bound to it from contacting petroliferous liquid as described above and involves: treating the spent polymer containing any vanadium and/or nickel with an aqueous acid to achieve an acid pH; and, separating the solids from the liquid; and then treating said spent catecholated polystyrene, at a temperature in the range of about 20.degree. to 100.degree. C. with an aqueous solution of at least one carbonate and/or bicarbonate of ammonium, alkali and alkaline earth metals, said solution having a pH between about 8 and 10; and, separating the solids and liquids from each other. Preferably the regeneration treatment of arsenic containing catecholated polymer is in two steps wherein the first step is carried out with an aqueous alcoholic carbonate solution containing lower alkyl alcohol, and, the steps are repeated using a bicarbonate.

Fish, Richard H. (Berkeley, CA)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

A novel plating process for microencapsulating metal hydrides  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

One approach to increasing the lifetime of the metal hydride electrode has been the use of conventional electroless plating to produce a coating of copper or nickel on the surface of the metal hydride powders. In this paper, a novel method for microencapsulating the active electrode powders is presented. This new plating technique takes advantage of the reducing power of hydrogen already stored inside the metal hydride to plate a variety of metals onto metal hydride materials. This method greatly simplifies electroless plating for these powders, eliminating the need for stabilizers and additives typically required for conventional electroless plating solutions. Metals that can be electrolessly plated with stored hydrogen have been identified based on thermodynamic considerations. Experimentally, micrometers thick coatings of copper, silver, and nickel have been plated on several metal hydrides.

Law, H.H.; Vyas, B.; Zahurak, S.M.; Kammlott, G.W. [AT and T Bell Labs., Murray Hill, NJ (United States)

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

Steps to Commercialization: Nickel Metal Hydride Batteries | Department of  

Energy Savers [EERE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion |Energy UsageAUDITVehicles »ExchangeDepartmentResolveFuture |Energy Steps to

168

Stabilization of Nickel Metal Catalysts for Aqueous Processing Systems -  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administrationcontroller systemsBiSiteNeutron Scattering4 By I. Tudosa,SpreadingStabilityEnergy

169

Advanced technologies for decontamination and conversion of scrap metal  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In October 1993, Manufacturing Sciences Corporation was awarded DOE contract DE-AC21-93MC30170 to develop and test recycling of radioactive scrap metal (RSM) to high value and intermediate and final product forms. This work was conducted to help solve the problems associated with decontamination and reuse of the diffusion plant barrier nickel and other radioactively contaminated scrap metals present in the diffusion plants. Options available for disposition of the nickel include decontamination and subsequent release or recycled product manufacture for restricted end use. Both of these options are evaluated during the course of this research effort. work during phase I of this project successfully demonstrated the ability to make stainless steel from barrier nickel feed. This paved the way for restricted end use products made from stainless steel. Also, after repeated trials and studies, the inducto-slag nickel decontamination process was eliminated as a suitable alternative. Electro-refining appeared to be a promising technology for decontamination of the diffusion plant barrier material. Goals for phase II included conducting experiments to facilitate the development of an electro-refining process to separate technetium from nickel. In parallel with those activities, phase II efforts were to include the development of the necessary processes to make useful products from radioactive scrap metal. Nickel from the diffusion plants as well as stainless steel and carbon steel could be used as feed material for these products.

MacNair, V.; Muth, T.; Shasteen, K.; Liby, A.; Hradil, G.; Mishra, B.

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

170

Reversible Poisoning of the Nickel/Zirconia Solid Oxide Fuel...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Poisoning of the NickelZirconia Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Anodes by Hydrogen Chloride in Coal Gas. Reversible Poisoning of the NickelZirconia Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Anodes by Hydrogen...

171

Nickel-Catalyzed Allylic Substitution of Simple Alkenes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This report describes a nickel-catalyzed allylic substitution process of simple alkenes whereby an important structural motif, a 1,4-diene, was prepared. The key to success is the use of an appropriate nickel–phosphine ...

Matsubara, Ryosuke

172

Preliminary evaluation of electrowinning for nickel scrap processing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purification of the 70,000 to 245,000 tons of diffusion plant nickel scrap permit its use in a variety of DOE and, with establishment of de minimus standards, foreign and domestic industrial applications. Nickel recycle would also substantially decrease DOE legacy wastes. This report presents data on electrolytes and separations which could be used in electrolytic purification of radiologically contaminated nickel scrap from first generation diffusion plants. Potentiometric scans and plating tests indicate that both industrial electrolytes, buffered nickel sulfate-sodium chloride and nickel chloride, provide good current densities. Electrolytes which contain ammonium thiocyanate or ammonium chloride also perform well. Nickel does not plate appreciably from nitrate solutions because the nitrate was preferentially reduced to nitrite. Solvent extractions of cobalt, a common contaminant in commercial nickel, and pertechnate, a radiological contaminant expected in DOE nickel scrap, are also successful.

Brown, G.M.; Compere, A.L.; Griffith, W.L.; Hayden, H.W.; Wilson, D.F.

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Formation of Carbon Nanostructures in Cobalt- and Nickel-Doped Carbon Aerogels  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We have prepared carbon aerogels (CAs) doped with cobalt or nickel through sol-gel polymerization of formaldehyde with the potassium salt of 2,4-dihydroxybenzoic acid, followed by ion-exchange with M(NO{sub 3}){sub 2} (where M = Co{sup 2+} or Ni{sup 2+}), supercritical drying with liquid CO{sub 2} and carbonization at temperatures between 400 C and 1050 C under an N{sub 2} atmosphere. The nanostructures of these metal-doped carbon aerogels were characterized by elemental analysis, nitrogen adsorption, high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). Metallic nickel and cobalt nanoparticles are generated during the carbonization process at about 400 C and 450 C, respectively, forming nanoparticles that are {approx}4 nm in diameter. The sizes and size dispersion of the metal particles increase with increasing carbonization temperatures for both materials. The carbon frameworks of the Ni- and Co-doped aerogels carbonized below 600 C mainly consist of interconnected carbon particles with a size of 15 to 30 nm. When the samples are pyrolyzed at 1050 C, the growth of graphitic nanoribbons with different curvatures is observed in the Ni and Co-doped carbon aerogel materials. The distance of graphite layers in the nanoribbons is about 0.38 nm. These metal-doped CAs retain the overall open cell structure of metal-free CAs, exhibiting high surface areas and pore diameters in the micro and mesoporic region.

Fu, R; Baumann, T F; Cronin, S; Dresselhaus, G; Dresselhaus, M; Satcher, Jr., J H

2004-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

174

Advanced technologies for decomtamination and conversion of scrap metal  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Department of Energy (DOE) faces the task of decommissioning much of the vast US weapons complex. One challenge of this effort includes the disposition of large amounts of radioactively contaminated scrap metal (RSM) including but not limited to steel, nickel, copper, and aluminum. The decontamination and recycling of RSM has become a key element in the DOE's strategy for cleanup of contaminated sites and facilities. Recycling helps to offset the cost of decommissioning and saves valuable space in the waste disposal facilities. It also reduces the amount of environmental effects associated with mining new metals. Work on this project is geared toward finding decontamination and/or recycling alternatives for the RSM contained in the decommissioned gaseous diffusion plants including approximately 40,000 tons of nickel. The nickel is contaminated with Technetium-99, and is difficult to remove using traditional decontamination technologies. The project, titled ``Advanced Technologies for Decontamination and Conversion of Scrap Metal'' was proposed as a four phase project. Phase 1 and 2 are complete and Phase 3 will complete May 31, 1999. Stainless steel made from contaminated nickel barrier was successfully produced in Phase 1. An economic evaluation was performed and a market study of potential products from the recycled metal was completed. Inducto-slag refining, after extensive testing, was eliminated as an alternative to remove technetium contamination from nickel. Phase 2 included successful lab scale and pilot scale demonstrations of electrorefining to separate technetium from nickel. This effort included a survey of available technologies to detect technetium in volumetrically contaminated metals. A new process to make sanitary drums from RSM was developed and implemented. Phase 3 included a full scale demonstration of electrorefining, an evaluation of electro-refining alternatives including direct dissolution, melting of nickel into anodes, a laser cutting demonstration, an investigation of commercial markets for RSM, and refinement of methods to quantify isotopic elements.

Valerie MacNair; Steve Sarten; Thomas Muth; Brajendra Mishra

1999-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

175

Selective Electroless Nickel Plating of Particle Arrays on Polyelectrolyte Multilayers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Selective Electroless Nickel Plating of Particle Arrays on Polyelectrolyte Multilayers Ilsoon Lee Received June 30, 2003. Revised Manuscript Received September 25, 2003 Selective electroless nickel plating, it was demonstrated that selective electroless nickel plating on complex 3-D microstructures with submicron resolution

Lee, Ilsoon

176

Mechanical and metallographic characterization of LIGA fabricated nickel and 80%Ni-20%Fe Permalloy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A table top servohydraulic load frame equipped with a laser displacement measurement system was constructed for the mechanical characterization of LIGA fabricated electroforms. A drop in tensile specimen geometry which includes a pattern to identify gauge length via laser scanning has proven to provide a convenient means to monitor and characterize mechanical property variations arising during processing. In addition to tensile properties, hardness and metallurgical data were obtained for nickel deposit specimens of current density varying between 20 and 80 mA/cm{sup 2} from a sulfamate based bath. Data from 80/20 nickel-iron deposits is also presented for comparison. As expected, substantial mechanical property differences from bulk metal properties are observed as well as a dependence of material strength on current density which is supported by grain size variation. While elastic modulus values of the nickel electrodeposit are near 160 GPa, yield stress values vary by over 60%. A strong orientation in the metal electrodeposits as well as variations in nucleating and growth morphology present a concern for anisotropic and geometry dependent mechanical properties within and between different LIGA components.

Christenson, T.R.; Buchheit, T.E.; Schmale, D.T. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Bourcier, R.J. [Corning Inc., NY (United States). Photonic Technologies Div.

1998-04-13T23:59:59.000Z

177

Black nickel selective absorber, optimization of parameters  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Electroplated black nickel selective absorber is one of the most commercially used element of solar energy systems. Electrodeposition parameters such as time of deposition, pH, current density, electrolyte temperature should be optimized to produce the most efficient selective absorber. The topology of the substrate material is very effective on selectivity and it should also be optimized. In this study, by controlling the conditions of electrodeposition black nickel selective absorbers are produced and their reflectivities are measured. The effects of the electrodeposition parameters together with the topology of the substrate, on the selective properties are investigated.

Akinoglu, B.; Cercioglu, V.; Ecevit, A.

1983-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Water treatment process and system for metals removal using Saccharomyces cerevisiae  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process and a system for removal of metals from ground water or from soil by bioreducing or bioaccumulating the metals using metal tolerant microorganisms Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Saccharomyces cerevisiae is tolerant to the metals, able to bioreduce the metals to the less toxic state and to accumulate them. The process and the system is useful for removal or substantial reduction of levels of chromium, molybdenum, cobalt, zinc, nickel, calcium, strontium, mercury and copper in water.

Krauter, Paula A. W. (Livermore, CA); Krauter, Gordon W. (Livermore, CA)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Status of the International Cooperative Program for Inspection of Nickel Alloy Components - PINC  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Primary water stress corrosion cracking (PWSCC) has occurred world-wide in nuclear power plants and is seen as a serious issue. Crack samples show very tight and very complex cracks in the nickel-base weld metal and forgings that are difficult to detect, size, and characterize. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is conducting a research program on non-destructive evaluation (NDE) reliability in detecting and characterizing PWSCC. This program is part of an international cooperative research project called the Program for the Inspection of Nickel-Alloy Components (PINC), led by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), which has been set up to leverage efforts in several countries to address this significant and common problem. This work has the general goal of developing an understanding of the morphology of PWSCC and assessing the NDE responses from it.

Schuster, George J.; Cumblidge, Stephen E.; Doctor, Steven R.; Moyer, Carol E.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Quantitative adhesion data for electroless nickel deposited on various substrates  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper includes a review of the literature on quantitative adhesion of electroless nickel coatings and then presents recent ring shear quantitative data for the electroless nickel deposited on a variety of substrates. Procedures for obtaining good adhesion between electroless nickel coatings and a variety of aluminum alloys (1100, 2024, 5083, 6061 and 7075), beryllium-copper, 4340 steel, HP 9-4-20 steel, and U-0.75 Ti are outlined. In addition, data are presented on a procedure for activating electroless nickel for subsequent coating with electrodeposited nickel. 6 tables.

Dini, J.W.; Johnson, H.R.

1982-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "type nickel metal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Quantitative adhesion data for electroless nickel deposited on various substrates  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A review of the literature on quantitative adhesion of electroless nickel coatings is given and recent ring shear quantitative data for the electroless nickel deposited on a variety of substrates are presented. Procedures for obtaining good adhesion between electroless nickel coatings and a variety of aluminum alloys (1100, 2024, 5083, 6061 and 7075), beryllium-copper, 4340 steel and HP 9-4-20 steel are outlined. In addition, data are presented on a procedure for activating electroless nickel for subsequent coating with electrodeposited nickel.

Dini, J.W.; Johnson, H.R.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Metal-Air Batteries  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Metal-air batteries have much higher specific energies than most currently available primary and rechargeable batteries. Recent advances in electrode materials and electrolytes, as well as new designs on metal-air batteries, have attracted intensive effort in recent years, especially in the development of lithium-air batteries. The general principle in metal-air batteries will be reviewed in this chapter. The materials, preparation methods, and performances of metal-air batteries will be discussed. Two main metal-air batteries, Zn-air and Li-air batteries will be discussed in detail. Other type of metal-air batteries will also be described.

Zhang, Jiguang; Bruce, Peter G.; Zhang, Gregory

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Low temperature iron- and nickel-catalyzed reactions leading to coalbed gas formation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Hydrocarbon hydrogenolysis and CO{sub 2} hydrogenation in the presence of Fe/SiO{sub 2} and Ni/SiO{sub 2} catalysts were evaluated as potential mechanisms contributing to natural gas formation in coalbeds. The hydrocarbons used as reactants in hydrogenolysis included butane, octane, 1-octene, and 1-dodecene. The reactions carried out in a laboratory batch reactor produced gas that contained methane concentrations greater than 90%, which resembles the composition of natural gas. Reaction temperatures were selected to resemble natural coalbed conditions. Evidence is presented to show that iron and nickel minerals, which can be present in coals at levels of 2,000 and 10 ppm, respectively, can become active under geologic conditions. The oxides (Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} and NiO) used as precursors of the active catalysts (Fe and Ni metals) were reduced at 200 C under a hydrogen atmosphere. Moessbauer spectroscopy showed that ca. 6% of the iron oxide was converted to the metal; in the case of nickel, oxygen titration showed that the extent of reduction to the metal was ca. 29%. The resultant fractions of the active metals in coals are adequate to catalyze generation of appreciable amounts of methane over geologic time.

Medina, J.C.; Butala, S.J.; Bartholomew, C.H.; Lee, M.L.

2000-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Effect of a fluorinated nickel surface on the decomposition of perfluorodiethoxymethane  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Perfluoropolyethers (PFPEs) are a commercial class of lubricants widely used in computer and aerospace industries. This is a study of the degradation of a perfluorinated ether in the presence of a metal fluoride. Perfluorodiethoxymethane (PFDEM) is a PFPE analog. Temperature programmed desorption shows no contribution of PFDEM toward nickel fluoride on an NiF{sub 2} surface obtained by CF{sub 3}I adsorption. Higher coverages of nickel fluoride do not show any evidence of NiF{sub 2} contribution from PFDEM. The results do not agree with the idea that a fluorinated surface might induce decomposition of PFPEs, leading to addition fluoride formation on the surface. The metal fluoride bond strength is not a legitimate concern for decomposition of PFE lubricants. Impurity in PFPEs might be the cause of initial surface fluoridation leading to breakdown of PFPEs which could cause additional metal fluoride formation. It is clear that the reaction of PFPEs with metals does not involve a direct formation of a simple M-F bond; results do not show any C-F bond cleavage of the fluorinated ether and do not support a proposed autocatalytic mechanism.

Sreevidya, S.

1995-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

185

Proposed sale of radioactively contaminated nickel ingots located at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Paducah, Kentucky  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) proposes to sell 8,500 radioactively contaminated nickel ingots (9.350 short tons), currently in open storage at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP), to Scientific Ecology Group, Inc. (SEG) for decontamination and resale on the international market. SEG would take ownership of the ingots when they are loaded for transport by truck to its facility in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. SEG would receive approximately 200 short tons per month over approximately 48 months (an average of 180 ingots per month). The nickel decontamination process specified in SEG`s technical proposal is considered the best available technology and has been demonstrated in prototype at SEG. The resultant metal for resale would have contamination levels between 0.3 and 20 becquerel per gram (Bq/g). The health hazards associated with release of the decontaminated nickel are minimal. The activity concentration of the end product would be further reduced when the nickel is combined with other metals to make stainless steel. Low-level radioactive waste from the SEG decontamination process, estimated to be approximately 382 m{sup 3} (12,730 ft), would be shipped to a licensed commercial or DOE disposal facility. If the waste were packaged in 0.23 m{sup 3}-(7.5 ft{sup 3}-) capacity drums, approximately 1,500 to 1,900 drums would be transported over the 48-month contract period. Impacts from the construction of decontamination facilities and the selected site are minimal.

NONE

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Delayed Nickel Decay in Gamma Ray Bursts  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Recently observed emission lines in the X-ray afterglow of gamma ray bursts suggest that iron group elements are either produced in the gamma ray burst, or are present nearby. If this material is the product of a thermonuclear burn, then such material would be expected to be rich in Nickel-56. If the nickel remains partially ionized, this prevents the electron capture reaction normally associated with the decay of Nickel-56, dramatically increasing the decay timescale. Here we examine the consequences of rapid ejection of a fraction of a solar mass of iron group material from the center of a collapsar/hypernova. The exact rate of decay then depends on the details of the ionization and therefore the ejection process. Future observations of iron, nickel and cobalt lines can be used to diagnose the origin of these elements and to better understand the astrophysical site of gamma ray bursts. In this model, the X-ray lines of these iron-group elements could be detected in suspected hypernovae that did not produce an observable gamma ray burst due to beaming.

G. C. McLaughlin; R. A. M. J. Wijers

2002-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

187

Positive bias temperature instability in p-type metal-oxide-semiconductor devices with HfSiON/SiO{sub 2} gate dielectrics  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present a detailed investigation on positive-bias temperature stress (PBTS) induced degradation of nitrided hafnium silicate (HfSiON)/SiO{sub 2} gate stack in n{sup +}-poly crystalline silicon (polySi) gate p-type metal-oxide-semiconductor (pMOS) devices. The measurement results indicate that gate dielectric degradation is a composite effect of electron trapping in as-fabricated as well as newly generated neutral traps, resulting a significant amount of stress-induced leakage current and generation of surface states at the Si/SiO{sub 2} interface. Although, a significant amount of interface states are created during PBTS, the threshold voltage (V{sub T}) instability of the HfSiON based pMOS devices is primarily caused by electron trapping and detrapping. It is also shown that PBTS creates both acceptor- and donor-like interface traps via different depassivation mechanisms of the Si{sub 3}???SiH bonds at the Si/SiO{sub 2} interface in pMOS devices. However, the number of donor-like interface traps ?N{sub it}{sup D} is significantly greater than that of acceptor-like interface traps ?N{sup A}{sub it}, resulting the PBTS induced net interface traps as donor-like.

Samanta, Piyas, E-mail: piyas@vcfw.org [Department of Physics, Vidyasagar College for Women, 39 Sankar Ghosh Lane, Kolkata 700 006 (India); Huang, Heng-Sheng; Chen, Shuang-Yuan [Institute of Mechatronic Engineering, National Taipei University of Technology, No. 1, Sec. 3, Chung-Hsiao E. Rd., Taipei 106, Taiwan (China); Liu, Chuan-Hsi [Department of Mechatronic Technology, National Taiwan Normal University, No. 162, Sec. 1, He-Ping E. Rd., Taipei 106, Taiwan (China); Cheng, Li-Wei [Central R and D Division, United Microelectronics Corporation, No. 3, Li-Hsin Rd. II, Hsinchu 300, Taiwan (China)

2014-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

188

Underground Corrosion of Activated Metals, 6-Year Exposure Analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The subsurface radioactive disposal site located at the Idaho National Laboratory contains neutronactivated metals from non-fuel nuclear-reactor-core components. A long-term underground corrosion test is being conducted to obtain site-specific corrosion rates to support efforts to more accurately estimate the transfer of activated elements in the surrounding arid vadose zone environment. The test uses nonradioactive metal coupons representing the prominent neutron-activated materials buried at the disposal location, namely, Type 304L stainless steel (UNS S30403), Type 316L stainless steel (S31603), nickel-chromium alloy (UNS NO7718), beryllium, aluminum 6061-T6 (A96061), and a zirconium alloy (UNS R60804). In addition, carbon steel (the material presently used in the cask disposal liners and other disposal containers) and a duplex stainless steel (UNS S32550) are also included in the test. This paper briefly describes the ongoing test and presents the results of corrosion analysis from coupons exposed underground for 1, 3, and 6 years.

M. K. Adler Flitton; T. S. Yoder

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Advanced technologies for decontamination and conversion of scrap metals  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Recycle of radioactive scrap metals (RSM) from decommissioning of DOE uranium enrichment and nuclear weapons manufacturing facilities is mandatory to recapture the value of these metals and avoid the high cost of disposal by burial. The scrap metals conversion project detailed below focuses on the contaminated nickel associated with the gaseous diffusion plants. Stainless steel can be produced in MSC`s vacuum induction melting process (VIM) to the S30400 specification using nickel as an alloy constituent. Further the case alloy can be rolled in MSC`s rolling mill to the mechanical property specification for S30400 demonstrating the capability to manufacture the contaminated nickel into valuable end products at a facility licensed to handle radioactive materials. Bulk removal of Technetium from scrap nickel is theoretically possible in a reasonable length of time with the high calcium fluoride flux, however the need for the high temperature creates a practical problem due to flux volatility. Bulk decontamination is possible and perhaps more desirable if nickel is alloyed with copper to lower the melting point of the alloy allowing the use of the high calcium fluoride flux. Slag decontamination processes have been suggested which have been proven technically viable at the Colorado School of Mines.

Muth, T.R. [Manufacturing Sciences Corp., Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Moore, J.; Olson, D.; Mishra, B. [Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO (United States)

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

190

Electrohydrodynamic atomization (EHDA) assisted wet chemical synthesis of nickel nanoparticles  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Highlights: ? Electrohydrodynamic atomization (EHDA) assisted chemical synthesis of nickel nanoparticles is reported. ? Substituting water with non-aqueous media prevents the formation of nickel hydroxide. ? Size of particles decreased from 10 to 20 nm down to 2–4 nm by using multi-jet mode. ? Synthesized nanoparticles have diffraction patterns similar to amorphous materials. -- Abstract: In this study nickel nanoparticles were prepared via chemical reduction of nickel acetate using sodium borohydride using electrohydrodynamic atomization (EHDA) technique. This technique was used to spray a finely dispersed aerosol of nickel precursor solution into the reductive bath. Obtained particles were characterized by means of X-ray diffraction (XRD), UV–Visible spectroscopy, and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Results confirmed the formation of nickel nanoparticles and showed that applying EHDA technique to chemical reduction method results in producing smaller particles with narrower size distribution in comparison with conventional reductive precipitation method.

Barzegar Vishlaghi, M. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Tabriz, Tabriz (Iran, Islamic Republic of)] [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Tabriz, Tabriz (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Farzalipour Tabriz, M., E-mail: meisam.fa@gmail.com [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Tabriz, Tabriz (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Mohammad Moradi, O. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Tabriz, Tabriz (Iran, Islamic Republic of)] [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Tabriz, Tabriz (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

2012-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

191

Competitive adsorption effects in the electrodeposition of iron-nickel alloys  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Two-step reaction mechanisms involving adsorbed monovalent intermediate ions for the electrodeposition of iron and nickel as single metals can be combined to form a predictive model for the codeposition of iron-nickel alloys. Inhibition of the more noble nickel in the presence of iron is caused by preferential surface coverage of the adsorbed iron intermediate resulting from a difference between the two elements in Tafel constant for the electrosorption step. The role of hydrolyzed cations and surface pH is investigated and methods for evaluating the influence of pH are explored. The analysis shows that changes in surface pH with potential are not necessary for iron-rich (anomalous) deposits, but that variations in pH from one electrolyte to another may influence deposit composition. The tendency toward iron-rich deposits with increasing overpotential exists in all systems, however, and can be prevented only by decreasing the iron concentration of the bath. An extension of the analysis to account for transport limitations in baths with low iron concentration is developed and calculations with the model are presented to illustrate the effects of current density and electrolyte convection under conditions similar to those investigated experimentally in the literature.

Matlosz, M. (Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne, (Switzerland). Dept. des materiaux)

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Nanostructured metal foams: synthesis and applications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Fabrication of monolithic metallic nanoporous materials is difficult using conventional methodology. Here they report a relatively simple method of synthesizing monolithic, ultralow density, nanostructured metal foams utilizing self-propagating combustion synthesis of novel metal complexes containing high nitrogen energetic ligands. Nanostructured metal foams are formed in a post flame-front dynamic assembly with densities as low as 0.011 g/cc and surface areas as high as 270 m{sup 2}/g. They have produced metal foams via this method of titanium, iron, cobalt, nickel, zirconium, copper, palladium, silver, hafnium, platinum and gold. Microstructural features vary as a function of composition and process parameters. Applications for the metal foams are discussed including hydrogen absorption in palladium foams. A model for the sorption kinetics of hydrogen in the foams is presented.

Luther, Erik P [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Tappan, Bryce [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Mueller, Alex [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Mihaila, Bogdan [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Volz, Heather [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Cardenas, Andreas [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Papin, Pallas [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Veauthier, Jackie [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Stan, Marius [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Positive Active Material For Alkaline Electrolyte Storage Battert Nickel Electrodes  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method of manufacturing a positive active material for nickel electrodes of alkaline storage batteries which consists of particles of hydroxide containing mainly nickel and covered with a layer of a hydroxide phase based on nickel and yttrium is disclosed. The proportion of the hydroxide phase is in the range 0.15% to 3% by weight of yttrium expressed as yttrium hydroxide relative to the total weight of particles.

Bernard, Patrick (Massy, FR); Baudry, Michelle (Le Pontaroux, FR)

2000-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

194

Electrodeposition of amorphous ternary nickel-chromium-phosphorus alloy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Amorphous ternary nickel-chromium-phosphorus alloys are electrodeposited from a bath comprising a nickel salt, a chromium salt, a phosphorus source such as sodium hypophosphite, a complexing agent for the nickel ions, supporting salts to increase conductivity, and a buffering agent. The process is carried out at about room temperature and requires a current density between about 20 to 40 A/dm.sup.2.

Guilinger, Terry R. (Albuquerque, NM)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

MECHANISTIC STUDIES OF ARYL-OXYGEN BOND ACTIVATION IN A NICKEL(0) DIPHOSPHINE-ETHER COMPLEX  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

with nickel precursors was studied. A series of nickel(0) complexes containing nickel-arene interactions.1).1a,1b Quenching of the lithium species with an electrophilic species leads to the functionalization

Winfree, Erik

196

Electrochimica Acta xxx (2005) xxxxxx Electrochemical and AFM study of nickel nucleation mechanisms on  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

electrodeposition was carried out from solutions with higher nickel concentrations. The clusters were also larger investigations. © 2005 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. Keywords: Nickel electrodeposition; Ammonia; Nucleation [13,14] for nickel electrodeposition from acidicchloridesolutionscontaininghighnickelconcentration

Pesic, Batric

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Hydrogen storage characteristics of nanograined free-standing magnesium–nickel films  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of nanograined free-standing magnesium–nickel ?lms MatthewAbstract Free-standing magnesium–nickel (Mg–Ni) ?lms withfree- standing magnesium–nickel ?lms. Magnesium hydride (MgH

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Direct Reduction of Waste through Refining of DOE Metal Assets - 13632  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

CVMR{sup R} presents a technology for refining nickel from the enrichment barrier materials of the DOE that is proven through 100 years of use by the metals industry. CVMR{sup R} applies modern controls, instrumentation for process and monitoring of the system, and innovative production methods to produce a wide spectrum of products that generate new technology applications and improvements to our society and economy. CVMR{sup R} will receive barrier materials as a secure operation and size reduce the metal to a shred that is fed to a carbonylation reactor where nickel is reacted with carbon monoxide and generate nickel carbonyl. The carbonyl will be filtered and decomposed with heat to form a variety of products that include high value nano powders, coated substrates, net shapes and pure nickel. The residue from the reactor will retain radionuclides from enrichment activities. The carbon monoxide will only react and extract nickel under the operating conditions to leave volumetric contamination in the unreacted residue. A demonstration plant was designed and built by CVMR{sup R} and operated by BWXT, to demonstrate the systems capabilities to DOE in 2006. A pilot plant operation precedes the detailed design of the nickel refinery and provides essential data for design, safe work practices, waste characterizations and system kinetics and confirms the project feasibility. CVMR{sup R} produces nickel products that are cleaner than the nickel in U.S. commerce and used by industry today. The CVMR{sup R} process and systems for nickel refining is well suited for DOE materials and will provide value through environmental stewardship, recovery of high value assets, and support of the DOE environmental remediation programs as the refined nickel generates additional long term benefits to local communities. (authors)

Hargett, Michael C.; Terekhov, Dimitri; Khozan, Kamran M. [Chemical Vapour Metal Refining - CVMR (United States)] [Chemical Vapour Metal Refining - CVMR (United States)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Magnesium substitutions in rare-earth metal germanides with the Gd5Si4 type. Synthesis, structure determination and magnetic properties of RE5-xMgxGe4 (RE=Gd-Tm, Lu and Y)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A series of magnesium-substituted rare-earth metal germanides with a general formula RE{sub 5-x}Mg{sub x}Ge{sub 4} (x {approx} 1.0-2.3; RE =Gd-Tm, Lu, Y) have been synthesized by high-temperature reactions and structurally characterized by single-crystal X-ray diffraction. These compounds crystallize with the common Gd{sub 5}Si{sub 4} type in the orthorhombic space group Pnma (No. 62; Z =4; Pearson's code oP36) and do not appear to undergo temperature-induced crystallographic phase transitions down to 120 K. Replacing rare-earth metal atoms with Mg, up to nearly 45 % at., reduces the valence electron count and is clearly expressed in the subtle changes of the Ge-Ge and metal-metal bonding. Magnetization measurements as a function of the temperature and the applied field reveal complex magnetic structures at cryogenic temperatures, and Curie-Weiss paramagnetic behavior at higher temperatures. The observed local moment magnetism is consistent with RE+ ground states in all cases. In the magnetically ordered phases, the magnetization cannot reach saturation in fields up to 50 kOe. The structural trends across the series and the variations of hte magnetic properties as a function of the Mg content are also discussed. KEYWORDS: Rare-earth intermetallics, germanides, crystal structure,Gd{sub 5}Si{sub 4} type.

Sarrao, J L [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Thompson, Joe D [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Tobash, P H [UNIV. OF DE; Bobev, S [UNIV. OF DE

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

alliages base nickel: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

XI, Universit de 5 Machining of nickel based superalloys using coated PCBN tooling. Open Access Theses and Dissertations Summary: ??Following a comprehensive literature...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "type nickel metal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

High Catalytic Rates for Hydrogen Production Using Nickel Electrocatal...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

High Catalytic Rates for Hydrogen Production Using Nickel Electrocatalysts with Seven-Membered Diphosphine Ligands Containing High Catalytic Rates for Hydrogen Production Using...

