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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "type nickel metal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Self-discharge mechanism of sealed-type nickel/metal-hydride battery  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Factors affecting the self-discharge rate of a nickel/metal-hydride (Ni-MH) battery, generally much higher than that of nickel/cadmium (Ni-Cd) battery, are investigated, and the self-discharge mechanism is discussed. Ammonia and amine participate in the shuttle reaction like nitrate ion in the Ni-Cd battery, resulting in acceleration of the self-discharge. When nonwoven fabric made of sulfonated-polypropylene is used as a separator instead of conventional polyamide separator, the self-discharge rate of the Ni-MH battery is strongly depressed, to the same level as that of Ni-Cd battery.

Ikoma, Munehisa; Hoshina, Yasuko; Matsumoto, Isao [Matsushita Battery Industrial Co., Ltd., Osaka (Japan); Iwakura, Chiaki [Univ. of Osaka Prefecture, Sakai, Osaka (Japan). Dept. of Applied Chemistry

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

Stabilization of Nickel Metal Catalysts for Aqueous ...  

Biomass and Biofuels Stabilization of Nickel Metal Catalysts for Aqueous Processing Systems Pacific Northwest National Laboratory.

3

Stabilization of Nickel Metal Catalysts for Aqueous Processing ...  

Search PNNL. PNNL Home; About; Research; Publications; Jobs; News; Contacts; Stabilization of Nickel Metal Catalysts for Aqueous Processing Systems. ...

4

Method for decontamination of nickel-fluoride-coated nickel containing actinide-metal fluorides  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention is a process for decontaminating particulate nickel contaminated with actinide-metal fluorides. In one aspect, the invention comprises contacting nickel-fluoride-coated nickel with gaseous ammonia at a temperature effecting nickel-catalyzed dissociation thereof and effecting hydrogen-reduction of the nickel fluoride. The resulting nickel is heated to form a melt and a slag and to effect transfer of actinide metals from the melt into the slag. The melt and slag are then separated. In another aspect, nickel containing nickel oxide and actinide metals is contacted with ammonia at a temperature effecting nickel-catalyzed dissociation to effect conversion of the nickel oxide to the metal. The resulting nickel is then melted and separated as described. In another aspect nickel-fluoride-coated nickel containing actinide-metal fluorides is contacted with both steam and ammonia. The resulting nickel then is melted and separated as described. The invention is characterized by higher nickel recovery, efficient use of ammonia, a substantial decrease in slag formation and fuming, and a valuable increase in the service life of the furnace liners used for melting.

Windt, Norman F. (Paducah, KY); Williams, Joe L. (Paducah, KY)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

Steps to Commercialization: Nickel Metal Hydride Batteries | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Steps to Commercialization: Nickel Metal Hydride Batteries Steps to Commercialization: Nickel Metal Hydride Batteries Steps to Commercialization: Nickel Metal Hydride Batteries October 17, 2011 - 10:42am Addthis Steps to Commercialization: Nickel Metal Hydride Batteries Matthew Loveless Matthew Loveless Data Integration Specialist, Office of Public Affairs How does it work? Through licensing and collaborative work, Energy Department-sponsored research can yield great economic benefits and help bring important new products to market. The Energy Department funds cutting-edge research on a broad range of topics ranging from advanced battery construction to the modeling of industrial processes and supercomputer simulation of supernovae. But this research is not only about furthering our understanding of the world around

6

Filler metal alloy for welding cast nickel aluminide alloys  

SciTech Connect

A filler metal alloy used as a filler for welding east nickel aluminide alloys contains from about 15 to about 17 wt. % chromium, from about 4 to about 5 wt. % aluminum, equal to or less than about 1.5 wt. % molybdenum, from about 1 to about 4.5 wt. % zirconium, equal to or less than about 0.01 wt. % yttrium, equal to or less than about 0.01 wt. % boron and the balance nickel. The filler metal alloy is made by melting and casting techniques such as are melting the components of the filler metal alloy and east in copper chill molds.

Santella, Michael L. (Knoxville, TN); Sikka, Vinod K. (Oak Ridge, TN)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Nickel-metal hydride battery development. Final technical report  

SciTech Connect

Rechargeable batteries are used as the power source for a broad range of portable equipment. Key battery selection criteria typically are weight, volume, first cost, life cycle cost, and environmental impact. Rechargeable batteries are favored from a life cycle cost and environmental impact standpoint over primary batteries. The nickel-metal hydride (Ni-MH) battery system has emerged as the battery of choice for many applications based on its superior characteristics when judged on the above criteria against other battery types. In most cases commercial Ni-MH batteries are constructed with coiled electrodes in cylindrical metal containers. Electro Energy, Inc. (EEI) has been developing a novel flat bipolar configuration of the Ni-MH system that offers weight, volume, and cost advantages when compared to cylindrical cells. The unique bipolar approach consists of fabricating individual flat wafer cells in conductive, carbon-filled, plastic face plates. The individual cells contain a nonconductive plastic border which is heat sealed around the perimeter to make a totally sealed unit cell. Multi-cell batteries are fabricated by stacking the individual wafer cells in such a way that the positive face of one cell contacts the negative face of the adjacent cell. The stack is then contained in an outer housing with end contacts. The purpose of this program was to develop, evaluate, and demonstrate the capabilities of the EEI Ni-MH battery system for consumer applications. The work was directed at the development and evaluation of the compact bipolar construction for its potential advantages of high power and energy density. Experimental investigations were performed on various nickel electrode types, hydride electrode formulations, and alternate separator materials. Studies were also directed at evaluating various oxygen recombination techniques for low pressure operation during charge and overcharge.

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

Mathematical modeling of the nickel/metal hydride battery system  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A group of compounds referred to as metal hydrides, when used as electrode materials, is a less toxic alternative to the cadmium hydroxide electrode found in nickel/cadmium secondary battery systems. For this and other reasons, the nickel/metal hydride battery system is becoming a popular rechargeable battery for electric vehicle and consumer electronics applications. A model of this battery system is presented. Specifically the metal hydride material, LaNi{sub 5}H{sub 6}, is chosen for investigation due to the wealth of information available in the literature on this compound. The model results are compared to experiments found in the literature. Fundamental analyses as well as engineering optimizations are performed from the results of the battery model. In order to examine diffusion limitations in the nickel oxide electrode, a ``pseudo 2-D model`` is developed. This model allows for the theoretical examination of the effects of a diffusion coefficient that is a function of the state of charge of the active material. It is found using present data from the literature that diffusion in the solid phase is usually not an important limitation in the nickel oxide electrode. This finding is contrary to the conclusions reached by other authors. Although diffusion in the nickel oxide active material is treated rigorously with the pseudo 2-D model, a general methodology is presented for determining the best constant diffusion coefficient to use in a standard one-dimensional battery model. The diffusion coefficients determined by this method are shown to be able to partially capture the behavior that results from a diffusion coefficient that varies with the state of charge of the active material.

Paxton, B.K. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Chemical Engineering]|[Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States). Energy and Environment Div.

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

Hydridable material for the negative electrode in a nickel-metal hydride storage battery  

SciTech Connect

A monophase hydridable material for the negative electrode of a nickel-metal hydride storage battery with a "Lave's phase" structure of hexagonal C14 type (MgZn.sub.2) has the general formula: Zr.sub.1-x Ti.sub.x Ni.sub.a Mn.sub.b Al.sub.c Co.sub.d V.sub.e where ##EQU1##

Knosp, Bernard (Neuilly-sur-Seine, FR); Bouet, Jacques (Paris, FR); Jordy, Christian (Dourdan, FR); Mimoun, Michel (Neuilly-sur-Marne, FR); Gicquel, Daniel (Lanorville, FR)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Ductile filler metal alloys for welding nickel aluminide alloys  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Nickel aluminum alloys are welded utilizing a nickel based alloy containing zirconium but substantially free of titanium and niobium which reduces the tendency to crack.

Santella, Michael L. (Knoxville, TN); McNabb, Jeffrey D. (Lenoir City, TN); Sikka, Vinod K. (Oak Ridge, TN)

2003-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

11

Nickel anode electrode  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A nickel anode electrode fabricated by oxidizing a nickel alloying material to produce a material whose exterior contains nickel oxide and whose interior contains nickel metal throughout which is dispersed the oxide of the alloying material and by reducing and sintering the oxidized material to form a product having a nickel metal exterior and an interior containing nickel metal throughout which is dispersed the oxide of the alloying material.

Singh, Prabhakar (Bethel, CT); Benedict, Mark (Monroe, CT)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

NICKEL HYDROXIDES  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Nickel hydroxides have been used as the active material in the positive electrodes of several alkaline batteries for over a century. These materials continue to attract a lot of attention because of the commercial importance of nickel-cadmium and nickel-metal hydride batteries. This review gives a brief overview of the structure of nickel hydroxide battery electrodes and a more detailed review of the solid state chemistry and electrochemistry of the electrode materials. Emphasis is on work done since 1989.

MCBREEN,J.

1997-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Nickel-Metal-Hydride Batterie--High Energy Storage for Electric Vehicles  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Freedomcar & Vehicle Technologies Program Freedomcar & Vehicle Technologies Program Nickel-Metal-Hydride Batteries - High Energy Storage for Electric Vehicles Background The key to making electric vehicles (EVs) practical is the development of batteries that can provide performance comparable with that of con ventional vehicles at a similar cost. Most EV batteries have limited energy storage capabili ties, permitting only relatively short driving distances before the batteries must be recharged. In 1991, under a coopera tive agreement with The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), the United States Advanced Battery Consortium (USABC) initiated development of nickel- metal-hydride (NiMH) battery technology and established it as a prime mid-term candidate for use in EVs. DOE funding has been instru

14

High capacity nickel battery material doped with alkali metal cations  

SciTech Connect

A high capacity battery material is made, consisting essentially of hydrated Ni(II) hydroxide, and about 5 wt. % to about 40 wt. % of Ni(IV) hydrated oxide interlayer doped with alkali metal cations selected from potassium, sodium and lithium cations.

Jackovitz, John F. (Monroeville, PA); Pantier, Earl A. (Penn Hills, PA)

1982-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

15

Feasibility study for the recycling of nickel metal hydride electric vehicle batteries. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This feasibility study examined three possible recycling processes for two compositions (AB{sub 2} and AB{sub 5}) of nickel metal hydride electric vehicle batteries to determine possible rotes for recovering battery materials. Analysts examined the processes, estimated the costs for capital equipment and operation, and estimated the value of the reclaimed material. They examined the following three processes: (1) a chemical process that leached battery powders using hydrochloric acid, (2) a pyrometallurical process, and (3) a physical separation/chemical process. The economic analysis revealed that the physical separation/chemical process generated the most revenue.

Sabatini, J.C.; Field, E.L.; Wu, I.C.; Cox, M.R.; Barnett, B.M.; Coleman, J.T. [Little (Arthur D.), Inc., Cambridge, MA (United States)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Diastereoselective nickel-catalyzed reductive coupling of alkynes and aldehydes and application towards the B-type amphidinolides  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The application of recently developed stereoselective nickel-catalyzed reductive coupling reactions of alkynes and aldehydes to the synthesis of complex natural product targets was explored. The "B-Type" amphidinolides ...

Ndubaku, Chudi O

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Evaluation of a new type stable nickel-zinc battery for electric vehicle application. Final report  

SciTech Connect

This report describes discharge-recharge cycle testing of 14 nickel-zinc storage battery cells of a proprietary design. This testing was to obtain performance data on new types of stabilized nickel-zinc battery cells for possible electric vehicle applications. The test sample cells were manufactured by Electrochimica Corporation (ELCA) in two sizes (15 ampere-hours and 225 ampere-hours) with a total of seven different internal combinations. The cells completed up to 470 cycles when testing was halted due to funding limitations. Near the end of testing, the cells were providing 40% of nominal capacity when discharged to 1.2 volts and 58 to 73% when discharged in two steps to 1.0 volt.

Not Available

1985-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

18

Progress in the development of Ovonic nickel-metal hydride batteries  

SciTech Connect

Proprietary, multicomponent hydrogen storage alloys using the principles of atomic engineering form the heart of Ovonic Nickel-Metal Hydride (Ni/MH) battery technology. This battery system, in development for 10 years, has been licensed to several manufacturers both for consumer cells and electric vehicle batteries. These cells have achieved a specific energy of over 80 Wh/kg, a peak power in excess of 200 W/kg, and over 1000 cycles at 100% depth of discharge. They also have an intrinsic ability to withstand overcharge and overdischarge abuse. Ovonic Ni/MH batteries are environmentally friendly and can be recycled. Performance data will be presented showing the successful scale-up of this technology for electric vehicle applications.

Venkatesan, S.; Corrigan, D.A.; Gifford, P.R.; Fetcenko, M.A.; Dhar, S.K.; Ovshinsky, S.R. (Ovonic Battery Co., Troy, MI (United States))

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Current status of environmental, health, and safety issues of nickel metal-hydride batteries for electric vehicles  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report identifies important environment, health, and safety issues associated with nickel metal-hydride (Ni-MH) batteries and assesses the need for further testing and analysis. Among the issues discussed are cell and battery safety, workplace health and safety, shipping requirements, and in-vehicle safety. The manufacture and recycling of Ni-MH batteries are also examined. This report also overviews the ``FH&S`` issues associated with other nickel-based electric vehicle batteries; it examines venting characteristics, toxicity of battery materials, and the status of spent batteries as a hazardous waste.

Corbus, D.; Hammel, C.J.; Mark, J.

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Electrochemical measurements on lightweight composite nickel-graphite battery electrodes  

SciTech Connect

Graphite mat fibers and nickel metal composite electrodes are superior to sintered carbonyl-nickel powder electrodes in nickel-cadmium cells. The composite electrode functions as a thin electrode and can be utilized in nickel-cadmium, nickel-iron, nickel-zinc, and nickel-hydrogen electrochemical systems. 4 refs.

Sutula, R.A.; Crowe, C.R.

1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "type nickel metal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Nickel-Catalyzed Heck-Type Reactions of Benzyl Chlorides and Simple Olefins  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nickel-catalyzed intermolecular benzylation and heterobenzylation of unactivated alkenes to provide functionalized allylbenzene derivatives are described. A wide range of both the benzyl chloride and alkene coupling partners ...

Matsubara, Ryosuke

22

Manufacturer: Panasonic Battery Type: ...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Battery Specifi cations Manufacturer: Panasonic Battery Type: Nickel Metal Hydride Rated Capacity: 5.5 Ahr Rated Power: Not Available Nominal Pack Voltage: 158.4 VDC Nominal Cell...

23

Gas atomization processing of tin and silicon modified LaNi{sub 5} for nickel-metal hydride battery applications  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Numerous researchers have studied the relevant material properties of so-called AB{sub 5} alloys for battery applications. These studies involved LaNi{sub 5} substituted alloys which were prepared using conventional cast and crush alloying techniques. While valuable to the understanding of metal hydride effects, the previous work nearly ignored the potential for alternative direct powder production methods, like high pressure gas atomization (HPGA). Thus, there is a need to understand the relationship between gas atomization processes, powder particle solidification phases, and hydrogen absorption properties of ultra fine (< 25 {micro}m) atomized powders with high surface area for enhanced battery performance. Concurrently, development of a gas atomization nozzle that is more efficient than all current designs is needed to increase the yield of ultrafine AB{sub 5} alloy powder for further processing advantage. Gas atomization processing of the AB{sub 5} alloys was demonstrated to be effective in producing ultrafine spherical powders that were resilient to hydrogen cycling for the benefit of improving corrosion resistance in battery application. These ultrafine powders benefited from the rapid solidification process by having refined solute segregation in the microstructure of the gas atomized powders which enabled a rapid anneal treatment of the powders. The author has demonstrated the ability to produce high yields of ultrafine powder efficiently and cost effectively, using the new HPGA-III technology. Thus, the potential benefits of processing AB{sub 5} alloys using the new HPGA technology could reduce manufacturing cost of nickel-metal hydride powder. In the near future, the manufacture of AB{sub 5} alloy powders could become a continuous and rapid production process. The economic benefit of an improved AB{sub 5} production process may thereby encourage the use of nickel-metal hydride rechargeable batteries in electrical vehicle applications in the foreseeable future.

Ting, J.

1999-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

24

Relating metal binding to DNA binding in the nickel regulatory protein NikR  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The concentration of transition metals within the cell must be tightly regulated. If the concentration of a given transition metal is too low the cell may not be able to perform life-sustaining processes, while high levels ...

Phillips, Christine M. (Christine Marie)

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Intermediate temperature grain boundary embrittlement in nickel-base weld metals.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The ductility-dip cracking (DDC) susceptibility of NiCrFe filler metals was evaluated using the strain-to-fracture (STF) Gleeble(R)-based testing technique. These high chromium Ni-base filler metals are (more)

Nissley, Nathan E

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Contaminated nickel scrap processing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The DOE will soon choose between treating contaminated nickel scrap as a legacy waste and developing high-volume nickel decontamination processes. In addition to reducing the volume of legacy wastes, a decontamination process could make 200,000 tons of this strategic metal available for domestic use. Contaminants in DOE nickel scrap include {sup 234}Th, {sup 234}Pa, {sup 137}Cs, {sup 239}Pu (trace), {sup 60}Co, U, {sup 99}Tc, and {sup 237}Np (trace). This report reviews several industrial-scale processes -- electrorefining, electrowinning, vapormetallurgy, and leaching -- used for the purification of nickel. Conventional nickel electrolysis processes are particularly attractive because they use side-stream purification of process solutions to improve the purity of nickel metal. Additionally, nickel purification by electrolysis is effective in a variety of electrolyte systems, including sulfate, chloride, and nitrate. Conventional electrorefining processes typically use a mixed electrolyte which includes sulfate, chloride, and borate. The use of an electrorefining or electrowinning system for scrap nickel recovery could be combined effectively with a variety of processes, including cementation, solvent extraction, ion exchange, complex-formation, and surface sorption, developed for uranium and transuranic purification. Selected processes were reviewed and evaluated for use in nickel side-stream purification. 80 refs.

Compere, A.L.; Griffith, W.L.; Hayden, H.W.; Johnson, J.S. Jr.; Wilson, D.F.

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Hot Cracking Study of High Chromium Nickel-Base Filler Metals ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Explosive Bonding of 316L to C18150 CuCrZr Alloy for ITER Applications Failure Mechanisms of Dissimilar Metal Welds During High Temperature Service.

28

Nucleation and Growth of Metallic Nickel in Internally Reduced NiO ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Hybrid Aerogel/Nanorod Functional Materials for Energy and Sensing ... and Functionally Graded Ceramic Coatings and/or Films on Metallic Materials in...

29

Stress Corrosion Cracking Resistance of Weld Metals 182, 72, and 308L  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) has occurred in alloy 182 weld metal in operating BWRs. This study compares the propagation behavior of IGSCC for nickel-base weld metal, alloy 182, with two other weld metals: type 308L stainless steel and a high-chromium nickel-base BWR candidate, alloy 72. Results indicate that weld metal 72 is more stress corrosion crack (SCC) resistant than either weld metals 182 or type 308L.

1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Inert anode containing oxides of nickel, iron and zinc useful for the electrolytic production of metals  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An inert anode for the electrolytic production of metals such as aluminum is disclosed. The inert anode includes a ceramic oxide material preferably made from NiO, Fe.sub.2 O.sub.3 and ZnO. The inert anode composition may comprise the following mole fractions of NiO, Fe.sub.2 O.sub.3 and ZnO: 0.2 to 0.99 NiO; 0.0001 to 0.8 Fe.sub.2 O.sub.3 ; and 0.0001 to 0.3 ZnO. The inert anode may optionally include other oxides and/or at least one metal phase, such as Cu, Ag, Pd, Pt, Au, Rh, Ru, Ir and/or Os. The Ni--Fe--Co--O ceramic material exhibits very low solubility in Hall cell baths used to produce aluminum.

Ray, Siba P. (Murrysville, PA); Weirauch, Jr., Douglas A. (Murrysville, PA); Liu, Xinghua (Monroeville, PA)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Inert anode containing oxides of nickel iron and cobalt useful for the electrolytic production of metals  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An inert anode for the electrolytic production of metals such as aluminum is disclosed. The inert anode includes a ceramic oxide material preferably made from NiO, Fe.sub.2 O.sub.3 and CoO. The inert anode composition may comprise the following mole fractions of NiO, Fe.sub.2 O.sub.3 and CoO: 0.15 to 0.99 NiO; 0.0001 to 0.85 Fe.sub.2 O.sub.3 ; and 0.0001 to 0.45 CoO. The inert anode may optionally include other oxides and/or at least one metal phase, such as Cu, Ag, Pd, Pt, Au, Rh, Ru, Ir and/or Os. The Ni--Fe--Co--O ceramic material exhibits very low solubility in Hall cell baths used to produce aluminum.

Ray, Siba P. (Murrysville, PA); Liu, Xinghua (Monroeville, PA); Weirauch, Jr., Douglas A. (Murrysville, PA)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Characteristics of the high-rate discharge capability of a nickel/metal hydride battery electrode  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The high rate discharge capability of the negative electrode in a Ni/MH battery is mainly determined by the charge transfer process at the interface between the metal hydride (MH) alloy powder and the electrolyte, and the mass transfer process in the bulk MH alloy powder. In this study, the anodic polarization curves of a MH electrode were measured and analyzed. An alloy of nominal composition Mm{sub 0.95}Ti{sub 0.05}Ni{sub 3.85}Co{sub 0.45}Mn{sub 0.35}Al{sub 0.35} was used as the negative electrode material. With increasing number of charge/discharge cycles, the MH alloy powders microcrack into particles several micrometers in diameter. The decrease in the MH alloy particle size results in an increase in both the activation surface area and the exchange current density of the MH alloy electrode. The electrode overpotentials of the MH electrode decreases with increasing number of cycles at a large value of anodic polarization current. The decrease in electrode overpotential leads to an increase in the high rate discharge capability of the MH electrode. By using the limiting current, the hydrogen diffusion coefficient in the MH alloy was estimated to be 1.2 x 10{sup {minus}11}cm{sup 2}s{sup {minus}1} assuming an average particle radius of 5 {micro}m.

Geng, M.; Han, J.; Feng, F.; Northwood, D.O.

1999-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Advanced nickel-metal hydride cell development. Final report, September 1993--March 1996  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Inert gas atomization using metal hydride alloys for a Ni/MH{sub x}cell was studied. Atomization of the alloys was demonstrated on a small production scale up to batch size of several kg. Relative performance of the atomized and nonatomized alloys was investigated for the electrode material in a Ni/MH{sub x} cell. The study included effects of charge-discharge rates, temperature, and particle size on cell voltage (polarization) and specific capacity. Results show that the specific capacity of the present atomized alloys was apprecialy smaller than that of the nonatomized powder, especially for initial cycles. Full activation of the atomized alloys oftentook several hundreds of cycles. However, no appreciable difference in discharge rate capability was observed with R10 and R12 alloys. Chemical compositions were indistinguishable, although the oxygen contents of the atomized alloys were always higher. Effects of Ni and Cu coating on alloy performance were studied after electroless coating; the coatings noticeably improved the electrode rate capability for all the alloys. The electrode polarization was esecially improved, but not the cycle life. Further studies are needed.

Lim, Hong S.

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Structure of a Putative Metal-Chelate Type ABC Transporter: An...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Putative Metal-Chelate Type ABC Transporter: An Inward-facing Conformation ATP-binding Cassette (ABC) transporters represent a large family of integral membrane proteins, which are...

35

Nickel/ruthenium catalyst and method for aqueous phase reactions  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of hydrogenation using a catalyst in the form of a plurality of porous particles wherein each particle is a support having nickel metal catalytic phase or reduced nickel deposited thereon in a first dispersed phase and an additional ruthenium metal deposited onto the support in a second dispersed phase. The additional ruthenium metal is effective in retarding or reducing agglomeration or sintering of the nickel metal catalytic phase thereby increasing the life time of the catalyst during hydrogenation reactions.

Elliott, Douglas C. (Richland, WA); Sealock, John L. (West Richland, WA)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Commercial Nickel and Nickel Alloys  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Table 6   Room-temperature physical properties of selected nickel-base alloys...Nickel 200 8.89 1435??1445 2615??2635 456 0.109 13.3 7.4 70 485 95 360 680 Nickel 201 8.89 1435??1445 2615??2635 456 0.109 13.1 7.3 79.3 550 85 360 680 Nickel 205 8.89 1435??1445 2615??2635 456 0.109 13.3 7.4 75.0 520 95 360 680 Nickel 211 8.72 1427 2600 532 0.127 13.3 7.4 44.7 310 169 310 590...

37

Sealed nickel-zinc battery  

SciTech Connect

A sealed, rechargeable nickel-zinc cell includes a zinc electrode active mass essentially free of zinc metal when at full discharge, a carboxylated styrene-butadiene binder retaining the zinc electrode mixture in a coherent structure, a predetermined amount of cadmium being included in the zinc electrode mixture, a separator preferably comprising at least two layers of material free of any adhesive binding the layers together and a wicking layer positioned between the nickel positive electrode and the separator.

Gibbard, H. F.; Menard, C. J.; Murray Jr., R. C.; Putt, R. A.; Valentine, T. W.

1985-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

38

Microfluidic Synthesis of Nickel Nanoparticles  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the current investigation, we aim at synthesizing nickel nanoparticles of ... A Novel Type of Carbon Coated Sulfur Nanoparticles for Li/S Batteries .... Production and Mechanical Properties of Nanostructured Copper and Copper Zinc Alloys.

39

Nickel aluminide alloys with improved weldability  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Weldable nickel aluminide alloys which are essentially free, if not entirely free, of weld hot cracking are provided by employing zirconium concentrations in these alloys of greater than 2.6 wt. % or sufficient to provide a substantial presence of Ni--Zr eutectic phase in the weld so as to prevent weld hot cracking. Weld filler metals formed from these so modified nickel aluminide alloys provide for crack-free welds in previously known nickel aluminide alloys.

Santella, Michael L. (Knoxville, TN); Goodwin, Gene M. (Lenior City, TN)

1995-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

40

Tilting of carbon encapsulated metallic nanocolumns in carbon-nickel nanocomposite films by ion beam assisted deposition  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The influence of assisting low-energy ({approx}50-100 eV) ion irradiation effects on the morphology of C:Ni ({approx}15 at. %) nanocomposite films during ion beam assisted deposition (IBAD) is investigated. It is shown that IBAD promotes the columnar growth of carbon encapsulated metallic nanoparticles. The momentum transfer from assisting ions results in tilting of the columns in relation to the growing film surface. Complex secondary structures are obtained, in which a significant part of the columns grows under local epitaxy via the junction of sequentially deposited thin film fractions. The influence of such anisotropic film morphology on the optical properties is highlighted.

Krause, Matthias [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, PF-510119, 01314 Dresden (Germany); Technische Universitaet Dresden, D-01062 Dresden (Germany); Muecklich, Arndt; Zschornak, Matthias; Wintz, Sebastian; Gemming, Sibylle; Abrasonis, Gintautas [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, PF-510119, 01314 Dresden (Germany); Oates, Thomas W. H. [Leibniz-Institut fuer Analytische Wissenschaft, ISAS e.V., Albert-Einstein-Str. 9, 12489 Berlin (Germany); Luis Endrino, Jose [Surfaces and Coatings Department, Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Madrid, c/Sor Juana Ines de la Cruz 3, Cantoblanco, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Baehtz, Carsten; Shalimov, Artem [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, PF-510119, 01314 Dresden (Germany); Rossendorf Beamline, European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, F-38043 Grenoble (France)

2012-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "type nickel metal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Determination of Primordial Metallicity and Mixing in the Type IIP Supernova 1993W  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

We present the results of a large grid of synthetic spectra and compare them to early spectroscopic observations of SN 1993W. This supernova was discovered close to its explosion date and at a recession velocity of 5400 km/s is located in the Hubble flow. We focus here on two early spectra that were obtained approximately 5 and 9 days after explosion. We parameterize the outer supernova envelope as a power-law density profile in homologous expansion. In order to extract information on the value of the parameters a large number of models was required. We show that very early spectra combined with detailed models can provide constraints on the value of the power law index, the ratio of hydrogen to helium in the surface of the progenitor, the progenitor metallicity and the amount of radioactive nickel mixed into the outer envelope of the supernova. The spectral fits reproduce the observed spectra exceedingly well. The spectral results combined with the early photometry predict that the explosion date was 4.7 {+-} 0.7 days before the first spectrum was obtained. The ability to obtain the metallicity from early spectra make SN IIP attractive probes of chemical evolution in the universe and by showing that we have the ability to pin down the parameters of the progenitor and mixing during the supernova explosion, it is likely to make SN IIP useful cosmological distance indicators which are at the same time complementary to SNe Ia.

Baron, E.; Nugent, Peter E.; Branch, David; Hauschildt, Peter H.; Turatto, M.; Cappellaro, E.

2002-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

42

Switchable Mirrors Based on Nickel-Magnesium Films  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Switchable Mirrors Based on Nickel-Magnesium Films Switchable Mirrors Based on Nickel-Magnesium Films Title Switchable Mirrors Based on Nickel-Magnesium Films Publication Type Journal Article LBNL Report Number LBNL-47180 Year of Publication 2001 Authors Richardson, Thomas J., Jonathan L. Slack, Robert D. Armitage, Robert Kostecki, Baker Farangis, and Michael D. Rubin Journal Applied Physics Letters Volume 78 Pagination 3047 Call Number LBNL-47180 Abstract An electrochromic mirror electrode based on reversible uptake of hydrogen in nickel magnesium alloy films is reported. Thin, magnesium-rich Ni-Mg films prepared on glass substrates by cosputtering from Ni and Mg targets are mirror-like in appearance and have low visible transmittance. Upon exposure to hydrogen gas or on cathodic polarization in alkaline electrolyte, the films take up hydrogen and become transparent. When hydrogen is removed, the mirror properties are recovered. The transition is believed to result from reversible formation of Mg2NiH4 and MgH2. A thin overlayer of palladium was found to enhance the kinetics of hydrogen insertion and extraction, and to protect the metal surface against oxidation.

43

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- International Nickel Co - Bayonne  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Nickel Co - Bayonne Nickel Co - Bayonne Laboratories - NJ 17 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: International Nickel Co., Bayonne Laboratories (NJ.17 ) Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: None Location: Bayonne , New Jersey NJ.17-1 Evaluation Year: 1994 NJ.17-1 Site Operations: Conducted research on the nickel plating of uranium metal. NJ.17-2 Site Disposition: Eliminated - Potential for contamination considered remote due to limited scope of the operations Radioactive Materials Handled: Yes Primary Radioactive Materials Handled: Uranium NJ.17-2 Radiological Survey(s): None Indicated Site Status: Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP Also see Documents Related to International Nickel Co., Bayonne Laboratories

44

Amorphous metal alloy and composite  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Amorphous metal alloys of the iron-chromium and nickel-chromium type have excellent corrosion resistance and high temperature stability and are suitable for use as a protective coating on less corrosion resistant substrates. The alloys are stabilized in the amorphous state by one or more elements of titanium, zirconium, hafnium, niobium, tantalum, molybdenum, and tungsten. The alloy is preferably prepared by sputter deposition.

Wang, Rong (Richland, WA); Merz, Martin D. (Richland, WA)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

NICKEL PLATING PROCESS  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A simplified process is presented for plating nickel by the vapor decomposition of nickel carbonyl. In a preferred form of the invention a solid surface is nickel plated by subjecting the surface to contact with a mixture containing by volume approximately 20% nickel carbonyl vapor, 2% hydrogen sulfide and .l% water vapor or 1% oxygen and the remainder carbon dioxide at room temperature until the desired thickness of nickel is obtained. The advantage of this composition over others is that the normally explosive nickel carbonyl is greatly stabilized.

Hoover, T.B.; Zava, T.E.

1959-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

46

Transition-Metal Hydrides  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Transition-Metal Hydride Electrochromics Transition-Metal Hydride Electrochromics A new type of electrochromic hydride material has interesting and unusual properties. Thin Ni-Mg films, for example, are mirror-like in appearance and have very low visible transmittance. On exposure to hydrogen gas or on reduction in alkaline electrolyte, the films become transparent. The transition is believed to result from formation of nickel magnesium hydride, Mg2NiH4. Switchable mirrors based on rare earth hydrides were discovered in 1996 at Vrije University in the Netherlands, Rare earth-magnesium alloy films were subsequently found to be superior to the pure lanthanides in maximum transparency and mirror-state reflectivity by Philips Laboratories. The newer transition-metal types which use less expensive and less reactive materials were discovered at LBNL. This has now become a very active area of study with a network of researchers.

47

Nickel/zinc batteries  

SciTech Connect

A review of the design, components, electrochemistry, operation and performance of nickel-zinc batteries is presented. 173 references. (WHK)

McBreen, J.

1982-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Nickel-catalyzed coupling reactions and synthetic studies toward ent-dioxepandehydrothyrsiferol via an epoxide-opening cascade  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nickel-Catalyzed Coupling Reactions. Nickel-catalyzed allene--aldehyde coupling and alkene--aldehyde coupling represent two methods of preparing allylic alcohols. Most asymmetric transition metal-catalyzed methods of ...

Ng, Sze-Sze

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Type B plutonium transport package development that uses metallic filaments and composite materials  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new package was developed for transporting Pu and U quantities that are currently carried in DOT-6M packages. It uses double containment with threaded closures and elastomeric seals. A composite overpack of metallic wire mesh and ceramic or quartz cloth insulation is provided for protection in accidents. Two prototypes were subjected to dynamic crush tests. A thermal computer model was developed and benchmarked by test results to predict package behavior in fires. The material performed isotropically in a global fashion. A Type B Pu transport package can be developed for DOE Pu shipments for less than $5000 if manufactured in quantity. 5 figs, 6 refs. (DLC)

Pierce, J.D.; Moya, J.L.; McClure, J.D.; Hohnstreiter, G.F. (Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)); Golliher, K.G. (USDOE Albuquerque Operations Office, NM (United States))

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Structural transformation of nickel hydroxide films during anodic oxidation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The transformation of anodically formed nickel hydroxide/oxy-hydroxide electrodes has been investigated. A mechanism is proposed for the anodic oxidation reaction, in which the reaction interface between the reduced and oxidized phases of the electrode evolves in a nodular topography that leads to inefficient utilization of the active electrode material. In the proposed nodular transformation model for the anodic oxidation reaction, nickel hydroxide is oxidized to nickel oxy-hydroxide in the region near the metal substrate. Since the nickel oxy-hydroxide is considerably more conductive than the surrounding nickel hydroxide, as further oxidation occurs, nodular features grow rapidly to the film/electrolyte interface. Upon emerging at the electrolyte interface, the reaction boundary between the nickel hydroxide and oxy-hydroxide phases spreads laterally across the film/electrolyte interface, creating an overlayer of nickel oxy-hydroxide and trapping uncharged regions of nickel hydroxide within the film. The nickel oxy-hydroxide overlayer surface facilitates the oxygen evolution side reaction. Scanning tunneling microscopy of the electrode in its charged state revealed evidence of 80 {endash} 100 Angstrom nickel oxy-hydroxide nodules in the nickel hydroxide film. In situ spectroscopic ellipsometer measurements of films held at various constant potentials agree quantitatively with optical models appropriate to the nodular growth and subsequent overgrowth of the nickel oxy-hydroxide phase. A two-dimensional, numerical finite difference model was developed to simulate the current distribution along the phase boundary between the charged and uncharged material. The model was used to explore the effects of the physical parameters that govern the electrode behavior. The ratio of the conductivities of the nickel hydroxide and oxy-hydroxide phases was found to be the dominant parameter in the system.

Crocker, R.W.; Muller, R.H.

1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

In situ spectroscopic detection of SMSI effect in a Ni/CeO2 system: hydrogen-induced burial and dig out of metallic nickel  

SciTech Connect

In situ APPES technique demonstrates that the strong metal support interaction effect (SMSI) in the Ni-ceria system is associated with the decoration and burial of metallic particles by the partially reduced support, a phenomenon reversible by evacuation at high temperature of the previously absorbed hydrogen.

Caballero, Alfonso; Holgado, Juan P.; Gonzalez-delaCruz, Victor M.; Habas, Susan e.; Herranz, Tirma; Salmeron, Miquel

2010-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

52

Preparation of Nickel Sulfate from Spent Nickel-Cadmium Batteries  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Aug 1, 2000 ... Preparation of Nickel Sulfate from Spent Nickel-Cadmium Batteries ... process could remove other impurities such as zinc and manganese.

53

Abstract for Dominik Nickel  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Dominik Nickel Technische Universitat Darmstadt, Germany Color-superconductivity within a Dyson-Schwinger approach Color-superconductivity is usually investigated at asymptotically...

54

Talvivaara Nickel Mine  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In full production the annual nickel production will be approximately 50,000tpa. In addition, the mine will also produce zinc, copper and cobalt.Talvivaara will...

55

Zinc-Nickel Battery  

The short lifetime of the conventional zinc-nickel oxide battery has been the primary factor limiting its commercial use, ... Higher voltage, lower co ...

56

Hydrodynamic Models of Type I X-Ray Bursts: Metallicity Effects  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Type I X-ray bursts are thermonuclear stellar explosions driven by charged-particle reactions. In the regime for combined H/He-ignition, the main nuclear flow is dominated by the rp-process (rapid proton-captures and beta+ decays), the 3 alpha-reaction, and the alpha-p-process (a suite of (alpha,p) and (p,gamma) reactions). The main flow is expected to proceed away from the valley of stability, eventually reaching the proton drip-line beyond A = 38. Detailed analysis of the relevant reactions along the main path has only been scarcely addressed, mainly in the context of parameterized one-zone models. In this paper, we present a detailed study of the nucleosynthesis and nuclear processes powering type I X-ray bursts. The reported 11 bursts have been computed by means of a spherically symmetric (1D), Lagrangian, hydrodynamic code, linked to a nuclear reaction network that contains 325 isotopes (from 1H to 107Te), and 1392 nuclear processes. These evolutionary sequences, followed from the onset of accretion up to the explosion and expansion stages, have been performed for 2 different metallicities to explore the dependence between the extension of the main nuclear flow and the initial metal content. We carefully analyze the dominant reactions and the products of nucleosynthesis, together with the the physical parameters that determine the light curve (including recurrence times, ratios between persistent and burst luminosities, or the extent of the envelope expansion). Results are in qualitative agreement with the observed properties of some well-studied bursting sources. Leakage from the predicted SbSnTe-cycle cannot be discarded in some of our models. Production of 12C (and implications for the mechanism that powers superbursts), light p-nuclei, and the amount of H left over after the bursting episodes will also be discussed.

Jordi Jose; Fermin Moreno; Anuj Parikh; Christian Iliadis

2010-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

57

FREQUENCY OF MAUNDER MINIMUM EVENTS IN SOLAR-TYPE STARS INFERRED FROM ACTIVITY AND METALLICITY OBSERVATIONS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We consider the common proposition that the fraction of chromospherically very inactive stars in a solar-type sample is analogous to the fraction of the Sun's main-sequence lifetime spent in a grand minimum state. In a new approach to this proposition, we examine chromospheric activity log R'{sub HK} in a stellar sample having Hipparcos parallax measurements, and having spectroscopically determined metallicity close to solar (-0.1 {<=} [Fe/H] {<=} 0.1). We evaluate height above the Hipparcos main sequence, and estimate age using isochrones, to identify the most Sun-like stars in this sample. As a threshold below which a star is labeled very inactive, we use the peak of the HK activity distribution mapped over the quiet Sun during the 1968 epoch. We estimate the fraction of Maunder Minimum (MM) analog candidates in our sample at 11.1%. Given the 70 yr duration of the historical MM, this suggests that in any given year there is a 1/630 chance of entering a similar grand minimum. There are three important cautions with this type of estimate. First, recent investigation using actual activity and photometric time series has suggested that very low activity may not be a necessary criterion for identifying a non-cycling MM analog candidate. Second, this type of estimate depends very strongly on the choice of very low activity threshold. Third, in instantaneous measurements of log R'{sub HK}, it is not always clear whether a star is a viable MM analog candidate or merely an older star nearing the end of its main-sequence lifetime.

Lubin, Dan [Scripps Institution of Oceanography, University of California, San Diego, CA 92093-0221 (United States); Tytler, David; Kirkman, David [Center for Astrophysics and Space Science, University of California, San Diego, CA 92093-0424 (United States)

2012-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

58

Influences on the oceanic biogeochemical cycling of the hybrid-type metals, cobalt, iron, and manganese  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Trace metal cycling is one of many processes that influence ocean ecosystem dynamics. Cobalt, iron, and manganese are redox active trace metal micro-nutrients with oceanic distributions that are influenced by both biological ...

Noble, Abigail Emery

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Thermoelectric material including a multiple transition metal-doped type I clathrate crystal structure  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A thermoelectric material includes a multiple transition metal-doped type I clathrate crystal structure having the formula A.sub.8TM.sub.y.sub.1.sup.1TM.sub.y.sub.2.sup.2 . . . TM.sub.y.sub.n.sup.nM.sub.zX.sub.46-y.sub.1.sub.-y.sub.2.sub.- . . . -y.sub.n.sub.-z. In the formula, A is selected from the group consisting of barium, strontium, and europium; X is selected from the group consisting of silicon, germanium, and tin; M is selected from the group consisting of aluminum, gallium, and indium; TM.sup.1, TM.sup.2, and TM.sup.n are independently selected from the group consisting of 3d, 4d, and 5d transition metals; and y.sub.1, y.sub.2, y.sub.n and Z are actual compositions of TM.sup.1, TM.sup.2, TM.sup.n, and M, respectively. The actual compositions are based upon nominal compositions derived from the following equation: z=8q.sub.A-|.DELTA.q.sub.1|y.sub.1-|.DELTA.q.sub.2|y.sub.2- . . . -|.DELTA.q.sub.n|y.sub.n, wherein q.sub.A is a charge state of A, and wherein .DELTA.q.sub.1, .DELTA.q.sub.2, .DELTA.q.sub.n are, respectively, the nominal charge state of the first, second, and n-th TM.

Yang, Jihui (Lakeshore, CA); Shi, Xun (Troy, MI); Bai, Shengqiang (Shanghai, CN); Zhang, Wenqing (Shanghai, CN); Chen, Lidong (Shanghai, CN); Yang, Jiong (Shanghai, CN)

2012-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

60

The Ages and Metallicities of Early Type Galaxies in the Fornax Cluster  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We have measured central line strengths for a complete sample of early type galaxies in the Fornax cluster, comprising 11 elliptical and 11 lenticular galaxies, more luminous than M_B=-17. In contrast to the elliptical galaxies in the sample studied by Gonzalez (and recently revisited by Trager) we find that the Fornax ellipticals follow the locus of galaxies of fixed age in Worthey's models and have metallicities varying from roughly solar to three times solar. The lenticular galaxies however exhibit a substantial spread to younger luminosity weighted ages indicating a more extended star formation history. We present measurements of the more sensitive indices: C4668 and Hgamma_A; these confirm and re-enforce the conclusions that the elliptical galaxies are coeval and that only the lenticular galaxies show symptoms of late star-formation. The inferred difference in the age distribution between lenticular and elliptical galaxies is a robust conclusion as the models generate consistent relative ages using different age and metallicity indicators even though the absolute ages remain uncertain. The young luminosity weighted ages of the S0s in the Fornax cluster are consistent with the recent discovery that the fraction of S0 galaxies in intermediate redshift clusters is a factor of 2-3 lower than found locally and suggests that a fraction of the cluster spiral galaxy population has evolved to quiescence in the 5 Gyr interval from z=0.5 to the present. Two of the faintest lenticular galaxies in our sample have blue continua and strong Balmer-line absorption suggesting starbursts \\la2 Gyrs ago. These may be the low redshift analogues of the starburst or post-starburst galaxies seen in clusters at z=0.3, similar to the Hdelta strong galaxies in the Coma cluster.

Harald Kuntschner; Roger L. Davies

1997-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "type nickel metal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

THE COORDINATION CHEMISTRY OF METAL SURFACES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

48 and the cluster chemistry by the The nickel and platinumL. Muetterties Department of Chemistry, Lawrence Berkeleyphenomenon in metal surface chemistry. Ultra high vacuw:n

Muetterties, Earl L.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Fourth International Symposium on Recycling of Metals  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Combining Lead-Zinc 2000 and Recycling of Metals and Engineered ... Andreas Sigmund, RSR Technologies, Inc. Secondary Copper, Nickel and Cobalt

63

Switchable mirrors based on nickel-magnesium films  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A new type of electrochromic mirror electrode based on reversible uptake of hydrogen in nickel magnesium alloy films is reported. Thin,magnesium-rich Ni-Mg films prepared on glass substrates by cosputtering from Ni and Mg targets are mirror-like in appearance and have low visible transmittance. Upon exposure to hydrogen gas or on reduction in alkaline electrolyte, the films take up hydrogen and become transparent. When hydrogen is removed, the mirror properties are recovered. The transition is believed to result from reversible formation of Mg2NiH4 and MgH2. A thin overlayer of palladium was found to enhance the kinetics of hydrogen insertion and extraction,and to protect the metal surface against oxidation.

