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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "type ia supernovae" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Dust around Type Ia supernovae  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Dust around Type Ia supernovae Lifan Wang 1,2 LawrenceIa. Subject headings: Supernovae: General, Dust, Extinctionline) bands for Type Ia supernovae. (a), upper panel, shows

Wang, Lifan

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

New approaches for modeling type Ia supernovae  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

runaway in Type Ia supernovae: How to run away? oIgnition in Type Ia Supernovae. II. A Three- dimensionalnumber modeling of type Ia supernovae. I. hydrodynamics.

Zingale, Michael; Almgren, Ann S.; Bell, John B.; Day, Marcus S.; Rendleman, Charles A.; Woosley, Stan

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

Rates and progenitors of type Ia supernovae  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Supernovae . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Supernovae Found 5.1 Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . .1.2 Non-Type Ia Supernovae . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1.3

Wood-Vasey, William Michael

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

Ideal bandpasses for type Ia supernova cosmology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

diversity of type Ia Supernovae, in preparation. Kim, A.error in measurements of supernovae depends on a periodicABSTRACT To use type Ia supernovae as standard candles for

Davis, Tamara M.; Schmidt, Brian P.; Kim, Alex G.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

Turbulence-Flame Interactions in Type Ia Supernovae  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Interactions in Type Ia Supernovae A. J. Aspden 1 , J. B.involved in type Ia supernovae (SN Ia) requires the use of ?generated by RT in type Ia supernovae should obey Bolgiano-

Aspden, Andrew J; Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, 1 Cyclotron Road, MS 50A-1148, Berkeley, CA 94720 (Authors 1, 2 & 3); Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of California at Santa Cruz, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (Author 4); Department of Physics and Astronomy, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY 11794 (Author 5)

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Type Ia Supernova Carbon Footprints  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present convincing evidence of unburned carbon at photospheric velocities in new observations of 5 Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) obtained by the Nearby Supernova Factory. These SNe are identified by examining 346 spectra from 124 SNe obtained before +2.5 d relative to maximum. Detections are based on the presence of relatively strong C II 6580 absorption "notches" in multiple spectra of each SN, aided by automated fitting with the SYNAPPS code. Four of the 5 SNe in question are otherwise spectroscopically unremarkable, with ions and ejection velocities typical of SNe Ia, but spectra of the fifth exhibits high-velocity (v > 20,000 km/s) Si II and Ca II features. On the other hand, the light curve properties are preferentially grouped, strongly suggesting a connection between carbon-positivity and broad band light curve/color behavior: Three of the 5 have relatively narrow light curves but also blue colors, and a fourth may be a dust-reddened member of this family. Accounting for signal-to-noise and phase, we ...

Thomas, R C; Aragon, C; Antilogus, P; Bailey, S; Baltay, C; Bongard, S; Buton, C; Canto, A; Childress, M; Chotard, N; Copin, Y; Fakhouri, H K; Gangler, E; Hsiao, E Y; Kerschhaggl, M; Kowalski, M; Loken, S; Nugent, P; Paech, K; Pain, R; Pecontal, E; Pereira, R; Perlmutter, S; Rabinowitz, D; Rigault, M; Rubin, D; Runge, K; Scalzo, R; Smadja, G; Tao, C; Weaver, B A; Wu, C; Brown, P J; Milne, P A

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Turbulent Combustion in Type Ia Supernova Models  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We review the astrophysical modeling of type Ia supernova explosions and describe numerical methods to implement numerical simulations of these events. Some results of such simulations are discussed.

F. K. Roepke; W. Hillebrandt

2006-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

8

Theoretical cosmic Type Ia supernova rates  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The aim of this work is the computation of the cosmic Type Ia supernova rates at very high redshifts (z>2). We adopt various progenitor models in order to predict the number of explosions in different scenarios for galaxy formation and to check whether it is possible to select the best delay time distribution model, on the basis of the available observations of Type Ia supernovae. We also computed the Type Ia supernova rate in typical elliptical galaxies of different initial luminous masses and the total amount of iron produced by Type Ia supernovae in each case. It emerges that: it is not easy to select the best delay time distribution scenario from the observational data and this is because the cosmic star formation rate dominates over the distribution function of the delay times; the monolithic collapse scenario predicts an increasing trend of the SN Ia rate at high redshifts whereas the predicted rate in the hierarchical scheme drops dramatically at high redshift; for the elliptical galaxies we note that the predicted maximum of the Type Ia supernova rate depends on the initial galactic mass. The maximum occurs earlier (at about 0.3 Gyr) in the most massive ellipticals, as a consequence of downsizing in star formation. We find that different delay time distributions predict different relations between the Type Ia supernova rate per unit mass at the present time and the color of the parent galaxies and that bluer ellipticals present higher supernova Type Ia rates at the present time.

R. Valiante; F. Matteucci; S. Recchi; F. Calura

2009-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

9

Low Mach Number Modeling of Type Ia Supernovae. II. Energy Evolution  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Number Modeling of Type Ia Supernovae. II. Energy EvolutionIa. Subject headings: supernovae: general — white dwarfs —the ignition of Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) is critical to

Almgren, Ann S.; Bell, John B.; Rendleman, Charles A.; Zingale, Mike

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Type Ia Supernova Hubble Residuals and Host-Galaxy Properties  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

magnitudes of type Ia supernovae from multi-band lightsuch an analysis on the supernovae of the Nearby Supernovaheadings: distance scale, supernovae: general 1 Physics

Kim, A. G.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

K-corrections and spectral templates of Type Ia supernovae  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

templates of Type Ia supernovae E. Y. Hsiao 1 , A. Conleyobservations of low-redshift supernovae are less a?ected byobservations, stars: supernovae Department of Physics and

Hsiao, E. Y.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Cosmic Supernova Rate History and Type Ia Supernova Progenitors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Adopting a single degenerate scenario for Type Ia supernova progenitors with the metallicity effect, we make a prediction of the cosmic supernova rate history as a composite of the supernova rates in spiral and elliptical galaxies, and compare with the recent observational data up to z ~ 0.55.

Chiaki Kobayashi; Ken'ichi Nomoto; Takuji Tsujimoto

2001-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

13

Type Ia Supernova Intrinsic Magnitude Dispersion and the Fitting of Cosmological Parameters  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Applied to Type Ia supernovae, my strategy provides adata sets. Subject headings: Supernovae: Data Analysis andhomogeneous nature of Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) makes them

Kim, Alex G

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Verifying the Cosmological Utility of Type Ia Supernovae: Implications of a Dispersion in the Ultraviolet Spectra  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Utility of Type Ia Supernovae: Implications of a Dispersionheadings: surveys – supernovae: general – cosmologicalparameters Introduction Supernovae of Type Ia (SNe Ia) are

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Thermonuclear supernova models, and observations of Type Ia supernovae  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this paper, we review the present state of theoretical models of thermonuclear supernovae, and compare their predicitions with the constraints derived from observations of Type Ia supernovae. The diversity of explosion mechanisms usually found in one-dimensional simulations is a direct consequence of the impossibility to resolve the flame structure under the assumption of spherical symmetry. Spherically symmetric models have been successful in explaining many of the observational features of Type Ia supernovae, but they rely on two kinds of empirical models: one that describes the behaviour of the flame on the scales unresolved by the code, and another that takes account of the evolution of the flame shape. In contrast, three-dimensional simulations are able to compute the flame shape in a self-consistent way, but they still need a model for the propagation of the flame in the scales unresolved by the code. Furthermore, in three dimensions the number of degrees of freedom of the initial configuration of the white dwarf at runaway is much larger than in one dimension. Recent simulations have shown that the sensitivity of the explosion output to the initial conditions can be extremely large. New paradigms of thermonuclear supernovae have emerged from this situation, as the Pulsating Reverse Detonation. The resolution of all these issues must rely on the predictions of observational properties of the models, and their comparison with current Type Ia supernova data, including X-ray spectra of Type Ia supernova remnants.

E. Bravo; C. Badenes; D. Garcia-Senz

2004-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

16

The Photometric Properties of Nearby Type Ia Supernovae  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Rise-Time Distribution of Nearby Type Ia Supernovae 3.1Highlight: The Physics of Supernovae, ed. W. Hillebrandt &1.1 Supernovae . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1.1.1

Ganeshalingam, Mohan

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

THE LOCAL HOSTS OF TYPE Ia SUPERNOVAE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We use multi-wavelength, matched aperture, integrated photometry from the Galaxy Evolution Explorer (GALEX), the Sloan Digital Sky Survey, and the RC3 to estimate the physical properties of 166 nearby galaxies hosting 168 well-observed Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia). The ultraviolet (UV) imaging of local SN Ia hosts from GALEX allows a direct comparison with higher-redshift hosts measured at optical wavelengths that correspond to the rest-frame UV. Our data corroborate well-known features that have been seen in other SN Ia samples. Specifically, hosts with active star formation produce brighter and slower SNe Ia on average, and hosts with luminosity-weighted ages older than 1 Gyr produce on average more faint, fast, and fewer bright, slow SNe Ia than younger hosts. New results include that in our sample, the faintest and fastest SNe Ia occur only in galaxies exceeding a stellar mass threshold of approx10{sup 10} M{sub sun}, leading us to conclude that their progenitors must arise in populations that are older and/or more metal rich than the general SN Ia population. A low host extinction subsample hints at a residual trend in peak luminosity with host age, after correcting for light-curve shape, giving the appearance that older hosts produce less-extincted SNe Ia on average. This has implications for cosmological fitting of SNe Ia, and suggests that host age could be useful as a parameter in the fitting. Converting host mass to metallicity and computing {sup 56}Ni mass from the supernova light curves, we find that our local sample is consistent with a model that predicts a shallow trend between stellar metallicity and the {sup 56}Ni mass that powers the explosion, but we cannot rule out the absence of a trend. We measure a correlation between {sup 56}Ni mass and host age in the local universe that is shallower and not as significant as that seen at higher redshifts. The details of the age-{sup 56}Ni mass correlations at low and higher redshift imply a luminosity-weighted age threshold of approx3 Gyr for SN Ia hosts, above which they are less likely to produce SNe Ia with {sup 56}Ni masses above approx0.5 M{sub sun}.

Neill, James D.; Martin, D. Christopher; Barlow, Tom A.; Foster, Karl; Friedman, Peter G.; Morrissey, Patrick; Wyder, Ted K. [California Institute of Technology, 1200 E. California Blvd., Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Sullivan, Mark [University of Oxford, Denys Wilkinson Building, Keble Road, Oxford, OX1 3RH (United Kingdom); Howell, D. Andrew [Las Cumbres Observatory Global Telescope Network, 6740 Cortona Dr., Suite 102, Goleta, CA 93117 (United States); Conley, Alex [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of Toronto, 50 St. George Street, Toronto, ONM5S3H8 (Canada); Seibert, Mark; Madore, Barry F. [The Observatories of the Carnegie Institute of Washington, 813 Santa Barbara Street, Pasadena, CA, 91101 (United States); Neff, Susan G. [Laboratory for Astronomy and Solar Physics, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Schiminovich, David [Department of Astronomy, Columbia University, New York, NY 10027 (United States); Bianchi, Luciana [Center for Astrophysical Sciences, Johns Hopkins University, 3400 N. Charles St., Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Donas, Jose; Milliard, Bruno [Laboratoire d'Astrophysique de Marseille, BP 8, Traverse du Siphon, 13376 Marseille Cedex 12 (France); Heckman, Timothy M. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Johns Hopkins University, Homewood Campus, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Lee, Young-Wook [Center for Space Astrophysics, Yonsei University, Seoul 120-749 (Korea, Republic of); Rich, R. Michael [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States)

2009-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

18

Improving Type Ia Supernova Standard Candle Cosmology Measurements Using Observations of Early-Type Host Galaxies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Host Galaxies of Type Ia Supernovae Introduction SN Ia Hosts109 C HAPTER 1 Cosmology, Type Ia Supernovae and HostGalaxies Observations of supernovae have played a role in

Meyers, Joshua Evan

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Direct numerical simulations of type Ia supernovae flames I: The landau-darrieus instability  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Simulations of Type Ia Supernovae Flames I: The Landau-Subject headings: supernovae: general — white dwarfs —could occur in Type Ia supernovae (Niemeyer & Woosley 1997),

Bell, J.B.; Day, M.S.; Rendleman, C.A.; Woosley, S.E.; Zingale, M.