202

Nickel Alloy Primary Water Bulk Surface and SCC Corrosion Film Analytical Characterization and SCC Mechanistic Implications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Alloy 600 corrosion coupon tests were performed: (1) to quantify the temperature dependency of general corrosion and (2) to characterize the composition and structure of bulk surface corrosion films for comparison with ongoing primary water SCC (PWSCC) crack tip corrosion film analyses. Results suggest that the thermal activation energy of Alloy 600 corrosion is consistent with the thermal activation energy of nickel alloy PWSCC. Analytical investigations of the structure and composition of Alloy 600 bulk surface corrosion oxides revealed a duplex (inner and outer) oxide layer structure. The outer layer is discontinuous and comprised of relatively large (1 to 3 {micro}m) nickel ferrite crystals and smaller ({approx}0.1 {micro}m) chromium containing nickel ferrite crystals. The inner layer consists of a relatively continuous chromite spinel (major phase) and chromia (Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} minor phase) which formed through non-selective oxidation. Chromia and dealloyed Alloy 600 (highly Ni enriched metal) were only observed at 337 C (640 F) and only along the boundaries of deformation induced fine grains and subcells. Specimens having deformation free surfaces exhibited continuous uniform inner chromite spinel oxide layers. Specimens with machining induced surface deformation produced non-uniform inner layer oxides (chromite spinel, Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} and unoxidized material). PWSCC crack tip oxides, in contrast, were fine grain (no duplex structure) and consisted of both chromium rich spinels and ''NiO'' structure oxides. Generally, nickel rich oxides were more abundant under more oxidized conditions (reduced coolant hydrogen) and spinel rich crack tip oxides were favored under more reducing conditions (increased coolant hydrogen). Bulk surface corrosion film thickness did not correlate with observed SCC growth rates. These results suggest that corrosion is not the rate controlling step of PWSCC but rather that PWSCC and corrosion have a common rate controlling sub process (e.g., cation diffusion, oxygen ingress).

Morton, D.; Lewis, N.; Hanson, M.; Rice, S.; Sanders, P.

2007-04-18T23:59:59.000Z

203

Effect of titania surface species on the chemisorption of CO and H/sub 2/ on polycrystalline nickel  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A submonolayer amount of titanium was deposited and subsequently oxidized in situ on a clean polycrystalline nickel foil in ultrahigh vacuum. Temperature-programmed desorption revealed the activation energy for CO desorption was reduced significantly by the presence of titania surface species. The titania-containing Ni surface showed three binding states for dissociative hydrogen adsorption. Adsorption into the strongest of these three states was an activated process. These results suggest the apparent suppression of CO and H/sub 2/ adsorption typically observed at 300 K for titania-supported group 8 metals may be due to the existence of titania species on the surfaces of the metal particles.

Raupp, G.B.; Dumesic, J.A.

1984-02-16T23:59:59.000Z

204

E-Print Network 3.0 - acid nickel ii Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Use of Magnetic and Electrically Conductive Fillers in a Polymer Matrix for Electromagnetic Interference Shielding Summary: of nickel powder were used, namely nickel powder I and...

205

E-Print Network 3.0 - aluminium nickel arsenic Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

and electrothermal Summary: , copper, nickel and palladium nitrates on the arsenic atomic absorption signal magnitude were examined... stabilisation of platform); C, nickel...

206

A new family of metal chalogenide thin film electrodes for photoelectrochemical applications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A new family of metal/semiconductor electrocomposite photoelectrodes is described for photoelectrochemical (PEC) applications. These electrocomposites are prepared from an aqueous dispersion containing the targeted metal (in ionic form) and the semiconductor particles. Electrodeposition of the metal affords a matrix in which the semiconductor particles are occluded. This approach is illustrated for nickel/TiO{sub 2} and nickel/CdS model candidates. The influence of preparation variables (deposition potential, temperature, pH, semiconductor content) on the PEC behavior is described.

Rajeshwar, K.; Tacconi, N.R. de [Univ. of Texas, Arlington, TX (United States)

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Soft-x-ray hollow fiber optics with inner metal coating  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A glass capillary with an inner metal coating is proposed to be used as soft-x-ray fiber optics in medical applications. Based on the results of theoretical calculations, nickel was chosen as the coating material for x rays radiated from a conventional x-ray tube. A nickel-coated capillary was fabricated by electroless deposition, and focusing and collimating effects were observed from measurements of the transmission efficiency of soft x rays. The transmission of a nickel-coated capillary with an inner diameter of 0.53 mm and a length of 300 mm was 10%, which is approximately double that of an uncoated glass capillary.

Matsuura, Yuji; Oyama, Tadaaki; Miyagi, Mitsunobu

2005-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

208

Adsorption of carbonyl sulfide on nickel and tungsten films  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The interaction of carbonyl sulfide with evaporated nickel and tungsten films has been investigated in the temperature range 195-450 K using gas pressures ranging from 1 to 13 N m/sup -2/. Rapid but mainly associative chemisorption of COS occurred on both metals at 195 K. Further adsorption of COS on W at temperatures 293-450 K was extremely slow and accompanied by more CO desorption than COS adsorbed. Sulfidation of Ni film by COS occurred at temperatures greater than or equal to 293 K with the liberation of carbon monoxide. The rate of adsorption increased with temperature but was independent of COS pressure. The activation energy (E/sub x/) increased with extent (X) of sulfidation to a limiting value of 97 kJ mol/sup -1/. A linear relationship was obtained from the plot of E/sub x/ against 1/X, suggesting the applicability of Cabrera-Mott theory to the sulfidation of Ni film by COS. 20 references, 2 figures, 1 table.

Saleh, J.M.; Nasser, F.A.K.

1985-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

209

Disproportionation of carbon monoxide on supported nickel catalysts  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The disproportionation of carbon monoxide was investigated mainly on a 5.5% Ni/Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ catalyst by infrared spectroscopy and temperature-programmed desorption. The reaction was found to be of first order with respect to the surface concentration of CO below 200/sup 0/C, while at 450/sup 0/C the reaction proceeded as a second order reaction for the pressure of CO. Results obtained with predeposited carbon indicated that the disproportionation reaction requires an ensemble of several nickel atoms. In agreement with this result, the disproportionation did not take place readily on a 1.1% Ni/Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ catalyst on which a high dispersion of the metal was indicated by both infrared spectroscopy and the chemisorption of hydrogen. In the temperature-programmed desorption (TPD) carbon monoxide desorbed in a single peak before 300/sup 0/C. Some of the carbon monoxide, however, underwent disproportionation during TPD and a carbon dioxide peak appeared at about 220/sup 0/C. Furthermore, carbon thus deposited on the surface was oxidized to carbon monoxide by oxygen supplied from the catalysts and gave a second peak of CO in TPD at temperatures higher than 300/sup 0/C. Possible sources of the oxygen were discussed.

Galuszka, J.; Chang, J.R.; Amenomiya, Y.

1981-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

JOURNAL DE PHYSIQUE Colfoque Cl, supplkrnent au no 4, Tome 38, Auril 1977, page Cl-333 METAL-OXIDES COMPOSITES FOR BaFe,,Ol PERMANENT MAGNETS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the possibility of producing composites of Ba ferrite with various metals such as cobalt, nickel, iron, copper of a CO deposit with preferential orientation obtained by chemical reduction and electrodeposition. 2. CO

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

211

Stabilization of Electrocatalytic Metal Nanoparticles at Metal...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Electrocatalytic Metal Nanoparticles at Metal-Metal Oxide-Graphene Triple Junction Points. Stabilization of Electrocatalytic Metal Nanoparticles at Metal-Metal Oxide-Graphene...

212

PHYTOEXTRACTION OF HEAVY METALS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

) Type of phytoremediation Cost effective form of environmental remediation (Glass 1999) Chelating Agents: desorb heavy metals from soil matrix and form water-soluble metal complexes (Shen et al -using hyperaccumulator plant biomass to produce a bio-ore for commercial use -Li et al. look at using Ni

Blouin-Demers, Gabriel

213

Thermoelectric transport properties of polycrystalline titanium diselenide co-intercalated with nickel and titanium using spark plasma sintering  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Polycrystalline samples of nickel intercalated (0-5%) TiSe{sub 2} were attempted via solid-state reaction in evacuated quartz tubes followed by densification using a spark plasma sintering process. X-ray diffraction data indicated that mixed NiSe{sub 2} and TiSe{sub 2} phases were present after initial synthesis by solid-state reaction, but a pure TiSe{sub 2} phase was present after the spark plasma sintering. While EPMA data reveals the stoichiometry to be near 1:1.8 (Ti:Se) for all samples, comparisons of the measured bulk densities to the theoretical densities suggest that the off stoichiometry is a result of the co-intercalation of both Ni and Ti rather than Se vacancies. Due to the presence of excess Ti (0.085-0.130 per formula) in the van der Waals gap of all the samples, the sensitive electron-hole balance is offset by the additional Ti-3d electrons, leading to an increase in the thermopower (n-type) over pristine, stoichiometric TiSe{sub 2}. The effects of the co-intercalation of both Ni and Ti in TiSe{sub 2} on the structural, thermal, and electrical properties are discussed herein. - Graphical abstract: Co-intercalation of nickel and excess titanium into the van der Waals gap of TiSe{sub 2} via solid state synthesis followed by spark plasma sintering results in a systematic shift in the ratio of hole and electron carrier concentration, which is close to unity for pristine TiSe{sub 2}. This directly affects the electrical transport properties, and as the structural disorder induced by intercalation suppresses the lattice thermal conductivity, co-intercalation is an effective route to enhance the thermoelectric properties of transition metal diselenides. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Single phase bulk Ni and Ti co-intercalated TiSe{sub 2} samples prepared by spark plasma sintering. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Density and X-ray diffraction suggest that the Ni and excess Ti are ordered in the Van der Waals gap. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Co-intercalation of Ni and Ti can be used to control electron-hole ratio and structural disorder.

Holgate, T.C. [Department of Energy Storage and Conversion, Technical University of Denmark, Riso Campus, 4000 Roskilde (Denmark); Zhu, S.; Zhou, M. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Clemson University, Clemson, SC 29634 (United States); Bangarigadu-Sanasy, S.; Kleinke, H. [Department of Chemistry, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, Ontario, N2L 3G1 (Canada); He, J. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Clemson University, Clemson, SC 29634 (United States); Tritt, T.M., E-mail: ttritt@clemson.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Clemson University, Clemson, SC 29634 (United States)

2013-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

214

Toxicity of nickel and nickel electroplating water to the freshwater cladoceran Moina macrocopa  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The present study investigates the effects of Ni{sup 2+} and other components of nickel electroplating water on the survival and reproductive capacity of the cladoceran Moina macrocopa, a common inhabitant of small ponds and rice paddies in Hong Kong and Southern China.

Wong, C.K.; Wong, P.K.; Tao, H. (Chinese Univ. of Hong Kong, Shatin (Hong Kong))

1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Thermal conductivity of electroless nickel-phosphorus alloy plating  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Properties of specific heat, thermal diffusivity, density, and calculated thermal conductivity have been determined for a modified acid bath electroless nickel-12.7 wt% phosphorus alloy between 298 ad 423 K. Thermal conductivity values are about half those of pure nickel.

Smith, D.D.

1982-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

High Activity of Ce1-xNixO2-y for H2 Production through Ethanol Steam Reforming: Tuning Catalytic Performance through Metal-Oxide Interactions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The importance of the oxide: Ce{sub 0.8}Ni{sub 0.2}O{sub 2-y} is an excellent catalyst for ethanol steam reforming. Metal-oxide interactions perturb the electronic properties of the small particles of metallic nickel present in the catalyst under the reaction conditions and thus suppress any methanation activity. The nickel embedded in ceria induces the formation of O vacancies, which facilitate cleavage of the OH bonds in ethanol and water.

G Zhou; L Barrio; S Agnoli; S Senanayake; J Evans; A Kubacka; M Estrella; J Hanson; A Martinez-Arias; et al.

2011-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

217

Pulsed electrodeposition of iron-nickel alloys  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper reports on the effects of dc, pulse, and pulse reverse current waveforms on deposition of Fe-Ni alloys studied in unagitated solutions and with a rotating cylindrical electrode. A nickel sulfamate/ferrous chloride electrolyte system at pH 2 less than 2 A/dm{sup 2}. Pulse reverse plating led to a decrease in anomalous deposition at low current densities. Rotating cylindrical electrodes indicated significant mass transfer effects at high current densities. During pulse reverse plating an increase in anodic pulse magnitude decreased anomalous deposition; pulse frequency had its greatest effect in reducing anomalous deposition between 100 and 300 Hz.

Grimmett, D.L.; Schwartz, M.; Nobe, K. (Dept. of Chemical Engineering, Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (US))

1990-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Production of H2 at Fast Rates Using a Nickel Electrocatalyst in Water/Acetonitrile Solutions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Efficient production of molecular hydrogen for storage of energy from renewable sources is crucial for the development of wind and solar power. Hydrogenase enzymes in nature catalyze H2 production using earth-abundant metals (iron and nickel) using precise delivery of protons to the metal center. Here we report a synthetic nickel complex containing proton relays, [Ni(PPh2NC6H4OH2)2](BF4)2 (PPh2NC6H4OH2 = 1,5-bis(p-hydroxyphenyl)-3,7-diphenyl-1,5-diaza-3,7-diphosphacyclooctane), that catalyzes the production of H2 in an aqueous environment with turnover frequencies of 750-170,000 s-1 at directly measured overpotentials of 310-470 mV. The remarkable performance of this catalyst in aqueous environments exceeds the requirements necessary for molecular catalytic production of H2 by energy derived from photovoltaic solar cells. This research was supported as part of the Center for Molecular Electrocatalysis, an Energy Frontier Research Center funded by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is operated by Battelle for the U.S. Department of Energy.

Hoffert, Wesley A.; Roberts, John A.; Bullock, R. Morris; Helm, Monte L.

2013-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

219

Method for regeneration of electroless nickel plating solution  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An electroless nickel(EN)/hypophosphite plating bath is provided employing acetic acid/acetate as a buffer and which is, as a result, capable of perpetual regeneration while avoiding the production of hazardous waste. A regeneration process is provided to process the spent EN plating bath solution. A concentrated starter and replenishment solution is provided for ease of operation of the plating bath. The regeneration process employs a chelating ion exchange system to remove nickel cations from spent EN plating solution. Phosphites are then removed from the solution by precipitation. The nickel cations are removed from the ion exchange system by elution with hypophosphorous acid and the nickel concentration of the eluate adjusted by addition of nickel salt. The treated solution and adjusted eluate are combined, stabilizer added, and the volume of resulting solution reduced by evaporation to form the bath starter and replenishing solution.

Eisenmann, Erhard T. (5423 Vista Sandia, NE., Albuquerque, NM 87111)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Method for regeneration of electroless nickel plating solution  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An electroless nickel(EN)/hypophosphite plating bath is provided employing acetic acid/acetate as a buffer and which is, as a result, capable of perpetual regeneration while avoiding the production of hazardous waste. A regeneration process is provided to process the spent EN plating bath solution. A concentrated starter and replenishment solution is provided for ease of operation of the plating bath. The regeneration process employs a chelating ion exchange system to remove nickel cations from spent EN plating solution. Phosphites are then removed from the solution by precipitation. The nickel cations are removed from the ion exchange system by elution with hypophosphorus acid and the nickel concentration of the eluate adjusted by addition of nickel salt. The treated solution and adjusted eluate are combined, stabilizer added, and the volume of resulting solution reduced by evaporation to form the bath starter and replenishing solution. 1 fig.

Eisenmann, E.T.

1997-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "type nickel metal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Effects of oxygen reduction on nickel deposition from unbuffered aqueous solutions. 2: Characterization of the electrode interface in electrodeposition  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Contrary to the reactive electrodeposition of cobalt, porous nickel is not easily produced by electrodeposition from neutral aqueous solutions in the presence of dissolved oxygen. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) examination of the electrode surface detected the presence of a highly stable metal hydroxide layer of the same characteristics as precipitated Ni(OH){sub 2}. The hydroxide layer inhibits the nucleation of nickel nuclei and increases the irreversibility in electrodeposition. For reactive deposition to result in a porous deposit, the hydroxide layer should have only moderate stability so that it can be continuously removed and reinstated by interfacial chemical and electrochemical reactions. The surface Ni(OH){sub 2} formed in neutral solutions lacks the reactivity for such dynamism. Nonetheless, the stability of surface Ni(OH){sub 2} could be lowered by increasing the acidity of the deposition medium. Careful pH control seems to be a requirement for nickel reactive electrodeposition to produce porous metal deposits.

Cui, C.Q.; Lee, J.Y.; Lin, J.; Tan, K.L. [National Univ. of Singapore (Singapore)

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Metalization of lipid vesicles via electroless plating  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The encapsulation of metallic particles and metallic oxides within lipid vesicles has recently been of interest for applications such as catalysis, water splitting, and magnetic control of spin coupling. In this communication the authors introduce the concept and practice of the deposition of metal on vesicles by using electroless plating techniques. Coordination of low valent transition metals to organic functional groups on the surface of the bilayer membrane provides a means of binding metal atoms to vesicles. Chemical reduction produced zero valent atoms which serve as sites for further metal deposition by the chemical reduction techniques of electroless plating. Specifically, this procedure involved the binding of a small amount of tetrachloropalladate to the vesicle bilayer, reduction of the palladium(II) to palladium(0), followed by the deposition of much larger amounts of metal from an electroless plating solution. Electroless plating solutions were used for the deposition of palladium, nickel, cobalt, or copper metal onto the catalytic palladium centers. Since the metallic particles were associated with the vesicles, colloids were formed that were stable in water for much longer periods than the control metal particles formed in water alone. If the vesicles were composed in part of unsaturated lipids, with the olefinic groups on the hydrocarbon chains, the initial evidence suggests the transition metal was directed into the bilayer, rather than staying on the surface.

Ferrar, W.T.; O'Brien, D.F.; Warshawsky, A.; Voycheck, C.L.

1988-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

223

Degradation of solid oxide fuel cell metallic interconnects in fuels containing sulfur  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Hydrogen is the main fuel for all types of fuel cells except direct methanol fuel cells. Hydrogen can be generated from all manner of fossil fuels, including coal, natural gas, diesel, gasoline, other hydrocarbons, and oxygenates (e.g., methanol, ethanol, butanol, etc.). Impurities in the fuel can cause significant performance problems and sulfur, in particular, can decrease the cell performance of fuel cells, including solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC). In the SOFC, the high (800-1000°C) operating temperature yields advantages (e.g., internal fuel reforming) and disadvantages (e.g., material selection and degradation problems). Significant progress in reducing the operating temperature of the SOFC from ~1000 ºC to ~750 ºC may allow less expensive metallic materials to be used for interconnects and as balance of plant (BOP) materials. This paper provides insight on the material performance of nickel, ferritic steels, and nickel-based alloys in fuels containing sulfur, primarily in the form of H2S, and seeks to quantify the extent of possible degradation due to sulfur in the gas stream.

Ziomek-Moroz, M.; Hawk, Jeffrey A.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Nickel-free duplex stainless steels  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

It is well known that nitrogen-alloying in steel produces a variety of exceptional properties such as high strength, high ductility and, eventually, resistance to stress corrosion cracking. High-nitrogen steels (HNS), therefore, have recently been developed to enhance the strength and corrosion resistance of stainless steels. However, due to a low solubility of nitrogen in a liquid steel under atmospheric pressure, the production of such high-nitrogen alloys needs high-pressure facilities that cause an extra cost. A possible route of developing high-nitrogen alloys under atmospheric pressure is to choose a duplex microstructure, where the amount of austenite and ferrite phase is nearly equal. A much lower nitrogen content is needed to maintain a 50% austenite phase compared with the necessary addition of nitrogen to reach a 100% austenitic microstructure. In addition, duplex stainless steels (DSS) with 40--60% ferrite can significantly improve the SCC-resistance. The objective of this work was to develop a new group of nickel-free, high strength and corrosion resistant DSS. Nickel was completely replaced by nitrogen in order to enhance SCC resistance and reduce the alloying element cost. The microstructure, mechanical properties, corrosion resistance and cost analysis of new alloys are investigated in comparison with some commercial stainless steels.

Wang, J.; Uggowitzer, P.J.; Magdowski, R.; Speidel, M.O. [ETH-Zentrum, Zurich (Switzerland). Inst. of Metallurgy] [ETH-Zentrum, Zurich (Switzerland). Inst. of Metallurgy

1998-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

225

Heavy reflector experiments in the IPEN/MB-01 reactor: Stainless steel, carbon steel and nickel  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

New experiments devoted to the measurements of physical parameters of a light water core surrounded by a heavy reflector were performed in the IPEN/MB-01 research reactor facility. These experiments comprise three sets of heavy reflector (SS-304, Carbon Steel, and Nickel) in a form of laminates around 3 mm thick. Each set was introduced individually in the west face of the core of the IPEN/MB-01 reactor. The aim here is to provide high quality experimental data for the interpretation and validation of the SS-304 heavy reflector calculation methods. The experiments of Carbon Steel, which is composed mainly of iron, and Nickel were performed to provide a consistent and an interpretative check for the SS-304 reflector experiment. The experimental results comprise critical control bank positions, temperatures and reactivities as a function of the number of the plates. Particularly to the case of Nickel, the experimental data are unique of its kind. The theoretical analysis was performed by MCNP-5 with the nuclear data library ENDF/B-VII.0. It was shown that this nuclear data library has a very good performance up to thirteen plates and overestimates the reactivity for higher number of plates independently of the type of the reflector.

Santos, Adimir dos; Andrade e Silva, Graciete Simoes de; Jerez, Rogerio; Liambos Mura, Luis Felipe; Fuga, Rinaldo [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares - IPEN-CNEN/SP Av. Prof. Lineu Prestes 2242 - CEP 05508-000 Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

2013-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

226

High Variability of the Metal Content of Tree Growth Rings as Measured by Synchrotron Micro X-ray Fluorescence Spectrometry  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Synchrotron radiation analysis was used to investigate the metal content of tree rings collected from paper birch, Betula papyrifera Marsh, on transects downwind from two metal smelters (nickel and copper). Individual trees reflected changes in ring metal content with time, which may be presumed to represent changes in local metal bioavailability. However, between-tree variations were large and no statistically significant differences in metal content as a function of time were found within or between sites. Although concentrations of both total and exchangeable copper and nickel in the soil increased with proximity to the respective smelter, this pattern was reflected only in the nickel content of rings near the nickel smelter; copper content did not vary with distance from either smelter. The sites did differ with respect to lead, manganese and zinc content of the rings, which may be related to pH. In conclusion, the variability between trees at each site suggests that dendroanalysis is a poor method for evaluating metal exposure at a large (site) scale. Tree ring metal content may be used to evaluate the metal uptake by individual trees but metal mobility in the stem makes it difficult to establish a reliable chronology.

Martin,R.; Naftel, S.; Macfie, S.; Jones, K.; Feng, H.; Trembley, C.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Parameters affecting the fate of metals in various soils  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

At Different Mixed Spike Concentrations 200 150 a Cadmium p Copper Lead Q Nickel 0 Zinc L. O LI 1 00 O O O 50 10 Mixed Spike Concentration 100 FIGURE 12. Per Cent Of Metal Accounted For In Bastrop Soil At Different Mixed Spike Concentrations..., copper, lead, nickel, and zinc along with four soils native to Texas . The following questions The citations on the following pages follow the style of the Jo 1 fthE loentt~Eai i Diplo, A icS sty of Civil Engineers. directed the course of the study...

Covar, Andrew Prescott

1975-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Distribution of copper, nickel, and cadmium in the surface waters of the North Atlantic and North Pacific Ocean  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Concentrations of copper, nickel, and cadmium have been determined for about 250 surface water samples. Nonupwelling open-ocean concentrations of these metals are Cu, 0.5-1.4 nmol/kg: Ni, 1-2 nmol/kg; and Cd, less than 10 pmol/kg. In the equatorial Pacific upwelling zone, concentrations of Ni (3 nmol/kg) and Cd (80 pmol/kg) are higher than in the open ocean, but Cu (0.9 nmol/kg) is not significantly enriched. Metal concentrations are higher in cool, nutrient-rich eastern boundary currents: Cu, 1.5 nmol/kg: Ni, 3.5 nmol/kg and Cd, 30-50 pmol/kg. Copper is distinctly higher in the coastal waters of the Gulf of Panama (3--4 nmol/kg) and also higher in the shelf waters north of the Gulf Stream (2.5 nmol/kg): these copper enrichments may be caused by copper remobilized from mildly reducing shelf sediments and maintained by a coastal nutrient trap. In the open ocean, events of high-Cu water (1.5--3.5 nmol/kg) are seen on scales up to 60 km; presumably, these are due to the advection of coastal water into the ocean interior. The lowest copper concentrations in the North Pacific central gyre (0.5 nmol/kg: (Bruland, 1980) are lower than in the Sargasso Sea (1.3 nmol/kg), while for nickel the lowest concentrations are 2 nmol/kg in both the North Pacific and the North Atlantic. Nickel and cadmium, while generally correlated with the nutrients in surface waters, show distinct regional changes in their element-nutrient correlations. The residual concentrations of trace metals in the surface waters of the ocean can be explained if biological discrimination against trace metals relative to phosphorus increases as productivity decreases.

Boyle, E.A.; Huested, S.S.; Jones, S.P.

1981-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

229

In vivo corrosion, tumor outcome, and microarray gene expression for two types of muscle-implanted tungsten alloys  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Tungsten alloys are composed of tungsten microparticles embedded in a solid matrix of transition metals such as nickel, cobalt, or iron. To understand the toxicology of these alloys, male F344 rats were intramuscularly implanted with pellets of tungsten/nickel/cobalt, tungsten/nickel/iron, or pure tungsten, with tantalum pellets as a negative control. Between 6 and 12 months, aggressive rhabdomyosarcomas formed around tungsten/nickel/cobalt pellets, while those of tungsten/nickel/iron or pure tungsten did not cause cancers. Electron microscopy showed a progressive corrosion of the matrix phase of tungsten/nickel/cobalt pellets over 6 months, accompanied by high urinary concentrations of nickel and cobalt. In contrast, non-carcinogenic tungsten/nickel/iron pellets were minimally corroded and urinary metals were low; these pellets having developed a surface oxide layer in vivo that may have restricted the mobilization of carcinogenic nickel. Microarray analysis of tumors revealed large changes in gene expression compared with normal muscle, with biological processes involving the cell cycle significantly up?regulated and those involved with muscle development and differentiation significantly down?regulated. Top KEGG pathways disrupted were adherens junction, p53 signaling, and the cell cycle. Chromosomal enrichment analysis of genes showed a highly significant impact at cytoband 7q22 (chromosome 7) which included mouse double minute (MDM2) and cyclin?dependant kinase (CDK4) as well as other genes associated with human sarcomas. In conclusion, the tumorigenic potential of implanted tungsten alloys is related to mobilization of carcinogenic metals nickel and cobalt from corroding pellets, while gene expression changes in the consequent tumors are similar to radiation induced animal sarcomas as well as sporadic human sarcomas. -- Highlights: ? Tungsten/nickel/cobalt, tungsten/nickel/iron, and pure tungsten were studied. ? Male Fischer rats implanted with pellets in gastrocnemius muscle of each hind leg. ? Aggressive rhabdomyosarcomas developed from tungsten/nickel/cobalt pellets only. ? Microarray gene expression analysis was carried out on selected tumors. ? Pellet degradation, urinary metal concentration, and sarcoma were correlated.

Schuster, B.E. [U.S. Army Research Laboratory, Weapons and Materials Research Directorate, B434 Mulberry Road, Aberdeen Proving Ground, MD 21005-5609 (United States)] [U.S. Army Research Laboratory, Weapons and Materials Research Directorate, B434 Mulberry Road, Aberdeen Proving Ground, MD 21005-5609 (United States); Roszell, L.E. [U.S. Army Institute of Public Health, 5158 Blackhawk Road, Aberdeen Proving Ground, MD 21010?5403 (United States)] [U.S. Army Institute of Public Health, 5158 Blackhawk Road, Aberdeen Proving Ground, MD 21010?5403 (United States); Murr, L.E.; Ramirez, D.A. [Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, University of Texas, El Paso, TX 79968 (United States)] [Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, University of Texas, El Paso, TX 79968 (United States); Demaree, J.D. [U.S. Army Research Laboratory, Weapons and Materials Research Directorate, B434 Mulberry Road, Aberdeen Proving Ground, MD 21005-5609 (United States)] [U.S. Army Research Laboratory, Weapons and Materials Research Directorate, B434 Mulberry Road, Aberdeen Proving Ground, MD 21005-5609 (United States); Klotz, B.R. [Dynamic Science Inc., Aberdeen Proving Ground, MD 21005?5609 (United States)] [Dynamic Science Inc., Aberdeen Proving Ground, MD 21005?5609 (United States); Rosencrance, A.B.; Dennis, W.E. [U.S. Army Center for Environmental Health Research, Department of Chemistry, Ft. Detrick, MD 21702?5010 (United States)] [U.S. Army Center for Environmental Health Research, Department of Chemistry, Ft. Detrick, MD 21702?5010 (United States); Bao, W. [SAS Institute, Inc. SAS Campus Drive, Cary, NC 27513 (United States)] [SAS Institute, Inc. SAS Campus Drive, Cary, NC 27513 (United States); Perkins, E.J. [U.S. Army Engineer Research and Development Center, 3909 Hall Ferry Road, Vicksburg MS 39180 (United States)] [U.S. Army Engineer Research and Development Center, 3909 Hall Ferry Road, Vicksburg MS 39180 (United States); Dillman, J.F. [U.S. Army Medical Research Institute of Chemical Defense, 3100 Ricketts Point Road, Aberdeen Proving Ground, MD 21010?5400 (United States)] [U.S. Army Medical Research Institute of Chemical Defense, 3100 Ricketts Point Road, Aberdeen Proving Ground, MD 21010?5400 (United States); Bannon, D.I., E-mail: desmond.bannon@us.army.mil [U.S. Army Institute of Public Health, 5158 Blackhawk Road, Aberdeen Proving Ground, MD 21010?5403 (United States)

2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

230

Desorption of carbon monoxide from nickel using mercaptans  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An IR spectroscopic study on the displacement of carbon monoxide with 1-propyl, 2-propyl-, 1-butyl-, 2-butyl-, and tert.-butyl mercaptan from nickel foil and silica-supported nickel showed that at low carbon monoxide coverage on supported nickel, mercaptan adsorption initially converted bridged to linear carbon monoxide surface species. At higher mercaptan pressures, carbon monoxide desorbed into the gas phase. A small amount of carbon monoxide remained on the surface when the poisoned sample was evacuated, and additional carbon monoxide adsorbed when 5 mm Hg of carbon monoxide was added to the evacuated sample.

Neff, L.D.; Sturdivant, A.E.; Wallace, J.L.

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Metal aminoboranes  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Metal aminoboranes of the formula M(NH2BH3)n have been synthesized. Metal aminoboranes are hydrogen storage materials. Metal aminoboranes are also precursors for synthesizing other metal aminoboranes. Metal aminoboranes can be dehydrogenated to form hydrogen and a reaction product. The reaction product can react with hydrogen to form a hydrogen storage material. Metal aminoboranes can be included in a kit.

Burrell, Anthony K.; Davis, Benjamin J.; Thorn, David L.; Gordon, John C.; Baker, R. Thomas; Semelsberger, Troy Allen; Tumas, William; Diyabalanage, Himashinie Vichalya; Shrestha, Roshan P.