Richardson,Thomas J.; Slack, Jonathan L.; Armitage, Robert D.; Kostecki, Robert; Farangis, Baker; Rubin, Michael D.

2001-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

64

Nickel and Nitric  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... based on nitric and nitrates, to the needs and opportunities in laterite nickel processing. ... Alternative Coolants and Cooling System Designs for Safer Freeze Lined ... Studies on Refining Cobalt Salt Solution by Extraction Chromatography to...

65

The evaluation of mechanical stresses developed in underlying silicon substrates due to electroless nickel under bump metallization using synchrotron X-ray topography  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The switch-over to the use of flip-chip Si integrated circuit bonding techniques has been driven by a need to develop higher power and lower voltage devices, capable of carrying larger currents with greater reliability. With the increased use of solder ... Keywords: 07.10.Pz, 61.10.Yh, 61.72.Ff, 62.20.-x, 65.70.+y, 68.35.Ct, 68.35.Gy, 85.40.-e, 85.40.Ls, 85.40.Sz, 89.20.+a, Electroless Ni(P) deposition, Electronic packaging, Reliability, Solder bump, Strain, Under-bump metallization (UBM), X-ray topography

D. Noonan; P. J. McNally; W. -M. Chen; A. Lankinen; L. Knuuttila; T. O. Tuomi; A. N. Danilewsky; R. Simon

2006-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Spontaneous discharge in nickel-zinc accumulations  

SciTech Connect

The authors have examined discharge in nickel-zinc accumulators and monitored the gas. The measurements were made at room temperature with types having two layers of hydrated cellulose separators on the zinc electrodes and capron separators on the nickel oxide ones. There was a ratio of 2.5 between the active masses of the negative and positive electrodes. After three controlled cycles the accumulators were tested for spontaneous discharge. Then they determined the spontaneous discharge after use. The hydrogen, oxygen, and nitrogen in the gas were determined by a gasometric method in combination with gas chromatography. The zinc and the nickel oxide electrodes contribute to the self-discharge, which considerably exceeds the capacity loss determined from the hydrogen production. The zinc electrode corrosion indicated by the hydrogen production increases when the accumulator is operated. When a charged battery is stored, nitrogen is produced as well as hydrogen and oxygen. The nitrate accelerates the spontaneous discharge.

Dmitrenko, V.E.; Zubov, M.S.; Kuznetsova, L.N.; Okhlobystin, N.I.; Toguzov, B.M.; Tikhomirov, Yu.V.

1988-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

67

Nickel gradient electrode  

SciTech Connect

This invention relates generally to rechargeable batteries, and, in particular, relates to batteries that use nickel electrodes. It provides an improved nickel electrode with a selected gradient of additive materials. The concentration of additives in the impregnating solution are controlled during impregnation such that an additive gradient is generated. In the situation where the highest ionic conductivity is needed at the current collector boundary with the active material, the electrochemical impregnating solution is initially high in additive, and at the end of impregnation has been adjusted to significantly lower additive concentration. For chemical impregnation, the electrodes are similarly dipped in solutions that are initially high in additive. This invention is suitable for conventional additives such as cobalt, cadmium, barium, manganese, and zinc. It is therefore one objective of the invention to provide an improved nickel electrode of a battery cell with an additive in the active material to increase the life of the battery cell. Another objective is to provide for an improved nickel electrode having a greater concentration of additive near the current collector of nickel.

Zimmerman, A.H.

1988-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

68

Nickel-iron battery system safety. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Eagle-Picher Industries conducted a literature search and experimental tests to characterize the generated flow rates of gaseous hydrogen (GH/sub 2/) and gaseous oxygen (GO/sub 2/) from an electrical vehicle (EV) nickel-iron battery system. The resulting gassing rates were used to experimentally evaluate the flame quenching capabilities of several candidate devices to prevent the propagation of flame within batteries having central watering/venting systems. The battery generated hydrogen (GH/sub 2/) and oxygen (GO/sub 2/) gasses were measured for a complete charge and discharge cycle. The data correlates well with accepted theory during strong overcharge conditions indicating that the measurements are valid for other portions of the cycle. Tests have confirmed that the gas mixture in the cells is always flammable regardless of the battery status. Research of flame arrestor literature yielded little information regarding their operation with hydrogen-oxygen mixtures. It was indicated that a conventional flame arrestor would not be effective over the broad spectrum of gassing conditions presented by a nickel-iron battery. Four different types of protective devices were evaluated. A foam-metal arrestor design was successful in quenching GH/sub 2/-GO/sub 2/ flames, however; the application of this flame arrestor to individual cell or module protection in a battery is problematic. A possible rearrangement of the watering/venting system to accept the partial protection of simple one-way valves is presented. This in combination with the successful foam-metal arrestor as main vent protection, could result in a significant improvement in battery protection. This concept was not tested.

Saltat, R.

1984-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Trace Metals in Oil Laboratory Proficiency Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Lab Proficiency Testing service for Trace Metals in Oil. Soybean oil sample to test for Iron, Copper, and Nickel using AOCS Official method Ca 18-79. Trace Metals in Oil Laboratory Proficiency Program Laboratory Proficiency Program (LPP) aocs applicants

70

Corrosion investigation of multilayered ceramics and experimental nickel alloys in SCWO process environments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A corrosion investigation was done at MODAR, Inc., using a supercritical water oxidation (SCWO) vessel reactor. Several types of multilayered ceramic rings and experimental nickel alloy coupons were exposed to a chlorinated cutting oil TrimSol, in the SCWO process. A corrosion casing was designed and mounted in the vessel reactor with precautions to minimize chances of degrading the integrity of the pressure vessel. Fifteen of the ceramic coated rings were stacked vertically in the casing at one time for each test. There was a total of 36 rings. The rings were in groupings of three rings that formed five sections. Each section saw a different SCWO environment, ranging from 650 to 300{degrees}C. The metal coupons were mounted on horizontal threaded holders welded to a vertical rod attached to the casing cover in order to hang down the middle of the casing. The experimental nickel alloys performed better than the baseline nickel alloys. A titania multilayered ceramic system sprayed onto a titanium ring remained intact after 120-180 hours of exposure. This is the longest time any coating system has withstood such an environment without significant loss.

Garcia, K.M.; Mizia, R.

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Hardfacing with cobalt and nickel alloys  

SciTech Connect

The use of cobalt or nickel alloys for added wear resistance was initiated in the early 1900s with the development of the cobalt-chromium-tungsten family of alloys. The cobalt alloys were called the Stellite'' because of their bright, shiny, nontarnished appearance. Further development and characterization of this alloy system established its usage in unlubricated metal-to-metal contact or erosion by high-velocity fluid or solid particulate impingement. Initially, the alloys were used as solid castings but later were applied by welding to tougher or more ductile substrates, hence the birth of the hardfacing industry. Many of the original Stellite compositions are still in use, but many others, including the nickel and iron alloys, have been developed for special applications or for use by newer application procedures. Examining the microstructural features and wear properties of these families of hardfacing alloys can help in choosing the right alloy for the job. Various cobalt and nickel alloys, their available product forms and the corresponding hardfacing methods, are reviewed in this article.

Wu, J.B.C. (Stoody Deloro Stellite, Inc., St. Louis, MO (United States)); Redman, J. (Redman (James), Los Angles, CA (United States))

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

CO2/oxalate Cathodes as Safe and Efficient Alternatives in High Energy Density Metal-Air Type Rechargeable Batteries  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present theoretical analysis on why and how rechargeable metal-air type batteries can be made significantly safer and more practical by utilizing CO2/oxalate conversions instead of O2/peroxide or O2/hydroxide ones, in the positive electrode. Metal-air batteries, such as the Li-air one, may have very large energy densities, comparable to that of gasoline, theoretically allowing for long range all-electric vehicles. There are, however, still significant challenges, especially related to the safety of their underlying chemistries, the robustness of their recharging and the need of supplying high purity O2 from air to the battery. We point out that the CO2/oxalate reversible electrochemical conversion is a viable alternative of the O2-based ones, allowing for similarly high energy density and almost identical voltage, while being much safer through the elimination of aggressive oxidant peroxides and the use of thermally stable, non-oxidative and environmentally benign oxalates instead.

Nemeth, Karoly

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

High Thermal Gradient Directional Solidification with Liquid Metal ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, High Thermal Gradient Directional Solidification with Liquid Metal Cooling and Its Application in the Processing of Nickel-Based Superalloys.

74

Increasing Coke Impurities Is this Really a Problem for Metal ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstract Scope, Increases in the Vanadium and Nickel content of anode grade coke in recent years have predictably affected smelter metal quality. This has now...

75

Predicting Nickel Precipitate Formation in Contaminated Soils. (3717)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Predicting Nickel Precipitate Formation in Contaminated Soils. (3717) Authors: E. Peltier* - Univ in contaminated soils plays a crucial role in determining the long term fate of toxic metal pollutants speciation in laboratory contaminated soils with thermodynamic and kinetic analyses of precipitate stability

Sparks, Donald L.

76

Hysteresis During Cycling of Nickel Hydroxide Active Material  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hysteresis During Cycling of Nickel Hydroxide Active Material Hysteresis During Cycling of Nickel Hydroxide Active Material Title Hysteresis During Cycling of Nickel Hydroxide Active Material Publication Type Journal Article Year of Publication 2001 Authors Srinivasan, Venkat, John W. Weidner, and John S. Newman Journal Electrochemical Society Volume 148 Start Page A969 Issue 9 Pagination A969-A980 Date Published 04/2001 Abstract The nickel hydroxide electrode is known to exhibit a stable hysteresis loop, with the potential on charge being higher than that on discharge at every state-of-charge ~SOC!.What we show here is that this loop created during a complete charge and discharge ~i.e., boundary curves! is not sufficient to define the state of the system. Rather, internal paths within the boundary curves ~i.e., scanning

77

Raney nickel catalytic device  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A catalytic device for use in a conventional coal gasification process which includes a tubular substrate having secured to its inside surface by expansion a catalytic material. The catalytic device is made by inserting a tubular catalytic element, such as a tubular element of a nickel-aluminum alloy, into a tubular substrate and heat-treating the resulting composite to cause the tubular catalytic element to irreversibly expand against the inside surface of the substrate.

O' Hare, Stephen A. (Vienna, VA)

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

ELECTRODEPOSITION OF NICKEL ON URANIUM  

SciTech Connect

Electrodeposited nickel coatings on uranium for protection from destructive corrosion in boiling water wns investigated. Correlation between the pretreatment of the uranium and subsequent protection by thin nickel coatings was established. Thin electrodeposited nickel coatings provide better protection when applied to a matte surface produced by blasting with an aqueous suspension of silica (100 mesh) followed by a cathodic treatment in 35 wt% sulfuric acid than when applied to the rough surfaces produced on uranium by anodic pretreatments and acid pickling. Blistering of nickel electrodeposits arising from hydrogen was encountered and eliminated. (auth)

Beard, A.P.; Crooks, D.D.

1954-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

79

Dispersion enhanced metal/zeolite catalysts  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Dispersion stabilized zeolite supported metal catalysts are provided as bimetallic catalyst combinations. The catalyst metal is in a reduced zero valent form while the dispersion stabilizer metal is in an unreduced ionic form. Representative catalysts are prepared from platinum or nickel as the catalyst metal and iron or chromium dispersion stabilizer.

Sachtler, Wolfgang M. H. (Evanston, IL); Tzou, Ming-Shin (Evanston, IL); Jiang, Hui-Jong (Evanston, IL)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Method Of Bonding A Metal Connection To An Electrode Including A Core Having A Fiber Or Foam Type Structure For An Electrochemical Cell, An  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of bonding a metal connection to an electrode including a core having a fiber or foam-type structure for an electrochemical cell, in which method at least one metal strip is pressed against one edge of the core and is welded thereto under compression, wherein, at least in line with the region in which said strip is welded to the core, which is referred to as the "main core", a retaining core of a type analogous to that of the main core is disposed prior to the welding.

Loustau, Marie-Therese (Bordeaux, FR); Verhoog, Roelof (Bordeaux, FR); Precigout, Claude (Lormont, FR)

1996-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "type nickel metal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Non-Sintered Nickel Electrode  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A non-sintered nickel electrode contains a conductive support and a paste comprising an electrochemically active material containing nickel hydroxide and a binder which is a mixture of an elastomer and a crystalline polymer. The proportion of the elastomer is in the range 25% to 60% by weight of the binder and the proportion of the crystalline polymer is in the range 40% to 75% by weight of the binder.

Bernard, Patrick (Massy, FR); Dennig, Corinne (Asnieres sur Seine, FR); Cocciantelli, Jean-Michel (Bordeaux, FR); Alcorta, Jose (Bordeaux, FR); Coco, Isabelle (Dax, FR)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Strained Ge channel p-type metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistors grown on Si???xGex/Si virtual substrates  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We have fabricated strained Ge channel p-type metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistors (p-MOSFETs) on Si??.??Ge??.?? virtual substrates. The poor interface between silicon dioxide (SiO??) and the Ge channel ...

Lee, Minjoo L.

83

A plant growth-promoting bacterium that decreases nickel toxicity in seedlings  

SciTech Connect

A plant growth-promoting bacterium, Kluyvera ascorbata SUD165, that contained high levels of heavy metals was isolated from soil collected near Sudbury, Ontario, Canada. The bacterium was resistant to the toxic effects of Ni{sup 2+}, Pb{sup 2+}, Zn{sup 2+}, and CrO{sub 4}{sup {minus}}, produced a siderophore(s), and displayed 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid deaminase activity. Canola seeds inoculated with this bacterium and then grown under gnotobiotic conditions in the presence of high concentrations of nickel chloride were partially protected against nickel toxicity. In addition, protection by the bacterium against nickel toxicity was evident in pot experiments with canola and tomato seeds. The presence of K. ascorbata SUD165 had no measurable influence on the amount of nickel accumulated per milligram (dry weight) of either roots or shoots of canola plants. Therefore, the bacterial plant growth-promoting effect in the presence of nickel was probably not attributable to the reduction of nickel uptake by seedlings. Rather, it may reflect the ability of the bacterium to lower the level of stress ethylene induced by the nickel.

Burd, G.I.; Dixon, D.G.; Glick, B.R. [Univ. of Waterloo, Ontario (Canada). Dept. of Biology

1998-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Metal-ceramic joint assembly  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A metal-ceramic joint assembly in which a brazing alloy is situated between metallic and ceramic members. The metallic member is either an aluminum-containing stainless steel, a high chromium-content ferritic stainless steel or an iron nickel alloy with a corrosion protection coating. The brazing alloy, in turn, is either an Au-based or Ni-based alloy with a brazing temperature in the range of 9500 to 1200.degree. C.

Li, Jian (New Milford, CT)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Stabilized nickel-zinc battery  

SciTech Connect

An alkaline nickel-zinc cell which has (1) a nickel-nickel hydroxide cathode; (2) a zinc-zinc oxide anode containing (A) a corrosion inhibitor such as PBO, SNO2, Tl2O3, in(OH)3 or mixtures thereof; (B) a slight corrosion accelerator such as cdo, bi2o3, ga2o3, or mixtures thereof; and (C) a zinc active material; (3) a mass-transport separator; (4) an alkaline electrolyte; and (5) means for charging the cell with an interrupted current having a frequency of from more than zero to 16 hertz with a rest period of not less than 60 milliseconds. Another desirable feature is the use of a pressure-cutoff switch to terminate charging when the internal pressure of the cell reaches a selected value in the range of from 5 to 8 psig.

Himy, A.; Wagner, O.C.

1982-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

86

Method of manufacturing positive nickel hydroxide electrodes  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of manufacturing a positive nickel hydroxide electrode is discussed. A highly porous core structure of organic material having a fibrous or reticular texture is uniformly coated with nickel powder and then subjected to a thermal treatment which provides sintering of the powder coating and removal of the organic core material. A consolidated, porous nickel support structure is thus produced which has substantially the same texture and porosity as the initial core structure. To provide the positive electrode including the active mass, nickel hydroxide is deposited in the pores of the nickel support structure.

Gutjahr, M.A.; Schmid, R.; Beccu, K.D.

1975-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

87

Estimation of the release and migration of nickel through soils and groundwater at the Hanford Site 218-E-12B Burial Ground  

SciTech Connect

An assessment was performed to evaluate release and transport of nickel from large metal components containing nickel-bearing alloys at the Hanford Site 218-E-12B Burial Ground. The potential for nickel within the components to enter groundwater under the burial site was investigated by examining available data on the site`s geology, geochemistry, and geohydrology to develop a conceptual model for release and transport of nickel from the components. In addition, laboratory studies were performed to provide information needed for the model, but which was not available from existing databases. Estimates of future concentrations of nickel radioisotopes ({sup 59}Ni and {sup 63}Ni) and total elemental nickel in the unconfined aquifer and in the Columbia River were developed based on this information.

Rhoads, K.; Bjornstad, B.N.; Lewis, R.E. [and others

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

The peculiar motions of early-type galaxies in two distant regions - V. The Mg-sigma relation, age and metallicity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We examine the Mg-sigma relation for early-type galaxies in the EFAR sample and its dependence on cluster properties. A maximum likelihood fit gives global Mg-sigma relations of Mgb'=0.131log(sigma)-0.131 and Mg2=0.257log(sigma)-0.305, with intrinsic scatter of 0.016 mag in Mgb' and 0.023 mag in Mg2. The zeropoint for cD galaxies is higher than for E/S0 galaxies, implying cDs are older and/or more metal-rich than E/S0s with the same sigma. Mg-sigma zeropoint variations between clusters are consistent with the number of galaxies observed per cluster and the global intrinsic scatter in Mg-sigma. We find no significant correlation between the Mg-sigma zeropoint and the cluster velocity dispersion, X-ray luminosity or X-ray temperature over a wide range in cluster mass. We compare the intrinsic scatter in the Mg-sigma and Fundamental Plane (FP) relations with stellar population models to constrain the dispersion in ages, metallicities and M/L ratios for early-type galaxies at fixed sigma. Variations in age alone or metallicity alone cannot explain the measured intrinsic scatter in both Mg-sigma and the FP. We derive the joint constraints on the dispersion in age and metallicity implied by the scatter in the Mg-sigma and FP relations for a simple Gaussian model. We find upper limits on the dispersions at fixed sigma of 32% in dt/t and 38% in dZ/Z if variations in age and metallicity are uncorrelated; only strongly anti-correlated variations lead to significantly higher upper limits. The joint distribution of residuals from the Mg-sigma and FP relations is only marginally consistent with a model having no correlation between age and metallicity, and is better-matched by a model in which age and metallicity variations are moderately anti-correlated, with younger galaxies being more metal-rich. (Abridged)

Matthew Colless; David Burstein; Roger L. Davies; Robert K. McMahan; R. P. Saglia; Gary Wegner

1998-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

89

Homogeneous Precipitation of Nickel Hydroxide Powders  

SciTech Connect

Precipitation and characterization of nickel hydroxide powders were investigated. A comprehensive precipitation model incorporating the metal ion hydrolysis, complexation and precipitation reactions was developed for the production of the powders with urea precipitation method. Model predictions on Ni{sup 2+} precipitation rate were confirmed with precipitation experiments carried out at 90 C. Experimental data and model predictions were in remarkable agreement. Uncertainty in the solubility product data of nickel hydroxides was found to be the large contributor to the error. There were demonstrable compositional variations across the particle cross-sections and the growth mechanism was determined to be the aggregation of primary crystallites. This implied that there is a change in the intercalate chemistry of the primary crystallites with digestion time. Predicted changes in the concentrations of simple and complex ions in the solution support the proposed mechanism. The comprehensive set of hydrolysis reactions used in the model described above allows the investigation of other systems provided that accurate reaction constants are available. the fact that transition metal ions like Ni{sup 2+} form strong complexes with ammonia presents a challenge in the full recovery of the Ni{sup 2+}. On the other hand, presence of Al{sup 3+} facilitates the complete precipitation of Ni{sup 2+} in about 3 hours of digestion. A challenge in their predictive modeling studies had been the fact that simultaneous incorporation of more than one metal ion necessitates a different approach than just using the equilibrium constants of hydrolysis, complexation and precipitation reactions. Another limitation of using equilibrium constants is that the nucleation stage of digestion, which is controlled mainly by kinetics, is not fully justified. A new program released by IBM Almaden Research Center (Chemical Kinetics Simulator{trademark}, Version 1.01) lets the user change the order of kinetic components of a reaction which was set to stoichiometric constant with which the species appear in the reaction in KINSIM by default. For instance, in the case of LDH precipitation, the new program allows to change the order of species in the reactions associated with Al{sup 3+} and let the Ni{sup 2+} reactions take over. This could be carried on iteratively until a good fit between the experimental data and the predictions were observed. However for such studies availability of accurate equilibrium constants (especially for the solubility products for the solid phase) is a prerequisite.

Bora Mavis

2003-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

90

Iron aluminides and nickel aluminides as materials for chemical air separation  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention is directed to a chemical air separation process using a molten salt solution of alkali metal nitrate and nitrite wherein the materials of construction of the containment for the process are chosen from intermetallic alloys of nickel and/or iron aluminide wherein the aluminum content is 28 atomic percent or greater to impart enhanced corrosion resistance.

Kang, Doohee (Macungie, PA)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Nickel aluminides and nickel-iron aluminides for use in oxidizing environments  

SciTech Connect

Nickel aluminides and nickel-iron aluminides treated with hafnium or zirconium, boron and cerium to which have been added chromium to significantly improve high temperature ductility, creep resistance and oxidation properties in oxidizing environments.

Liu, Chain T. (Oak Ridge, TN)

1988-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

92

Comparative Carcinogenicity of Nickel Compounds: A Review of Nickel Toxicity, Pharmacokinetics, and Mode of Action  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes a comprehensive integrated review of the current extensive toxicological and epidemiological literature on nickel compounds. Nickel compounds are present in relatively high quantities in oil fuels combusted to generate electricity.

1999-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

93

Templated synthesis of nickel nanoparticles: Toward heterostructured nanocomposites for efficient hydrogen storage  

SciTech Connect

The world is currently facing an energy and environmental crisis for which new technologies are needed. Development of cost-competitive materials for catalysis and hydrogen storage on-board motor vehicles is crucial to lead subsequent generations into a more sustainable and energy independent future. This thesis presents work toward the scalable synthesis of bimetallic heterostructures that can enable hydrogen to compete with carbonaceous fuels by meeting the necessary gravimetric and volumetric energy densities and by enhancing hydrogen sorption/desorption kinetics near ambient temperatures and pressures. Utilizing the well-known phenomenon of hydrogen spillover, these bimetallic heterostructures could work by lowering the activation energy for hydrogenation and dehydrogenation of metals. Herein, we report a novel method for the scalable synthesis of silica templated zero-valent nickel particles (Ni?SiO{sub 2}) that hold promise for the synthesis of nickel nanorods for use in bimetallic heterostructures for hydrogen storage. Our synthesis proceeds by chemical reduction of a nickel-hydrazine complex with sodium borohydride followed by calcination under hydrogen gas to yield silica encapsulated nickel particles. Transmission electron microscopy and powder X-ray diffraction were used to characterize the general morphology of the resultant nanocapsules as well as the crystalline phases of the incorporated Ni{sup 0} nanocrystals. The structures display strong magnetic behavior at room temperature and preliminary data suggests nickel particle size can be controlled by varying the amount of nickel precursor used in the synthesis. Calcination under different environments and TEM analysis provides evidence for an atomic migration mechanism of particle formation. Ni?SiO{sub 2} nanocapsules were used as seeds to induce heterogeneous nucleation and subsequent growth within the nanocapsule via electroless nickel plating. Nickel nanoparticle growth occurs under high temperature alkaline conditions, however silica nanocapsule integrity is not maintained due to the incompatibility of silica with the growth conditions. Silica nanocapsule integrity is maintained under low temperature neutral conditions, but nickel particle growth is not observed. Through FTIR and UV/Vis analysis, we show the degree of crosslinking and condensation increases in calcined silica compared to as-synthesized silica. We propose the increased density of the silica nanocapsule hinders mass transfer of the bulky nickel precursor complex from solution and onto the surface of the catalytic zero-valent nickel seed within the nanocapsule cavity. Decreasing the density of the silica nanocapsule can be achieved through co-condensation of tetraethylorthosilicate with an alkyl functionalized silane followed by calcination to remove the organic component or by chemical etching in alkaline solution, but will not be addressed in this thesis.

Nelson, Nicholas Cole [Ames Laboratory

2013-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

94

Metallic glass composition. [That does not embrittle upon annealing  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This patent pertains to a metallic glass alloy that is either iron-based or nickel-based or based on a mixture of iron and nickel, containing lesser amounts of elements selected from the group boron, silicon, carbon and phosphorous to which is added an amount of a ductility-enhancing element selected from the group cerium, lanthanum, praseodymium and neodymium sufficient to increase ductility of the metallic glass upon annealing.

Kroeger, D.M.; Koch, C.C.

1984-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

95

PROCESS OF COATING WITH NICKEL BY THE DECOMPOSITION OF NICKEL CARBONYL  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved process is presented for the deposition of nickel coatings by the thermal decomposition of nickel carbonyl vapor. The improvement consists in incorporating a small amount of hydrogen sulfide gas in the nickel carbonyl plating gas. It is postulated that the hydrogen sulfide functions as a catalyst. i

Hoover, T.B.

1959-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Nickel Recovery from Sukinda Chromite Overburden Using ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstract Scope, Shewanella putrefaciens is exploited for recovery of Nickel and Cobalt from Chromite overburden (COB) which is found to have 0.5- 1.0...

97

Nickel Alloys Used in Nuclear Power Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstract Scope, Nickel based alloys are used extensively in nuclear power ... of Zircaloy Liquidus and Solidus with an Instrumented Transvarestraint Test.

98

Nickel-zinc batteries for RPV applications. Interim technical report 15 Nov 78-15 Dec 79  

SciTech Connect

Interim results are presented for a program dealing with the placement of nickel-zinc batteries in specific military applications, namely the BQM-34A and the PQM-102 Remotely Piloted Vehicles. The nickel-zinc system was chosen for these applications because RPV's demand a high quality secondary battery that offers a compromise between long life (calendar and cycle) and low weight and volume. Program tasks include continued development of the nickel zinc system, calendar and cycle life testing of the two candidate batteries, qualification testing, and flight testing in operational RPV's. Test results of developmental cells and batteries include cycle life testing of various separator materials, high rate/low temperature discharges with various types of nickel electrodes, zinc electrode substrate, and charging methods. Calendar and cycle life testing is underway which will demonstrate the ability of the nickel-zinc system to be routinely cycled over an extended period of time.

Dappert, D.

1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Twelve Year Study of Underground Corrosion of Activated Metals  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The subsurface radioactive disposal facility located at the U.S. Department of Energys Idaho site contains neutron-activated metals from non-fuel nuclear-reactor-core components. A long-term corrosion study is being conducted to obtain site-specific corrosion rates to support efforts to more accurately estimate the transfer of activated elements in an arid vadose zone environment. The study uses non-radioactive metal coupons representing the prominent neutron-activated material buried at the disposal location, namely, two types of stainless steels, welded stainless steel, welded nickel-chromium steel alloy, zirconium alloy, beryllium, and aluminum. Additionally, carbon steel (the material used in cask disposal liners and other disposal containers) and duplex stainless steel (high-integrity containers) are also included in the study. This paper briefly describes the test program and presents the corrosion rate results through twelve years of underground exposure.

M. Kay Adler Flitton; Timothy S. Yoder

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Desulfurization with transition metal catalysts. Quarterly summary  

SciTech Connect

The overall objective of this research is to develop desulfurizing transition metal catalysts, which are active in homogeneous media at moderate temperatures and pressures for the purification of coal-derived fuels and chemicals. To this end, the mechanism of action is being examined whereby newly identified nickel(0) complexes desulfurize organosulfur compounds in solution at 65 to 70/sup 0/C. The sulfur compounds under investigation are typical of those commonly encountered in coal-derived liquids and solids, such as thiophenes, sulfides and mercaptans. The following studies on the homogeneous, stoichiometric desulfurizing agent, bis(1,5-cyclooctadiene) nickel(0) ((COD)/sub 2/Ni), were continued: (a) activation of the agent by means of added mono-, bi-/sup 2/ and tri-dentate amines, either of the tertiary or primary amine type; (b) labeling studies designed to reveal the source of the hydrogen that replaces the sulfur in the desulfurization of dibenzothiophene; (c) comparison of the desulfurizing activity of (COD)/sub 2/Ni, both in the presence and in the absence of lithium aluminum hydride; and (d) testing for the role of any biphenylene intermediate in these desulfurizations. Results are reported.

Eisch, J J

1980-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "type nickel metal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Parasitic corrosion-resistant anode for use in metal/air or metal/O/sub 2/ cells  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A consumable metal anode is described which is used in refuelable electrochemical cells and wherein at least a peripheral edge portion of the anode is protected against a corrosive alkaline environment of the cell by the application of a thin metal coating, the coating being formed of metals such as nickel, silver, and gold.

Joy, R.W.; Smith, D.F.

1982-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

102

Parasitic corrosion resistant anode for use in metal/air or metal/O.sub.2 cells  

SciTech Connect

A consumable metal anode which is used in refuelable electrochemical cells and wherein at least a peripheral edge portion of the anode is protected against a corrosive alkaline environment of the cell by the application of a thin metal coating, the coating being formed of metals such as nickel, silver, and gold.

Joy, Richard W. (Santa Clara, CA); Smith, David F. (Boulder Creek, CA)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Plasma Synthesis and Characterization of Nickel Ferrite Nanopowders  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The technique consists of injecting an aqueous solution of nickel and iron nitrate inside a radio-frequency thermal plasma torch in order to generate nickel ferrite...

104

Structure and stability of Co(II)-complexes formed by wild-type and metal-ligand substitution mutants of T4 gene 32 protein  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Phage T4 gene 32 protein (gp32) is a zinc metalloprotein that binds cooperatively and preferentially to single-stranded nucleic acids and functions as a replication and recombination accessory protein. We have previously shown that the ZN(II) coordination by gp32 employs a metal ligand donor set unrelated to any known zinc-finger motif thus far described and is derived from the His64-XI2-Cys77-Xg-Cys87-X2-CYS90 sequence in the ssDNA-binding core domain of the molecule. Crystallographic studies reveal that His64 and Cys77 are derived from two independent p-strands and are relatively more buried from solvent than are Cys87 and Cys9O, which combine to nucleate an (X-helix. In an effort to understand the origin of the stability of the metal complex, we have employed an anaerobic optical spectroscopic, competitive metal binding assay to determine the coordination geometry and association constants (Ka) for the binding of CO(II) to wild-type gp32 and a series of zinc ligand substitution mutants. We find that all non-native metal complexes retain tetrahedral coordination geometry but are greatly destabilized in a manner essentially independent of whether a new protein-derived coordination bond is forfned (e.g., in H64C gp32) or not. Quantitative Co(H) binding isotherms for the His64 mutants reveal that these gp32s form a dimeric CYS4 tetrathiolate intermediate complex of differing affinities at limiting [Co]f; each then rearranges at high [Co]f to form a monomolecular site of the expected geometry and Ka=IXIO4 M-1. C87S and C90A gp32s, in contrast, form a single complex at all [Co]f, consistent with CYS2-His-H20 tetrahedral geometry of Ka=1-2xlo5 M-1. The susceptibility of all mutant metal sites to oxidation by 02 is far greater than the wild-type protein; none appear to be functional ssDNA binding proteins. These studies reveal that the local protein structure greatly limits accommodation of an altered complex in a ligand-specific manner. The implications of this work for de novo design of zinc complexes in proteins will be discussed.

Guo, Juqian

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Behavior of W and WSi(x) Contact Metallization on n- and p- Type GaN  

SciTech Connect

Sputter-deposited W-based contacts on p-GaN (N{sub A} {approximately} 10{sup 18} cm{sup {minus}3}) display non-ohmic behavior independent of annealing temperature when measured at 25 C. The transition to ohmic behavior occurs above {approximately} 250 C as more of the acceptors become ionized. The optimum annealing temperature is {approximately} 700 C under these conditions. These contacts are much more thermally stable than the conventional Ni/Au metallization, which shows a severely degraded morphology even at 700 C. W-based contacts may be ohmic as-deposited on very heavily doped n-GaN, and the specific contact resistance improves with annealing up to {approximately} 900 C.

Abernathy, C.R.; Cao, X.A.; Cole, M.W.; Eizenberg, M.; Lothian, J.R.; Pearton, S.J.; Ren, F.; Shul, R.J.; Zeitouny, A.; Zolper, J.C.

1999-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

106

Recycling - Nickel-based superalloys  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A business and technology perspective on recycling, partiularly recycling of household waste, metals and plastics. 0, 563, Diana Grady, 7/2/2008 9:55 AM

107

New electrically conducting solids based on nickel(II) - bis (1,3-dithiole-2-thione-4,5-diselenolate)  

SciTech Connect

Electrochemical oxidation of the metal-organic complex, nickel(II) - bis(1,3 - dithiole - 2 - thione - 4,5 - diselenolate) (Ni(dsit){sub 2}){sup 2{minus}}, yields highly conducting salts, in which the stoichiometry and packing arrangement depends critically on the site of the counter-cations incorporated. Smaller counter-cations, e.g., tetramethylammonium and tetramethylphosphonium ions, yield salts with a 1:2 cation N:(dsit){sub 2} stoichiometry, while the larger tetraethylammonium ion yields a salt with 2:2 stoichiometry. In both these salts, the Ni(dsit){sub 2} units occur as tightly bound dimers, in which coordination geometry of nickel is a unique, but not unprecedented square-pyramidal type. Moreover, the packing arrangement of (Ni(dsit){sub 2}){sub 2} dimer units in both (Me{sub 4}N) (Ni(dsit){sub 2}){sub 2} and (Me{sub 4}P) (Ni(dsit){sub 2}){sub 2} is {kappa}-type, similar to that found in the organic superconductor with the highest-known T{sub c} (10.4 K), {kappa}-(BEDT-TTF){sub 2}Cu(NCS){sub 2}. Both these salts possess good room temperature conductivities ({sigma}{sub rt} = 36 and 19 S {center dot} cm{sup {minus}1} respectively), but the temperature dependence of their conductivities is characteristic of semiconductors with small bandgaps (E{sub g} = 0.11 and 0.13 eV respectively). The 2:2 salt (Et{sub 4}N){sub 2}(Ni(dsit){sub 2}){sub 2}, on the other hand, has a substantially lower room temperature conductivity, about six orders of magnitude smaller than that of the 1:2 salts. 19 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

Kini, A.M.; Beno, M.A.; Budz, S.; Wang, H.H.; Williams, J.M.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Metallization of large silicon wafers. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A metallization scheme has been developed which allows selective plating of silicon solar cell surfaces. The system is comprised of three layers. Palladium, through the formation of palladium silicide at 300/sup 0/C in nitrogen, makes ohmic contact to the silicon surface. Nickel, plated on top of the palladium silicide layer, forms a solderable interface. Lead-tin solder on the nickel provides conductivity and allows a convenient means for interconnection of cells. To apply this metallization, three chemical plating baths are employed. Palladium is deposited with an immersion palladium solution and an electroless palladium solution, and nickel is deposited with an electroless nickel solution. Solder is applied with a molten solder dip. Extensive development work has been performed to achieve an effective immersion palladium solution formulation, leading to reproducible formation of the palladium silicide contact layer. This metallization system has been repeatedly demonstrated to be extremely effective. Current-voltage characteristic curve fill factors of 78% are easily achieved. This has been done while maintaining metal contact adhesion at such a strength as to fail by fracturing silicon upon perpendicular pull testing rather than be delaminating the metal system. Process specifications and procedures have been prepared.

Pryor, R.A.

109

Nickel porphyrins for memory optical applications  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention relates to a nickel-porphyrin derivative in a matrix, the nickel-porphyrin derivative comprising at least two conformational isomers, a lower-energy-state conformer and a higher-energy-state conformer, such that when the higher-energy-state conformer is generated from the lower-energy-state conformer following absorption of a photon of suitable energy, the time to return to the lower-energy-state conformer is greater than 40 nanoseconds at approximately room temperature. The nickel-porphyrin derivative is useful in optical memory applications.

Shelnutt, John A. (Tijeras, NM); Jia, Songling (Albuquerque, NM); Medforth, Craig (Vacaville, CA); Holten, Dewey (St. Louis, MO); Nelson, Nora Y. (Manteca, CA); Smith, Kevin M. (Davis, CA)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

SN 2010ay is a Luminous and Broad-lined Type Ic Supernova within a Low-metallicity Host Galaxy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

[abridged] We report on our serendipitous pre-discovery detection and detailed follow-up of the broad-lined Type Ic supernova SN 2010ay at z\\approx0.067 imaged by the Pan-STARRS1 3{\\pi} survey just \\sim3 days after explosion. We estimate the explosion date and the peak luminosity of the SN, MR\\approx-20.2 mag, significantly brighter than known GRB-SNe and one of the most luminous SNe Ic ever discovered. We measure the photospheric expansion velocity of the explosion, v_ph\\approx19.2x10^3 km/s at \\sim40 days after explosion. In comparison with other broad-lined SNe, the characteristic velocity of SN 2010ay is 2-5x higher and similar to the measurements for GRB-SNe at comparable epochs. Moreover the velocity declines two times slower than other SNe Ic-BL and GRB-SNe. Assuming that the optical emission is powered by radioactive decay, the peak magnitude implies the synthesis of an unusually large mass of 56 Ni, M_Ni=0.9+0.2 M_solar. Our modeling of the light-curve points to a total ejecta mass, Mej\\approx4.7M_so...

Sanders, Nathan E; Valenti, S; Chomiuk, L; Berger, E; Smartt, S; Hurley, K; Barthelmy, S D; Chornock, R; Foley, R J; Levesque, E M; Narayan, G; Kirshner, R P; Botticella, M T; Briggs, M S; Connaughton, V; Terada, Y; Gehrels, N; Golenetskii, S; Mazets, E; Cline, T; von Kienlin, A; Boynton, W; Chambers, K C; Grav, T; Heasley, J N; Hodapp, K W; Jedicke, R; Kaiser, N; Kudritzki, R -P; Luppino, G A; Lupton, R H; Magnier, E A; Monet, D G; Morgan, J S; Onaka, P M; Price, P A; Stubbs, C W; Tonry, J L; Wainscoat, R J; Waterson, M F

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Novel Ternary Molten Salt Electrolytes for intermediate-temperature sodium/nickel chloride batteries  

SciTech Connect

The sodium-nickel chloride (ZEBRA) battery is typically operated at relatively high temperature (250~350C) to achieve adequate electrochemical performance. Reducing the operating temperature in the range of 150 to 200C can lead to enhanced cycle life by suppressing temperature related degradation mechanisms. The reduced temperature range also allows for lower cost materials of construction such as elastomeric sealants and gaskets. To achieve adequate electrochemical performance at lower operating temperatures requires an overall reduction in ohmic losses associated with temperature. This includes reducing the ohmic resistance of ?-alumina solid electrolyte (BASE) and the incorporation of low melting point molten salt as the secondary electrolyte. In present work, planar-type Na/NiCl2 cells with a thin flat plate BASE (600 ?m) and low melting point secondary electrolyte were evaluated at reduced temperatures. Molten salt formulation for use as secondary electrolytes were fabricated by the partial replace of NaCl in the standard secondary electrolyte (NaAlCl4) with other lower melting point alkali metal salts such as NaBr, LiCl, and LiBr. Electrochemical characterization of the ternary molten salts demonstrated , improved ionic conductivity, and sufficient electrochemical window at reduced temperatures. Furthermore, Na/NiCl2 cells with 50 mol% NaBr-containing secondary electrolyte exhibited reduced polarizations at 175C compared to the cell with the standard NaAlCl4 catholyte. The cells also exhibited stable cycling performance even at 150oC.

Li, Guosheng; Lu, Xiaochuan; Coyle, Christopher A.; Kim, Jin Yong; Lemmon, John P.; Sprenkle, Vincent L.; Yang, Zhenguo

2012-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

112

Radioactive Nickel-63 - ORNL Neutron Sciences  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Making Radioactive Nickel-63 Making Radioactive Nickel-63 ORNL-Supplied Nickel-63 Enables High-Sensitivity Explosives, Chemical Weapons, and Narcotics Detectors at Airports Explosives and narcotics detector. Detectors based on ion mobility spectrometry using ORNL 63Ni can now satisfy enhanced Homeland Security requirements at airports and other sensitive locations. When Transportation Security Administration (TSA) inspectors swipe a cloth over your luggage and then place it in an analyzer to check for explosives residue, they are using a device containing 63Ni, a radioactive isotope of nickel, made at ORNL. ORNL is the exclusive producer for 63Ni in North America and perhaps worldwide. "Our only competition would probably be Russia. They have high-flux research reactors and may well be supplying the material also,"

113

X-Ray Absorption Spectroscopy of Transition Metal-Magnesium Hydride Thin  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

X-Ray Absorption Spectroscopy of Transition Metal-Magnesium Hydride Thin X-Ray Absorption Spectroscopy of Transition Metal-Magnesium Hydride Thin Films Title X-Ray Absorption Spectroscopy of Transition Metal-Magnesium Hydride Thin Films Publication Type Journal Article LBNL Report Number LBNL-50574 Year of Publication 2002 Authors Richardson, Thomas J., Baker Farangis, Jonathan L. Slack, Ponnusamy Nachimuthu, Rupert C. C. Perera, Nobumichi Tamura, and Michael D. Rubin Journal Journal of Alloys and Compounds Volume 356-357 Start Page 204 Pagination 204-207 Date Published 08/2003 Keywords A. hydrogen storage materials, NEXAFS, thin film s; C. EXAFS, x-ray diffraction Abstract Mixed metal thin films containing magnesium and a first-row transition element exhibit very large changes in both reflectance and transmittance on exposure to hydrogen gas. Changes in electronic structure and coordination of the magnesium and transition metal atoms during hydrogen absorption were studied using dynamic in situ transmission mode X-ray absorption spectroscopy. Mg K-edge and Ni, Co, and Ti L-edge spectra reflect both reversible and irreversible changes in the metal environments. A significant shift in the nickel L absorption edge shows it to be an active participant in hydride formation. The effect on cobalt and titanium is much less dramatic, suggesting that these metals act primarily as catalysts for formation of magnesium hydride.

114

Welding and Repair Technology Center: Evaluation of High-Chromium Nickel-Base Welding Alloys, Resistance to Solidification Cracking - Update  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

One of the challenges faced by nuclear power industry engineers and managers responsible for making welding and repair decisions is selection of weld metals that have adequate resistance to stress corrosion cracking (SCC) with acceptable resistance to other forms of cracking. Continued testing and evaluation of new and enhanced high-chromium nickel-base filler metals is important to understanding the influence of slight composition changes on sensitivity to known cracking mechanisms and general ...

2013-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

115

Production of Gas-Solid Structures in Aluminum and Nickel Alloys by Gasar Processing  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Experimental data on directional and bulk solidification of hydrogen-charged samples of aluminum alloy A356 and nickel alloy Inconel 718 are discussed. The solidification structure of the porous zone is shown to be dependent on many process variables. Of these variables, hydrogen content in the melt prior to solidification, and furnace atmospheric pressure during solidification play the decisive role. Also important are the furnace atmosphere composition, the solidification velocity, and the temperature distribution of the liquid metal inside the mold.

Apprill, J.M.; Baldwin, M.D.; Maguire, M.C.; Miszkiel, M.E.; Shapovalov, V.I.