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

New approaches for modeling type Ia supernovae  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ich and J. Stein. On the thermonuclear runaway in Type IaSmall-Scale Stability of Thermonuclear Flames o in Type IaS. E. Woosley. The thermonuclear explosion of chandrasekhar

Zingale, Michael; Almgren, Ann S.; Bell, John B.; Day, Marcus S.; Rendleman, Charles A.; Woosley, Stan

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "type ia supernovae" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Nearby Supernova Factory Observations of SN 2006D: On Sporadic Carbon Signatures in Early Type Ia Supernova Spectra  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

with low volume-?lling factor. Subject headings: supernovae:general — supernovae: individual (SN 2006D)Introduction Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) make valuable

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Probing Cosmological Isotropy With Type IA Supernovae  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We investigate the validity of the Cosmological Principle by mapping the cosmological parameters $H_0$ and $q_0$ through the celestial sphere. In our analysis, performed in a low-redshift regime to follow a model-independent approach, we use two compilations of type Ia Supernovae (SNe Ia), namely the Union2.1 and the JLA datasets. Firstly, we show that the angular distributions for both SNe Ia datasets are statistically anisotropic at high confidence level ($p$-value $<$ 0.0001), in particular the JLA sample. Then we find that the cosmic expansion and acceleration are mainly of dipolar type, with maximal anisotropic expansion [acceleration] pointing towards $(l,b) \\simeq (326^{\\circ},12^{\\circ})$ [$(l,b) \\simeq (174^{\\circ},27^{\\circ})$], and $(l,b) \\simeq (58^{\\circ},-60^{\\circ})$ [$(l,b) \\simeq (225^{\\circ},51^{\\circ})$] for the Union2.1 and JLA data, respectively. Secondly, we use a geometrical method to test the hypothesis that the non-uniformly distributed SNe Ia events could introduce anisotropic imp...

Bengaly, C A P; Alcaniz, J S

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Closest Type Ia Supernova in Decades Solves a Cosmic Mystery  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

PTF 11kly as it appeared in the nearby M101 galaxy. (Images: Peter Nugent) Type Ia supernovae (SN Ia's) are the extraordinarily bright and remarkably similar "standard candles"...

24

SHOCK BREAKOUT FROM TYPE Ia SUPERNOVA  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The mode of explosive burning in Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) remains an outstanding problem. It is generally thought to begin as a subsonic deflagration, but this may transition into a supersonic detonation (the delayed detonation transition, DDT). We argue that this transition leads to a breakout shock, which would provide the first unambiguous evidence that DDTs occur. Its main features are a hard X-ray flash (approx20 keV) lasting approx10{sup -2} s with a total radiated energy of approx10{sup 40} erg, followed by a cooling tail. This creates a distinct feature in the visual light curve, which is separate from the nickel decay. This cooling tail has a maximum absolute visual magnitude of M{sub V} approx -9 to -10 at approx1 day, which depends most sensitively on the white dwarf radius at the time of the DDT. As the thermal diffusion wave moves in, the composition of these surface layers may be imprinted as spectral features, which would help to discern between SN Ia progenitor models. Since this feature should accompany every SNe Ia, future deep surveys (e.g., m = 24) will see it out to a distance of approx80 Mpc, giving a maximum rate of approx60 yr{sup -1}. Archival data sets can also be used to study the early rise dictated by the shock heating (at approx20 days before maximum B-band light). A similar and slightly brighter event may also accompany core bounce during the accretion-induced collapse to a neutron star, but with a lower occurrence rate.

Piro, Anthony L.; Chang, Philip; Weinberg, Nevin N., E-mail: tpiro@astro.berkeley.ed, E-mail: pchang@astro.berkeley.ed, E-mail: nweinberg@astro.berkeley.ed [Astronomy Department and Theoretical Astrophysics Center, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Three-dimensional numerical simulations of Rayleigh-Taylor unstable flames in type Ia supernovae  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Unstable Flames in Type Ia Supernovae M. Zingale 1 , S. E.Subject headings: supernovae: general — white dwarfs —ame in Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) is well recognized (M¨

Zingale, M.; Woosley, S.E.; Rendleman, C.A.; Day, M.S.; Bell, J.B.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

SPECTROSCOPY OF TYPE Ia SUPERNOVAE BY THE CARNEGIE SUPERNOVA PROJECT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This is the first release of optical spectroscopic data of low-redshift Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) by the Carnegie Supernova Project including 604 previously unpublished spectra of 93 SNe Ia. The observations cover a range of phases from 12 days before to over 150 days after the time of B-band maximum light. With the addition of 228 near-maximum spectra from the literature, we study the diversity among SNe Ia in a quantitative manner. For that purpose, spectroscopic parameters are employed such as expansion velocities from spectral line blueshifts and pseudo-equivalent widths (pW). The values of those parameters at maximum light are obtained for 78 objects, thus providing a characterization of SNe Ia that may help to improve our understanding of the properties of the exploding systems and the thermonuclear flame propagation. Two objects, namely, SNe 2005M and 2006is, stand out from the sample by showing peculiar Si II and S II velocities but otherwise standard velocities for the rest of the ions. We further study the correlations between spectroscopic and photometric parameters such as light-curve decline rate and color. In agreement with previous studies, we find that the pW of Si II absorption features are very good indicators of light-curve decline rate. Furthermore, we demonstrate that parameters such as pW2 (Si II 4130) and pW6 (Si II 5972) provide precise calibrations of the peak B-band luminosity with dispersions of Almost-Equal-To 0.15 mag. In the search for a secondary parameter in the calibration of peak luminosity for SNe Ia, we find a Almost-Equal-To 2{sigma}-3{sigma} correlation between B-band Hubble residuals and the velocity at maximum light of S II and Si II lines.

Folatelli, Gaston [Kavli Institute for the Physics and Mathematics of the Universe (Kavli IPMU, WPI), Todai Institutes for Advanced Study, the University of Tokyo, 277-8583 Kashiwa (Japan); Morrell, Nidia; Phillips, Mark M.; Hsiao, Eric; Campillay, Abdo; Contreras, Carlos; Castellon, Sergio; Roth, Miguel [Las Campanas Observatory, Carnegie Observatories, Casilla 601, La Serena (Chile); Hamuy, Mario; Anderson, Joseph P. [Departamento de Astronomia, Universidad de Chile, Casilla 36-D, Santiago (Chile); Krzeminski, Wojtek [N. Copernicus Astronomical Center, ul. Bartycka 18, 00-716 Warszawa (Poland); Stritzinger, Maximilian [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Aarhus University, Ny Munkegade 120, DK-8000 Aarhus C (Denmark); Burns, Christopher R.; Freedman, Wendy L.; Madore, Barry F.; Murphy, David; Persson, S. E. [Observatories of the Carnegie Institution of Washington, 813 Santa Barbara Street, Pasadena, CA 91101 (United States); Prieto, Jose L. [Department of Astrophysical Sciences, Princeton University, 4 Ivy Ln., Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States); Suntzeff, Nicholas B.; Krisciunas, Kevin, E-mail: gaston.folatelli@ipmu.jp [George P. and Cynthia Woods Mitchell Institute for Fundamental Physics and Astronomy, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Texas A and M University, College Station, TX 77843 (United States); and others

2013-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

27

Constraining Cosmic Evolution of Type Ia Supernovae  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present the first large-scale effort of creating composite spectra of high-redshift type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) and comparing them to low-redshift counterparts. Through the ESSENCE project, we have obtained 107 spectra of 88 high-redshift SNe Ia with excellent light-curve information. In addition, we have obtained 397 spectra of low-redshift SNe through a multiple-decade effort at Lick and Keck Observatories, and we have used 45 ultraviolet spectra obtained by HST/IUE. The low-redshift spectra act as a control sample when comparing to the ESSENCE spectra. In all instances, the ESSENCE and Lick composite spectra appear very similar. The addition of galaxy light to the Lick composite spectra allows a nearly perfect match of the overall spectral-energy distribution with the ESSENCE composite spectra, indicating that the high-redshift SNe are more contaminated with host-galaxy light than their low-redshift counterparts. This is caused by observing objects at all redshifts with similar slit widths, which corresponds to different projected distances. After correcting for the galaxy-light contamination, subtle differences in the spectra remain. We have estimated the systematic errors when using current spectral templates for K-corrections to be {approx}0.02 mag. The variance in the composite spectra give an estimate of the intrinsic variance in low-redshift maximum-light SN spectra of {approx}3% in the optical and growing toward the ultraviolet. The difference between the maximum-light low and high-redshift spectra constrain SN evolution between our samples to be < 10% in the rest-frame optical.

Foley, Ryan J.; Filippenko, Alexei V.; Aguilera, C.; Becker, A.C.; Blondin, S.; Challis, P.; Clocchiatti, A.; Covarrubias, R.; Davis, T.M.; Garnavich, P.M.; Jha, S.; Kirshner, R.P.; Krisciunas, K.; Leibundgut, B.; Li, W.; Matheson, T.; Miceli, A.; Miknaitis, G.; Pignata, G.; Rest, A.; Riess, A.G.; /UC, Berkeley, Astron. Dept. /Cerro-Tololo InterAmerican Obs. /Washington U., Seattle, Astron. Dept. /Harvard-Smithsonian Ctr. Astrophys. /Chile U., Catolica /Bohr Inst. /Notre Dame U. /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Texas A-M /European Southern Observ. /NOAO, Tucson /Fermilab /Chile U., Santiago /Harvard U., Phys. Dept. /Baltimore, Space Telescope Sci. /Johns Hopkins U. /Res. Sch. Astron. Astrophys., Weston Creek /Stockholm U. /Hawaii U. /Illinois U., Urbana, Astron. Dept.

2008-02-13T23:59:59.000Z

28

EARLY EMISSION FROM TYPE Ia SUPERNOVAE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A unique feature of deflagration-to-detonation (DDT) white dwarf explosion models of supernovae of type Ia is the presence of a strong shock wave propagating through the outer envelope. We consider the early emission expected in such models, which is produced by the expanding shock-heated outer part of the ejecta and precedes the emission driven by radioactive decay. We expand on earlier analyses by considering the modification of the pre-detonation density profile by the weak shocks generated during the deflagration phase, the time evolution of the opacity, and the deviation of the post-shock equation of state from that obtained for radiation pressure domination. A simple analytic model is presented and shown to provide an acceptable approximation to the results of one-dimensional numerical DDT simulations. Our analysis predicts a {approx}10{sup 3} s long UV/optical flash with a luminosity of {approx}1 to {approx}3 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 39} erg s{sup -1}. Lower luminosity corresponds to faster (turbulent) deflagration velocity. The luminosity of the UV flash is predicted to be strongly suppressed at t > t{sub drop} {approx} 1 hr due to the deviation from pure radiation domination.

Rabinak, Itay; Waxman, Eli [Department of Particle Physics and Astrophysics, Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovot 76100 (Israel); Livne, Eli, E-mail: itay.rabinak@weizmann.ac.il [Racah Institute of Physics, Hebrew University, Jerusalem (Israel)

2012-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

29

Timescale stretch parameterization of Type Ia supernova B-band light curves  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the light curve of Type Ia supernovae discovered by theof the high-redshift supernovae. This work was supported inobjects. Subject headings: supernovae: general – cosmology:

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Direct numerical simulations of type Ia supernovae flames II: The rayleigh-taylor instability  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Weaver, T. A. 1994, in Supernovae, Les Houches, Session LIV,Simulations of Type Ia Supernovae Flames II: The Rayleigh-Subject headings: supernovae: general — white dwarfs —

Bell, J.B.; Day, M.S.; Rendleman, C.A.; Woosley, S.E.; Zingale, M.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

High-Redshift Type Ia Supernova Rates in Galaxy Cluster and Field Environments  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

29 Candidates classified as supernovae . . . . . . . .1.1 Type Ia Supernovae as Standard Candles . . . . . . . .4.2.3 Supernovae . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4.2.4

Barbary, Kyle Harris

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

K-corrections and extinction corrections for Type Ia supernovae  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The measurement of the cosmological parameters from Type Ia supernovae hinges on our ability to compare nearby and distant supernovae accurately. Here we present an advance on a method for performing generalized K-corrections for Type Ia supernovae which allows us to compare these objects from the UV to near-IR over the redshift range 0 < z < 2. We discuss the errors currently associated with this method and how future data can improve upon it significantly. We also examine the effects of reddening on the K-corrections and the light curves of Type Ia supernovae. Finally, we provide a few examples of how these techniques affect our current understanding of a sample of both nearby and distant supernovae.