2010-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

232

Quantifying the effect of metal-rich precipitates on minority carrier diffusion length in multicrystalline silicon using synchrotron-based  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Quantifying the effect of metal-rich precipitates on minority carrier diffusion length diffusion length of individual transition metal species in multicrystalline silicon. SR-XBIC, -XRF, and -XAS correlation between local concentrations of copper and nickel silicide precipitates and a decrease of minority

233

Master of Science project in advanced computational material physics Electrical conductivity of the correlated metal LaNiO3  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Master of Science project in advanced computational material physics Electrical conductivity of the correlated metal LaNiO3 Lanthanum nickelate, LaNiO3, belongs to the class of materials named strongly correlated metals. Several properties of these materials can not be understood based on standard

Hellsing, Bo

234

Figure and finish characterization of high performance metal mirrors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Most metal mirrors currently used in synchrotron radiation (SR) beam lines to reflect soft x-rays are made of electroless nickel plate on an aluminum substrate. This material combination has allowed optical designers to incorporate exotic cylindrical aspheres into grazing incidence x-ray beam-handling systems by taking advantage of single-point diamond machining techniques. But the promise of high-quality electroless nickel surfaces has generally exceeded the performance. We will examine the evolution of electroless nickel surfaces through a study of the quality of mirrors delivered for use at the National Synchrotron Light Source over the past seven years. We have developed techniques to assess surface quality based on the measurement of surface roughness and figure errors with optical profiling instruments. It is instructive to see how the quality of the surface is related to the complexity of the machine operations required to produce it.

Takacs, P.Z. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); Church, E.L. [Army Armament Research and Development Command, Dover, NJ (United States)

1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Atomistic computer simulation analysis of nanocrystalline nickel-tungsten alloys  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Nanocrystalline nickel-tungsten alloys are harder, stronger, more resistant to degradation, and safer to electrodeposit than chromium. Atomistic computer simulations have previously met with success in replicating the ...

Engwall, Alison Michelle

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Performance of electroless nickel coated steel in oil field environments  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Details of test programs to establish the corrosion and erosion resistance of electroless nickel coating in saline/CO/sub 2//H/sub 2/S petroleum production environments at temperatures up to 180/sup 0/C (350 F) are presented, together with actual experience with their use. Data on heat treatment and deposit composition effects on electroless nickel corrosion in oil field services are given.

Duncan, R.N.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Performance of Electroless Nickel coatings in oil field environments  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Recent experience has shown functional Electroless Nickel to have outstanding resistance to corrosion and erosion in petroleum production facilities. Details of test programs to establish the performance of this coating in saline/CO/sub 2//H/sub 2/S environments at temperatures up to 180 C (350 F) are reported, together with actual experience with their use. Data also are presented on the effect of heat treatment and of deposit composition on the corrosion of Electroless Nickel in oil field services.

Duncan, R.N.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

In-situ scanning probe microscopy of electrodeposited nickel.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The performance characteristics and material properties such as stress, microstructure, and composition of nickel coatings and electroformed components can be controlled over a wide range by the addition of small amounts of surface-active compounds to the electroplating bath. Saccharin is one compound that is widely utilized for its ability to reduce tensile stress and refine grain size in electrodeposited nickel. While the effects of saccharin on nickel electrodeposition have been studied by many authors in the past, there is still uncertainty over saccharin's mechanisms of incorporation, stress reduction, and grain refinement. In-situ scanning probe microscopy (SPM) is a tool that can be used to directly image the nucleation and growth of thin nickel films at nanometer length scales to help elucidate saccharin's role in the development and evolution of grain structure. In this study, in-situ atomic force microscopy (AFM) and scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) techniques are used to investigate the effects of saccharin on the morphological evolution of thin nickel films. By observing mono-atomic height nickel island growth with and without saccharin present we conclude that saccharin has little effect on the nickel surface mobility during deposition at low overpotentials where the growth occurs in a layer-by-layer mode. Saccharin was imaged on Au(l11) terraces as condensed patches without resolved packing structure. AFM measurements of the roughness evolution of nickel films up to 1200 nm thick on polycrystalline gold indicate that saccharin initially increases the roughness and surface skewness of the deposit that at greater thickness becomes smoother than films deposited without saccharin. Faceting of the deposit morphology decreases as saccharin concentration increases even for the thinnest films that have 3-D growth.

Kelly, James J.; Dibble, Dean C.

2004-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Corrosion resistance of nickel-containing alloys in petrochemical environments  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Numerous nickel-containing alloys possess a desirable combination of properties vital to long term dependability within petrochemical and refinery plants. Critical to many operations is the requirement for elevated temperature sulfidation resistance under either reducing or oxidizing environments. This paper surveys the role of materials, environmental factors, alloying elements and the formation of protective scales on the performance of selected nickel-containing alloys.

Smith, G.D. [Inco Alloys International, Inc., Huntington, WV (United States)

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Underground Corrosion of Activated Metals in an Arid Vadose Zone Environment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The subsurface radioactive disposal site located at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory contains neutron-activated metals from nonfuel nuclear-reactor- core components. A long-term corrosion test is being conducted to obtain site-specific corrosion rates to support efforts to more accurately estimate the transfer of activated elements in an arid vadose zone environment. The tests use nonradioactive metal coupons representing the prominent neutron-activated material buried at the disposal location, namely, Type 304L stainless steel, Type 315L stainless steel, nickel-chromium alloy (UNS NO7718), beryllium, aluminum 6061-T6, and a zirconium alloy, (UNS R60804). In addition, carbon steel (the material presently used in the cask disposal liners and other disposal containers) and a duplex stainless steel (UNS S32550) (the proposed material for the high- integrity disposal containers) are also included in the test program. This paper briefly describes the test program and presents the early corrosion rate results after 1 year and 3 years of underground exposure.

Adler Flitton, Mariana Kay; Mizia, Ronald Eugene; Bishop, Carolyn Wagoner

2002-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "type nickel metal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Underground Corrosion of Activated Metals in an Arid Vadose Zone Environment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The subsurface radioactive disposal site located at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory contains neutron-activated metals from nonfuel nuclear-reactor- core components. A long-term corrosion test is being conducted to obtain site-specific corrosion rates to support efforts to more accurately estimate the transfer of activated elements in an arid vadose zone environment. The tests use nonradioactive metal coupons representing the prominent neutron-activated material buried at the disposal location, namely, Type 304L stainless steel, Type 315L stainless steel, nickel-chromium alloy (UNS NO7718), beryllium, aluminum 6061-T6, and a zirconium alloy, (UNS R60804). In addition, carbon steel (the material presently used in the cask disposal liners and other disposal containers) and a duplex stainless steel (UNS S32550) (the proposed material for the high- integrity disposal containers) are also included in the test program. This paper briefly describes the test program and presents the early corrosion rate results after 1 year and 3 years of underground exposure.

Adler Flitton, M.K; Mizia, R.E.; Bishop, C.W.

2001-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

242

Nickel coated aluminum battery cell tabs  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A battery cell tab is described. The battery cell tab is anodized on one end and has a metal coating on the other end. Battery cells and methods of making battery cell tabs are also described.

Bucchi, Robert S.; Casoli, Daniel J.; Campbell, Kathleen M.; Nicotina, Joseph

2014-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

243

Rapid substitution of gold for aluminum metallization on integrated circuits  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A rapid procedure for substitution of gold for aluminum metallization on integrated solid-state circuits, such as solid-state chemical multisensor chips, has been developed. The final product consists of original aluminum overlaid with nickel and gold, both deposited by an electroless process. The final metallization is chemically inert and the resistance of the contacts remains ohmic and unchanged from the original value. The substitution can be performed either at the wafer or at the chip level. After the plasma etching, the metallization process takes only 25 min.

Krasopoulos, A.V. [Washington State Univ., Pullman, WA (United States). Dept. of Chemical Engineering; Li, J.; Josowicz, M.; Janata, J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Kinetic method for the determination of iridium in copper and copper-nickel alloys and in industrial solutions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This article discusses the kinetic determination of iridium in copper and copper-nickel alloys, in ores and ore processing products containing down to 10/sup -8/%, and in waste solutions down to 0.01 mg/liter. The procedure for the kinetic determination of iridium based on the oxidation of mercury(I) and cerium(IV) is described. The applications of the schemes presented allows one to widen significantly the range of products to be analyzed, to determine iridium at a concentration of 10/sup -8/% in the presence of copper and noble metals, and to shorten the time required for the analysis.

Danilova, F.I.; Fedotova, I.A.; Ustinova, N.V.

1986-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Measurement of the Nickel/Nickel Oxide Transition in Ni-Cr-Fe Alloys and Updated Data and Correlations to Quantify the Effect of Aqueous Hydrogen on Primary Water SCC  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Alloys 600 and X-750 have been shown to exhibit a maximum in primary water stress corrosion cracking (PWSCC) susceptibility, when testing is conducted over a range of aqueous hydrogen (H{sub 2}) levels. Contact electric resistance (CER) and corrosion coupon testing using nickel specimens has shown that the maximum in SCC susceptibility occurs in proximity to the nickel-nickel oxide (Ni/NiO) phase transition. The measured location of the Ni/NiO transition has been shown to vary with temperature, from 25 scc/kg H{sub 2} at 360 C to 4 scc/kg H{sub 2} at 288 C. New CER measurements show that the Ni/NiO transition is located at 2 scc/kg H{sub 2} at 260 C. An updated correlation of the phase transition is provided. The present work also reports CER testing conducted using an Alloy 600 specimen at 316 C. A large change in resistance occurred between 5 and 10 scc/kg H{sub 2}, similar to the results obtained at 316 C using a nickel specimen. This result adds confidence in applying the Ni/NiO transition measurements to Ni-Cr-Fe alloys. The understanding of the importance of the Ni/NiO transition to PWSCC has been used previously to quantify H{sub 2} effects on SCC growth rate (SCCGR). Specifically, the difference in the electrochemical potential (EcP) of the specimen or component from the Ni/NiO transition (i.e., EcP{sub Ni/NiO}-EcP) has been used as a correlating parameter. In the present work, these SCCGR-H{sub 2} correlations, which were based on SCCGR data obtained at relatively high test temperatures (338 and 360 C), are evaluated via SCCGR tests at a reduced temperature (316 C). The 316 C data are in good agreement with the predictions, implying that the SCCGR-H{sub 2} correlations extrapolate well to reduced temperatures. The SCCGR-H{sub 2} correlations have been revised to reflect the updated Ni/NiO phase transition correlation. New data are presented for EN82H weld metal (also known as Alloy 82) at 338 C. Similar to other nickel alloys, SCC of EN82H is a function of the aqueous H{sub 2} level, with the SCCGR exhibiting a maximum near the Ni/NiO transition. For example, the SCCGR at 8 scc/kg H{sub 2} is {approx} 81 x higher than at 60 scc/kg H{sub 2}. The 8 scc/kg H{sub 2} condition is near the Ni/NiO transition (located at {approx} 14 scc/kg H{sub 2} at 338 C), while 60 scc/kg H{sub 2} is well into the nickel metal regime. A hydrogen-SCCGR correlation is provided for EN82H. The data and understanding obtained from the present work show that SCC can be mitigated by adjusting the aqueous H{sub 2} level. For example, SCCGR is typically minimized at relatively high aqueous H{sub 2} levels, that are well into the nickel metal regime (i.e., far from the Ni/NiO transition).

Steven A. Attanasio; David S. Morton

2003-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

246

Method of making metal matrix composites reinforced with ceramic particulates  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Composite materials and methods for making such materials are disclosed in which dispersed ceramic particles are at chemical equilibrium with a base metal matrix, thereby permitting such materials to be remelted and subsequently cast or otherwise processed to form net weight parts and other finished (or semi-finished) articles while maintaining the microstructure and mechanical properties (e.g. wear resistance or hardness) of the original composite. The composite materials of the present invention are composed of ceramic particles in a base metal matrix. The ceramics are preferably carbides of titanium, zirconium, tungsten, molybdenum or other refractory metals. The base metal can be iron, nickel, cobalt, chromium or other high temperature metal and alloys thereof. For ferrous matrices, alloys suitable for use as the base metal include cast iron, carbon steels, stainless steels and iron-based superalloys.

Cornie, James A. (North Chelmsford, MA); Kattamis, Theodoulos (Watertown, MA); Chambers, Brent V. (Cambridge, MA); Bond, Bruce E. (Bedford, MA); Varela, Raul H. (Canton, MA)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Method of making metal matrix composites reinforced with ceramic particulates  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Composite materials and methods for making such materials are disclosed in which dispersed ceramic particles are at chemical equilibrium with a base metal matrix, thereby permitting such materials to be remelted and subsequently cast or otherwise processed to form net weight parts and other finished (or semi-finished) articles while maintaining the microstructure and mechanical properties (e.g. wear resistance or hardness) of the original composite. The composite materials of the present invention are composed of ceramic particles in a base metal matrix. The ceramics are preferably carbides of titanium, zirconium, tungsten, molybdenum or other refractory metals. The base metal can be iron, nickel, cobalt, chromium or other high temperature metal and alloys thereof. For ferrous matrices, alloys suitable for use as the base metal include cast iron, carbon steels, stainless steels and iron-based superalloys. 2 figs.

Cornie, J.A.; Kattamis, T.; Chambers, B.V.; Bond, B.E.; Varela, R.H.

1989-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Molecular characterization of vanadyl and nickel non-porphyrin compounds in heavy crude petroleums and residua  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The molecular characterization of vanadium and nickel compounds in heavy crude petroleums has been the subject of current research. Arabian Heavy, Maya, Boscan, Cerro Negro, Prudhoe Bay, Wilmington Beta, Kern River, and Morichal crude petroleums have been examined. Fractions from D 2007 separations, porphyrin extractions, and solvent selective extraction with reversed phase column separations of these petroleums have been studied thoroughly by EPR. Important structural aspects are emerging from the presented data: (1) There are non-porphyrin metal complexes in the crude petroleums. (2) They appear to be smaller molecules with MW < 400 which are liberated when the tertiary structure of the large asphaltics is denatured. (3) The first coordination spheres of this class of compounds are possibly 4N, N O 2S, and 4S. 10 references, 3 figures, 1 table.

Reynolds, J.G.; Biggs, W.R.; Fetzer, J.C.; Gallegos, E.J.; Fish, R.H.; Komlenic, J.J.; Wines, B.K.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Metal inks  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Self-reducing metal inks and systems and methods for producing and using the same are disclosed. In an exemplary embodiment, a method may comprise selecting metal-organic (MO) precursor, selecting a reducing agent, and dissolving the MO precursor and the reducing agent in an organic solvent to produce a metal ink that remains in a liquid phase at room temperature. Metal inks, including self-reducing and fire-through metal inks, are also disclosed, as are various applications of the metal inks.

Ginley, David S; Curtis, Calvin J; Miedaner, Alex; van Hest, Marinus Franciscus Antonius Maria; Kaydanova, Tatiana

2014-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

250

Small molecule binding to electrophilic trigonal pyramidal platinum, palladium, and nickel  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Chapter 1 A general introduction to the concepts and background of several types of transition metal complexes that motivate and inform the research described herein. These include a-complexes and molecular adducts of ...

Tsay, Charlene

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Neuroendocrine effects of acute nickel chloride administration in rats  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An sc injection of nickel chloride (20 and 10 mg/kg) led to a profound and consistent increase of circulating prolactin (PRL) levels after 1 day and lasted for 4 days (p < 0.001) in male rats. Increases in insulin levels occurred 1 and 2 days postinjection. The nickel-induced PRL rise could be abolished by a simultaneous administration of 2-bromo-..cap alpha..-ergocryptine (CB 154). In vitro incubation of pituitaries from rats that received 20 mg/kg of nickel chloride 48 hr prior to sacrifice released more PRL into the culture medium, as well as contained more PRL in the final tissue than did the pituitaries from control animals. The hypothalamic extracts (HE) obtained from hypothalami of nickel-injected rats were tested also in vitro on normal rat pituitaries and the results showed that the HE from such rats released more PRL and therefore had less prolactin-inhibiting factor (PIF) than the HE obtained from control rats. The results show that nickel chloride has effects on the endocrine system that (a) last considerably longer than previously reported, (b) are mediated through the neuroendocrine system, and (c) instead of specifically inhibiting PRL secretion from the pituitary promote high circulating PRL levels lasting from 1 to 4 days.

Clemons, G.K.; Garcia, J.F.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Characterization of segregation in nickel and titanium aluminides  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Atom probe field ion microscopy has been used to characterize the distributions of microalloying additions in the microstructure of a variety of nickel and titanium aluminides. In Ni{sub 3}Al, boron additions were found to segregate to dislocations, low angle boundaries, stacking faults, antiphase boundaries, and grain boundaries. The boron and aluminum levels at grain boundaries were found to vary both from boundary to boundary and also along an individual boundary segment. In some cases, a boron-enriched film up to {approximately}3 nm thick was observed. In aluminum-enriched Ni{sub 3}Al, ultrafine clusters containing up to approximately 10 boron atoms were detected in the matrix. In contrast, the majority of the boron additions in NiAl was determined to be in the form of ultrafine MB{sub 2}-type precipitates. These precipitates offset the benefits of the boron segregation to the high angle grain boundaries. In molybdenum-doped NiAl, atom probe analyses indicated extremely low solubilities of the molybdenum and other trace impurities in the matrix and significant enrichments of molybdenum, nitrogen and silicon, boron, and iron at the grain boundaries. In boron-doped two phase {alpha}{sub 2} + {gamma} TiAl containing chromium, niobium, and tungsten, the boron level was found to be significantly depleted from the bulk level in both the {alpha}{sub 2} and {gamma} phases and a variety of coarse borides including TiB, TiB{sub 2} and a finer chromium-enriched (Ti, Cr){sub 2}B precipitate was observed. The tungsten and chromium were determined to partition preferentially to the {alpha}{sub 2} phase and also to segregated to the {alpha}{sub 2}-{gamma} and {gamma}-{gamma} interfaces. These results indicate that a significant proportion of the microalloying elements are consumed by the boride precipitates.

Miller, M.K.; Larson, D.J.; Russell, K.F. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Metals and Ceramics Div.

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Leaching of metals from ores. (Latest citations from the US Patent bibliographic file with exemplary claims). Published Search  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The bibliography contains citations of selected patents concerning the extraction of metals from ores by leaching. Topics include leaching of metals from ore heaps, mine tailings, smelter wastes, and sea nodules. Metals covered include gold, uranium, copper, nickel, silver, manganese, and cobalt. Bacterio-electric, biological-acid, and hydrogen peroxide leaching are included. (Contains 50-250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

NONE

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Silicone metalization  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A system for providing metal features on silicone comprising providing a silicone layer on a matrix and providing a metal layer on the silicone layer. An electronic apparatus can be produced by the system. The electronic apparatus comprises a silicone body and metal features on the silicone body that provide an electronic device.

Maghribi, Mariam N. (Livermore, CA); Krulevitch, Peter (Pleasanton, CA); Hamilton, Julie (Tracy, CA)

2008-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

255

Silicone metalization  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A system for providing metal features on silicone comprising providing a silicone layer on a matrix and providing a metal layer on the silicone layer. An electronic apparatus can be produced by the system. The electronic apparatus comprises a silicone body and metal features on the silicone body that provide an electronic device.

Maghribi, Mariam N. (Livermore, CA); Krulevitch, Peter (Pleasanton, CA); Hamilton, Julie (Tracy, CA)

2006-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

256

Research, development, and demonstration of nickel-iron batteries for electric vehicle propulsion. Annual report, 1979  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The program has progressed to the stage of evaluating full-sized (220 Ah) cells, multicell modules, and 22 kWh batteries. Nickel electrodes that display stable capacities of up to 24 Ah/plate (at C/3 drain rate) at design thickness (2.5 mm) in tests at 200/sup +/ test cycles. Iron electrodes of the composite-type are also delivering 24 Ah/plate (at C/3) at target thickness (1.0 mm). Iron plates are displaying capacity stability for 300/sup +/ test cycles in continuing 3 plate cell tests. Best finished cells are delivering 57 to 63 Wh/kg at C/3, based on cell weights of the finished cells, and in the actual designed cell volume. 6-cell module (6-1) performance has demonstrated 239 Ah, 1735 Wh, 53 WH/kg at the C/3 drain rate. This module is now being evaluated at the National Battery Test Laboratory. The 2 x 4 battery has been constructed, tested, and delivered for engineering test and evaluation. The battery delivered 22.5 kWh, as required (199 Ah discharge at 113 V-bar) at the C/3 drain rate. The battery has performed satisfactorily under dynamometer and constant current drain tests. Some cell problems, related to construction, necessitated changing 3 modules, but the battery is now ready for further testing. Reduction in nickel plate swelling (and concurrent stack electrolyte starvation), to improve cycling, is one area of major effort to reach the final battery objectives. Pasted nickel electrodes are showing promise in initial full-size cell tests and will continue to be evaluated in finished cells, along with other technology advancements. 30 figures, 14 tables.

Not Available

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Magnetization of an electroless deposited nickel-phosphorus alloy J. Flchon, S. Karbal, F. Machizaud  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1405 Magnetization of an electroless deposited nickel-phosphorus alloy J. Fléchon, S. Karbal, F) du nickel c.f.c. et l'on observe une brusque augmentation de 03C3*o,o et de Tc. Ces résultats sont en cristallin de nickel pur et de phosphure de nickel Ni3P après un recuit à 773 K. Nous avons confirmé l

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

258

Chromium modified nickel-iron aluminide useful in sulfur bearing environments  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An improved nickel-iron aluminide containing chromium and molybdenum additions to improve resistance to sulfur attack.

Cathcart, John V. (Knoxville, TN); Liu, Chain T. (Oak Ridge, TN)

1989-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

259

Ductile tungsten-nickel alloy and method for making same  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention is directed to a ductile, high-density tungsten-nickel alloy which possesses a tensile strength in the range of 100,000 to 140,000 psi and a tensile elongation of 3.1 to 16.5 percent in 1 inch at 25.degree.C. This alloy is prepared by the steps of liquid phase sintering a mixture of tungsten-0.5 to 10.0 weight percent nickel, heat treating the alloy at a temperature above the ordering temperature of approximately 970.degree.C. to stabilize the matrix phase, and thereafter rapidly quenching the alloy in a suitable liquid to maintain the matrix phase in a metastable, face-centered cubic, solid- solution of tungsten in nickel.

Snyder, Jr., William B. (Knoxville, TN)

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Determination of Tin in Nickel-based Alloys by Electrothermal Laser-excited  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Determination of Tin in Nickel-based Alloys by Electrothermal Laser-excited Atomic Fluorescence. The determination of tin in nickel-based alloys by laser-excited sampling, has been the most frequently employed technique for the determination of tin in nickel-based alloys.3­5 The useatomic fluorescence in a graphite

Michel, Robert G.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "type nickel metal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Effects of Catalyst Introduction Methods Using PAMAM Dendrimers on Selective Electroless Nickel Deposition on Polyelectrolyte  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Effects of Catalyst Introduction Methods Using PAMAM Dendrimers on Selective Electroless Nickel stamping. After patterning, the sample surfaces were placed in an electroless bath where nickel the effects of catalyst introduction methods using poly(amidoamine) (PAMAM) dendrimers on the nickel

Lee, Ilsoon

262

Dissolution of Nickel Oxide in a Smelter Contaminated Soil. (S02-mcnear100330-Oral)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Dissolution of Nickel Oxide in a Smelter Contaminated Soil. (S02-mcnear100330-Oral) Abstract: Aerially dispersed nickel oxide particles from a nickel smelter were studied. SXRF mapping and SEM imaging oxides used in previous studies may not be representative of that generated from the smelter facility due

Sparks, Donald L.

263

Journal of Magnetism and Magnetic Materials 288 (2005) 196204 Micromagnetic studies of nickel microbars fabricated by  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Abstract Micromagnetic configurations and macromagnetic properties of electrodeposited nickel microbars: 75.50.Cc; 75.75.+a; 81.15.Pq Keywords: Electrodeposited nickel; Magnetic microbar; Magnetic vortex (VSM) studies of nickel microbars with round corners, produced by nanoimprinting and electrodeposition

Pesic, Batric

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Numerical analysis of a model for Nickel-Iron alloy electrodeposition on rotating disk  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Numerical analysis of a model for Nickel-Iron alloy electrodeposition on rotating disk electrode N the nickel-iron electrodeposition process, we have developed one-dimensional numerical model. This model ad can predict characteristic features of the nickel-iron sys- tem. this work was supported

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

265

An Experimental Study of Microfabricated Nickel Spark Plug Georgia Institute of technology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

electrodeposition through polymer molds. The nickel spark plugs are tested at 20 Hz using spark energies of 5 mAn Experimental Study of Microfabricated Nickel Spark Plug Georgia Institute of technology Atlanta presents experimental. results of the erosion and wear characteristics of micromachined nickel spark plugs

266

Flexible metal film with micro-and nanopatterns transferred by electrochemical deposition  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

if the film can bend or even can roll up. Generally, the metal film can be produced by electroless deposition film A nickel film ð25 mm � 30 mm � 2 mm� was chosen as master, which was cleaned by acetone, methanol

267

ThreeDimensional Metallic Microstructures Fabricated by Soft Lithography and Microelectrodeposition  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

will require new approaches not drawn from existing tech­ nologies. Electroforming (electrodeposition structures by repairing any strain­induced defects with electrodeposition of ad­ ditional metal over bubblememorydevices, 11 thin­ film chip carriers, 2 and components for MEMS (nickel turbine rotor, 5 magnetic

Whitesides, Sue

268

Three-Dimensional Metallic Microstructures Fabricated by Soft Lithography and Microelectrodeposition  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

existing tech- nologies. Electroforming (electrodeposition and electromachin- ing) is a technique with electrodeposition of ad- ditional metal over the damaged areas. Most techniques that are used in conjunction (nickel turbine rotor,5 magnetic microactuator,12 microgears, microvalves and pumps,13 capacitive

Prentiss, Mara

269

Corrosion-resistant fuel cladding allow for liquid metal fast breeder reactors  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An aluminide coating for a fuel cladding tube for LMFBRs (liquid metal fast breeder reactors) such as those using liquid sodium as a heat transfer agent. The coating comprises a mixture of nickel-aluminum intermetallic phases and presents good corrosion resistance to liquid sodium at temperatures up to 700.degree. C. while additionally presenting a barrier to outward diffusion of .sup.54 Mn.

Brehm, Jr., William F. (Richland, WA); Colburn, Richard P. (Pasco, WA)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Formation of amorphous metal alloys by chemical vapor deposition  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Amorphous alloys are deposited by a process of thermal dissociation of mixtures or organometallic compounds and metalloid hydrides, e.g., transition metal carbonyl such as nickel carbonyl, and diborane. Various sizes and shapes of deposits can be achieved, including near-net-shape free standing articles, multilayer deposits, and the like. Manipulation or absence of a magnetic field affects the nature and the structure of the deposit.

Mullendore, Arthur W. (Sandia Park, NM)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

A nonchromate method for refurbishment of worn metallic components  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Hard chrome electrodeposition is a widely used method for building up worn metallic components, but regulations concerning hexavalent chromium effluent are making this process less acceptable. A new method is described in which electroless nickel with phosphorus is used in a closed-loop system in order to build up the worn surface, and an amorphous diamond-like carbon (DLC) coating is bonded to this to provide a low-friction bearing surface. The combination is highly resistant to wear and corrosion.

Dearnaley, G.; Badger, P. [Southwest Research Inst., San Antonio, TX (United States); [Wear-Cote International Inc., Rock Island, IL (United States)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

272

DETERMINATION OF IN-VITRO LUNG SOLUBILITY AND INTAKE-TO-DOSE CONVERSION FACTOR FOR TRITIATED LANTHANUM NICKEL ALUMINUM ALLOY  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A sample of tritiated lanthanum nickel aluminum alloy (LaNi4.25Al0.75 or LANA.75) similar to that used at the Savannah River Site Tritium Facilities was analyzed to estimate the particle size distribution of this metal tritide powder and the rate, at which this material dissolves in the human respiratory tract after it is inhaled. This information is used to calculate the committed effective dose received by a worker after inhaling the material. These doses, which were calculated using the same methodology given in the DOE Tritium Handbook, are presented as inhalation intake-to-dose conversion factors (DCF). The DCF for this metal tritide is less than the DCF for tritiated water and radiation worker bioassay programs designed for tritiated water are adequate to monitor for intakes of this material.

Farfan, E.; Labone, T.; Staack, G.; Cheng, Y.; Zhou, Y.; Varallo, T.

2011-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

273

Thin films of mixed metal compounds  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Disclosed is a thin film heterojunction solar cell, said heterojunction comprising a p-type I-III-IV[sub 2] chalcopyrite substrate and an overlying layer of an n-type ternary mixed metal compound wherein said ternary mixed metal compound is applied to said substrate by introducing the vapor of a first metal compound to a vessel containing said substrate from a first vapor source while simultaneously introducing a vapor of a second metal compound from a second vapor source of said vessel, said first and second metals comprising the metal components of said mixed metal compound; independently controlling the vaporization rate of said first and second vapor sources; reducing the mean free path between vapor particles in said vessel, said gas being present in an amount sufficient to induce homogeneity of said vapor mixture; and depositing said mixed metal compound on said substrate in the form of a uniform composition polycrystalline mixed metal compound. 5 figs.

Mickelsen, R.A.; Chen, W.S.

1985-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

274

Electrodeposition of amorphous ternary nickel-chromium-phosphorus alloy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This patent describes a method of forming amorphous ternary nickel-phosphorus-chromium alloy deposits by electrodeposition on an electrically conductive substrate. It comprises: subjecting the substrate to an applied current density between about 20 and 40 A/dm{sup 2} at a temperature from the range of about 20{degrees} to 30{degrees} C. in a bath comprising: a chromium salt and a nickel salt in a weight ratio of about 3:1, a phosphorus source of about 0.3 M P concentration; about 0.3 M of a complexing agent; about 0.1 M of a supporting salt; and about 0.1 M of buffer.

Guilinger, T.R.

1990-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

275

Electrodeposition of nickel oxyhydroxide films through polymer masks  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Electrochromic materials have attracted much attention for devices including ``smart windows`` and displays. Nickel oxyhydroxide films were electrodeposited through gelatin masks, whose thicknesses may control the optical transmittances of the deposited electrochromic films. The difference of transmittance, {Delta}T{sub 540}, between bleaching and coloration states at wavelength of 540 nm has a linear relationship with the gelatin mask thickness. {Delta}T{sub 540} increased if nickel oxyhydroxide was prepared in agitated electrolyte. The electrodeposited films, prepared with gelatin masks, may have higher stability. These results showed the feasibility of fabricating an electrochromic device with a controlled image whose contrast and brightness are adjustable with potential or current.

Yang, M.C.; Lin, C.K.; Su, C.L. [National Cheng Kung Univ., Tainan (Taiwan, Province of China). Dept. of Chemical Engineering

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Regenerate metal-plating baths to cut waste and save  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

During electrode-based metal plating of equipment components, the formation of an electrical field causes metal deposits to be thicker at edges and seams, and thinner on flat surfaces. And, electrode-based methods consume large amounts of energy. Electroless-nickel (EN) -- or autocatalytic -- plating systems were pioneered in the 1940s to solve these problems. EN plating produces a more uniform coating, irrespective of the complexity of the part, and it consumes less electricity, since to electric current is required during plating. Plating in an EN system results from a chemical reaction between nickel in the bath and the substrate of the equipment component. The downside of electroless plating, however, is the limited life of the nickel bath, and the large volume of metal waste produced by bath disposal. Ionsep Corp. (Wilmington, Del.) has developed an electrodialytic system that continuously reforms the EN plating baths, to give them longer life. Its patented system has been successfully laboratory tested in a 1-ft{sup 2} cell, and the firm recently won a $250,000 grant from the US Dept. of Energy (Washington, D.C.) and Environmental Protection Agency (Washington, D.C.), to design and engineer a commercial-scale version of the system.