1999-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

116

Magneto-optical Kerr effect studies of Cu2O/nickel heterostructures  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cuprous oxide (Cu"2O) is a diamagnetic p-type semiconductor material, considered to be highly attractive for the rapidly emerging field of oxide electronics. In this work Cu"2O layers with various thicknesses were produced by atomic layer deposition ... Keywords: ALD, Cu2O, MOKE, Nickel, Spintronics

Georgeta Salvan, Peter Robaschik, Michael Fronk, Steve MLler, Thomas Waechtler, Stefan E. Schulz, Robert Mothes, Heinrich Lang, Christian Schubert, Senoy Thomas, Manfred Albrecht, Dietrich R. T. Zahn

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Non-pulsed electrochemical impregnation of flexible metallic battery plaques  

SciTech Connect

A method of loading active battery material into porous, flexible, metallic battery plaques, comprises the following steps: precipitating nickel hydroxide active material within the plaque, by making the plaque cathodic, at a high current density, in an electro-precipitation cell also containing a consumable nickel anode and a solution comprising nickel nitrate, having a pH of between 2.0 and 2.8; electrochemically oxidizing the precipitate in caustic formation solution; and repeating the electro-precipitation step at a low current density.

Maskalick, Nicholas J. (Pittsburgh, PA)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Mercury and Other Trace Metals in Coal  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document summarizes the trace metal analyses of more than 150 as-received bituminous, sub-bituminous, and lignite coal samples from full-scale power plants. Analyses for mercury, arsenic, beryllium, cadmium, chromium, copper, nickel, and lead offer a benchmark for utilities to compare and contrast their own estimates and measurements of trace element content in coal.

1997-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

119

Crystallographic studies of the metal-responsive transcription factor NikR  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Metal ion homeostasis is critical to the survival of all cells, because requirements for these essential nutrients must be balanced with their toxicity when present at elevated concentrations. Regulation of nickel ...

Schreiter, Eric R. (Eric Robert)

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Dual role of nickel in sodium/nickel chloride batteries  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Corrosion of Ni metal in chloroaluminate melts containing sulfur additive was investigated in order to see whether Ni could be used not only as active material but also as current collector and cell- case material. Three layers were found after three days; they comprised NiCl{sub 2}, Ni sulfide, and NaAlCl{sub 4}. Ni-200 wires were also tested under tension in NaAlCl{sub 4} + 2 wt%S at 300 C; no stress corrosion was observed. Results show that Ni metal is very stable. 9 refs, 3 figs. (DLC)

Prakash, J.; Redey, L.; Skocypec, R.; Lowrey, R.; Vissers, D.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "type nickel metal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Inspection of Nickel Alloy Welds: Results from Five Year International Program  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission established and coordinated the international Program for the Inspection of Nickel alloy Components (PINC). The goal of PINC was to evaluate the capabilities of various nondestructive examination (NDE) techniques to detect and characterize primary water stress corrosion cracking (PWSCC) in dissimilar metal welds. Round-robin results showed that a combination of conventional and phased-array ultrasound provide the highest performance for flaw detection and depth sizing in dissimilar metal piping welds. The effective detection of flaws in bottom-mounted instrumentation penetrations by eddy current and ultrasound shows that it may be possible to reliably inspect these components in the field.

Prokofiev, Iouri; Cumblidge, Stephen E.; Doctor, Steven R.

2011-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

122

Removal of arsenic, vanadium, and/or nickel compounds from petroliferous liquids  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Described is a process for removing arsenic, vanadium, and/or nickel from petroliferous derived liquids (shale oil, SRC, etc.) by contacting said liquid at an elevated temperature with a divinylbenzene-crosslinked polystyrene having catechol ligands anchored thereon. For vanadium and nickel removal an amine, preferably a diamine is included. Also, described is a process for regenerating spent catecholated polystyrene by removal of the arsenic, vanadium, and/or nickel bound to it from contacting petroliferous liquid as described above and involves: treating the spent polymer containing any vanadium and/or nickel with an aqueous acid to achieve an acid pH; and, separating the solids from the liquid; and then treating said spent catecholated polystyrene, at a temperature in the range of about 20/sup 0/ to 100/sup 0/C with an aqueous solution of at least one carbonate and/or bicarbonate of ammonium, alkali and alkaline earth metals, said solution having a pH between about 8 and 10; and, separating the solids and liquids from each other. Preferably the regeneration treatment of arsenic containing catecholated polymer is in two steps wherein the first step is carried out with an aqueous alcoholic carbonate solution containing lower alkyl alcohol, and, the steps are repeated using a bicarbonate.

Fish, R.H.

1985-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

123

Removal of arsenic, vanadium, and/or nickel compounds from petroliferous liquids  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Described is a process for removing arsenic, vanadium, and/or nickel from petroliferous derived liquids by contacting said liquid at an elevated temperature with a divinylbenzene-crosslinked polystyrene having catechol ligands anchored thereon. For vanadium and nickel removal an amine, preferably a diamine is included. Also, described is a process for regenerating spent catecholated polystyrene by removal of the arsenic, vanadium, and/or nickel bound to it from contacting petroliferous liquid as described above and involves: treating the spent polymer containing any vanadium and/or nickel with an aqueous acid to achieve an acid pH; and, separating the solids from the liquid; and then treating said spent catecholated polystyrene, at a temperature in the range of about 20.degree. to 100.degree. C. with an aqueous solution of at least one carbonate and/or bicarbonate of ammonium, alkali and alkaline earth metals, said solution having a pH between about 8 and 10; and, separating the solids and liquids from each other. Preferably the regeneration treatment of arsenic containing catecholated polymer is in two steps wherein the first step is carried out with an aqueous alcoholic carbonate solution containing lower alkyl alcohol, and, the steps are repeated using a bicarbonate.

Fish, Richard H. (Berkeley, CA)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Removal of arsenic, vanadium and/or nickel compounds from spent catecholated polymer  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Described is a process for removing arsenic, vanadium, and/or nickel from petroliferous derived liquids by contacting said liquid at an elevated temperature with a divinylbenzene-crosslinked polystyrene having catechol ligands anchored thereon. For vanadium and nickel removal an amine, preferably a diamine is included. Also, described is a process for regenerating spent catecholated polystyrene by removal of the arsenic, vanadium, and/or nickel bound to it from contacting petroliferous liquid as described above and involves: treating the spent polymer containing any vanadium and/or nickel with an aqueous acid to achieve an acid pH; and, separating the solids from the liquid; and then treating said spent catecholated polystyrene, at a temperature in the range of about 20.degree. to 100.degree. C. with an aqueous solution of at least one carbonate and/or bicarbonate of ammonium, alkali and alkaline earth metals, said solution having a pH between about 8 and 10; and, separating the solids and liquids from each other. Preferably the regeneration treatment of arsenic containing catecholated polymer is in two steps wherein the first step is carried out with an aqueous alcoholic carbonate solution containing lower alkyl alcohol, and, the steps are repeated using a bicarbonate.

Fish, Richard H. (Berkeley, CA)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Removal of arsenic, vanadium and/or nickel compounds from spent catecholated polymer  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Described is a process for removing arsenic, vanadium, and/or nickel from petroliferous derived liquids by contacting said liquid at an elevated temperature with a divinylbenzene-crosslinked polystyrene having catechol ligands anchored thereon. For vanadium and nickel removal an amine, preferably a diamine is included. Also, described is a process for regenerating spent catecholated polystyrene by removal of the arsenic, vanadium, and/or nickel bound to it from contacting petroliferous liquid as described above and involves: treating the spent polymer containing any vanadium and/or nickel with an aqueous acid to achieve an acid pH; and, separating the solids from the liquid; and then treating said spent catecholated polystyrene, at a temperature in the range of about 20 to 100 C with an aqueous solution of at least one carbonate and/or bicarbonate of ammonium, alkali and alkaline earth metals, said solution having a pH between about 8 and 10; and, separating the solids and liquids from each other. Preferably the regeneration treatment of arsenic containing catecholated polymer is in two steps wherein the first step is carried out with an aqueous alcoholic carbonate solution containing lower alkyl alcohol, and, the steps are repeated using a bicarbonate.

Fish, R.H.

1987-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

126

Advanced technologies for decomtamination and conversion of scrap metal  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Department of Energy (DOE) faces the task of decommissioning much of the vast US weapons complex. One challenge of this effort includes the disposition of large amounts of radioactively contaminated scrap metal (RSM) including but not limited to steel, nickel, copper, and aluminum. The decontamination and recycling of RSM has become a key element in the DOE's strategy for cleanup of contaminated sites and facilities. Recycling helps to offset the cost of decommissioning and saves valuable space in the waste disposal facilities. It also reduces the amount of environmental effects associated with mining new metals. Work on this project is geared toward finding decontamination and/or recycling alternatives for the RSM contained in the decommissioned gaseous diffusion plants including approximately 40,000 tons of nickel. The nickel is contaminated with Technetium-99, and is difficult to remove using traditional decontamination technologies. The project, titled ``Advanced Technologies for Decontamination and Conversion of Scrap Metal'' was proposed as a four phase project. Phase 1 and 2 are complete and Phase 3 will complete May 31, 1999. Stainless steel made from contaminated nickel barrier was successfully produced in Phase 1. An economic evaluation was performed and a market study of potential products from the recycled metal was completed. Inducto-slag refining, after extensive testing, was eliminated as an alternative to remove technetium contamination from nickel. Phase 2 included successful lab scale and pilot scale demonstrations of electrorefining to separate technetium from nickel. This effort included a survey of available technologies to detect technetium in volumetrically contaminated metals. A new process to make sanitary drums from RSM was developed and implemented. Phase 3 included a full scale demonstration of electrorefining, an evaluation of electro-refining alternatives including direct dissolution, melting of nickel into anodes, a laser cutting demonstration, an investigation of commercial markets for RSM, and refinement of methods to quantify isotopic elements.

Valerie MacNair; Steve Sarten; Thomas Muth; Brajendra Mishra

1999-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

127

Processing of Lead, Zinc, Copper and Nickel Concentrates  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstract Scope, Processing of copper, zinc, lead and nickel concentrates is becoming more challenging due increasingly complex mineralogy. Smelters are ...

128

Solidification Properties of Nickel Alloys for Casting Simulation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

First Principles Modeling of Shape Memory Alloy Magnetic Refrigeration Materials ... Different Generations of Gamma Prime Precipitates in a Commercial Nickel...

129

Nickel Speciation Measurements at Oil-Fired Power Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Nickel in power plant stack gas emissions may be present in several forms, including nickel subsulfide, a known carcinogen. To test for nickel subsulfide, EPRI performed flue gas measurements at four oil-fired power plants, representing a range of fuel sulfur levels as well as NOx and particulate control technologies. This report summarizes the field measurements to determine the form (or speciation) of nickel flue gas emissions. Utilities can use the results to conduct health risk assessments and suppor...

1999-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

130

Metal-Air Batteries  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Metal-air batteries have much higher specific energies than most currently available primary and rechargeable batteries. Recent advances in electrode materials and electrolytes, as well as new designs on metal-air batteries, have attracted intensive effort in recent years, especially in the development of lithium-air batteries. The general principle in metal-air batteries will be reviewed in this chapter. The materials, preparation methods, and performances of metal-air batteries will be discussed. Two main metal-air batteries, Zn-air and Li-air batteries will be discussed in detail. Other type of metal-air batteries will also be described.

Zhang, Jiguang; Bruce, Peter G.; Zhang, Gregory

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Breakthrough Research on Platinum-Nickel Alloys  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Breakthrough Research on Platinum-Nickel Alloys Print Breakthrough Research on Platinum-Nickel Alloys Print Two out of three of the kinetic barriers to the practical use of polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) hydrogen fuel cells in automobiles have been breached: the impractically high amount of extra energy needed for the oxidation reduction reaction (ORR) on the catalyst and the loss of catalytic surface areas available for ORR. Using a combination of probes and calculations, a group of scientists has demonstrated that the Pt3Ni(111) alloy is ten times more active for ORR than the corresponding Pt(111) surface and ninety times more active than the current state-of-the-art Pt/C catalysts used in existing PEM fuel cells. This new variation of the platinum-nickel alloy is the most active oxygen-reducing catalyst ever reported.

132

Breakthrough Research on Platinum-Nickel Alloys  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Breakthrough Research on Breakthrough Research on Platinum-Nickel Alloys Breakthrough Research on Platinum-Nickel Alloys Print Wednesday, 28 February 2007 00:00 Two out of three of the kinetic barriers to the practical use of polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) hydrogen fuel cells in automobiles have been breached: the impractically high amount of extra energy needed for the oxidation reduction reaction (ORR) on the catalyst and the loss of catalytic surface areas available for ORR. Using a combination of probes and calculations, a group of scientists has demonstrated that the Pt3Ni(111) alloy is ten times more active for ORR than the corresponding Pt(111) surface and ninety times more active than the current state-of-the-art Pt/C catalysts used in existing PEM fuel cells. This new variation of the platinum-nickel alloy is the most active oxygen-reducing catalyst ever reported.

133

X-ray absorption near edge structure spectrometry study of nickel and lead speciation in coals and coal combustion products  

SciTech Connect

The fate and environmental impacts of trace elements from coal fired power stations are a significant concern because of the large quantities of coal used as an energy source. The ultimate environmental fate and health impact of some of these trace elements is dependent on their various forms and oxidation states. Nickel and lead are two of the trace elements classified as 'priority pollutants' by the National Pollutant Inventory (NPI) in Australia. This study attempts to understand speciation of nickel and lead in coal and coal combustion products from five coal fired power stations in Australia where bituminous rank coals are utilized. Non-destructive X-ray Absorption Near Edge Structure Spectrometry (XANES) was used to determine speciation of these metals. Semiquantitative speciation of nickel and lead was calculated using a linear combination fit of XANES spectra obtained for selected pure reference compounds. In all fly ash samples, 28-80% of nickel was present as nickel in NiSO{sub 4} form, which is a more toxic and more bioavailable form of nickel. Less toxic NiO was detected in fly ash samples in the range of 0-15%. Speciation of lead revealed that 65-70% is present as PbS in the feed coals. In all fly ash samples analyzed, lead comprised different proportions of PbCl{sub 2}, PbO, and PbSO{sub 4}. PbCl{sub 2} and PbSO{sub 4} contents varied between 30-70% and 30-60%, respectively. Chemical reactions resulting in nickel and lead transformation that are likely to have occurred in the post-combustion environment are discussed. 22 refs., 7 figs., 7 tabs.

Pushan Shah; Vladimir Strezov; Peter F. Nelson [Macquarie University, Sydney, NSW (Australia). CRC for Coal in Sustainable Development

2009-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

134

Surface modification of nickel battery electrodes by cobalt plasma immersion ion implantation and deposition  

SciTech Connect

Nickel hydroxide is the electrochemically active material in the positive electrode of several important rechargeable alkaline-electrolyte batteries. It is believed that divalent Ni(OH){sub 2} is converted to trivalent NiOOH as the electrode is electrochemically oxidized during the battery charging process, and the reverse reaction (electrochemical reduction) occurs during battery discharge, however the details of this process are not completely understood. Because these electrochemical reactions involve surface charge-transfer processes, it is anticipated that surface modification may result in improved battery performance. We used broad-beam metal ion implantation and Metal Plasma Immersion Ion Implantation and Deposition to add cobalt and other species to the nickel electrode surface. The principle of the latter technique is explained in detail. It is shown that implanted and deposited cobalt ions act as a dopant of Ni(OH){sub 2}, and thereby alter its electronic conductivity. This electronic effect promotes lateral growth of NiOOH nodules and more-complete conversion of Ni(OH){sub 2} to NiOOH, which can be interpreted in terms of the nodule growth model. Other dopants such as Au, W, Pb, Ta and Ti{sub 4}O{sub 7} were also tested for suppressing the parasitic oxygen evolution reaction in rechargeable nickel cells.

Anders, S.; Anders, A.; Brown, I.; Kong, F.; McLarnon, F.

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Metal Aminoboranes  

Metal aminoboranes of the formula M(NH.sub.2BH.sub.3).sub.n have been synthesized. Metal aminoboranes are hydrogen storage materials. Metal aminoboranes are also precursors for synthesizing other metal aminoboranes. Metal aminoboranes can be ...

136

Castable nickel aluminide alloys for structural applications  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The specification discloses nickel aluminide alloys which include as a component from about 0.5 to about 4 at. % of one or more of the elements selected from the group consisting of molybdenum or niobium to substantially improve the mechanical properties of the alloys in the cast condition.

Liu, Chain T. (Oak Ridge, TN)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Charging system for nickel-zing batteries  

SciTech Connect

A source of constant current or constant power supplies charging current to a nickel-zinc battery to produce a generally S-shaped battery voltage waveform. To improve battery life, charging is terminated at the inflection point where the slope of the battery voltage changes from increasing to decreasing.

Jones, R. A.; Reoch, W. D.

1985-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

138

Growth of hollow nickel fluoride whiskers  

SciTech Connect

Hollow nickel fluoride whiskers have been obtained by condensation from the vapor phase onto a platinum substrate in a flow of hydrogen fluoride. Crystals up to 5 mm in length have a square cross section with a 300 {+-} 30-{mu}m side. The wall thickness is 85 {+-} 20 {mu}m.

Petrov, S. V.; Orekhov, Yu. F. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Kapitsa Institute for Physical Problems (Russian Federation); Fedorov, P. P., E-mail: ppf@lst.gpi.ru [Russian Academy of Sciences, Prokhorov General Physics Institute (Russian Federation)

2009-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

139

Delayed Nickel Decay in Gamma Ray Bursts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Recently observed emission lines in the X-ray afterglow of gamma ray bursts suggest that iron group elements are either produced in the gamma ray burst, or are present nearby. If this material is the product of a thermonuclear burn, then such material would be expected to be rich in Nickel-56. If the nickel remains partially ionized, this prevents the electron capture reaction normally associated with the decay of Nickel-56, dramatically increasing the decay timescale. Here we examine the consequences of rapid ejection of a fraction of a solar mass of iron group material from the center of a collapsar/hypernova. The exact rate of decay then depends on the details of the ionization and therefore the ejection process. Future observations of iron, nickel and cobalt lines can be used to diagnose the origin of these elements and to better understand the astrophysical site of gamma ray bursts. In this model, the X-ray lines of these iron-group elements could be detected in suspected hypernovae that did not produce an observable gamma ray burst due to beaming.

G. C. McLaughlin; R. A. M. J. Wijers

2002-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

140

Characterization of Nickel Laterite Ore  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Influence of Different Cooling Structure on Surface Crack of HSLA Steel Plate by ... of Si3N4-SiC Heat Absorption Ceramic Material Used for Tower Type Solar...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "type nickel metal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Primary Water SCC Understanding and Characterization Through Fundamental Testing in the Vicinity of the Nickel/Nickel Oxide Phase Transition  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper quantifies the nickel alloy stress corrosion crack growth rate (SCCGR) dissolved hydrogen level functionality. SCCGR has been observed to exhibit a maximum in proximity to the nickel/nickel oxide phase transition. The dissolved hydrogen level SCCGR dependency has been quantified in a phenomenological model in terms of the stability of nickel oxide not the dissolved hydrogen level. The observed SCCGR dependency has been extended to lower temperatures through the developed model and Contact Electrical Resistance (CER) measurements of the nickel/nickel oxide phase transition. Understanding obtained from this hydrogen level SCC functionality and complementary SCC subprocesses test results is discussed. Specifically, the possible SCC fundamental subprocesses of corrosion kinetics, hydrogen permeation and pickup have also been measured for nickel alloys. Secondary Ion Mass Spectroscopy (SIMS) analysis has been performed on SCCGR specimens tested in heavy water (D{sub 2}O).

D.S. Morton; S.A. Attanasio; G.A. Young

2001-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

142

Research and development of advanced nickel-iron batteries for electric vehicle propulsion  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The purpose of this program has been to develop and demonstrate an advanced nickel-iron battery suitable for use in electric vehicles. During the course of this contract various steps and modification have been taken to improve Nickel-Iron battery performance while reducing cost. Improvement of the nickel electrode through slurry formulations and substrate changes, as seen with the fiber electrode, were investigated. Processing parameters for impregnation and formation were also manipulated to improve efficiency. Impregnation saw the change of anode type from platinized titanium to the consumable nickel anode. Formation changes were also made allowing for doubled processing capabilities of positive electrodes, a savings in both time and money. A final design change involved the evolution of the NIF-200 from the NIF-220. This change permitted the use of 1.2 mm iron electrodes and maintained the necessary performance characteristics for electric vehicle propulsion. Emphasis on a pilot plant became the main focus during the late 1989--90 period. The pilot plant facility would be a culmination of the program providing the best product at the lowest price.

Not Available

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Advanced technologies for decontamination and conversion of scrap metals  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recycle of radioactive scrap metals (RSM) from decommissioning of DOE uranium enrichment and nuclear weapons manufacturing facilities is mandatory to recapture the value of these metals and avoid the high cost of disposal by burial. The scrap metals conversion project detailed below focuses on the contaminated nickel associated with the gaseous diffusion plants. Stainless steel can be produced in MSC`s vacuum induction melting process (VIM) to the S30400 specification using nickel as an alloy constituent. Further the case alloy can be rolled in MSC`s rolling mill to the mechanical property specification for S30400 demonstrating the capability to manufacture the contaminated nickel into valuable end products at a facility licensed to handle radioactive materials. Bulk removal of Technetium from scrap nickel is theoretically possible in a reasonable length of time with the high calcium fluoride flux, however the need for the high temperature creates a practical problem due to flux volatility. Bulk decontamination is possible and perhaps more desirable if nickel is alloyed with copper to lower the melting point of the alloy allowing the use of the high calcium fluoride flux. Slag decontamination processes have been suggested which have been proven technically viable at the Colorado School of Mines.

Muth, T.R. [Manufacturing Sciences Corp., Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Moore, J.; Olson, D.; Mishra, B. [Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO (United States)

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

144

Equilibrium Crystal Shape of Nickel  

SciTech Connect

The crystal shape of Ni particles, dewetted in the solid state on sapphire substrates, was examined as a function of the partial pressure of oxygen (P(O2)) and iron content using scanning and transmission electron microscopy. The chemical composition of the surface was characterized by atom-probe tomography. Unlike other FCC equilibrium crystal shapes, the Ni crystals containing little or no impurities exhibited a facetted shape, indicating large surface anisotropy. In addition to the {111}, {100} and {110} facets, which are usually present in the equilibrium crystal shape of FCC metals, high index facets were identified such as {135} and {138} at low P(O2), and {012} and {013} at higher P(O2). The presence of iron altered the crystal shape into a truncated sphere with only facets parallel to denser planes. The issue of particle equilibration is discussed specifically for the case of solid-state dewetting.

Meltzman, Hila [Technion, Israel Institute of Technology; Chatain, Dominique [Universite d'Aix-Marseille; Avizemer, Dan [Technion, Israel Institute of Technology; Besmann, Theodore M [ORNL; Kaplan, Prof. Wayne D. [Technion, Israel Institute of Technology

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Nanostructured metal foams: synthesis and applications  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Fabrication of monolithic metallic nanoporous materials is difficult using conventional methodology. Here they report a relatively simple method of synthesizing monolithic, ultralow density, nanostructured metal foams utilizing self-propagating combustion synthesis of novel metal complexes containing high nitrogen energetic ligands. Nanostructured metal foams are formed in a post flame-front dynamic assembly with densities as low as 0.011 g/cc and surface areas as high as 270 m{sup 2}/g. They have produced metal foams via this method of titanium, iron, cobalt, nickel, zirconium, copper, palladium, silver, hafnium, platinum and gold. Microstructural features vary as a function of composition and process parameters. Applications for the metal foams are discussed including hydrogen absorption in palladium foams. A model for the sorption kinetics of hydrogen in the foams is presented.

Luther, Erik P [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Tappan, Bryce [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Mueller, Alex [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Mihaila, Bogdan [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Volz, Heather [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Cardenas, Andreas [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Papin, Pallas [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Veauthier, Jackie [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Stan, Marius [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

EVALUATION OF KANIGEN, ELECTROLESS NICKEL PLATING FOR STEAM SIDE OF A SODIUM COMPONENT STEAM GENERATOR  

SciTech Connect

The evaluation of Kanigen electroless nickel plating for surfaces in contact with water and steam in a sodium-heated Type 316 stainless steel steam generator is reported. The purpose of the coating is to afford protection from stress corrosion cracking originating on the water-steam side of the unit. It is concluded that the Kanigen coating does not afford adequate protection for the service conditions. (D.L.C.)

1961-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

147

Program on Technology Innovation: A Preliminary Hybrid Model of Nickel Alloy Stress Corrosion Crack Propagation in PWR Primary Water Environments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Susceptibility to stress corrosion cracking (SCC) of nickel-based alloys in pressurized water reactor (PWR) primary water environments is a well-known issue in the nuclear power industry. Empirical models have been developed for this alloy/environment system, including the Scott model; the similar Materials Reliability Program, MRP-55 model for Alloy 600; and the MRP-115 model for weld metal. A model of the effects of dissolved hydrogen concentration, temperature, and the resulting electrochemical potent...

2008-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

148

Quinary metallic glass alloys  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

At least quinary alloys form metallic glass upon cooling below the glass transition temperature at a rate less than 10.sup.3 K/s. Such alloys comprise zirconium and/or hafnium in the range of 45 to 65 atomic percent, titanium and/or niobium in the range of 4 to 7.5 atomic percent, and aluminum and/or zinc in the range of 5 to 15 atomic percent. The balance of the alloy compositions comprise copper, iron, and cobalt and/or nickel. The composition is constrained such that the atomic percentage of iron is less than 10 percent. Further, the ratio of copper to nickel and/or cobalt is in the range of from 1:2 to 2:1. The alloy composition formula is: (Zr,Hf).sub.a (Al,Zn).sub.b (Ti,Nb).sub.c (Cu.sub.x Fe.sub.y (Ni,Co).sub.z).sub.d wherein the constraints upon the formula are: a ranges from 45 to 65 atomic percent, b ranges from 5 to 15 atomic percent, c ranges from 4 to 7.5 atomic percent, d comprises the balance, d.multidot.y is less than 10 atomic percent, and x/z ranges from 0.5 to 2.

Lin, Xianghong (Pasadena, CA); Johnson, William L. (Pasadena, CA)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Quinary metallic glass alloys  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

At least quinary alloys form metallic glass upon cooling below the glass transition temperature at a rate less than 10{sup 3}K/s. Such alloys comprise zirconium and/or hafnium in the range of 45 to 65 atomic percent, titanium and/or niobium in the range of 4 to 7.5 atomic percent, and aluminum and/or zinc in the range of 5 to 15 atomic percent. The balance of the alloy compositions comprise copper, iron, and cobalt and/or nickel. The composition is constrained such that the atomic percentage of iron is less than 10 percent. Further, the ratio of copper to nickel and/or cobalt is in the range of from 1:2 to 2:1. The alloy composition formula is: (Zr,Hf){sub a}(Al,Zn){sub b}(Ti,Nb){sub c}(Cu{sub x}Fe{sub y}(Ni,Co){sub z}){sub d} wherein the constraints upon the formula are: a ranges from 45 to 65 atomic percent, b ranges from 5 to 15 atomic percent, c ranges from 4 to 7.5 atomic percent, d comprises the balance, d{hor_ellipsis}y is less than 10 atomic percent, and x/z ranges from 0.5 to 2.

Lin, X.; Johnson, W.L.

1998-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

150

DOE Seeks Industry Input on Nickel Disposition Strategy | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DOE Seeks Industry Input on Nickel Disposition Strategy DOE Seeks Industry Input on Nickel Disposition Strategy DOE Seeks Industry Input on Nickel Disposition Strategy March 23, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis WASHINGTON, D.C. - The Energy Department's prime contractor, Fluor-B&W Portsmouth (FBP), managing the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant (GDP), issued a request for Expressions of Interest (EOI) seeking industry input to support the development of an acquisition strategy for potential disposition of DOE nickel. The EOI requests technical, financial, and product market information to review the feasibility of technologies capable of decontaminating the nickel to a level indistinguishable from what is commercially available, such that it could be safely recycled and reused. The EOI scope is for 6,400 tons of nickel to be recovered from the uranium enrichment process

151

DOE Seeks Industry Input on Nickel Disposition Strategy | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Industry Input on Nickel Disposition Strategy Industry Input on Nickel Disposition Strategy DOE Seeks Industry Input on Nickel Disposition Strategy March 23, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis WASHINGTON, D.C. - The Energy Department's prime contractor, Fluor-B&W Portsmouth (FBP), managing the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant (GDP), issued a request for Expressions of Interest (EOI) seeking industry input to support the development of an acquisition strategy for potential disposition of DOE nickel. The EOI requests technical, financial, and product market information to review the feasibility of technologies capable of decontaminating the nickel to a level indistinguishable from what is commercially available, such that it could be safely recycled and reused. The EOI scope is for 6,400 tons of nickel to be recovered from the uranium enrichment process

152

Hot Corrosion Resistant and High Strength Nickel-Based Single ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Flow chart for the design of hot-corrosion resistant and high strength nickel- based single crystal superalloys. Fig.& Typical SEM image of designed single-.

153

Differential Thermal Analysis of Nickel-Base Superalloys  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Differential thermal analysis was performed on over 200 nickel-base superalloys that ... differential thermal analysis (DTA) to simply and accurately measure.

154

Structural Changes During Thermal Fatigue of Two Nickel-Based ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

greatly affect the thermal endurance of these heat-resisting alloys. I?. ... factors govern- ing the thermal fatigue behavior of a number of commercial nickel-.

155

Development of Economically Doped Heat-Resistant Nickel Single ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Development of Economically Doped Heat-Resistant Nickel Single-Crystal Superalloys for Blades of Perspective Gas Turbine Engines.

156

Alloying Effects on Surface Stability and Creep Strength of Nickel ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

for the increase in the efficiency of power generation and also the attendant decrease in the emission of carbon dioxide into the air Cl]. Nickel-based superalloys...

157

Synthesis and Characterization of Nanocrystalline Nickel Zinc Oxide ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Stochiometric amount of nickel nitrate and zinc nitrate were used to prepare the corresponding solution. Particles were synthesized by hydrogen reduction of the ...

158

Chromium-free Conversion Coating for Electroplated Zinc-nickel  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Chromium-free Conversion Coating for Electroplated Zinc- nickel. Author(s), Melissa L. Klingenberg, Clayton Drees, Elizabeth Berman,...

159

Remove Nickel from Slag Lixivium of Scrap Copper Smelting  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This high content nickel must be separated from the leachate not only for resource recovery, but also for the subsequent zinc electrocwinning which must keep...

160

Selective Removal of Thiophene from Liquid Fuels over Nickel ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Selective Removal of Thiophene from Liquid Fuels over Nickel -Based Nanocrystalline Zinc Oxide. Author(s), Mohammad Rafiqul Islam, Jewel...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "type nickel metal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Determination of Vanadium/Nickel Proportionality in the Asphaltene...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Determination of VanadiumNickel Proportionality in the Asphaltene Fraction of Crude Oil Using Thin-Layer Chromatography with Femtosecond Laser Ablation-Inductively Coupled...

162

-Oriented Nickel Using -Orientated Nano-twinned Copper  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this study, we find that the electroplated (111)-orientated nickel films can be strongly enhanced by using the highly (111)-oriented nano-twinned copper as the...

163

Abnormal Phases in High W Content Nickel Base Superalloys and ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

2Beijing Institute of Aeronautical Materials, Beijing 100095, China. 3School of Materials ... In China, it was paid attention to develop a series of cast nickel.

164

Cobalt-Free Nickel-Base Wrought Superalloys - TMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

COBALT-FREE NICKEL-BASE WROUGHT SUPERALLOYS. E. P. Whelan. Climax Molybdenum Company of. Ann Arbor, Michigan. Michigan. A study has been...

165

Characterization and Processing Ultramafic Nickel Ore after Acid ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Structural changes in the ore due to combined acid (H2SO4) and grinding treatment .... Selective Removal of Thiophene from Liquid Fuels over Nickel- Based...

166

On the Celestial Limits of Nickel-Base Superalloys  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Let us now bring back grain boundaries, which have always been the weak links in nickel-base superalloys, and, their strengthening a challenge.,. We are now...

167

The Influence of Dissolved hydrogen on Nickel Alloy SCC: A Window to Fundamental Insight  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Prior stress corrosion crack growth rate (SCCGR) testing of nickel alloys as a function of the aqueous hydrogen concentration (i.e., the concentration of hydrogen dissolved in the water) has identified different functionalities at 338 and 360 C. These SCCGR dependencies have been uniquely explained in terms of the stability of nickel oxide. The present work evaluates whether the influence of aqueous hydrogen concentration on SCCGR is fundamentally due to effects on hydrogen absorption and/or corrosion kinetics. Hydrogen permeation tests were conducted to measure hydrogen pickup in and transport through the metal. Repassivation tests were performed in an attempt to quantify the corrosion kinetics. The aqueous hydrogen concentration dependency of these fundamental parameters (hydrogen permeation, repassivation) has been used to qualitatively evaluate the film-rupture/oxidation (FRO) and hydrogen assisted cracking (HAC) SCC mechanisms. This paper discusses the conditions that must be imposed upon these mechanisms to describe the known nickel alloy SCCGR aqueous hydrogen concentration functionality. Specifically, the buildup of hydrogen within Alloy 600 (measured through permeability) does not exhibit the same functionality as SCC with respect to the aqueous hydrogen concentration. This result implies that if HAC is the dominant SCC mechanism, then corrosion at isolated active path regions (i.e., surface initiation sites or cracks) must be the source of localized elevated detrimental hydrogen. Repassivation tests showed little temperature sensitivity over the range of 204 to 360 C. This result implies that for either the FRO or the HAC mechanism, corrosion processes (e.g., at a crack tip, in the crack wake, or on surfaces external to the crack) cannot by themselves explain the strong temperature dependence of nickel alloy SCC.

D.S. Morton; S.A. Attanasio; G.A. Young; P.L. Andresen; T.M. Angeliu

2000-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

168

Alkali metal protective garment and composite material  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A protective garment and composite material providing satisfactory heat resistance and physical protection for articles and personnel exposed to hot molten alkali metals, such as sodium. Physical protection is provided by a continuous layer of nickel foil. Heat resistance is provided by an underlying backing layer of thermal insulation. Overlying outer layers of fireproof woven ceramic fibers are used to protect the foil during storage and handling.

Ballif, III, John L. (Salt Lake City, UT); Yuan, Wei W. (Seattle, WA)

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Degradation of solid oxide fuel cell metallic interconnects in fuels containing sulfur  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

SOFC from ~1000 C to ~750 C may allow less expensive metallic materials to be used for interconnects and as balance of plant (BOP) materials. This paper provides insight on the material performance of nickel, ferritic steels, and nickel-based alloys in fuels containing sulfur, primarily in the form of H2S, and seeks to quantify the extent of possible degradation due to sulfur in the gas stream.

Ziomek-Moroz, M.; Hawk, Jeffrey A.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Electrode Plate For An Eletrlchemical Cell And Having A Metal Foam Type Support, And A Method Of Obtaining Such An Electrode  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The electrode plate includes an active portion that is pasted with active material, and a plate head that is made up of three layers of compressed metal foam comprising: a non-pasted portion of height G of the support of the electrode plate; and two strips of non-pasted metal foam of height R on either side of the non-pasted portion of height G of the support and also extending for an overlap height h.sub.2 over the pasted portion of the support. The plate head includes a zone of reduced thickness including a portion that is maximally compressed, and a transitional portion between said maximally compressed portion and the remainder of the electrode which is of thickness e.sub.2. A portion of said plate head forms a connection tab. The method of obtaining the electrode consists in simultaneously rolling all three layers of metal foam in the plate head, and then in cutting matter away from the plates so as to obtain respective connection tabs.

Verhoog, Roelof (Bordeaux, FR); Precigout, Claude (Bordeaux, FR); Stewart, Donald (Bordeaux, FR)

1996-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

171

SEPARATION OF METAL SALTS BY ADSORPTION  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

It has been found that certain metal salts, particularly the halides of iron, cobalt, nickel, and the actinide metals, arc readily absorbed on aluminum oxide, while certain other salts, particularly rare earth metal halides, are not so absorbed. Use is made of this discovery to separate uranium from the rare earths. The metal salts are first dissolved in a molten mixture of alkali metal nitrates, e.g., the eutectic mixture of lithium nitrate and potassium nitrate, and then the molten salt solution is contacted with alumina, either by slurrying or by passing the salt solution through an absorption tower. The process is particularly valuable for the separation of actinides from lanthanum-group rare earths.

Gruen, D.M.

1959-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

172

Draft Genome Sequences for Two Metal-Reducing Pelosinus fermentans Strains Isolated from a Cr(VI) Contaminated Site and for Type Strain R7  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Pelosinus fermentans 16S rRNA gene sequences have been reported from diverse geographical sites since the recent isolation of the type strain. We present the genome sequence of the P. fermentans type strain R7 (DSM 17108) and genome sequences for two new strains with different abilities to reduce iron, chromate, and uranium.

Brown, Steven D [ORNL; Podar, Mircea [ORNL; Klingeman, Dawn Marie [ORNL; Johnson, Courtney M [ORNL; Yang, Zamin Koo [ORNL; Utturkar, Sagar M [ORNL; Land, Miriam L [ORNL; Mosher, Jennifer J [ORNL; Hurt, Jr., Richard Ashley [ORNL; Phelps, Tommy Joe [ORNL; Palumbo, Anthony Vito [ORNL; Arkin, Adam [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL); Hazen, Terry C [ORNL; Elias, Dwayne A [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Buffer layers on rolled nickel or copper as superconductor substrates  

SciTech Connect

Buffer layer architectures are epitaxially deposited on biaxially-textured rolled substrates of nickel and/or copper and their alloys for high current conductors, and more particularly buffer layer architectures such as Y.sub.2 O.sub.3 /Ni, YSZ/Y.sub.2 O.sub.3 /Ni, Yb.sub.2 O.sub.3 /Ni, Yb.sub.2 O.sub.3 /Y.sub.2 O.sub.3 /Ni, Yb.sub.2 O.sub.3 /CeO.sub.2 /Ni, RE.sub.2 O.sub.3 /Ni (RE=Rare Earth), and Yb.sub.2 O.sub.3 /YSZ/CeO.sub.2 /Ni, Y.sub.2 O.sub.3 /Cu, YSZ/Y.sub.2 O.sub.3 /Cu, Yb.sub.2 O.sub.3 /Cu, Yb.sub.2 O.sub.3 /Y.sub.2 O.sub.3 /Cu, Yb.sub.2 O.sub.3 /CeO.sub.2 /Cu, RE.sub.2 O.sub.3 /Cu, and Yb.sub.2 O.sub.3 /YSZ/CeO.sub.2 /Cu. Deposition methods include physical vapor deposition techniques which include electron-beam evaporation, rf magnetron sputtering, pulsed laser deposition, thermal evaporation, and solution precursor approach, which includes chemical vapor deposition, combustion CVD, metal-organic decomposition, sol-gel processing, and plasma spray.

Paranthaman, Mariappan (Knoxville, TN); Lee, Dominic F. (Knoxville, TN); Kroeger, Donald M. (Knoxville, TN); Goyal, Amit (Knoxville, TN)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Metal Aminoboranes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Metal Aminoboranes Metal Aminoboranes Metal Aminoboranes Metal aminoboranes of the formula M(NH.sub.2BH.sub.3).sub.n have been synthesized. June 25, 2013 Metal Aminoboranes Metal aminoboranes of the formula M(NH.sub.2BH.sub.3).sub.n have been synthesized. Available for thumbnail of Feynman Center (505) 665-9090 Email Metal Aminoboranes Metal aminoboranes of the formula M(NH.sub.2BH.sub.3).sub.n have been synthesized. Metal aminoboranes are hydrogen storage materials. Metal aminoboranes are also precursors for synthesizing other metal aminoboranes. Metal aminoboranes can be dehydrogenated to form hydrogen and a reaction product. The reaction product can react with hydrogen to form a hydrogen storage material. Metal aminoboranes can be included in a kit. U.S. Patent No.: 7,713,506 (DOE S-112,798)

175

High Activity of Ce1-xNixO2-y for H2 Production through Ethanol Steam Reforming: Tuning Catalytic Performance through Metal-Oxide Interactions  

SciTech Connect

The importance of the oxide: Ce{sub 0.8}Ni{sub 0.2}O{sub 2-y} is an excellent catalyst for ethanol steam reforming. Metal-oxide interactions perturb the electronic properties of the small particles of metallic nickel present in the catalyst under the reaction conditions and thus suppress any methanation activity. The nickel embedded in ceria induces the formation of O vacancies, which facilitate cleavage of the OH bonds in ethanol and water.

G Zhou; L Barrio; S Agnoli; S Senanayake; J Evans; A Kubacka; M Estrella; J Hanson; A Martinez-Arias; et al.

2011-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

176

Survey of Iron and Nickel Concentrations in PWR Primary Coolant  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The concentrations of iron and nickel corrosion products in primary coolant water were measured at eleven different pressurized water reactors. Two reactors experienced anomalies in the axial power distribution during the cycles that were sampled. The axial power distribution anomalies appeared to be associated with high-coolant nickel concentrations early in the fuel cycle.

2001-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

177

Comparative c-type cytochrome expression analysis in Shewanella oneidensis strain MR-1 and Anaeromyxobacter dehalogenans strain 2CP-C grown with soluble and insoluble oxidised metal electron acceptors  

SciTech Connect

The genomes of Shewanella oneidensis strain MR-1 and Anaeromyxobacter dehalogenans strain 2CP-C encode 40 and 69 putative c-type cytochrome genes, respectively. Deletion mutant and biochemical studies have assigned specific functions to a few c-type cytochromes involved in electron transfer to oxidised metals in Shewanella oneidensis strain MR-1. Although promising, the genetic approach is limited to gene deletions that produce a distinct phenotype, and organism for which a genetic system is available. To more comprehensively investigate and compare c-type cytochrome expression in Shewanella oneidensis strain MR-1 and Anaeromyxobacter dehalogenans strain 2CP-C, proteomic measurements were used to characterise lysates of cells grown with soluble Fe(III) (as ferric citrate) and insoluble Mn(IV) (as MnO2) as electron acceptors. Strain MR-1 expressed 19 and 20, and strain 2CP-C expressed 27 and 25 c-type cytochromes when grown with Fe(III) and Mn(IV), respectively. The majority of c-type cytochromes (77% for strain MR-1 and 63% for strain 2CP-C) were expressed under both growth conditions; however, the analysis also revealed unique c-type cytochromes that were specifically expressed in cells grown with soluble Fe(III) or insoluble Mn(IV). Proteomic characterisation proved to be a promising approach for determining the c-type cytochrome complement expressed under different growth conditions, and will help elucidating the specific functions of more c-type cytochromes that are the basis for Shewanella and Anaeromyxobacter respiratory versatility.

Nissen, Silke [ORNL; Liu, Xiaoxin [ORNL; Chourey, Karuna [ORNL; Hettich, Robert {Bob} L [ORNL; Wagner, Darlene D [Georgia Institute of Technology; Pffifner, Susan [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Loeffler, Frank E [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Method for regeneration of electroless nickel plating solution  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An electroless nickel(EN)/hypophosphite plating bath is provided employing acetic acid/acetate as a buffer and which is, as a result, capable of perpetual regeneration while avoiding the production of hazardous waste. A regeneration process is provided to process the spent EN plating bath solution. A concentrated starter and replenishment solution is provided for ease of operation of the plating bath. The regeneration process employs a chelating ion exchange system to remove nickel cations from spent EN plating solution. Phosphites are then removed from the solution by precipitation. The nickel cations are removed from the ion exchange system by elution with hypophosphorous acid and the nickel concentration of the eluate adjusted by addition of nickel salt. The treated solution and adjusted eluate are combined, stabilizer added, and the volume of resulting solution reduced by evaporation to form the bath starter and replenishing solution.

Eisenmann, Erhard T. (5423 Vista Sandia, NE., Albuquerque, NM 87111)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Method for regeneration of electroless nickel plating solution  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An electroless nickel(EN)/hypophosphite plating bath is provided employing acetic acid/acetate as a buffer and which is, as a result, capable of perpetual regeneration while avoiding the production of hazardous waste. A regeneration process is provided to process the spent EN plating bath solution. A concentrated starter and replenishment solution is provided for ease of operation of the plating bath. The regeneration process employs a chelating ion exchange system to remove nickel cations from spent EN plating solution. Phosphites are then removed from the solution by precipitation. The nickel cations are removed from the ion exchange system by elution with hypophosphorus acid and the nickel concentration of the eluate adjusted by addition of nickel salt. The treated solution and adjusted eluate are combined, stabilizer added, and the volume of resulting solution reduced by evaporation to form the bath starter and replenishing solution. 1 fig.

Eisenmann, E.T.