Nugent, Peter; Kim, Alex; Perlmutter, Saul

2002-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

33

UV Spectroscopy of Type Ia Supernovae at Low- and High-Redshift  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Spectroscopy of Type Ia Supernovae at Low- and High-RedshiftUV properties of Type Ia Supernovae. The low-redshift studyULDA Access Guide No. 6: Supernovae, The Netherlands: ESA

Nugent, Peter

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Feasibility of Measuring the Cosmological Constant [LAMBDA] and Mass Density [Omega] using Type Ia Supernovae  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

at z = 1. uncertainty for supernovae at z = 1. mR Adding theMass Density .Q Using Type Ia Supernovae A. Goobar and S.Density Q Using Type Ia Supernovae Ariel Goobar l and Saul

Goobar, A.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Simulations of Turbulent Thermonuclear Burning in Type Ia Supernovae  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Type Ia supernovae have recently received considerable attention because it appears that they can be used as "standard candles" to measure cosmic distances out to billions of light years away from us. Observations of type Ia supernovae seem to indicate that we are living in a universe that started to accelerate its expansion when it was about half its present age. These conclusions rest primarily on phenomenological models which, however, lack proper theoretical understanding, mainly because the explosion process, initiated by thermonuclear fusion of carbon and oxygen into heavier elements, is difficult to simulate even on supercomputers. Here, we investigate a new way of modeling turbulent thermonuclear deflagration fronts in white dwarfs undergoing a type Ia supernova explosion. Our approach is based on a level set method which treats the front as a mathematical discontinuity and allows for full coupling between the front geometry and the flow field. New results of the method applied to the problem of type Ia supernovae are obtained. It is shown that in 2-D with high spatial resolution and a physically motivated subgrid scale model for the nuclear flames numerically "converged" results can be obtained, but for most initial conditions the stars do not explode. In contrast, simulations in 3-D, do give the desired explosions and many of their properties, such as the explosion energies, lightcurves and nucleosynthesis products, are in very good agreement with observed type Ia supernovae.

W. Hillebrandt; M. Reinecke; W. Schmidt; F. K. Roepke; C. Travaglio; J. C. Niemeyer

2004-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

36

Could there be a hole in type Ia supernovae?  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the favored progenitor scenario, Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) arise from a white dwarf accreting material from a non-degenerate companion star. Soon after the white dwarf explodes, the ejected supernova material engulfs the companion star; two-dimensional hydrodynamical simulations by Marietta et al. (2001) show that, in the interaction, the companion star carves out a conical hole of opening angle 30-40 degrees in the supernova ejecta. In this paper we use multi-dimensional Monte Carlo radiative transfer calculations to explore the observable consequences of an ejecta-hole asymmetry. We calculate the variation of the spectrum, luminosity, and polarization with viewing angle for the aspherical supernova near maximum light. We find that the supernova looks normal from almost all viewing angles except when one looks almost directly down the hole. In the latter case, one sees into the deeper, hotter layers of ejecta. The supernova is relatively brighter and has a peculiar spectrum characterized by more highly ionized species, weaker absorption features, and lower absorption velocities. The spectrum viewed down the hole is comparable to the class of SN 1991T-like supernovae. We consider how the ejecta-hole asymmetry may explain the current spectropolarimetric observations of SNe Ia, and suggest a few observational signatures of the geometry. Finally, we discuss the variety currently seen in observed SNe Ia and how an ejecta-hole asymmetry may fit in as one of several possible sources of diversity.

Kasen, Daniel; Nugent, Peter; Thomas, R.C.; Wang, Lifan

2004-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

37

Effect of nuclear structure on Type Ia supernova nucleosynthesis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The relationship among nuclear structure, the weak processes in nuclei, and astrophysics becomes quite apparent in supernova explosion and nucleosynthesis studies. In this brief article, I report on progress made in the last few years on calculating electron capture and beta-decay rates in iron-group nuclei. I also report on applications of these rates to Type-Ia nucleosynthesis studies.

D. J. Dean

2000-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

38

Intermediate-band Photometry of Type Ia Supernovae  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present optical light curves of five Type Ia supernovae (2002er, 2002fk, 2003cg, 2003du, 2003fk). The photometric observations were performed in a set of intermediate-band filters. SNe 2002er, 2003du appear to be normal SN Ia events with similar light curve shapes, while SN 2003kf shows the behavior of a brighter SN Ia with slower decline rate after maximum. The light curves of SN 2003cg is unusual; they show a fast rise and dramatic decline near maximum and do not display secondary peak at longer wavelengths during 15-30 days after maximum light. This suggests that SN 2003cg is likely to be an intrinsically subluminous, 91bg-like SN Ia. Exploration of SN Ia feature lines through intermediate-band photometry is briefly discussed.

Wang, X; Zhang, T; Li, Z; Wang, Xiaofeng; Zhou, Xu; Zhang, Tianmeng; Li, Zongwei

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Type Ia supernova rate studies from the SDSS-II Supernova Study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The author presents new measurements of the type Ia SN rate from the SDSS-II Supernova Survey. The SDSS-II Supernova Survey was carried out during the Fall months (Sept.-Nov.) of 2005-2007 and discovered {approx} 500 spectroscopically confirmed SNe Ia with densely sampled (once every {approx} 4 days), multi-color light curves. Additionally, the SDSS-II Supernova Survey has discovered several hundred SNe Ia candidates with well-measured light curves, but without spectroscopic confirmation of type. This total, achieved in 9 months of observing, represents {approx} 15-20% of the total SNe Ia discovered worldwide since 1885. The author describes some technical details of the SN Survey observations and SN search algorithms that contributed to the extremely high-yield of discovered SNe and that are important as context for the SDSS-II Supernova Survey SN Ia rate measurements.

Dilday, Benjamin; /Chicago U.

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

The type Ia supernovae and the Hubble's constant  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Hubble's constant is usually surmised to be a constant; but the experiments show a large spread and conflicting estimates. According to the plasma-redshift theory, the Hubble's constant varies with the plasma densities along the line of sight. It varies then slightly with the direction and the distance to a supernova and a galaxy. The relation between the magnitudes of type Ia supernovae and their observed redshifts results in an Hubble's constant with an average value in intergalactic space of 59.44 km per s per Mpc. The standard deviation from this average value is only 0.6 km per s per Mpc, but the standard deviation in a single measurement is about 8.2 km per s per Mpc. These deviations do not include possible absolute calibration errors. The experiments show that the Hubble's constant varies with the intrinsic redshifts of the Milky Way galaxy and the host galaxies for type Ia supernovae, and that it varies with the galactic latitude. These findings support the plasma-redshift theory and contradict the contemporary big-bang theory. Together with the previously reported absence of time dilation in type Ia supernovae measurements, these findings have profound consequences for the standard cosmological theory.

Ari Brynjolfsson

2004-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "type ia supernovae" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Diversity of Type Ia Supernovae Imprinted in Chemical Abundances  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A time delay of Type Ia supernova (SN Ia) explosions hinders the imprint of their nucleosynthesis on stellar abundances. However, some occasional cases give birth to stars that avoid enrichment of their chemical compositions by massive stars and thereby exhibit a SN Ia-like elemental feature including a very low [Mg/Fe] (~-1). We highlight the elemental feature of Fe-group elements for two low-Mg/Fe objects detected in nearby galaxies, and propose the presence of a class of SNe Ia that yield the low abundance ratios of [Cr,Mn,Ni/Fe]. Our novel models of chemical evolution reveal that our proposed class of SNe Ia (slow SNe Ia) is associated with ones exploding on a long timescale after their stellar birth, and gives a significant impact on the chemical enrichment in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC). In the Galaxy, on the other hand, this effect is unseen due to the overwhelming enrichment by the major class of SNe Ia that explode promptly (prompt SNe Ia) and eject a large amount of Fe-group elements. This nice...

Tsujimoto, Takuji

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Single-Degenerate Type Ia Supernovae Are Preferentially Overluminous  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Recent observational and theoretical progress has favored merging and helium-accreting sub-Chandrasekhar mass white dwarfs in the double-degenerate and the double-detonation channels, respectively, as the most promising progenitors of normal Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia). Thus the fate of rapidly-accreting Chandrasekhar mass white dwarfs in the single-degenerate channel remains more mysterious then ever. In this paper, we clarify the nature of ignition in Chandrasekhar-mass single-degenerate SNe Ia by analytically deriving the existence of a characteristic length scale which establishes a transition from central ignitions to buoyancy-driven ignitions. Using this criterion, combined with data from three-dimensional simulations of convection and ignition, we demonstrate that the overwhelming majority of ignition events within Chandrasekhar-mass white dwarfs in the single-degenerate channel are buoyancy-driven, and consequently lack a vigorous deflagration phase. We thus infer that single-degenerate SNe Ia are gen...

Fisher, Robert

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

CIRCUMSTELLAR ABSORPTION IN DOUBLE DETONATION TYPE Ia SUPERNOVAE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Upon formation, degenerate He core white dwarfs are surrounded by a radiative H-rich layer primarily supported by ideal gas pressure. In this Letter, we examine the effect of this H-rich layer on mass transfer in He+C/O double white dwarf binaries that will eventually merge and possibly yield a Type Ia supernova (SN Ia) in the double detonation scenario. Because its thermal profile and equation of state differ from the underlying He core, the H-rich layer is transferred stably onto the C/O white dwarf prior to the He core's tidal disruption. We find that this material is ejected from the binary system and sweeps up the surrounding interstellar medium hundreds to thousands of years before the SN Ia. The close match between the resulting circumstellar medium profiles and values inferred from recent observations of circumstellar absorption in SNe Ia gives further credence to the resurgent double detonation scenario.

Shen, Ken J. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Guillochon, James [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Foley, Ryan J., E-mail: kenshen@astro.berkeley.edu [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States)

2013-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

44

Quantitative comparison between Type Ia supernova spectra at low and high redshifts: A case study  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Highlight - The Physics of Supernovae, ESO/MPA/MPE Workshop,Evolution in high-redshift supernovae Fig. 8 “Ca ii H&K”SN 1991T/SN 1999aa-like supernovae. 1. Introduction Type Ia

Garavini, G.; Supernova Cosmology Project

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Learning from the scatter in type Ia supernovae  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Type Ia Supernovae are standard candles so their mean apparent magnitude has been exploited to learn about the redshift-distance relationship. Besides intrinsic scatter in this standard candle, additional scatter is caused by gravitational magnification by large scale structure. Here we probe the dependence of this dispersion on cosmological parameters and show that information about the amplitude of clustering, {sigma}{sub 8}, is contained in the scatter. In principle, it will be possible to constrain {sigma}{sub 8} to within 5% with observations of 2000 Type Ia Supernovae. We identify three sources of systematic error - evolution of intrinsic scatter, baryon contributions to lensing, and non-Gaussianity of lensing - which will make this measurement difficult.

Dodelson, Scott [Particle Astrophysics Center, Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, Batavia, Illinois 60510-0500 (United States); Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois 60637-1433 (United States); Vallinotto, Alberto [Particle Astrophysics Center, Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, Batavia, Illinois 60510-0500 (United States); Department of Physics, The University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois 60637-1433 (United States)

2006-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

46

DIVERSITY OF TYPE Ia SUPERNOVAE IMPRINTED IN CHEMICAL ABUNDANCES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A time delay of Type Ia supernova (SN Ia) explosions hinders the imprint of their nucleosynthesis on stellar abundances. However, some occasional cases give birth to stars that avoid enrichment of their chemical compositions by massive stars and thereby exhibit an SN-Ia-like elemental feature including a very low [Mg/Fe] ( Almost-Equal-To - 1). We highlight the elemental feature of Fe-group elements for two low-Mg/Fe objects detected in nearby galaxies, and propose the presence of a class of SNe Ia that yield the low abundance ratios of [Cr, Mn, Ni/Fe]. Our novel models of chemical evolution reveal that our proposed class of SNe Ia (slow SNe Ia) is associated with ones exploding on a long timescale after their stellar birth and give a significant impact on the chemical enrichment in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC). In the Galaxy, on the other hand, this effect is unseen due to the overwhelming enrichment by the major class of SNe Ia that explode promptly (prompt SNe Ia) and eject a large amount of Fe-group elements. This nicely explains the different [Cr, Mn, Ni/Fe] features between the two galaxies as well as the puzzling feature seen in the LMC stars exhibiting very low Ca but normal Mg abundances. Furthermore, the corresponding channel of slow SN Ia is exemplified by performing detailed nucleosynthesis calculations in the scheme of SNe Ia resulting from a 0.8 + 0.6 M{sub Sun} white dwarf merger.