NONE

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Preliminary Compatibility Assessment of Metallic Dispenser Materials for Service in Ethanol Fuel Blends  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The compatibility of selected metals representative of those commonly used in dispensing systems was evaluated in an aggressive E20 formulation (CE20a) and in synthetic gasoline (Reference Fuel C) in identical testing to facilitate comparison of results. The testing was performed at modestly elevated temperature (nominally 60 C) and with constant fluid flow in an effort to accelerate potential interactions in the screening test. Based on weight change, the general corrosion of all individual coupons exposed in the vapor phase above Reference Fuel C and CE20a as well as all coupons immersed in Reference Fuel C was essentially nil (<0.3 {micro}m/y), with no evidence of localized corrosion such as pitting/crevice corrosion or selective leaching at any location. Modest discoloration was observed on the copper-based alloys (cartridge brass and phosphor bronze), but the associated corrosion films were quite thin and apparently protective. For coupons immersed in CE20a, four different materials exhibited net weight loss over the entire course of the experiment: cartridge brass, phosphor bronze, galvanized steel, and terne-plated steel. None of these exhibited substantial incompatibility with the test fluid, with the largest general corrosion rate calculated from coupon weight loss to be approximately 4 {micro}m/y for the cartridge brass specimens. Selective leaching of zinc (from brass) and tin (from bronze) was observed, as well as the presence of sulfide surface films rich in these elements, suggesting the importance of the role of sulfuric acid in the CE20a formulation. Analysis of weight loss data for the slightly corroded metals indicated that the corrosivity of the test environment decreased with exposure time for brass and bronze and increased for galvanized and terne-plated steel. Other materials immersed in CE20a - type 1020 mild steel, type 1100 aluminum, type 201 nickel, and type 304 stainless steel - each appeared essentially immune to corrosion at the test conditions.

Pawel, Steven J [ORNL; Kass, Michael D [ORNL; Janke, Christopher James [ORNL

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

25. Steenbock symposium -- Biosynthesis and function of metal clusters for enzymes: Proceedings  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This symposium was held June 10--14, 1997 in Madison, Wisconsin. The purpose of this conference was to provide a multidisciplinary forum for exchange of state-of-the-art information on biochemistry of enzymes that have an affinity for metal clusters. Attention is focused on the following: metal clusters involved in energy conservation and remediation; tungsten, molybdenum, and cobalt-containing enzymes; Fe proteins, and Mo-binding proteins; nickel enzymes; and nitrogenase.

NONE

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

279

National Low-Level Waste Management Program Radionuclide Report Series. Volume 10, Nickel-63  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report outlines the basic radiological, chemical, and physical characteristics of nickel-63 ({sup 63}Ni) and examines how these characteristics affect the behavior of {sup 63}Ni in various environmental media, such as soils, groundwater, plants, animals, the atmosphere, and the human body. Discussions also include methods of {sup 63}Ni production, waste types, and waste forms that contain {sup 63}Ni. The primary source of {sup 63}Ni in the environment has been low-level radioactive waste material generated as a result of neutron activation of stable {sup 62}Ni that is present in the structural components of nuclear reactor vessels. {sup 63}Ni enters the environment from the dismantling activities associated with nuclear reactor decommissioning. However, small amounts of {sup 63}Ni have been detected in the environment following the testing of thermonuclear weapons in the South Pacific. Concentrations as high as 2.7 Bq{sup a} per gram of sample (or equivalently 0.0022 parts per billion) were observed on Bikini Atoll (May 1954). {sup 63}Ni was not created as a fission product species (e.g., from {sup 235}U or {sup 239}Pu fissions), but instead was produced as a result of neutron capture in {sup 63}Ni, a common nickel isotope present in the stainless steel components of nuclear weapons (e.g., stainless-304 contains {approximately}9% total Ni or {approximately}0.3% {sup 63}Ni).

Carboneau, M.L.; Adams, J.P.

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Research, development, and demonstration of nickel-zinc batteries for electric-vehicle propulsion. Annual report for 1980  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Progress in work at Exide in three main development areas, i.e., battery design and development, nickel cathode study, and electrochemical studies is reported. Battery design and development concentrated on the optimization of design parameters, including electrode spacing, charging methods, electrolyte concentration, the design and fabrication of prototype cells and modules, and testing to verify these parameters. Initial experiments indicated that an interelectrode spacing of 2.5 mm was optimum when normal (D.C.) charging is used. It was during these experiments that a high rate charging technique was developed to deposit a dense active zinc which did not shed during vibration. A 4 cell - 300 Ah experimental module was built and sent to NBTL for testing. Initial testing on this module and a 300 Ah cell are reported. Experiments on electrolyte concentration indicate that higher concentrations of KOH (8M, 9M or 10M) are beneficial to capacity maintenance. Available nickel cathodes were evaluated for possible use in the VIBROCEL. These included pocket, sintered plaque impregnated, nickel plated steel wool impregnated, plastic bonded and CMG (multifoil) electrodes. These electrodes have Coulombic densities ranging from 70 Ah/Kg for pocket plates to 190 Ah/Kg for CMG electrodes. Detailed test data are presented for each type including rate capability, effect of zincate on performance, and capacity maintenance with cycling. Work on zinc deposition emphasized the special charging technique. This is a deposition using special waveforms of charging current, to deposit dense crystalline zinc on the anode substrate.

Not Available

1981-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "type nickel metal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Research, development, and demonstration of nickel-zinc batteries for electric-vehicle propulsion. Annual report for 1981  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Progress is reported on battery design and development, nickel cathode development, and electrochemical studies. (WHK)

Not Available

1982-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Research, development, and demonstration of nickel-iron batteries for electric vehicle propulsion. Annual report for 1980  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The FY 1980 program continued to involve full-size, prototype cell, module and battery fabrication and evaluation, aimed at advancing the technical capabilities of the nickel-iron battery, while simultaneously reducing its potential cost in materials and process areas. Improved Electroprecipitation Process (EPP) nickel electrodes of design thickness (2.5 mm) are now being prepared that display stable capacities of 23 to 25 Ah for the C/3 drain rate at 200+ test cycles. Iron electrodes of the composite-type are delivering 24 Ah at the target thickness (1.0 mm). Iron electrodes are displaying capacity stability for > 1000 test cycles in continuing 3 plate cell tests. Finished cells have delivered 57 to 61 Wh/kg at C/3, and have demonstrated cyclic stability to 500+ cycles at 80% depth of discharge profiles at Westinghouse. A 6-cell module that demonstrated 239 Ah, 1735 Wh, 48 Wh/kg at the C/3 drain rate has also been evaluated at the National Battery Test Laboratory, ANL. It operated for 327 test cycles, to a level of 161 Ah at the C/3 rate, before being removed from test. Reduction in nickel electrode swelling (and concurrent stack starvation), to improve cycling, continues to be an area of major effort to reach the final battery cycle life objectives. Pasted nickel electrodes continue to show promise for meeting the life objectives while, simultaneously, providing a low manufacturing cost. Refinements have occurred in the areas of cell hardware, module manifolding and cell interconnections. These improvements have been incorporated into the construction and testing of the cells and modules for this program. Temperature tests at 0/sup 0/C were performed on a 6-cell module and showed a decrease in capacity of only 25% in Ah and .29% in Wh as compared to 25/sup 0/C performance. Additional tests are planned to demonstrate performance at -15/sup 0/C and 40/sup 0/C.

Not Available

1981-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

Crack growth rates of nickel alloy welds in a PWR environment.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In light water reactors (LWRs), vessel internal components made of nickel-base alloys are susceptible to environmentally assisted cracking. A better understanding of the causes and mechanisms of this cracking may permit less conservative estimates of damage accumulation and requirements on inspection intervals. A program is being conducted at Argonne National Laboratory to evaluate the resistance of Ni alloys and their welds to environmentally assisted cracking in simulated LWR coolant environments. This report presents crack growth rate (CGR) results for Alloy 182 shielded-metal-arc weld metal in a simulated pressurized water reactor (PWR) environment at 320 C. Crack growth tests were conducted on 1-T compact tension specimens with different weld orientations from both double-J and deep-groove welds. The results indicate little or no environmental enhancement of fatigue CGRs of Alloy 182 weld metal in the PWR environment. The CGRs of Alloy 182 in the PWR environment are a factor of {approx}5 higher than those of Alloy 600 in air under the same loading conditions. The stress corrosion cracking for the Alloy 182 weld is close to the average behavior of Alloy 600 in the PWR environment. The weld orientation was found to have a profound effect on the magnitude of crack growth: cracking was found to propagate faster along the dendrites than across them. The existing CGR data for Ni-alloy weld metals have been compiled and evaluated to establish the effects of key material, loading, and environmental parameters on CGRs in PWR environments. The results from the present study are compared with the existing CGR data for Ni-alloy welds to determine the relative susceptibility of the specific Ni-alloy weld to environmentally enhanced cracking.

Alexandreanu, B.; Chopra, O. K.; Shack, W. J.; Energy Technology

2006-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

284

Molten salt extraction process for the recovery of valued transition metals from land-based and deep-sea minerals  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process for extracting transition metals and particularly cobalt and manganese together with iron, copper and nickel from low grade ores (including ocean-floor nodules) by converting the metal oxides or other compositions to chlorides in a molten salt, and subsequently using a combination of selective distillation at temperatures below about 500/degree/C, electrolysis at a voltage not more negative that about /minus/1.5 volt versus Ag/AgCl, and precipitation to separate the desired manganese and cobalt salts from other metals and provide cobalt and manganese in metallic forms or compositions from which these metals may be more easily recovered.

Maroni, V.A.; von Winbush, S.

1987-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Discovery of Chromium, Manganese, Nickel, and Copper Isotopes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Twenty-seven chromium, twenty-five manganese, thirty-one nickel and twenty-six copper isotopes have so far been observed and the discovery of these isotopes is discussed. For each isotope a brief synopsis of the first refereed publication, including the production and identification method, is presented.

K. Garofali; R. Robinson; M. Thoennessen

2010-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

286

Dynamics, Brandom-Style Bernhard Nickel Harvard University  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Dynamics, Brandom-Style Bernhard Nickel · Harvard University June 26, 2011 Abstract This paper understood as a special version of dynamic semantics, so that these semantics by themselves offer and motivations. Keywords static semantics · dynamic semantics · incompatibility se- mantics · brandom · norms

Nickel, Bernhard

287

Pollution prevention and waste minimization in metal finishing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study was done to identify pollution prevention and waste minimization opportunities in the general plating department and the printed circuit board processing department. Recommendations for certain recycle and recovery technologies were mad in order to reduce usage of acids and the volume of heavy metal sludge that is formed at the industrial Wastewater Pretreatment Facility (IWPF). Some of these technologies discussed were acid purification, electrowinning, and ion exchange. Specific technologies are prescribed for specific processes. Those plating processes where the metals can be recovered are copper, nickel, gold, cadmium, tin, lead, and rhodium.

Stimetz, C.J.

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Nickel-Specific Response in the Transcriptional Regulator, 'Escherichia Coli'NikR  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Studies of the transcriptional repression of the Ni-specific permease encoded by the Pnik operon by Escherichia coli NikR using a LacZ reporter assay establish that the NikR response is specific to nickel in vivo. Toward understanding this metal ion-specific response, X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) analysis of various M-NikR complexes (M = Co(II), Ni(II), Cu(II), Cu(I), and Zn(II)) was used to show that each high-affinity binding site metal adopts a unique structure, with Ni(II) and Cu(II) being the only two metal ions to feature planar four-coordinate complexes. The results are consistent with an allosteric mechanism whereby the geometry and ligand selection of the metal present in the high-affinity site induce a unique conformation in NikR that subsequently influences DNA binding. The influence of the high-affinity metal on protein structure was examined using hydrogen/deuterium (H/D) exchange detected by liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (LC-ESI-MS). Each NikR complex gives rise to differing amounts of H/D exchange; Zn(II)- and Co(II)-NikR are most like apo-NikR, while the exchange time course is substantially different for Ni(II) and to a lesser extent for Cu(II). In addition to the high-affinity metal binding site, E. coli NikR has a low-affinity metal-binding site that affects DNA binding affinity. We have characterized this low-affinity site using XAS in heterobimetallic complexes of NikR. When Cu(II) occupies the high-affinity site and Ni(II) occupies the low-affinity site, the Ni K-edge XAS spectra show that the Ni site is composed of six N/O-donors. A similar low-affinity site structure is found for the NikR complex when Co(II) occupies the low-affinity site and Ni(II) occupies the high-affinity site, except that one of the Co(II) ligands is a chloride derived from the buffer.

Leitch, S.; Bradley, M.J.; Rowe, J.L.; Chivers, P.T.; Maroney, M.J.; /Massachusetts U., Amherst /Washington U., St. Louis

2007-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

289

Nickel-Specific Response in the Transcriptional Regulator, Escherichia coli NikR  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Studies of the transcriptional repression of the Ni-specific permease encoded by the P{sub nik} operon by Escherichia coli NikR using a LacZ reporter assay establish that the NikR response is specific to nickel in vivo. Toward understanding this metal ion-specific response, X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) analysis of various M-NikR complexes (M = Co(II), Ni(II), Cu(II), Cu(I), and Zn(II)) was used to show that each high-affinity binding site metal adopts a unique structure, with Ni(II) and Cu(II) being the only two metal ions to feature planar four-coordinate complexes. The results are consistent with an allosteric mechanism whereby the geometry and ligand selection of the metal present in the high-affinity site induce a unique conformation in NikR that subsequently influences DNA binding. The influence of the high-affinity metal on protein structure was examined using hydrogen/deuterium (H/D) exchange detected by liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (LC-ESI-MS). Each NikR complex gives rise to differing amounts of H/D exchange; Zn(II)- and Co(II)-NikR are most like apo-NikR, while the exchange time course is substantially different for Ni(II) and to a lesser extent for Cu(II). In addition to the high-affinity metal binding site, E. coli NikR has a low-affinity metal-binding site that affects DNA binding affinity. We have characterized this low-affinity site using XAS in heterobimetallic complexes of NikR. When Cu(II) occupies the high-affinity site and Ni(II) occupies the low-affinity site, the Ni K-edge XAS spectra show that the Ni site is composed of six N/O-donors. A similar low-affinity site structure is found for the NikR complex when Co(II) occupies the low-affinity site and Ni(II) occupies the high-affinity site, except that one of the Co(II) ligands is a chloride derived from the buffer.

Leitch,S.; Bradley, M.; Rowe, J.; Chivers, P.; Maroney, M.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Effects of Additive Elements on the Phase Formation and Morphological Stability of Nickel Monosilicide Films  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Alloying elements can substantially affect the formation and morphological stability of nickel monosilicide. A comprehensive study of phase formation was performed on 24 Ni alloys with varying concentrations of alloying elements. Silicide films have been used for more than 15 years to contact the source, drain and gate of state-of-the-art complementary-metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) devices. In the past, the addition of alloying elements was shown to improve the transformation from the high resistivity C49 to the low resistivity C54-TiSi{sub 2} phase and to allow for the control of surface and interface roughness of CoSi{sub 2} films as well as produce significant improvements with respect to agglomeration of the films. Using simultaneous time-resolved X-ray diffraction (XRD), resistance and light scattering measurements, we follow the formation of the silicide phases in real time during rapid thermal annealing. Additions to the Ni-Si system lead to modifications in the phase formation sequence at low temperatures (metal-rich phases), to variations in the formation temperatures of NiSi and NiSi{sub 2}, and to changes in the agglomeration behavior of the films formed. Of the 24 elements studied, additions of Mo, Re, Ta and W are amongst the most efficient to retard agglomeration while elements such as Pd, Pt and Rh are most efficient to retard the formation of NiSi{sub 2}.

Lavoie,C.; Detavernier, C.; Cabral, Jr. , C.; d'Heurle, F.; Kellock, A.; Jordan-Sweet, J.; Harper, J.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

CHARACTERIZATION OF THE STRUCTURE AND REACTIVITY OF A NICKEL(II)-TRIPEPTIDE MIMIC OF NICKEL SUPEROXIDE DISMUTASE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. However, prior to this work, the structure and chemical reactivity of the nickel-peptide complex were undefined. The work presented herein involves structural and reactivity investigations of the MAP-tag bound with NiII in the dianionic complex [Ni-NCC]2...

Glass, Amanda M.

2012-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

292

Metal oxide films on metal  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A structure including a thin film of a conductive alkaline earth metal oxide selected from the group consisting of strontium ruthenium trioxide, calcium ruthenium trioxide, barium ruthenium trioxide, lanthanum-strontium cobalt oxide or mixed alkaline earth ruthenium trioxides thereof upon a thin film of a noble metal such as platinum is provided.

Wu, Xin D. (Los Alamos, NM); Tiwari, Prabhat (Los Alamos, NM)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Positive electrode current collector for liquid metal cells  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A current collector for the positive electrode of an electrochemical cell with a positive electrode including a sulfide. The cell also has a negative electrode and a molten salt electrolyte including halides of a metal selected from the alkali metals and the alkaline earth metals in contact with both the positive and negative electrodes. The current collector has a base metal of copper, silver, gold, aluminum or alloys thereof with a coating thereon of iron, nickel, chromium or alloys thereof. The current collector when subjected to cell voltage forms a sulfur-containing compound on the surface thereby substantially protecting the current collector from further attack by sulfur ions during cell operation. Both electroless and electrolytic processes may be used to deposit coatings.

Shimotake, Hiroshi (Hinsdale, IL); Bartholme, Louis G. (Joliet, IL)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

Positive-electrode current collector for liquid-metal cells  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A current collector for the positive electrode of an electrochemical cell with a positive electrode including a sulfide. The cell also has a negative electrode and a molten salt electrolyte including halides of a metal selected from the alkali metals and the alkaline earth metals in contact with both the positive and negative electrodes. The current collector has a base metal of copper, silver, gold, aluminum or alloys thereof with a coating thereon of iron, nickel, chromium or alloys thereof. The current collector when subjected to cell voltage forms a sulfur-containing compound on the surface thereby substantially protecting the current collector from further attack by sulfur ions during cell operation. Both electroless and electrolytic processes may be used to deposit coatings.

Shimotake, H.; Bartholme, L.G.

1982-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

295

PLUTONIUM METALLIC FUELS FOR FAST REACTORS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Early interest in metallic plutonium fuels for fast reactors led to much research on plutonium alloy systems including binary solid solutions with the addition of aluminum, gallium, or zirconium and low-melting eutectic alloys with iron and nickel or cobalt. There was also interest in ternaries of these elements with plutonium and cerium. The solid solution and eutectic alloys have most unusual properties, including negative thermal expansion in some solid-solution alloys and the highest viscosity known for liquid metals in the Pu-Fe system. Although metallic fuels have many potential advantages over ceramic fuels, the early attempts were unsuccessful because these fuels suffered from high swelling rates during burn up and high smearing densities. The liquid metal fuels experienced excessive corrosion. Subsequent work on higher-melting U-PuZr metallic fuels was much more promising. In light of the recent rebirth of interest in fast reactors, we review some of the key properties of the early fuels and discuss the challenges presented by the ternary alloys.

STAN, MARIUS [Los Alamos National Laboratory; HECKER, SIEGFRIED S. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2007-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

296

Draft Genome Sequence for Microbacterium laevaniformans Strain OR221, a Bacterium Tolerant to Metals, Nitrate, and Low pH  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Microbacterium laevaniformans strain OR221 was isolated from subsurface sediments obtained from the Field Research Center (FRC) in Oak Ridge, TN. It was characterized as a bacterium tolerant to heavy metals such as uranium, nickel, cobalt, cadmium, as well as nitrate and low pH. We present its draft genome sequence.

Brown, Steven D [ORNL; Palumbo, Anthony Vito [ORNL; Panikov, Nikolai [ORNL; Ariyawansa, Thilini [Northeastern University; Klingeman, Dawn Marie [ORNL; Johnson, Courtney M [ORNL; Land, Miriam L [ORNL; Utturkar, Sagar M [ORNL; Epstein, Slava [Northeastern University

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Metals 2000  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This strategic planning exercise identified and characterized new and emerging advanced metallic technologies in the context of the drastic changes in global politics and decreasing fiscal resources. In consideration of a hierarchy of technology thrusts stated by various Department of Defense (DOD) spokesmen, and the need to find new and creative ways to acquire and organize programs within an evolving Wright Laboratory, five major candidate programs identified are: C-17 Flap, Transport Fuselage, Mach 5 Aircraft, 4.Fighter Structures, and 5. Missile Structures. These results were formed by extensive discussion with selected major contractors and other experts, and a survey of advanced metallic structure materials. Candidate structural applications with detailed metal structure descriptions bracket a wide variety of uses which warrant consideration for the suggested programs. An analysis on implementing smart skins and structures concepts is given from a metal structures perspective.

Allison, S.W.; Rogers, L.C.; Slaughter, G. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Boensch, F.D. [6025 Oak Hill Lane, Centerville, OH (United States); Claus, R.O.; de Vries, M. [Virginia Polytechnic Inst. and State Univ., Blacksburg, VA (United States)

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

A Synthetic Nickel Electrocatalyst With a Turnover Frequency Above 100,000 s-1 for H2 Production  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Increased worldwide energy demand will require greater use of carbon-neutral sustainable energy sources. The intermittent nature of solar and wind power requires storage of energy, so electrocatalysts that convert electrical energy to chemical bonds in fuels are needed. Platinum is an excellent catalyst, but it is of low abundance and high cost. Hydrogenase enzymes in Nature catalyze the evolution of H2 and use earth-abundant metals such as nickel and iron. We report that a synthetic nickel catalyst, [Ni(7PPh2NPh)2](BF4)2, (7PPh2NPh = 1,3,6-triphenyl-1-aza-3,6-diphosphacycloheptane) catalyzes the production of H2 using [(DMF)H]+OTf as the proton source, with turnover frequencies of 31,000 s-1 in dry acetonitrile and 108,000 s-1 in the presence of H2O (1.2 M), at a potential of -1.13 V (vs. the ferrocenium/ferrocene couple). These turnover frequencies exceed those reported for the [FeFe] hydrogenase enzyme by more than an order of magnitude, and are the fastest reported for any molecular catalyst for H2 production. This material is based upon work supported as part of the Center for Molecular Electrocatalysis, an Energy Frontier Research Center funded by the US Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences.

Helm, Monte L.; Stewart, Michael P.; Bullock, R. Morris; Rakowski DuBois, Mary; DuBois, Daniel L.

2011-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

299

Dendritic metal nanostructures  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Dendritic metal nanostructures made using a surfactant structure template, a metal salt, and electron donor species.

Shelnutt, John A. (Tijeras, NM); Song, Yujiang (Albuquerque, NM); Pereira, Eulalia F. (Vila Nova de Gaia, PT); Medforth, Craig J. (Winters, CA)

2010-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

300

Electrodeposition of amorphous ternary nickel-chromium-phosphorus alloy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This patent describes a method of forming amorphous ternary nickel-phosphorus-chromium alloy deposits by electrodeposition on an electrically conductive substrate. It comprises: subjecting the substrate to an applied current density between about 20 and 40 A/dm{sup 2} at a temperature from the range of about 20{degrees} to 30{degrees}C in a bath. The bath comprising: a chromium salt and a nickel salt in a weight ratio of about 3:1, a phosphorus source at about 0.3 MP concentration; about 0.3 M of a complexing agent; about 0.1 M of a supporting salt; and about 1.0 M of buffer.

Guilinger, T.R.

1990-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "type nickel metal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Improvement in electrochromic stability of electrodeposited nickel hydroxide thin film  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The electrochromic nickel hydroxide thin film was anodically deposited from an aqueous solution. The effect of solution temperature, postheat-treatment temperature, and addition of cadmium on the electrochromic behavior (color/bleach durability cycle, response time, and coloration efficiency of the nickel hydroxide films in NaOH) were investigated. A significant increase in the color/bleach durability cycle from 500 (for the as-deposited film) to more than 5000 cycles (for the heat-treated film) was observed. The addition of cadmium increased the utilization of the active materials. It was found that the coloration efficiency was 40 cm{sup 2}/C and coloration and bleaching response time were 20 to 30 s and 8 to 10 s, respectively. The change in the electrochromic properties with heat-treatment temperature is discussed based on the physical and electrochemical analysis.

Natarajan, C.; Matsumoto, H.; Nogami, G. [Kyushu Inst. of Tech., Kitakyushu (Japan). Dept. of Electrical Engineering

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Sulfur poisoning of H/sub 2/ and CO adsorption on supported nickel  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

New and previously published adsorption data for hydrogen and carbon monoxide on various fresh and presulfided nickel/alumina catalysts showed that at 298/sup 0/K, the fractional hydrogen uptake decreased linearly with sulfur coverage; that irreversible adsorption of carbon monoxide was higher on sulfided than on fresh catalysts at 190/sup 0/, 273/sup 0/, and 300/sup 0/K, probably as a result of nickel tetracarbonyl formation; and that substantial amounts of nickel tetracarbonyl were formed in the gas phase in the presence of sulfided catalysts, which caused significant loss of nickel. The formation of the nickel tetracarbonyl probably proceeded via stable subcarbonyl species. At carbon monoxide pressures of < 1 mm Hg, no carbon monoxide absorbed at room temperature, but at methanation temperature (473/sup 0/-673/sup 0/K), dissociative adsorption did take place. Chemisorption of carbon monoxide therefore, cannot be used to measure nickel dispersion on used catalysts.

Bartholomew, C.H.; Pannell, R.B.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Process for the electrodeposition of low stress nickel-manganese alloys  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A process for electrodepositing a low stress nickel-manganese multilayer alloy on an electrically conductive substrate is provided. The process includes the steps of immersing the substrate in an electrodeposition solution containing a nickel salt and a manganese salt and repeatedly passing an electric current through an immersed surface of the substrate. The electric current is alternately pulsed for predetermined durations between a first electrical current that is effective to electrodeposit nickel and a second electrical current that is effective to electrodeposit nickel and manganese. A multilayered alloy having adjacent layers of nickel and a nickel-manganese alloy on the immersed surface of the substrate is thereby produced. The resulting multilayered alloy exhibits low internal stress, high strength and ductility, and high strength retention upon exposure to heat.

Kelly, James John; Goods, Steven Howard; Yang, Nancy Yuan-Chi; Cadden, Charles Henry

2005-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

304

Non-stoichiometric AB5 alloys for metal hydride electrodes  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention provides a non-stoichiometric alloy comprising a composition having the formula AB.sub.5+X an atomic ratio wherein A is selected from the group consisting of the rare earth metals, yttrium, mischmetal, or a combination thereof; B is nickel and tin, or nickel and tin and at least a third element selected from the group consisting of the elements in group IVA of the periodic table, aluminum, manganese, iron, cobalt, copper, antimony or a combination thereof; X is greater than 0 and less than or equal to about 2.0; and wherein at least one substituted A site is occupied by at least one of the B elements. An electrode incorporating said alloy and an electrochemical cell incorporating said electrode are also described.

Reilly, James J. (Bellport, NY); Adzic, Gordana D. (Setauket, NY); Johnson, John R. (Calverton, NY); Vogt, Thomas (Cold Spring Harbor, NY); McBreen, James (Bellport, NY)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

The Surface Morphology Characterization of Electroless Nickel Immersion Gold Under Bump Metallurgy (UBM) Using SEM  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper presents the surface morphology characterization at each process step in electroless nickel immersion gold (ENIG) deposition using Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM). The characterization start at initial bond pad, followed by cleaning, activation, first zincation, zinc removal, second zincation, electroless nickel and lastly immersion gold process. The result shows that the surface morphology of initial bond pad starts to change with deposition of zinc layer and further changes with deposition of nickel and gold layer.

Arshad, M. K. Md; Isa, M. N. Md; Sohiful, Z. M. A. [School of Microelectronic, Kolej Universiti Kejuruteraan Utara Malaysia (KUKUM), Blok A, Kompleks Pusat Pengajian KUKUM, Jalan Kangar-Arau, 02600 Jejawi, Perlis (Malaysia)

2007-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

306

CHEMICAL WASTE RECYCLING PROGRAM All types of batteries are collected by Chemical Waste Services (CWS) for recycling. These include  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Services (CWS) for recycling. These include alkaline, lithium, rechargeable, coin batteries, lead-cadmium (ni-cads), nickel metal hydride, lithium, etc. They are individually bagged and placed phones, drills, computers, cameras, PDAs, toys and games. It is also used as a corrosion resistant

Baker, Chris I.

307

Polymer quenched prealloyed metal powder  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A powder metallurgical process of preparing a sheet from a powder having an intermetallic alloy composition such as an iron, nickel or titanium aluminide. The sheet can be manufactured into electrical resistance heating elements having improved room temperature ductility, electrical resistivity, cyclic fatigue resistance, high temperature oxidation resistance, low and high temperature strength, and/or resistance to high temperature sagging. The iron aluminide has an entirely ferritic microstructure which is free of austenite and can include, in weight %, 4 to 32% Al, and optional additions such as .ltoreq.1% Cr, .gtoreq.0.05% Zr .ltoreq.2% Ti, .ltoreq.2% Mo, .ltoreq.1% Ni, .ltoreq.0.75% C, .ltoreq.0.1% B, .ltoreq.1% submicron oxide particles and/or electrically insulating or electrically conductive covalent ceramic particles, .ltoreq.1% rare earth metal, and/or .ltoreq.3 % Cu. The process includes forming a non-densified metal sheet by consolidating a powder having an intermetallic alloy composition such as by roll compaction, tape casting or plasma spraying, forming a cold rolled sheet by cold rolling the non-densified metal sheet so as to increase the density and reduce the thickness thereof and annealing the cold rolled sheet. The powder can be a water, polymer or gas atomized powder which is subjecting to sieving and/or blending with a binder prior to the consolidation step. After the consolidation step, the sheet can be partially sintered. The cold rolling and/or annealing steps can be repeated to achieve the desired sheet thickness and properties. The annealing can be carried out in a vacuum furnace with a vacuum or inert atmosphere. During final annealing, the cold rolled sheet recrystallizes to an average grain size of about 10 to 30 .mu.m. Final stress relief annealing can be carried out in the B2 phase temperature range.

Hajaligol, Mohammad R. (Midlothian, VA); Fleischhauer, Grier (Midlothian, VA); German, Randall M. (State College, PA)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Mixed ionic and electronic conducting electrode studies for an alkali metal thermal to electric converter  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This research focuses on preparation, kinetics, and performance studies of mixed ionic and electronic conducting electrodes (MIEE) applied in an alkali metal thermal to electric converter (AMTEC). Two types of MIEE, metal/sodium titanate and metal...

Guo, Yuyan

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

309

Determining the Heavy Metal Pollution in Mascara (Algeria) by Using Casuarina equisetifolia  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Abstract. In this study, Casuarina equisetifolia needles were evaluated as the possible biomonitors of heavy metal air pollution in Mascara (Algeria). The needles were sampled from seven locations with different degrees of metal pollution (near roads) and from a control site. The concentrations of lead, zinc, copper and nickel were measured by using a flame atomic absorption spectrophotometer. The maximal values of these four metals were found in the samples collected near the roads and the minimal values were found in the control site. Furthermore, sites with high traffic density and frequency of cars stoppage showed high heavy metal concentrations. However, the comparison of concentrations of all metals showed that the zinc one had the highest concentration of all. The cluster analysis divided the selected sampling sites in three distinct clusters. With regard to the results of this study, Casuarina equisetifolia can be successfully applied in biomonitoring of air pollution. Key words: Casuarina equisetifolia, Mascara, biomonitors, pollution, heavy metals.