1997-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

180

Conflicting Roles Of Nickel In Controlling Cathode Performance In Lithium-ion Batteries  

SciTech Connect

A variety of approaches are being made to enhance the performance of lithium ion batteries. Incorporating multi-valence transition metal ions into metal oxide cathodes has been identified as an essential approach to achieve the necessary high voltage and high capacity. However, the fundamental mechanism that limits their power rate and cycling stability remains unclear. The power rate strongly depends on the lithium ion drift speed in the cathode. Crystallographically, these transition metal-based cathodes frequently have a layered structure. In the classic wisdom, it is accepted that lithium ion travels swiftly within the layers moving out/in of the cathode during the charge/discharge. Here, we report the unexpected discovery of a thermodynamically driven, yet kinetically controlled, surface modification in the widely explored lithium nickel manganese oxide cathode material, which may inhibit the battery charge/discharge rate. We found that during cathode synthesis and processing before electrochemical cycling in the cell nickel can preferentially move along the fast diffusion channels and selectively segregate at the surface facets terminated with a mix of anions and cations. This segregation essentially blocks the otherwise fast out/in pathways for lithium ions during the charge/discharge. Therefore, it appears that the transition metal dopant may help to provide high capacity and/or high voltage, but can be located in a wrong location that blocks or slows lithium diffusion, limiting battery performance. In this circumstance, limitations in the properties of Li-ion batteries using these cathode materials can be determined more by the materials synthesis issues than by the operation within the battery itself.

Gu, Meng; Belharouak, Ilias; Genc, Arda; Wang, Zhiguo; Wang, Dapeng; Amine, Khalil; Gao, Fei; Zhou, Guangwen; Thevuthasan, Suntharampillai; Baer, Donald R.; Zhang, Jiguang; Browning, Nigel D.; Liu, Jun; Wang, Chong M.

2012-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "type nickel metal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

WELDED TRANSITION JOINT BETWEEN 2-1/4% Cr 1% Mo STEEL AND TYPE 316 STAINLESS STEEL. SODIUM COMPONENTS DESIGN PROJECT RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT PROGRAM-FINAL REPORT  

SciTech Connect

A steam generator, wherein the boiler, steam drum, and superheater are integrated into one single unit, requires the welding of a transition joint between the 2 1/4% Cr-1% Mo steel of the steam drum and the type 316 stainless steel of the superheater. A practicable procedure was developed for the welding of this transition joint and the properties of the weld were evaluated by mechanical testing and metallurgical evaluation. After evaluating the technical aspects of the project and their relation to the fabrication of the generator, it was considered desirable to overlay the welding edge of the 2 1/4% Cr-1% Mo steel with a suitable austenitic weld metul which would subsequently be welded to the type 316 stainless steel of the superheater. Austenitic stainless steel and high-nickel alloy weld metals were evaluated for the overlay; whereas only austenitic stainless steel weld metals were evaluated for the final weld joining the components. It was concluded that type 309 stainless steel weld metal deposited automatically by the submergedarc process is completely satisfactory for cladding the 2 1/4% Cr-1% Mo base metal and for making the final transition weld joining the steam drum and superheater sections of the generator. Supplementary mechanical tests, metallographic examinations, and hardness surveys further attested to the adequacy of the quality of the transition joint resulting from the procedures developed by this program. A detailed fabrication and thermal treatment specification is included for the welding of a transition joint between

1960-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

182

Facile synthesis of porous-structured nickel oxide thin film by pulsed laser deposition  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Porous-structured nickel oxide (PsNiO) was obtained through the oxidization of a nickel thin film. The nickel thin film was deposited using the pulsed laser deposition (PLD) method on a nickel foil as a substrate. The results show uniform PsNiO after ...

Siamak Pilban Jahromi; Nay Ming Huang; Ahmad Kamalianfar; Hong Ngee Lim; Muhamad Rasat Muhamad; Ramin Yousefi

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Heavy reflector experiments in the IPEN/MB-01 reactor: Stainless steel, carbon steel and nickel  

SciTech Connect

New experiments devoted to the measurements of physical parameters of a light water core surrounded by a heavy reflector were performed in the IPEN/MB-01 research reactor facility. These experiments comprise three sets of heavy reflector (SS-304, Carbon Steel, and Nickel) in a form of laminates around 3 mm thick. Each set was introduced individually in the west face of the core of the IPEN/MB-01 reactor. The aim here is to provide high quality experimental data for the interpretation and validation of the SS-304 heavy reflector calculation methods. The experiments of Carbon Steel, which is composed mainly of iron, and Nickel were performed to provide a consistent and an interpretative check for the SS-304 reflector experiment. The experimental results comprise critical control bank positions, temperatures and reactivities as a function of the number of the plates. Particularly to the case of Nickel, the experimental data are unique of its kind. The theoretical analysis was performed by MCNP-5 with the nuclear data library ENDF/B-VII.0. It was shown that this nuclear data library has a very good performance up to thirteen plates and overestimates the reactivity for higher number of plates independently of the type of the reflector.

Santos, Adimir dos; Andrade e Silva, Graciete Simoes de; Jerez, Rogerio; Liambos Mura, Luis Felipe; Fuga, Rinaldo [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares - IPEN-CNEN/SP Av. Prof. Lineu Prestes 2242 - CEP 05508-000 Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

2013-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

184

Research, development and demonstration of nickel-iron batteries for electric vehicle propulsion. Annual report, 1978  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The program has advanced to the level of full-size, prototype cell fabrication and evaluation. EPP nickel electrodes are now being prepared of up to 24 Ah/plate (at C/3 drain rate) at design thickness (2.5 mm). Iron electrodes of the composite-type are delivering 24 Ah/plate (at C/3) at target thickness (1.0 mm). Both plates are displaying good capacity stability at 130 to 175 test cycles, respectively, in some of the 3 plate cell tests. Finished cells are delivering up to 58 Wh/Kg at C/3, based on projected weight of the finished cell and in the actual designed cell volume. Reduction in cell resistance, reduction in nickel plate processing time and swelling on cycling are areas of major effort to reach the final battery objectives. Thermal nickel electrodes are showing promise in full size plate tests (up to 22 Ah in a plate of only 2.3 mm thickness) and will be evaluated in finished cells as soon as the technology shows repeatable results in full-size test plates.

Not Available

1979-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

The Effects of Temperature on the Electrochemical Performance of Sodium-Nickel Chloride Batteries  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The sodium-nickel chloride (ZEBRA) battery is typically fabricated with a thick tubular ?"-alumina solid electrolyte (BASE) and operated at relatively high temperatures (? 300C) to achieve adequate electrochemical performance. In the present work, a planar-type sodium-nickel chloride battery possessing a thin BASE (~600 ?m thick) was tested in order to evaluate the feasibility of the battery operation at low temperatures (?200C). Electrochemical test results revealed that the battery was able to be cycled at C/3 rate at as low as 175C despite the higher cell polarization at the reduced temperature. Overall, low operating temperature resulted in a considerable improvement in the stability of cell performance. Cell degradation was negligible at 175C, while 55% increase in end-of-charge polarization was observed at 280C after 60 cycles. SEM analysis indicated that the performance degradation at higher temperatures was related to the particle growth of both nickel and sodium chloride in the cathode. The cells tested at lower temperatures (e.g., 175 and 200C), however, exhibited a sharp drop in cell voltage at the end of discharge due to the diffusion limitation, possibly caused by the limited ionic conductivity of NaAlCl4 melt or the poor wettability of sodium on the BASE. Therefore, improvements in the ionic conductivity of a secondary electrolyte and sodium wetting are desirable to further enhance the battery performance at low temperatures.

Lu, Xiaochuan; Li, Guosheng; Kim, Jin Yong; Lemmon, John P.; Sprenkle, Vincent L.; Yang, Zhenguo

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Ignition Characteristics of Aluminum-Nickel Heterostructures ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Novel Forming Techniques in Fabrication of Powder-based Metals via Current Activated Tip-Based Sintering (CATS) Particle Size Distribution of Natural...

187

Technology for the Examination of Boiler Tubing Dissimilar Metal Welds, Revision 1  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Until recently, the typical nondestructive evaluation (NDE) detection methods for evaluating dissimilar metal tubing joined by austenitic filler metal welding, induction pressure welding, or nickel-based filler metal welding were the use of liquid penetrant examinations to detect surface cracking and the use of conventional fixed-angle pulse-echo or linear phased array ultrasonic examination to detect subsurface cracking. Radiographic techniques (both conventional and digital) have also been used to ...

2012-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

188

Process for forming a nickel foil with controlled and predetermined permeability to hydrogen  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention provides a novel process for forming a nickel foil having a controlled and predetermined hydrogen permeability. This process includes the steps of passing a nickel plating bath through a suitable cation exchange resin to provide a purified nickel plating bath free of copper and gold cations, immersing a nickel anode and a suitable cathode in the purified nickel plating bath containing a selected concentration of an organic sulfonic acid such as a napthalene-trisulfonic acid, electrodepositing a nickel layer having the thickness of a foil onto the cathode, and separating the nickel layer from the cathode to provide a nickel foil. The anode is a readily-corrodible nickel anode. The present invention also provides a novel nickel foil having a greater hydrogen permeability than palladium at room temperature.

Engelhaupt, Darell E. (Kansas City, MO)

1981-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

189

Research and development of advanced nickel-iron batteries for electric vehicle propulsion. Annual report, February 1990--January 1991  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The purpose of this program has been to develop and demonstrate an advanced nickel-iron battery suitable for use in electric vehicles. During the course of this contract various steps and modification have been taken to improve Nickel-Iron battery performance while reducing cost. Improvement of the nickel electrode through slurry formulations and substrate changes, as seen with the fiber electrode, were investigated. Processing parameters for impregnation and formation were also manipulated to improve efficiency. Impregnation saw the change of anode type from platinized titanium to the consumable nickel anode. Formation changes were also made allowing for doubled processing capabilities of positive electrodes, a savings in both time and money. A final design change involved the evolution of the NIF-200 from the NIF-220. This change permitted the use of 1.2 mm iron electrodes and maintained the necessary performance characteristics for electric vehicle propulsion. Emphasis on a pilot plant became the main focus during the late 1989--90 period. The pilot plant facility would be a culmination of the program providing the best product at the lowest price.

Not Available

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

190

Microsoft PowerPoint - Nickell.ppt  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Spring 2009 Technical Workshop Spring 2009 Technical Workshop U.S. DOE 2009 Congestion Study Bradley M Nickell, PE Renewable Integration and Planning Director Transmission Expansion Planning Policy Committee 2008 Study Results Today's Discussion ● TEPPC Study Scenarios ● 2008 Study Results ● 2009 Study Requests ● Related WECC Activities 2017 Renewable Energy Scenarios ● 15% Renewables Case - PC4A ● 15% Renewables plus 20% Energy Efficiency - PC4B ● 15% Renewables plus 20% Energy Efficiency plus a $20 per ton CO2 adder - PC4C-3 3 2017 - Base Case ● Loads - Member supplied 2017 Forecast ● Transmission System - WECC base case 2016-2017 ● Generation - All existing, plus LRS Category 1 and Category 2 generation. Sufficient RPS resources were added to meet minimum RPS requirements for 2017, which equates

191

EA-1599: Disposition of Radioactively Contaminated Nickel Located at the  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

99: Disposition of Radioactively Contaminated Nickel Located 99: Disposition of Radioactively Contaminated Nickel Located at the East Tennessee Technology Park, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, and the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Paducah, Kentucky, for Controlled Radiological Applications EA-1599: Disposition of Radioactively Contaminated Nickel Located at the East Tennessee Technology Park, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, and the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Paducah, Kentucky, for Controlled Radiological Applications Summary This EA was being prepared to evaluate potential environmental impacts of a proposal to dispose of nickel scrap that is volumetrically contaminated with radioactive materials and that DOE recovered from equipment it had used in uranium enrichment. This EA is on hold. Public Comment Opportunities No public comment opportunities at this time.

192

Acid Leaching of Nickel Laterites with Jarosite Precipitation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Acid Leaching of Nickel Laterites with Jarosite Precipitation ... shortly after the development of the jarosite process for iron control in zinc refining. ... The Recycling of Cobalt from Alloy Scrap, Spent Batteries or Catalysts and...

193

Elastic Properties and Determination of Elastic Constants of Nickel ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

NICKEL-BASE SUPERALLOYS BY A FREE-FREE BEAM TECHNIQUE. W. Hermann*, H.G. ... and on a precipitation-free near-y matrix material are presented.

194

Geogenic Nickel Speciation in Serpentine Soils and Its Relationship to Nickel Uptake in Hyperaccumulator Plants. Tuesday, November 3, 2009: 3:00 PM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Geogenic Nickel Speciation in Serpentine Soils and Its Relationship to Nickel Uptake Siebecker1, Tiziana Centofanti2, Rufus Chaney2 and Donald Sparks1, (1)Plant and Soil Sciences, Univ to extract pollutants from soil. Some can accumulate up to 20g/kg nickel in dry shoot biomass. This ability

Sparks, Donald L.

195

Prospect of advanced lead-acid, nickel/iron and nickel/zinc batteries for electric vehicle applications  

SciTech Connect

Major progress has been achieved in the lead-acid, nickel/iron and nickel/zinc battery technology development since the initiation of the Near-Term EV Battery Project in 1978. Against the specific energy goal of 56 Wh/kg the demonstrated specific energies are 41 Wh/kg for the improved lead-acid batteries, 48 Wh/kg for the improved nickel/iron batteries, and 68 Wh/kg for the improved nickel/zinc batteries. These specific energy values would allow an ETV-1 vehicle to have an urban range of 80 miles in the case of the improved lead-acid batteries, 96 miles for the improved nickel/iron batteries, and 138 miles for the improved nickel/zinc batteries. All represent a significant improvement over the state-of-the-art lead-acid battery capability of about 30 Wh/kg with approximately a 51 mile urban range for the ETV-1 vehicle. The project goal for specific power of 104 W/kg for 30 seconds at a 50% depth of discharge has been achieved for all of the technologies with the improved lead-acid demonstrating 111 W/kg, the improved nickel/iron demonstrating 103 W/kg and the improved nickel/zinc demonstrating 131 W/kg. Again this is a significant improvement over the state-of-the-art lead-acid battery capability of 70 W/kg. Substantial progress has been made against the life cycle goal of 800 cycles as evidenced by the demonstrated lead-acid battery achievement of >295 cycles in ongoing tests, the nickel/iron demonstrated capability of >515 cycles in ongoing tests, and the nickel/zinc demonstrated capability of 179 cycles. Except for the nickel/zinc batteries, the demonstrated cycle life is better than the state-of-the-art lead-acid battery cycle life of about 250 cycles. Future program emphases will be on improving cycle life and further reductions in cost.

Yao, N.P.; Christianson, C.C.; Hornstra, F.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Method of making metal matrix composites reinforced with ceramic particulates  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Composite materials and methods for making such materials are disclosed in which dispersed ceramic particles are at chemical equilibrium with a base metal matrix, thereby permitting such materials to be remelted and subsequently cast or otherwise processed to form net weight parts and other finished (or semi-finished) articles while maintaining the microstructure and mechanical properties (e.g. wear resistance or hardness) of the original composite. The composite materials of the present invention are composed of ceramic particles in a base metal matrix. The ceramics are preferably carbides of titanium, zirconium, tungsten, molybdenum or other refractory metals. The base metal can be iron, nickel, cobalt, chromium or other high temperature metal and alloys thereof. For ferrous matrices, alloys suitable for use as the base metal include cast iron, carbon steels, stainless steels and iron-based superalloys.

Cornie, James A. (North Chelmsford, MA); Kattamis, Theodoulos (Watertown, MA); Chambers, Brent V. (Cambridge, MA); Bond, Bruce E. (Bedford, MA); Varela, Raul H. (Canton, MA)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Light Metals  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Alternative processes; Anode design and operation; Cell fundamentals and ... Hot-rolling technologies; Deformation of materials; Primary metal production.

198

Measurement of the Nickel/Nickel Oxide Transition in Ni-Cr-Fe Alloys and Updated Data and Correlations to Quantify the Effect of Aqueous Hydrogen on Primary Water SCC  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Alloys 600 and X-750 have been shown to exhibit a maximum in primary water stress corrosion cracking (PWSCC) susceptibility, when testing is conducted over a range of aqueous hydrogen (H{sub 2}) levels. Contact electric resistance (CER) and corrosion coupon testing using nickel specimens has shown that the maximum in SCC susceptibility occurs in proximity to the nickel-nickel oxide (Ni/NiO) phase transition. The measured location of the Ni/NiO transition has been shown to vary with temperature, from 25 scc/kg H{sub 2} at 360 C to 4 scc/kg H{sub 2} at 288 C. New CER measurements show that the Ni/NiO transition is located at 2 scc/kg H{sub 2} at 260 C. An updated correlation of the phase transition is provided. The present work also reports CER testing conducted using an Alloy 600 specimen at 316 C. A large change in resistance occurred between 5 and 10 scc/kg H{sub 2}, similar to the results obtained at 316 C using a nickel specimen. This result adds confidence in applying the Ni/NiO transition measurements to Ni-Cr-Fe alloys. The understanding of the importance of the Ni/NiO transition to PWSCC has been used previously to quantify H{sub 2} effects on SCC growth rate (SCCGR). Specifically, the difference in the electrochemical potential (EcP) of the specimen or component from the Ni/NiO transition (i.e., EcP{sub Ni/NiO}-EcP) has been used as a correlating parameter. In the present work, these SCCGR-H{sub 2} correlations, which were based on SCCGR data obtained at relatively high test temperatures (338 and 360 C), are evaluated via SCCGR tests at a reduced temperature (316 C). The 316 C data are in good agreement with the predictions, implying that the SCCGR-H{sub 2} correlations extrapolate well to reduced temperatures. The SCCGR-H{sub 2} correlations have been revised to reflect the updated Ni/NiO phase transition correlation. New data are presented for EN82H weld metal (also known as Alloy 82) at 338 C. Similar to other nickel alloys, SCC of EN82H is a function of the aqueous H{sub 2} level, with the SCCGR exhibiting a maximum near the Ni/NiO transition. For example, the SCCGR at 8 scc/kg H{sub 2} is {approx} 81 x higher than at 60 scc/kg H{sub 2}. The 8 scc/kg H{sub 2} condition is near the Ni/NiO transition (located at {approx} 14 scc/kg H{sub 2} at 338 C), while 60 scc/kg H{sub 2} is well into the nickel metal regime. A hydrogen-SCCGR correlation is provided for EN82H. The data and understanding obtained from the present work show that SCC can be mitigated by adjusting the aqueous H{sub 2} level. For example, SCCGR is typically minimized at relatively high aqueous H{sub 2} levels, that are well into the nickel metal regime (i.e., far from the Ni/NiO transition).

Steven A. Attanasio; David S. Morton

2003-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

199

Process for fabrication of metal oxide films  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention is comprised of a method of fabricating metal oxide films from a plurality of reactants by inducing a reaction by plasma deposition among the reactants. The plasma reaction is effective for consolidating the reactants and producing thin films of metal oxides, e.g. electro-optically active transition metal oxides, at a high deposition rate. The presence of hydrogen during the plasma reaction enhances the deposition rate of the metal oxide. Various types of metal oxide films can be produced.

Tracy, C.E.; Benson, D.; Svensson, S.

1990-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

200

Influence of process parameters on rolling-contact-fatigue life of ion plated nickel-copper-silver lubrication  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, we present a connection between argon ion flux, element-mixing, and rolling contact fatigue (RCF) life of a thin film nickel-copper-silver lubricant on ball bearings. The film is deposited on the balls using an ion plating process and tested for RCF in high vacuum. The ion flux is measured using a Langmuir probe and the plane stress within the film during deposition is calculated using a thin film model. Experiments reveal that there is an inverse relationship between ion flux and RCF life for most deposition voltage and pressure combinations tested, specifically, 15.5-18.5 mTorr and 1.5-3.5 kV. For voltages up to 2.5 kV, RCF life decreases as ion flux increases due to increased compressive stress within the film, reaching as high as 2.6 GPa. For voltages between 2.5 and 3.5 kV, interlayer mixing of nickel and copper with the silver layer reduces RCF life due to contamination, even as ion flux and corresponding film compressive stress are reduced. A Monte Carlo-based simulation tool, SRIM is used to track collision cascades of the argon ions and metal atoms within the coating layers. At process voltages above 2.5 kV we observe elemental mixing of copper and nickel with the silver layer using Auger electron spectroscopy of coated steel and Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} balls. The authors conclude that an ion flux greater than 5.0 x 10{sup 14} cm{sup -2} s{sup -1} leads to reduced RCF life due to high film stress. In addition, process voltages greater than 2.5 kV also reduce RCF life due to contamination and interlayer mixing of nickel and copper within the silver layer.

Danyluk, Mike; Dhingra, Anoop [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, Milwaukee, Wisconsin 53211-3029 (United States)

2012-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "type nickel metal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

High Temperature Interactions of Antimony with Nickel  

SciTech Connect

In this chapter, the surface and bulk interactions of antimony with the Ni-based anodes in solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC) will be discussed. High fuel flexibility is a significant advantage of SOFCs, allowing the direct use of fossil and bio fuels without a hydrogen separation unit. Synthesis gas derived from coal and biomass consists of a mixture of hydrogen, carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, and steam, but finite amounts of tars and trace impurities such as S, Se, P, As, Sb, Cd, Pb, Cl, etc, are also always present. While synthesis gas is commonly treated with a series of chemical processes and scrubbers to remove the impurities, complete purification is not economical. Antimony is widely distributed in coals. During coal gasification antimony is volatilized, such that contact with the SOFC anodes and other SOFC parts, e.g., interconnect, current collecting wires, fuel gas supplying tubing, is most likely. This chapter addresses the following topics: high temperature Ni - Sb interactions; alteration phase, Ni3Sb, Ni5Sb2, NiSb, formation; thermochemical modeling; impact of Sb on the electrocatalytic activity of Ni toward the fuel oxidation and the presence of other impurities (sulfur, in particular); converted anode structural instability during long-term SOFC operation; comparison with nickel heterogeneous catalysts.

Marina, Olga A.; Pederson, Larry R.

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Small molecule binding to electrophilic trigonal pyramidal platinum, palladium, and nickel  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Chapter 1 A general introduction to the concepts and background of several types of transition metal complexes that motivate and inform the research described herein. These include a-complexes and molecular adducts of ...

Tsay, Charlene

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Superalloy Surface Treatment for Improved Metal Performance  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Superalloy Surface Treatment Superalloy Surface Treatment for Improved Metal Performance Opportunity Research is active on the patent pending technology, titled "Method to Improve Superalloy Resistance by Surface Treatment." This technology is available for licensing and/or further collaborative research from the U.S. Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL). Overview To produce power more efficiently and cleanly, the next generation of power and aero turbines along with other essential components will have to operate at extreme temperatures and pressures. Currently advanced single crystal nickel-based superalloys are used in such extreme environments. Even though these components are coated with a bond

204

Formation of amorphous metal alloys by chemical vapor deposition  

SciTech Connect

Amorphous alloys are deposited by a process of thermal dissociation of mixtures or organometallic compounds and metalloid hydrides, e.g., transition metal carbonyl such as nickel carbonyl, and diborane. Various sizes and shapes of deposits can be achieved, including near-net-shape free standing articles, multilayer deposits, and the like. Manipulation or absence of a magnetic field affects the nature and the structure of the deposit.

Mullendore, Arthur W. (Sandia Park, NM)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Thin films of mixed metal compounds  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Disclosed is a thin film heterojunction solar cell, said heterojunction comprising a p-type I-III-IV[sub 2] chalcopyrite substrate and an overlying layer of an n-type ternary mixed metal compound wherein said ternary mixed metal compound is applied to said substrate by introducing the vapor of a first metal compound to a vessel containing said substrate from a first vapor source while simultaneously introducing a vapor of a second metal compound from a second vapor source of said vessel, said first and second metals comprising the metal components of said mixed metal compound; independently controlling the vaporization rate of said first and second vapor sources; reducing the mean free path between vapor particles in said vessel, said gas being present in an amount sufficient to induce homogeneity of said vapor mixture; and depositing said mixed metal compound on said substrate in the form of a uniform composition polycrystalline mixed metal compound. 5 figs.

Mickelsen, R.A.; Chen, W.S.

1985-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

206

Precious Metals  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

"Advances in the Extractive Metallurgy of Selected Rare and Precious Metals" ( 1991 Review of Extractive Metallurgy), J.E. Hoffmann, April 1991, pp. 18-23.

207

Ductile tungsten-nickel alloy and method for making same  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention is directed to a ductile, high-density tungsten-nickel alloy which possesses a tensile strength in the range of 100,000 to 140,000 psi and a tensile elongation of 3.1 to 16.5 percent in 1 inch at 25.degree.C. This alloy is prepared by the steps of liquid phase sintering a mixture of tungsten-0.5 to 10.0 weight percent nickel, heat treating the alloy at a temperature above the ordering temperature of approximately 970.degree.C. to stabilize the matrix phase, and thereafter rapidly quenching the alloy in a suitable liquid to maintain the matrix phase in a metastable, face-centered cubic, solid- solution of tungsten in nickel.

Snyder, Jr., William B. (Knoxville, TN)

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Structure and property of magnetron sputtered ternary cobalt-nickel silicide films  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ternary cobalt-nickel silicide films were prepared using magnetron sputtering from an equiatomic cobalt-nickel alloy target on Si substrate. The effect of post-deposition annealing on the phase formation, structural properties and resistivity of the ... Keywords: Annealing, Magnetron sputtering, Resistivity, Ternary cobalt-nickel silicides

Zhou Xia; Shihua Huang

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

SOLDERING OF ALUMINUM BASE METALS  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This patent deals with the soldering of aluminum to metals of different types, such as copper, brass, and iron. This is accomplished by heating the aluminum metal to be soldered to slightly above 30 deg C, rubbing a small amount of metallic gallium into the part of the surface to be soldered, whereby an aluminum--gallium alloy forms on the surface, and then heating the aluminum piece to the melting point of lead--tin soft solder, applying lead--tin soft solder to this alloyed surface, and combining the aluminum with the other metal to which it is to be soldered.

Erickson, G.F.

1958-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

210

DETERMINATION OF IN-VITRO LUNG SOLUBILITY AND INTAKE-TO-DOSE CONVERSION FACTOR FOR TRITIATED LANTHANUM NICKEL ALUMINUM ALLOY  

SciTech Connect

A sample of tritiated lanthanum nickel aluminum alloy (LaNi4.25Al0.75 or LANA.75) similar to that used at the Savannah River Site Tritium Facilities was analyzed to estimate the particle size distribution of this metal tritide powder and the rate, at which this material dissolves in the human respiratory tract after it is inhaled. This information is used to calculate the committed effective dose received by a worker after inhaling the material. These doses, which were calculated using the same methodology given in the DOE Tritium Handbook, are presented as inhalation intake-to-dose conversion factors (DCF). The DCF for this metal tritide is less than the DCF for tritiated water and radiation worker bioassay programs designed for tritiated water are adequate to monitor for intakes of this material.

Farfan, E.; Labone, T.; Staack, G.; Cheng, Y.; Zhou, Y.; Varallo, T.

2011-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

211

Preliminary Compatibility Assessment of Metallic Dispenser Materials for Service in Ethanol Fuel Blends  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The compatibility of selected metals representative of those commonly used in dispensing systems was evaluated in an aggressive E20 formulation (CE20a) and in synthetic gasoline (Reference Fuel C) in identical testing to facilitate comparison of results. The testing was performed at modestly elevated temperature (nominally 60 C) and with constant fluid flow in an effort to accelerate potential interactions in the screening test. Based on weight change, the general corrosion of all individual coupons exposed in the vapor phase above Reference Fuel C and CE20a as well as all coupons immersed in Reference Fuel C was essentially nil (brass and phosphor bronze), but the associated corrosion films were quite thin and apparently protective. For coupons immersed in CE20a, four different materials exhibited net weight loss over the entire course of the experiment: cartridge brass, phosphor bronze, galvanized steel, and terne-plated steel. None of these exhibited substantial incompatibility with the test fluid, with the largest general corrosion rate calculated from coupon weight loss to be approximately 4 {micro}m/y for the cartridge brass specimens. Selective leaching of zinc (from brass) and tin (from bronze) was observed, as well as the presence of sulfide surface films rich in these elements, suggesting the importance of the role of sulfuric acid in the CE20a formulation. Analysis of weight loss data for the slightly corroded metals indicated that the corrosivity of the test environment decreased with exposure time for brass and bronze and increased for galvanized and terne-plated steel. Other materials immersed in CE20a - type 1020 mild steel, type 1100 aluminum, type 201 nickel, and type 304 stainless steel - each appeared essentially immune to corrosion at the test conditions.

Pawel, Steven J [ORNL; Kass, Michael D [ORNL; Janke, Christopher James [ORNL

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Preliminary Compatibility Assessment of Metallic Dispenser Materials for Service in Ethanol Fuel Blends  

SciTech Connect

The compatibility of selected metals representative of those commonly used in dispensing systems was evaluated in an aggressive E20 formulation (CE20a) and in synthetic gasoline (Reference Fuel C) in identical testing to facilitate comparison of results. The testing was performed at modestly elevated temperature (nominally 60 C) and with constant fluid flow in an effort to accelerate potential interactions in the screening test. Based on weight change, the general corrosion of all individual coupons exposed in the vapor phase above Reference Fuel C and CE20a as well as all coupons immersed in Reference Fuel C was essentially nil (<0.3 {micro}m/y), with no evidence of localized corrosion such as pitting/crevice corrosion or selective leaching at any location. Modest discoloration was observed on the copper-based alloys (cartridge brass and phosphor bronze), but the associated corrosion films were quite thin and apparently protective. For coupons immersed in CE20a, four different materials exhibited net weight loss over the entire course of the experiment: cartridge brass, phosphor bronze, galvanized steel, and terne-plated steel. None of these exhibited substantial incompatibility with the test fluid, with the largest general corrosion rate calculated from coupon weight loss to be approximately 4 {micro}m/y for the cartridge brass specimens. Selective leaching of zinc (from brass) and tin (from bronze) was observed, as well as the presence of sulfide surface films rich in these elements, suggesting the importance of the role of sulfuric acid in the CE20a formulation. Analysis of weight loss data for the slightly corroded metals indicated that the corrosivity of the test environment decreased with exposure time for brass and bronze and increased for galvanized and terne-plated steel. Other materials immersed in CE20a - type 1020 mild steel, type 1100 aluminum, type 201 nickel, and type 304 stainless steel - each appeared essentially immune to corrosion at the test conditions.

Pawel, Steven J [ORNL; Kass, Michael D [ORNL; Janke, Christopher James [ORNL

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Submicrometer-sized hollow nickel spheres synthesized by autocatalytic reduction  

SciTech Connect

A facile method to fabricate submicrometer-sized hollow nickel spheres by autocatalyzing the redox reaction around a sacrificial colloidal particle surface is presented in this paper. The size distribution of these spheres can be controlled by regulating the concentration of the alkali solution. The hollow nickel particles were characterized by field emission scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy and X-ray powder diffraction. The hollow spheres produced by this process may have potential applications in many fields, including chemistry, biotechnology and materials science.

Deng Yida [State Key Laboratory of Metal Matrix Composites, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, 1954, Huashan Road, Shanghai 200030 (China)]. E-mail: denyda@sjtu.edu.cn; Zhao Ling [State Key Laboratory of Metal Matrix Composites, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, 1954, Huashan Road, Shanghai 200030 (China); Liu Lei [State Key Laboratory of Metal Matrix Composites, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, 1954, Huashan Road, Shanghai 200030 (China); Shen Bin [State Key Laboratory of Metal Matrix Composites, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, 1954, Huashan Road, Shanghai 200030 (China); Hu Wenbin [State Key Laboratory of Metal Matrix Composites, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, 1954, Huashan Road, Shanghai 200030 (China)

2005-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

214

PLUTONIUM-CERIUM-COBALT AND PLUTONIUM-CERIUM-NICKEL ALLOYS  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

>New plutonium-base teroary alloys useful as liquid reactor fuels are described. The alloys consist of 10 to 20 atomic percent cobalt with the remainder plutonium and cerium in any desired proportion, with the plutonium not in excess of 88 atomic percent; or, of from 10 to 25 atomic percent nickel (or mixture of nickel and cobalt) with the remainder plutonium and cerium in any desired proportion, with the plutonium not in excess of 86 atomic percent. The stated advantages of these alloys over unalloyed plutonium for reactor fuel use are a lower melting point and a wide range of permissible plutonium dilution.

Coffinberry, A.S.

1959-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

215

C:\Eco-SSLs\Contaminant Specific Documents\Nickel\March 2007\Eco-SSL for Nickel.wpd  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nickel Nickel Interim Final OSWER Directive 9285.7-76 U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Office of Solid Waste and Emergency Response 1200 Pennsylvania Avenue, N.W. Washington, DC 20460 March 2007 This page intentionally left blank i TABLE OF CONTENTS 1.0 INTRODUCTION . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 2.0 SUMMARY OF ECO-SSLs FOR NICKEL . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 3.0 ECO-SSL FOR TERRESTRIAL PLANTS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 4.0 ECO-SSL FOR SOIL INVERTEBRATES . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 5.0 ECO-SSL FOR AVIAN WILDLIFE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 5.1 Avian TRV . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 5.2 Estimation of Dose and Calculation of the Eco-SSL . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 6.0 ECO-SSL FOR MAMMALIAN WILDLIFE .

216

Catalysis Without Precious Metals  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Written for chemists in industry and academia, this ready reference and handbook summarizes recent progress in the development of new catalysts that do not require precious metals. The research thus presented points the way to how new catalysts may ultimately supplant the use of precious metals in some types of reactions, while highlighting the remaining challenges. This material is based upon work supported as part of the Center for Molecular Electrocatalysis, an Energy Frontier Research Center funded by the US Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences.

Bullock, R. Morris

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Molten salt extraction process for the recovery of valued transition metals from land-based and deep-sea minerals  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for extracting transition metals and particularly cobalt and manganese together with iron, copper and nickel from low grade ores (including ocean-floor nodules) by converting the metal oxides or other compositions to chlorides in a molten salt, and subsequently using a combination of selective distillation at temperatures below about 500.degree. C., electrolysis at a voltage not more negative than about -1.5 volt versus Ag/AgCl, and precipitation to separate the desired manganese and cobalt salts from other metals and provide cobalt and manganese in metallic forms or compositions from which these metals may be more easily recovered.

Maroni, Victor A. (Naperville, IL); von Winbush, Samuel (Huntington, NY)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Molten salt extraction process for the recovery of valued transition metals from land-based and deep-sea minerals  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for extracting transition metals and particularly cobalt and manganese together with iron, copper and nickel from low grade ores (including ocean-floor nodules) by converting the metal oxides or other compositions to chlorides in a molten salt, and subsequently using a combination of selective distillation at temperatures below about 500/degree/C, electrolysis at a voltage not more negative that about /minus/1.5 volt versus Ag/AgCl, and precipitation to separate the desired manganese and cobalt salts from other metals and provide cobalt and manganese in metallic forms or compositions from which these metals may be more easily recovered.

Maroni, V.A.; von Winbush, S.

1987-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Pollution prevention and waste minimization in metal finishing  

SciTech Connect

This study was done to identify pollution prevention and waste minimization opportunities in the general plating department and the printed circuit board processing department. Recommendations for certain recycle and recovery technologies were mad in order to reduce usage of acids and the volume of heavy metal sludge that is formed at the industrial Wastewater Pretreatment Facility (IWPF). Some of these technologies discussed were acid purification, electrowinning, and ion exchange. Specific technologies are prescribed for specific processes. Those plating processes where the metals can be recovered are copper, nickel, gold, cadmium, tin, lead, and rhodium.

Stimetz, C.J.

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

National Low-Level Waste Management Program Radionuclide Report Series. Volume 10, Nickel-63  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report outlines the basic radiological, chemical, and physical characteristics of nickel-63 ({sup 63}Ni) and examines how these characteristics affect the behavior of {sup 63}Ni in various environmental media, such as soils, groundwater, plants, animals, the atmosphere, and the human body. Discussions also include methods of {sup 63}Ni production, waste types, and waste forms that contain {sup 63}Ni. The primary source of {sup 63}Ni in the environment has been low-level radioactive waste material generated as a result of neutron activation of stable {sup 62}Ni that is present in the structural components of nuclear reactor vessels. {sup 63}Ni enters the environment from the dismantling activities associated with nuclear reactor decommissioning. However, small amounts of {sup 63}Ni have been detected in the environment following the testing of thermonuclear weapons in the South Pacific. Concentrations as high as 2.7 Bq{sup a} per gram of sample (or equivalently 0.0022 parts per billion) were observed on Bikini Atoll (May 1954). {sup 63}Ni was not created as a fission product species (e.g., from {sup 235}U or {sup 239}Pu fissions), but instead was produced as a result of neutron capture in {sup 63}Ni, a common nickel isotope present in the stainless steel components of nuclear weapons (e.g., stainless-304 contains {approximately}9% total Ni or {approximately}0.3% {sup 63}Ni).

Carboneau, M.L.; Adams, J.P.

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "type nickel metal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Crack growth rates of nickel alloy welds in a PWR environment.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In light water reactors (LWRs), vessel internal components made of nickel-base alloys are susceptible to environmentally assisted cracking. A better understanding of the causes and mechanisms of this cracking may permit less conservative estimates of damage accumulation and requirements on inspection intervals. A program is being conducted at Argonne National Laboratory to evaluate the resistance of Ni alloys and their welds to environmentally assisted cracking in simulated LWR coolant environments. This report presents crack growth rate (CGR) results for Alloy 182 shielded-metal-arc weld metal in a simulated pressurized water reactor (PWR) environment at 320 C. Crack growth tests were conducted on 1-T compact tension specimens with different weld orientations from both double-J and deep-groove welds. The results indicate little or no environmental enhancement of fatigue CGRs of Alloy 182 weld metal in the PWR environment. The CGRs of Alloy 182 in the PWR environment are a factor of {approx}5 higher than those of Alloy 600 in air under the same loading conditions. The stress corrosion cracking for the Alloy 182 weld is close to the average behavior of Alloy 600 in the PWR environment. The weld orientation was found to have a profound effect on the magnitude of crack growth: cracking was found to propagate faster along the dendrites than across them. The existing CGR data for Ni-alloy weld metals have been compiled and evaluated to establish the effects of key material, loading, and environmental parameters on CGRs in PWR environments. The results from the present study are compared with the existing CGR data for Ni-alloy welds to determine the relative susceptibility of the specific Ni-alloy weld to environmentally enhanced cracking.

Alexandreanu, B.; Chopra, O. K.; Shack, W. J.; Energy Technology

2006-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

222

Nickel container of highly-enriched uranium bodies and sodium  

SciTech Connect

A fuel element comprises highly a enriched uranium bodies coated with a nonfissionable, corrosion resistant material. A plurality of these bodies are disposed in layers, with sodium filling the interstices therebetween. The entire assembly is enclosed in a fluid-tight container of nickel.

Zinn, Walter H. (Hinsdale, IL)

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Moire Superstructures of Graphene on Faceted Nickel Islands  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-dimensional nickel islands on highly oriented pyrolytic graphite substrate. We observed graphene domains exhibiting-standing graphene (red thin lines). (C) Calculated projected density of states (PDOS) corresponding to carbon atoms-Area Synthesis of High Quality and Uniform Graphene Films on Copper Foils. Science 2009, 324, 1312­1314. 14. Li

Ciobanu, Cristian

224

Metal detector technology data base  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The tests described in this report were conducted to obtain information on the effects target characteristics have on portal type metal detector response. A second purpose of the tests was to determine the effect of detector type and settings on the detection of the targets. Although in some cases comparison performance of different types and makes of metal detectors is found herein, that is not the primary purpose of the report. Further, because of the many variables that affect metal detector performance, the information presented can be used only in a general way. The results of these tests can show general trends in metal detection, but do little for making accurate predictions as to metal detector response to a target with a complex shape such as a handgun. The shape of an object and its specific metal content (both type and treatment) can have a significant influence on detection. Thus it should not be surprising that levels of detection for a small 100g stainless steel handgun are considerably different than for detection of the 100g stainless steel right circular cylinder that was used in these tests. 7 figs., 1 tab.

Porter, L.K.; Gallo, L.R.; Murray, D.W.

1990-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

PLUTONIUM METALLIC FUELS FOR FAST REACTORS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Early interest in metallic plutonium fuels for fast reactors led to much research on plutonium alloy systems including binary solid solutions with the addition of aluminum, gallium, or zirconium and low-melting eutectic alloys with iron and nickel or cobalt. There was also interest in ternaries of these elements with plutonium and cerium. The solid solution and eutectic alloys have most unusual properties, including negative thermal expansion in some solid-solution alloys and the highest viscosity known for liquid metals in the Pu-Fe system. Although metallic fuels have many potential advantages over ceramic fuels, the early attempts were unsuccessful because these fuels suffered from high swelling rates during burn up and high smearing densities. The liquid metal fuels experienced excessive corrosion. Subsequent work on higher-melting U-PuZr metallic fuels was much more promising. In light of the recent rebirth of interest in fast reactors, we review some of the key properties of the early fuels and discuss the challenges presented by the ternary alloys.

STAN, MARIUS [Los Alamos National Laboratory; HECKER, SIEGFRIED S. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2007-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

226

Research, development and demonstration of nickel-zinc batteries for electric vehicle propulsion. Annual report, 1979  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Progress achieved under ANL Contract No. 31-109-38-4248 from 16 August 1978 to 16 August 1979 is reported. The first segment of the overall program, component development, consists of four basic tasks proceeding in parallel: nickel electrode development, zinc electrode development, separator development, and sealed cell development. Each of these tasks is reported herein on a self-contained basis. System engineering is the second major subdivision of the effort. It includes the design and testing of all cells, the investigation of charge control devices and techniques, and the complete analysis of all cells for failure modes. It also encompasses the accelerated testing of 20-Ah cells. To date, large numbers of these cells (incorporating separator variations, active material additives and internal design variations) have been subjected to this type of testing. 48 figures, 47 tables. (RWR)

Not Available

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Non-stoichiometric AB5 alloys for metal hydride electrodes  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention provides a non-stoichiometric alloy comprising a composition having the formula AB.sub.5+X an atomic ratio wherein A is selected from the group consisting of the rare earth metals, yttrium, mischmetal, or a combination thereof; B is nickel and tin, or nickel and tin and at least a third element selected from the group consisting of the elements in group IVA of the periodic table, aluminum, manganese, iron, cobalt, copper, antimony or a combination thereof; X is greater than 0 and less than or equal to about 2.0; and wherein at least one substituted A site is occupied by at least one of the B elements. An electrode incorporating said alloy and an electrochemical cell incorporating said electrode are also described.

Reilly, James J. (Bellport, NY); Adzic, Gordana D. (Setauket, NY); Johnson, John R. (Calverton, NY); Vogt, Thomas (Cold Spring Harbor, NY); McBreen, James (Bellport, NY)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Measurement of the Nickel/Nickel Oxide Phase Transition in High Temperature Hydrogenated Water Using the Contact Electric Resistance (CER) Technique  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Prior studies of Alloy 600 and Alloy X-750 have shown the existence of a maximum in stress corrosion cracking (SCC) susceptibility in high temperature water (e.g., at 360 C), when testing is conducted over a range of dissolved (i.e., aqueous) hydrogen (H{sub 2}) concentrations. It has also been shown that this maximum in SCC susceptibility tends to occur in proximity to the nickel/nickel oxide (Ni/NiO) phase transition, suggesting that oxide phase stability may affect primary water SCC (PWSCC) resistance. Previous studies have estimated the Ni/NiO transition using thermodynamic calculations based on free energies of formation for NiO and H{sub 2}O. The present study reports experimental measurements of the Ni/NiO transition performed using a contact electric resistance (CER) instrument. The CER is capable of measuring the surface resistance of a metal to determine whether it is oxide-covered or oxide-free at a given condition. The transition aqueous hydrogen (H{sub 2}) concentration corresponding to the Ni/NiO equilibrium was measured at 288, 316, 338 and 360 C using high purity Ni specimens. The results showed an appreciable deviation (i.e., 7 to 58 scc H{sub 2}/kg H{sub 2}O) between the measured Ni/NiO transition and the theoretical Ni/NiO transition previously calculated using free energy data from the Journal of Solution Chemistry. The CER-measured position of the Ni/NiO transition is in good agreement with the maxima in PWSCC susceptibility at 338 and 360 C. The measured Ni/NiO transition provides a reasonable basis for estimating the aqueous H{sub 2} level at which the maximum in SCC susceptibility is likely to be observed at temperatures lower than 338 to 360 C, at which SCC tests are time-consuming to perform. Limited SCC data are presented which are consistent with the observation that SCC susceptibility is maximized near the Ni/NiO transition at 288 C.