Tsujimoto, Takuji [National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, Mitaka-shi, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan); Shigeyama, Toshikazu, E-mail: taku.tsujimoto@nao.ac.jp [Research Center for the Early Universe, Graduate School of Science, University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan)

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

A New Determination of the High Redshift Type Ia Supernova Rates with the Hubble Space Telescope Advanced Camera for Surveys  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Schmidt, B. P. , 2003, in Supernovae and Gamma Ray Bursts,for identifying Type Ia supernovae (although spectroscopicfor future high-statistics supernovae searches in which

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

The type Ia supernova SNLS-03D3bb from a super-Chandrasekhar-mass white dwarf star  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

magnitudes of Type IA supernovae. Astrophys. J. Lett. 413,from 42 High-Redshift Supernovae. Astrophys. J. 517, 565–Observational Evidence from Supernovae for an Accelerating

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Diagnosing multiplicative error by lensing magnification of type Ia supernovae  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Weak lensing causes spatially coherent fluctuations in flux of type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia). This lensing magnification allows for weak lensing measurement independent of cosmic shear. It is free of shape measurement errors associated with cosmic shear and can therefore be used to diagnose and calibrate multiplicative error. Although this lensing magnification is difficult to measure accurately in auto correlation, its cross correlation with cosmic shear and galaxy distribution in overlapping area can be measured to significantly higher accuracy. Therefore these cross correlations can put useful constraint on multiplicative error, and the obtained constraint is free of cosmic variance in weak lensing field. We present two methods implementing this idea and estimate their performances. We find that, with $\\sim 1$ million SNe Ia that can be achieved by the proposed D2k survey with the LSST telescope (Zhan et al. 2008), multiplicative error of $\\sim 0.5\\%$ for source galaxies at $z_s\\sim 1$ can be detected and la...

Zhang, Pengjie

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Measurement of Omega_m, Omega_Lambda from a blind analysis of Type Ia supernovae with CMAGIC: Using color information to verify the acceleration of the Universe  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

analysis of Type Ia supernovae with CMAGIC: Using colorof 21 high redshift supernovae using a new technique (lightcurves of Type Ia supernovae, ?rst introduced in Wang

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

SALT2: using distant supernovae to improve the use of Type Ia supernovae as distance indicators  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present an empirical model of Type Ia supernovae spectro-photometric evolution with time. The model is built using a large data set including light-curves and spectra of both nearby and distant supernovae, the latter being observed by the SNLS collaboration. We derive the average spectral sequence of Type Ia supernovae and their main variability components including a color variation law. The model allows us to measure distance moduli in the spectral range 2500-8000 A with calculable uncertainties, including those arising from variability of spectral features. Thanks to the use of high-redshift SNe to model the rest-frame UV spectral energy distribution, we are able to derive improved distance estimates for SNe Ia in the redshift range 0.8supernovae.

J. Guy; P. Astier; S. Baumont; D. Hardin; R. Pain; N. Regnault; S. Basa; R. G. Carlberg; A. Conley; S. Fabbro; D. Fouchez; I. M. Hook; D. A. Howell; K. Perrett; C. J. Pritchet; J. Rich; M. Sullivan; P. Antilogus; E. Aubourg; G. Bazin; J. Bronder; M. Filiol; N. Palanque-Delabrouille; P. Ripoche; V. Ruhlmann-Kleider

2007-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

52

TYPE Ia SUPERNOVAE STRONGLY INTERACTING WITH THEIR CIRCUMSTELLAR MEDIUM  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Owing to their utility for measurements of cosmic acceleration, Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) are perhaps the best-studied class of SNe, yet the progenitor systems of these explosions largely remain a mystery. A rare subclass of SNe Ia shows evidence of strong interaction with their circumstellar medium (CSM), and in particular, a hydrogen-rich CSM; we refer to them as SNe Ia-CSM. In the first systematic search for such systems, we have identified 16 SNe Ia-CSM, and here we present new spectra of 13 of them. Six SNe Ia-CSM have been well studied previously, three were previously known but are analyzed in depth for the first time here, and seven are new discoveries from the Palomar Transient Factory. The spectra of all SNe Ia-CSM are dominated by H{alpha} emission (with widths of {approx}2000 km s{sup -1}) and exhibit large H{alpha}/H{beta} intensity ratios (perhaps due to collisional excitation of hydrogen via the SN ejecta overtaking slower-moving CSM shells); moreover, they have an almost complete lack of He I emission. They also show possible evidence of dust formation through a decrease in the red wing of H{alpha} 75-100 days past maximum brightness, and nearly all SNe Ia-CSM exhibit strong Na I D absorption from the host galaxy. The absolute magnitudes (uncorrected for host-galaxy extinction) of SNe Ia-CSM are found to be -21.3 mag {<=} M{sub R} {<=} -19 mag, and they also seem to show ultraviolet emission at early times and strong infrared emission at late times (but no detected radio or X-ray emission). Finally, the host galaxies of SNe Ia-CSM are all late-type spirals similar to the Milky Way, or dwarf irregulars like the Large Magellanic Cloud, which implies that these objects come from a relatively young stellar population. This work represents the most detailed analysis of the SN Ia-CSM class to date.

Silverman, Jeffrey M. [Department of Astronomy, University of Texas, Austin, TX 78712-0259 (United States); Nugent, Peter E. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Gal-Yam, Avishay; Arcavi, Iair; Ben-Ami, Sagi [Benoziyo Center for Astrophysics, Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovot 76100 (Israel); Sullivan, Mark [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Southampton, Southampton SO17 1BJ (United Kingdom); Howell, D. Andrew; Graham, Melissa L. [Las Cumbres Observatory Global Telescope Network, Goleta, CA 93117 (United States); Filippenko, Alexei V.; Bloom, Joshua S.; Cenko, S. Bradley; Clubb, Kelsey I. [Department of Astronomy, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720-3411 (United States); Cao, Yi; Horesh, Assaf; Kulkarni, Shrinivas R. [Cahill Center for Astrophysics, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Chornock, Ryan; Foley, Ryan J. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Coil, Alison L. [Department of Physics, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA 92093 (United States); Griffith, Christopher V. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Kasliwal, Mansi M., E-mail: jsilverman@astro.as.utexas.edu [Observatories of the Carnegie Institution of Science, Pasadena, CA 91101 (United States); and others

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Tension in the Recent Type Ia Supernovae Datasets  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In the present work, we investigate the tension in the recent Type Ia supernovae (SNIa) datasets Constitution and Union. We show that they are in tension not only with the observations of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) anisotropy and the baryon acoustic oscillations (BAO), but also with other SNIa datasets such as Davis and SNLS. Then, we find the main sources responsible for the tension. Further, we make this more robust by employing the method of random truncation. Based on the results of this work, we suggest two truncated versions of the Union and Constitution datasets, namely the UnionT and ConstitutionT SNIa samples, whose behaviors are more regular.

Hao Wei

2010-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

54

Could there be a hole in type Ia supernovae?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Highlight: The Physics of Supernovae. Pro- ceedings of the EThere Be A Hole In Type l a Supernovae? Daniel Kasen, Peterscenario, Type l a Supernovae (SNe la) arise from a white

Kasen, Daniel; Nugent, Peter; Thomas, R.C.; Wang, Lifan

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

HOST GALAXY PROPERTIES AND HUBBLE RESIDUALS OF TYPE Ia SUPERNOVAE FROM THE NEARBY SUPERNOVA FACTORY  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We examine the relationship between Type Ia supernova (SN Ia) Hubble residuals and the properties of their host galaxies using a sample of 115 SNe Ia from the Nearby Supernova Factory. We use host galaxy stellar masses and specific star formation rates fitted from photometry for all hosts, as well as gas-phase metallicities for a subset of 69 star-forming (non-active galactic nucleus) hosts, to show that the SN Ia Hubble residuals correlate with each of these host properties. With these data we find new evidence for a correlation between SN Ia intrinsic color and host metallicity. When we combine our data with those of other published SN Ia surveys, we find the difference between mean SN Ia brightnesses in low- and high-mass hosts is 0.077 {+-} 0.014 mag. When viewed in narrow (0.2 dex) bins of host stellar mass, the data reveal apparent plateaus of Hubble residuals at high and low host masses with a rapid transition over a short mass range (9.8 {<=} log (M{sub *}/M{sub Sun }) {<=} 10.4). Although metallicity has been a favored interpretation for the origin of the Hubble residual trend with host mass, we illustrate how dust in star-forming galaxies and mean SN Ia progenitor age both evolve along the galaxy mass sequence, thereby presenting equally viable explanations for some or all of the observed SN Ia host bias.

Childress, M.; Aldering, G.; Aragon, C.; Bailey, S.; Fakhouri, H. K.; Hsiao, E. Y.; Kim, A. G.; Loken, S. [Physics Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Antilogus, P.; Bongard, S.; Canto, A.; Cellier-Holzem, F.; Guy, J. [Laboratoire de Physique Nucleaire et des Hautes Energies, Universite Pierre et Marie Curie Paris 6, Universite Paris Diderot Paris 7, CNRS-IN2P3, 4 place Jussieu, F-75252 Paris Cedex 05 (France); Baltay, C. [Department of Physics, Yale University, New Haven, CT 06250-8121 (United States); Buton, C.; Kerschhaggl, M.; Kowalski, M. [Physikalisches Institut, Universitaet Bonn, Nussallee 12, D-53115 Bonn (Germany); Chotard, N.; Copin, Y.; Gangler, E. [Universite de Lyon, F-69622, Lyon (France); Universite de Lyon 1, Villeurbanne (France); CNRS/IN2P3, Institut de Physique Nucleaire de Lyon (France); and others

2013-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

56

Type Ia Supernova Spectral Line Ratios as LuminosityIndicators  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Type Ia supernovae have played a crucial role in thediscovery of the dark energy, via the measurement of their light curvesand the determination of the peak brightness via fitting templates to theobserved lightcurve shape. Two spectroscopic indicators are also known tobe well correlated with peak luminosity. Since the spectroscopicluminosity indicators are obtained directly from observed spectra, theywill have different systematic errors than do measurements usingphotometry. Additionally, these spectroscopic indicators may be usefulfor studies of effects of evolution or age of the SNe~;Ia progenitorpopulation. We present several new variants of such spectroscopicindicators which are easy to automate and which minimize the effects ofnoise. We show that these spectroscopic indicators can be measured byproposed JDEM missions such as snap and JEDI.

Bongard, Sebastien; Baron, E.; Smadja, G.; Branch, David; Hauschildt, Peter H.

2005-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

57

Polarisation spectral synthesis for Type Ia supernova explosion models  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present a Monte Carlo radiative transfer technique for calculating synthetic spectropolarimetry for multi-dimensional supernova explosion models. The approach utilises "virtual-packets" that are generated during the propagation of the Monte Carlo quanta and used to compute synthetic observables for specific observer orientations. Compared to extracting synthetic observables by direct binning of emergent Monte Carlo quanta, this virtual-packet approach leads to a substantial reduction in the Monte Carlo noise. This is vital for calculating synthetic spectropolarimetry (since the degree of polarisation is typically very small) but also useful for calculations of light curves and spectra. We first validate our approach via application of an idealised test code to simple geometries. We then describe its implementation in the Monte Carlo radiative transfer code ARTIS and present test calculations for simple models for Type Ia supernovae. Specifically, we use the well-known one-dimensional W7 model to verify tha...