Lakhdari Aissa; Benabdeli Kéloufi

310

Lead, Uranium, and Nickel Compound Data from the XAFS Library at the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory (SSRL)  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

The x-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (XAFS) library at the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory is intended to be a reference library of XAFS spectra for various lead, uranium, and nickel compounds. Compounds are organized by central atom and all spectra are transmission data. Molecular Environmental Science (MES) research at SSRL focuses on the fundamental interfacial, molecular- and nano-scale processes that control contaminant and nutrient cycling in the biosphere with the goal of elucidating global elemental cycles and anthropogenic influences on the environment. Key areas of investigation include the: (a) Structural chemistry of water and dissolved solutes, (b) Structural chemistry and reactivity of complex natural environmental materials with respect to heavy metals and metalloids (biominerals, Fe- and Mn-oxides, biofilms, and organic materials), (c) Reactions at environmental interfaces, including sorption, precipitation and dissolution processes that affect the bioavailability of heavy metals and other contaminants, and (d) Microbial transformations of metals and anions. SSRL-based MES research utilizes synchrotron-based x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS), x-ray diffraction (XRD), small-angle x-ray scattering (SAXS), x-ray standing wave (XSW) spectroscopy, and photoemission spectroscopy (PES) because of their unique capabilities to probe structure/composition relationships in complex, non-crystalline, and dilute materials. [copied from http://www-ssrl.slac.stanford.edu/mes/index.html

311

Slow positron annihilation spectroscopy and electron microscopy of electron beam evaporated cobalt and nickel silicides  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Metal silicide thin films on single-crystal silicon substrates are the subject of much research, due to their applications as electrical contacts and interconnects, diffusion barriers, low resistance gates, and field-assisted positron moderators, among others. Defects within the silicide layer and/or at the silicide/silicon interface are detrimental to device performance, since they can act as traps for charge carriers, as well as positrons. Pinholes penetrating the film are another detriment particularly for cobalt silicide films, since they allow electrons to permeate the film, rather than travel ballistically, in addition to greatly increasing surface area for recombination events. A series of epitaxial cobalt and nickel silicide thin films, deposited via electron-beam evaporation and annealed at various temperatures, have been grown on single-crystal silicon (111) substrates, in an effort to establish a relationship between deposition and processing parameters and film quality. The films have been analyzed by transmission and scanning electron microscopy, sputter depth profile Auger, and slow positron annihilation spectroscopy. The latter has been shown to both correlate and complement the traditional electron microscopy results.

Frost, R.L.; DeWald, A.B. (Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, Georgia 30332 (USA)); Zaluzec, M.; Rigsbee, J.M. (University of Illinois, Urbana, Illinois 61801 (USA)); Nielsen, B.; Lynn, K.G. (Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York 11973 (USA))

1990-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Nickel-catalyzed asymmetric cross-couplings of secondary allylic chlorides and planar-chiral compounds in asymmetric synthesis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In Part I, nickel-catalyzed asymmetric carbon-carbon bond-forming reactions are described. A nickel/Pybox system effectively catalyzes regio- and enantioselective cross-couplings between racemic secondary allylic chlorides ...

Son, Sunghee

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Nickel-catalyzed reductive coupling reactions of 1,6-enynes and the total synthesis of (+)-acutiphycin  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Nickel-Catalyzed Reductive Coupling Reactions of Aldehydes and Chiral 1,6-Enynes. A study of nickel-catalyzed reductive coupling reactions of aldehydes and chiral 1,6-enynes has provided evidence for stereospecific ligand ...

Moslin, Ryan Thomas McLeod

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Decontamination and Conversion of Nickel Radioactive Scrap Metal. Innovative Technology Summary Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document contains information on the above-mentioned technology, including description, applicability, cost, and performance data.

NONE

2001-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Improving nickel metal hydride batteries through research in negative electrode corrosion control and novel electrode materials  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

electrode materials. In order to fully understand the processes involved in the corrosion study, tests were carried at Brookhaven National Laboratory using X-ray Absorption Near Edge Spectroscopy. These tests showed that Zn prevented the corrosion of Ni-a...

Alexander, Michael Scott

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Method Of Charging Maintenance-Free Nickel Metal Hydride Storage Cells  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method of charging an industrial maintenance-free Ni-MH storage cell, the method comprising in combination a first stage at a constant current I.sub.1 lying in the range I.sub.c /10 to I.sub.c /2, and a second stage at a constant current I.sub.2 lying in the range I.sub.c /50 to I.sub.c /10, the changeover from the first stage to the second stage taking place when the time derivative of the temperature reaches a threshold value which varies as a function of the temperature at the time of the changeover.

Berlureau, Thierry (Bordeaux, FR); Liska, Jean-Louis (Bordeaux, FR)

1999-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

317

COORDINATION CHEMISTRY OF METAL SURFACES AND METAL COMPLEXES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

probable orientation of acetonitrile molecules bound to atwo isomeric molecules, acetonitrile and methyl isocyanide,of methyl isocyanide to acetonitrile within these nickel

Muetterties, E.L.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Trending: Metal Oxo Bonds  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

including materials science, chemistry, and biology. Highly covalent metal-oxygen multiple bonds (metal oxos) are the building blocks of metal oxides and have a bearing...

319

Composite metal membrane  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A composite metal membrane including a first metal layer of Group IVB met or Group VB metals, the first metal layer sandwiched between two layers of an oriented metal of palladium, platinum or alloys thereof is provided together with a process for the recovery of hydrogen from a gaseous mixture including contacting a hydrogen-containing gaseous mixture with a first side of a nonporous composite metal membrane including a first metal of Group IVB metals or Group VB metals, the first metal layer sandwiched between two layers of an oriented metal of palladium, platinum or alloys thereof, and, separating hydrogen from a second side of the nonporous composite metal membrane.

Peachey, Nathaniel M. (Espanola, NM); Dye, Robert C. (Los Alamos, NM); Snow, Ronny C. (Los Alamos, NM); Birdsell, Stephan A. (Los Alamos, NM)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

Composite metal membrane  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A composite metal membrane including a first metal layer of Group IVB met or Group VB metals, the first metal layer sandwiched between two layers of an oriented metal of palladium, platinum or alloys thereof is provided together with a process for the recovery of hydrogen from a gaseous mixture including contacting a hydrogen-containing gaseous mixture with a first side of a nonporous composite metal membrane including a first metal of Group IVB metals or Group VB metals, the first metal layer sandwiched between two layers of an oriented metal of palladium, platinum or alloys thereof, and, separating hydrogen from a second side of the nonporous composite metal membrane.

Peachey, N.M.; Dye, R.C.; Snow, R.C.; Birdsell, S.A.

1998-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "type nickel metal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Carbon migration in 5Cr-0.5Mo/21Cr-12Ni dissimilar metal welds  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The carbon migration between a ferritic steel and an austenitic steel was studied in submerged arc-welded 5Cr-0.5Mo/21Cr-12Ni dissimilar metal welds (DMWs) after aging at 500 C for various times and after long-term service in technical practice. The distribution of carbon, chromium, nickel, and iron in the areas around the weld interface was determined by electron probe microanalysis, and the microstructural aspect in the carbon-depleted/enriched zone was characterized by optical microscopy and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Furthermore, the precipitation sequences and composition characteristics of the carbides were identified by diffraction pattern microanalysis and energy-dispersive X-ray (EDX) microanalysis. It was found (1) that there exists a coherent relationship between intracrystalline M{sub 23}C{sub 6} and the austenitic matrix; (2) that the composition of M{sub 23}C{sub 6} in the carbon-enriched zone is independent of the duration of aging and service; (3) that the maximum carbon concentration is determined by the carbide type, the composition characteristic of precipitated carbides, and the concentration of carbide-forming Cr adjacent to the weld interface in the carbon-enriched zone; and (4) that the carbon migration in the 5Cr-0.5Mo/21Cr-12Ni DMWs can be described by a diffusion model.

Huang, M.L.; Wang, L. [Dalian Univ. of Technology (China). Dept. of Materials Engineering

1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

DIRECT DECOMPOSITION OF METHANE TO HYDROGEN ON METAL LOADED ZEOLITE CATALYST  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The manufacture of hydrogen from natural gas is essential for the production of ultra clean transportation fuels. Not only is hydrogen necessary to upgrade low quality crude oils to high-quality, low sulfur ultra clean transportation fuels, hydrogen could eventually replace gasoline and diesel as the ultra clean transportation fuel of the future. Currently, refinery hydrogen is produced through the steam reforming of natural gas. Although efficient, the process is responsible for a significant portion of refinery CO2 emissions. This project is examining the direct catalytic decomposition of methane as an alternative to steam reforming. The energy required to produce one mole of hydrogen is slightly lower and the process does not require water-gas-shift or pressure-swing adsorption units. The decomposition process does not produce CO2 emissions and the product is not contaminated with CO -- a poison for PEM fuel cells. In this work we examined the direct catalytic decomposition of methane over a metal modified zeolite catalyst and the recovery of catalyst activity by calcination. A favorable production of hydrogen was obtained, when compared with previously reported nickel-zeolite supported catalysts. Reaction temperature had a strong influence on catalyst activity and on the type of carbon deposits. The catalyst utilized at 873 and 973 K could be regenerated without any significant loss of activity, however the catalyst utilized at 1073 K showed some loss of activity after regeneration.

Lucia M. Petkovic; Daniel M. Ginosar; Kyle C. Burch; Harry W. Rollins

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Electrochemical characterization of cobalt-encapsulated nickel as cathodes for MCFC  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Electrochemical characterization of cobalt-encapsulated nickel as cathodes for MCFC Anand an electroless deposition process. The electrochemical oxidation behavior of the Co-coated electrodes is similar when compared to bare nickel oxide electrodes in the presence of cathode gas. The solubility decreased

Popov, Branko N.

324

Influence of dimensionality on deep tunneling rates: A study based on the hydrogen-nickel system  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, such as hydrogen embrittlement, catalysis, and fuel storage.1 Moreover, tunneling draws fundamental interest sinceInfluence of dimensionality on deep tunneling rates: A study based on the hydrogen-nickel system hydrogen into a surface site of a nickel crystal is used to investigate deep tunneling phenomena. A method

Zeiri, Yehuda

325

Mathematical Modeling and Experimental Investigations of Isothermal Solidification during Transient Liquid Phase Bonding of Nickel  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Liquid Phase Bonding of Nickel Superalloys M. A. Arafin1, a , M. Medraj1, b , D. P. Turner2, c and P Liquid Phase Bonding, Nickel Superalloys. Abstract. Mathematical model, based on Fick's second law of diffusion, was used to predict the time required to complete isothermal solidification and to determine

Medraj, Mamoun

326

Structure-Activity Correlations in a Nickel-Borate Oxygen Evolution D. Kwabena Bediako,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Structure-Activity Correlations in a Nickel-Borate Oxygen Evolution Catalyst D. Kwabena Bediako of the electrodeposited films, is accompanied by structure and oxidation state changes. Coulometric measurements correlated with X-ray absorption near- edge structure spectra of the active catalyst show that the nickel

327

Progress in the development of lightweight nickel electrode for aerospace applications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The NASA Lewis Research Center is currently developing nickel electrodes for nickel-hydrogen (Ni-H2) cells and batteries. These electrodes are lighter in weight and have higher specific energy than the heavy sintered state of the art nickel electrodes. In the present approach, lightweight materials or plaques are used as conductive supports for the nickel hydroxide active material. These plaques (fiber, felt, and nickel plated plastic) are fabricated into nickel electrodes by electrochemically impregnating them with active material. Initial performance tests include capacity measurements at five discharge levels, C/2, 1.0C, 1.37C, 2.0C, and 2.74C. The electrodes that pass the initial tests are life cycle tested at 40 and 80 percent depths of discharge (DOD). Different formulations of nickel fiber materials obtained from several manufacturers are currently being tested as possible candidates for nickel electrodes. Over 7,000 cycles of life cycle testing have been accumulated at 40 percent DOD, using the lightweight fiber electrode in a boiler plate Ni-H2 cell with stable voltage.

Britton, D.L.

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

Cyclic strain hardening of nanocrystalline nickel B. Moser a,b,*, T. Hanlon a,c  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Cyclic strain hardening of nanocrystalline nickel B. Moser a,b,*, T. Hanlon a,c , K.S. Kumar d , S strain hardening and frequency-dependent fatigue life in electrodeposited nanocrystalline Ni subjected. All rights reserved. Keywords: Nanocrystalline materials; Nickel; Low cycle fatigue; Fracture; Cyclic

Suresh, Subra

329

Deforming nanocrystalline nickel at ultrahigh strain rates Y. M. Wang,a  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Deforming nanocrystalline nickel at ultrahigh strain rates Y. M. Wang,a E. M. Bringa, J. M. Mc of this letter is to investigate these deformation mechanisms using a model material, nanocrystalline nickel Goodfellow Inc.; and 2 we also electrodeposited Ni samples at several other grain sizes, 30­100 nm.11

Meyers, Marc A.

330

Application of ultrasound in solvent extraction of nickel and gallium  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The effects of ultrasound on the rate of solvent extraction of nickel with Lix 65N and Lix 70, and gallium with Kelex 100 were investigated. These solvent extraction systems are noted by their sluggish nature. Low frequency (20 kHz) ultrasound increased the rates of extraction of nickel by factors of four to seven. The ultrasound had no effect on the final chemical equilibrium. Gallium extraction rates were enhanced with the use of ultrasound by as much as a factor of 15. Again, the ultrasound had no effect on extraction equilibrium. For both nickel and gallium, the enhanced rates were attributed to increased interfacial surface area associated with ultrasonically induced cavitation and microdroplet formation. The stability of the microdroplets permitted intermittent application of ultrasound with corresponding decreases in ultrasonic energy requirements. The lowest energy consumption was observed with short (0.25 to 5 s) bursts of high power (41 to 61 W) ultrasonic inputs. The study also provided insight into the factors that affect the complex extraction of gallium from sodium aluminate solutions. The rate controlling step was found to be the dehydration of the gallate ion, Ga(OH)4, and the first complex formation between gallium and Kelex 100. Sodium was found to enhance the extraction rate up to a point, beyond which increased concentration was detrimental. Increasing aluminum concentration was found to slow extraction rates. Modifiers and diluents were shown to markedly affect extraction rates even without ultrasound. Ketone modifiers, particularly 2-undecanone, when used with Kermac 470B or Escaid 200 diluents enhanced extraction rates of gallium to the point that the use of ultrasound provided no additional benefits. The positive effects of ketone modifiers for the solvent extraction of gallium had not been previously reported.

Pesic, B.

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

Synthesis, structural and magnetic characterisation of nanocrystalline nickel ferrite NiFe2O4 obtained by reactive milling  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Synthesis, structural and magnetic characterisation of nanocrystalline nickel ferrite ­ NiFe2O4-Napoca, Romania Abstract Nanocrystalline nickel ferrite (NiFe2O4) has been synthesized from a stoichiometric. The particles size distribution was analyzed using a laser particle size analyser. The nickel ferrite begins

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

332

Advanced nickel base alloys for high strength, corrosion applications  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Improved nickel-base alloys of enhanced strength and corrosion resistance, produced by atomization of an alloy melt under an inert gas atmosphere and of composition 0-20Fe, 10-30Cr, 2-12Mo, 6 max. Nb, 0.05-3 V, 0.08 max. Mn, 0.5 max. Si, less than 0.01 each of Al and Ti, less than 0.05 each of P and S, 0.01-0.08C, less than 0.2N, 0.1 max. 0, bal. Ni.

Flinn, John E. (Idaho Falls, ID)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Electroless nickel: an important coating for diamond turning applications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Diamond turning is the use of a single-point diamond tool on a precision lathe under very precisely controlled machine and environmental conditions to fabricate finished components. With a machine presently available at LLNL a part accuracy between 0.05 and 1.0 ..mu..m (2 and 40 millionths of an inch) is obtainable. Coatings offer significant advantages for diamond turning applications inasmuch as they can be applied to lightweight substrates such as aluminum or beryllium. One of the most used coatings for diamond turning applications is electroless nickel. Purpose of this paper is to document case histories of such applications and suggest areas for future work.

Dini, J.W.

1980-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

334

Electrodeposited tungsten-nickel-boron: A replacement for hexavalent chromium  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Chromium, deposited from acidic solutions of its hexavalent ion, has been the rule for wear resistant, corrosion resistant coatings for many years. Although chromium coatings are durable, the plating process generates air emissions, effluent rinse waters, and process solutions that are toxic, suspected carcinogens, and a risk to human health and the environment. Tungsten-nickel-boron (W-Ni-B) alloy deposition is a potential substitute for hexavalent chrome. It has excellent wear, corrosion, and mechanical properties and also may be less of an environmental risk. This study examines the electroplating process and deposit properties of W-Ni-B and compares them with those of hexavalent chrome.

Steffani, C.; Meltzer, M.

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Torsion Testing of Diffusion Bonded LIGA Formed Nickel  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A test technique has been devised which is suitable for the testing of the bond strength of batch diffusion bonded LIGA or DXRL defined structures. The method uses a torsion tester constructed with the aid of LIGA fabrication and distributed torsion specimens which also make use of the high aspect ratio nature of DXRL based processing. Measurements reveal achieved bond strengths of 130MPa between electroplated nickel with a bond temperature of 450 C at 7 ksi pressure which is a sufficiently low temperature to avoid mechanical strength degradation.

Buchheit, T.E.; Christenson, T.R.; Schmale, D.T.

1999-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

336

Advanced nickel base alloys for high strength, corrosion applications  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Improved nickel-base alloys of enhanced strength and corrosion resistance, produced by atomization of an alloy melt under an inert gas atmosphere and of composition 0--20Fe, 10--30Cr, 2--12Mo, 6 max. Nb, 0.05--3 V, 0.08 max. Mn, 0.5 max. Si, less than 0.01 each of Al and Ti, less than 0.05 each of P and S, 0.01--0.08C, less than 0.2N, 0.1 max. 0, bal. Ni. 3 figs.

Flinn, J.E.

1998-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

337

Preparation and electrochemical properties of multiwalled carbon nanotubes-nickel oxide porous composite for supercapacitors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Porous nickel oxide/multiwalled carbon nanotubes (NiO/MWNTs) composite material was synthesized using sodium dodecyl phenyl sulfate as a soft template and urea as hydrolysis-controlling agent. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) results show that the as-prepared nickel oxide nanoflakes aggregate to form a submicron ball shape with a porous structure, and the MWNTs with entangled and cross-linked morphology are well dispersed in the porous nickel oxide. The composite shows an excellent cycle performance at a high current of 2 A g{sup -1} and keeps a capacitance retention of about 89% over 200 charge/discharge cycles. A specific capacitance approximate to 206 F g{sup -1} has been achieved with NiO/MWNTs (10 wt.%) in 2 M KOH electrolyte. The electrical conductivity and the active sites for redox reaction of nickel oxide are significantly improved due to the connection of nickel nanoflakes by the long entangled MWNTs.

Zheng Yanzhen [College of Materials Science and Chemical Engineering, Harbin Engineering University, Harbin 150001 (China); Zhang Milin [College of Materials Science and Chemical Engineering, Harbin Engineering University, Harbin 150001 (China)]. E-mail: dhyzyz@yahoo.com.cn; Gao Peng [College of Materials Science and Chemical Engineering, Harbin Engineering University, Harbin 150001 (China)

2007-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

338

The synthesis, characterization and reactivity of high oxidation state nickel fluorides  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The research described in this thesis has mainly addressed the challenge of the synthesis of thermodynamically unstable nickel fluorides, which cannot be made by traditional thermal methods. A low-temperature approach towards the synthesis of such transition metal fluorides exploits the greater thermodynamic stability of high oxidation states in anions and involves the use of anhydrous hydrogen fluoride (aHF) as a solvent. The general method consists of combining an aHF soluble starting material (e.g., K{sub 2}NiF{sub 6}) with a Lewis fluoroacid (e.g., BF{sub 3}), which precipitates a neutral polymeric solid state fluoride: 2 K{sup +} + NiF{sub 6}{sup 2{minus}} + BF{sub 3} {r_arrow} NiF{sub 4} + 2 BF{sub 4}{sup {minus}} + 2 K{sup +}. At room temperature, this reaction yields a different structural phase, with composition K{sub x}NiF{sub 3} (x {approx} 0.18). This material has a pseudo-hexagonal tungsten bronze structure (H{sub 0}-K{sub x}NiF{sub 3}), and is an ionic conductor, probably due to K{sup +} ions hosted in the lattice channels. R-NiF{sub 3} is capable of fluorinating a wide range of inorganic and organic substrates. These reactions have probably shed light on the mechanism of the Simons Electrochemical Fluorination (ECF) Process, an important industrial method of fluorinating organic compounds. It has long been speculated that NiF{sub 3} plays a role in the ECF process, which uses nickel electrodes in aHF solvent. K{sub 2}NiF{sub 6} also fluorinates organic compounds in aHF, but interestingly, yields different fluorinated products. The reduction of R-NiF{sub 3} and K{sub 2}NiF{sub 6} during fluorination reactions yields NiF{sub 2}. A method has been developed to regenerate NiF{sub 6}{sup 2{minus}} from NiF{sub 2}.

Chacon, L.C. [Univ. of Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Chemistry]|[Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States). Chemical Sciences Div.

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Synthesis and Hydride Transfer Reactions of Cobalt and Nickel Hydride Complexes to BX3 Compounds  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Hydrides of numerous transition metal complexes can be generated by the heterolytic cleavage of H{sub 2} gas such that they offer alternatives to using main group hydrides in the regeneration of ammonia borane, a compound that has been intensely studied for hydrogen storage applications. Previously, we reported that HRh(dmpe){sub 2}, dmpe = 1,2-bis(dimethylphosphinoethane) was capable of reducing a variety of BX{sub 3} compounds having hydride affinity (HA) greater than or equal to HA of BEt{sub 3}. This study examines the reactivity of less expensive cobalt and nickel hydride complexes, (HCo(dmpe){sub 2} and [HNi(dmpe){sub 2}]{sup +}), to form B-H bonds. The hydride donor abilities ({Delta}G{sub H{sup -}}{sup o}) of HCo(dmpe){sub 2} and [HNi(dmpe){sub 2}]{sup +} were positioned on a previously established scale in acetonitrile that is cross-referenced with calculated HAs of BX{sub 3} compounds. The collective data guided our selection of BX{sub 3} compounds to investigate and aided our analysis of factors that determine favorability of hydride transfer. HCo(dmpe){sub 2} was observed to transfer H{sup -} to BX{sub 3} compounds with X = H, OC{sub 6}F{sub 5} and SPh. The reaction with B(SPh){sub 3} is accompanied by formation of (BH{sub 3}){sub 2}-dmpe and (BH{sub 2}SPh){sub 2}-dmpe products that follow from reduction of multiple BSPh bonds and loss of a dmpe ligand from Co. Reactions between HCo(dmpe){sub 2} and B(SPh){sub 3} in the presence of triethylamine result in formation of Et{sub 3}N-BH{sub 2}SPh and Et{sub 3}N-BH{sub 3} with no loss of dmpe ligand. Reactions of the cationic complex [HNi(dmpe){sub 2}]{sup +} with B(SPh){sub 3} under analogous conditions give Et{sub 3}N-BH{sub 2}SPh as the final product along with the nickel-thiolate complex [Ni(dmpe){sub 2}(SPh)]{sup +}. The synthesis and characterization of HCo(dedpe){sub 2} (dedpe = diethyldiphenyl(phosphino)ethane) from H{sub 2} and a base is also discussed; including the formation of an uncommon trans dihydride species, trans-[(H{sub 2})Co(dedpe){sub 2}][BF{sub 4}].

Mock, Michael T.; Potter, Robert G.; O'Hagan, Molly J.; Camaioni, Donald M.; Dougherty, William G.; Kassel, W. S.; DuBois, Daniel L.

2011-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

340

Mathematical model of a NiOOH/metal hydride cell. Final report, September 15, 1993--November 14, 1996  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

One of the objectives of work on the nickel/metal hydride cell has been to develop a mathematical model of the performance of the cell. This is a summary of work to date and is meant to be a Final Report of the BES project. Mathematical model of the nickel/metal hydride cell depends on the kinetics, thermodynamics, and transport properties of the metal hydride electrode. Consequently, investigations were carried out to determine: (1) the exchange current density and the equilibrium potential as a function of hydrogen content in the electrode; (2) the hydrogen diffusion coefficient in the bulk of the alloy; (3) the hydrogen reaction rate order; (4) the symmetry factor for hydrogen evolution reaction and (5) to determine the reaction mechanisms of the hydrogen charge and discharge processes including overcharge and overdischarge mechanism.

White, R.E.; Popov, B.N.

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "type nickel metal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Metal Hydrides  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion | Department of EnergyDevelopmentTechnologies |Charles Page -toMetabolic PathwaysMetal

342

Processing capabilties for the elimination of contaminated metal scrapyards at DOE/ORO-managed sites. [Metal smelting facility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Capabilities exist for reducing all the contaminated nickel, aluminum, and copper scrap to ingot form by smelting. Processing these metals at existing facilities could be completed in about 5 or 6 years. However, these metals represent only about 20% of the total metal inventories currently on hand at the DOE/ORO-managed sites. No provisions have been made for the ferrous scrap. Most of the ferrous scrap is unclassified and does not require secured storage. Also, the potential resale value of the ferrous scrap at about $100 per ton is very low in comparison. Consequently, this scrap has been allowed to accumulate. With several modifications and equipment additions, the induction melter at PGDP could begin processing ferrous scrap after its commitment to nickel and aluminum. The PGDP smelter is a retrofit installation, and annual throughput capabilities are limited. Processing of the existing ferrous scrap inventories would not be completed until the FY 1995-2000 time frame. An alternative proposal has been the installation of induction melters at the other two enrichment facilities. Conceptual design of a generic metal smelting facility is under way. The design study includes capital and operating costs for scrap preparation through ingot storage at an annual throughput of 10,000 tons per year. Facility design includes an induction melter with the capability of melting both ferrous and nonferrous metals. After three years of operation with scrapyard feed, the smelter would have excess capacity to support on-site decontamination and decomissioning projects or upgrading programs. The metal smelting facility has been proposed for FY 1984 line item funding with start-up operations in FY 1986.

Mack, J.E.; Williams, L.C.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Metallic coatings for enhancement of thermal contact conductance  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The reliability of standard electronic modules may be improved by decreasing overall module temperature. This may be accomplished by enhancing the thermal contact conductance at the interface between the module frame guide rib and the card rail to which the module is clamped. Some metallic coatings, when applied to the card rail, would deform under load, increasing the contact area and associated conductance. This investigation evaluates the enhancements in thermal conductance afforded by vapor deposited silver and gold coatings. Experimental thermal conductance measurements were made for anodized aluminum 6101-T6 and electroless nickel-plated copper C11000-H03 card materials to the aluminum A356-T61 rail material. Conductance values for the electroless nickel-plated copper junction ranged from 600 to 2800 W/m(exp 2)K and those for the anodized aluminum junction ranged from 25 to 91 W/m(exp 2)K for contact pressures of 0.172-0.862 MPa and mean junction temperatures of 20-100 C. Experimental thermal conductance values of vapor deposited silver- and gold-coated aluminum A356-T61 rail surfaces indicate thermal enhancements of 1.25-2.19 for the electroless nickel-plated copper junctions and 1.79-3.41 for the anodized aluminum junctions. The silver and gold coatings provide significant thermal enhancement; however, these coating-substrate combinations are susceptible to galvanic corrosion under some conditions. 25 refs.

Lambert, M.A.; Fletcher, L.S. (Texas A M Univ., College Station, TX (United States))

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Method of preparing silicon carbide particles dispersed in an electrolytic bath for composite electroplating of metals  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for preparing silicon carbide particles dispersed in an electrolytic bath for composite electroplating of metals includes the steps of washing the silicon carbide particles with an organic solvent; washing the silicon carbide particles with an inorganic acid; grinding the silicon carbide particles; and heating the silicon carbide particles in a nickel-containing solution at a boiling temperature for a predetermined period of time.

Peng, Yu-Min (Hsinchu, TW); Wang, Jih-Wen (Hsinchu, TW); Liue, Chun-Ying (Tau-Yung, TW); Yeh, Shinn-Horng (Kaohsiung, TW)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

SURFACE MODIFICATION OF ZIRCALOY-4 SUBSTRATES WITH NICKEL ZIRCONIUM INTERMETALLICS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Surfaces of Zircaloy-4 (Zr-4) substrates were modified with nickel-zirconium (NiZr) intermetallics to tailor oxidation performance for specialized applications. Surface modification was achieved by electroplating Zr-4 substrates with nickel (Ni) and then performing thermal treatments to fully react the Ni plating with the substrates, which resulted in a coating of NiZr intermetallics on the substrate surfaces. Both plating thickness and thermal treatment were evaluated to determine the effects of these fabrication parameters on oxidation performance and to identify an optimal surface modification process. Isothermal oxidation tests were performed on surface-modified materials at 290°, 330°, and 370°C under a constant partial pressure of oxidant (i.e., 1 kPa D2O in dry Ar at 101 kPa) for 64 days. Test results revealed an enhanced, transient oxidation rate that decreased asymptotically toward the rate of the Zr-4 substrate. Oxidation kinetics were analyzed from isothermal weight gain data, which were correlated with microstructure, hydrogen pickup, strength, and hardness.

Luscher, Walter G.; Gilbert, Edgar R.; Pitman, Stan G.; Love, Edward F.

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

Nickel electroplating of steam generator tubes (kiss sleeving process)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This process, the nickel electroplating of steam generator tubes, has been jointly developed under a Belgatom (Laborelec) and Framatome agreement with shared experience gained by both companies, industrial applications being under the responsibility of Framatome. Application of the coating in zones where residual stresses or cracks are present prevents contact between the primary water and the tube, which stops the stress corrosion process. In the Doel 2 plant, 91 tubes have been plated since 1985, and different sets of parameters have been used for comparison purposes. Among these tubes, 9 have been preventively plugged because of defective plating, 9 have been pulled out for laboratory examinations, 2 just after plating and 7 after 1 or 2 yr of service. There are 73 plated tubes still in service. From the tests that were performed, it was possible to select an optimized set of parameters guaranteeing the following properties: bridging of existing cracks and good behavior of the coating in relevant zones, good adhesion to the Inconel tube, high ductility, low residual stresses, thermal shock resistance, corrosion resistance, erosion resistance, and low cobalt content. The licensability of this process is being completed. It is based first on the leak-before-break concept to determine the characteristics of the nickel plating, thickness in particular, and second on the inspectability of ultrasonic testing methods.

Michaut, B.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

Oxide dispersion strengthening of nickel electrodeposits for microsystem applications.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Oxide dispersion strengthened nickel (ODS-Ni) electrodeposits were fabricated to net shape in a nickel sulfamate bath using the LIGA process. A 20 g/l charge of 10 nm Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} powder was suspended in the bath during electrodeposition to produce specimens containing an approximately 0.001-0.02 volume fraction dispersion of the alumina particulate. Mechanical properties are compared to baseline specimens fabricated using an identical sulfamate bath chemistry without the Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} powder charge. Results reveal that the as-deposited ODS-Ni exhibited significantly higher yield strength and ultimate tensile strength than the baseline material. This increase in as-deposited strength is attributed to Orowan strengthening. The ODS-Ni also showed improved retention of room temperature strength after annealing over a range of temperatures up to 600 C. Microscopy revealed that this resistance to anneal softening was due to an inhibition of grain growth in the presence of the oxide dispersion. Nanoindentation measurements revealed that the properties of the dispersion strengthened deposit were uniform through its thickness, even in narrow, high aspect ratio structures. At elevated temperatures, the strength of the ODS-Ni was approximately three times greater than that of the baseline material although with a significant reduction in hot ductility.