S.A. Attanasio; D.S. Morton; M.A. Ando; N.F. Panayotou; C.D. Thompson

2001-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

229

Metallic Nanopowders  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

...three different types, as shown in Fig. 11. A nanocrystal or nanocrystalline material is a dense material

230

Level densities of nickel isotopes: microscopic theory versus experiment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We apply a spin-projection method to calculate microscopically the level densities of a family of nickel isotopes $^{59-64}$Ni using the shell model Monte Carlo approach in the complete $pfg_{9/2}$ shell. Accurate ground-state energies of the odd-mass nickel isotopes, required for the determination of excitation energies, are determined using the Green's function method recently introduced to circumvent the odd particle-number sign problem. Our results are in excellent agreement with recent measurements based on proton evaporation spectra and with level counting data at low excitation energies. We also compare our results with neutron resonance data, assuming equilibration of parity and a spin-cutoff model for the spin distribution at the neutron binding energy, and find good agreement with the exception of $^{63}$Ni.

M. Bonett-Matiz; Abhishek Mukherjee; Y. Alhassid

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Method for heat treating iron-nickel-chromium alloy  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for heat treating an age-hardenable iron-nickel-chromium alloy to obtain a bimodal distribution of gamma prime phase within a network of dislocations, the alloy consisting essentially of about 25% to 45% nickel, 10% to 16% chromium, 1.5% to 3% of an element selected from the group consisting of molybdenum and niobium, about 2% titanium, about 3% aluminum, and the remainder substantially all iron. To obtain optimum results, the alloy is heated to a temperature of 1025.degree. C. to 1075.degree. C. for 2-5 minutes, cold-worked about 20% to 60%, aged at a temperature of about 775.degree. C. for 8 hours followed by an air-cool, and then heated to a temperature in the range of 650.degree. C. to 700.degree. C. for 2 hours followed by an air-cool.

Merrick, Howard F. (Suffern, NY); Korenko, Michael K. (Rockville, MD)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

State-of-Knowledge Assessment of Residual Oil Nickel Emissions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report summarizes current knowledge of nickel emissions from power plants firing residual oil. The primary motivation for the study was the Maximum Achievable Control Technology (MACT) standard proposed by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) in 2004. Although EPA subsequently withdrew its proposed standard, EPRI and members of its Gas and Oil Boiler Interest Group (GOBIG) decided that completion of the study and documentation of its findings were worthwhile.

2007-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

233

Solidification/stabilization of simulated uranium and nickel contaminated sludges  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Research missions in nuclear energy conducted by the U.S. Department of Energy facilities have generated large volumes of mixed wastes with hazardous and radioactive components. Uranium and nickel are the primary contaminants of concern in this research which focused on better understanding the Solidification/Stabilization (S/S) chemistry, complex waste-binder interactions, and the suitability and effectiveness of additives in the Portland cement based treatment systems. The treatability was investigated with a simulated waste representative of the actual Oak Ridge K-25 pond waste. Screening tools such as the short term slurry tests were used to ascertain the behavior of the contaminants in the cement based systems for a range of binder-to-waste ratios, and optimal substitutions of cement with additives. This was used in combination with the Acid Neutralizing Capacity of the S/S system components to design solid waste form mixes to be evaluated over long curing periods. Attempts at estimating the extent of sorption and other immobilization mechanisms were made using dry and hydrated cement matrices. Portland cement based systems with flyash, silica fume and sodium sulfide as additives were studied. Porewater uranium and nickel concentrations, leachability, physical immobilization in terms Of MacMullin number and Unconfined Compressive Strength, regulatory compliance, and risk reduction were evaluated in the solid waste forms ranging over three binder-to-waste ratios. The 900 mg/L uranium and 3,000 mg/L nickel in the untreated sludge were reduced to less than 10 mg/L uranium and 30 mg /L nickel in the TCLP extract of the solidified waste form.

Ramabhadran, Sanjay

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Polymer quenched prealloyed metal powder  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A powder metallurgical process of preparing a sheet from a powder having an intermetallic alloy composition such as an iron, nickel or titanium aluminide. The sheet can be manufactured into electrical resistance heating elements having improved room temperature ductility, electrical resistivity, cyclic fatigue resistance, high temperature oxidation resistance, low and high temperature strength, and/or resistance to high temperature sagging. The iron aluminide has an entirely ferritic microstructure which is free of austenite and can include, in weight %, 4 to 32% Al, and optional additions such as .ltoreq.1% Cr, .gtoreq.0.05% Zr .ltoreq.2% Ti, .ltoreq.2% Mo, .ltoreq.1% Ni, .ltoreq.0.75% C, .ltoreq.0.1% B, .ltoreq.1% submicron oxide particles and/or electrically insulating or electrically conductive covalent ceramic particles, .ltoreq.1% rare earth metal, and/or .ltoreq.3 % Cu. The process includes forming a non-densified metal sheet by consolidating a powder having an intermetallic alloy composition such as by roll compaction, tape casting or plasma spraying, forming a cold rolled sheet by cold rolling the non-densified metal sheet so as to increase the density and reduce the thickness thereof and annealing the cold rolled sheet. The powder can be a water, polymer or gas atomized powder which is subjecting to sieving and/or blending with a binder prior to the consolidation step. After the consolidation step, the sheet can be partially sintered. The cold rolling and/or annealing steps can be repeated to achieve the desired sheet thickness and properties. The annealing can be carried out in a vacuum furnace with a vacuum or inert atmosphere. During final annealing, the cold rolled sheet recrystallizes to an average grain size of about 10 to 30 .mu.m. Final stress relief annealing can be carried out in the B2 phase temperature range.

Hajaligol, Mohammad R. (Midlothian, VA); Fleischhauer, Grier (Midlothian, VA); German, Randall M. (State College, PA)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Thermostat Metals  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

...A thermostat metal is a composite material (usually in the form of sheet or strip) that consists of two or more materials bonded together, of which one can be a nonmetal. Because the materials bonded together to form the composite differ in

236

METAL COMPOSITIONS  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Alloys of uranium which are strong, hard, and machinable are presented, These alloys of uranium contain bctween 0.1 to 5.0% by weight of at least one noble metal such as rhodium, palladium, and gold. The alloys may be heat treated to obtain a product with iniproved tensile and compression strengths,

Seybolt, A.U.

1959-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Surface Modification of Nickel Foams by a Slurry Aluminizing Process  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A novel slurry-based process for aluminizing nickel foams while improving the mechanical properties and conserving the excellent ductility is reported. Cellular unalloyed nickel foams with 92% porosity and uniform pore size and distribution were used as a starting material. Several slurries of different compositions were examined to investigate the possibility of developing an aluminide-nickel intermetallic coating on a Ni foam without considerably degrading the original ductile properties of the foam. The process temperature was varying from 400 to 850 deg. C and the process holding time was ranging between 2h to 6h. Scanning electron microscopy with an energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry and X-Ray diffraction were applied to assess the effectiveness of the aluminizing process and determine both the optimum parameters of the procedure (slurry composition, holding temperature and time) and the concentration profiles across the coating cross-section. The mechanical behavior of the aluminized Ni-foams was evaluated by the conduction of micro-tension tests. The resulting Ni-foams after aluminization retain the pore structure of original Ni-foams and present a thick outer surface layer which consists of a range of aluminide phases. The mechanical properties of the Ni-foams aluminized in low process temperature were insignificantly affected.

Omar, H.; Papanastasiou, N.; Psyllaki, P.; Stergioudi, F.; Tsipas, D. N. [Physical Metallurgy Laboratory (PML), Mechanical Engineering Department, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, 54124 Thessaloniki (Greece); Tsipas, S. A. [Dpto. Ciencia e Ingenieria de Materiales e Ingenieria Quimica Escuela Politecnica Superior Universidad Carlos III de Madrid, Avda de la Universidad, 30 28911 Leganes (Spain); Michailidis, N. [Physical Metallurgy Laboratory (PML), Mechanical Engineering Department, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, 54124 Thessaloniki (Greece); Department of Mechanical Engineering, Physical Metallurgy Laboratory, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Thessaloniki 54124 (Greece)

2010-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

238

CORROSION RESISTANCE OF STRUCTURAL AMORPHOUS METAL  

SciTech Connect

Corrosion costs the Department of Defense billions of dollars every year, with an immense quantity of material in various structures undergoing corrosion. For example, in addition to fluid and seawater piping, ballast tanks, and propulsions systems, approximately 345 million square feet of structure aboard naval ships and crafts require costly corrosion control measures. The use of advanced corrosion-resistant materials to prevent the continuous degradation of this massive surface area would be extremely beneficial. The potential advantages of amorphous metals have been recognized for some time [Latanison 1985]. Iron-based corrosion-resistant, amorphous-metal coatings under development may prove important for maritime applications [Farmer et al. 2005]. Such materials could also be used to coat the entire outer surface of containers for the transportation and long-term storage of spent nuclear fuel, or to protect welds and heat affected zones, thereby preventing exposure to environments that might cause stress corrosion cracking [Farmer et al. 1991, 2000a, 2000b]. In the future, it may be possible to substitute such high-performance iron-based materials for more-expensive nickel-based alloys, thereby enabling cost savings in a wide variety of industrial applications. It should be noted that thermal-spray ceramic coatings have also been investigated for such applications [Haslam et al. 2005]. This report focuses on the corrosion resistance of a yttrium-containing amorphous metal, SAM1651. SAM1651 has a glass transition temperature of {approx}584 C, a recrystallization temperature of {approx}653 C, and a melting point of {approx}1121 C. The measured critical cooling rate for SAM1651 is {le} 80 K per second, respectively. The yttrium addition to SAM1651 enhances glass formation, as reported by Guo and Poon [2003]. The corrosion behavior of SAM1651 was compared with nickel-based Alloy 22 in electrochemical polarization measurements performed in several highly concentrated chloride solutions.

Lian, T; Day, S D; Farmer, J C

2006-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

239

Pressure Water Leaching Molybdenum and Nickel from Mo-Ni ore of ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Pressure Water Leaching Molybdenum and Nickel from Mo-Ni ore of Black Shale without Reagent. Author(s), Zhigan Deng. On-Site Speaker...

240

Magnetic Analysis of Nickel Nano-Particles in Solid Oxide Fuel Cell ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

During operation of the fuel cell in reducing environments, nickel particle formation ... of Advanced Ferritic Creep Resistant Steels for Fossil Energy Applications.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "type nickel metal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Phase Calculation and its Use in Alloy Design Program for Nickel ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

PHASE CALCULATION AND ITS USE. IN ALLOY DESIGN PROGRAM FOR NICKEL-BASE SUPERALLOYS. H. Harada, K. Ohno, T. Yamagata,. T. Yokokawa

242

Effect of Cooling Rate on the Fatigue Life of a Nickel-Base ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Effect of Cooling Rate on the Fatigue Life of a Nickel-Base ... The Zinagizado Processes as New Electrochemical Alternative to Prevent the...

243

Creep Rupture Behaviour of Nickel Base Alloys for 700C Steam ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Nickel base alloys are important for future steam turbines operating at 700 "C or ..... appropriated to calculate the time dependent stress and strain distribution of...

244

The Role of Small Amounts of Magnesium in Nickel-Base and ... - TMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

incentive for reduction and elimination of Co in nickel-base superalloys. ..... effect on steady-state creep rate and activation energy of creep. Substitution of small.

245

Chip-Package Nano-Structured Copper and Nickel Interconnections with Metallic and Polymeric Bonding Interfaces .  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??With the semiconductor industry racing toward a historic transition, nano chips with less than 45 nm features demand I/Os in excess of 20,000 with multi-core (more)

Aggarwal, Ankur

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Decontamination and Conversion of Nickel Radioactive Scrap Metal. Innovative Technology Summary Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document contains information on the above-mentioned technology, including description, applicability, cost, and performance data.

NONE

2001-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Market Feasibility for Nickel Metal Hyride and Other Advanced Electric Vehicle Batteries in Selected Stationary Applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Governments in the United States and other countries, as well as the automotive, battery, and utility industries, have spent millions to demonstrate the viability of next generation of batteries for electric vehicles (EVs) and hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs). An important question remains unanswered: "What value might these EV and HEV batteries add when employed in stationary and secondary use applications?"

2000-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

248

Precious Metals  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Title, Author, Publisher, Product Type, In Stock, Date Published. Add to Cart, Image, Click on Title to view details, Member (Student) Price, Non-member Price.

249

Lead, Uranium, and Nickel Compound Data from the XAFS Library at the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory (SSRL)  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

The x-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (XAFS) library at the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory is intended to be a reference library of XAFS spectra for various lead, uranium, and nickel compounds. Compounds are organized by central atom and all spectra are transmission data. Molecular Environmental Science (MES) research at SSRL focuses on the fundamental interfacial, molecular- and nano-scale processes that control contaminant and nutrient cycling in the biosphere with the goal of elucidating global elemental cycles and anthropogenic influences on the environment. Key areas of investigation include the: (a) Structural chemistry of water and dissolved solutes, (b) Structural chemistry and reactivity of complex natural environmental materials with respect to heavy metals and metalloids (biominerals, Fe- and Mn-oxides, biofilms, and organic materials), (c) Reactions at environmental interfaces, including sorption, precipitation and dissolution processes that affect the bioavailability of heavy metals and other contaminants, and (d) Microbial transformations of metals and anions. SSRL-based MES research utilizes synchrotron-based x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS), x-ray diffraction (XRD), small-angle x-ray scattering (SAXS), x-ray standing wave (XSW) spectroscopy, and photoemission spectroscopy (PES) because of their unique capabilities to probe structure/composition relationships in complex, non-crystalline, and dilute materials. [copied from http://www-ssrl.slac.stanford.edu/mes/index.html

250

Energy Conservation in Metals  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

About this Symposium. Meeting, 2010 TMS Annual Meeting & Exhibition. Symposium, Energy Conservation in Metals. Sponsorship, The Minerals, Metals and...

251

Hydrogen embrittlement in pulse-plated Nickel material of liquid ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

About this Abstract. Meeting, 2014 TMS Annual Meeting & Exhibition. Symposium , Multiscale Approaches to Hydrogen-assisted Degradation of Metals.

252

Competing, Coverage-Dependent Decomposition Pathways for C2Hy Species on Nickel (111) Jonathan E. Mueller,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

reasons. Nickel is the primary catalyst in the steam reforming process for converting methane and water in which it typically selects for methane production.4 More recently, nickel has also been used extensively

Goddard III, William A.

253

Nickel-catalyzed asymmetric cross-couplings of secondary allylic chlorides and planar-chiral compounds in asymmetric synthesis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In Part I, nickel-catalyzed asymmetric carbon-carbon bond-forming reactions are described. A nickel/Pybox system effectively catalyzes regio- and enantioselective cross-couplings between racemic secondary allylic chlorides ...

Son, Sunghee

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

HYCSOS: a chemical heat pump and energy conversion system based on metal hydrides. 1979 status report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The current status of the HYCSOS chemical heat pump and energy conversion system based on metal hydrides is described. Heat transfer fluid loops were insulated and modified for isothermal operation. Software development for HYCSOS manual mode operation was completed. Routines to handle data acquisition, logging, compression, correction and plotting, using a Tektronix Graphics system with flexible disk data storage, provide a rapid and versatile means of presenting HYCSOS data for analysis. Advanced concept heat exchangers to improve the heat transfer of the hydride bed with the heat transfer fluid are discussed. Preliminary tests made with a LaNi/sub 5/ loaded aluminum foam test unit showed that heat transfer properties are very markedly improved. Thermodynamic expressions are applied to the selection of alloys for use in HYCSOS. The substitution of aluminum for nickel in AB/sub 5/ type alloys is shown to reduce hysteresis and permits the use of potentially lower cost materials with added flexibility for the optimization of engineering design and performance characteristics of the hydride heat pump system. Transient thermal measurements on hydride beds of CaNi/sub 5/ and LaNi/sub 5/ show no deterioration with cycling. Relatively slow heat transfer between the hydride beds and heat transfer fluid in the coiled tube heat exchangers is indicated by temperature lag of the bed and heat transfer fluid. Improved heat transfer is anticipated with aluminum foam heat exchangers.

Sheft, I.; Gruen, D.M.; Lamich, G.

1979-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

DIRECT DECOMPOSITION OF METHANE TO HYDROGEN ON METAL LOADED ZEOLITE CATALYST  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The manufacture of hydrogen from natural gas is essential for the production of ultra clean transportation fuels. Not only is hydrogen necessary to upgrade low quality crude oils to high-quality, low sulfur ultra clean transportation fuels, hydrogen could eventually replace gasoline and diesel as the ultra clean transportation fuel of the future. Currently, refinery hydrogen is produced through the steam reforming of natural gas. Although efficient, the process is responsible for a significant portion of refinery CO2 emissions. This project is examining the direct catalytic decomposition of methane as an alternative to steam reforming. The energy required to produce one mole of hydrogen is slightly lower and the process does not require water-gas-shift or pressure-swing adsorption units. The decomposition process does not produce CO2 emissions and the product is not contaminated with CO -- a poison for PEM fuel cells. In this work we examined the direct catalytic decomposition of methane over a metal modified zeolite catalyst and the recovery of catalyst activity by calcination. A favorable production of hydrogen was obtained, when compared with previously reported nickel-zeolite supported catalysts. Reaction temperature had a strong influence on catalyst activity and on the type of carbon deposits. The catalyst utilized at 873 and 973 K could be regenerated without any significant loss of activity, however the catalyst utilized at 1073 K showed some loss of activity after regeneration.

Lucia M. Petkovic; Daniel M. Ginosar; Kyle C. Burch; Harry W. Rollins

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Effect of thermal treatments on the properties of nickel and cobalt activated-charcoal-supported catalysts  

SciTech Connect

The effect of thermal pretreatment in N[sub 2] up to 723 K and the activation treatments in H[sub 2] and an inert atmosphere on the properties of Ni and Co activated-charcoal-supported catalysts were studied. Catalysts were characterized by means of N[sub 2] adsorption at 77 K, H[sub 2] chemisorption at room temperature, thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The catalysts' activity and selectivity for acetone hydrogenation to 2-propanol under unusual and severe conditions (473 K and high overall acetone conversion) were also measured. TGA and XRD evidence was found for the charcoal-support-promoted NiO and CoO reduction to the metallic states when the catalysts were subjected to an inert atmosphere above 723 K caused a loss of acetone hydrogenation activity (calculated on a metal load basis) for both the Ni and Co activated-charcoal-supported catalysts, with respect to that of the low-temperature (573 K) activation treatments. In a series of activated-charcoal-supported Ni catalysts, a large decrease in the H[sub 2] chemisorption uptake was also found for a sample pretreated in N[sub 2] at 723 K prior to H[sub 2] reduction. These results were not due to nickel or cobalt sintering, as shown by XRD line broadening measurements. The catalytic activity loss was accompanied by a decrease (in the case of Ni) and an increase (in the case of Co) in the 2-propanol selectivity. 44 refs., 13 figs., 3 tabs.

Gandia, L.M.; Montes, M. (Universidad del Pais Vasco, San Sebastian (Spain))

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Systematic Approach to Compare the Inflammatory Response of Liver Cell Culture Systems Exposed to Silver, Copper, and Nickel Nanoparticles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Although nano-sized metal colloids are used in industrial and medicinal applications, little is known about the potential liver toxicity of these materials after occupational or intentional exposures. To begin to resolve some outstanding hepatotoxicity concerns, the inflammatory response of hepatocytes after exposure to metal colloids was assessed. Four ~30-nm-sized metal colloids, including silver (nano-Ag), copper (nano-Cu) and nickel (nano-Ni) were examined in an effort to understand the induced cytokine expression in a murine liver cell line (AML12). Here we also utilized another system, co-cultures of hepatocytes, Kupffers cells, and lymphocytes isolated from C57BL6 mice. Cells were exposed to the materials over dose-response (0.1mg/L to 1000mg/L) and time-dependent (4 h, 48 h, and 1-week) studies. Cytotoxicity was measured via metabolism of resazurin and validated via MTT assay and cell counts. Inflammatory response was determined by cytokine profiles (TNF-a and IL-6), as well as by mRNA and protein expression of heat shock protein (Hsp70). Results from cells exposed to nano-Ag to doses of up to 100mg/L exhibited no significant changes in cytotoxicity, IL-6, or TNF-a production, or Hsp70 expression. Both nano-Cu and nano-Ni exposed cells exhibited decreased metabolism, increased Hsp70 induction, and increased inflammatory responses (IL-6 and TNF-a). Dynamic light scattering and electron microscopy were used to characterize particle size and surface charge. All three metal colloidal systems demonstrated different particle size distributions, agglomerated sizes, and surface zeta potentials. Furthermore, each metal colloid system elicited different inflammatory biomarker responses and stress protein expression.

Banerjee, Nivedita

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Functional Metal Phosphonates  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The primary goal of the work described in this dissertation was the incorporation of functionality into metal phosphonates. This was done in one of several ways. The first involved using phosphonate ligands that had covalently attached organic functional groups. In some cases, these ligands undergo reactions during the solvothermal syntheses which can impart new chemical reactivity. Another method used to introduce functionality was to partially or completely substitute metal atoms within phosphonate clusters to create materials which may have interesting magnetic properties. By controlling the way these clusters pack in the solids, their magnetic properties may be able to be augmented. The final method used to impart functionality to metal phosphonates was the incorporation of N-donor and bulky aryl groups into the phosphonate ligands. These influences caused structural variations which exposed potentially active sites within the materials, including both Lewis acidic and basic sites, as well as Bronsted acid sites. The first strategy was employed in the design of tetravalent metal phosphonates which have covalently incorporated bipyridine moieties. The materials are porous so that the bipyridine sites can chelate Pd atoms from solution, which can then be reduced to stable nanoparticles trapped within the phosphonate matrix. This approach was also used in the synthesis of surface-functionalized divalent metal phosphonates which exhibit interesting amine uptake properties. Solvent and cation substitution effects were used to control the packing and connectivity of phosphonate-based clusters. The selective substitution of metal atoms within the clusters may lead to interesting magnetic materials. In other work, N-donor and bulky phosphonates were used to influence the structure of several SnII phosphonates, which resulted in the discovery of a new layered structure type. The effect of the Sn-N interaction on the structures is investigated, and found to have significant effects on the structural units formed and how they pack in the solid state. The work presented herein represents only a small fraction of the rich chemistry of metal phosphonates. Creative researchers will continue to push boundaries and find new and interesting applications for phosphonate-based materials.

Perry, Houston Phillipp

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Mathematical model of a NiOOH/metal hydride cell. Final report, September 15, 1993--November 14, 1996  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

One of the objectives of work on the nickel/metal hydride cell has been to develop a mathematical model of the performance of the cell. This is a summary of work to date and is meant to be a Final Report of the BES project. Mathematical model of the nickel/metal hydride cell depends on the kinetics, thermodynamics, and transport properties of the metal hydride electrode. Consequently, investigations were carried out to determine: (1) the exchange current density and the equilibrium potential as a function of hydrogen content in the electrode; (2) the hydrogen diffusion coefficient in the bulk of the alloy; (3) the hydrogen reaction rate order; (4) the symmetry factor for hydrogen evolution reaction and (5) to determine the reaction mechanisms of the hydrogen charge and discharge processes including overcharge and overdischarge mechanism.

White, R.E.; Popov, B.N.

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

260

Processing capabilties for the elimination of contaminated metal scrapyards at DOE/ORO-managed sites. [Metal smelting facility  

SciTech Connect

Capabilities exist for reducing all the contaminated nickel, aluminum, and copper scrap to ingot form by smelting. Processing these metals at existing facilities could be completed in about 5 or 6 years. However, these metals represent only about 20% of the total metal inventories currently on hand at the DOE/ORO-managed sites. No provisions have been made for the ferrous scrap. Most of the ferrous scrap is unclassified and does not require secured storage. Also, the potential resale value of the ferrous scrap at about $100 per ton is very low in comparison. Consequently, this scrap has been allowed to accumulate. With several modifications and equipment additions, the induction melter at PGDP could begin processing ferrous scrap after its commitment to nickel and aluminum. The PGDP smelter is a retrofit installation, and annual throughput capabilities are limited. Processing of the existing ferrous scrap inventories would not be completed until the FY 1995-2000 time frame. An alternative proposal has been the installation of induction melters at the other two enrichment facilities. Conceptual design of a generic metal smelting facility is under way. The design study includes capital and operating costs for scrap preparation through ingot storage at an annual throughput of 10,000 tons per year. Facility design includes an induction melter with the capability of melting both ferrous and nonferrous metals. After three years of operation with scrapyard feed, the smelter would have excess capacity to support on-site decontamination and decomissioning projects or upgrading programs. The metal smelting facility has been proposed for FY 1984 line item funding with start-up operations in FY 1986.

Mack, J.E.; Williams, L.C.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "type nickel metal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Void-free micro-pattern of nickel fabricated by electroplating with supercritical carbon dioxide emulsion  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Void-free micro-pattern of nickel was fabricated electrochemically by applying supercritical carbon dioxide emulsion (Sc-CO"2-E). Evolution of hydrogen gas bubbles is usually the cause of defect and pinholes for microstructures fabricated electrochemically ... Keywords: Micro-pattern, Microstructure, Nickel, Supercritical carbon dioxide emulsion, Void-free

Tso-Fu Mark Chang; Toshikazu Tasaki; Chiemi Ishiyama; Masato Sone

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Research, development and demonstration of nickel-zinc batteries for electric vehicle propulsion. Annual report, 1978  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The work carried out under the Yardney Contract with ANL for R, D and D on nickel zinc batteries over the past year was directed in three major areas: (1) elucidating the failure modes of the nickel-zinc battery system; (2) improving performance of the system; and (3) effecting a cost reduction program. Progress on the three areas is reported. (TFD)

Not Available

1979-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Effects of additive elements on the phase formation and morphological stability of nickel monosilicide films  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Alloying elements can substantially affect the formation and morphological stability of nickel monosilicide. A comprehensive study of phase formation was performed on 24 Ni alloys with varying concentrations of alloying elements. Silicide films have ... Keywords: Agglomeration, Alloying, NiSi, NiSi2, Nickel silicides

C. Lavoie; C. Detavernier; C. Cabral, Jr.; F. M. d'Heurle; A. J. Kellock; J. Jordan-Sweet; J. M. E. Harper

2006-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Rate limiting mechanism of transition metal gettering in multicrystalline silicon  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The authors have performed studies on multicrystalline silicon used for solar cells in the as-grown state and after a series of processing and gettering steps. The principal goal of this work is to determine the rate limiting step for metal impurity gettering from multicrystalline silicon with an emphasis on the release of impurities from structural defects. Synchrotron-based x-ray fluorescence mapping was used to monitor the release process. Copper and nickel impurities were found to reside primarily at dislocations in the as-grown state of the material. Short annealing treatments rapidly dissolved the impurity agglomerates. Based on these results and modeling of the dissolution process, copper and nickel is in the form of small agglomerates (< 10 nm) clustered together over micron-scale regions in the as-grown material. Aluminum gettering further disintegrated the agglomerates to below the sensitivity of the system, 2--5 nm in radii. No significant barrier to release of copper or nickel from dislocations was observed.

McHugo, S.A.; Thompson, A.C. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States); Imaizumi, M. [Toyota Technological Inst., Nagoya (Japan); Hieslmair, H.; Weberr, E.R. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Materials Science

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Advanced nickel base alloys for high strength, corrosion applications  

SciTech Connect

Improved nickel-base alloys of enhanced strength and corrosion resistance, produced by atomization of an alloy melt under an inert gas atmosphere and of composition 0-20Fe, 10-30Cr, 2-12Mo, 6 max. Nb, 0.05-3 V, 0.08 max. Mn, 0.5 max. Si, less than 0.01 each of Al and Ti, less than 0.05 each of P and S, 0.01-0.08C, less than 0.2N, 0.1 max. 0, bal. Ni.

Flinn, John E. (Idaho Falls, ID)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Materials Reliability Program: Finite-Element Model Validation for Dissimilar Metal Butt-Welds (MRP-316)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Residual stresses imparted by the welding process are a principal factor in the process of primary water stress corrosion cracking (PWSCC) of Alloy 82/182 nickel-alloy dissimilar metal (DM) piping butt welds in pressurized water reactors (PWRs). Analytical models are frequently used to simulate the welding process in order to predict the residual stress distribution in the weld and base material as an input to crack growth calculations. The crack growth calculations, in turn, have demonstrated a high sen...

2011-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

267

The synthesis, characterization and reactivity of high oxidation state nickel fluorides  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The research described in this thesis has mainly addressed the challenge of the synthesis of thermodynamically unstable nickel fluorides, which cannot be made by traditional thermal methods. A low-temperature approach towards the synthesis of such transition metal fluorides exploits the greater thermodynamic stability of high oxidation states in anions and involves the use of anhydrous hydrogen fluoride (aHF) as a solvent. The general method consists of combining an aHF soluble starting material (e.g., K{sub 2}NiF{sub 6}) with a Lewis fluoroacid (e.g., BF{sub 3}), which precipitates a neutral polymeric solid state fluoride: 2 K{sup +} + NiF{sub 6}{sup 2{minus}} + BF{sub 3} {r_arrow} NiF{sub 4} + 2 BF{sub 4}{sup {minus}} + 2 K{sup +}. At room temperature, this reaction yields a different structural phase, with composition K{sub x}NiF{sub 3} (x {approx} 0.18). This material has a pseudo-hexagonal tungsten bronze structure (H{sub 0}-K{sub x}NiF{sub 3}), and is an ionic conductor, probably due to K{sup +} ions hosted in the lattice channels. R-NiF{sub 3} is capable of fluorinating a wide range of inorganic and organic substrates. These reactions have probably shed light on the mechanism of the Simons Electrochemical Fluorination (ECF) Process, an important industrial method of fluorinating organic compounds. It has long been speculated that NiF{sub 3} plays a role in the ECF process, which uses nickel electrodes in aHF solvent. K{sub 2}NiF{sub 6} also fluorinates organic compounds in aHF, but interestingly, yields different fluorinated products. The reduction of R-NiF{sub 3} and K{sub 2}NiF{sub 6} during fluorination reactions yields NiF{sub 2}. A method has been developed to regenerate NiF{sub 6}{sup 2{minus}} from NiF{sub 2}.

Chacon, L.C. [Univ. of Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Chemistry]|[Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States). Chemical Sciences Div.

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

DOE Seeking Input on Alternative Uses of Nickel Inventory | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Seeking Input on Alternative Uses of Nickel Inventory Seeking Input on Alternative Uses of Nickel Inventory DOE Seeking Input on Alternative Uses of Nickel Inventory March 9, 2007 - 10:28am Addthis WASHINGTON, DC - The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is seeking input from industry representatives on the safe disposition of approximately 15,300 tons of nickel scrap recovered from uranium enrichment process equipment at the Department's Oak Ridge, TN, and Paducah, KY, facilities. The Expression of Interest (EOI), released today, will assist in DOE's evaluation of restricted uses of its nickel material for controlled radiological applications. These restricted uses could include use in commercial nuclear power plants, DOE nuclear facilities, or by the U.S. Navy. The Department will solicit input through May 8, 2007.

269

DOE Seeking Input on Alternative Uses of Nickel Inventory | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DOE Seeking Input on Alternative Uses of Nickel Inventory DOE Seeking Input on Alternative Uses of Nickel Inventory DOE Seeking Input on Alternative Uses of Nickel Inventory March 9, 2007 - 10:28am Addthis WASHINGTON, DC - The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is seeking input from industry representatives on the safe disposition of approximately 15,300 tons of nickel scrap recovered from uranium enrichment process equipment at the Department's Oak Ridge, TN, and Paducah, KY, facilities. The Expression of Interest (EOI), released today, will assist in DOE's evaluation of restricted uses of its nickel material for controlled radiological applications. These restricted uses could include use in commercial nuclear power plants, DOE nuclear facilities, or by the U.S. Navy. The Department will solicit input through May 8, 2007.

270

Mechanochemical processing for metals and metal alloys  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A set of processes for preparing metal powders, including metal alloy powders, by ambient temperature reduction of a reducible metal compound by a reactive metal or metal hydride through mechanochemical processing. The reduction process includes milling reactants to induce and complete the reduction reaction. The preferred reducing agents include magnesium and calcium hydride powders. A process of pre-milling magnesium as a reducing agent to increase the activity of the magnesium has been established as one part of the invention.

Froes, Francis H. (Moscow, ID); Eranezhuth, Baburaj G. (Moscow, ID); Prisbrey, Keith (Moscow, ID)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

3-D Metals | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Metals Metals Jump to: navigation, search Name 3-D Metals Facility 3-D Metals Sector Wind energy Facility Type Small Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Location Valley City OH Coordinates 41.2481362°, -81.88305616° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.2481362,"lon":-81.88305616,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

272

HIGH TEMPERATURE OXIDATION/CORROSION BEHAVIOR OF METALS AND ALLOYS UNDER A HYDROGEN GRADIENT  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Metallic interconnects in SOFC stacks, perform in challenging environment, as they are simultaneously exposed to a reducing environment (e.g. hydrogen, reformate) on one side and an oxidizing environment (e.g. air) on the other side at elevated temperatures. To understand the oxidation/corrosion behavior of metals and alloys under the dual exposures and assess their suitability, selected metals and alloys, including nickel, Fe-Cr and Ni-Cr base chromia forming alloys, alumina forming Fecralloy, were investigated. It was found that the oxidation/corrosion behavior of metals and alloys in the presence of dual environment can be significantly different in terms of scale structure and/or chemistry from their exposure in a single oxidizing or reducing atmosphere. The anomalous oxidization/corrosion is attributed to the presence of hydrogen diffusion flux from the fuel side to the air side under the influence of a hydrogen gradient across the metallic substrates.

Yang, Z Gary; Xia, Gordon; Walker, Matthew S.; Wang, Chong M.; Stevenson, Jeffry W.; Singh, Prabhakar

2007-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

High-temperature sodium nickel chloride battery for electric vehicles  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Although the sodium-nickel chloride cell couple has a high voltage (2.59 V) and a high specific energy (790 Wh/kg), the performance of present incarnations of this battery tend to be limited by their power. Because the nickel chloride electrode dominates the resistance and weight of the cell, research on this cell couple at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) has been primarily directed toward improving both the specific power and energy of the NiCl{sub 2} electrodes. During the course of these investigations a major breakthrough was achieved in lowering the impedance and increasing the usable capacity through the use of chemical additives and a tailored electrode morphology. This improved Ni/NiCl{sub 2} electrode has excellent performance characteristics, wide-temperature operation and fast recharge capability. Modeling studies done on this electrode indicate that a fully developed Na/NiCl{sub 2} battery based on ANL-single tube and bipolar designs would surpass the mid-term and approach the long-term goals of the US Advanced Battery Consortium.

Prakash, J.; Redey, L.; Nelson, P.A.; Vissers, D.R. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Electrotechnical Technology Program

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Extracting metals directly from metal oxides  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of extracting metals directly from metal oxides by exposing the oxide to a supercritical fluid solvent containing a chelating agent is described. Preferably, the metal is an actinide or a lanthanide. More preferably, the metal is uranium, thorium or plutonium. The chelating agent forms chelates that are soluble in the supercritical fluid, thereby allowing direct removal of the metal from the metal oxide. In preferred embodiments, the extraction solvent is supercritical carbon dioxide and the chelating agent is selected from the group consisting of .beta.-diketones, halogenated .beta.-diketones, phosphinic acids, halogenated phosphinic acids, carboxylic acids, halogenated carboxylic acids, and mixtures thereof. In especially preferred embodiments, at least one of the chelating agents is fluorinated. The method provides an environmentally benign process for removing metals from metal oxides without using acids or biologically harmful solvents. The chelate and supercritical fluid can be regenerated, and the metal recovered, to provide an economic, efficient process.

Wai, Chien M. (Moscow, ID); Smart, Neil G. (Moscow, ID); Phelps, Cindy (Moscow, ID)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Extracting metals directly from metal oxides  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of extracting metals directly from metal oxides by exposing the oxide to a supercritical fluid solvent containing a chelating agent is described. Preferably, the metal is an actinide or a lanthanide. More preferably, the metal is uranium, thorium or plutonium. The chelating agent forms chelates that are soluble in the supercritical fluid, thereby allowing direct removal of the metal from the metal oxide. In preferred embodiments, the extraction solvent is supercritical carbon dioxide and the chelating agent is selected from the group consisting of {beta}-diketones, halogenated {beta}-diketones, phosphinic acids, halogenated phosphinic acids, carboxylic acids, halogenated carboxylic acids, and mixtures thereof. In especially preferred embodiments, at least one of the chelating agents is fluorinated. The method provides an environmentally benign process for removing metals from metal oxides without using acids or biologically harmful solvents. The chelate and supercritical fluid can be regenerated, and the metal recovered, to provide an economic, efficient process. 4 figs.

Wai, C.M.; Smart, N.G.; Phelps, C.

1997-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

276

Vanadium and nickel complexes in petroleum resid acid, base, and neutral fractions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Acid and base fractions from petroleum vacuum resids with no detectable (by visible spectrophotometry) quantities of porphyrinic Ni or V complexes were hydrotreated under various conditions to determine if significant amounts of porphyrinic metals were released, via disassociation or other means, upon hydrotreating. No significant quantities were observed, thereby indicating that nonporphyrinic metals were not simply associated, complexed or otherwise masked (in terms of visible spectrophotometric response) porphyrinic metal complexes. However, it is possible that hydrotreating was simply not effective in breaking up these associates and/or that some porphyrinic forms of metal were in fact released but were rapidly destroyed by hydrotreating. In addition, three liquid chromatographic (LC) separation methods were sequentially applied to Cerro Negro (Orinoco belt Venezuelan heavy crude) >700[degree]C resid in an effort to separate and concentrate the metal complexes present. Nonaqueous ion exchange chromatography was used initially to separate the resid into acid, base and neutral types. Two concentrates containing 19,500 and 13,500 ppm total V, or an estimated 19 and 13 wt % V-containing compounds respectively, were obtained. The degree of enrichment of Ni compounds obtained was significantly lower. By visible spectrophotometry, using vanadyl etioporphyrin as a standard, each of the concentrates contained near a 1:1 ratio of porphyrinic:nonporphyrinic V complexes. Analogous separation behavior for porphyrinic versus nonporphyrinic metal forms was observed throughout much of the work, thereby suggesting that a comparable diversity of structures existed within each general class of metal compounds. The generally wide dispersion of both Ni and V over the LC separation scheme suggests a structural variety of metal complexes that is comparable to that observed for other heteroatoms (N, S, O) in petroleum.

Pearson, C.D.; Green, J.D.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Vanadium and nickel complexes in petroleum resid acid, base, and neutral fractions  

SciTech Connect

Acid and base fractions from petroleum vacuum resids with no detectable (by visible spectrophotometry) quantities of porphyrinic Ni or V complexes were hydrotreated under various conditions to determine if significant amounts of porphyrinic metals were released, via disassociation or other means, upon hydrotreating. No significant quantities were observed, thereby indicating that nonporphyrinic metals were not simply associated, complexed or otherwise masked (in terms of visible spectrophotometric response) porphyrinic metal complexes. However, it is possible that hydrotreating was simply not effective in breaking up these associates and/or that some porphyrinic forms of metal were in fact released but were rapidly destroyed by hydrotreating. In addition, three liquid chromatographic (LC) separation methods were sequentially applied to Cerro Negro (Orinoco belt Venezuelan heavy crude) >700{degree}C resid in an effort to separate and concentrate the metal complexes present. Nonaqueous ion exchange chromatography was used initially to separate the resid into acid, base and neutral types. Two concentrates containing 19,500 and 13,500 ppm total V, or an estimated 19 and 13 wt % V-containing compounds respectively, were obtained. The degree of enrichment of Ni compounds obtained was significantly lower. By visible spectrophotometry, using vanadyl etioporphyrin as a standard, each of the concentrates contained near a 1:1 ratio of porphyrinic:nonporphyrinic V complexes. Analogous separation behavior for porphyrinic versus nonporphyrinic metal forms was observed throughout much of the work, thereby suggesting that a comparable diversity of structures existed within each general class of metal compounds. The generally wide dispersion of both Ni and V over the LC separation scheme suggests a structural variety of metal complexes that is comparable to that observed for other heteroatoms (N, S, O) in petroleum.

Pearson, C.D.; Green, J.D.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Award Types  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

nuclear deterrent; reduce global threats; and solve other emerging national security and energy challenges. Contact Awards Team (505) 667-7824 Email Types of Awards The Awards...

279

Development of materials resistant to metal dusting degradation.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Metal dusting corrosion has been a serious problem in the petroleum and petrochemical industries, such as reforming and syngas production systems. This form of deterioration has led to worldwide material loss for 50 years. For the past three years, we have studied the mechanism of metal dusting for Fe- and Ni-base alloys. In this report, we present a correlation between the weight loss and depth of pits that form in Ni-base alloys. Nickel-base alloys were also tested at 1 and 14.8 atm (210 psi), in a high carbon activity environment. Higher system pressure was found to accelerate corrosion in most Ni-base alloys. To reduce testing time, a pre-pitting method was developed. Mechanical scratches on the alloy surface led to fast metal dusting corrosion. We have also developed preliminary data on the performance of weldments of several Ni-base alloys in a metal dusting environment. Finally, Alloy 800 tubes and plates used in a reformer plant were examined by scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray, and Raman spectroscopy. The oxide scale on the surface of the Alloy 800 primarily consists of Fe{sub 1+x}Cr{sub 2-X}O{sub 4} spinel phase with high Fe content. Carbon can diffuse through this oxide scale. It was discovered that the growth of metal dusting pits could be stopped by means of a slightly oxidized alloy surface. This leads to a new way to solve metal dusting problem.

Natesan, K.; Zeng, Z.

2006-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

280

Biological availability of nickel arsenides: toxic effects of particulate Ni/sub 5/As/sub 2/  

SciTech Connect

Considerations of (1) oil shale retort operating conditions, (2) oil shale elemental composition, (3) nickel and arsenic physico-chemical properties, and (4) oil shale matrix structure lead to the suggestion that nickel arsenides may be formed during the oil shale retorting process. The biological effects of nickel arsenides have not been previously studied. However, similarities between nickel subarsenide and nickel subsulfide and nickel subselenimide, both of which are known potent carcinogens, have caused concern that nickel arsenides may have adverse effects on biological systems. To determine if fugitive nickel arsenides from an oil shale retort could pose a threat to personnel in the workplace or to other living organisms in the environment, a program to study the toxicity of nickel arsenides has been initiated. Five stable nickel arsenides (Ni/sub 5/As/sub 2/, Ni/sub 2/As, Ni/sub 11/As/sub 8/, NiAs, and NiAs/sub 2/) and nickel arsenic sulfide (NiAsS) are considered possible species for study.

Gurley, L.R.; Tobey, R.A.; Valdez, J.G.; Halleck, M.S.; Barham, S.S.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "type nickel metal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Sintering Process of Nickel Laterite Based of Limonitic Style  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Electricity-independent Generation of Si Based on the Use of Rice Husk: A Process Concept Energy consumption of metal electrowinning: an optimization.

282

Solvent Extraction for the Separation into Nickel and Cobalt with ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recovery of Precious Metals from Chloride Media Using Microalgae Waste from Biofuel Extraction Segregation Roasting of a Saprolitic Laterite Ore: An...

283

Mechanism of Selective Chlorination of Reduced Limonitic Nickel ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recovery of Precious Metals from Chloride Media Using Microalgae Waste from Biofuel Extraction Segregation Roasting of a Saprolitic Laterite Ore: An...

284

Solidification Cracking Study of High Chromium Nickel-Base Filler ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... and rank the relative cracking susceptibility of these filler metal specifications. ... Surface Processing of Ag /TiO2 Nanowire Membranes for Solar Photovoltaic...

285

Method of Determining the Extent to which a Nickel Structure has been Attached by a Fluorine-Containing Gas  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The method of determining the extent to which a nickel structure has been attacked by a halogen containing gas to which it has been exposed which comprises preparing a quantity of water substantially free from dissolved oxygen, passing ammonia gas through a cuprammonium solution to produce ammonia substantially free from oxygen, dissolving said oxygen-free ammonia in said water to produce a saturated aqueous ammonia solution free from uncombined oxygen, treating at least a portion of said nickel structure of predetermined weight with said solution to dissolve nickel compounds from the surface of said structure without dissolving an appreciable amount of said nickel and analyzing the resulting solution to determine the quantity of said nickel compounds that was associated with said said portion of said structure to determine the proportion of combined nickel in said nickel structure.