Bulla, M; Kromer, M

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Turbulence-Flame Interactions in Type Ia Supernovae  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The large range of time and length scales involved in type Ia supernovae (SN Ia) requires the use of flame models. As a prelude to exploring various options for flame models, we consider, in this paper, high-resolution three-dimensional simulations of the small-scale dynamics of nuclear flames in the supernova environment in which the details of the flame structure are fully resolved. The range of densities examined, 1 to $8 \\times 10^7$ g cm$^{-3}$, spans the transition from the laminar flamelet regime to the distributed burning regime where small scale turbulence disrupts the flame. The use of a low Mach number algorithm facilitates the accurate resolution of the thermal structure of the flame and the inviscid turbulent kinetic energy cascade, while implicitly incorporating kinetic energy dissipation at the grid-scale cutoff. For an assumed background of isotropic Kolmogorov turbulence with an energy characteristic of SN Ia, we find a transition density between 1 and $3 \\times 10^7$ g cm$^{-3}$ where the nature of the burning changes qualitatively. By $1 \\times 10^7$ g cm$^{-3}$, energy diffusion by conduction and radiation is exceeded, on the flame scale, by turbulent advection. As a result, the effective Lewis Number approaches unity. That is, the flame resembles a laminar flame, but is turbulently broadened with an effective diffusion coefficient, $D_T \\sim u' l$, where $u'$ is the turbulent intensity and $l$ is the integral scale. For the larger integral scales characteristic of a real supernova, the flame structure is predicted to become complex and unsteady. Implications for a possible transition to detonation are discussed.

A. J. Aspden; J. B. Bell; M. S. Day; S. E. Woosley; M. Zingale

2008-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

59

CARBON DEFLAGRATION IN TYPE Ia SUPERNOVA. I. CENTRALLY IGNITED MODELS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A leading model for Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) begins with a white dwarf near the Chandrasekhar mass that ignites a degenerate thermonuclear runaway close to its center and explodes. In a series of papers, we shall explore the consequences of ignition at several locations within such dwarfs. Here we assume central ignition, which has been explored before, but is worth revisiting, if only to validate those previous studies and to further elucidate the relevant physics for future work. A perturbed sphere of hot iron ash with a radius of {approx}100 km is initialized at the middle of the star. The subsequent explosion is followed in several simulations using a thickened flame model in which the flame speed is either fixed-within the range expected from turbulent combustion-or based on the local turbulent intensity. Global results, including the explosion energy and bulk nucleosynthesis (e.g., {sup 56}Ni of 0.48-0.56 M{sub Sun }) turn out to be insensitive to this speed. In all completed runs, the energy released by the nuclear burning is adequate to unbind the star, but not enough to give the energy and brightness of typical SNe Ia. As found previously, the chemical stratification observed in typical events is not reproduced. These models produce a large amount of unburned carbon and oxygen in central low velocity regions, which is inconsistent with spectroscopic observations, and the intermediate mass elements and iron group elements are strongly mixed during the explosion.

Ma, H.; Woosley, S. E.; Malone, C. M. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Almgren, A.; Bell, J. [Center for Computational Sciences and Engineering, Lawrence Berkeley National Lab, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Theoretical Clues to the Ultraviolet Diversity of Type Ia Supernovae  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The effect of metallicity on the observed light of Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) could lead to systematic errors as the absolute magnitudes of local and distant SNe Ia are compared to measure luminosity distances and determine cosmological parameters. The UV light may be especially sensitive to metallicity, though different modeling methods disagree as to the magnitude, wavelength dependence, and even the sign of the effect. The outer density structure, ^56 Ni, and to a lesser degree asphericity, also impact the UV. We compute synthetic photometry of various metallicity-dependent models and compare to UV/optical photometry from the Swift Ultra-Violet/Optical Telescope. We find that the scatter in the mid-UV to near-UV colors is larger than predicted by changes in metallicity alone and is not consistent with reddening. We demonstrate that a recently employed method to determine relative abundances using UV spectra can be done using UVOT photometry, but we warn that accurate results require an accurate model of t...

Brown, Peter J; Milne, Peter; Roming, Peter W A; Wang, Lifan

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "type ia supernovae" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

HOST GALAXIES OF TYPE Ia SUPERNOVAE FROM THE NEARBY SUPERNOVA FACTORY  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present photometric and spectroscopic observations of galaxies hosting Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) observed by the Nearby Supernova Factory. Combining Galaxy Evolution Explorer (GALEX) UV data with optical and near-infrared photometry, we employ stellar population synthesis techniques to measure SN Ia host galaxy stellar masses, star formation rates (SFRs), and reddening due to dust. We reinforce the key role of GALEX UV data in deriving accurate estimates of galaxy SFRs and dust extinction. Optical spectra of SN Ia host galaxies are fitted simultaneously for their stellar continua and emission lines fluxes, from which we derive high-precision redshifts, gas-phase metallicities, and H{alpha}-based SFRs. With these data we show that SN Ia host galaxies present tight agreement with the fiducial galaxy mass-metallicity relation from Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) for stellar masses log(M{sub *}/M{sub Sun }) > 8.5 where the relation is well defined. The star formation activity of SN Ia host galaxies is consistent with a sample of comparable SDSS field galaxies, though this comparison is limited by systematic uncertainties in SFR measurements. Our analysis indicates that SN Ia host galaxies are, on average, typical representatives of normal field galaxies.

Childress, M.; Aldering, G.; Aragon, C.; Bailey, S.; Fakhouri, H. K.; Hsiao, E. Y.; Kim, A. G.; Loken, S. [Physics Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Antilogus, P.; Bongard, S.; Canto, A.; Cellier-Holzem, F.; Guy, J. [Laboratoire de Physique Nucleaire et des Hautes Energies, Universite Pierre et Marie Curie Paris 6, Universite Paris Diderot Paris 7, CNRS-IN2P3, 4 place Jussieu, F-75252 Paris Cedex 05 (France); Baltay, C. [Department of Physics, Yale University, New Haven, CT 06250-8121 (United States); Buton, C.; Kerschhaggl, M.; Kowalski, M. [Physikalisches Institut, Universitaet Bonn, Nussallee 12, D-53115 Bonn (Germany); Chotard, N.; Copin, Y.; Gangler, E. [Universite de Lyon, F-69622, Lyon (France); Universite de Lyon 1, Villeurbanne (France); CNRS/IN2P3, Institut de Physique Nucleaire de Lyon (France); and others

2013-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

62

Reflections on Reflexions: I. Light Echoes in Type Ia Supernovae  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In the last ten years, observational evidences about a possible connection between Type Ia Supernovae (SNe) properties and the environment where they explode have been steadily growing. In this paper I discuss, from a theoretical point of view but with an observer's perspective, the usage of light echoes (LEs) to probe the CSM around SNe of Type Ia since, in principle, they give us a unique opportunity of getting a three-dimensional description of the SN environment. In turn, this can be used to check the often suggested association of some Ia's with dusty/star forming regions, which would point to a young population for the progenitors. After giving a brief introduction to the LE phenomenon in single scattering approximation, I derive analytical and numerical solutions for the optical light and colour curves for a few simple dust geometries. A fully 3D multiple scattering treatment has also been implemented in a Monte Carlo code, which I have used to investigate the effects of multiple scattering. In particular, I have explored in detail the LE colour dependency from time and dust distribution, since this is a promising tool to determine the dust density and derive the effective presence of multiple scattering from the observed properties. Finally, again by means of Monte Carlo simulations, I have studied the effects of multiple scattering on the LE linear polarization, analyzing the dependencies from the dust parameters and geometry. Both the analytical formalism and MC codes described in this paper can be used for any LE for which the light curve of the central source is known.

F. Patat

2004-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

63

SPIN-UP/SPIN-DOWN MODELS FOR TYPE Ia SUPERNOVAE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the single-degenerate scenario for Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia), a white dwarf (WD) must gain a significant amount of matter from a companion star. Because the accreted mass carries angular momentum, the WD is likely to achieve fast spin periods, which can increase the critical mass, M{sub crit}, needed for explosion. When M{sub crit} is higher than the maximum mass achieved by the WD, the central regions of the WD must spin down before it can explode. This introduces super-Chandrasekhar single-degenerate explosions, and a delay between the completion of mass gain and the time of the explosion. Matter ejected from the binary during mass transfer therefore has a chance to become diffuse, and the explosion occurs in a medium with a density similar to that of typical regions of the interstellar medium. Also, either by the end of the WD's mass increase or else by the time of explosion, the donor may exhaust its stellar envelope and become a WD. This alters, generally diminishing, explosion signatures related to the donor star. Nevertheless, the spin-up/spin-down model is highly predictive. Prior to explosion, progenitors can be super-M{sub Ch} WDs in either wide binaries with WD companions or cataclysmic variables. These systems can be discovered and studied through wide-field surveys. Post-explosion, the spin-up/spin-down model predicts a population of fast-moving WDs, low-mass stars, and even brown dwarfs. In addition, the spin-up/spin-down model provides a paradigm which may be able to explain both the similarities and the diversity observed among SNe Ia.

Stefano, R. Di [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Voss, R. [Department of Astrophysics/IMAPP, Radboud University Nijmegen, P.O. Box 9010, NL-6500 GL Nijmegen (Netherlands); Claeys, J. S. W. [Sterrekundig Instituut, Universiteit Utrecht, P.O. Box 800000, 3508 TA Utrecht (Netherlands)

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Type Ia Supernovae Rates and Galaxy Clustering from the CFHT Supernova Legacy Survey  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope Supernova Legacy Survey (SNLS) has created a large homogeneous database of intermediate redshift (0.2 rates, properties, and host galaxy star formation rates. The SNLS SN Ia database has now been combined with a photometric redshift galaxy catalog and an optical galaxy cluster catalog to investigate the possible influence of galaxy clustering on the SN Ia rate, over and above the expected effect due to the dependence of SFR on clustering through the morphology-density relation. We identify three cluster SNe Ia, plus three additional possible cluster SNe Ia, and find the SN Ia rate per unit mass in clusters at intermediate redshifts is consistent with the rate per unit mass in field early-type galaxies and the SN Ia cluster rate from low redshift cluster targeted surveys. We also find the number of SNe Ia in cluster environments to be within a factor of two of expectations from the two component SNIa rate model.

M. L. Graham; C. J. Pritchet; M. Sullivan; S. D. J. Gwyn; J. D. Neill; E. Y. Hsiao; P. Astier; D. Balam; C. Balland; S. Basa; R. G. Carlberg; A. Conley; D. Fouchez; J. Guy; D. Hardin; I. M. Hook; D. A. Howell; R. Pain; K. Perrett; N. Regnault; S. Baumont; J. Le Du; C. Lidman; S. Perlmutter; P. Ripoche; N. Suzuki; E. S. Walker; T. Zhang

2008-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

65

Restframe I-band Hubble diagram for type Ia supernovae up to redshift z ~; 0.5  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in STScI Symposium Ser. 13, Supernovae and gamma-ray bursts:Highlight: The Physics of Supernovae, ed. W. Hillebrandt &diagram for type Ia supernovae up to redshift z ? 0.5 ? S.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

EVIDENCE FOR TYPE Ia SUPERNOVA DIVERSITY FROM ULTRAVIOLET OBSERVATIONS WITH THE HUBBLE SPACE TELESCOPE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present ultraviolet (UV) spectroscopy and photometry of four Type Ia supernovae (SNe 2004dt, 2004ef, 2005M, and 2005cf) obtained with the UV prism of the Advanced Camera for Surveys on the Hubble Space Telescope. This ...

Lewin, Walter H. G.

67

Type Ia supernova rate at a redshift of ~ 0.1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present the type Ia rate measurement based on two EROS supernova search campaigns (in 1999 and 2000). Sixteen supernovae identified as type Ia were discovered. The measurement of the detection efficiency, using a Monte Carlo simulation, provides the type Ia supernova explosion rate at a redshift ~ 0.13. The result is $0.125^{+0.044+0.028}_{-0.034-0.028} h_{70}^2$ SNu where 1 SNu = 1 SN / $10^{10} L_{sun}^B$ / century. This value is compatible with the previous EROS measurement (Hardin et al. 2000), done with a much smaller sample, at a similar redshift. Comparison with other values at different redshifts suggests an evolution of the type Ia supernova rate.