Janek, Richard P. (Owens Technology Inc., Palo Alto, CA); Kotula, Paul Gabriel; Buchheit, Thomas Edward; Michael, R. P.; Goods, Steven Howard

2003-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Cosmic metal production and the mean metallicity of the Universe  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

By means of detailed chemo-photometric models for elliptical, spiral and irregular galaxies, we evaluate the cosmic history of the production of chemical elements as well as the metal mass density of the present-day universe. We then calculate the mean metal abundances for galaxies of different morphological types, along with the average metallicity of galactic matter in the universe (stars, gas and intergalactic medium). For the average metallicity of galaxies in the local universe, we find Z_gal= 0.0175, i.e. close to the solar value. We find the main metal production in spheroids (ellipticals and bulges) to occur at very early times, implying an early peak in the metal production and a subsequent decrease. On the other hand, the metal production in spirals and irregulars is always increasing with time. We perform a self-consistent census of the baryons and metals in the local universe finding that, while the vast majority of the baryons lies outside galaxies in the inter-galactic medium (IGM), 52 % of the metals (with the exception of the Fe-peak elements) is locked up in stars and in the interstellar medium. We estimate indirectly the amount of baryons which resides in the IGM and we derive its mean Fe abundance, finding a value of X_Fe,IGM=0.05 X_Fe,sun. We believe that this estimate is uncertain by a factor of 2, owing to the normalization of the local luminosity function. This means that the Fe abundance of 0.3 solar inferred from X-ray observations of the hot intra-cluster medium (ICM) is higher than the average Fe abundance of the inter-galactic gas in the field.

F. Calura; F. Matteucci

2004-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

349

NICKEL SPECIES EMISSION INVENTORY FOR OIL-FIRED BOILERS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Representative duplicate fly ash samples were obtained from the stacks of 400-MW and 385-MW utility boilers (Unit A and Unit B, respectively) using a modified U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Method 17 sampling train assembly as they burned .0.9 and 0.3 wt% S residual oils, respectively, during routine power plant operations. Residual oil fly ash (ROFA) samples were analyzed for nickel (Ni) concentrations and speciation using inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy, x-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) spectroscopy, x-ray diffraction (XRD), and a water-soluble Ni extraction method. ROFA water extraction residues were also analyzed for Ni speciation using XAFS and XRD. Total Ni concentrations in the ROFAs were similar, ranging from 1.3 to 1.5 wt%; however, stack gas Ni concentrations in the Unit A were {approx}990 {micro}g/Nm{sup 3} compared to {approx}620 {micro}g/Nm{sup 3} for Unit B because of the greater residual oil feed rates employed at Unit A to attain higher load (i.e., MW) conditions with a lower heating value oil. Ni speciation analysis results indicate that ROFAs from Unit A contain about 3 wt% NiSO{sub 4} {center_dot} xH{sub 2}O (where x is assumed to be 6 for calculation purposes) and a Ni-containing spinel compound, similar in composition to (Mg,Ni)(Al,Fe){sub 2}O{sub 4}. ROFAs from Unit B contain on average 2.0 wt% NiSO{sub 4} {center_dot} 6H{sub 2}O and 1.1 wt% NiO. XAFS and XRD analyses did not detect any nickel sulfide compounds, including nickel subsulfide (Ni{sub 3}S{sub 2}) (XAFS detection limit is 5% of the total Ni concentration). In addition, XAFS measurements indicated that inorganic sulfate and organic thiophene species account for >97% of the total sulfur in the ROFAs. The presence of NiSO{sub 4} {center_dot} xH{sub 2}O and nickel oxide compound mixtures and lack of carcinogenic Ni{sub 3}S{sub 2} or nickel sulfide compounds (e.g., NiS, NiS{sub 2}) in ROFAs stack-sampled from 400- and 385-MW boilers are contrary to EPA's Ni inhalation cancer risk assessment (''Study of Hazardous Air Pollutant Emissions from Electric Utility Steam Generating Units--Final Report to Congress'', February 1998), where it is assumed that the Ni compound mixture emitted from oil-fired utilities is 50% as carcinogenic as Ni{sub 3}S{sub 2}. Apparently, this assumption greatly overestimates the Ni inhalation cancer risk from oil-fired utilities.

Kevin C. Galbreath; Richard L. Schulz; Donald L. Toman; Carolyn M. Nyberg

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

In situ x-ray absorption fine structure and optical reflectance studies of electrodeposited nickel hydrous oxide films in alkaline electrolytes.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) and optical reflectance spectroscopy (RS) have been used to examine in situ electronic and structural aspects of nickel hydrous oxide, a-Ni(OH)2(hyd), electrodes supported on gold in alkaline electrolytes as a function of their state of charge. The extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) of a-Ni(OH)2(hyd) electrodes in the uncharged (UC, or discharged) and overcharged (OC, or fully charged) states yielded, in each case, a single set of two distinct nearest-neighbor shells, with distances, d(Ni-O)1 = 2.05 {+-} 0.02 {angstrom} and d(Ni-Ni)1 = 3.11 {+-} 0.02 {angstrom} for UC, and d(Ni-O)1 = 1.87 {+-} 0.02 {angstrom} and d(Ni-Ni)1 = 2.83 {+-} 0.02 {angstrom} for OC. The in situ EXAFS of films allowed to self-discharge following overcharge could be fit with contributions from both sets of shells, suggesting that only two types of nickel sites are sufficient to account for the redox chemistry of this material. These data, in addition to information derived both from quantitative X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) and optical RS in the visible range, indicate that the excess anodic charge, i.e., beyond the one-electron oxidation of Ni2+ sites, observed during the first oxidation of freshly prepared a-Ni(OH)2(hyd) electrodes may not be related to oxidation state changes involving nickel sites in the lattice, and, therefore, do not support the existence of nickel sites with a formal oxidation state higher than three for charged or overcharged electrodes in this media.

Hu, Y.; Bae, I. T.; Mo, Y.; Antonio, M. R.; Scherson, D. A.; Chemistry; Case Western Reserve Univ.

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Electrocatalytic hydrogenation using precious metal microparticles in redox-active polymer films  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Glassy carbon felt electrodes have been modified by electrodeposition of poly(pyrrole-viologen) films (derived from N,N{prime}-dialkyl-4,4{prime}-bipyridinium salts), followed by electroprecipitation of precious metal (Pt, Pd, Rh, or Ru) microparticles. The resulting electrodes have been proved to be active for the electrocatalytic hydrogenation of conjugated enones (2-cyclohexen-1-one, cryptone, carvone, isophorone), styrene, and benzonitrile in aqueous media (pH 1). Despite low loadings of metal catalysts, high electric and products yields and a long term stability of these cathodes have been observed. The influence of the metal loading and the polymer structure on the catalytic efficiency as well as the selectivity obtained according to the metal catalyst used have been studied. Comparison with results previously reported for other catalytic cathodes like Pt/Pt, Pd/C, or Raney nickel electrodes proves the high efficiency of these metal microparticles within redox polymer film based electrodes.

Coche, L.; Ehui, B.; Limosin, D.; Moutet, J.C. (Univ. Joseph Fourier, Grenoble (France))

1990-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

352

Method of determining the extent to which a nickel structure has been attached by a fluorine-containing gas  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The method of determining the extent to which a nickel structure has been attacked by a halogen containing gas to which it has been exposed which comprises preparing a quantity of water substantially free from dissolved oxygen, passing ammonia gas through a cuprammonium solution to produce ammonia substantially free from oxygen, dissolving said oxygen-free ammonia in said water to produce a saturated aqueous ammonia solution free from uncombined oxygen, treating at least a portion of said nickel structure of predetermined weight with said solution to dissolve nickel compounds from the surface of said structure without dissolving an appreciable amount of said nickel and analyzing the resulting solution to determine the quantity of said nickel compounds that was associated with said said portion of said structure to determine the proportion of combined nickel in said nickel structure.

Brusie, James P. (Oak Ridge, TN)

2004-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

353

Method of Determining the Extent to which a Nickel Structure has been Attached by a Fluorine-Containing Gas  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The method of determining the extent to which a nickel structure has been attacked by a halogen containing gas to which it has been exposed which comprises preparing a quantity of water substantially free from dissolved oxygen, passing ammonia gas through a cuprammonium solution to produce ammonia substantially free from oxygen, dissolving said oxygen-free ammonia in said water to produce a saturated aqueous ammonia solution free from uncombined oxygen, treating at least a portion of said nickel structure of predetermined weight with said solution to dissolve nickel compounds from the surface of said structure without dissolving an appreciable amount of said nickel and analyzing the resulting solution to determine the quantity of said nickel compounds that was associated with said said portion of said structure to determine the proportion of combined nickel in said nickel structure.

Brusie, James P.

2004-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

354

Development of nickel silicide for integrated circuit technology.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

?? Continuous advancements in devices, materials and processes have resulted in integrated circuits with smaller device dimensions, higher functionality and higher speed. The complementary metal… (more)

Do, Phu H.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

Trace metal capture by various sorbents during fluidized bed coal combustion  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Toxic trace metallic elements such as arsenic, beryllium, cadmium, chromium, cobalt, lead, manganese, mercury, nickel, and selenium are usually contained in coal in various forms and trace amounts. These metals will either stay in the ash or be vaporized during high temperature combustion. Portions of the vaporized metals may eventually be emitted from a combustion system in the form of metal fumes or particulates with diameters less than 1 micron, which are potentially hazardous to the environment. Current practice of controlling trace metal emissions during coal combustion employs conventional air pollution control devices (APCDs), such as electrostatic precipitators and baghouses, to collect fly ash and metal fumes. The control may not always be effective on metal fumes due to their extremely fine sizes. This study is to explore the opportunities for improved control of toxic trace metal emissions from coal-fired combustion systems. Specifically, the technology proposed is to employ suitable sorbents to reduce the amount of metal volatilization and capture volatilized metal vapors during fluidized bed coal combustion. The objective of the study was to investigate experimentally and theoretically the metal capture process.

Ho, T.C.; Ghebremeskel, A.N.; Hopper, J.R. [Lamar Univ., Beaumont, TX (United States)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

356

Mechanochemical processing for metals and metal alloys  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A set of processes for preparing metal powders, including metal alloy powders, by ambient temperature reduction of a reducible metal compound by a reactive metal or metal hydride through mechanochemical processing. The reduction process includes milling reactants to induce and complete the reduction reaction. The preferred reducing agents include magnesium and calcium hydride powders. A process of pre-milling magnesium as a reducing agent to increase the activity of the magnesium has been established as one part of the invention.

Froes, Francis H. (Moscow, ID); Eranezhuth, Baburaj G. (Moscow, ID); Prisbrey, Keith (Moscow, ID)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

CO hydrogenation and adsorption studies on supported nickel SMSI catalysts. Technical report no. 42, 1 January-31 December 1985  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The uptake of CO by Ni/TiO2 and Ni/Ti/sub 2/O/sub 3/ was investigated at 25 and 125 C following low-temperature (LT = 250 C) and high-temperature (HT = 450 C) reduction. Infrared spectroscopy was used to identify the onset of nickel carbonyl (Ni(CO)/sub 4/) formation under various conditions of temperature and pressure. The CO uptake data were modeled using the Langmuir equation for isothermal adsorption. Monolayer coverages and equilibrium constants for CO adsorption were obtained from the uptake data. Carbon monoxide monolayer coverages were not affected by the reduction temperature of either Ni/TiO/sub 2/ or Ni/Ti/sub 2/O/sub 3/. Methanation activity at 275C was approximately a factor of 2 greater for the Ni/TiO/sub 2/ (LT) than the NiTiO/sub 2/ (HT) catalyst. This correlated well with the relative strength of the CO-metal surface bond, which also decreased by a factor of approximately 2. These findings suggest that the enhanced methanation rate observed on TiO/sub 2/ supported catalysts is not due to the presence or absence of a strong metal-support interaction condition of the TiO/sub 2/ but to other properties of TiO/sub 2/ as compared to other supports.

Fang, S.M.; White, J.M.; Campione, T.J.; Ekerdt, J.G.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

Characterization of Uranium Codeposited with Hydrogen on Nickel Cathodes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Previously, it has been reported that nuclear transmutation reactions are accelerated when radioactive elements are subjected to low-level electric fields during electrolysis of aqueous electrolytes. Our research investigated the codeposition of U{sub 3}O{sub 8} and H on Ni cathodes, using an acidic electrolyte and a Pt anode. Then, the radiation emitted by the electroplated U{sub 3}O{sub 8} was compared with radiation emitted by unelectrolyzed U{sub 3}O{sub 8} from the same batch. The electroplated U{sub 3}O{sub 8} initially produced {approx}2900 counts in 3 min (April 17, 2000). This rose sporadically in steps to {approx} 3700 counts in 3 min on May 11, 2000, and it remained relatively constant at this level until the GM measurements ended on June 8, 2000. The unelectrolyzed U{sub 3}O{sub 8} from the same batch emitted radiation at a much lower rate, {approx}1250 counts in 3 min, and this remained almost constant over the entire period of measurement. After the GM measurements, a gamma-ray spectrometer was used to measure radiation from the same two, 10-mg electroplated and unelectrolyzed U{sub 3}O{sub 8} samples. The net integral of the same 36 peaks for the same measurement time (25 h) gave 53 000 counts for the electroplated sample, 1.7 times as many as the 31 000 counts for the unelectrolyzed sample. Alpha and beta measurements are under way for both samples. Figure 2 shows a scanning electron microscope micrograph of a typical surface structure of uranium electroplated on a nickel cathode. The donut-like features appear to be the result of microscopic surface eruptions that produced voids surrounded by raised circular rims. Figure 3 shows an energy dispersive spectrometer spectrum from electroplated U{sub 3}O{sub 8} on a nickel cathode. In addition to oxygen and uranium, cesium, iron, and nickel are present. A peak at 16.36 keV, which overlaps with a uranium peak at 16.44 keV, is tentatively labeled as fermium. Mass spectrometer and X-ray diffraction studies are also underway.

G. Goddard; S. Frantz

2000-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

359

Sulfur poisoning of H/sub 2/ and CO adsorption on supported nickel  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Effects of H/sub 2/S on adsorption of H/sub 2/ and CO on unsupported nickel are: H/sub 2/ adsorption at 298/sup 0/K and CO adsorption at 190/sup 0/K were lowered by presulfiding; and irreversible CO adsorption at 298/sup 0/K was decreased, whereas reversible adsorption was increased after presulfiding, the stoichiometry in the latter case suggesting the formation of Ni(CO)/sub 4/. Recent studies indicate a similar, but even more complex behavior in the case of supported nickel. These effects of sulfur poisoning on H/sub 2/ and CO adsorption on supported nickel are described and discussed.

Bartholomew, C.H.; Pannell, R.B.

1980-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Fuel electrode containing pre-sintered nickel/zirconia for a solid oxide fuel cell  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A fuel cell structure (2) is provided, having a pre-sintered nickel-zirconia fuel electrode (6) and an air electrode (4), with a ceramic electrolyte (5) disposed between the electrodes, where the pre-sintered fuel electrode (6) contains particles selected from the group consisting of nickel oxide, cobalt and cerium dioxide particles and mixtures thereof, and titanium dioxide particles, within a matrix of yttria-stabilized zirconia and spaced-apart filamentary nickel strings having a chain structure, and where the fuel electrode can be sintered to provide an active solid oxide fuel cell.

Ruka, Roswell J. (Pittsburgh, PA); Vora, Shailesh D. (Monroeville, PA)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "type nickel metal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

The magnetic properties of the iron-rich, iron-nickel-zinc alloys  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

this density. The samples were again sealed in steel jackets with a 12 small amount of zinc to maintain the vapor pressure high enough to al- low the impregnated zinc to remain in the samples. The jacketed speci- 0 mens were heated to 1000 C for two hours.... This curve indicated that the coercive force is strongly affected by the zinc content of the al- loy. Fig, 12 is a plot of hardness against nickel content. The 10 w/o Zn al'loys gave the greatest hardness with low nickel content. As the nickel content...

Gupton, Paul Stephen

1961-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

Water-soluble metal-binding polymers with ultrafiltration: A technology for the removal, concentration, and recovery of metal ions from aqueous streams  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The use of water-soluble metal-binding polymers coupled with ultrafiltration (UF) is a technology under development to selectively concentrate and recover valuable or regulated metal-ions from dilute process or waste waters. The polymers have a sufficiently large molecular size that they can be separated and concentrated using commercially available UF technology. The polymers can then be reused by changing the solution conditions to release the metal-ions, which are recovered in a concentrated form for recycle or disposal. Pilot-scale demonstrations have been completed for a variety of waste streams containing low concentrations of metal ions including electroplating wastes (zinc and nickel) and nuclear waste streams (plutonium and americium). Many other potential commercial applications exist including remediation of contaminated solids. An overview of both the pilot-scale demonstrated applications and small scale testing of this technology are presented.

Smith, B.F.; Robison, T.W.; Jarvinen, G.D.

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

363

Development of materials resistant to metal dusting degradation.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Metal dusting corrosion has been a serious problem in the petroleum and petrochemical industries, such as reforming and syngas production systems. This form of deterioration has led to worldwide material loss for 50 years. For the past three years, we have studied the mechanism of metal dusting for Fe- and Ni-base alloys. In this report, we present a correlation between the weight loss and depth of pits that form in Ni-base alloys. Nickel-base alloys were also tested at 1 and 14.8 atm (210 psi), in a high carbon activity environment. Higher system pressure was found to accelerate corrosion in most Ni-base alloys. To reduce testing time, a pre-pitting method was developed. Mechanical scratches on the alloy surface led to fast metal dusting corrosion. We have also developed preliminary data on the performance of weldments of several Ni-base alloys in a metal dusting environment. Finally, Alloy 800 tubes and plates used in a reformer plant were examined by scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray, and Raman spectroscopy. The oxide scale on the surface of the Alloy 800 primarily consists of Fe{sub 1+x}Cr{sub 2-X}O{sub 4} spinel phase with high Fe content. Carbon can diffuse through this oxide scale. It was discovered that the growth of metal dusting pits could be stopped by means of a slightly oxidized alloy surface. This leads to a new way to solve metal dusting problem.

Natesan, K.; Zeng, Z.

2006-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

364

Micrographic detection of plastic deformation in nickel base alloys  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for detecting low levels of plastic deformation in metal articles comprising electrolytically etching a flow free surface of the metal article with nital at a current density of less than about 0.1 amp/cm.sup.2 and microscopically examining the etched surface to determine the presence of alternating striations. The presence of striations indicates plastic deformation in the article.

Steeves, Arthur F. (Schenectady, NY); Bibb, Albert E. (Clifton Park, NY)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

Recovery of nickel-cobalt alloy from superalloy scrap  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper describes Bureau of Mines investigations of recovery of Ni, Co, Cr, and other metals from mixed contaminated superalloy scrap. The scrap is melt-refined and cast into anodes for electrodeposition of recyclable Ni-Co alloy. Preliminary experiments to recover Cr, W, and other metals from the anode sludge and other byproducts are discussed.

Holman, J.H.; Molloy, S.A.; Neumeier, L.A.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

Oxygen addition to sulfur of metal thiolates  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, and characterized. Molecular oxygen or hydrogen peroxide reacted with (N,N'-bis(mercaptoethyl)-1,5-diazacyclooctane-nickel(II), (BME-DACO)2Ni3 +2, to produce a trimetallic, (N,N'-bismercaptoethyl-1,5-diazacyclooctane-nickel(II))-nickelate, (BME-DACO)2Ni3 2...

Soma, Takako

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

367

Extracting metals directly from metal oxides  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method of extracting metals directly from metal oxides by exposing the oxide to a supercritical fluid solvent containing a chelating agent is described. Preferably, the metal is an actinide or a lanthanide. More preferably, the metal is uranium, thorium or plutonium. The chelating agent forms chelates that are soluble in the supercritical fluid, thereby allowing direct removal of the metal from the metal oxide. In preferred embodiments, the extraction solvent is supercritical carbon dioxide and the chelating agent is selected from the group consisting of {beta}-diketones, halogenated {beta}-diketones, phosphinic acids, halogenated phosphinic acids, carboxylic acids, halogenated carboxylic acids, and mixtures thereof. In especially preferred embodiments, at least one of the chelating agents is fluorinated. The method provides an environmentally benign process for removing metals from metal oxides without using acids or biologically harmful solvents. The chelate and supercritical fluid can be regenerated, and the metal recovered, to provide an economic, efficient process. 4 figs.

Wai, C.M.; Smart, N.G.; Phelps, C.

1997-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

368

Extracting metals directly from metal oxides  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method of extracting metals directly from metal oxides by exposing the oxide to a supercritical fluid solvent containing a chelating agent is described. Preferably, the metal is an actinide or a lanthanide. More preferably, the metal is uranium, thorium or plutonium. The chelating agent forms chelates that are soluble in the supercritical fluid, thereby allowing direct removal of the metal from the metal oxide. In preferred embodiments, the extraction solvent is supercritical carbon dioxide and the chelating agent is selected from the group consisting of .beta.-diketones, halogenated .beta.-diketones, phosphinic acids, halogenated phosphinic acids, carboxylic acids, halogenated carboxylic acids, and mixtures thereof. In especially preferred embodiments, at least one of the chelating agents is fluorinated. The method provides an environmentally benign process for removing metals from metal oxides without using acids or biologically harmful solvents. The chelate and supercritical fluid can be regenerated, and the metal recovered, to provide an economic, efficient process.

Wai, Chien M. (Moscow, ID); Smart, Neil G. (Moscow, ID); Phelps, Cindy (Moscow, ID)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

Studies on nickel-tungsten oxide thin films  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Nickel-Tungsten oxide (95:5) thin films were prepared by rf sputtering at 200W rf power with various substrate temperatures. X-ray diffraction study reveals the amorphous nature of films. The substrate temperature induced decrease in energy band gap with a maximum transmittance of 71%1 was observed. The Micro-Raman study shows broad peaks at 560 cm{sup ?1} and 1100 cm{sup ?1} correspond to Ni-O vibration and the peak at 860 cm{sup ?1} can be assigned to the vibration of W-O-W bond. Photoluminescence spectra show two peaks centered on 420 nm and 485 nm corresponding to the band edge emission and vacancies created due to the addition of tungsten, respectively.

Usha, K. S. [Department of Physics, Alagappa University, Karaikudi - 630 004 (India); Sivakumar, R., E-mail: krsivakumar1979@yahoo.com [Directorate of Distance Education, Alagappa University, Karaikudi - 630 004 (India); Sanjeeviraja, C. [Department of Physics, Alagappa Chettiar College of Engineering and Technology, Karaikudi - 630 004 (India)

2014-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

370

Diamond tool wear of electrodeposited nickel-phosphorus alloy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Nickel-Phosphorus alloys are attractive materials for diamond turning applications such as fabrication of large optics and other high precision parts. Although the mechanism is not understood, diamond tool wear is minimized when the phosphorus content of the deposit is greater than 11% (wgt). In recent years, increased attention has been directed at electrodeposition as an alternate to electroless deposition for producing Ni-P alloys. One principal advantage of the electrodeposition process is that alloys with 14--15% P can be obtained; another is that an order of magnitude greater deposition thickness can be provided if necessary. This paper compares diamond turning results for electrodeposited and electroless Ni-P alloys and shows that the electrodeposited coatings provide promising results. 28 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

Dini, J.W.; Donaldson, R.R.; Syn, C.K. (Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (USA)); Sugg, D.J. (Techmetals, Inc., Dayton, OH (USA))

1990-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Two-dimensional modeling of nickel electrodeposition in LIGA microfabrication.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Two-dimensional processes of nickel electrodeposition in LIGA microfabrication were modeled using the finite-element method and a fully coupled implicit solution scheme via Newtons technique. Species concentrations, electrolyte potential, flow field, and positions of the moving deposition surfaces were computed by solving the species-mass, charge, and momentum conservation equations as well as pseudo-solid mesh-motion equations that employ an arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian (ALE) formulation. Coupling this ALE approach with repeated re-meshing and re-mapping makes it possible to track the entire transient deposition processes from start of deposition until the trenches are filled, thus enabling the computation of local current densities that influence the microstructure and functional/mechanical properties of the deposit.

Evans, Gregory Herbert (Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA); Chen, Ken Shuang

2003-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

Studies of mechanisms and kinetics of methane and ethane steam reforming on nickel catalysts  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Methane and ethane adsorption/desorption and reaction on steam-reforming catalysts, Ni(INCO), Ni/ZrO{sub 2}, and Ni/CaAl{sub 2}O{sub 4}, were studied by temperature-programmed desorption (TPD), temperature-programmed surface reaction (TPSR), and thermogravimetric (TGA) techniques. The data show that only a fraction of the methane adsorbed (determined by TPSR with H{sub 2}) on nickel catalysts is desorbed during TPD experiments. The results of TPD indicate supports and promoters affect the adsorption of methane and ethane, and transformation of adsorbed carbon species. Several carbon types formed during methane and ethane adsorptions including {alpha}, {beta}, {gamma}, vermicular (v), and graphitic (c) carbon can be identified by TPSR. These data indicate that the distribution of these carbon forms is also strongly a function of adsorption temperature and catalyst. The results show that there are significant quantities of CH{sub 4}, CO, and CO{sub 2} desorbed during TPSR reaction of H{sub 2}O with preadsorbed CH{sub 4}, CD{sub 4} and C{sub 2}H{sub 6}. The agreement between previously reported steady-state and the unsteady-state steam reforming reforming rates of this study indicates that the steam-reforming kinetic data can be quantitatively measured by TPSR experiments.

Hsieh, H.Y.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

Controlled synthesis of nickel ferrite nanocrystals with tunable properties using a novel induction thermal plasma method  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Nickel ferrite spinel nanopowders were synthesised using a solution spray radio-frequency inductively coupled plasma reactor over a wide range of compositions (Ni{sub x}Fe{sub 3-x}O{sub 4}, x???1), with metastable powders produced for x?=?0, 0.25, and 0.5. X-ray fluorescence and X-ray diffraction coupled to Rietveld refinement show that this synthesis technique offers an excellent level of control over both the chemical and crystallographic composition of the nanopowder through the control of the input Fe/Ni ratio. The technique produces highly crystalline nanopowders without the need for post-synthesis annealing. A bulk Fe/Ni ratio ?2 yields a pure spinel Ni{sub x}Fe{sub 3-x}O{sub 4} phase, whereas Fe/Ni ratio <2 results in the excess Ni partitioning to a secondary bunsenite (Ni{sub x},Fe{sub 1-x})O phase. Morphological analysis using transmission electron microscopy shows that two types of particles are produced in different parts of the reactor: a highly faceted powder with the truncated octahedron morphology and a smaller-sized random agglomerate. The faceted particles have a log-normal particle size distribution, with an average size of about 30?nm while the agglomerates have a characteristic length of ?3–5?nm.

Bastien, Samuel; Braidy, Nadi [Department of Chemical Engineering and Biotechnological Engineering, Université de Sherbrooke, Sherbrooke, Québec J1K 2R1 (Canada)

2013-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

374

Vortex dynamics : a window into the properties of type-II superconductors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A. Superconductivity . . . . . . . . . .theory of superconductivity B. Type I . . . . . . . . . . .11] P. G. DeGennes, Superconductivity of Metals and Alloys,

Taylor, Benjamin Jeremy

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

Carbon and carbon monoxide hydrogenation on nickel: support effects  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Hydrogenation of carbon, deposited on nickel catalysts by CO disproportionation, was investigated by temperature-programmed surface reaction (TPSR) for four oxide supports, alumina (Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/), silica (SiO/sub 2/), titanium oxide (TiO/sub 2/), and SiO/sub 2/.Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/. The rate of carbon monoxide hydrogenation was measured by temperature-programmed reaction (TPR) for comparison. The rate of carbon hydrogenation to methane was found to be independent of the support and an average activation energy of 42 kJ/mol was estimated. In contrast, the rate of carbon monoxide hydrogenation was very sensitive to the catalyst support. Nickel (Ni) supported on TiO/sub 2/ exhibited the highest specific activity, and two distinct sites for methanation were observed on Ni/TiO/sub 2/ and Ni/Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/. The lowest specific activities were observed for Ni/SiO/sub 2/ and Ni/SiO/sub 2/.Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/. For all catalysts, carbon hydrogenation occurred at a lower temperature than carbon monoxide hydrogenation. For both TPR and TPSR, small amounts of ethane were formed and at a lower temperature than methane. The amount of less-active, ..beta..-carbon observed in TPSR experiments was very small on all catalysts. These results indicate that at high coverages, carbon hydrogenation does not depend on the support, and thus it is not rate-determining for CO hydrogenation in excess hydrogen. The support is also shown to change the specific rate of carbon monoxide methanation; activity differences seen in steady-state experiments are not just due to differences in site densities. 5 figures, 5 tables.

Ozdogan, S.Z.; Gochis, P.D.; Falconer, J.L.

1983-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

Rovibronically selected and resolved two-color laser photoionization and photoelectron study of nickel carbide cation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We have performed a two-color laser photoionization and photoelectron study of nickel carbide (NiC) and its cation (NiC{sup +}). By preparing NiC in a single rovibronic level of an intermediate vibronic state via visible laser excitation prior to ultraviolet laser photoionization, we have measured the photoionization efficiency spectrum of NiC near its ionization threshold, covering the formation of NiC{sup +}(X {sup 2}{Sigma}{sup +};v{sup +}=0-3). We have also obtained well-resolved rotational transitions for the v{sup +}=0 and 1 vibrational bands of the NiC{sup +}(X {sup 2}{Sigma}{sup +}) ground state. The assignment of rotational transitions observed between the neutral NiC intermediate state and the NiC{sup +} ion ground state has allowed the direct determination of a highly precise value for the ionization energy of NiC, IE(NiC)=67 525.1{+-}0.5 cm{sup -1} (8.372 05{+-}0.000 06 eV). This experiment also provides reliable values for the vibrational spacing [{Delta}G(1/2)=859.5{+-}0.5 cm{sup -1}], rotational constants (B{sub e}{sup +}=0.6395{+-}0.0018 cm{sup -1} and {alpha}{sub e}{sup +}=0.0097{+-}0.0009 cm{sup -1}), and equilibrium bond distance (r{sub e}{sup +}=1.628 A) for the NiC{sup +}(X {sup 2}{Sigma}{sup +}) ground state. The experimental results presented here are valuable for benchmarking the development of more reliable ab initio quantum computation procedures for energetic and spectroscopic calculations of transition metal-containing molecules.