Brusie, James P.

2004-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

286

Metallic Power Inc | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Metallic Power Inc Metallic Power Inc Jump to: navigation, search Name Metallic Power Inc Place Carlsbad, California Zip CA 92009- Product Metallic Power, which closed down in September 2004, was focused on remote and distributed power solutions based on zinc-air fuel cell technology. Coordinates 31.60396°, -100.641609° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":31.60396,"lon":-100.641609,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

287

A new high energy stabilized nickel-zinc rechargeable battery system for SLI and EV applications  

SciTech Connect

The nickel oxide-zinc rechargeable battery system is a serious candidate for a high power economical EV battery. The introduction of a new chemistry has resulted in stabilization of the performance of the zinc anode without adversely affecting the nickel electrode. The result has been a major enhancement of the cycle life capability with retention of the remarkably high practical energy density (both gravimetric and volumetric) of the nickel-zinc system. Near term practical applications for both passenger car truck SLI batteries as well as long term deep cycle applications for electric vehicles are discussed.

Reisner, D.; Eisenberg, M.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Performance evaluation of two black nickel and two black chrome solar collectors  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This test program was based on the evaluation of four unique solar collectors described as follows: (a) black nickel collector surface with a desiccant drying bed, (b) black nickel collector surface without a desiccant drying bed, (c) black chrome collector surface with a dessicant drying bed, and (d) black chrome collector surface without a desiccant drying bed. The test program included three distinct phases: Initial performance evaluation, natural environmental aging, and post-aging performance evaluation. Results of Phase III testing conclusively indicated a higher normalized efficiency for black chrome surfaces when compared to black nickel. Analysis of these results is shown. The results are tabulated.

Losey, R.

1977-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Fuel electrode containing pre-sintered nickel/zirconia for a solid oxide fuel cell  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A fuel cell structure (2) is provided, having a pre-sintered nickel-zirconia fuel electrode (6) and an air electrode (4), with a ceramic electrolyte (5) disposed between the electrodes, where the pre-sintered fuel electrode (6) contains particles selected from the group consisting of nickel oxide, cobalt and cerium dioxide particles and mixtures thereof, and titanium dioxide particles, within a matrix of yttria-stabilized zirconia and spaced-apart filamentary nickel strings having a chain structure, and where the fuel electrode can be sintered to provide an active solid oxide fuel cell.

Ruka, Roswell J. (Pittsburgh, PA); Vora, Shailesh D. (Monroeville, PA)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Metallic Glass II  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Aug 8, 2013 ... Application of Metallic Glass for High Performance Si Solar Cell: ... of the metallic glasses during heating is dependent on the thermal stability of...

291

Light Metals 2010  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Feb 1, 2010 ... Softcover book: Light Metals 2008 Volume 2: Aluminum Reduction. Hardcover book and CD-ROM: Light Metals 2009...

292

Bulk Metallic Glasses IX  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... of elements to form metallic-glass alloys] have resulted in the required cooling rate ... Bauschinger Effect in Metallic Glass Nanowires under Cyclic Loading.

293

Refractory Metals Committee  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Refractory Metals Committee is part of the Structural Materials Division. Our Mission: Includes all technical aspects of the science of refractory metals and...

294

Principal Metals Online  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Topic Title: WEB RESOURCE: Principal Metals Online Topic Summary: Principal Metals inventory database. Created On: 2/9/2007 5:41 AM, Topic View:.

295

Bulk Metallic Glasses XI  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Jul 15, 2013 ... A Bulk Metallic Glass with Record-breaking Damage Tolerance ... Oxidation on the Surface Characteristics of Zr-based Bulk Metallic Glasses.

296

Process for the displacement of cyanide ions from metal-cyanide complexes  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention relates to water-soluble polymers and the use of such water-soluble polymers in a process for the displacement of the cyanide ions from the metal ions within metal-cyanide complexes. The process waste streams can include metal-cyanide containing electroplating waste streams, mining leach waste streams, mineral processing waste streams, and related metal-cyanide containing waste streams. The metal ions of interest are metals that give very strong complexes with cyanide, mostly iron, nickel, and copper. The physical separation of the water-soluble polymer-metal complex from the cyanide ions can be accomplished through the use of ultrafiltration. Once the metal-cyanide complex is disrupted, the freed cyanide ions can be recovered for reuse or destroyed using available oxidative processes rendering the cyanide nonhazardous. The metal ions are released from the polymer, using dilute acid, metal ion oxidation state adjustment, or competing chelating agents, and collected and recovered or disposed of by appropriate waste management techniques. The water-soluble polymer can then be recycled. Preferred water-soluble polymers include polyethyleneimine and polyethyleneimine having a catechol or hydroxamate group.

Smith, Barbara F. (Los Alamos, NM); Robinson, Thomas W. (Los Alamos, NM)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Three D Metals Wind Turbine | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Three D Metals Wind Turbine Three D Metals Wind Turbine Jump to: navigation, search Name Three D Metals Wind Turbine Facility Three D Metals Wind Turbine Sector Wind energy Facility Type Small Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Three D Metals Energy Purchaser Three D Metals Location Valley City OH Coordinates 41.248155°, -81.883079° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.248155,"lon":-81.883079,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

298

Comparison of methods for leaching heavy metals from composts  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents the determination of total iron, copper, zinc, chromium, nickel, lead, cadmium and mercury contents in the compost obtained from sorted municipal organic solid waste applying the following methods of sample mineralization: 40% hydrofluoric acid with preliminary incineration of a sample, a mixture of concentrated nitric(V) and chloric(VII) acids with preliminary incineration of organic matter and a mixture of nitric(V) and chloric(VII) acids without sample incineration. The speciation analysis of Tessier was used to estimate the bioavailability of the metals. Elution degrees of the mobile forms of the metals from the compost with 10% nitric(V) acid and 1 mol/dm{sup 3} hydrochloric acid were compared. The contents of the elements in the eluates were determined applying atomic absorption spectrometry.

Ciba, Jerzy; Zolotajkin, Maria; Kluczka, Joanna; Loska, Krzysztof; Cebula, Jan

2003-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Melanin Types  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Melanin Types Melanin Types Name: Irfan Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: N/A Question: What are different types of melanins? And what are the functions of these types? Replies: Hi Irfan! Melanin is a dark compound or better a photoprotective pigment. Its major role in the skin is to absorb the ultraviolet (UV) light that comes from the sun so the skin is not damaged. Sun exposure usually produces a tan at the skin that represents an increase of melanin pigment in the skin. Melanin is important also in other areas of the body, as the eye and the brain., but it is not completely understood what the melanin pigment does in these areas. Melanin forms a special cell called melanocyte. This cell is found in the skin, in the hair follicle, and in the iris and retina of the eye.

300

Type systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The study of type systems has emerged as one of the most active areas of research in programming languages, with applications in software engineering, language design, high-performance compiler implementation, and security. This chapter discusses the ...

Benjamin C. Pierce

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "type nickel metal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Trending: Metal Oxo Bonds  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Trending: Metal Oxo Bonds Trending: Metal Oxo Bonds Trending: Metal Oxo Bonds Print Wednesday, 29 May 2013 00:00 Metal oxides are important for scientific and technical applications in a variety of disciplines, including materials science, chemistry, and biology. Highly covalent metal-oxygen multiple bonds (metal oxos) are the building blocks of metal oxides and have a bearing on the oxide's desirable chemical, magnetic, electronic, and thermal properties. The lack of a more sophisticated grasp of bonding in metal oxides constitutes a roadblock to innovation in a wide variety of important emergent technologies, including industrial catalysis, biomimetic transformations, and artificial photosynthesis. To address this problem, a research team from four national laboratories, three Department of Energy synchrotron user facilities, and the University of Washington has applied spectroscopic and computational analyses to a number of metal oxides, quantifying trends in metal oxo bonding for groups of metals across the periodic table.

302

Neutron imaging of alkali metal heat pipes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

High-temperature heat pipes are two-phase, capillary driven heat transfer devices capable of passively providing high thermal fluxes. Such a device using a liquid-metal coolant can be used as a solution for successful thermal management on hypersonic flight vehicles. Imaging of the liquid-metal coolant inside will provide valuable information in characterizing the detailed heat and mass transport. Neutron imaging possesses an inherent advantage from the fact that neutrons penetrate the heat pipe metal walls with very little attenuation, but are significantly attenuated by the liquid metal contained inside. Using the BT-2 beam line at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) in Gaithersburg, Maryland, preliminary efforts have been conducted on a nickel-sodium heat pipe. The contrast between the attenuated beam and the background is calculated to be approximately 3%. This low contrast requires sacrifice in spatial or temporal resolution so efforts have since been concentrated on lithium (Li) which has a substantially larger neutron attenuation cross section. Using the CG-1D beam line at the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) of Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, the first neutron images of high-temperature molybdenum (Mo)-Li heat pipes have been achieved. The relatively high neutron cross section of Li allows for the visualization of the Li working fluid inside the heat pipes. The evaporator region of a gravity assisted cylindrical heat pipe prototype 25 cm long was imaged from start-up to steady state operation up to approximately 900 C. In each corner of the square bore inside, the capillary action raises the Li meniscus above the bulk Li pool in the evaporator region. As the operational temperature changes, the meniscus shapes and the bulk meniscus height also changes. Furthermore, a three-dimensional tomographic image is also reconstructed from the total of 128 projection images taken 1.4o apart in which the Li had already cooled and solidified.

Kihm, Ken [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Kirchoff, Eric [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Golden, Matt [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Rosenfeld, J. [Thermacore Inc.; Rawal, S. [Lockheed Martin Space Systems Company; Pratt, D. [United States Air Force Research Laboratory, Wright-Patterson Air Force Base; Bilheux, Hassina Z [ORNL; Walker, Lakeisha MH [ORNL; Voisin, Sophie [ORNL; Hussey, Dan [NIST Center for Neutron Research (NCRN), Gaithersburg, MD

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Metal electrode for amorphous silicon solar cells  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An amorphous silicon solar cell having an N-type region wherein the contact to the N-type region is composed of a material having a work function of about 3.7 electron volts or less. Suitable materials include strontium, barium and magnesium and rare earth metals such as gadolinium and yttrium.

Williams, Richard (Princeton, NJ)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

INFRARED ABSORPTION SPECTROSCOPY OF CARBON MONOXIDE ON NICKEL FILMS: A LOW TEMPERATURE THERMAL DETECTION TECHNIQUE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

requirements are a low heat capacity sample and a smallwith hundreds of times the heat capacity of the nickel filmsOnly very thin,low heat capacity samples can be used. A tiny

Bailey, Robert Brian

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

F12: Process and Mechanism of Producing Ferro-nickel Nuggets ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Softening properties of laterite nickel ore was studied, result showed that ... of Composite Materials Recycled Pet-Based Reinforced with Zinc Particles ... and Electrochemical Properties of the Mg-Mn-Si-O System for Mg Battery Application.

306

Nickel-catalyzed preparation of acrylamides from alpha olefins and isocyanates ; Synthetic studies toward ripostatin A  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Chapter I. In the presence of the N-heterocyclic carbene ligand IPr, the nickel(0)-catalyzed coupling reaction of a-olefins and branched aliphatic isocyanates provides c,-unsaturated amides arising from preferential C-C ...

Schleicher, Kristin D. (Kristin Diann)

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Ultrasonic welding of nylon cell cases on a nickel--cadmium battery  

SciTech Connect

A joint design and ultrasonic welding schedule capable of making a leak-tight pressure joint in nylon was developed. This will permit the replacement of polystyrene with nylon for cell cases on a nickel--cadmium battery.

Bengtson, G W

1973-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Effects of residues from municipal solid waste landfill on corn yield and heavy metal content  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The effects of residues from municipal solid waste landfill, Khon Kaen Municipality, Thailand, on corn (Zea mays L.) yield and heavy metal content were studied. Field experiments with randomized complete block design with five treatments (0, 20, 40, 60 and 80% v/v of residues and soil) and four replications were carried out. Corn yield and heavy metal contents in corn grain were analyzed. Corn yield increased by 50, 72, 85 and 71% at 20, 40, 60 and 80% treatments as compared to the control, respectively. All heavy metals content, except cadmium, nickel and zinc, in corn grain were not significantly different from the control. Arsenic, cadmium and zinc in corn grain were strongly positively correlated with concentrations in soil. The heavy metal content in corn grain was within regulated limits for human consumption.

Prabpai, S. [Suphan Buri Campus Establishment Project, Kasetsart University, 50 U Floor, Administrative Building, Paholyothin Road, Jatujak, Bangkok 10900 (Thailand)], E-mail: s.prabpai@hotmail.com; Charerntanyarak, L. [Department of Epidemiology, Faculty of Public Health, Khon Kaen University, Khon Kaen 40002 (Thailand)], E-mail: lertchai@kku.ac.th; Siri, B. [Department of Agronomy, Faculty of Agriculture, Khon Kaen University, Khon Kaen 40002 (Thailand)], E-mail: boonmee@kku.ac.th; Moore, M.R. [The University of Queensland, The National Research Center for Environmental Toxicology, 39 Kessels Road, Coopers Plans, Brisbane, Queensland 4108 (Australia)], E-mail: m.moore@uq.edu.au; Noller, Barry N. [The University of Queensland, Centre for Mined Land Rehabilitation, Brisbane, Queensland 4072 (Australia)], E-mail: b.noller@uq.edu.au

2009-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

309

Corrosion of valve metals  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A general survey related to the corrosion of valve metals or film-forming metals. The way these metals corrode with some general examples is described. Valve metals form relatively perfect oxide films with little breakdown or leakage when anodized. (FS)

Draley, J.E.

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Precious Metals Conversion Information  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Precious Metals Conversion Information. The Office of Weights and Measures (OWM) has prepared a Conversion Factors ...

2012-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

311

METAL PRODUCTION AND CASTING  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This patent covers a method and apparatus for collecting the molten metal produced by high temperature metal salt reduction. It consists essentially of subjecting the reaction vessel to centrifugal force in order to force the liberatcd molten metal into a coherent molten mass, and allowing it to solidify there. The apparatus is particularly suitable for use with small quantities of rare metals.

Magel, T.T.

1958-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Ceramic to metal seal  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Providing a high strength, hermetic ceramic to metal seal by essentially heating a wire-like metal gasket and a ceramic member, which have been chemically cleaned, while simultaneously deforming from about 50 to 95 percent the metal gasket against the ceramic member at a temperature of about 30 to 75 percent of the melting temperature of the metal gasket.

Snow, Gary S. (Albuquerque, NM); Wilcox, Paul D. (Albuquerque, NM)

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Trace metal transformation in gasification  

SciTech Connect

The Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) is carrying out an investigation that will provide methods to predict the fate of selected trace elements in integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) and integrated gasification fuel cell (IGFC) systems to aid in the development of methods to control the emission of trace elements determined to be air toxics. The goal of this project is to identify the effects of critical chemical and physical transformations associated with trace element behavior in IGCC and IGFC systems. The trace elements included in this project are arsenic, chromium, cadmium, mercury, nickel, selenium, and lead. The research seeks to identify and fill, experimentally and/or theoretically, data gaps that currently exist on the fate and composition of trace elements. The specific objectives are to 1) review the existing literature to identify the type and quantity of trace elements from coal gasification systems, 2) perform laboratory-scale experimentation and computer modeling to enable prediction of trace element emissions, and 3) identify methods to control trace element emissions.

Benson, S.A.; Erickson, T.A.; Zygarlicke, C.J.; O`Keefe, C.A.; Katrinak, K.A.; Allen, S.E.; Hassett, D.J.; Hauserman, W.B. [North Dakota Univ., Grand Forks, ND (United States). Energy and Environmental Research Center; Holcombe, N.T. [USDOE Morgantown Energy Technology Center, WV (United States)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

314

Trace metal transformations in gasification  

SciTech Connect

The Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) is carrying out an investigation that will provide methods to predict the fate of selected trace elements in integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) and integrated gasification fuel cell (IGFC) systems to aid in the development of methods to control the emission of trace elements determined to be air toxics. The goal of this project is to identify the effects of critical chemical and physical transformations associated with trace element behavior in IGCC and IGFC systems. The trace elements included in this project are arsenic, chromium, cadmium, mercury, nickel, selenium, and lead. The research seeks to identify and fill, experimentally and/or theoretically, data gaps that currently exist on the fate and composition of trace elements. The specific objectives are to (1) review the existing literature to identify the type and quantity of trace elements from coal gasification systems, (2) perform laboratory-scale experimentation and computer modeling to enable prediction of trace element emissions, and (3) identify methods to control trace element emissions.

Benson, S.; Erickson, T.A.; Zygarlicke, C.J. [and others

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Trending: Metal Oxo Bonds  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Trending: Metal Oxo Bonds Print Trending: Metal Oxo Bonds Print Metal oxides are important for scientific and technical applications in a variety of disciplines, including materials science, chemistry, and biology. Highly covalent metal-oxygen multiple bonds (metal oxos) are the building blocks of metal oxides and have a bearing on the oxide's desirable chemical, magnetic, electronic, and thermal properties. The lack of a more sophisticated grasp of bonding in metal oxides constitutes a roadblock to innovation in a wide variety of important emergent technologies, including industrial catalysis, biomimetic transformations, and artificial photosynthesis. To address this problem, a research team from four national laboratories, three Department of Energy synchrotron user facilities, and the University of Washington has applied spectroscopic and computational analyses to a number of metal oxides, quantifying trends in metal oxo bonding for groups of metals across the periodic table.

316

Trending: Metal Oxo Bonds  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Trending: Metal Oxo Bonds Print Trending: Metal Oxo Bonds Print Metal oxides are important for scientific and technical applications in a variety of disciplines, including materials science, chemistry, and biology. Highly covalent metal-oxygen multiple bonds (metal oxos) are the building blocks of metal oxides and have a bearing on the oxide's desirable chemical, magnetic, electronic, and thermal properties. The lack of a more sophisticated grasp of bonding in metal oxides constitutes a roadblock to innovation in a wide variety of important emergent technologies, including industrial catalysis, biomimetic transformations, and artificial photosynthesis. To address this problem, a research team from four national laboratories, three Department of Energy synchrotron user facilities, and the University of Washington has applied spectroscopic and computational analyses to a number of metal oxides, quantifying trends in metal oxo bonding for groups of metals across the periodic table.

317

Trending: Metal Oxo Bonds  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Trending: Metal Oxo Bonds Print Trending: Metal Oxo Bonds Print Metal oxides are important for scientific and technical applications in a variety of disciplines, including materials science, chemistry, and biology. Highly covalent metal-oxygen multiple bonds (metal oxos) are the building blocks of metal oxides and have a bearing on the oxide's desirable chemical, magnetic, electronic, and thermal properties. The lack of a more sophisticated grasp of bonding in metal oxides constitutes a roadblock to innovation in a wide variety of important emergent technologies, including industrial catalysis, biomimetic transformations, and artificial photosynthesis. To address this problem, a research team from four national laboratories, three Department of Energy synchrotron user facilities, and the University of Washington has applied spectroscopic and computational analyses to a number of metal oxides, quantifying trends in metal oxo bonding for groups of metals across the periodic table.

318

Trending: Metal Oxo Bonds  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Trending: Metal Oxo Bonds Print Trending: Metal Oxo Bonds Print Metal oxides are important for scientific and technical applications in a variety of disciplines, including materials science, chemistry, and biology. Highly covalent metal-oxygen multiple bonds (metal oxos) are the building blocks of metal oxides and have a bearing on the oxide's desirable chemical, magnetic, electronic, and thermal properties. The lack of a more sophisticated grasp of bonding in metal oxides constitutes a roadblock to innovation in a wide variety of important emergent technologies, including industrial catalysis, biomimetic transformations, and artificial photosynthesis. To address this problem, a research team from four national laboratories, three Department of Energy synchrotron user facilities, and the University of Washington has applied spectroscopic and computational analyses to a number of metal oxides, quantifying trends in metal oxo bonding for groups of metals across the periodic table.

319

Understanding the role of cerium during VIM refining of nickel ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

D.R. Muzyka and C.R. Whitney: U.S. Patent No. 3575734, April 20, 1971. F. Cosandey, D. Li, F. Sczerzenie, G. E. Maurer, and J. K. Tien:Metall. Trans. A, in press...

320

Serrated Yielding in a Nickel-Base Superalloy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

D.L.Anton,T.Khan,R.D.Kissinger,D.L.Klarstrom. TheMinerals,Metals ..... observed are mapped in Figure 2. 0.1 0.1 70 70. q q n n q. NO SERRATIONS. 0.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "type nickel metal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Materials Reliability Program: Welding Residual Stress Dissimilar Metal Butt-Weld Finite Element Modeling Handbook (MRP-317)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The residual stresses imparted by the welding process are a principal factor in the process of primary water stress corrosion cracking (PWSCC) of Alloy 82/182 nickel-alloy (i.e., dissimilar metal) piping butt welds in pressurized water reactors (PWRs). Numerical methods by finite element analyses are frequently used to simulate the welding process in order to predict the residual stress distribution in the weld and base material as an input to crack growth calculations. The crack growth calculations, in ...

2011-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

322

The role of hydrogen in the hydrogenation and hydrogenolysis of aniline on the nickel single crystal surfaces: Its implication on the mechanisms of HDN reactions  

SciTech Connect

The selectivity of hydrogenation and hydrogenolysis reactions for organonitrogen compounds on transition metal surfaces depends heavily on the availability of surface hydrogen surface under reaction conditions. The surface hydrogen produced during dehydrogenation of adsorbed aniline upon thermal activation does not significantly modify hydrogenolysis reactions because it desorbs below the reaction temperatures. A series of experiments which use external hydrogen to control the concentration of surface hydrogen at reaction temperatures are reported here. In situ kinetic measurements in the presence of reactive hydrogen environments have been used to probe the details of the adsorbed species and reaction mechanisms. Nickel single crystals have been used as well defined model catalysts for hydrodenitrogenation (HDN) reactions. Previously, the effect of external hydrogen on aniline hydrogenolysis on the Pt(111) surface has been reported. On Pt(111), C-N bond activation is substantially enhanced in the presence of hydrogen. The increased C-N bond cleavage is facilitated by hydrogen which maintains a parallel adsorption of the aromatic derivative of aniline. In the absence of surface hydrogen, the adsorbed intermediate tilts away from surface because of partial dehydrogenation with increasing temperature at about 400 K. This paper will discuss a recent study of aniline reactions on the Ni(100) and Ni(111) surfaces both in the presence and absence of hydrogen. Reactivity comparisons will also be made for these two nickel surfaces towards adsorbed aniline.

Huang, S.X.; Gland, J.L. [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Fischer, D.A. [National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD (United States)

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

3D Imaging of Nickel Oxidation States using Full Field X-ray Absorption Near Edge Structure Nanotomography  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Reduction-oxidation (redox) cycling of the nickel electrocatalyst phase in the solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) anode can lead to performance degradation and cell failure. A greater understanding of nickel redox mechanisms at the microstructural level is vital to future SOFC development. Transmission x-ray microscopy (TXM) provides several key techniques for exploring oxidation states within SOFC electrode microstructure. Specifically, x-ray nanotomography and x-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy have been applied to study samples of varying nickel (Ni) and nickel oxide (NiO) compositions. The imaged samples are treated as mock SOFC anodes containing distinct regions of the materials in question. XANES spectra presented for the individual materials provide a basis for the further processing and analysis of mixed samples. Images of composite samples obtained are segmented, and the distinct nickel and nickel oxide phases are uniquely identified using full field XANES spectroscopy. Applications to SOFC analysis are discussed.

Nelson, George; Harris, William; Izzo, John; Grew, Kyle N. (Connecticut); (USARL)

2012-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

324

INVESTIGATION IN HARDSURFACING A NICKEL-COPPER ALLOY (MONEL400).  

SciTech Connect

Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) investigated the causes of weldability problems and materials failures encountered with the application of Monel (Ni-Cu) 400 as a base material and Stellite 6 (Co-Cr) as the hard-surfacing material when using the oxyacetylene welding process. This work was performed under a cooperative research and development agreement (CRADA) with the Target Rock Division of the Curtiss-Wright Flow Control Corporation. BNL evaluated two heats of Monel 400 material. One of the heats had performed well during manufacturing, producing an acceptable number of ''good'' parts. The second heat had produced some good parts but also exhibited a peculiar type of hardsurfacing/base metal collapse during the welding process. A review of the chemistry on the two heats of material indicated that they both met the chemical requirements for Monel400. During examination of the failed component, linear indications (cracks) were evident on the valve body, both on the circumferential area (top of valve body) and below the hard surfaced weld deposit. independent measurements also indicated that the two heats met the specification requirement for the material. The heat affected zone (HAZ) also contained linear discontinuities. The valve body was welded using the oxyacetylene welding process, a qualified and skilled welder, and had been given a pre-heat of between 1400-1600 F (760-871 C), which is the Target Rock qualified procedure requirement. Both original suppliers performed mechanical testing on their material that indicated the two heats also met the mechanical property requirements of the specification. The BNL investigation into the cause of the differences between these heats of material utilized the following techniques: (1) Heat Treatment of both heats of material; (2) Hardness testing; (3) Optical microscopy; (4) Scanning electron microscope (SEM)/Fractography; and (5) Energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS). The report concludes that the cause of the failure of the valve body during welding is not obvious, however, it does not appear to be a welding issue. The observed inter-granular fractures indicate a grain boundary problem. Further research is recommended.

CZAJKOWSKI,C.; BUTTERS,M.

2001-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Research, development and demonstration of nickel-zinc batteries for electric vehicle propulsion. Annual report for 1978  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This is the first annual report describing progress in the 33-month cooperative program between Argonne National Laboratory and Gould Inc.'s Nickel-Zinc/Electric Vehicle Project. The purpose of the program is to demonstrate the technical and economic feasibility of the nickel-zinc battery for electric vehicle propulsion. The successful completion of the program will qualify the nickel-zinc battery for use in the Department of Energy's demonstration program under the auspices of Public Law 94-413.

Not Available

1979-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Metal Finishing: A Small-business Guide  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Many of the challenges faced by small business owners can be addressed through efficient use of electric technology. Each volume in the Small-business Guide describes the current state of a business type and details new or alternative electric equipment that can help it meet its characteristic problems. The "Metal Finishing" guide is intended to familiarize readers with the business of metal finishing by providing descriptions of basic processes and practices and summaries of the key challenges faced by ...

1997-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

327

UNDERSTANDING THE MECHANISMS CONTROLLING ENVIRONMENTALLY-ASSISTED INTERGRANULAR CRACKING OF NICKEL-BASE ALLOYS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Creep and IG cracking of nickel-base alloys depend principally on two factors--the deformation behavior and the effect of the environment. We have shown that both contribute to the observed degradation in primary water. The understanding of cracking does not lie wholly within the environmental effects arena, nor can it be explained only by intrinsic mechanical behavior. Rather, both processes contribute to the observed behavior in primary water. In this project, we had three objectives: (1) to verify that grain boundaries control deformation in Ni-16Cr-9Fe at 360 C, (2) to identify the environmental effect on IGSCC, and (3) to combine CSLBs and GBCs to maximize IGSCC resistance in Ni-Cr-Fe in 360 C primary water. Experiments performed in hydrogen gas at 360 C confirm an increase in the primary creep rate in Ni-16Cr-9Fe at 360 C due to hydrogen. The creep strain transients caused by hydrogen are proposed to be due to the collapse of dislocation pile-ups, as confirmed by observations in HVEM. The observations only partially support the hydrogen-enhanced plasticity model, but also suggest a potential role of vacancies in the accelerate creep behavior in primary water. In high temperature oxidation experiments designed to examine the potential for selective internal oxidation in the IGSCC process, cracking is greatest in the more oxidizing environments compared to the low oxygen potential environments where nickel metal is stable. In Ni-Cr-Fe alloys, chromium oxides form preferentially along the grain boundaries, even at low oxygen potential, supporting a potential role in grain boundary embrittlement due to preferential oxidation. Experiments designed to determine the role of grain boundary deformation on intergranular cracking have established, for the first time, a cause-and-effect relationship between grain boundary deformation and IGSCC. That is, grain boundary deformation in Ni-16Cr-9Fe in 360 C primary water leads to IGSCC of the deformed boundaries. As well, the activation energy for grain boundary diffusion driving grain boundary deformation, QHAB=231 kJ/mole, is comparable to that for IGSCC initiation (212-241 kJ/mole), suggesting that grain boundary deformation is also the rate limiting factor for crack initiation. The resistance to IGSCC of Ni-16Cr-9Fe can be maximized by combining grain boundary misorientation with grain boundary carbide precipitation. Taken separately, an increased coincident site lattice fraction, and precipitation of grain boundary carbides increase the resistance to IGSCC initiation in 360 C primary water. In combination, the increase in resistance is greater than either of the effects taken separately. The grain boundary carbides tend to prefer the high angle boundaries, and thus, the combined treatment affords greater resistance by protecting a higher fraction of grain boundaries than either taken separately.

Gary S. Was

2004-02-13T23:59:59.000Z

328

Alkali metal nitrate purification  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process is disclosed for removing contaminants from impure alkali metal nitrates containing them. The process comprises heating the impure alkali metal nitrates in solution form or molten form at a temperature and for a time sufficient to effect precipitation of solid impurities and separating the solid impurities from the resulting purified alkali metal nitrates. The resulting purified alkali metal nitrates in solution form may be heated to evaporate water therefrom to produce purified molten alkali metal nitrates suitable for use as a heat transfer medium. If desired, the purified molten form may be granulated and cooled to form discrete solid particles of purified alkali metal nitrates.

Fiorucci, Louis C. (Hamden, CT); Morgan, Michael J. (Guilford, CT)

1986-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

329

Sheffield Metals International | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Metals International Metals International Jump to: navigation, search Name Sheffield Metals International Address 5467 Evergreen Parkway Place Sheffield Village, Ohio Zip 44054 Sector Buildings, Efficiency, Solar Product Agriculture; Consulting; Manufacturing; Retail product sales and distribution;Trainining and education Phone number 800-283-5262 Website http://www.sheffieldmetals.com Coordinates 41.452914°, -82.072009° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.452914,"lon":-82.072009,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

330

Daiyang Metal Co Ltd | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Daiyang Metal Co Ltd Daiyang Metal Co Ltd Jump to: navigation, search Name Daiyang Metal Co Ltd Place Seoul, Seoul, Korea (Republic) Zip 137-040 Sector Solar Product Stainless steel manufacturing and CIGS solar cell maker. Coordinates 37.557121°, 126.977379° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":37.557121,"lon":126.977379,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

331

Northern States Metals Company | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Metals Company Metals Company Jump to: navigation, search Name Northern States Metals Company Address 3207 Innovation Place Place Youngstown, Ohio Zip 44509 Sector Solar Product Manufacturing Phone number 330-799-1855 Website http://extrusions.com Coordinates 41.123592°, -80.704685° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.123592,"lon":-80.704685,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

332

Analysis of gas-phase condensation of nickel nanoparticles  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Gas-phase condensation of 8000 nickel atoms is examined by molecular dynamics simulation with a tight-binding potential. A detailed study of the evolution of the system cooled at a constant rate from 1000 K to 77 K is presented. The results are used to identify four distinct stages of the evolution from a hot atomic gas to a few synthesized particles. An analysis of possible nanoparticle formation mechanisms suggests that cluster-cluster aggregation is the dominant one. The simulation shows that there two stages of cluster formation are of primary importance with regard to aggregation. At the first stage, spherical liquid clusters nucleate with uniform size distribution. The second stage is characterized by a distinct transition from uniform to bimodal size distribution due to aggregation of relatively large clusters. The particles obtained by gas-phase synthesis are analyzed by the CNA method [25]. It is found that most nanoparticles produced in the simulation have either icosahedral or mixed FCC/HCP structure.

Gafner, S. L.; Gafner, Yu. Ya. [Khakassian State University (Russian Federation)], E-mail: ygafner@khsu.ru

2008-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

333

Welding metallurgy of nickel alloys in gas turbine components  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Materials for gas turbine engines are required to meet a wide range of temperature and stress application requirements. These alloys exhibit a combination of creep resistance, creep rupture strength, yield and tensile strength over a wide temperature range, resistance to environmental attack (including oxidation, nitridation, sulphidation and carburization), fatigue and thermal fatigue resistance, metallurgical stability and useful thermal expansion characteristics. These properties are exhibited by a series of solid-solution-strengthened and precipitation-hardened nickel, iron and cobalt alloys. The properties needed to meet the turbine engine requirements have been achieved by specific alloy additions, by heat treatment and by thermal mechanical processing. A thorough understanding of the metallurgy and metallurgical processing of these materials is imperative in order to successfully fusion weld them. This same basic understanding is required for repair of a component with the added dimension of the potential effects of thermal cycling and environmental exposure the component will have endured in service. This article will explore the potential problems in joining and repair welding these materials.

Lingenfelter, A. C., LLNL

1997-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

334

X-ray diffractometry of lanthanum-nickel-aluminum alloys  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

X-ray diffractometry provides much useful information on LANA alloys that complements data obtained by SEM and Electron Microprobe Analysis. Accurate measurements of the hexagonal lattice parameters of the primary LaNi{sub 5-y}Aly phase reveal the aluminum content (y) and allow the prediction of desorption pressures for the hydrogen isotopes. A study of the broadening of x-ray diffraction lines of the LaNi{sub 5-y}Aly primary phase caused by cyclic absorption and desorption of hydrogen suggests that substitution of aluminum for nickel stabilizes the primary phase with respect to formation of antistructure defects that could cause undesirable trapping of hydrogen isotopes. Correlation of XRD with SEM and EMPA results has helped identify secondary phases, determine their abundances in volume percent, and reveal how they react with hydrogen and the atmosphere. Characterizations of LANA alloys used in process development has provided the bases for development of specifications for alloys to be used in the Replacement Trittium Facility. 28 refs., 4 tabs., 12 figs.

Mosley, W.C.

1988-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

335

Nickel-hydrogen battery with oxygen and electrolyte management features  

SciTech Connect

A nickel-hydrogen battery or cell having one or more pressure vessels containing hydrogen gas and a plurality of cell-modules therein. Each cell-module includes a configuration of cooperatively associated oxygen and electrolyte mangement and component alignment features. A cell-module having electrolyte includes a negative electrode, a positive electrode adapted to facilitate oxygen diffusion, a separator disposed between the positive and negative electrodes for separating them and holding electrolyte for ionic conductivity, an absorber engaging the surface of the positive electrode facing away from the separator for providing electrolyte to the positive electrode, and a pair of surface-channeled diffusion screens for enclosing the positive and negative electrodes, absorber, and separator and for maintaining proper alignment of these components. The screens, formed in the shape of a pocket by intermittently sealing the edges together along as many as three sides, permit hydrogen gas to diffuse therethrough to the negative electrodes, and prevent the edges of the separator from swelling. Electrolyte is contained in the cell-module, absorbhed by the electrodes, the separator and the absorber.

Sindorf, John F. (Pewaukee, WI)

1991-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

336

Welding stainless and 9% nickel steel cryogenic vessels  

SciTech Connect

Gases are often more efficiently stored and shipped as liquids at cryogenic temperatures. Pure gases commonly stored below liquefaction temperatures include oxygen {minus}297 F ({minus}183 C), argon {minus}302 f ({minus}186 C), nitrogen {minus}320 F ({minus}196 C), hydrogen {minus}423 F ({minus}253 C) and helium {minus}452 F ({minus}269 C). Natural gas is also transported and frequently stored as liquefied natural gas (LNG) at temperatures below {minus}261 F ({minus}163 C). Storage tanks for the pure gases are generally shop fabricated in sizes that can be shipped by conventional carriers. Smaller LNG vessels for over-the-road and railroad fuel applications are also shop-fabricated. Shown in a figure is a rail-mounted tank designed to supply liquefied natural gas to locomotives. Another example of a tank installation is also shown. LNG terminal storage tanks are generally field-erected vessels fabricated from 9% nickel steel in sizes of 50,000 to 100,000 m{sup 3} (315,000 to 630,000 bbls). This article focuses on welding practices for shop-fabricated vessels and equipment.

Avery, R.E. [Nickel Development Inst., Londonderry, NH (United States); Parsons, D. [Parsons (David), Hampstead, NH (United States)

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Type: Renewal  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1 INCITE Awards 1 INCITE Awards Type: Renewal Title: -Ab Initio Dynamical Simulations for the Prediction of Bulk Properties‖ Principal Investigator: Theresa Windus, Iowa State University Co-Investigators: Brett Bode, Iowa State University Graham Fletcher, Argonne National Laboratory Mark Gordon, Iowa State University Monica Lamm, Iowa State University Michael Schmidt, Iowa State University Scientific Discipline: Chemistry: Physical INCITE Allocation: 10,000,000 processor hours Site: Argonne National Laboratory Machine (Allocation): IBM Blue Gene/P (10,000,000 processor hours) Research Summary: This project uses high-quality electronic structure theory, statistical mechanical methods, and

338

Synthesis, characterization and solid state electrical properties of 1-D coordination polymer of the type [Cu{sub x}Ni{sub 1-x}(dadb){center_dot}yH{sub 2}O]{sub n}  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

New heterobimetallic complexes [Cu{sub x}Ni{sub 1-x}(dadb){center_dot}yH{sub 2}O]{sub n} {l_brace}where dadb=2,5-Diamino-3,6-dichloro-1,4-benzoquinone (1); x=1 (2), 0.5 (4), 0.25 (5), 0.125 (6), 0.0625 (7) and 0 (3); y=2; n=degree of polymerization{r_brace} were synthesized and characterized. Heterobimetallic complexes show normal magnetic moments, whereas, monometallic complexes exhibit magnetic moments less than the value due to spin only. Thermo-gravimetric analysis shows that degradation of the ligand dadb moiety is being controlled by the electronic environment of the Cu(II) ions in preference over Ni(II) in heterobimetallic complexes. Existence of the mixed valency/non-integral oxidation states of copper and nickel metal ions in the complex 4 has been attributed from magnetic moment and ESR spectral results. Solid state dc electrical conductivity of all the complexes was investigated. Monometallic complexes were found to be semiconductors, whereas heterobimetallic coordination polymer 4 was found to exhibit metallic behaviour. Existence of mixed valency/ non-integral oxidation state of metal ions seems to be responsible for the metallic behaviour. - Graphical abstract: Contrast to the semiconductor monometallic complexes 2 and 3, the heterobimetallic complex 4 exhibits metallic behaviour attributed to the mixed valency/non-integral oxidation state of the metal ions concluded from magnetic and ESR spectral studies. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer 1-D coordination compounds of the type Cu{sub x}Ni{sub 1-x}(dadb){center_dot}yH{sub 2}O were synthesized and characterized. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Thermal degradation of the complexes provides an indication of long range electronic communication between metal to ligand. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer On inclusion of Ni(II) into 1-D coordination polymer of Cu(II). (a) Cu(II) and Ni(II) ions exhibit non-integral oxidation state. (b) resulting heterobimetallic complex 4 exhibits metallic behaviour at all temperature range of the present study whereas monometallic complexes are semiconductor.

Prasad, R.L., E-mail: rlpjc@yahoo.co.in [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, BHU, Varanasi-221005, India. (India); Kushwaha, A. [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, BHU, Varanasi-221005, India. (India)] [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, BHU, Varanasi-221005, India. (India); Shrivastava, O.N. [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, BHU, Varanasi-221005, India. (India)] [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, BHU, Varanasi-221005, India. (India)

2012-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

339

Metal phthalocyanine catalysts  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

As a new composition of matter, alkali metal or ammonium or tetraalkylammonium diazidoperfluorophthalocyanatoferrate. Other embodiments of the invention comprise compositions wherein the metal of the coordination complex is cobalt, manganese and chromium.

Ellis, Jr., Paul E. (Downingtown, PA); Lyons, James E. (Wallingford, PA)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

Metal phthalocyanine catalysts  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A new composition of matter is described which is an alkali metal or ammonium or tetraalkylammonium diazidoperfluorophthalocyanatoferrate. Other embodiments of the invention comprise compositions wherein the metal of the coordination complex is cobalt, manganese and chromium.

Ellis, P.E. Jr.; Lyons, J.E.

1994-10-11T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "type nickel metal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Bulk Metallic Glasses X  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Jul 31, 2012 ... Aerospace and Spacecraft Applications for Bulk Metallic Glasses and Matrix Composites Air Oxidation of a Binary Cu64.5Zr35.5 Bulk Metallic...

342

Bulk Metallic Glasses VII  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Sponsorship, The Minerals, Metals and Materials Society ... Air-Oxidation of a ( Zr55Cu30Al10Ni5)98Er2 Bulk Metallic Glass at 350-500oc Anelastic...

343

Interactions of structural defects with metallic impurities in multicrystalline silicon  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Interactions between structural defects and metallic impurities were studied in multicrystalline silicon for solar cells applications. The objective was to gain insight into the relationship between solar cell processing, metallic impurity behavior and the resultant effect on material/device performance. With an intense synchrotron x-ray source, high sensitivity x-ray fluorescence measurements were utilized to determine impurity distributions with a spatial resolution of {approx} 1{micro}m. Diffusion length mapping and final solar cell characteristics gauged material/device performance. The materials were tested in both the as-grown state and after full solar cell processing. Iron and nickel metal impurities were located at structural defects in as-grown material, while after solar cell processing, both impurities were still observed in low performance regions. These results indicate that multicrystalline silicon solar cell performance is directly related to metal impurities which are not completely removed during typical processing treatments. A discussion of possible mechanisms for this incomplete removal is presented.

McHugo, S.A. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (US). Advanced Light Source; Hieslmair, H.; Weber, E.R. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (US). Dept. of Materials Science and Mineral Engineering; Rosenblum, M.D.; Kalejs, J.P. [ASE Americas Inc., Billerica, MA (US)

1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Bacteria Types  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Bacteria Types Bacteria Types Name: Evelyn Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: N/A Question: What is the significance of S. marcescens,M.luteus, S.epidermidis, and E. Coli? Which of these are gram-positive and gram-negative, and where can these be found? Also, what problems can they cause? When we culture these bacteria, we used four methods: plates, broth, slants, and pour plates. The media was made of TSB, TSA, NAP, and NAD. What is significant about these culturing methods? Replies: I could give you the answer to that question but it is more informative, and fun, to find out yourself. Start with the NCBI library online (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/) and do a query with the species name, and 'virulence' if you want to know what they're doing to us. Have a look at the taxonomy devision to see how they are related. To find out if they're gram-pos or neg you should do a gram stain if you can. Otherwise you'll find that information in any bacteriology determination guide. Your question about the media is not specific enough so I can't answer it.

345

Liquid metal thermoacoustic engine  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

We are studying a liquid metal thermoacoustic engine both theoretically and experimentally. This type of engine promises to produce large quantities of electrical energy from heat at modest efficiency with no moving parts. A sound wave is usually thought of as consisting of pressure oscillations, but always attendant to the pressure oscillation are temperature oscillations. The combination produces a rich variety of ''thermoacoustic'' effects. These effects are usually so small that they are never noticed in everyday life; nevertheless under the right circumstances they can be harnessed to produce powerful heat engines, heat pumps, and refrigerators. In our liquid metal thermoacoustic engine, heat flow from a high temperature source to a low temperature sink generates a high-amplitude standing acoustic wave in liquid sodium. This acoustic power is converted to electric power by a simple magnetohydrodynamic effect at the acoustic oscillation frequency. We have developed a detailed thermoacoustic theory applicable to this engine, and find that a reasonably designed liquid sodium engine operating between 700/sup 0/C and 100/sup 0/C should generate about 60 W/cm/sup 2/ of acoustic power at about 1/3 of Carnot's efficiency. Construction of a 3000 W-thermal laboratory model engine has just been completed, and we have exciting preliminary experimental results as of the time of preparation of this manuscript showing, basically, that the engine works. We have also designed and built a 1 kHz liquid sodium magnetohydrodynamic generator and have extensive measurements on it. It is now very well characterized both experimentally and theoretically. The first generator of its kind, it already converts acoustic power to electric power with 40% efficiency. 16 refs., 5 figs.

Swift, G.W.; Migliori, A.; Wheatley, J.C.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

Exploring the mechanisms critical to the operation of metal face seals through modeling and experiments  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis aims to explore operation mechanisms of a special type of mechanical face seals: the flexible metal-to-metal face seal (FMMFS). Unique features of the FMMFS include much more flexibility in the circumferential ...