Blanc, G; Alard, C; Albert, J N; Aldering, G; Amadon, A; Andersen, J; Ansari, R; Aubourg, E; Balland, C; Bareyre, P; Beaulieu, J P; Charlot, X; Conley, A; Coutures, C; Dahlen, T; Derue, F; Fan, X; Ferlet, R; Folatelli, G; Fouqué, P; Garavini, G; Glicenstein, J F; Goldman, B; Goobar, A; Gould, A; Graff, D; Gros, M; Haïssinski, J; Hamadache, C; Hardin, D; Hook, I M; De Kat, J; Kent, S; Kim, A; Lasserre, T; Le Guillou, Laurent; Lesquoy, E; Loup, C; Magneville, C; Marquette, J B; Maurice, E; Maury, A; Milsztajn, A; Moniez, M; Mouchet, M; Newberg, H; Nobili, S; Palanque-Delabrouille, Nathalie; Perdereau, O; Prévôt, L; Rahal, Y R; Regnault, N; Rich, J; Ruiz-Lapuente, P; Spiro, M; Tisserand, P; Vidal-Madjar, A; Vigroux, L; Walton, N A; Zylberajch, S

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Type Ia supernova rate at a redshift of ~ 0.1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present the type Ia rate measurement based on two EROS supernova search campaigns (in 1999 and 2000). Sixteen supernovae identified as type Ia were discovered. The measurement of the detection efficiency, using a Monte Carlo simulation, provides the type Ia supernova explosion rate at a redshift ~ 0.13. The result is $0.125^{+0.044+0.028}_{-0.034-0.028} h_{70}^2$ SNu where 1 SNu = 1 SN / $10^{10} L_{sun}^B$ / century. This value is compatible with the previous EROS measurement (Hardin et al. 2000), done with a much smaller sample, at a similar redshift. Comparison with other values at different redshifts suggests an evolution of the type Ia supernova rate.

G. Blanc; C. Afonso; C. Alard; J. N. Albert; G. Aldering; A. Amadon; J. Andersen; R. Ansari; E. Aubourg; C. Balland; P. Bareyre; J. P. Beaulieu; X. Charlot; A. Conley; C. Coutures; T. Dahlen; F. Derue; X. Fan; R. Ferlet; G. Folatelli; P. Fouque; G. Garavini; J. F. Glicenstein; B. Goldman; A. Goobar; A. Gould; D. Graff; M. Gros; J. Haissinski; C. Hamadache; D. Hardin; I. M. Hook; J. deKat; S. Kent; A. Kim; T. Lasserre; L. LeGuillou; E. Lesquoy; C. Loup; C. Magneville; J. B. Marquette; E. Maurice; A. Maury; A. Milsztajn; M. Moniez; M. Mouchet; H. Newberg; S. Nobili; N. Palanque-Delabrouille; O. Perdereau; L. Prevot; Y. R. Rahal; N. Regnault; J. Rich; P. Ruiz-Lapuente; M. Spiro; P. Tisserand; A. Vidal-Madjar; L. Vigroux; N. A. Walton; S. Zylberajch

2004-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

69

Gamma-rays from Type Ia supernova SN2014J  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The whole set of INTEGRAL observations of type Ia supernova SN2014J, covering the period 16-162 days after the explosion has being analyzed. For spectral fitting the data are split into early and late periods covering days 16-35 and 50-162, respectively, optimized for Ni-56 and Co-56 lines. As expected for the early period much of the gamma-ray signal is confined to energies below $\\sim$200 keV, while for the late period it is most strong above 400 keV. In particular, in the late period Co-56 lines at 847 and 1248 keV are detected at 4.7 and 4.3 sigma respectively. The lightcurves in several representative energy bands are calculated for the entire period. The resulting spectra and lightcurves are compared with a subset of models. We confirm our previous finding that the gamma-ray data are broadly consistent with the expectations for canonical 1D models, such as delayed detonation or deflagration models for a near-Chandrasekhar mass WD. Late optical spectra (day 136 after the explosion) show rather symmetric ...

Churazov, E; Isern, J; Bikmaev, I; Bravo, E; Chugai, N; Grebenev, S; Jean, P; Knödlseder, J; Lebrun, F; Kuulkers, E

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

COSMOLOGY WITH PHOTOMETRICALLY CLASSIFIED TYPE Ia SUPERNOVAE FROM THE SDSS-II SUPERNOVA SURVEY  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present the cosmological analysis of 752 photometrically classified Type Ia Supernovae (SNe Ia) obtained from the full Sloan Digital Sky Survey II (SDSS-II) Supernova (SN) Survey, supplemented with host-galaxy spectroscopy from the SDSS-III Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey. Our photometric-classification method is based on the SN classification technique of Sako et al., aided by host-galaxy redshifts (0.05 < z < 0.55). SuperNova ANAlysis simulations of our methodology estimate that we have an SN Ia classification efficiency of 70.8%, with only 3.9% contamination from core-collapse (non-Ia) SNe. We demonstrate that this level of contamination has no effect on our cosmological constraints. We quantify and correct for our selection effects (e.g., Malmquist bias) using simulations. When fitting to a flat {Lambda}CDM cosmological model, we find that our photometric sample alone gives {Omega} {sub m} = 0.24{sup +0.07} {sub -0.05} (statistical errors only). If we relax the constraint on flatness, then our sample provides competitive joint statistical constraints on {Omega} {sub m} and {Omega}{sub {Lambda}}, comparable to those derived from the spectroscopically confirmed Three-year Supernova Legacy Survey (SNLS3). Using only our data, the statistics-only result favors an accelerating universe at 99.96% confidence. Assuming a constant wCDM cosmological model, and combining with H {sub 0}, cosmic microwave background, and luminous red galaxy data, we obtain w = -0.96{sup +0.10} {sub -0.10}, {Omega} {sub m} = 0.29{sup +0.02} {sub -0.02}, and {Omega} {sub k} = 0.00{sup +0.03} {sub -0.02} (statistical errors only), which is competitive with similar spectroscopically confirmed SNe Ia analyses. Overall this comparison is reassuring, considering the lower redshift leverage of the SDSS-II SN sample (z < 0.55) and the lack of spectroscopic confirmation used herein. These results demonstrate the potential of photometrically classified SN Ia samples in improving cosmological constraints.

Campbell, Heather; D'Andrea, Chris B; Nichol, Robert C.; Smith, Mathew; Lampeitl, Hubert [Institute of Cosmology and Gravitation, University of Portsmouth, Portsmouth, PO1 3FX (United Kingdom)] [Institute of Cosmology and Gravitation, University of Portsmouth, Portsmouth, PO1 3FX (United Kingdom); Sako, Masao [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Pennsylvania, 209 South 33rd Street, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States)] [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Pennsylvania, 209 South 33rd Street, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); Olmstead, Matthew D.; Brown, Peter; Dawson, Kyle S. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Utah, 115 South 1400 East 201, Salt Lake City, UT 84112 (United States)] [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Utah, 115 South 1400 East 201, Salt Lake City, UT 84112 (United States); Bassett, Bruce [Mathematics Department, University of Cape Town, Rondebosch, Cape Town (South Africa)] [Mathematics Department, University of Cape Town, Rondebosch, Cape Town (South Africa); Biswas, Rahul; Kuhlmann, Steve [Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 South Cass Avenue, Lemont, IL 60439 (United States)] [Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 South Cass Avenue, Lemont, IL 60439 (United States); Cinabro, David [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Wayne State University, Detroit, MI 48126 (United States)] [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Wayne State University, Detroit, MI 48126 (United States); Dilday, Ben [Las Cumbres Observatory Global Telescope Network, 6740 Cortona Dr., Suite 102, Goleta, CA 93117 (United States)] [Las Cumbres Observatory Global Telescope Network, 6740 Cortona Dr., Suite 102, Goleta, CA 93117 (United States); Foley, Ryan J. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States)] [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Frieman, Joshua A. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, The University of Chicago, 5640 South Ellis Avenue, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States)] [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, The University of Chicago, 5640 South Ellis Avenue, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States); Garnavich, Peter [Department of Physics, University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, IN 46556 (United States)] [Department of Physics, University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, IN 46556 (United States); Hlozek, Renee [Department of Astrophysical Sciences, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States)] [Department of Astrophysical Sciences, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States); Jha, Saurabh W. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Rutgers University, 136 Frelinghuysen Road, Piscataway, NJ 08854 (United States)] [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Rutgers University, 136 Frelinghuysen Road, Piscataway, NJ 08854 (United States); Kunz, Martin, E-mail: Heather.Campbell@port.ac.uk [African Institute for Mathematical Sciences, Muizenberg, 7945, Cape Town (South Africa)] [African Institute for Mathematical Sciences, Muizenberg, 7945, Cape Town (South Africa); and others

2013-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

71

Multi-color light curves of type Ia supernovae on the color-magnitude diagram: A novel step toward more precise distance and extinction estimates  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Date is earlier than for supernovae with smaller ?m 15 . SeeLight Curves of Type Ia Supernovae on the Color-Magnituderelation of Type Ia supernovae after optical maximum can

Wang, Lifan; Goldhaber, Gerson; Aldering, Greg; Perlmutter, Saul

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

DUST IN A TYPE Ia SUPERNOVA PROGENITOR: SPITZER SPECTROSCOPY OF KEPLER'S SUPERNOVA REMNANT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Characterization of the relatively poorly understood progenitor systems of Type Ia supernovae is of great importance in astrophysics, particularly given the important cosmological role that these supernovae play. Kepler's supernova remnant, the result of a Type Ia supernova, shows evidence for an interaction with a dense circumstellar medium (CSM), suggesting a single-degenerate progenitor system. We present 7.5-38 {mu}m infrared (IR) spectra of the remnant, obtained with the Spitzer Space Telescope, dominated by emission from warm dust. Broad spectral features at 10 and 18 {mu}m, consistent with various silicate particles, are seen throughout. These silicates were likely formed in the stellar outflow from the progenitor system during the asymptotic giant branch stage of evolution, and imply an oxygen-rich chemistry. In addition to silicate dust, a second component, possibly carbonaceous dust, is necessary to account for the short-wavelength Infrared Spectrograph and Infrared Array Camera data. This could imply a mixed chemistry in the atmosphere of the progenitor system. However, non-spherical metallic iron inclusions within silicate grains provide an alternative solution. Models of collisionally heated dust emission from fast shocks (>1000 km s{sup -1}) propagating into the CSM can reproduce the majority of the emission associated with non-radiative filaments, where dust temperatures are {approx}80-100 K, but fail to account for the highest temperatures detected, in excess of 150 K. We find that slower shocks (a few hundred km s{sup -1}) into moderate density material (n{sub 0} {approx} 50-250 cm{sup -3}) are the only viable source of heating for this hottest dust. We confirm the finding of an overall density gradient, with densities in the north being an order of magnitude greater than those in the south.

Williams, Brian J.; Borkowski, Kazimierz J.; Reynolds, Stephen P. [Physics Department, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27695-8202 (United States); Ghavamian, Parviz [Department of Physics, Astronomy, and Geosciences, Towson University, Towson, MD 21252 (United States); Blair, William P. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Johns Hopkins University, 3400 N. Charles St., Baltimore, MD 21218-2686 (United States); Long, Knox S. [STScI, 3700 San Martin Dr., Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Sankrit, Ravi, E-mail: brian.j.williams@nasa.gov [SOFIA/USRA, NASA Ames Research Center, M/S N211-3, Moffett Field, CA 94035 (United States)

2012-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

73

Prospective Type Ia supernova surveys from Dome A  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

time series of ?1000 z supernovae. These can serve tocapable of discovering supernovae shortly after explosion§4. 2. Low-Redshift Supernovae A nearby sample is essential

Kim, A.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Low-Metallicity Inhibition of Type Ia Supernovae and Galactic and Cosmic Chemical Evolution  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We introduce a metallicity dependence of Type Ia supernova (SN Ia) rate into the Galactic and cosmic chemical evolution models. In our SN Ia progenitor scenario, the accreting white dwarf (WD) blows a strong wind to reach the Chandrasekhar mass limit. If the iron abundance of the progenitors is as low as [Fe/H] 1-2, SNe Ia can be found only in the environments where the timescale of metal enrichment is sufficiently short as in starburst galaxies and ellipticals. The low-metallicity inhibition of SNe Ia can shed new light on the following issues: 1) The limited metallicity range of the SN Ia progenitors would imply that ``evolution effects'' are relatively small for the use of high redshift SNe Ia to determine the cosmological parameters. 2) WDs of halo populations are poor producers of SNe Ia, so that the WD contribution to the halo mass is not constrained from the iron abundance in the halo. 3) The abundance patterns of globular clusters and field stars in the Galactic halo lack of SN Ia signatures in spite of their age difference of several Gyrs, which can be explained by the low-metallicity inhibition of SNe Ia. 4) It could also explain why the SN Ia contamination is not seen in the damped Ly\\alpha systems for over a wide range of redshift.