Chang, Yih Chung [Department of Chemistry, University of California, Davis, Davis, California 95616 (United States); Institute of Atomic and Molecular Sciences, Academia Sinica, Taipei, 106, Taiwan (China); Shi Xiaoyu; Ng, C. Y. [Department of Chemistry, University of California, Davis, Davis, California 95616 (United States); Lau, Kai-Chung [Department of Biology and Chemistry, City University of Hong Kong, Kowloon (Hong Kong); Yin Qingzhu [Department of Geology, University of California, Davis, Davis, California 95616 (United States); Liou, H. T. [Institute of Atomic and Molecular Sciences, Academia Sinica, Taipei, 106, Taiwan (China)

2010-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

377

JOURNAL DE PHYSIQUE Colloque C2, supplment au n 3, Tome 40, mars 1979, page C2-261 MbSSBAUER SPECTROSCOPY ON NICKEL-ZINC FERRITES+  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SSBAUER SPECTROSCOPY ON NICKEL-ZINC FERRITES+ T.M. Uen++ *and P.K. Tseng** ^Department of Physios, National Tsing, Taiwan, Republic of China Résumé.- La structure magnétique hyperfine du système ZnxNij-xFezO^ (ferrite de le même type de ferrite avec x égal à 0,3; 0,5 et 0,65 à différentes températures en-dessous du point

Boyer, Edmond

378

Nickel (II)-induced cytotoxicity and apoptosis in human proximal tubule cells through a ROS- and mitochondria-mediated pathway  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Nickel compounds are known to be toxic and carcinogenic in kidney and lung. In this present study, we investigated the roles of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and mitochondria in nickel (II) acetate-induced cytotoxicity and apoptosis in the HK-2 human renal cell line. The results showed that the cytotoxic effects of nickel (II) involved significant cell death and DNA damage. Nickel (II) increased the generation of ROS and induced a noticeable reduction of mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP). Analysis of the sub-G1 phase showed a significant increase in apoptosis in HK-2 cells after nickel (II) treatment. Pretreatment with N-acetylcysteine (NAC) not only inhibited nickel (II)-induced cell death and DNA damage, but also significantly prevented nickel (II)-induced loss of MMP and apoptosis. Cell apoptosis triggered by nickel (II) was characterized by the reduced protein expression of Bcl-2 and Bcl-xL and the induced the protein expression of Bad, Bcl-Xs, Bax, cytochrome c and caspases 9, 3 and 6. The regulation of the expression of Bcl-2-family proteins, the release of cytochrome c and the activation of caspases 9, 3 and 6 were inhibited in the presence of NAC. These results suggest that nickel (II) induces cytotoxicity and apoptosis in HK-2 cells via ROS generation and that the mitochondria-mediated apoptotic signaling pathway may be involved in the positive regulation of nickel (II)-induced renal cytotoxicity.

Wang, Yi-Fen; Shyu, Huey-Wen [Department of Medical Laboratory Sciences and Biotechnology, Fooyin University, Kaohsiung, Taiwan (China)] [Department of Medical Laboratory Sciences and Biotechnology, Fooyin University, Kaohsiung, Taiwan (China); Chang, Yi-Chuang [Department of Nursing, Fooyin University, Kaohsiung, Taiwan (China)] [Department of Nursing, Fooyin University, Kaohsiung, Taiwan (China); Tseng, Wei-Chang [Department of Medical Laboratory Sciences and Biotechnology, Fooyin University, Kaohsiung, Taiwan (China)] [Department of Medical Laboratory Sciences and Biotechnology, Fooyin University, Kaohsiung, Taiwan (China); Huang, Yeou-Lih [Department of Medical Laboratory Science and Biotechnology, Kaohsiung Medical University, Kaohsiung, Taiwan (China)] [Department of Medical Laboratory Science and Biotechnology, Kaohsiung Medical University, Kaohsiung, Taiwan (China); Lin, Kuan-Hua; Chou, Miao-Chen; Liu, Heng-Ling [Department of Medical Laboratory Sciences and Biotechnology, Fooyin University, Kaohsiung, Taiwan (China)] [Department of Medical Laboratory Sciences and Biotechnology, Fooyin University, Kaohsiung, Taiwan (China); Chen, Chang-Yu, E-mail: mt037@mail.fy.edu.tw [Department of Medical Laboratory Sciences and Biotechnology, Fooyin University, Kaohsiung, Taiwan (China)] [Department of Medical Laboratory Sciences and Biotechnology, Fooyin University, Kaohsiung, Taiwan (China)

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Process for the displacement of cyanide ions from metal-cyanide complexes  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention relates to water-soluble polymers and the use of such water-soluble polymers in a process for the displacement of the cyanide ions from the metal ions within metal-cyanide complexes. The process waste streams can include metal-cyanide containing electroplating waste streams, mining leach waste streams, mineral processing waste streams, and related metal-cyanide containing waste streams. The metal ions of interest are metals that give very strong complexes with cyanide, mostly iron, nickel, and copper. The physical separation of the water-soluble polymer-metal complex from the cyanide ions can be accomplished through the use of ultrafiltration. Once the metal-cyanide complex is disrupted, the freed cyanide ions can be recovered for reuse or destroyed using available oxidative processes rendering the cyanide nonhazardous. The metal ions are released from the polymer, using dilute acid, metal ion oxidation state adjustment, or competing chelating agents, and collected and recovered or disposed of by appropriate waste management techniques. The water-soluble polymer can then be recycled. Preferred water-soluble polymers include polyethyleneimine and polyethyleneimine having a catechol or hydroxamate group.

Smith, Barbara F. (Los Alamos, NM); Robinson, Thomas W. (Los Alamos, NM)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Mechanism and Transition-State Structures for Nickel-Catalyzed Reductive Alkyne?Aldehyde Coupling Reactions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The mechanism of nickel-catalyzed reductive alkyne?aldehyde coupling reactions has been investigated using density functional theory. The preferred mechanism involves oxidative cyclization to form the nickeladihydrofuran ...

McCarren, P. R.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "type nickel metal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Effectiveness of nickel plating in inhibiting atmospheric corrosion of copper alloy contacts  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A series of tests was run to determine the effect of Ni plating thickness on connector contact resistance. Copper coupons were plated with an electrolytic nickel strike followed by electroless nickel to produce Ni layers of 10, 20, 55 and 100 {micro}in. The coupons were then exposed to a simulated industrial environment. Pore corrosion was observed after the exposure, which correlated with Ni thickness. In a second series of tests, beryllium-copper four-tine contacts with 50 {micro}in of gold plate over electrolytic nickel strike/electroless-nickel plates of varying thickness were exposed the same corrosive environment. Contact resistance of mated pairs was monitored over a two-month period. The degradation in contact resistance correlated with the Ni thickness used in the connectors.

Ernest, T.; Sorensen, R.; Guilinger, T.

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

382

Perspective on electrodeposited and electroless nickel coatings used in optical applications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Electrodeposits of copper, gold, silver and electroless nickel coatings are playing an ever more important role in optical technology. Any material that can be adherently coated with these deposits can be finished by conventional polishing or diamond turning techniques, thus greatly expanding design strategies and supporting manufacturing capability for optical surfaces. The importance of good quality coatings, e.g., the absence of surface pits, porosity, nodules, stress and inclusions large enough to damage the diamond tool or adversely effect conventional polishing process are emphasized and information is presented on influence of plating defects on optics. Recent data on the diamond turning and polishing of other electrodeposited coatings including bright nickel, sulfamate nickel and tin-nickel are also included.

Sanger, G.M.; Dini, J.W.

1982-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

383

Nickel-catalyzed preparation of acrylamides from alpha olefins and isocyanates ; Synthetic studies toward ripostatin A  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Chapter I. In the presence of the N-heterocyclic carbene ligand IPr, the nickel(0)-catalyzed coupling reaction of a-olefins and branched aliphatic isocyanates provides c,-unsaturated amides arising from preferential C-C ...

Schleicher, Kristin D. (Kristin Diann)

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Dispersion and Characterization of Nickel Nanostrands in Thermoset and Thermoplastic Polymers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Nickel Nanostrands (NiNS) are nano-particles that are highly branched and have a high aspect ratio. These particles show promise as excellent additives to composites when electrical conductivity is desired. Unfortunately, there is very little...

Whalen, Casey Allen

2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

385

INEL metal recycle radioactive scrap metal survey report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

DOE requested that inventory and characterization of radioactive scrap metal (RSM) be conducted across the DOE complex. Past studies have estimated the metal available from unsubstantiated sources. In meetings held in FY-1993, with seven DOE sites represented and several DOE-HQ personnel present, INEL personnel discovered that these numbers were not reliable and that large stockpiles did not exist. INEL proposed doing in-field measurements to ascertain the amount of RSM actually available. This information was necessary to determine the economic viability of recycling and to identify feed stock that could be used to produce containers for radioactive waste. This inventory measured the amount of RSM available at the selected DOE sites. Information gathered included radionuclide content and chemical form, general radiation field, alloy type, and mass of metal.

Funk, D.M.

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

Type B Accident Investigation on the June 27, 2002, Exothermic...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

June 27, 2002, Exothermic Metal Reaction Event During Converter Disassembly in Building K-33 at the East Tennessee Technology Park Type B Accident Investigation on the June 27,...

387

Type B Accident Investigation Board Report, May 8, 2004, Exothermic...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Transfer Activities, East Tennessee Technology Park, Oak Ridge, Tennessee Type B Accident Investigation Board Report, May 8, 2004, Exothermic Metal Reactor Event During Sodium...

388

Metal-phosphate binders  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A metal-phosphate binder is provided. The binder may include an aqueous phosphoric acid solution, a metal-cation donor including a metal other than aluminum, an aluminum-cation donor, and a non-carbohydrate electron donor.

Howe, Beth Ann [Lewistown, IL; Chaps-Cabrera, Jesus Guadalupe [Coahuila, MX

2009-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

389

Electrodeposition of nickel-chromium-phosphorous alloys in the presence of additives  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ELECTRODEPOSITION OF NICKEL-CHROMIUM- PHOSPHOROUS ALLOYS IN THE PRESENCE OF ADDITIVES A Thesis by RAHUL BINDLISH Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree... of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1991 Major Subject: Chemical Engineering ELECTRODEPOSITION OF NICKEL-CHROMIUM- PHOSPHOROUS ALLOYS IN THE PRESENCE OF ADDITIVES A Thesis by RAHUL BINDLISH Approved as to style and content by: Ralph E. White (Chair...

Bindlish, Rahul

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Processing and Characterization of Precision Microparts from Nickel-based Materials  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The objective of this research was to study the influence of electroplating parameters on electrodeposit characteristics for the production of nickel (Ni) and nickel-iron (Ni-Fe) microparts by photoelectroforming. The research focused on the most relevant parameter for industry, which is the current density, because it determines the process time and the consumed energy. The results of the Ni and Ni-Fe characterisations can be divided into two aspects closely linked with each other ; the morphology and the hardness.

Allen, D; Bedner, K; Cabezza, M; Courtot, B; Duval, A; Impey, S A; Saumer, M

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Enhanced electrochromic property of nickel hydroxide thin films prepared by anodic deposition  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Nickel hydroxide and nickel oxide thin films have received much attention as electrochromic (EC) materials, particularly as the materials for a complementary counterlayer against an EC tungsten oxide layer in smart window systems. Nickel hydroxide thin films were prepared onto transparent conductive tin oxide (NESA) substrates by potentiostatic electrolysis of a nickel amine complex solution at various potentials (0.6 to 1.5 V vs. Ag/AgCl). Nickel hydroxide thin film (F0.7) obtained at relatively lower anodic potential (0.7 V) showed enhanced electrochromism between colorless and dark brown in a sodium borate buffer solution at pH 12; the absorption spectrum in the colored (oxidized) state was broadened in the visible and near-infrared region compared with the nickel hydroxide films prepared at the higher anodic potential (1.1 V). characterization of the films revealed that crystal structure of F0.7 is assigned to [alpha]-Ni(OH)[sub 2], and that its electrochromism is based on the reversible oxidation to hexagonal [gamma][sub 2]-2NiO[sub 2] [center dot] NiOOH structure. Composite nickel hydroxide film, i.e., by the electrolytic deposition at 1.1 V followed by that at 0.7 V, showed electrochromic property similar to F0.7 and its durability in repeated redox cycles were much improved in comparison with that of F0.7. Electrochromic properties in switching performance of this composite nickel hydroxide film were investigated.

Chigane, Masaya; Ishikawa, Masami (Osaka Municipal Technical Research Inst. (Japan). Dept. of Inorganic Chemistry)

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

Metal electrode for amorphous silicon solar cells  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An amorphous silicon solar cell having an N-type region wherein the contact to the N-type region is composed of a material having a work function of about 3.7 electron volts or less. Suitable materials include strontium, barium and magnesium and rare earth metals such as gadolinium and yttrium.

Williams, Richard (Princeton, NJ)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Metal Hydrides - Science Needs  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

with traditions in metal hydride research Metal and Ceramic Sciences Condensed Matter Physics Materials Chemistry Chemical and Biological Sciences Located on campus of Tier...

394

Neutron imaging of alkali metal heat pipes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

High-temperature heat pipes are two-phase, capillary driven heat transfer devices capable of passively providing high thermal fluxes. Such a device using a liquid-metal coolant can be used as a solution for successful thermal management on hypersonic flight vehicles. Imaging of the liquid-metal coolant inside will provide valuable information in characterizing the detailed heat and mass transport. Neutron imaging possesses an inherent advantage from the fact that neutrons penetrate the heat pipe metal walls with very little attenuation, but are significantly attenuated by the liquid metal contained inside. Using the BT-2 beam line at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) in Gaithersburg, Maryland, preliminary efforts have been conducted on a nickel-sodium heat pipe. The contrast between the attenuated beam and the background is calculated to be approximately 3%. This low contrast requires sacrifice in spatial or temporal resolution so efforts have since been concentrated on lithium (Li) which has a substantially larger neutron attenuation cross section. Using the CG-1D beam line at the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) of Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, the first neutron images of high-temperature molybdenum (Mo)-Li heat pipes have been achieved. The relatively high neutron cross section of Li allows for the visualization of the Li working fluid inside the heat pipes. The evaporator region of a gravity assisted cylindrical heat pipe prototype 25 cm long was imaged from start-up to steady state operation up to approximately 900 C. In each corner of the square bore inside, the capillary action raises the Li meniscus above the bulk Li pool in the evaporator region. As the operational temperature changes, the meniscus shapes and the bulk meniscus height also changes. Furthermore, a three-dimensional tomographic image is also reconstructed from the total of 128 projection images taken 1.4o apart in which the Li had already cooled and solidified.

Kihm, Ken [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Kirchoff, Eric [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Golden, Matt [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Rosenfeld, J. [Thermacore Inc.; Rawal, S. [Lockheed Martin Space Systems Company; Pratt, D. [United States Air Force Research Laboratory, Wright-Patterson Air Force Base; Bilheux, Hassina Z [ORNL; Walker, Lakeisha MH [ORNL; Voisin, Sophie [ORNL; Hussey, Dan [NIST Center for Neutron Research (NCRN), Gaithersburg, MD

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

Method for producing highly reflective metal surfaces  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The invention is a novel method for producing mirror surfaces which are extremely smooth and which have high optical reflectivity. The method includes depositing, by electrolysis, an amorphous layer of nickel on an article and then diamond-machining the resulting nickel surface to increase its smoothness and reflectivity. The machined nickel surface then is passivated with respect to the formation of bonds with electrodeposited nickel. Nickel then is electrodeposited on the passivated surface to form a layer of electroplated nickel whose inside surface is a replica of the passivated surface. The mandrel then may be-re-passivated and provided with a layer of electrodeposited nickel, which is then recovered from the mandrel providing a second replica. The mandrel can be so re-used to provide many such replicas. As compared with producing each mirror-finished article by plating and diamond-machining, the new method is faster and less expensive.

Arnold, J.B.; Steger, P.J.; Wright, R.R.

1982-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

396

INVESTIGATION IN HARDSURFACING A NICKEL-COPPER ALLOY (MONEL400).  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) investigated the causes of weldability problems and materials failures encountered with the application of Monel (Ni-Cu) 400 as a base material and Stellite 6 (Co-Cr) as the hard-surfacing material when using the oxyacetylene welding process. This work was performed under a cooperative research and development agreement (CRADA) with the Target Rock Division of the Curtiss-Wright Flow Control Corporation. BNL evaluated two heats of Monel 400 material. One of the heats had performed well during manufacturing, producing an acceptable number of ''good'' parts. The second heat had produced some good parts but also exhibited a peculiar type of hardsurfacing/base metal collapse during the welding process. A review of the chemistry on the two heats of material indicated that they both met the chemical requirements for Monel400. During examination of the failed component, linear indications (cracks) were evident on the valve body, both on the circumferential area (top of valve body) and below the hard surfaced weld deposit. independent measurements also indicated that the two heats met the specification requirement for the material. The heat affected zone (HAZ) also contained linear discontinuities. The valve body was welded using the oxyacetylene welding process, a qualified and skilled welder, and had been given a pre-heat of between 1400-1600 F (760-871 C), which is the Target Rock qualified procedure requirement. Both original suppliers performed mechanical testing on their material that indicated the two heats also met the mechanical property requirements of the specification. The BNL investigation into the cause of the differences between these heats of material utilized the following techniques: (1) Heat Treatment of both heats of material; (2) Hardness testing; (3) Optical microscopy; (4) Scanning electron microscope (SEM)/Fractography; and (5) Energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS). The report concludes that the cause of the failure of the valve body during welding is not obvious, however, it does not appear to be a welding issue. The observed inter-granular fractures indicate a grain boundary problem. Further research is recommended.

CZAJKOWSKI,C.; BUTTERS,M.

2001-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Hydrogen-induced cracking along the fusion boundary of dissimilar metal welds  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Presented here are the results from a series of experiments in which dissimilar metals welds were made using the gas tungsten arc welding process with pure argon or argon-6% hydrogen shielding gas. The objective was to determine if cracking near the fusion boundary of dissimilar metal welds could be caused by hydrogen absorbed during welding and to characterize the microstructures in which cracking occurred. Welds consisted of ER308 and ER309LSi austenitic stainless steel and ERNiCr-3-nickel-based filler metals deposited on A36 steel base metal. Cracking was observed in welds made with all three filler metals. A ferrofluid color metallography technique revealed that cracking was confined to regions in the weld metal containing martensite. Microhardness indentations indicated that martensitic regions in which cracking occurred had hardness values from 400 to 550 HV. Cracks did not extend into bulk weld metal with hardness less than 350 HV. Martensite formed near the fusion boundary in all three filler metals due to regions of locally increased base metal dilution.

Rowe, M.D.; Nelson, T.W.; Lippold, J.C. [Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States)

1999-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

Geochemical, metagenomic and metaproteomic insights into trace metal utilization by methane-oxidizing microbial consortia in sulfidic marine sediments  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Microbes have obligate requirements for trace metals in metalloenzymes that catalyze important biogeochemical reactions. In anoxic methane- and sulfide-rich environments, microbes may have unique adaptations for metal acquisition and utilization due to decreased bioavailability as a result of metal sulfide precipitation. However, micronutrient cycling is largely unexplored in cold ( 10 C) and sulfidic (>1 mM H2S) deep-sea methane seep ecosystems. We investigated trace metal geochemistry and microbial metal utilization in methane seeps offshore Oregon and California, USA, and report dissolved concentrations of nickel (0.5-270 nM), cobalt (0.5-6 nM), molybdenum (10-5,600 nM) and tungsten (0.3-8 nM) in Hydrate Ridge sediment porewaters. Despite low levels of cobalt and tungsten, metagenomic and metaproteomic data suggest that microbial consortia catalyzing anaerobic oxidation of methane utilize both scarce micronutrients in addition to nickel and molybdenum. Genetic machinery for cobalt-containing vitamin B12 biosynthesis was present in both anaerobic methanotrophic archaea (ANME) and sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB). Proteins affiliated with the tungsten-containing form of formylmethanofuran dehydrogenase were expressed in ANME from two seep ecosystems, the first evidence for expression of a tungstoenzyme in psychrotolerant microorganisms. Finally, our data suggest that chemical speciation of metals in highly sulfidic porewaters may exert a stronger influence on microbial bioavailability than total concentration

Glass, DR. Jennifer [California Institute of Technology, Pasadena; Yu, DR. Hang [California Institute of Technology, Pasadena; Steele, Joshua [California Institute of Technology, Pasadena; Dawson, Katherine [California Institute of Technology, Pasadena; Sun, S [University of California, San Diego; Chourey, Karuna [ORNL; Hettich, Robert {Bob} L [ORNL; Orphan, V [California Institute of Technology, Pasadena

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Heavy metal biosensor  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Compositions and methods are provided for detection of certain heavy metals using bacterial whole cell biosensors.

Hillson, Nathan J; Shapiro, Lucille; Hu, Ping; Andersen, Gary L

2014-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

400

Study of electrodeposited nickel-molybdenum, nickel-tungsten, cobalt-molybdenum, and cobalt-tungsten as hydrogen electrodes in alkaline water electrolysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Electrodeposited nickel-molybdenum, nickel-tungsten, cobalt-molybdenum, and cobalt-tungsten were characterized for the hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) in the electrolysis of 30 w/o KOH alkaline water at 25 C. The rate-determining step (rds) of the HER was suggested based on the Tafel slope of polarization and the capacitance of electrode-solution interface determined by ac impedance measurement. The HER on the nickel- and cobalt-based codeposits was enhanced significantly compared with that o the electrolytic nickel and cobalt with comparable deposit loadings. The decrease in the HER overpotential was more pronounced on the molybdenum-containing codeposits, particularly on cobalt-molybdenum which also showed a high stability. The enhancement of the HER was attributed to both the synergetic composition and the increased active surface of the codeposits. The real electrocatalytic activity of te electrodes and the effect of their and the increased active surface of the codeposits. The real electrocatalytic activity of the electrodes and the effect of their surface increase were distinguished quantitatively. The linear relations between HER overpotential and surface roughness factor of the electrodes on a Y-log(X) plot were obtained experimentally and interpreted based on the Tafel law.

Fan, C.; Piron, D.L.; Sleb, A.; Paradis, P. (Ecole Polytechnique de Montreal, Quebec (Canada). Dept. de Metallurgie et de Genie des Materiaux)

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "type nickel metal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Diamond tool wear vs cutting distance on electroless nickel mirrors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Wear data are presented for diamond tools cutting electroless nickel (eNi) for cut lengths up to 70,000 ft (13 miles). Two tools having different infrared absorption characteristics were used to cut an eNi preparation that had yielded minimum values for surface roughness and tool wear rate in a previous study. The data include Talystep measurement of the rms amplitude of the feed-marks versus cumulative cutting distance, representative examples of shape changes for the feed-mark profiles, SEM and optical micrographs of the tool rake and flank face wear zones, and measurements of the cutting edge profile and edge recession distance by a tool-nose replication technique. Feed-mark roughness values were found to increase from 5 to 90 A rms over the duration of the test, with an associated edge recession of about 1000 A and the development of a periodic tool edge grooving indicative of burnishing of the part surface. The ir absorption data successfully predicted the order of the two tools in terms of wear rate and fracture toughness.

Syn, C.K.; Taylor, J.S.; Donaldson, R.R.

1986-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

402

Ultrafast charge localization in a stripe-phase nickelate  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Self-organized electronically-ordered phases are a recurring feature in correlated materials, resulting in e.g. fluctuating charge stripes whose role in high-Tc superconductivity is under debate. However, the relevant cause-effect relations between real-space charge correlations and low-energy excitations remain hidden in time-averaged studies. Here, we reveal ultrafast charge localization and lattice vibrational coupling as dynamical precursors of stripe formation in the model compound La1.75Sr0.25NiO4, using ultrafast and equilibrium mid-infrared spectroscopy. The opening of a pseudogap at a crossover temperature T* far above long-range stripe formation establishes the onset of electronic localization which is accompanied by an enhanced Fano asymmetry of Ni-O stretch vibrations. Ultrafast excitation triggers a sub-picosecond dynamics exposing the synchronous modulation of electron-phonon coupling and charge localization. These results illuminate the role of localization in forming the pseudogap in nickelates, opening a path to understanding this mysterious phase in a broad class of complex oxides.

Coslovich, Giacomo; Huber, Bernhard; Lee, Wei-Sheng; Sasagawa, Takao; Hussain, Zahid; Bechtel, Hans A.; Martin, Michael C.; Shen, Zhi-Xun; W. Schoenlein, Robert; A. Kaindl, Robert

2013-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

403

High conductivity composite metal  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Electrical conductors and methods of producing them are disclosed, where the conductors possess both high strength and high conductivity. Conductors are comprised of carbon steel and a material chosen from a group consisting of copper, nickel, silver, and gold. Diffusion barriers are placed between these two materials. The components of a conductor are assembled and then the assembly is subjected to heat treating and mechanical deformation steps. 10 figs.

Zhou, R.; Smith, J.L.; Embury, J.D.

1998-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

404

High conductivity composite metal  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Electrical conductors and methods of producing them, where the conductors possess both high strength and high conductivity. Conductors are comprised of carbon steel and a material chosen from a group consisting of copper, nickel, silver, and gold. Diffusion barriers are placed between these two materials. The components of a conductor are assembled and then the assembly is subjected to heat treating and mechanical deformation steps.

Zhou, Ruoyi (Los Alamos, NM); Smith, James L. (Los Alamos, NM); Embury, John David (Hamilton, CA)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Crystalline silicon growth in nickel/a-silicon bilayer  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The effect of substrate temperature on amorphous Silicon crystallization, mediated by metal impurity is reported. Bilayers of Ni(200nm)/Si(400nm) are deposited on fused silica substrate by electron beam evaporator at 200 and 500 Degree-Sign C. Raman mapping shows that, 2 to 5 micron size crystalline silicon clusters are distributed over the entire surface of the sample. X-ray diffraction and X-ray absorption spectroscopy studies demonstrate silicon crystallizes over the metal silicide seeds and grow with the annealing temperature.

Mohiddon, Md Ahamad; Naidu, K. Lakshun [School of Physics, University of Hyderabad, Hyderabad-500046 (India) and Department of Physics, University of Trento, 38123 POVO (Trento) (Italy); Dalba, G. [Department of Physics, University of Trento, 38123 POVO (Trento) (Italy); Rocca, F. [IFN-CNR, Institute for Photonics and Nanotechnologies, Unit FBK-Photonics of Trento, 38123, Trento (Italy); Krishna, M. Ghanashyam [School of Physics, University of Hyderabad, Hyderabad-500046 (India)

2013-02-05T23:59:59.000Z

406

Textures of oxide films grown on nickel electrodeposits  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

High-temperature corrosion properties of heat-resistant materials depend on the formation of a protective oxide layer on their surface, which inhibits further degradation. Among many factors affecting the oxide growth rate and its resistance to spallation, the crystallographic texture of the metallic substrate plays an important role. In this study, the authors explore the possibilities of modifying the surface texture of polycrystalline Ni using electrodeposition. In addition to analyzing the texture of metallic substrates and its evolution at high temperatures, the texture of oxide formed on each substrate is also considered.

Czerwinski, F.; Palumbo, G.; Szpunar, J.A.

1998-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

407

The consequences of helium production and nickel additions on microstructure development in isotopically tailored ferritic alloys  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A series of alloys have been made adding various isotopes of nickel in order to vary the production of helium during irradiation by a two step nuclear reaction in a mixed spectrum reactor. The alloys use a base composition of Fe-12Cr with an addition of 1.5% nickel, either in the form of {sup 60}Ni which produces no helium, {sup 59}Ni which produces helium at a rate of about 10 appm He/dpa, or natural nickel which provides an intermediate level of helium due to delayed development of {sup 59}Ni. Specimens were irradiated in the HFIR at Oak Ridge, TN to 7.5 dpa at 300 and 400 C. Microstructural examinations indicated that nickel additions promote precipitation in all alloys, but the effect appears to be much stronger at 400 C than at 300 C. There is sufficient dose by 7 dpa (and with 2 appm He) to initiate void swelling in ferritic/martensitic alloys. Little difference was found between response from {sup 59}Ni and natural nickel. Also, helium bubble development for high helium generation conditions appeared to be very different at 300 and 400 C. At 300 C, it appeared that high densities of bubbles formed whereas at 400 C, bubbles could not be identified, possibly because of the complexity of the microstructure, but more likely because helium accumulated at precipitate interfaces.

Gelles, D.S. [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

1999-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Stability of nickel-coated sand as gravel-pack material for thermal wells  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Laboratory flow tests have been carried out to study the stability of various nickel-coated sands under aqueous steam temperature and pH conditions that may exist in thermal recovery operations. Other gravel-pack materials tested include Ottawa sand, sintered bauxite, cement clinker, zirconium oxide, and nickel pellets. A comparison was made between the performances of these materials after exposure to identical thermal and hydrolytic conditions. Test results indicate that nickel-coated sands are highly resistant to dissolution at temperatures as high as 300/sup 0/C (570/sup 0/F) and to solution pH's from 4.75 to 11. Weight losses measured after a 72-hour period were less than 1%. In contrast, weight losses from sintered bauxite, zirconium oxide, and Ottawa sand dissolution tests were 30 to 70 times higher under the same conditions. Cement clinker losses were in the intermediate range under alkaline conditions. API standard crushing and acid-solubility tests for proppants also were performed on nickel-coated sands. These results were favorable in that they exceeded the recommended standards. This study of nickel-coated sand stability and mechanical strength has demonstrated its high potential for application as either a gravel-pack material or proppant in thermal recovery operations.

Sacuta, A.; Nguyen, D.M.; Kissel, G.A. (Alberta Research Council (CA))

1988-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Enantioselective nickel-catalyzed reductive coupling reactions of alkynes and aldehydes. Synthesis of amphidinolides T1 and T4 via catalytic, stereoselective macrocyclizations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

I. Enantioselective Nickel-Catalyzed Reductive Couplings of Alkynes and Aldehydes Allylic alcohol synthesis via a nickel-catalyzed reductive coupling reaction of alkylsubstituted alkynes and aldehydes was studied for ligand ...

Colby Davie, Elizabeth A. (Elizabeth Anne)

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

A Modular, Energy-Based Approach to the Development of Nickel Containing Molecular Electrocatalysts for Hydrogen Production and Oxidation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This review discusses the development of molecular electrocatalysts for H2 production and oxidation based on nickel. A modular approach is used in which the structure of the catalyst is divided into first second and outer coordination spheres. The first coordination sphere consists of the ligands bound directly to the metal center, and this coordination sphere can be used to control such factors as the presence or absence of vacant coordination sites, redox potentials, hydride acceptor abilities and other important thermodynamic parameters. The second coordination sphere is defined as functional groups such as pendant acids or bases that can interact with bound substrates such as H2 molecules and hydride ligands, but that do not form strong bonds with the metal center. These functional groups can play diverse roles such as assisting the heterolytic cleavage of H2, controlling intra- and intermolecular proton transfer reactions, and provide a physical pathway for coupling proton and electron transfer reactions. By controlling both the hydride donor/acceptor ability of the catalysts using the first coordination sphere and the proton acceptor/donor abilities of the functional groups in the second coordination sphere, catalysts can be designed that are biased toward H2 production, H2 oxidation, or that are bidirectional (catalyzing both H2 oxidation and production). The outer coordination sphere is defined as that portion of the catalytic system that are not in the first and second coordination spheres. This coordination sphere can assist in the delivery of protons and electrons to and from the catalytically active site, thereby adding another important avenue for controlling catalytic activity. Many features of these simple catalytic systems are good models for enzymes and they provide the opportunity to probe certain aspects of catalysis that may be difficult in enzymes themselves, but that can provide insights into enzyme function and reactivity.

Shaw, Wendy J.; Helm, Monte L.; DuBois, Daniel L.

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Exploring the mechanisms critical to the operation of metal face seals through modeling and experiments  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This thesis aims to explore operation mechanisms of a special type of mechanical face seals: the flexible metal-to-metal face seal (FMMFS). Unique features of the FMMFS include much more flexibility in the circumferential ...

Wang, Yong, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Dept. of Aeronautics and Astronautics

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Simple Chemical Routes for Changing Composition or Morphology in Metal Chalcogenide Nanomaterials  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Metal chalcogenide nanomaterials are interesting due to their size dependent properties and potential use in numerous types of devices or applications. The synthetic methods of binary phase metal chalcogenide nanoparticles are well established...