Wang, Yong, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Dept. of Aeronautics and Astronautics

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

Ferrocyanide Safety Project Dynamic X-Ray Diffraction studies of sodium nickel ferrocyanide reactions with equimolar nitrate/nitrite salts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Dynamic X-ray Diffraction (DXRD) has been to used to identify and quantify the solid state reactions that take place between sodium nickel ferrocyanide, Na{sub 2}NiFe(CN){sub 6}, and equimolar concentrations of sodium nitrate/nitrite, reactions of interest to the continued environmental safety of several large underground waste storage tanks at the Hanford site in eastern Washington. The results are supportive of previous work, which indicated that endothermic dehydration and melting of the nitrates take place before the occurrence of exothermic reactions that being about 300{degrees}C. The DXRD results show that a major reaction set at these temperatures is the occurrence of a series reaction that produces sodium cyanate, NaCNO, as an intermediate in a mildly exothermic first step. In the presence of gaseous oxygen, NaCNO subsequently reacts exothermally and at a faster rate to form metal oxides. Measurements of the rate of this reaction are used to estimate the heat release. Comparisons of this estimated heat release rate with heat transfer rates from a hypothetical ``hot spot`` show that, even in a worst-case scenario, the heat transfer rates are approximately eight times higher than the rate of energy release from the exothermic reactions.

Dodds, J.N. [Washington State Univ., Pullman, WA (United States). Dept. of Chemical Engineering]|[UNOCAL, Brea, CA (United States). Hartley Research Center

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Precision metal rulers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... precision metal rulers. Our customers include state bureaus of Weights and Measures and departments of Agriculture. We also ...

2011-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

349

Fasteners & Metals Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Directory of Accredited Laboratories. Fasteners & Metals Program. The Fastener Quality Act (FQA), Public Law 101-592, was ...

2013-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

350

TMS Light Metals Publication  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The following instructions should be used when submitting a manuscript for any TMS Light Metals proceedings volume. INTRODUCTION. Orientation to...

351

Refractory Metals 2011  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Aug 2, 2010 ... TMS Structural Materials Division TMS: Refractory Metals Committee. Organizer( s), Omer Dogan, DOE National Energy Technology Laboratory

352

Ligand Intermediates in Metal-Catalyzed Reactions  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The longest-running goal of this project has been the synthesis, isolation, and physical chemical characterization of homogeneous transition metal complexes containing ligand types believed to be intermediates in the metal-catalyzed conversion of CO/H{sub 2}, CO{sub 2}, CH{sub 4}, and similar raw materials to organic fuels, feedstocks, etc. In the current project period, complexes that contain unusual new types of C{sub x}(carbide) and C{sub x}O{sub y} (carbon oxide) ligands have been emphasized. A new program in homogeneous fluorous phase catalysis has been launched as described in the final report.

Gladysz, John A.

1999-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

353

Metal-Containing Organic and Carbon Aerogels for Hydrogen Storage  

SciTech Connect

This document and the accompanying manuscript summarize the technical accomplishments of our one-year LDRD-ER effort. Hydrogen storage and hydrogen fuel cells are important components of the 2003 Hydrogen Fuel Initiative focused on the reduction of America's dependence on oil. To compete with oil as an energy source, however, one must be able to transport and utilize hydrogen at or above the target set by DOE (6 wt.% H{sub 2}) for the transportation sector. Other than liquid hydrogen, current technology falls well short of this DOE target. As a result, a variety of materials have recently been investigated to address this issue. Carbon nanostructures have received significant attention as hydrogen storage materials due to their low molecular weight, tunable microporosity and high specific surface areas. For example, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) achieved 5 to 10 wt.% H{sub 2} storage using metal-doped carbon nanotubes. That study showed that the intimate mix of metal nanoparticles with graphitic carbon resulted in the unanticipated hydrogen adsorption at near ambient conditions. The focus of our LDRD effort was the investigation of metal-doped carbon aerogels (MDCAs) as hydrogen storage materials. In addition to their low mass densities, continuous porosities and high surface areas, these materials are promising candidates for hydrogen storage because MDCAs contain a nanometric mix of metal nanoparticles and graphitic nanostructures. For FY04, our goals were to: (1) prepare a variety of metal-doped CAs (where the metal is cobalt, nickel or iron) at different densities and carbonization temperatures, (2) characterize the microstructure of these materials and (3) initiate hydrogen adsorption/desorption studies to determine H2 storage properties of these materials. Since the start of this effort, we have successfully prepared and characterized Ni- and Co-doped carbon aerogels at different densities and carbonization temperatures. The bulk of this work is described in the attached manuscript entitled 'Formation of Carbon Nanostructures in Cobalt- and Nickel- Doped Carbon Aerogels'. This one-year effort has lead to our incorporation into the DOE Carbon-based Hydrogen Storage Center of Excellence at NREL, with funding from DOE's Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Program starting in FY05.

Satcher, Jr., J H; Baumann, T F; Herberg, J L

2005-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

354

Interim evaluation of nickel plate on aluminum-jacketed fuel elements  

SciTech Connect

Nickel plating on the coolant contacting surfaces of aluminum-jacketed fuel elements is highly attractive for increasing resistance. Potential benefits include a highly corrosion-resistant coating for severe localized conditions, reduction of mechanical damage to fuel element jackets, improved fuel element alignment (by reducing friction between fuel element and process tube ribs) and probably lower overfall surface temperatures to reduction in corrosion product film with improved corrosion resistance, neutron economy might also be realized. For example, substitution of a 0.5 mil thick nickel plate for 15-mils thickness of aluminum jacket would result in no reactivity loss and permit a concomitant increase in uranium volume, or in coolant flow annulus. Attendant problems include providing an adherent continuous plate of uniform thickness and possibly contamination of reactor effluent by radio-nickel-cobalt, and phosphorous and it was found that gross sloughing of the nickel plate had occurred. Development and testing work was carried out to determine the cause and a solution to the Greece problem. Studies were limited to the behavior of chemically-deposited nickel because of the unique capability of the process to deposit a coating of uniform thickness in the 0.1 - 0.2 mils thick range, regardless of the geometry of the plated piece. Based on ex- reactor tests, a readily applicable method for significantly improving plate adherence has been developed, as summarized in this report.

Jacky, G.F.

1960-02-08T23:59:59.000Z

355

Templated synthesis of nickel nanoparticles: Toward heterostructured nanocomposites for efficient hydrogen storage  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

provides evidence for an atomic migration mechanism of particle formation. Ni?SiO{sub 2} nanocapsules were used as seeds to induce heterogeneous nucleation and subsequent growth within the nanocapsule via electroless nickel plating. Nickel nanoparticle growth occurs under high temperature alkaline conditions, however silica nanocapsule integrity is not maintained due to the incompatibility of silica with the growth conditions. Silica nanocapsule integrity is maintained under low temperature neutral conditions, but nickel particle growth is not observed. Through FTIR and UV/Vis analysis, we show the degree of crosslinking and condensation increases in calcined silica compared to as-synthesized silica. We propose the increased density of the silica nanocapsule hinders mass transfer of the bulky nickel precursor complex from solution and onto the surface of the catalytic zero-valent nickel seed within the nanocapsule cavity. Decreasing the density of the silica nanocapsule can be achieved through co-condensation of tetraethylorthosilicate with an alkyl functionalized silane followed by calcination to remove the organic component or by chemical etching in alkaline solution, but will not be addressed in this thesis.

Nelson, Nicholas Cole [Ames Laboratory

2013-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

356

Supercritical Carbon Dioxide-Soluble Ligands for Extracting Actinide Metal Ions from Porous Solids  

SciTech Connect

Numerous types of actinide-bearing waste materials are found throughout the DOE complex. Most of these wastes consist of large volumes of non-hazardous materials contaminated with relatively small quantities of actinide elements. Separation of these wastes into their inert and radioactive components would dramatically reduce the costs of stabilization and disposal. For example, the DOE is responsible for decontaminating concrete within 7000 surplus contaminated buildings. The best technology now available for removing surface contamination from concrete involves removing the surface layer by grit blasting, which produces a large volume of blasting residue containing a small amount of radioactive material. Disposal of this residue is expensive because of its large volume and fine particulate nature. Considerable cost savings would result from separation of the radioactive constituents and stabilization of the concrete dust. Similarly, gas diffusion plants for uranium enrichment contain valuable high-purity nickel in the form of diffusion barriers. Decontamination is complicated by the extremely fine pores in these barriers, which are not readily accessible by most cleaning techniques. A cost-effective method for the removal of radioactive contaminants would release this valuable material for salvage. The objective of this project is to develop novel, substituted diphosphonic acid ligands that can be used for supercritical carbon dioxide extraction of actinide ions from solid wastes. Specifically, selected diphosphonic acids, which are known to form extremely stable complexes with actinides in aqueous and organic solution, are to be rendered carbon dioxide-soluble by the introduction of appropriate alkyl- or silicon-containing substituents. The metal complexation chemistry of these new ligands in SC-CO2 will then be investigated and techniques for their use in actinide extraction from porous solids developed.

Dietz, Mark L.

2001-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Durable metallized polymer mirror  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A metallized polymer mirror construction is disclosed having improved durability against delamination and tunneling, comprising: an outer layer of polymeric material; a metal oxide layer underlying the outer layer of polymeric material; a silver reflective layer underneath the metal oxide layer; and a layer of adhesive attaching the silver layer to a substrate. 6 figs.

Schissel, P.O.; Kennedy, C.E.; Jorgensen, G.J.; Shinton, Y.D.; Goggin, R.M.

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

PRODUCTION OF METALS  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process is described producing metallic thorium, titanium, zirconium, or hafnium from the fluoride. In the process, the fluoride is reduced with alkali or alkaline earth metal and a booster compound (e.g. iodine or a decomposable oxysalt) in a sealed bomb at superatmospheric pressure and a temperature above the melting point of the metal to be produced.

Spedding, F.H.; Wilhelm, H.A.; Keller, W.H.

1961-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

359

Enantioselective nickel-catalyzed reductive coupling reactions of alkynes and aldehydes. Synthesis of amphidinolides T1 and T4 via catalytic, stereoselective macrocyclizations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

I. Enantioselective Nickel-Catalyzed Reductive Couplings of Alkynes and Aldehydes Allylic alcohol synthesis via a nickel-catalyzed reductive coupling reaction of alkylsubstituted alkynes and aldehydes was studied for ligand ...

Colby Davie, Elizabeth A. (Elizabeth Anne)

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Facility Type!  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

ITY: ITY: --&L~ ----------- srct-r~ -----------~------~------- if yee, date contacted ------------- cl Facility Type! i I 0 Theoretical Studies Cl Sample 84 Analysis ] Production 1 Diepasal/Storage 'YPE OF CONTRACT .--------------- 1 Prime J Subcontract&- 1 Purchase Order rl i '1 ! Other information (i.e., ---------~---~--~-------- :ontrait/Pirchaee Order # , I C -qXlJ- --~-------~~-------~~~~~~ I I ~~~---~~~~~~~T~~~ FONTRACTING PERIODi IWNERSHIP: ,I 1 AECIMED AECMED GOVT GOUT &NTtiAC+OR GUN-I OWNED ----- LEEE!? M!s LE!Ps2 -LdJG?- ---L .ANDS ILJILDINGS X2UIPilENT IRE OR RAW HA-I-L :INAL PRODUCT IASTE Z. RESIDUE I I kility l pt I ,-- 7- ,+- &!d,, ' IN&"E~:EW AT SITE -' ---------------- , . Control 0 AEC/tlED managed operations

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "type nickel metal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Silica Embedded Metal Hydrides  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A method to produce silica embedded metal hydride was developed. The product is a composite in which metal hydride particles are embedded in a matrix of silica. The silica matrix is highly porous. Hydrogen gas can easily reach the embedded metal hydride particles. The pores are small so that the metal hydride particles cannot leave the matrix. The porous matrix also protects the metal hydride particles from larger and reactive molecules such as oxygen, since the larger gas molecules cannot pass through the small pores easily. Tests show that granules of this composite can absorb hydrogen readily and withstand many cycles without making fines.

Heung, L.K. [Westinghouse Savannah River Company, AIKEN, SC (United States); Wicks, G.G.

1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

High-temperature Hydrogen Permeation in Nickel Alloys  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In gas cooled Very High Temperature Reactor concepts, tritium is produced as a tertiary fission product and by activation of graphite core contaminants, such as lithium; of the helium isotope, He-3, that is naturally present in the He gas coolant; and the boron in the B4C burnable poison. Because of its high mobility at the reactor outlet temperatures, tritium poses a risk of permeating through the walls of the intermediate heat exchanger (IHX) or steam generator (SG) systems, potentially contaminating the environment and in particular the hydrogen product when the reactor heat is utilized in connection with a hydrogen generation plant. An experiment to measure tritium permeation in structural materials at temperatures up to 1000 C has been constructed at the Idaho National Laboratory Safety and Tritium Applied Research (STAR) facility within the Next Generation Nuclear Plant program. The design is based on two counter flowing helium loops to represent heat exchanger conditions and was optimized to allow control of the materials surface condition and the investigation of the effects of thermal fatigue. In the ongoing campaign three nickel alloys are being considered because of their high-temperature creep properties, alloy 617, 800H and 230. This paper introduces the general issues related to tritium in the on-going assessment of gas cooled VHTR systems fission product transport and outlines the planned research activities in this area; outlines the features and capabilities of the experimental facility being operated at INL; presents and discusses the initial results of hydrogen permeability measurements in two of the selected alloys and compares them with the available database from previous studies.

P. Calderoni; M. Ebner; R. Pawelko

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

Nanostructured lithium nickel manganese oxides for lithium-ion batteries.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Nanostructured lithium nickel manganese oxides were investigated as advanced positive electrode materials for lithium-ion batteries designated to power plug-in hybrid electric vehicles and all-electric vehicles. The investigation included material characterization and electrochemical testing. In cell tests, the Li{sub 1.375}Ni{sub 0.25}Mn{sub 0.75}O{sub 2.4375} composition achieved high capacity (210 mAh g{sup -1}) at an elevated rate (230 mA g{sup -1}), which makes this material a promising candidate for high energy density Li-ion batteries, as does its being cobalt-free and uncoated. The material has spherical morphology with nanoprimary particles embedded in micrometer-sized secondary particles, possesses a multiphase character (spinel and layered), and exhibits a high packing density (over 2 g cm{sup -3}) that is essential for the design of high energy density positive electrodes. When combined with the Li{sub 4}Ti{sub 5}O{sub 12} stable anode, the cell showed a capacity of 225 mAh g{sup -1} at the C/3 rate (73 mA g{sup -1}) with no capacity fading for 200 cycles. Other chemical compositions, Li{sub (1+x)}Ni{sub 0.25}Mn{sub 0.75}O{sub (2.25+x/2)} (0.32 {le} x {le} 0.65), were also studied, and the relationships among their structural, morphological, and electrochemical properties are reported.

Deng, H.; Belharouak, I.; Cook, R. E.; Wu, H.; Sun, Y.-K.; Amine, K.; Hanyang Univ.

2010-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

364

Method of Applying a Cerium Diffusion Coating to a Metallic Alloy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Applying a Cerium Diffusion Applying a Cerium Diffusion Coating to a Metallic Alloy Opportunity The Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) is seeking licensing partners interested in implementing United States Patent Number 7,553,517 entitled "Method of Applying a Cerium Diffusion Coating to a Metallic Alloy." This invention is applicable to advanced, next-generation power plant components; solid oxide fuels cells; heaters and heat exchangers; or any other application where oxidation-resistant metals are needed. Disclosed in this patent is NETL's robust, inexpensive process for increasing the oxidation resistance of nickel-based superalloys, as well as ferritic and austenitic stainless steels. The process involves applying a cerium oxide (CeO

365

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Metals Disintegrating Co Inc - NJ 0-03  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Disintegrating Co Inc - NJ Disintegrating Co Inc - NJ 0-03 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: METALS DISINTEGRATING CO., INC. (NJ.0-03 ) Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: None Location: 271 Grove Avenue , Verona or Elizabeth , New Jersey NJ.0-03-1 NJ.0-03-2 NJ.0-03-3 Evaluation Year: 1987 NJ.0-03-3 Site Operations: Provided nickel to Linde. NJ.0-03-3 NJ.0-03-4 Site Disposition: Eliminated - No radioactive materials were handled at this site. NJ.0-03-3 Radioactive Materials Handled: None Indicated Primary Radioactive Materials Handled: None Indicated Radiological Survey(s): None Indicated Site Status: Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP Also see Documents Related to METALS DISINTEGRATING CO., INC. NJ.0-03-1 - Letter; Goman to Metals Disintegrating Company, Inc.

366

A study of the metal content of municipal solid waste. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Knowledge of the content of toxic components, so called pollutant precursors, in the municipal solid waste (MSW) stream is essential to development of the strategies for source reduction and reuse, recycling, composting and disposal. Data are scarce; trends in composition for any locality even more so. In a previous study the total and water soluble chlorine content of the components of municipal solid waste were determined from sampling studies at two sites, Baltimore County, MD, and Brooklyn, NY, each for a five day period. The total sulfur content of the combined combustible components was also determined. Because of the scarcity of data and synergistic effects, it seemed appropriate to determine the heavy metal content of the preceding material prior to its disposal. The metals chosen were the so-called priority pollutant metals (PPM): antimony, arsenic, beryllium, cadmium, chromium, copper, lead, mercury, nickel, selenium, silver, thallium, and zinc.

Churney, K.L.; Domalski, E.S.

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

Research, development, and demonstration of nickel-iron batteries for electric vehicle propulsion. Annual report, 1980  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of the Eagle-Picher nickel-iron battery program is to develop a nickel-iron battery for use in the propulsion of electric and electric-hybrid vehicles. To date, the program has concentrated on the characterization, fabrication and testing of the required electrodes, the fabrication and testing of full-scale cells, and finally, the fabrication and testing of full-scale (270 AH) six (6) volt modules. Electrodes of the final configuration have now exceeded 1880 cycles and are showing minimal capacity decline. Full-scale cells have presently exceeded 600 cycles and are tracking the individual electrode tests almost identically. Six volt module tests have exceeded 500 cycles, with a specific energy of 48 Wh/kg. Results to date indicate the nickel-iron battery is beginning to demonstrate the performance required for electric vehicle propulsion.

Not Available

1981-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

Method for improving x-ray diffraction determinations of residual stress in nickel-base alloys  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for improving the technique of measuring residual stress by x-ray diffraction in pieces of nickel-base alloys is discussed. Part of a predetermined area of the surface of a nickel-base alloy is covered with a dispersion. This exposes the covered and uncovered portions of the surface of the alloy to x-rays by way of an x-ray diffractometry apparatus, making x-ray diffraction determinations of the exposed surface, and measuring the residual stress in the alloy based on these determinations. The dispersion is opaque to x-rays and serves a dual purpose, since it masks off unsatisfactory signals such that only a small portion of the surface is measured, and it supplies an internal standard by providing diffractogram peaks comparable to the peaks of the nickel alloy so that the alloy peaks can be very accurately located regardless of any sources of error external to the sample. 2 figs.

Berman, R.M.; Cohen, I.

1988-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

369

Nucleosynthesis of Nickel-56 from Gamma-Ray Burst Accretion Disks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We examine the prospects for producing Nickel-56 from black hole accretion disks, by examining a range of steady state disk models. We focus on relatively slowly accreting disks in the range of 0.05 - 1 solar masses per second, as are thought to be appropriate for the central engines of long-duration gamma-ray bursts. We find that significant amounts of Nickel-56 are produced over a wide range of parameter space. We discuss the influence of entropy, outflow timescale and initial disk position on mass fraction of Nickel-56 which is produced. We keep careful track of the weak interactions to ensure reliable calculations of the electron fraction, and discuss the role of the neutrinos.

R. Surman; G. C. McLaughlin; N. Sabbatino

2011-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

370

NUCLEOSYNTHESIS OF NICKEL-56 FROM GAMMA-RAY BURST ACCRETION DISKS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We examine the prospects for producing nickel-56 from black hole accretion disks, by examining a range of steady-state disk models. We focus on relatively slowly accreting disks in the range of M-dot = 0.05 M{sub Sun} s{sup -1} to M-dot = 1 M{sub Sun} s{sup -1}, as are thought to be appropriate for the central engines of long-duration gamma-ray bursts. We find that significant amounts of nickel-56 are produced over a wide range of parameter space. We discuss the influence of entropy, outflow timescale, and initial disk position on mass fraction of nickel-56 which is produced. We keep careful track of the weak interactions to ensure reliable calculations of the electron fraction, and discuss the role of the neutrinos.

Surman, R.; Sabbatino, N. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Union College, Schenectady, NY 12308 (United States); McLaughlin, G. C. [Department of Physics, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27695-8202 (United States)

2011-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

371

Extraction process for removing metallic impurities from alkalide metals  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A development is described for removing metallic impurities from alkali metals by employing an extraction process wherein the metallic impurities are extracted from a molten alkali metal into molten lithium metal due to the immiscibility of the alkali metals in lithium and the miscibility of the metallic contaminants or impurities in the lithium. The purified alkali metal may be readily separated from the contaminant-containing lithium metal by simple decanting due to the differences in densities and melting temperatures of the alkali metals as compared to lithium.

Royer, Lamar T. (Knoxville, TN)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

Extraction process for removing metallic impurities from alkalide metals  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A development is described for removing metallic impurities from alkali metals by employing an extraction process wherein the metallic impurities are extracted from a molten alkali metal into molten lithium metal due to the immiscibility of the alkali metals in lithium and the miscibility of the metallic contaminants or impurities in the lithium. The purified alkali metal may be readily separated from the contaminant-containing lithium metal by simple decanting due to the differences in densities and melting temperatures of the alkali metals as compared to lithium.

Royer, L.T.

1987-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

373

A Computational Approach to Homogenizing Nickel-Based Single Crystal Alloys  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Computational Approach to Homogenizing Nickel-Based Computational Approach to Homogenizing Nickel-Based Single Crystal Alloys Contact NETL Technology Transfer Group techtransfer@netl.doe.gov May 2013 Significance * Provides significantly diminished processing costs, including reduced energy consumption and throughput times, and increased availability of capital equipment such as furnaces, due to shorter heat treatments * Generates superior Ni-based superalloys with improved performance in downstream applications * Provides extreme flexibility, allowing for modification to meet the differing constraints of individual production facilities and the level of homogenization desired

374

Removal of field and embedded metal by spin spray etching  

SciTech Connect

A process of removing both the field metal, such as copper, and a metal, such as copper, embedded into a dielectric or substrate at substantially the same rate by dripping or spraying a suitable metal etchant onto a spinning wafer to etch the metal evenly on the entire surface of the wafer. By this process the field metal is etched away completely while etching of the metal inside patterned features in the dielectric at the same or a lesser rate. This process is dependent on the type of chemical etchant used, the concentration and the temperature of the solution, and also the rate of spin speed of the wafer during the etching. The process substantially reduces the metal removal time compared to mechanical polishing, for example, and can be carried out using significantly less expensive equipment.

Contolini, Robert J. (Pleasanton, CA); Mayer, Steven T. (San Leandro, CA); Tarte, Lisa A. (Livermore, CA)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

Metal Speciation in Landfill Leachates with a Focus on the Influence of Organic Matter  

SciTech Connect

This study characterizes the heavy-metal content in leachates collected from eight landfills in France. In order to identify heavy metal occurrence in the different size fractions of leachates, a cascade filtration protocol was applied directly in the field, under a nitrogen gas atmosphere to avoid metal oxidation. The results of analyses performed on the leachates suggest that most of the metals are concentrated in the <30 kDa fraction, while lead, copper and cadmium show an association with larger particles. Initial speciation calculations, without considering metal association with organic matter, suggest that leachate concentrations in lead, copper, nickel and zinc are super-saturated with respect to sulphur phases. Speciation calculations that account for metal complexation with organic matter, considered as fulvic acids based on C1(s) NEXAFS spectroscopy, show that this mechanism is not sufficient to explain such deviation from equilibrium conditions. It is therefore hypothesized that the deviation results also from the influence of biological activity on the kinetics of mineral phase precipitation and dissolution, thus providing a dynamic system. The results of chemical analyses of sampled fluids are compared with speciation calculations and some implications for the assessment of metal mobility and natural attenuation in a context of landfill risk assessment are discussed.

F Claret; C Tournassat; C Crouzet; E Gaucher; T Schfer; G Braibant; D Guyonnet

2011-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

376

Developing grain boundary diagrams as a materials science tool: A case study of nickel-doped molybdenum  

SciTech Connect

Impurity-based, premelting-like, grain boundary (GB) ''phases'' (complexions) can form in alloys and influence sintering, creep, and microstructural development. Calculation of Phase Diagrams (CalPhaD) methods and Miedema-type statistical interfacial thermodynamic models are combined to forecast the formation and stability of subsolidus quasiliquid GB phases in binary alloys. This work supports a long-range scientific goal of developing ''GB (phase) diagrams'' as a new materials science tool to help controlling the materials fabrication processing and resultant materials properties. Using nickel-doped molybdenum as a model system, a type of GB diagram (called ''{lambda} diagram'') is computed to represent the temperature- and composition-dependent thermodynamic tendency for general GBs to disorder. Subsequently, controlled sintering experiments are conducted to estimate the GB diffusivity as a function of temperature and overall composition, and the experimental results correlate well with the computed GB diagram. Although they are not yet rigorous GB-phase diagrams with well-defined transition lines, the predictability and usefulness of such {lambda} diagrams are demonstrated. Related interfacial thermodynamic models and computational approaches are discussed.

Shi Xiaomeng; Luo Jian [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Center for Optical Materials Science and Engineering Technologies, Clemson University, Clemson, South Carolina 29634 (United States)

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Sumitomo Metal Industries Ltd Sumitomo Metals | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Sumitomo Metal Industries Ltd Sumitomo Metals Sumitomo Metal Industries Ltd Sumitomo Metals Jump to: navigation, search Name Sumitomo Metal Industries Ltd (Sumitomo Metals) Place Osaka-shi, Osaka, Japan Zip 540-0041 Sector Solar Product Engaged in the steel, engineering, and electronics businesses; works on fuel cell component technology and manufactures silicon wafers for the solar sector. References Sumitomo Metal Industries Ltd (Sumitomo Metals)[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Sumitomo Metal Industries Ltd (Sumitomo Metals) is a company located in Osaka-shi, Osaka, Japan . References ↑ "Sumitomo Metal Industries Ltd (Sumitomo Metals)" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Sumitomo_Metal_Industries_Ltd_Sumitomo_Metals&oldid=351744"

378

Metal speciation in landfill leachates with a focus on the influence of organic matter  

SciTech Connect

Highlights: > This study characterises the heavy-metal content in leachates collected from eight landfills in France. > Most of the metals are concentrated in the <30 kDa fraction, while Pb, Cu and Cd are associated with larger particles. > Metal complexation with OM is not sufficient to explain apparent supersaturation of metals with sulphide minerals. - Abstract: This study characterises the heavy-metal content in leachates collected from eight landfills in France. In order to identify heavy metal occurrence in the different size fractions of leachates, a cascade filtration protocol was applied directly in the field, under a nitrogen gas atmosphere to avoid metal oxidation. The results of analyses performed on the leachates suggest that most of the metals are concentrated in the <30 kDa fraction, while lead, copper and cadmium show an association with larger particles. Initial speciation calculations, without considering metal association with organic matter, suggest that leachate concentrations in lead, copper, nickel and zinc are super-saturated with respect to sulphur phases. Speciation calculations that account for metal complexation with organic matter, considered as fulvic acids based on C1(s) NEXAFS spectroscopy, show that this mechanism is not sufficient to explain such deviation from equilibrium conditions. It is therefore hypothesized that the deviation results also from the influence of biological activity on the kinetics of mineral phase precipitation and dissolution, thus providing a dynamic system. The results of chemical analyses of sampled fluids are compared with speciation calculations and some implications for the assessment of metal mobility and natural attenuation in a context of landfill risk assessment are discussed.

Claret, Francis, E-mail: f.claret@brgm.fr [BRGM, 3 avenue C. Guillemin, BP 6009, 45060 Orleans (France); Tournassat, Christophe; Crouzet, Catherine; Gaucher, Eric C. [BRGM, 3 avenue C. Guillemin, BP 6009, 45060 Orleans (France); Schaefer, Thorsten [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Institute for Nuclear Waste Disposal (INE), P.O. Box 3640, 76021 Karlsruhe (Germany); Freie Universitaet Berlin, Institute of Geological Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Hydrogeology Group, D-12249 Berlin (Germany); Braibant, Gilles; Guyonnet, Dominique [BRGM, 3 avenue C. Guillemin, BP 6009, 45060 Orleans (France)

2011-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

379

Status of improved lead-acid, nickel/iron, and nickel/zinc batteries being developed under DOE's electric vehicle battery program  

SciTech Connect

The significant progress achieved in each of the three battery systems since the initiation of this battery development program is described. The 1982 demonstrated accomplishments are verified test results obtained on multicell modules (typically three to six cells each) at NBTL through May 1982. In particular, significant technical progress has been made in extending battery life. Additional progress in cell development and battery subsystem design (chargers, watering systems, electrolyte management systems) has allowed the construction of full-size battery packs. Globe Battery Division (lead-acid), Westinghouse (nickel/iron), and Eagle-Picher (nickel/iron) delivered full-size batteries to the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) for in-vehicle testing and evaluation.

Miller, J.F.; Rajan, J.B.; Hornstra, F.; Christianson, C.C.; Yao, N.P.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Number: 1894 Type: factoid ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... type> Type: factoid Description: How high is the pitcher's mound? ... 2047 Type: factoid Description: How close is Mercury to ...

2003-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "type nickel metal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

High cycle life, cobalt free, AB{5} metal hydride electrodes [Revised 11/10/98  

SciTech Connect

Cobalt-free La(Ni,Sn)5+x alloys have been identified as low cost, corrosion resistant electrodes for nickel-metal-hydride batteries. The structure of theses alloys are similar to non-stoichiometric La(Ni,Cu)5+x compounds; i.e., they retain the P6/mmm space group while Ni dumbbells occupy La sites. Electrodes fabricated from some of these novel alloys have capacities and cycle lives equivalent to those made from commercial, battery grade, AB5 alloys with cobalt.

Vogt, Tom; Reilly, J.J.; Johnson, J.R.; Adzic, G.D.; Ticianelli, E.A.; Mukerjee, S.; McBreen, J.

1998-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

382

FORMING PROTECTIVE FILMS ON METAL  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Methods are described of inhibiting the corrosion of ferrous metal by contact with heavy liquid metals such as bismuth and gallium at temperatures above 500 icient laborato C generally by bringing nltrogen and either the metal zirconium, hafnium, or titanium into reactlve contact with the ferrous metal to form a thin adherent layer of the nitride of the metal and thereafter maintaining a fractional percentage of the metal absorbed in the heavy liquid metal in contact with the ferrous metal container. The general purpose for uslng such high boiling liquid metals in ferrous contalners would be as heat transfer agents in liquid-metal-fueled nuclear reactors.

Gurinsky, D.H.; Kammerer, O.F.; Sadofsky, J.; Weeks, J.R.

1958-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

383

Mosaic neurofibromatosis type 1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

with neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) with microdeletionsM, Huson S. Mosaic (segmental) neurofibromatosis type 1and type 2: no longer neurofibromatosis type 5. Am J Med

Liang, Christine; Schaffer, Julie V

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Gender differences in the disposition and toxicity of metals  

SciTech Connect

There is increasing evidence that health effects of toxic metals differ in prevalence or are manifested differently in men and women. However, the database is small. The present work aims at evaluating gender differences in the health effects of cadmium, nickel, lead, mercury and arsenic. There is a markedly higher prevalence of nickel-induced allergy and hand eczema in women compared to men, mainly due to differences in exposure. Cadmium retention is generally higher in women than in men, and the severe cadmium-induced Itai-itai disease was mainly a woman's disease. Gender differences in susceptibility at lower exposure are uncertain, but recent data indicate that cadmium has estrogenic effects and affect female offspring. Men generally have higher blood lead levels than women. Lead accumulates in bone and increased endogenous lead exposure has been demonstrated during periods of increased bone turnover, particularly in women in pregnancy and menopause. Lead and mercury, in the form of mercury vapor and methylmercury, are easily transferred from the pregnant women to the fetus. Recent data indicate that boys are more susceptible to neurotoxic effects of lead and methylmercury following exposure early in life, while experimental data suggest that females are more susceptible to immunotoxic effects of lead. Certain gender differences in the biotransformation of arsenic by methylation have been reported, and men seem to be more affected by arsenic-related skin effect than women. Experimental studies indicate major gender differences in arsenic-induced cancer. Obviously, research on gender-related differences in health effects caused by metals needs considerable more focus in the future.

Vahter, Marie [Divisions of Metals and Health and Toxicology and Neurotoxicology, Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Box 210, SE-171 77 Stockholm (Sweden)]. E-mail: Marie.Vahter@imm.ki.se; Akesson, Agneta [Divisions of Metals and Health and Toxicology and Neurotoxicology, Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Box 210, SE-171 77 Stockholm (Sweden); Liden, Carola [Occupational and Environmental Dermatology, Department of Medicine, Karolinska, Institutet and Stockholm County Council (Sweden); Ceccatelli, Sandra [Divisions of Metals and Health and Toxicology and Neurotoxicology, Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Box 210, SE-171 77 Stockholm (Sweden); Berglund, Marika [Divisions of Metals and Health and Toxicology and Neurotoxicology, Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Box 210, SE-171 77 Stockholm (Sweden)

2007-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

385

Metal atomization spray nozzle  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A spray nozzle for a magnetohydrodynamic atomization apparatus has a feed passage for molten metal and a pair of spray electrodes mounted in the feed passage. The electrodes, diverging surfaces which define a nozzle throat and diverge at an acute angle from the throat. Current passes through molten metal when fed through the throat which creates the Lorentz force necessary to provide atomization of the molten metal.

Huxford, Theodore J. (Harriman, TN)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

Supported metal alloy catalysts  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process of preparing a Group IV, V, or VI metal carbonitride including reacting a Group IV, V, or VI metal amide complex with ammonia to obtain an intermediate product; and, heating the intermediate product to temperatures and for times sufficient to form a Group IV, V, or VI metal carbonitride is provided together with the product of the process and a process of reforming an n-alkane by use of the product.

Barrera, Joseph (Albuquerque, NM); Smith, David C. (Santa Clara, CA)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Metal atomization spray nozzle  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A spray nozzle for a magnetohydrodynamic atomization apparatus has a feed passage for molten metal and a pair of spray electrodes mounted in the feed passage. The electrodes, diverging surfaces which define a nozzle throat and diverge at an acute angle from the throat. Current passes through molten metal when fed through the throat which creates the Lorentz force necessary to provide atomization of the molten metal. 6 figures.

Huxford, T.J.

1993-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

388

Metal atom oxidation laser  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A chemical laser which operates by formation of metal or carbon atoms and reaction of such atoms with a gaseous oxidizer in an optical resonant cavity is described. The lasing species are diatomic or polyatomic in nature and are readily produced by exchange or other abstraction reactions between the metal or carbon atoms and the oxidizer. The lasing molecules may be metal or carbon monohalides or monoxides. (auth)

Jensen, R.J.; Rice, W.W.; Beattie, W.H.

1975-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

389

Metal atom oxidation laser  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A chemical laser which operates by formation of metal or carbon atoms and reaction of such atoms with a gaseous oxidizer in an optical resonant cavity is described. The lasing species are diatomic or polyatomic in nature and are readily produced by exchange or other abstraction reactions between the metal or carbon atoms and the oxidizer. The lasing molecules may be metal or carbon monohalides or monoxides.

Jensen, R.J.; Rice, W.W.; Beattie, W.H.

1975-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

390

Characterization of Light Metals  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mar 15, 2012 ... Characterization of Grit Blasted Metallic Biomaterials by ... The grit blasting, a surface improvement treatment is used to enhance mechanical...

391

Metal Matrix Composites - TMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

METAL- MATRIX COMPOSITES UNDER MULTI- AXIAL LOADINGS: M. V. S. Ravisankar ... including the values of the stress exponent and the activation energy.

392

ELECTRON WELDING OF METALS  

SciTech Connect

The advantages and disadvantages of the electron welding of metals are briefly reviewed. Typical apparatuses used for electron welding are described. (J.S.R)

Stohr, J.-A.

1958-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Metallic glass alloys of Zr, Ti, Cu and Ni  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

At least quaternary alloys form metallic glass upon cooling below the glass transition temperature at a rate less than 10.sup.3 K/s. Such alloys comprise titanium from 19 to 41 atomic percent, an early transition metal (ETM) from 4 to 21 atomic percent and copper plus a late transition metal (LTM) from 49 to 64 atomic percent. The ETM comprises zirconium and/or hafnium. The LTM comprises cobalt and/or nickel. The composition is further constrained such that the product of the copper plus LTM times the atomic proportion of LTM relative to the copper is from 2 to 14. The atomic percentage of ETM is less than 10 when the atomic percentage of titanium is as high as 41, and may be as large as 21 when the atomic percentage of titanium is as low as 24. Furthermore, when the total of copper and LTM are low, the amount of LTM present must be further limited. Another group of glass forming alloys has the formula (ETM.sub.1-x Ti.sub.x).sub.a Cu.sub.b (Ni.sub.1-y Co.sub.y).sub.c wherein x is from 0.1 to 0.3, y.cndot.c is from 0 to 18, a is from 47 to 67, b is from 8 to 42, and c is from 4 to 37. This definition of the alloys has additional constraints on the range of copper content, b.

Lin, Xianghong (Pasadena, CA); Peker, Atakan (Pasadena, CA); Johnson, William L. (Pasadena, CA)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

Radiochemical Analysis of Tritium for ITER Type B Metallic Radwastes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Measurement, Monitoring, and Accountancy / Proceedings of the Ninth International Conference on Tritium Science and Technology

H. J. Ahn; J. Park; K. Song; B-C Na; S. Rosanvallon; D. Stout

395

Relative grain boundary area and energy distributions in nickel Jia Li, Shen J. Dillon 1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Relative grain boundary area and energy distributions in nickel Jia Li, Shen J. Dillon 1 , Gregory crystallographic parameters, a quantity that will be referred to as the grain boundary energy distribution (GBED­20]. The first comprehensive measurement of the grain boundary energy distribution was carried out for Mg

Rohrer, Gregory S.

396

Nickel-Based Superalloy Welding Practices for Industrial Gas Turbine Applications M.B. Henderson  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Nickel-Based Superalloy Welding Practices for Industrial Gas Turbine Applications M.B. Henderson and reduced costs for industrial gas turbine engines demands extended use of high strength-high temperature superalloys are used within the industrial gas turbine (IGT) engine manufacturing industry, specifically

Cambridge, University of

397

The electrochemical performance of ordered mesoporous carbon/nickel compounds composite material for supercapacitor  

SciTech Connect

A series of high performance ordered mesoporous carbon/nickel compounds composites have been synthesized by a combination of incipient wetness impregnation and hydrothermal method for the first time. X-ray diffraction (XRD), N{sub 2} adsorption/desorption isotherms and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) are used to characterize the composites derived at the hydrothermal temperature of 125, 150, 175, 200, 250, 275 and 300 {sup o}C. The formation of nanosized nickel compounds, fully inside the mesopore system, was confirmed with XRD and TEM. An N{sub 2} adsorption/desorption isotherms measurements still revealed mesoporosity for the host/guest compounds. It is noteworthy that an OMC/nickel nitrate hydroxide hydrate composite (OMCN-150) exhibits more excellent performance. Based on the various hydrothermal temperatures of the composite, the capacitance of an OMCN-150 delivering the best electrochemical performance is about 2.4 (5 mV s{sup -1}) and 1.5 (50 mV s{sup -1}) times of the pristine OMC. The capacitance retention of an OMCN-150 is 96.1%, which indicates that the electrochemical performance of the supercapacitor is improved greatly, and represents novel research and significant advances in the field of electrode composite materials for supercapacitor. -- Graphical abstract: A series of high performance nickel compound/ordered mesoporous carbon composites were synthesized by a combination of incipient wetness impregnation and hydrothermal method for the first time. Display Omitted

Feng, Jicheng; Zhao, Jiachang; Tang, Bohejin; Liu, Ping [College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Shanghai University of Engineering Science, Shanghai 201620 (China); Xu, Jingli, E-mail: jinglixu@sues.edu.c [College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Shanghai University of Engineering Science, Shanghai 201620 (China)

2010-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

398

In?uence of Process Parameters for Electroless Plating Nickel Alloy ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstract Scope, Carbon ?bers have been coated with nickel alloy nanoparticles by ... The catalyzation time for 45min, coating time for 20min, bath temperature of 70, pH of 9,and ... Wear Resistance and Adherence of Tio2 Sol-Gel Thin Films.

399

Laboratory Evaluations of Cobalt-Free, Nickel-Based Hard-Facing Alloys for Nuclear Applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A number of international nuclear steam supply vendors specify cobalt-free hard-facing alloys to reduce radiation field buildup. Laboratory tests have identified several nickel-based alloys having the wear resistance and other properties acceptable for nuclear plant components.

1987-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

400

Study of lithium diffusion in RF sputtered Nickel/Vanadium mixed oxides thin films  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Study of lithium diffusion in RF sputtered NickelÁ/Vanadium mixed oxides thin films F. Artuso a lithium insertion inside RF sputtered Ni/V mixed oxides thin films have been investigated employing, showed three steps clearly involved in the intercalation mechanism of lithium in the oxide films: (i

Artuso, Florinda

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "type nickel metal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Formation of metal oxides by cathodic arc deposition  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Metal oxide thin films are of interest for a number of applications. Cathodic arc deposition, an established, industrially applied technique for formation of nitrides (e.g. TiN), can also be used for metal oxide thin film formation. A cathodic arc plasma source with desired cathode material is operated in an oxygen atmosphere, and metal oxides of various stoichiometric composition can be formed on different substrates. We report here on a series of experiments on metal oxide formation by cathodic arc deposition for different applications. Black copper oxide has been deposited on ALS components to increase the radiative heat transfer between the parts. Various metal oxides such as tungsten oxide, niobium oxide, nickel oxide and vanadium oxide have been deposited on ITO glass to form electrochromic films for window applications. Tantalum oxide films are of interest for replacing polymer electrolytes. Optical waveguide structures can be formed by refractive index variation using oxide multilayers. We have synthesized multilayers of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}/AI{sub 2}O{sub 3}/Si as possible basic structures for passive optoelectronic integrated circuits, and Al{sub 2-x}Er{sub x}O{sub 3} thin films with a variable Er concentration which is a potential component layer for the production of active optoelectronic integrated devices such as amplifiers or lasers at a wavelength of 1.53 {mu}m. Aluminum and chromium oxide films have been deposited on a number of substrates to impart improved corrosion resistance at high temperature. Titanium sub-oxides which are electrically conductive and corrosion resistant and stable in a number of aggressive environments have been deposited on various substrates. These sub-oxides are of great interest for use in electrochemical cells.

Anders, S.; Anders, A.; Rubin, M.; Wang, Z.; Raoux, S.; Kong, F.; Brown, I.G.

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Effect of molybdenum plus chromium on the corrosion of iron-, nickel-, and cobalt-base alloys in basaltic lava and simulated magmatic gas at 1150/sup 0/C  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The compatibility of several binary and ternary alloys in a magma environment was studied. Binary alloys containing molybdenum and ternary alloys containing chromium and molybdenum were exposed to basaltic lava at 1150/sup 0/C for periods of 24 and 96 hours. A cover gas was used to produce oxygen and sulfur fugacities corresponding to those of the gases dissolved in basaltic melts. Three base metals were used. These included iron, nickel, and cobalt. The primary reactions in binary alloys were found to be sulfidation. Oxide scales with a spinel layer formed on ternary alloys. The synergistic effect of molybdenum and chromium additions in ternary alloys exhibited superior corrosion resistance to binary alloys which formed base-metal sulfides down grain-boundaries. Extensive analyses of the reaction products by scanning electron microscopy, X-ray energy dispersive analysis, electron microprobe analysis, and metallography are presented for each alloys. The products formed are discussed with reference to thermodynamic stability diagrams, and the reaction path concept is used to explain some of the corrosion.

Ehrlich, S.A.; Douglass, D.L.

1982-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Porous metallic bodies  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Porous metallic bodies having a substantially uniform pore size of less than about 200 microns and a density of less than about 25 percent theoretical, as well as the method for making them, are disclosed. Group IIA, IIIB, IVB, VB, and rare earth metal hydrides a

Landingham, R.L.