Chiaki Kobayashi; Takuji Tsujimoto; Ken'ich Nomoto; Izumi Hachisu; Mariko Kato

1998-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

75

Closest Type Ia Supernova in Decades Solves a Cosmic Mystery  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation Proposed New SubstationClean Communities of WesternVailCloistered JuneLabClosest Type Ia

76

Tycho Brahe's 1572 supernova as a standard type Ia explosion revealed from its light echo spectrum  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) are thermonuclear explosions of white dwarf stars in close binary systems. They play an important role as cosmological distance indicators and have led to the discovery of the accelerated expansion of the Universe. Among the most important unsolved questions are how the explosion actually proceeds and whether accretion occurs from a companion or via the merging of two white dwarfs. Tycho Brahe's supernova of 1572 (SN 1572) is thought to be one of the best candidates for a SN Ia in the Milky Way. The proximity of the SN 1572 remnant has allowed detailed studies, such as the possible identification of the binary companion, and provides a unique opportunity to test theories of the explosion mechanism and the nature of the progenitor. The determination of the yet unknown exact spectroscopic type of SN 1572 is crucial to relate these results to the diverse population of SNe Ia. Here we report an optical spectrum of Tycho Brahe's supernova near maximum brightness, obtained from a scattered-light echo more than four centuries after the direct light of the explosion swept past Earth. We find that SN 1572 belongs to the majority class of normal SNe Ia. The presence of a strong Ca II IR feature at velocities exceeding 20,000 km/s, which is similar to the previously observed polarized features in other SNe Ia, suggests asphericity in SN 1572.

Oliver Krause; Masaomi Tanaka; Tomonori Usuda; Takashi Hattori; Miwa Goto; Stephan Birkmann; Ken'ichi Nomoto

2008-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

77

A Precision Photometric Comparison between SDSS-II and CSP Type Ia Supernova Data  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Consistency between Carnegie Supernova Project (CSP) and SDSS-II supernova (SN) survey ugri measurements has been evaluated by comparing SDSS and CSP photometry for nine spectroscopically confirmed Type Ia supernova observed contemporaneously by both programs. The CSP data were transformed into the SDSS photometric system. Sources of systematic uncertainty have been identified, quantified, and shown to be at or below the 0.023 magnitude level in all bands. When all photometry for a given band is combined, we find average magnitude differences of equal to or less than 0.011 magnitudes in ugri, with rms scatter ranging from 0.043 to 0.077 magnitudes. The u band agreement is promising, with the caveat that only four of the nine supernovae are well-observed in u and these four exhibit an 0.038 magnitude supernova-to-supernova scatter in this filter.

Mosher, J; Corlies, L; Folatelli, G; Frieman, J; Holtzman, J; Jha, S W; Kessler, R; Marriner, J; Phillips, M M; Stritzinger, M; Morrell, N; Schneider, D P

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

On the thermonuclear runaway in Type Ia supernovae: How to run away  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Type Ia Supernovae are thought to be thermonuclear explosions of massive white dwarfs (WD). We present the first study of multi-dimensional effects during the final hours prior to the thermonuclear runaway which leads to the explosion. The calculations utilize an implicit, 2-D hydrodynamical code

P. Höflich; J. Stein

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Turbulent Oxygen Flames in Type Ia Supernovae A. J. Aspden1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Turbulent Oxygen Flames in Type Ia Supernovae A. J. Aspden1 , J. B. Bell1 , and S. E. Woosley2 oxygen flames. The two aims of the paper are to examine the response of the inductive oxygen flame to intense levels of turbulence, and to explore the possibility of transition to detonation in the oxygen

80

Analytical Expressions For Light-Curves Of Ordinary And Superluminous Supernovae Type Ia  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ordinary supernovae of type Ia (SNeIa) may be produced by the thermonuclear explosion of white dwarfs (WDs), which after their nascence in proto-planetary nebulae accrete fall-back matter and approach the Chandrasekhar mass limit. If the detonation continues into the fall-back layer and/or if the SNIa debris collide with it, they may produce a super Chandrasekhar SNIa. A few underlying physical assumptions of such model yield a very simple master formula that reproduces quite well the bolometric light-curves of both ordinary and supeluminous SNeIa. Other main properties of SNeIa, including the empirical 'brighter-slower' Philipps' relation that was used to standardize ordinary SNeIa as distance indicators and led to the discovery of the accelerating expansion of the universe are also reproduced.

Shlomo Dado; Arnon Dar

2014-02-06T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "type ia supernovae" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

THE IMPACT OF METALLICITY ON THE RATE OF TYPE Ia SUPERNOVAE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The metallicity of a star strongly affects both its evolution and the properties of the stellar remnant that results from its demise. It is generally accepted that stars with initial masses below {approx}8 M{sub Sun} leave behind white dwarfs and that some sub-population of these lead to Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia). However, it is often tacitly assumed that metallicity has no effect on the rate of SNe Ia. We propose that a consequence of the effects of metallicity is to significantly increase the SN Ia rate in lower-metallicity galaxies, in contrast to previous expectations. This is because lower-metallicity stars leave behind higher-mass white dwarfs, which should be easier to bring to explosion. We first model SN Ia rates in relation to galaxy masses and ages alone, finding that the elevation in the rate of SNe Ia in lower-mass galaxies measured by Lick Observatory SN Search is readily explained. However, we then see that models incorporating this effect of metallicity agree just as well. Using the same parameters to estimate the cosmic SN Ia rate, we again find good agreement with data up to z Almost-Equal-To 2. We suggest that this degeneracy warrants more detailed examination of host galaxy metallicities. We discuss additional implications, including for hosts of high-z SNe Ia, the SN Ia delay time distribution, super-Chandrasekhar SNe, and cosmology.

Kistler, Matthew D. [California Institute of Technology, Mail Code 350-17, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Stanek, K. Z.; Kochanek, Christopher S.; Thompson, Todd A. [Center for Cosmology and Astro-Particle Physics, Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Prieto, Jose L. [Carnegie Observatories, 813 Santa Barbara Street, Pasadena, CA 91101 (United States)

2013-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

82

Type Ia Supernovae M100 in Early 2006  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

://rsdwww.nrl.navy.mil/7212/montes/snetax.html 2.) http://www.lbl.gov/ScienceArticles/Archive/sabl/2005/October/04supernovae.html

Crenshaw, Michael

83

[O I] ??6300, 6364 IN THE NEBULAR SPECTRUM OF A SUBLUMINOUS TYPE Ia SUPERNOVA  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this Letter, a late-phase spectrum of SN 2010lp, a subluminous Type Ia supernova (SN Ia), is presented and analyzed. As in 1991bg-like SNe Ia at comparable epochs, the spectrum is characterized by relatively broad [Fe II] and [Ca II] emission lines. However, instead of narrow [Fe III] and [Co III] lines that dominate the emission from the innermost regions of 1991bg-like supernovae (SNe), SN 2010lp shows [O I] ??6300, 6364 emission, usually associated with core-collapse SNe and never previously observed in a subluminous thermonuclear explosion. The [O I] feature has a complex profile with two strong, narrow emission peaks. This suggests that oxygen is distributed in a non-spherical region close to the center of the ejecta, severely challenging most thermonuclear explosion models discussed in the literature. We conclude that, given these constraints, violent mergers are presently the most promising scenario to explain SN 2010lp.

Taubenberger, S.; Kromer, M.; Hillebrandt, W. [Max-Planck-Institut für Astrophysik, Karl-Schwarzschild-Str. 1, D-85741 Garching (Germany)] [Max-Planck-Institut für Astrophysik, Karl-Schwarzschild-Str. 1, D-85741 Garching (Germany); Pakmor, R. [Heidelberger Institut für Theoretische Studien, Schloss-Wolfsbrunnenweg 35, D-69118 Heidelberg (Germany)] [Heidelberger Institut für Theoretische Studien, Schloss-Wolfsbrunnenweg 35, D-69118 Heidelberg (Germany); Pignata, G. [Departamento de Ciencias Fisicas, Universidad Andres Bello, Avda. Republica 252, Santiago (Chile)] [Departamento de Ciencias Fisicas, Universidad Andres Bello, Avda. Republica 252, Santiago (Chile); Maeda, K. [Kavli Institute for the Physics and Mathematics of the Universe (WPI), Todai Institutes for Advanced Study, University of Tokyo, 5-1-5 Kashiwanoha, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8583 (Japan)] [Kavli Institute for the Physics and Mathematics of the Universe (WPI), Todai Institutes for Advanced Study, University of Tokyo, 5-1-5 Kashiwanoha, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8583 (Japan); Hachinger, S. [Julius-Maximilians-Universität Würzburg, Emil-Fischer-Str. 31, D-97074 Würzburg (Germany)] [Julius-Maximilians-Universität Würzburg, Emil-Fischer-Str. 31, D-97074 Würzburg (Germany); Leibundgut, B. [European Southern Observatory, Karl-Schwarzschild-Str. 2, D-85748 Garching (Germany)] [European Southern Observatory, Karl-Schwarzschild-Str. 2, D-85748 Garching (Germany)

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Constructing a cosmological model-independent Hubble diagram of type Ia supernovae with cosmic chronometers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We apply two methods to reconstruct the Hubble parameter $H(z)$ as a function of redshift from 15 measurements of the expansion rate obtained from age estimates of passively evolving galaxies. These reconstructions enable us to derive the luminosity distance to a certain redshift $z$, calibrate the light-curve fitting parameters accounting for the (unknown) intrinsic magnitude of type Ia supernova (SNe Ia) and construct cosmological model-independent Hubble diagrams of SNe Ia. In order to test the compatibility between the reconstructed functions of $H(z)$, we perform a statistical analysis considering the latest SNe Ia sample, the so-called JLA compilation. We find that, while one of the reconstructed functions leads to a value of the local Hubble parameter $H_0$ in excellent agreement with the one reported by the Planck collaboration, the other requires a higher value of $H_0$, which is consistent with recent measurements of this quantity from Cepheids and other local distance indicators.

Li, Zhengxiang; Yu, Hongwei; Zhu, Zong-Hong; Alcaniz, J S

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Tycho Brahe's 1572 supernova as a standard type Ia explosion revealed from its light echo spectrum  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) are thermonuclear explosions of white dwarf stars in close binary systems. They play an important role as cosmological distance indicators and have led to the discovery of the accelerated expansion of the Universe. Among the most important unsolved questions are how the explosion actually proceeds and whether accretion occurs from a companion or via the merging of two white dwarfs. Tycho Brahe's supernova of 1572 (SN 1572) is thought to be one of the best candidates for a SN Ia in the Milky Way. The proximity of the SN 1572 remnant has allowed detailed studies, such as the possible identification of the binary companion, and provides a unique opportunity to test theories of the explosion mechanism and the nature of the progenitor. The determination of the yet unknown exact spectroscopic type of SN 1572 is crucial to relate these results to the diverse population of SNe Ia. Here we report an optical spectrum of Tycho Brahe's supernova near maximum brightness, obtained from a scatter...

Krause, Oliver; Usuda, Tomonori; Hattori, Takashi; Goto, Miwa; Birkmann, Stephan; Nomoto, Ken'ichi

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

RESULTS OF THE LICK OBSERVATORY SUPERNOVA SEARCH FOLLOW-UP PHOTOMETRY PROGRAM: BVRI LIGHT CURVES OF 165 TYPE Ia SUPERNOVAE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present BVRI light curves of 165 Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) from the Lick Observatory Supernova Search follow-up photometry program from 1998 through 2008. Our light curves are typically well sampled (cadence of 3-4 days) with an average of 21 photometry epochs. We describe our monitoring campaign and the photometry reduction pipeline that we have developed. Comparing our data set to that of Hicken et al., with which we have 69 overlapping supernovae (SNe), we find that as an ensemble the photometry is consistent, with only small overall systematic differences, although individual SNe may differ by as much as 0.1 mag, and occasionally even more. Such disagreement in specific cases can have significant implications for combining future large data sets. We present an analysis of our light curves which includes template fits of light-curve shape parameters useful for calibrating SNe Ia as distance indicators. Assuming the B - V color of SNe Ia at 35 days past maximum light can be presented as the convolution of an intrinsic Gaussian component and a decaying exponential attributed to host-galaxy reddening, we derive an intrinsic scatter of {sigma} = 0.076 {+-} 0.019 mag, consistent with the Lira-Phillips law. This is the first of two papers, the second of which will present a cosmological analysis of the data presented herein.