Wark, Stacey Elaine

2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

413

High-Affinity Binding and Direct Electron Transfer to Solid Metals...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Binding and Direct Electron Transfer to Solid Metals by the Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 Outer Membrane c-type High-Affinity Binding and Direct Electron Transfer to Solid Metals...

414

Nickel(II) and copper(II) complexes with pyridine-containing macrocycles bearing an aminopropyl pendant arm: synthesis,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Nickel(II) and copper(II) complexes with pyridine-containing macrocycles bearing an aminopropyl that were used for the preparation of the copper(II) complexes. The structures of three nickel(II) complexes and two copper(II) complexes were determined by X-ray crystallography. Protonation of the pendant arm (p

Nazarenko, Alexander

415

Method of attaching ceramics to gas-turbine metal components  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

When attaching ceramics to metal gas-turbine parts, an interlayer of lowmodulus fiber metal is recommended as a buffer layer to compensate for the different coefficients of thermal expansion. This elastic interlayer, made of matted and sintered metallic fibers, is actually a woven mat with 90% of the volume taken up by porosity. Nickel alloys, Hastelloy-X, Inconel-600, FeCrAlSi, and FeCrAlY can be used for the interlayer. However, the last two alloys provide optimum oxidation and high-temperature-corrosion resistance. The interlayers are attached to the component metal by normal brazing, while the ceramic is attached by plasma spraying. The bond between the ceramic and the interlayer is formed by the penetration and condensation of the sprayed powder in the interlayer pores. This joining method can be most efficiently used in high-pressure-turbine seals; combustion-chamber facings; facings of slag hoppers and boosted steamboiler combustion chambers; coal gasification equipment, including valves, cyclones, transport main pipelines and exhaust valves; cylinder heads; and diesel engine pistons.

Legchilin, P.F.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Research, development, and demonstration of nickel-iron batteries for electric vehicle propulsion. Annual report, 1980  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of the Eagle-Picher nickel-iron battery program is to develop a nickel-iron battery for use in the propulsion of electric and electric-hybrid vehicles. To date, the program has concentrated on the characterization, fabrication and testing of the required electrodes, the fabrication and testing of full-scale cells, and finally, the fabrication and testing of full-scale (270 AH) six (6) volt modules. Electrodes of the final configuration have now exceeded 1880 cycles and are showing minimal capacity decline. Full-scale cells have presently exceeded 600 cycles and are tracking the individual electrode tests almost identically. Six volt module tests have exceeded 500 cycles, with a specific energy of 48 Wh/kg. Results to date indicate the nickel-iron battery is beginning to demonstrate the performance required for electric vehicle propulsion.

Not Available

1981-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

Using electroless nickel to coat reinforcing steel in chloride contaminated concrete  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This work is a study of the behavior of steel rebar coated by electroless nickel in chloride-contaminated concrete. The steel rebars were coated in an electroless nickel bath for 1, 2 and 3 hours. They were then subjected to heat treatment at 400 C for periods of 1, 2 and 3 hours. The nickel-coated rebars were embedded in concrete samples with NaCl concentrations at 0.00; 0.10; 0.15 and 0.20 %, based on concrete weight. Their behavior was evaluated by measurement of potentials, polarization resistance, potentiodynamic polarization curves, electrical resistance and visual inspection. Corrosion rates were less than 0.01 {micro}A/cm{sup 2} after 40 months` testing.

Sanchez, M.A.; Parra, L.A.; Perez, O.A.; Rincon, O. de [Univ. del Zulia, Maracaibo (Venezuela)

1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

418

Influence of phosphorus content and heat treatment on the machinability of electroless nickel deposits  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Diamond turning is the use of a single point diamond tool on a precision lathe under very precisely controlled machine and environmental conditions to fabricate finished components. Coatings offer significant advantages for diamond turning applications inasmuch as they can be applied to light weight substrates such as aluminum or beryllium, or unusual substrates such as molybdenum or glass. One of the most used frequently employed coatings for diamond turning applications is electroless nickel. On occasions, electroless nickel deposits are not diamond turnable, e.g., tool life is shortened. This could be a function of phosphorus content, age of the solution, stress in the deposit, additives in the solution, heat treat conditions, etc. Efforts reported in this paper include machinability studies on electroless nickel deposits varying in composition from 1.8-13% phosphorus in the as-deposited condition, and after heating at 200, 400 and 600/sup 0/C.

Syn, C.K.; Dini, J.W.; Taylor, J.S.; Mara, G.L.; Vandervoort, R.R.; Donaldson, R.R.

1985-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

419

Electrochemical study of SiC particle occlusion during nickel electrodeposition  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Previous, published work conducted by the Bureau of Mines showed that chromium particle occlusion occurs as a result of particle collisions with the cathode surface. Conductive chromium particles within the electric field were also shown to cause a local rise in the cathodic current density on the area immediately adjacent to that particle. In order to research the effect of conductive particles vs. semiconductive particles on the occlusion process, nickel electrodeposition was studied in the presence of SiC particles and compared to previous studies on nickel electrodeposition in the presence and absence of Cr particles. The effect of semiconductive SiC particles on nickel electrodeposition was to catalyze the formation of H[sub ads] as well as Ni[sub ads][sup +] intermediates. Evidence of a H[sub ads] intermediate was obtained by current efficiency studies of Ni electrodeposition as well as X-ray diffraction and hydrogen analyses of the coatings made during electrodeposition.

Watson, S.W. (Bureau of Mines, Albany, OR (United States))

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

Electrodeposition of a nickel-indium alloy from an ammonium citrate electrolyte  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The possibility of the electrolytic deposition of a nickel-indium alloy from an ammonium citrate electrolyte for purposes of increasing the cathode current output was investigated. The alloy antifriction coating was deposited in a rectangular glass bath of an electrolyte containing indium in the forms of a sulfate and a hydroxocitrate complex and nickel in the forms of mixed ammonium and citrate complexes as well as in sulfate form. The dependence of indium content and current output of the alloy on current density and indium sulfate concentration in the electrolyte was determined. Polarization curves for alloy precipitation established that indium precipitated at more negative potentials than nickel. The effect of indium content on microhardness was also assessed. An optimum electrolyte composition, pH value, and current density were established.

Vinogradov, S.N.; Perelygin, Yu.P.

1988-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "type nickel metal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Nucleosynthesis of Nickel-56 from Gamma-Ray Burst Accretion Disks  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We examine the prospects for producing Nickel-56 from black hole accretion disks, by examining a range of steady state disk models. We focus on relatively slowly accreting disks in the range of 0.05 - 1 solar masses per second, as are thought to be appropriate for the central engines of long-duration gamma-ray bursts. We find that significant amounts of Nickel-56 are produced over a wide range of parameter space. We discuss the influence of entropy, outflow timescale and initial disk position on mass fraction of Nickel-56 which is produced. We keep careful track of the weak interactions to ensure reliable calculations of the electron fraction, and discuss the role of the neutrinos.

R. Surman; G. C. McLaughlin; N. Sabbatino

2011-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

422

Money where it comes from and how we use it MA.02.01.06.07: Identifies pennies, nickels, dimes, and quarters, and their values.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Money ­ where it comes from and how we use it MA.02.01.06.07: Identifies pennies, nickels, dimes properties. Pre-survey: How is money made? Where is money made? What is the name of each coin? What in value section on chart - use money magnets to discuss how many pennies make a nickel, nickels make

423

Metal-Containing Organic and Carbon Aerogels for Hydrogen Storage  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document and the accompanying manuscript summarize the technical accomplishments of our one-year LDRD-ER effort. Hydrogen storage and hydrogen fuel cells are important components of the 2003 Hydrogen Fuel Initiative focused on the reduction of America's dependence on oil. To compete with oil as an energy source, however, one must be able to transport and utilize hydrogen at or above the target set by DOE (6 wt.% H{sub 2}) for the transportation sector. Other than liquid hydrogen, current technology falls well short of this DOE target. As a result, a variety of materials have recently been investigated to address this issue. Carbon nanostructures have received significant attention as hydrogen storage materials due to their low molecular weight, tunable microporosity and high specific surface areas. For example, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) achieved 5 to 10 wt.% H{sub 2} storage using metal-doped carbon nanotubes. That study showed that the intimate mix of metal nanoparticles with graphitic carbon resulted in the unanticipated hydrogen adsorption at near ambient conditions. The focus of our LDRD effort was the investigation of metal-doped carbon aerogels (MDCAs) as hydrogen storage materials. In addition to their low mass densities, continuous porosities and high surface areas, these materials are promising candidates for hydrogen storage because MDCAs contain a nanometric mix of metal nanoparticles and graphitic nanostructures. For FY04, our goals were to: (1) prepare a variety of metal-doped CAs (where the metal is cobalt, nickel or iron) at different densities and carbonization temperatures, (2) characterize the microstructure of these materials and (3) initiate hydrogen adsorption/desorption studies to determine H2 storage properties of these materials. Since the start of this effort, we have successfully prepared and characterized Ni- and Co-doped carbon aerogels at different densities and carbonization temperatures. The bulk of this work is described in the attached manuscript entitled 'Formation of Carbon Nanostructures in Cobalt- and Nickel- Doped Carbon Aerogels'. This one-year effort has lead to our incorporation into the DOE Carbon-based Hydrogen Storage Center of Excellence at NREL, with funding from DOE's Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Program starting in FY05.

Satcher, Jr., J H; Baumann, T F; Herberg, J L

2005-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

424

Electroless nickel and ion-plated protective coatings for silvered glass mirrors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Two methods of protecting second surface silvered glass mirrors from environmental degradation have been evaluated. One method employed silver mirrors overcoated with Al, Ni, 304 stainless steel, Cr, and an Al/Cu alloy prepared by ion-plating. The other method used conventional wet process silver mirrors protected with a thin electroless nickel coating. These mirrors were compared with conventional paint backed silver/copper mirrors after exposure to elevated temperatures and water vapor. The electroless nickel mirrors showed consistently more resistance to these stresses than either the conventional or ion-plated mirrors suggesting that they may provide more durable field service.

Lind, M.A.; Chaudiere, D.A.; Stewart, T.L.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy study of nickel-iron deposition. 1: Experimental results  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Results of an electrochemical impedance spectroscopy study of nickel-iron codeposition are presented. Impedance spectra are influenced in a complicated manner by the applied current density, rotation speed, and concentration of ferrous ions. Spectra are particularly sensitive to current density and ferrous-ion concentration. As a basis for comparison, an experimental and theoretical study of nickel deposition from an iron-free bath is presented. It is found that it is the inductive loop of the impedance spectra that changes most dramatically in the presence of ferrous ions.

Baker, B.C.; West, A.C. [Columbia Univ., New York, NY (United States). Dept. of Chemical Engineering, Materials Science, and Mining Engineering

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

The numerical solution of a nickel-cadmium battery cell model using the method of lines  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

THE NUMERICAL SOLUTION OF A NICKEL-CADMIUM BATTERY CELL MODEL USING THE METHOD OF LINES A Thesis by TESHOME HAILU Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies Texas Adi:M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree... of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1990 Major Subject: Chemical Engineering THE NUMERICAL SOLUTION OF A NICKEL-CADMIUM BATTERY CELL MODEL USING THE METHOD OF LINES A Thesis by TESHOME HAILU Approved as to style and content by: Ralph E. White (Chairman...

Hailu, Teshome

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

Hydrogen ions produced by plasma-assisted catalytic ionization using nickel grid  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Positive and negative hydrogen ions are produced by plasma-assisted catalytic ionization using a nickel grid, where the irradiation current density of positive ions onto the grid can be controlled by the discharge power. The irradiation energy can be controlled by both the grid potential and the discharge plasma potential. Extraction properties and energy distributions of positive and negative ions produced in the cases of using the grid and a porous nickel plate are compared. Two production mechanisms of negative ions are found in the process of plasma-assisted catalytic ionization.

Oohara, W.; Kawata, K.; Hibino, T. [Department of Electronic Device Engineering, Yamaguchi University, Ube 755-8611 (Japan)] [Department of Electronic Device Engineering, Yamaguchi University, Ube 755-8611 (Japan)

2013-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

428

Graphene-Passivated Nickel as an Oxidation-Resistant Electrode for Spintronics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Published as: ACS Nano 6, 10930 (2012) DOI: 10.1021/nn304424x Graphene-Passivated Nickel as an Oxidation-Resistant Electrode for Spintronics Bruno Dlubak1, Marie-Blandine Martin2, Robert S. Weatherup1, Heejun Yang2, Cyrile Deranlot2... 4-6, 14195 Berlin, Germany We report on graphene-passivated ferromagnetic electrodes (GPFE) for spin devices. GPFE are shown to act as spin-polarized oxidation-resistant electrodes. The direct coating of nickel with few layer graphene through a...

Dlubak, Bruno; Martin, Marie-Blandine; Weatherup, Robert S.; Yang, Heejun; Deranlot, Cyrile; Blume, Raoul; Schloegl, Robert; Fert, Albert; Anane, Abdelmadjid; Hofmann, Stephan; Seneor, Pierre; Robertson, John

2012-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

429

Iron-nickel-chromium alloy having improved swelling resistance and low neutron absorbence  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An iron-nickel-chromium age-hardenable alloy suitable for use in fast breeder reactor ducts and cladding which utilizes the gamma-double prime strengthening phase and characterized in having a delta or eta phase distributed at or near grain boundaries. The alloy consists essentially of about 33-39.5% nickel, 7.5-16% chromium, 1.5-4% niobium, 0.1-0.7% silicon, 0.01-0.2% zirconium, 1-3% titanium, 0.2-0.6% aluminum, and the remainder essentially all iron. Up to 0.4% manganese and up to 0.010% magnesium can be added to inhibit trace element effects.

Korenko, Michael K. (Richland, WA)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

Liquid Metal Transformers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The room temperature liquid metal is quickly emerging as an important functional material in a variety of areas like chip cooling, 3D printing or printed electronics etc. With diverse capabilities in electrical, thermal and flowing behaviors, such fluid owns many intriguing properties that had never been anticipated before. Here, we show a group of unconventional phenomena occurring on the liquid metal objects. Through applying electrical field on the liquid metals immersed in water, a series of complex transformation behaviors such as self-assembling of a sheet of liquid metal film into a single sphere, quick mergences of separate metal droplets, controlled self-rotation and planar locomotion of liquid metal objects can be realized. Meanwhile, it was also found that two accompanying water vortexes were induced and reliably swirled near the rotating liquid metal sphere. Further, effects of the shape, size, voltage, orientation and geometries of the electrodes to control the liquid metal transformers were clar...

Sheng, Lei; Liu, Jing

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

Metal phthalocyanine catalysts  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

As a new composition of matter, alkali metal or ammonium or tetraalkylammonium diazidoperfluorophthalocyanatoferrate. Other embodiments of the invention comprise compositions wherein the metal of the coordination complex is cobalt, manganese and chromium.

Ellis, Jr., Paul E. (Downingtown, PA); Lyons, James E. (Wallingford, PA)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

Durable metallized polymer mirror  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A metallized polymer mirror construction having improved durability against delamination and tunneling, comprising: an outer layer of polymeric material; a metal oxide layer underlying the outer layer of polymeric material; a silver reflective layer underneath the metal oxide layer; and a layer of adhesive attaching the silver layer to a substrate.

Schissel, Paul O. (Golden, CO); Kennedy, Cheryl E. (Lafayette, CO); Jorgensen, Gary J. (Pine, CO); Shinton, Yvonne D. (Northglenn, CO); Goggin, Rita M. (Englewood, CO)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

Durable metallized polymer mirror  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A metallized polymer mirror construction is disclosed having improved durability against delamination and tunneling, comprising: an outer layer of polymeric material; a metal oxide layer underlying the outer layer of polymeric material; a silver reflective layer underneath the metal oxide layer; and a layer of adhesive attaching the silver layer to a substrate. 6 figs.

Schissel, P.O.; Kennedy, C.E.; Jorgensen, G.J.; Shinton, Y.D.; Goggin, R.M.

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

Structural study of multilayered vanadium/nickel superlattices  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We have studied the microstructure of V/Ni metallic superlattice, using x-ray and neutron diffraction. We find a sharp and broad rocking curves around the first-order Bragg peak, and attribute them to a columnar structure which gives rise to two modulation structures; one the ordinary layered structure within the columns and the other the averaged modulation structure which produces the sharp rocking peak.

Homma, H.; Lepetre, Y.; Murduck, J.M.; Schuller, I.K.; Majkrzak, C.F.

1985-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

Notice Type: Presolicitation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

NAICS Code: 332 -- Fabricated Metal Product Manufacturing/332322 -- Sheet Metal Work Manufacturing Storage Container. (Microsoft IE required). Additional specifications and opening and closing dates

436

Pulmonary toxicity after exposure to military-relevant heavy metal tungsten alloy particles  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Significant controversy over the environmental and public health impact of depleted uranium use in the Gulf War and the war in the Balkans has prompted the investigation and use of other materials including heavy metal tungsten alloys (HMTAs) as nontoxic alternatives. Interest in the health effects of HMTAs has peaked since the recent discovery that rats intramuscularly implanted with pellets containing 91.1% tungsten/6% nickel/2.9% cobalt rapidly developed aggressive metastatic tumors at the implantation site. Very little is known, however, regarding the cellular and molecular mechanisms associated with the effects of inhalation exposure to HMTAs despite the recognized risk of this route of exposure to military personnel. In the current study military-relevant metal powder mixtures consisting of 92% tungsten/5% nickel/3% cobalt (WNiCo) and 92% tungsten/5% nickel/3% iron (WNiFe), pure metals, or vehicle (saline) were instilled intratracheally in rats. Pulmonary toxicity was assessed by cytologic analysis, lactate dehydrogenase activity, albumin content, and inflammatory cytokine levels in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid 24 h after instillation. The expression of 84 stress and toxicity-related genes was profiled in lung tissue and bronchoalveolar lavage cells using real-time quantitative PCR arrays, and in vitro assays were performed to measure the oxidative burst response and phagocytosis by lung macrophages. Results from this study determined that exposure to WNiCo and WNiFe induces pulmonary inflammation and altered expression of genes associated with oxidative and metabolic stress and toxicity. Inhalation exposure to both HMTAs likely causes lung injury by inducing macrophage activation, neutrophilia, and the generation of toxic oxygen radicals. -- Highlights: ? Intratracheal instillation of W–Ni–Co and W–Ni–Fe induces lung inflammation in rats. ? W–Ni–Co and W–Ni–Fe alter expression of oxidative stress and toxicity genes. ? W–Ni–Co induces a greater oxidative burst response than W–Ni–Fe in lung macrophages.

Roedel, Erik Q., E-mail: Erik.Roedel@amedd.army.mil [Department of General Surgery, Tripler Army Medical Center, Honolulu, HI 96859 (United States); Cafasso, Danielle E., E-mail: Danielle.Cafasso@amedd.army.mil [Department of General Surgery, Tripler Army Medical Center, Honolulu, HI 96859 (United States); Lee, Karen W.M., E-mail: Karen.W.Lee@amedd.army.mil [Department of Clinical Investigation, Tripler Army Medical Center, Honolulu, HI 96859 (United States); Pierce, Lisa M., E-mail: Lisa.Pierce@amedd.army.mil [Department of Clinical Investigation, Tripler Army Medical Center, Honolulu, HI 96859 (United States)

2012-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

437

Removal of field and embedded metal by spin spray etching  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process of removing both the field metal, such as copper, and a metal, such as copper, embedded into a dielectric or substrate at substantially the same rate by dripping or spraying a suitable metal etchant onto a spinning wafer to etch the metal evenly on the entire surface of the wafer. By this process the field metal is etched away completely while etching of the metal inside patterned features in the dielectric at the same or a lesser rate. This process is dependent on the type of chemical etchant used, the concentration and the temperature of the solution, and also the rate of spin speed of the wafer during the etching. The process substantially reduces the metal removal time compared to mechanical polishing, for example, and can be carried out using significantly less expensive equipment. 6 figs.

Contolini, R.J.; Mayer, S.T.; Tarte, L.A.

1996-01-23T23:59:59.000Z

438

Recovery of non-ferrous metals from smelter flue dusts and sludges  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A method is described for treating a smelter by-product so as to recover copper, nickel, zinc, an cobalt metal therefrom and convert any arsenic and sulfur in the smelter by-product into non-leachable forms of arsenic and sulfur, the method comprising: (a) mixing the smelter by-product with hydrated lime to form a paste; (b) forming the paste into agglomerates, (c) roasting the agglomerates in air at a temperature sufficient to oxidize the arsenic and sulfur therein and cause said oxidized arsenic and sulfur to react with the lime in the agglomerates to form non-leachable arsenic-containing and sulfur-containing calcium compounds within the roasted agglomerates; and (d) contacting the roasted agglomerates with a basic aqueous lixiviant solution comprising dissolved ammonia and an ammonium salt so as to dissolve copper, nickel, zinc and cobalt from the roasted agglomerates into the lixiviant solution, thereby converting the lixiviant solution to a pregnant liquor enriched in said copper, nickel, zinc and cobalt.

Bartlett, R.W.

1993-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

439

High-temperature corrosion of metallic alloys in an oxidizing atmosphere containing NaCl  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A particular heat-exchanger application involved metallic alloys exposed to flue gases of an aluminum remelt furnace. Because the flue gases might contain NaCl and other halides, the corrosion behavior of the alloys was to be investigated. Planned direct exposure of candidate alloys to the flue gases, however, was not conducted because of premature termination of the project. Complementary laboratory testing was conducted on seven commercially available alloys and two nickel aluminides. These materials were exposed to an oxidizing atmosphere containing 0.06 wt % NaCl for 1100 h at 1000/degree/C. Most of the alloy exhibited grain-boundary attack, which resulted in complete oxidation of enveloped grains. The alloys Incoloy MA-956, Incoloy 800, Inconel 625, Inconel 601, Hastelloy X, Haynes 188, and nickel aluminide IC-50 were substantially more corroded than Alloy 214 and nickel aluminide IC-221. The latter two alloys, therefore, would probably be superior to the others in application involving flue gases containing NaCl. Strength fabricability, and weldability, which are briefly discussed, would also affect selection of materials. 8 refs., 12 figs., 5 tabs.

Federer, J.I.

1989-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

Welding type 347 stainless steel -- An interpretive report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Stainless steels fall into three major classifications: ferritic, austenitic and martensitic. Type 347 stainless steels are classified as austenitic, though, as well be described later, they may contain small amounts of ferrite as well. They are of the 18-8 chromium-nickel type with up to 1% niobium, an element once referred to as columbium. Type 347 stainless steel is the primary focus of this document. Similar stainless steels containing niobium will be included, such as Types 348 and 309Nb, as these are frequently encountered in certain applications in welded construction. Ferritic and duplex stainless steels, some of which may contain niobium, are not within the scope of this report. This report covers the following topics: applicable welding processes; composition; properties; ferrite potential effect of weld thermal cycle; post-weld heat treatments; cracks and microfissures; and industrial applications.

Thomas, R.D. Jr.; Messler, R.W. Jr.

1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "type nickel metal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Liquid Metal Transformers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The room temperature liquid metal is quickly emerging as an important functional material in a variety of areas like chip cooling, 3D printing or printed electronics etc. With diverse capabilities in electrical, thermal and flowing behaviors, such fluid owns many intriguing properties that had never been anticipated before. Here, we show a group of unconventional phenomena occurring on the liquid metal objects. Through applying electrical field on the liquid metals immersed in water, a series of complex transformation behaviors such as self-assembling of a sheet of liquid metal film into a single sphere, quick mergences of separate metal droplets, controlled self-rotation and planar locomotion of liquid metal objects can be realized. Meanwhile, it was also found that two accompanying water vortexes were induced and reliably swirled near the rotating liquid metal sphere. Further, effects of the shape, size, voltage, orientation and geometries of the electrodes to control the liquid metal transformers were clarified. Such events are hard to achieve otherwise on rigid metal or conventional liquid spheres. This finding has both fundamental and practical significances which suggest a generalized way of making smart soft machine, collecting discrete metal fluids, as well as flexibly manipulating liquid metal objects including accompanying devices.

Lei Sheng; Jie Zhang; Jing Liu

2014-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

442

ccsd00001984, Selective production of metallic carbon nanotubes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ccsd­00001984, version 1 ­ 18 Oct 2004 Selective production of metallic carbon nanotubes Yasushi- type nanotubes (metallic character) evaluated using the previous Huckel-Poisson method can be applied at the tip of a nanotube in a realistic system. Setting the cross-section of a nanotube and the external #12

443

Experimental studies of the chemistry of metal clusters  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The procedures for studying chemical reactions of metal clusters in a continuous-flow reactor are described, and examples of such studies are given. Experiments to be discussed include kinetics and thermodynamics measurements, and determination of the composition of clusters saturated with various adsorbate reagents. Specific systems to be covered include the reaction of iron clusters with ammonia and with hydrogen, the reaction of nickel clusters with hydrogen and with ammonia, and the reaction of platinum clusters with ethylene. The last two reactions are characterized by complex, multi-step processes that lead to adsorbate decomposition and hydrogen desorption from the clusters. Methods for probing these processes will be discussed. 26 refs., 8 figs.

Parks, E.K.; Riley, S.J.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

Strengthening of metallic alloys with nanometer-size oxide dispersions  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Austenitic stainless steels and nickel-base alloys containing, by wt. %, 0.1 to 3.0% V, 0.01 to 0.08% C, 0.01 to 0.5% N, 0.05% max. each of Al and Ti, and 0.005 to 0.10% O, are strengthened and ductility retained by atomization of a metal melt under cover of an inert gas with added oxygen to form approximately 8 nanometer-size hollow oxides within the alloy grains and, when the alloy is aged, strengthened by precipitation of carbides and nitrides nucleated by the hollow oxides. Added strengthening is achieved by nitrogen solid solution strengthening and by the effect of solid oxides precipitated along and pinning grain boundaries to provide temperature-stabilization and refinement of the alloy grains.

Flinn, John E. (Idaho Falls, ID); Kelly, Thomas F. (Madison, WI)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

Strengthening of metallic alloys with nanometer-size oxide dispersions  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Austenitic stainless steels and nickel-base alloys containing, by wt. %, 0.1 to 3.0% V, 0.01 to 0.08% C, 0.01 to 0.5% N, 0.05% max. each of Al and Ti, and 0.005 to 0.10% O, are strengthened and ductility retained by atomization of a metal melt under cover of an inert gas with added oxygen to form approximately 8 nanometer-size hollow oxides within the alloy grains and, when the alloy is aged, strengthened by precipitation of carbides and nitrides nucleated by the hollow oxides. Added strengthening is achieved by nitrogen solid solution strengthening and by the effect of solid oxides precipitated along and pinning grain boundaries to provide temperature-stabilization and refinement of the alloy grains. 20 figs.

Flinn, J.E.; Kelly, T.F.

1999-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

Science at the interface : grain boundaries in nanocrystalline metals.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Interfaces are a critical determinant of the full range of materials properties, especially at the nanoscale. Computational and experimental methods developed a comprehensive understanding of nanograin evolution based on a fundamental understanding of internal interfaces in nanocrystalline nickel. It has recently been shown that nanocrystals with a bi-modal grain-size distribution possess a unique combination of high-strength, ductility and wear-resistance. We performed a combined experimental and theoretical investigation of the structure and motion of internal interfaces in nanograined metal and the resulting grain evolution. The properties of grain boundaries are computed for an unprecedented range of boundaries. The presence of roughening transitions in grain boundaries is explored and related to dramatic changes in boundary mobility. Experimental observations show that abnormal grain growth in nanograined materials is unlike conventional scale material in both the level of defects and the formation of unfavored phases. Molecular dynamics simulations address the origins of some of these phenomena.

Rodriguez, Mark Andrew; Follstaedt, David Martin; Knapp, James Arthur; Brewer, Luke N.; Holm, Elizabeth Ann; Foiles, Stephen Martin; Hattar, Khalid M.; Clark, Blythe B.; Olmsted, David L.; Medlin, Douglas L.

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

Study of lithium diffusion in RF sputtered Nickel/Vanadium mixed oxides thin films  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Study of lithium diffusion in RF sputtered NickelÁ/Vanadium mixed oxides thin films F. Artuso a lithium insertion inside RF sputtered Ni/V mixed oxides thin films have been investigated employing, showed three steps clearly involved in the intercalation mechanism of lithium in the oxide films: (i

Artuso, Florinda

448

Reliability of Nano-Structured Nickel Interconnections Replacing FlipChip Solder Assembly without Underfill  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Reliability of Nano-Structured Nickel Interconnections Replacing FlipChip Solder Assembly without of Technology, GA 30332-0560 Abstract This paper reports the reliability of fine pitch interconnections using lower stresses in the interconnections and enhance reliability though they add electrical parasitics

Swaminathan, Madhavan

449

Research, development and demonstration of nickel-zinc batteries for electric vehicle propulsion. Annual report, 1979  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Activities in a program to develop a Ni/Zn battery for electric vehicle propulsion are reported. Aspects discussed include battery design and development, nickel cathode study, and basic electrochemistry. A number of engineering drawings are supplied. 61 figures, 11 tables. (RWR)

Not Available

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

Comparing calculated and measured grain boundary energies in nickel Gregory S. Rohrer a  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Laboratories (SNL) [23] have utilized new, high-throughput methods to measure energy for large ensemblesComparing calculated and measured grain boundary energies in nickel Gregory S. Rohrer a , Elizabeth boundary energy data sets for Ni. Using these results, we perform the first large-scale comparison between

Rohrer, Gregory S.

451

Influence of steps on the interaction between adsorbed hydrogen atoms and a nickel surface  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

practical phenomena such as hydrogen stor- age, corrosion, and embrittlement. One of the goals of surfaceInfluence of steps on the interaction between adsorbed hydrogen atoms and a nickel surface Aubrey T-dimensional phase behavior of adsorbed hydrogen on a Ni surface using helium atom scattering. Specifically

Sibener, Steven

452

Studies in Bioinorganic Chemistry: Synthesis and Reactivity of Nickel and Vanadyl NxSy Complexes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

As inspired by the coordination environment of nickel in NikR and NiSOD, imidazole ligands were incorporated into N2SNiII square planar complexes in order to investigate the electronic and structural features of NiII species containing both...

Jenkins, Roxanne Michelle

2011-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

453

Direct Physical Exfoliation of Few-Layer Graphene from Graphite Grown on a Nickel Foil Using  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Direct Physical Exfoliation of Few-Layer Graphene from Graphite Grown on a Nickel Foil Using Physical graphene exfoliation from graphite using optimized PDMS PACS codes: 68.65.Pq, 81.05.ue, 81.05.uf for the site-specific direct physical exfoliation of few-layer graphene sheets from cheap and easily

Maruyama, Shigeo

454

Optimization of Yield in Magnetic Cell Separations Using Nickel Nanowires of Different Lengths  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Optimization of Yield in Magnetic Cell Separations Using Nickel Nanowires of Different Lengths Anne in this area is electrodeposited nanowires (8). These nanowires have several properties that make them- lectively electrodeposited along the growth axis (9). Unlike the beads, which are composed of magnetic

Chen, Christopher S.

455

Reduction of magnetostatic interactions in self-organized arrays of nickel nanowires using atomic layer deposition  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Reduction of magnetostatic interactions in self-organized arrays of nickel nanowires using atomic of magnetic nanowires are commonly synthesized by electrodeposition in nanoporous alumina templates. Due atomic layer deposition we reduce the diameter of the pores prior to electrodeposition. This reduces

Boyer, Edmond