1984-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

404

Clean Metal Spray Forming  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

controlled transfer of liquid metal from the ESR pool to the spray forming system is performed using a ... heating to maintain superheat and avoid freezing of the liquid metal as it flows through the funnel. ... As is the case with all similar cross-.

405

Explosion metal welding  

SciTech Connect

Process parameters pertaining to welding similar and dissimilar metals using explosives are reviewed. The discussion centers on the interrelationship of physical parameters which play a part in achieving desirable metallurgical results. Present activities in explosion metal welding at LASL are presented and shown how they related to the interests of the ERDA community.

Popoff, A.A.

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Liquid metal hydrogen barriers  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Hydrogen barriers which comprise liquid metals in which the solubility of hydrogen is low and which have good thermal conductivities at operating temperatures of interest. Such barriers are useful in nuclear fuel elements containing a metal hydride moderator which has a substantial hydrogen dissociation pressure at reactor operating temperatures.

Grover, George M. (Los Alamos, NM); Frank, Thurman G. (Los Alamos, NM); Keddy, Edward S. (Los Alamos, NM)

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

PRODUCTION OF PLUTONIUM METAL  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process is given for producing plutonium metal by the reduction of plutonium chloride, dissolved in alkali metal chloride plus or minus aluminum chloride, with magnesium or a magnesium-aluminum alloy at between 700 and 800 deg C and separating the plutonium or plutonium-aluminum alloy formed from the salt.

Lyon, W.L.; Moore, R.H.

1961-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

408

Mixed Metal Films with Switchable Optical Properties  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Mixed Metal Films with Switchable Optical Properties Mixed Metal Films with Switchable Optical Properties Title Mixed Metal Films with Switchable Optical Properties Publication Type Journal Article LBNL Report Number LBNL-49043 Year of Publication 2001 Authors Richardson, Thomas J., Jonathan L. Slack, Baker Farangis, and Michael D. Rubin Journal Applied Physics Letters Volume 80 Pagination 1349-1351 Call Number LBNL-49043 Abstract Thin, Pd-capped metallic films containing magnesium and first row transition metals (Mn, Fe, Co) switch reversibly from their initial reflecting state to visually transparent states when exposed to gaseous hydrogen or following reduction cathodic polarization in an alkaline electrolyte. Reversion to the reflecting state is achieved by exposure to air or by anodic polarization. The films were prepared by co-sputtering from one magnesium target and one manganese, iron, or cobalt target. Both the dynamic optical switching range and the speed of the transition depend on the magnesium-transition metal ratio. Infrared spectra of films in the transparent, hydrided (deuterided) states support the presence of the intermetallic hydride phases Mg3MnH7, Mg2FeH6, and Mg2CoH5.

409

CORROSION STUDY OF AMORPHOUS METAL RIBBONS  

SciTech Connect

Corrosion costs the Department of Defense billions of dollars every year, with an immense quantity of material in various structures undergoing corrosion. For example, in addition to fluid and seawater piping, ballast tanks, and propulsions systems, approximately 345 million square feet of structure aboard naval ships and crafts require costly corrosion control measures. The use of advanced corrosion-resistant materials to prevent the continuous degradation of this massive surface area would be extremely beneficial. The potential advantages of amorphous metals have been recognized for some time [Latanison 1985]. Iron-based corrosion-resistant, amorphous-metal coatings under development may prove important for maritime applications [Farmer et al. 2005]. Such materials could also be used to coat the entire outer surface of containers for the transportation and long-term storage of spent nuclear fuel, or to protect welds and heat affected zones, thereby preventing exposure to environments that might cause stress corrosion cracking [Farmer et al. 1991, 2000a, 2000b]. In the future, it may be possible to substitute such high-performance iron-based materials for more-expensive nickel-based alloys, thereby enabling cost savings in a wide variety of industrial applications. It should be noted that thermal-spray ceramic coatings have also been investigated for such applications [Haslam et al. 2005]. This report focuses on the corrosion resistance of iron-based melt-spun amorphous metal ribbons. Melt-Spun ribbon is made by rapid solidification--a stream of molten metal is dropped onto a spinning copper wheel, a process that enables the manufacture of amorphous metals which are unable to be manufactured by conventional cold or hot rolling techniques. The study of melt-spun ribbon allows quick evaluation of amorphous metals corrosion resistance. The melt-spun ribbons included in this study are DAR40, SAM7, and SAM8, SAM1X series, and SAM2X series. The SAM1X series ribbons have Ni additions in increments of 1, 3, 5, and 7 atom percent, to DAR40. For example, 1X7 means a composition of 7-atom% Ni added to 93-atom% of DAR40. Similarly, The SAM1X series ribbons have Mo additions in increments of 1, 3, 5, and 7 atom percent, to DAR40. For example, 2X3 means a composition of 3-atom% Mo added to 97-atom% of DAR40. SAM7 ribbon is a Fe-Cr-Mo-Y-C-B metal glass, commonly called Alloy1651. SAM8 is SAM7 with an additional 3-atom% W. The nominal compositions of DAR40 and SAM7 are listed in Table 1. SAM7 ribbon is extremely brittle and hard to manufactured by melt-spinning, only limited number of SAM7 ribbons were tested.

Lian, T; Day, S D; Farmer, J C

2006-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

410

July 7, 2006 METAL FABRICATIONS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.....................................................................................................................8 2.02 Stainless Steel Specification for Zinc Coating (Hot-Dip) on Iron and Steel Hardware A167 Specification for Stainless and Heat-Resisting Chromium-Nickel Steel Plate, Sheet and Strip A276 Specification for Stainless and Heat-Resisting Steel Bars

411

Production of magnesium metal  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process of producing magnesium metal includes providing magnesium carbonate, and reacting the magnesium carbonate to produce a magnesium-containing compound and carbon dioxide. The magnesium-containing compound is reacted to produce magnesium metal. The carbon dioxide is used as a reactant in a second process. In another embodiment of the process, a magnesium silicate is reacted with a caustic material to produce magnesium hydroxide. The magnesium hydroxide is reacted with a source of carbon dioxide to produce magnesium carbonate. The magnesium carbonate is reacted to produce a magnesium-containing compound and carbon dioxide. The magnesium-containing compound is reacted to produce magnesium metal. The invention further relates to a process for production of magnesium metal or a magnesium compound where an external source of carbon dioxide is not used in any of the reactions of the process. The invention also relates to the magnesium metal produced by the processes described herein.

Blencoe, James G. (Harriman, TN); Anovitz, Lawrence M. (Knoxville, TN); Palmer, Donald A. (Oliver Springs, TN); Beard, James S. (Martinsville, VA)

2010-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

412

Nickel-catalyzed asymmetric arylations of [alpha]-halocarbonyl compounds and studies of boratabenzene-containing transition metal complexes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Chapter 1 begins with a review of the current literature on cross-coupling methods to generate a-arylcarbonyl compounds, with a special emphasis on asymmetric arylations. The second section of chapter 1 describes the ...

Lundin, Pamela M. (Pamela Marie)

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Aromaticity and Antiaromaticity in Transition-Metal Systems  

SciTech Connect

Aromaticity is an important concept in chemistry primarily for hydrocarbon compounds, but it has been extended to compounds containing transition-metal atoms. Recent findings of aromaticity and antiaromaticy in all-metal clusters have stimulated further researches in describing the chemical bonding, structures, and stability in transition-metal clusters and compounds on the basis of aromaticity and antiaromaticity, which are reviewed here. The presence of d-orbitals endows much more diverse chemistry, structure, and chemical bonding to transition-metal clusters and compounds. One interesting feature is the existence of a new type of ?-aromaticity, in addition to ?- and ?-aromaticity that are only possible for main group compounds. Another striking characteristic in the chemical bonding of transition-metal systems is the multi-fold nature of aromaticity, antiaromaticity, or even conflicting aromaticity. Separate sets of counting rules have been proposed for cyclic transition-metal systems to account for the three types of ?-, ?-, and ?-aromaticity/antiaromaticity. The diverse transition-metal clusters and compounds reviewed here indicate that multiple aromaticity and antiaromaticity may be much more common in chemistry than one would anticipate. It is hoped that the current review will stimulate interest in further understanding the structure and bonding, on the basis of aromaticity and antiaromaticity, of other known or unknown transition-metal systems, such as the active sites of enzymes or other biomolecules, which contain transition-metal atoms and clusters.

Zubarev, Dmitry Y.; Averkiev, Boris B.; Zhai, Hua Jin; Wang, Lai S.; Boldyrev, Alexander I.

2008-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

414

Fuel assembly transfer basket for pool type nuclear reactor vessels  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A fuel assembly transfer basket for a pool type, liquid metal cooled nuclear reactor having a side access loading and unloading port for receiving and relinquishing fuel assemblies during transfer.

Fanning, Alan W. (San Jose, CA); Ramsour, Nicholas L. (San Jose, CA)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

Laser Deposited In Situ TiC Reinforced Nickel Matrix Composites  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstract Scope, A new class of Ni-Ti-C based metal matrix composites has been ... of Metal Matrix Composites via Spark Plasma Sintering for Nuclear Energy...

416

Welding and Repair Technology Center: High Chromium Ni-base Filler Metal Evaluation using the Strain-to-Fracture Test Method  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Higher chromium, nickel-base alloys (2830% Cr) have been promoted for weld overlay applications, new construction, and applications to replace 82/182 filler material. New alloys developed to meet the required Cr levelincluding filler metal 52 (ERNiCrFe-7) and later heats of filler metal 52M (ERNiCrFe-7a)did not have the same weldability as its predecessor 82 (ERNiCrFe-3). A key welding issue was ductility dip cracking (DDC), which is the result of low grain boundary strength at high temperatures. DDC res...

2008-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

417

Materials Reliability Program: Effects of Dissolved Hydrogen, Temperature, and Hydrogen Peroxide on Low Temperature Crack Propagation (LTCP) Fracture Resistance of Weld Metals 182, 52, and 152 (MRP-209)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Primary Water Stress Corrosion Cracking (PWSCC) of Alloy 600 nozzles and its weld metals 182 and 82 was first experienced domestically in control rod drive mechanisms at Oconee units and in reactor vessel hot leg nozzles at V.C. Summer station. Publications by Bettis Laboratory have shown nickel-base alloys X-750 and 690 and weld metals 82 and 52 to be susceptible to a reduction in fracture resistance thought to be due to a hydrogen cracking mechanism called low temperature crack propagation (LTCP). Thes...

2007-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

418

Heavy metals in commercial fish in New Jersey  

SciTech Connect

Levels of contaminants in fish are of particular interest because of the potential risk to humans who consume them. While attention has focused on self-caught fish, most of the fish eaten by the American public comes from commercial sources. We sampled 11 types of fish and shellfish obtained from supermarkets and specialty fish markets in New Jersey and analyzed them for arsenic, cadmium, chromium, lead, manganese, mercury, and selenium. We test the null hypothesis that metal levels do not vary among fish types, and we consider whether the levels of any metals could harm the fish themselves or their predators or pose a health risk for human consumers. There were significant interspecific differences for all metals, and no fish types had the highest levels of more than two metals. There were few significant correlations (Kendall tau) among metals for the three most numerous fish (yellowfin tuna, bluefish, and flounder), the correlations were generally low (below 0.40), and many correlations were negative. Only manganese and lead positively were correlated for tuna, bluefish, and flounder. The levels of most metals were below those known to cause adverse effects in the fish themselves. However, the levels of arsenic, lead, mercury, and selenium in some fish were in the range known to cause some sublethal effects in sensitive predatory birds and mammals and in some fish exceeded health-based standards. The greatest risk from different metals resided in different fish; the species of fish with the highest levels of a given metal sometimes exceeded the human health guidance or standards for that metal. Thus, the risk information given to the public (mainly about mercury) does not present a complete picture. The potential of harm from other metals suggests that people not only should eat smaller quantities of fish known to accumulate mercury but also should eat a diversity of fish to avoid consuming unhealthy quantities of other heavy metals. However, consumers should bear in mind that standards have a margin of safety.

Burger, Joanna [Division of Life Sciences, 604 Allison Road, Piscataway, NJ 08854-8082 (United States) and Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences Institute and Consortium for Risk Evaluation with Stakeholder Participation, Piscataway, NJ 08854 (United States)]. E-mail: burger@biology.rutgers.edu; Gochfeld, Michael [Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences Institute and Consortium for Risk Evaluation with Stakeholder Participation, Piscataway, NJ 08854 (United States); Environmental and Occupational Medicine, UMDNJ-Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, Piscataway, NJ 08854 (United States)

2005-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

419

Microscopy and spectroscopy of lithium nickel oxide based particles used in high-power lithium-ion cells.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Structural and electronic investigations were conducted on lithium nickel oxide-based particles used in positive electrodes of 18650-type high-power Li-ion cells. K-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) revealed trivalent Ni and Co ions in the bulk LiNi{sub 0.8}Co{sub 0.2}O{sub 2} powder used to prepare the high power electrode laminates. Using oxygen K-edge XAS, high resolution electron microscopy, nanoprobe diffraction, and electron energy-loss spectroscopy, we identified a <5 nm thick modified layer on the surface of the oxide particles, which results from the loss of Ni and Li ordering in the layered R{bar 3}m structure. This structural change was accompanied by oxygen loss and a lowering of the Ni- and Co-oxidation states in the surface layer. Growth of this surface layer may contribute to the impedance rise observed during accelerated aging of these Li-ion cells.

Abraham, D. P.; Twesten, R. D.; Balasubramanian, M.; Kropf, A. J.; Fischer, D.; McBreen, J.; Petrov, I.; Amine, K.; Chemical Engineering; Univ. of Illinois; BNL; NIST

2003-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

Type checking and normalisation.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This thesis is about Martin-Lf's intuitionistic theory of types (type theory). Type theory is at the same time a formal system for mathematical proof and (more)

Chapman, James Maitland

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "type nickel metal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Hybrid type checking  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Phase distinctions in type theory. Manuscript, 1988. [10]Typechecking dependent types and subtypes. In Lecture notesF. Pfenning. Intersection types and computational effects.

Flanagan, C

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

Type 2 segmental glomangiomas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

skin disorders: different types of severitiy reflectevidence for dichotomous types of severitiy. Arch Dermatol9. Happle R, Knig A. Type 2 segmental manifestation of

Hoekzema, Rick; Zonneveld, Ingrid M; Wal, Allard C van der

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

Nickel-catalyzed reductive coupling reactions : application to the total syntheses of pumiliotoxins 209F and 251D  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Catalytic Asymmetric Reductive Coupling of 1,3-Enynes and Aromatic Aldehydes Nickel-catalyzed reductive coupling reactions of 1,3-enynes and aromatic aldehydes efficiently afford conjugated dienols in excellent regioselectivity ...

Woodin, Katrina Sue

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

Characterisation of the electroless nickel deposit as a barrier layer/under bump metallurgy on IC metallisation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Selective electroless nickel-phosphorus deposits on integrated circuit (IC) metallisation such as copper and aluminium were characterised using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy ... Keywords: IC metallisation, barrier, crystallisation, electroless

James F. Rohan; Gerald O'Riordan

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

Business Center for Precious Metals  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Department of Energy Business Center for Precious Metals Department of Energy Business Center for Precious Metals Becky Eddy National Nuclear Security Administration Y-12 Site...

426

Nonferrous Metals Society of China  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Nonferrous Metals Society of China (NFSoc) is a technological organization of scientists and technologists engaged in the nonferrous metals industry.

427

Metal RIE 1: Unaxis 790  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Scientific Opportunities / Applications: Physical milling of most metals; Anisotropic etching of metal films; Anisotropic etching of SiO 2 and SiN x. ...

2013-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

428

Actinide metal processing  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for converting an actinide metal such as thorium, uranium, or plutonium to an actinide oxide material by admixing the actinide metal in an aqueous medium with a hypochlorite as an oxidizing agent for sufficient time to form the actinide oxide material and recovering the actinide oxide material is described together with a low temperature process for preparing an actinide oxide nitrate such as uranyl nitrate. Additionally, a composition of matter comprising the reaction product of uranium metal and sodium hypochlorite is provided, the reaction product being an essentially insoluble uranium oxide material suitable for disposal or long term storage.

Sauer, N.N.; Watkin, J.G.

1992-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

429

Actinide metal processing  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention is comprised of a process of converting an actinide metal such as thorium, uranium, or plutonium to an actinide oxide material by admixing the actinide metal in an aqueous medium with a hypochlorite as an oxidizing agent for sufficient time to form the actinide oxide material and recovering the actinide oxide material is provided together with a low temperature process of preparing an actinide oxide nitrate such as uranyl nitrate. Additionally, a composition of matter comprising the reaction product of uranium metal and sodium hypochlorite is provided, the reaction product being an essentially insoluble uranium oxide material suitable for disposal or long term storage.

Sauer, N.N.; Watkin, J.G.

1991-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

430

Charged Metallic Clusters  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Usually in Nuclear Physics the minimum of the liquid drop model (LDM) energy occurs at a mass asymmetry which is different from the minimum of shell correction. Charged metallic clusters are ideal emitters of singly ionized trimers because both LDM and shell correction are reaching a minimum for the same mass asymmetry corresponding to the emission of a charged particle with two delocalized electrons. Maximum dissociation energy (Q-value) is obtained for metallic clusters with high surface tension and low Wigner-Seitz radius (transition metals). The Q-values for spheroidal shapes are much larger than for hemispheroids.

Poenaru, D. N.; Gherghescu, R. A. [Horia Hulubei National Institute of Physics and Nuclear Engineering (IFIN-HH), Bucharest-Magurele (Romania); Frankfurt Institute for Advanced Studies, Johann Wolfgang Goethe University, Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Solov'yov, A. V.; Greiner, W. [Frankfurt Institute for Advanced Studies, Johann Wolfgang Goethe University, Frankfurt am Main (Germany)

2009-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

431

Liquid metal electric pump  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An electrical pump for pumping liquid metals to high pressures in high temperature environments without the use of magnets or moving mechanical parts. The pump employs a non-porous solid electrolyte membrane, typically ceramic, specific to the liquid metal to be pumped. A DC voltage is applied across the thickness of the membrane causing ions to form and enter the membrane on the electrically positive surface, with the ions being neutralized on the opposite surface. This action provides pumping of the liquid metal from one side of the non-porous solid electrolyte membrane to the other. 3 figs.

Abbin, J.P.; Andraka, C.E.; Lukens, L.L.; Moreno, J.B.

1992-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

432

Nickel-induced down-regulation of {Delta}Np63 and its role in the proliferation of keratinocytes  

SciTech Connect

Epidemiological, animal, and cell studies have demonstrated that nickel compounds are human carcinogens. The mechanisms of their carcinogenic actions remain to be investigated. p63, a close homologue of the p53 tumor suppressor protein, has been linked to cell fate determination and/or maintenance of self-renewing populations in several epithelial tissues, including skin, mammary gland, and prostate. {Delta}Np63, a dominant negative isoform of p63, is amplified in a variety of epithelial tumors including squamous cell carcinomas and carcinomas of the prostate and mammary glands. The present study shows that nickel suppressed {Delta}Np63 expression in a short-time treatment (up to 48 h). Nickel treatment caused activation of NF-{kappa}B. Blockage of NF-{kappa}B partially reversed nickel-induced {Delta}Np63 suppression. Nickel decreased interferon regulatory factor (IRF) 3 and IRF7, IKK{epsilon}, and Sp100. Over-expression of IRF3 increased {Delta}Np63 expression suppressed by nickel. Nickel was able to activate p21, and its activation was offset by the over-expression of {Delta}Np63. In turn, elevated p63 expression counteracted the ability of nickel to restrict cell growth. The present study demonstrated that nickel decreased interferon regulatory proteins IRF3 and IRF7, and activated NF-{kappa}B, resulting in {Delta}Np63 suppression and then p21 up-regulation. {Delta}Np63 plays an important role in nickel-induced cell proliferation. - Highlights: > Ni suppressed {Delta}Np63 expression in HaCat cells. > Ni activated NF-{kappa}B, decreased expressions of IRF3 and IRF7, IKK{epsilon}, and Sp100. > Over-expression of IRF3 increased {Delta}Np63 expression suppressed by Ni. > Ni activated p21, and its activation was offset by over-expression of {Delta}Np63. > Elevated p63 expression counteracted the ability of nickel to restrict cell growth.

Zhang Zhuo, E-mail: zhuo.zhang@uky.edu [Department of Preventive Medicine and Environmental Health, University of Kentucky, 121 Washington Avenue, Lexington, KY 40536 (United States); Li Wenqi [Department of Preventive Medicine and Environmental Health, University of Kentucky, 121 Washington Avenue, Lexington, KY 40536 (United States); Cheng Senping [Graduate Center for Toxicology, University of Kentucky, 1095 VA Drive, Lexington, KY 40536 (United States); Yao Hua [Department of Stomatology, The First Affiliated Hospital, College of Medicine, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, Zhejiang 310003 (China); Zhang Fan; Chang Qingshan [Graduate Center for Toxicology, University of Kentucky, 1095 VA Drive, Lexington, KY 40536 (United States); Ke Zunji [Department of Internal Medicine, University of Kentucky, 800 Rose Street, Lexington, KY 40536 (United States); Wang Xin; Son, Young-Ok [Graduate Center for Toxicology, University of Kentucky, 1095 VA Drive, Lexington, KY 40536 (United States); Luo Jia [Department of Internal Medicine, University of Kentucky, 800 Rose Street, Lexington, KY 40536 (United States); Shi Xianglin [Graduate Center for Toxicology, University of Kentucky, 1095 VA Drive, Lexington, KY 40536 (United States)

2011-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

433

The bioinorganic chemistry of N2S2 metal complexes: reactivity and ligating ability  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

[N,N??-bis-(mercaptoethyl)-1,5-diazacyclooctanato]NiII, Ni-1, is known to undergo metallation reactions with numerous metals. [N,N??-bis-(mercaptoethyl)-1,5-diazacycloheptanato]NiII, (bme-dach)Ni or Ni-1??, differs from Ni-1 by one less carbon in its diazacycle backbone ring producing subtle differences in N2S2Ni geometry. Metallation of Ni-1?? with PdCl2, Pd(NO3)2, and NiBr2 produced three structural forms: Ni2Pd basket, Ni4Pd2 C4-paddlewheel, and Ni3 slant chair. In attempts to provide a rationale for the heterogeneity in the active site of Acetyl coA Synthase, metal ion capture studies of Ni-1 in methanol found a qualitative ranking of metal ion preference: Zn2+ copper some 15 orders of magnitude above nickel or zinc in binding affinity. Sulfur dioxide uptake by Ni-1?? is characterized by significant color change, improved adduct solubility, and reversible binding of two equivalents of SO2. These combined properties establish Ni-1?? as a suitable model for gas uptake at nickel thiolate sites and as a possibly useful chemical sensor for this poisonous gas. Comparisons of molecular structures,? ?(SO) stretching frequencies, and thermal gravimetric analyses are made to reported adducts including the diazacyclooctane derivative, Ni-1?2SO2. Visual SO2 detection limits of Ni-1 and Ni-1?? are established at 25 ppm and 100 ppm, respectively. Structural studies of products resulting from reaction at the nucleophilic S-sites of (bme-dach)Ni and [(bme-dach)Zn]2 included acetyl chloride and sodium iodoacetate as electrophiles are shown. The acetyl group is a natural electrophile important to the citric acid cycle. Acetylation of (bme-dach)Ni produces a five coordinate, paramagnetic species. Iodoacetate is a cysteine modification agent known to inhibit enzymatic activity. The reaction of (bme-dach)Ni and sodium iodoacetate yields a blue, six coordinate nickel complex in a N2S2O2 donor environment. The bismercaptodiazacycloheptane ligand binds lead(II) forming an unprecedented structural form of N2S2M dimers, in which Pb2+ is largely bound to sulfur in a highly distorted trigonal geometry. Its unusual structure is described in comparison to other derivatives of the bme-daco ligand. The synthesis and structural characterization of square pyramidal (bme-dach)GaCl are also given and compared to the analogous (bme-daco)GaCl.

Golden, Melissa Lynn

2002-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

Nickel-zinc batteries for RPV applications. Final technical report 15 Nov 79-15 Aug 81  

SciTech Connect

Final technical results are presented for a program dealing with the placement of nickel-zinc batteries in specific military applications, namely the BQM-34A and the PQM-102 Remotely Piloted Vehicles (RPV's). The nickel-zinc system was selected for these applications because RPV's demand a high quality secondary battery that offers a compromise between long life (calendar and cycle) and low weight and volume.

Dappert, D.

1982-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

WeldingFabr&MetalForm  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Welding, Welding, Fabrication, and Metal Forming Manufacturing Technologies The department consists of three trades: weld- ing; fabrication and assembly; and precision metal forming. These interrelated groups use similar equipment and rely on each other's skills. One stop will get you the service of three reliable trades. The team manufactures and assembles proto- type hardware and has the in-house capability of producing hardware with sizes ranging from thumbnail to rail-car. Expertise includes aircraft quality sheet metal construction, certified weld- ing, and assembly. The staff has experience managing a variety of activities: design modifi- cation assistance; in-house fabrication; and project management and can work with your engineers to transform sketches and ideas into working prototypes.

436

Writing with Complex Type  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

29] Middendorp, J. 2004. Dutch type. 010 Publishers. [30]A. Hyland. 1992. Twentieth-century type. Laurence King. [7]Robertson. 2005. From Movable Type to Moving Type-Evolution

Lewis, Jason; Nadeau, Bruno

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

Divalent metal nanoparticles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Metal nanoparticles hold promise for many scientific and technological applications, such as chemical and biological sensors, vehicles for drug delivery, and subdiffraction limit waveguides. To fabricate such devices, a ...

DeVries, Gretchen Anne

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

Production of magnesium metal  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process of producing magnesium metal includes providing magnesium carbonate, and reacting the magnesium carbonate to produce a magnesium-containing compound and carbon dioxide. The magnesium-containing compound is reacted to produce magnesium metal. The carbon dioxide is used as a reactant in a second process. In another embodiment of the process, a magnesium silicate is reacted with a caustic material to produce magnesium hydroxide. The magnesium hydroxide is reacted with a source of carbon dioxide to produce magnesium carbonate. The magnesium carbonate is reacted to produce a magnesium-containing compound and carbon dioxide. The magnesium-containing compound is reacted to produce magnesium metal. The invention also relates to the magnesium metal produced by the processes described herein.

Blencoe, James G. (Harriman, TN); Anovitz, Lawrence M. (Knoxville, TN); Palmer, Donald A. (Oliver Springs, TN); Beard, James S. (Martinsville, VA)

2012-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

439

Controlled Metal Photodeposition  

A reliable syntheses of semiconductor-metal heterostructure has been developed to enable application of materials in catalytic, magnetic, and opto-electronic devices, and Iowa State University, The Ames Laboratory's Contractor, is looking for ...

440

General Light Metals  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mar 3, 2011 ... A detailed literature survey indicates that vacuum sintering is able to produce ... In recent years, there is a high demand for light-weight metals foams. ... Each powder mixture's composition is determined by response surface...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "type nickel metal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Metal Matrix Composites II  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Oct 29, 2013... of Al-AC8H/Al2O3p Metal Matrix Composites Produced by Stir Casting Route: Anne Zulfia1; Maman Ajiriyanto1; 1University of Indonesia

442

Molten metal reactors  

SciTech Connect

A molten metal reactor for converting a carbon material and steam into a gas comprising hydrogen, carbon monoxide, and carbon dioxide is disclosed. The reactor includes an interior crucible having a portion contained within an exterior crucible. The interior crucible includes an inlet and an outlet; the outlet leads to the exterior crucible and may comprise a diffuser. The exterior crucible may contain a molten alkaline metal compound. Contained between the exterior crucible and the interior crucible is at least one baffle.

Bingham, Dennis N; Klingler, Kerry M; Turner, Terry D; Wilding, Bruce M

2013-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

443

abstract data type  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Definition of abstract data type, possibly with links to more information and implementations. NIST. abstract data type. (definition). ...

2013-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

444

Lithium metal reduction of plutonium oxide to produce plutonium metal  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is described for the chemical reduction of plutonium oxides to plutonium metal by the use of pure lithium metal. Lithium metal is used to reduce plutonium oxide to alpha plutonium metal (alpha-Pu). The lithium oxide by-product is reclaimed by sublimation and converted to the chloride salt, and after electrolysis, is removed as lithium metal. Zinc may be used as a solvent metal to improve thermodynamics of the reduction reaction at lower temperatures. Lithium metal reduction enables plutonium oxide reduction without the production of huge quantities of CaO--CaCl.sub.2 residues normally produced in conventional direct oxide reduction processes.

Coops, Melvin S. (Livermore, CA)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

Microstructural characterization of a Zr-Ti-Ni-Mn-V-Cr based AB{sub 2}-type battery alloy  

SciTech Connect

Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM), combined with X-ray Diffraction (XRD) and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) was employed to investigate a proprietary and multicomponent AB{sub 2} type Nickel-Metal Hydride (Ni-MH) battery alloy. This material was prepared by High Pressure Gas Atomization (HPGA) and examined in both the as-atomized and heat treated condition. TEM examination showed a heavily faulted dendritic growth structure in as-atomized powder. Selected Area Diffraction (SAD) showed that this region consisted of both a cubic C15 structure with lattice constant a=7.03 and a hexagonal C14 structure with lattice parameter a=4.97 {angstrom}, c=8.11 {angstrom}. The Orientation Relationship (OR) between the C14 and C15 structures was determined to be (111)[1{bar 1}0]{sub C15}//(0001)[11{bar 2}0]{sub C14}. An interdendritic phase possessing the C14 structure was also seen. There was also a very fine grain region consisting of the C14 structure. Upon heat treatment, the faulted structure became more defined and appeared as intercalation layers within the grains. Spherical particles rich in Zr and Ni appeared scattered at the grain boundaries instead of the C14 interdendritic phase. The polycrystalline region also changed to a mixture of C14 and C15 structures. These results as well as phase stability of the C15 and C14 structures based on a consideration of atomic size factor and the average electron concentration are discussed.

Shi, Zhan

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

Cadmium ban spurs interest in zinc-nickel coating for corrosive aerospace environments  

SciTech Connect

OSHA recently reduced the permissible exposure level for cadmium. The new standard virtually outlaws cadmium production and use, except in the most cost-insensitive applications. Aerospace manufacturers, which use cadmium extensively in coatings applications because of the material's corrosion resistance, are searching for substitutes. The most promising alternative found to date is a zinc-nickel alloy. Tests show that the alloy outperforms cadmium without generating associated toxicity issues. As a result, several major manufacturing and standards organizations have adopted the zinc-nickel compound as a standard cadmium replacement. The basis for revising the cadmium PEL -- which applies to occupational exposure in industrial, agricultural and maritime occupations -- is an official OSHA determination that employees exposed to cadmium under the existing PEL face significant health risks from lung cancer and kidney damage. In one of its principal uses, cadmium is electroplated to steel, where it acts as an anticorrosive agent.

Bates, J. (Pure Coatings Inc., West Palm Beach, FL (United States))

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

Single crystal Processing and magnetic properties of gadolinium nickel  

SciTech Connect

GdNi is a rare earth intermetallic material that exhibits very interesting magnetic properties. Spontaneous magnetostriction occurs in GdNi at T{sub C}, on the order of 8000ppm strain along the c-axis and only until very recently the mechanism causing this giant magnetostriction was not understood. In order to learn more about the electronic and magnetic structure of GdNi, single crystals are required for anisotropic magnetic property measurements. Single crystal processing is quite challenging for GdNi though since the rare-earth transition-metal composition yields a very reactive intermetallic compound. Many crystal growth methods are pursued in this study including crucible free methods, precipitation growths, and specially developed Bridgman crucibles. A plasma-sprayed Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3} W-backed Bridgman crucible was found to be the best means of GdNi single crystal processing. With a source of high-quality single crystals, many magnetization measurements were collected to reveal the magnetic structure of GdNi. Heat capacity and the magnetocaloric effect are also measured on a single crystal sample. The result is a thorough report on high quality single crystal processing and the magnetic properties of GdNi.

Shreve, Andrew John [Ames Laboratory

2012-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

448

Synthesis and Characterization of Porous Metal Phosphonates  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This dissertation focuses on the challenge of developing porous metal arylphosphonates with both high crystallinity and functional porosity by using different synthetic approaches. Metal phosphonates are an extensive class of materials based upon extended inorganic-organic architectures such as chains, layers and three-dimensional networks. Metal phosphonates generally favor extended inorganic architectures leading to pillared materials with no porosity. We found that the use of template molecules, type of ligand and choice of metal ions could be used to deviate from the pillared structure. Many of these structures had interesting properties that were explored. The results can be divided into three areas: We developed non-pillared monovalent metal phosphonates by investigating both the role of water and template molecules in the solvothermal synthesis. The role of water in solvothermal reactions was found to have a profound influence on the structure of monovalent metal phosphonates and the structures could be tailored from zero/one-dimensional to two-dimensional. Non-pillared structures could be synthesized by using template molecules. For a zinc phosphonate, we converted a layered structure into a three-dimensional framework by using small template molecules in the solvothermal reaction. The compound exhibited reversible dehydration behavior. The change in the framework structure and guest positions was monitored during this process. Two different ligands were used in the development of porous aluminum phosphonates. One series exhibited reversible dehydration behavior, which had a dramatic influence on permanent porosity of the material. The stability of the dehydrated phase is a result of the geometry of the aluminum atom, which in some cases has coordinatively unsaturated metal sites. The second series was developed with ion exchange applications in mind therefore the pore environment was tailored to favor ion exchange processes. The most important aspect is that these compounds exhibit high selectivity for Th^(4+) ions. In total 28 new compounds were prepared, and their utility and structures clarified.

Kinnibrugh, Tiffany Lewis

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

Method for determining the hardness of strain hardening articles of tungsten-nickel-iron alloy  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention is directed to a rapid nondestructive method for determining the extent of strain hardening in an article of tungsten-nickel-iron alloy. The method comprises saturating the article with a magnetic field from a permanent magnet, measuring the magnetic flux emanating from the article, comparing the measurements of the magnetic flux emanating from the article with measured magnetic fluxes from similarly shaped standards of the alloy with known amounts of strain hardening to determine the hardness.

Wallace, Steven A. (Knoxville, TN)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

Method for determining the hardness of strain hardening articles of tungsten-nickel-iron alloy  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention is directed to a rapid nondestructive method for determining the extent of strain hardening in an article of tungsten-nickel-iron alloy. The method comprises saturating the article with a magnetic field from a permanent magnet, measuring the magnetic flux emanating from the article, comparing the measurements of the magnetic flux emanating from the article with measured magnetic fluxes from similarly shaped standards of the alloy with known amounts of strain hardening to determine the hardness.

Wallace, S.A.

1981-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

451

Evolution of Microstructure in a Nickel-based Superalloy as a Function of Ageing Time  

SciTech Connect

An experimental investigation, combining synchrotron X-ray powder diffraction, small-angle neutron-scattering, and transmission electron microscopy, has been undertaken to study the microstructure of nanoprecipitates in a nickel-based superalloy. Upon increasing the ageing time during a heat-treatment process, the average size of the precipitates first decreases before changing to a monotonical growth stage. Possible reasons for this observed structural evolution, which is predicted thermodynamically, are suggested.

Chen, Wei-Ren [ORNL; Smith, Gregory Scott [ORNL; Porcar, L. [National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST); Liaw, Peter K [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Kai, Ji-Jung [ORNL; Ren, Yang [Argonne National Laboratory (ANL)

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

452

Review of membrane separators and zinc-nickel oxide battery development  

SciTech Connect

After a discussion of membranes and their role in zinc-nickel oxide batteries, possible solutions are reviewed for problems related to membrane separators in these batteries. Experiments to characterize a membrane are also summarized. A bibliography is included to show what is being done in the field of battery research to develop practical membranes for use in Ni/Zn or Ag/Zn batteries. (LEW)

Bennion, D.N.

1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

453

Develop nickel--zinc battery suitable for electric vehicle propulsion. Task A: design and cost study  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A three-month design and cost study for the use of nickel--zinc batteries in electric vehicles is presented. Battery configuration is analyzed, and expected performance is set forth. Current development problems concern component materials and capacity decline on cycling, electrolyte maintenance, and thermal characteristics. The manufacturing process is outlined, and estimates are made for cost, materials requirements, capital needs, etc. 61 figures, 24 tables. (RWR)

None

1977-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

454

Lead Adsorption on Nickel Alloys and Magnetite Under Faulted PWR Secondary Side Conditions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Lead-assisted stress corrosion cracking (PbSCC) is a serious concern that can affect all steam generator tubing materials currently employed. A better understanding of lead (Pb) behavior is needed at steam generator and feedwater temperature before possible mitigation techniques can be successfully developed. This report documents results of an experimental program that investigated adsorption of lead onto nickel alloys and magnetite. Fundamental information regarding this adsorption phenomenon is import...

2006-07-12T23:59:59.000Z

455

Influence of dissolved hydrogen on nickel alloy SCC in high temperature water  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Stress corrosion crack growth rate (SCCGR) tests of nickel alloys were conducted at 338 C and 360 C as a function of the hydrogen concentration in high purity water. Test results identified up to a 7 x effect of hydrogen levels in the water on crack growth rate, where the lowest growth rates were associated with the highest hydrogen levels. At 338 C, the crack growth rate decreased as the hydrogen levels were increased. However, different results were observed for the test conducted at 360 C. As the hydrogen level was increased in the 360 C tests, the crack growth rate initially increased, a maximum was exhibited at a hydrogen level of {approximately} 20 scc/kg, and thereafter the crack growth rate decreased. Based on this testing and a review of the commercial literature, the thermodynamic stability of nickel oxide, not the dissolved hydrogen concentration, was identified as a fundamental parameter influencing the susceptibility of nickel alloys to SCC. These test results are discussed in relation to the accuracy of extrapolating high temperature SCC results to lower temperatures.

Morton, D.S.; Attanasio, S.A.; Fish, J.S.; Schurman, M.K. [Lockheed Martin, Schenectady, NY (United States)

1999-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

Understanding Sulfur Poisoning and Regeneration of Nickel Biomass Conditioning Catalysts using X-Ray Absorption Spectroscopy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The production of biofuels can proceed via a biomass gasification to produce syngas, which can then undergo catalytic conditioning and reforming reactions prior to being sent to a fuel synthesis reactor. Catalysts used for biomass conditioning are plagued by short lifetimes which are a result of, among other things, poisoning. Syngas produced from biomass gasification may contain between 30-300 ppm H2S, depending on the feedstock and gasification conditions, and H2S is a key catalyst poison. In order to overcome catalyst poisoning, either an H2S-tolerant catalyst or an efficient regeneration protocol should be employed. In this study, sulfur K-edge X-ray absorption near edge spectroscopy (XANES) was used to monitor sulfur species on spent catalyst samples and the transformation of these species from sulfides to sulfates during steam and air regeneration on a Ni/Mg/K/Al2O3 catalyst used to condition biomass-derived syngas. Additionally, nickel K-edge EXAFS and XANES are used to examine the state of nickel species on the catalysts. Post-reaction samples showed the presence of sulfides on the H2S-poisoned nickel catalyst and although some gaseous sulfur species were observed to leave the catalyst bed during regeneration, sulfur remained on the catalyst and a transformation from sulfides to sulfates was observed. The subsequent H2 reduction led to a partial reduction of sulfates back to sulfides. A proposed reaction sequence is presented and recommended regeneration strategies are discussed.

Yung, M. M.; Cheah, S.; Kuhn, J. N.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

457

Types of Costs Types of Cost Estimates  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

05-1 · Types of Costs · Types of Cost Estimates · Methods to estimate capital costs MIN E 408) costs apply to those items that are consumed in production process and are roughly proportional to level in cash flow analysis and in the decision to use the equipment for reclamation? Types of Costs #12

Boisvert, Jeff

458

Types of Costs Types of Cost Estimates  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

· Types of Costs · Types of Cost Estimates · Methods to estimate capital costs MIN E 408: Mining the equipment for reclamation? Types of Costs #12;· Marginal Cost: ­ Change in total cost ­ Any production process involves fixed and variable costs. As production increases/expands, fixed costs are unchanged, so

Boisvert, Jeff

459

Inspecting The Effect Of Thermal Stress On The Interdiffusion Of Metal Multilayer Produced By Electron-Beam Gun Evaporation  

SciTech Connect

Diffusion in thin film layers, especially in metal thin films, is caused reduction of the layers' quality, particularly reduction of the adhesion of layers. We have investigated the influence of deposition temperature on diffusion of atoms in Ag/Ni multilayers. For this purpose, silver and nickel layers were deposited in a vacuum by electron gun method at different temperatures and then Rutherford backscattering (RBS) analysis was used for studying the influence of increasing temperature on diffusion of the layers. Finally, laser damage threshold test was used for adhesion comparison of the layers.

Asl, Jahanbakhsh Mashaiekhy; Shafieizadeh, Zahra; Anaraki, Mahdi; Sabbaghzadeh, Jamshid [Iranian National Center for Laser Science and Technology, PO Box 14665-576, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

2010-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

460

Liquid metal thermal electric converter  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A liquid metal thermal electric converter which converts heat energy to electrical energy. The design of the liquid metal thermal electric converter incorporates a unique configuration which directs the metal fluid pressure to the outside of the tube which results in the structural loads in the tube to be compressive. A liquid metal thermal electric converter refluxing boiler with series connection of tubes and a multiple cell liquid metal thermal electric converter are also provided.

Abbin, Joseph P. (Albuquerque, NM); Andraka, Charles E. (Albuquerque, NM); Lukens, Laurance L. (Albuquerque, NM); Moreno, James B. (Albuquerque, NM)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "type nickel metal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Method for forming metal contacts  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Methods of forming metal contacts with metal inks in the manufacture of photovoltaic devices are disclosed. The metal inks are selectively deposited on semiconductor coatings by inkjet and aerosol apparatus. The composite is heated to selective temperatures where the metal inks burn through the coating to form an electrical contact with the semiconductor. Metal layers are then deposited on the electrical contacts by light induced or light assisted plating.

Reddington, Erik; Sutter, Thomas C; Bu, Lujia; Cannon, Alexandra; Habas, Susan E; Curtis, Calvin J; Miedaner, Alexander; Ginley, David S; Van Hest, Marinus Franciscus Antonius Maria

2013-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

462

Materials Reliability Program: Evaluation of Potential for Low Temperature Crack Propagation in Reactor Pressure Vessel Outlet Nozzl e Dissimilar Metal Butt Welds by Stress and Fracture Mechanics Analyses (MRP-247)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Low Temperature Crack Propagation is a form of hydrogen embrittlement that can cause, under specific environmental conditions in laboratory tests, severe degradation of the fracture resistance of nickel-base alloys X-750 and 690, and weld metals 82/182 and 52/152. While no operating plant has exhibited evidence of LTCP, the hydrogen levels and temperature conditions necessary for LTCP to occur are present during some PWR shutdowns. This report evaluates the potential for the thermal stresses generated du...

2008-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

463

BWRVIP-212: BWR Vessel and Internals Project, Evaluation of Crack Growth Rates of Nickel-Base Alloys 52, 152, and 690 in BWR Enviro nments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study summarizes available information on stress corrosion cracking (SCC) performance of high-chromium, nickel-base (Ni-base) alloys in boiling water reactor (BWR) environments.

2009-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

464

Comparative in vitro cytotoxicity of nickel oxides and nickel-copper oxides to rat, mouse, and dog pulmonary alveolar macrophages  

SciTech Connect

Metal oxides containing either Ni alone (NiO's) or both Ni and Cu (Ni-CuO's) are encountered during Ni refining. Six NiO compounds calcined at temperatures ranging from < 650 to 1045/sup 0/ and four Ni-CuO's containing from 6.9 to 28% Cu and 44 to 69% Ni were screened for their in vitro cytotoxicity to alveolar macrophages (AM). NiO's were less toxic to rat AM than were the Ni-CuO compounds. The toxicity of the Ni-CuO compounds increased with increasing Cu content and decreasing Ni content of the molecules, indicating that the toxicity was due to the Cu content of the molecules. AM obtained from beagle dogs, F344/N rats, and B6C3F/sub 1/ mice displayed the following species sensitivities: dog > rat approx. = mouse, with dog AM being most sensitive. The observed differences in species sensitivities correlated with differences in the phagocytic abilities of dog, rat, and mouse AM, with the ranking of phagocytic abilities of the AM in decreasing order of ability being dog > rat > mouse.

Benson, J.M.; Henderson, R.F.; Pickrell, J.A.