Ganeshalingam, Mohan; Li Weidong; Filippenko, Alexei V.; Anderson, Carmen; Foster, Griffin; Griffith, Christopher V.; Joubert, Niels; Leja, Joel; Macomber, Brent; Pritchard, Tyler; Thrasher, Patrick; Winslow, Dustin [Department of Astronomy, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720-3411 (United States); Gates, Elinor L.; Grigsby, Bryant J.; Lowe, Thomas B. [Lick Observatory, P.O. Box 85, Mount Hamilton, CA 95140 (United States)

2010-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

87

Spectral Observations and Analyses of Low-Redshift Type Ia Supernovae  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1.3.2 Thermonuclear Supernovae . . . . . . . . 1.4 Why WriteIa are the result of thermonuclear explosions of C/O whiteIa are the result of thermonuclear explosions of C/O white

Silverman, Jeffrey Michael

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

On the small-scale stability of thermonuclear flames in Type Ia supernovae  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present a numerical model which allows us to investigate thermonuclear flames in Type Ia supernova explosions. The model is based on a finite-volume explicit hydrodynamics solver employing PPM. Using the level-set technique combined with in-cell reconstruction and flux-splitting schemes we are able to describe the flame in the discontinuity approximation. We apply our implementation to flame propagation in Chandrasekhar-mass Type Ia supernova models. In particular we concentrate on intermediate scales between the flame width and the Gibson-scale, where the burning front is subject to the Landau-Darrieus instability. We are able to reproduce the theoretical prediction on the growth rates of perturbations in the linear regime and observe the stabilization of the flame in a cellular shape. The increase of the mean burning velocity due to the enlarged flame surface is measured. Results of our simulation are in agreement with semianalytical studies.

F. K. Roepke; J. C. Niemeyer; W. Hillebrandt

2003-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

89

On the Stability of Thermonuclear Burning Fronts in Type Ia Supernovae  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Summary. The propagation of cellularly stabilized thermonuclear flames is investigated by means of numerical simulations. In Type Ia supernova explosions the corresponding burning regime establishes at scales below the Gibson length. The cellular flame stabilization—which is a result of an interplay between the Landau-Darrieus instability and a nonlinear stabilization mechanism—is studied for the case of propagation into quiescent fuel as well as interaction with vortical fuel flows. Our simulations indicate that in thermonuclear supernova explosions stable cellular flames develop around the Gibson scale and that a deflagration-to-detonation transition is unlikely to be triggered from flame evolution effects here. 1

F. K. Röpke; W. Hillebr

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

On the Stability of Thermonuclear Burning Fronts in Type Ia Supernovae  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The propagation of cellularly stabilized thermonuclear flames is investigated by means of numerical simulations. In Type Ia supernova explosions the corresponding burning regime establishes at scales below the Gibson length. The cellular flame stabilization - which is a result of an interplay between the Landau-Darrieus instability and a nonlinear stabilization mechanism - is studied for the case of propagation into quiescent fuel as well as interaction with vortical fuel flows. Our simulations indicate that in thermonuclear supernova explosions stable cellular flames develop around the Gibson scale and that deflagration-to-detonation transition is unlikely to be triggered from flame evolution effects here.

F. K. Roepke; W. Hillebrandt

2004-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

91

THE DISCOVERY OF THE MOST DISTANT KNOWN TYPE Ia SUPERNOVA AT REDSHIFT 1.914  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present the discovery of a Type Ia supernova (SN) at redshift z = 1.914 from the CANDELS multi-cycle treasury program on the Hubble Space Telescope (HST). This SN was discovered in the infrared using the Wide-Field Camera 3, and it is the highest-redshift Type Ia SN yet observed. We classify this object as a SN Ia by comparing its light curve and spectrum with those of a large sample of Type Ia and core-collapse SNe. Its apparent magnitude is consistent with that expected from the {Lambda}CDM concordance cosmology. We discuss the use of spectral evidence for classification of z > 1.5 SNe Ia using HST grism simulations, finding that spectral data alone can frequently rule out SNe II, but distinguishing between SNe Ia and SNe Ib/c can require prohibitively long exposures. In such cases, a quantitative analysis of the light curve may be necessary for classification. Our photometric and spectroscopic classification methods can aid the determination of SN rates and cosmological parameters from the full high-redshift CANDELS SN sample.

Jones, David O.; Rodney, Steven A.; Riess, Adam G. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Mobasher, Bahram [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Riverside, CA 92521 (United States); Dahlen, Tomas; Casertano, Stefano; Koekemoer, Anton [Space Telescope Science Institute, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); McCully, Curtis; Keeton, Charles R.; Patel, Brandon [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Rutgers, State University of New Jersey, Piscataway, NJ 08854 (United States); Frederiksen, Teddy F.; Hjorth, Jens [Dark Cosmology Centre, Niels Bohr Institute, University of Copenhagen, Juliane Maries Vej 30, DK-2100 Copenhagen (Denmark); Strolger, Louis-Gregory [Department of Physics, Western Kentucky University, Bowling Green, KY 42101 (United States); Wiklind, Tommy G. [Joint ALMA Observatory, ESO, Santiago (Chile); Challis, Peter [Harvard/Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Graur, Or [School of Physics and Astronomy, Tel-Aviv University, Tel-Aviv 69978 (Israel); Hayden, Brian; Garnavich, Peter [Department of Physics, University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, IN 46556 (United States); Weiner, Benjamin J. [Department of Astronomy, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Filippenko, Alexei V. [Department of Astronomy, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720-3411 (United States); and others

2013-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

92

Verifying the Cosmological Utility of Type Ia Supernovae: Implications of a Dispersion in the Ultraviolet Spectra  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We analyze the mean rest-frame ultraviolet (UV) spectrum of Type Ia Supernovae (SNe) and its dispersion using high signal-to-noise ratio Keck-I/LRIS-B spectroscopy for a sample of 36 events at intermediate redshift (z=0.5) discovered by the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope Supernova Legacy Survey (SNLS). We introduce a new method for removing host galaxy contamination in our spectra, exploiting the comprehensive photometric coverage of the SNLS SNe and their host galaxies, thereby providing the first quantitative view of the UV spectral properties of a large sample of distant SNe Ia. Although the mean SN Ia spectrum has not evolved significantly over the past 40percent of cosmic history, precise evolutionary constraints are limited by the absence of a comparable sample of high-quality local spectra. The mean UV spectrum of our z~;;=0.5 SNe Ia and its dispersion is tabulated for use in future applications. Within the high-redshift sample, we discover significant UV spectral variations and exclude dust extinction as the primary cause by examining trends with the optical SN color. Although progenitor metallicity may drive some of these trends, the variations we see are much larger than predicted in recent models and do not follow expected patterns. An interesting new result is a variation seen in the wavelength of selected UV features with phase. We also demonstrate systematic differences in the SN Ia spectral features with SN light curve width in both the UV and the optical. We show that these intrinsic variations could represent a statistical limitation in the future use of high-redshift SNe Ia for precision cosmology. We conclude that further detailed studies are needed, both locally and at moderate redshift where the rest-frame UV can be studied precisely, in order that future missions can confidently be planned to fully exploit SNe Ia as cosmological probes.

Nugent, Peter E; Ellis, R.S.; Sullivan, M.; Nugent, P.E.; Howell, D.A.; Gal-Yam, A.; Astier, P.; Balam, D.; Balland, C.; Basa, S.; Carlberg, R.; Conley, A.; Fouchez, D.; Guy, J.; Hardin, D.; Hook, I.; Pain, R.; Perrett, K.; Pritchet, C.J.; Regnault, N.

2008-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

93

Utilizing Type Ia Supernovae in a Large, Fast, Imaging Survey to Constrain Dark Energy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We study the utility of a large sample of type Ia supernovae that might be observed in an imaging survey that rapidly scans a large fraction of the sky for constraining dark energy. We consider information from the traditional luminosity distance test as well as the spread in SNeIa fluxes at fixed redshift induced by gravitational lensing. We include a treatment of photometric redshift uncertainties in our analysis. Our primary result is that the information contained in the mean distance moduli of SNeIa and the dispersion among SNeIa distance moduli complement each other, breaking a degeneracy between the present dark energy equation of state and its time variation without the need for a high-redshift supernova sample. To address photometric redshift uncertainties, we present dark energy constraints as a function of the size of an external set of spectroscopically-observed SNeIa that may be used for redshift calibration, nspec. We find that an imaging survey can constrain the dark energy equation of state at the epoch where it is best constrained with a 1-sigma error of sigma(wpiv)~0.03-0.09$, depending upon various assumptions. In addition, the marginal improvement in the error sigma(wpiv) from an increase in the spectroscopic calibration sample drops once nspec ~ 10^3. This result is important because it is of the order of the size of calibration samples likely to be compiled in the coming decade and because, for samples of this size, the spectroscopic and imaging surveys individually place comparable constraints on the dark energy equation of state. In all cases, it is best to calibrate photometric redshifts with a set of spectroscopically-observed SNeIa with relatively more objects at high redshift than the parent sample of imaging SNeIa.

Andrew R. Zentner; Suman Bhattacharya

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

A Generalized {ital K} Correction for Type Ia Supernovae: Comparing {ital R}-band Photometry Beyond {ital z=9.2} with B,V, and {ital R}-band Nearby Photometry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

spectroscopically peculiar supernovae, and to search for anyK Correction for Type Ia Supernovae: Comparing R-bandK Correction for Type Ia Supernovae: Comparing R-band

Goodbar, Ariel

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Variable Selection for Modeling the Absolute Magnitude at Maximum of Type Ia Supernovae  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We discuss what is an appropriate set of explanatory variables in order to predict the absolute magnitude at the maximum of Type Ia supernovae. In order to have a good prediction, the error for future data, which is called the "generalization error," should be small. We use cross-validation in order to control the generalization error and LASSO-type estimator in order to choose the set of variables. This approach can be used even in the case that the number of samples is smaller than the number of candidate variables. We studied the Berkeley supernova database with our approach. Candidates of the explanatory variables include normalized spectral data, variables about lines, and previously proposed flux-ratios, as well as the color and light-curve widths. As a result, we confirmed the past understanding about Type Ia supernova: i) The absolute magnitude at maximum depends on the color and light-curve width. ii) The light-curve width depends on the strength of Si II. Recent studies have suggested to add more va...

Uemura, Makoto; Kawabata, S; Ikeda, Shiro; Maeda, Keiichi

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

COMPARING THE LIGHT CURVES OF SIMULATED TYPE Ia SUPERNOVAE WITH OBSERVATIONS USING DATA-DRIVEN MODELS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We propose a robust, quantitative method to compare the synthetic light curves of a Type Ia supernova (SN Ia) explosion model with a large set of observed SNe Ia, and derive a figure of merit for the explosion model's agreement with observations. The synthetic light curves are fit with the data-driven model SALT2 which returns values for stretch, color, and magnitude at peak brightness, as well as a goodness-of-fit parameter. Each fit is performed multiple times with different choices of filter bands and epoch range in order to quantify the systematic uncertainty on the fitted parameters. We use a parametric population model for the distribution of observed SN Ia parameters from large surveys, and extend it to represent red, dim, and bright outliers found in a low-redshift SN Ia data set. We discuss the potential uncertainties of this population model and find it to be reliable given the current uncertainties on cosmological parameters. Using our population model, we assign each set of fitted parameters a likelihood of being observed in nature, and a figure of merit based on this likelihood. We define a second figure of merit based on the quality of the light curve fit, and combine the two measures into an overall figure of merit for each explosion model. We compute figures of merit for a variety of one-, two-, and three-dimensional explosion models and show that our evaluation method allows meaningful inferences across a wide range of light curve quality and fitted parameters.

Diemer, Benedikt; Kessler, Richard; Graziani, Carlo; Jordan, George C. IV; Lamb, Donald Q.; Long, Min; Van Rossum, Daniel R., E-mail: bdiemer@oddjob.uchicago.edu [Flash Center for Computational Science, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States)

2013-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

97

Strong near-infrared carbon in the Type Ia supernova iPTF13ebh  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present near-infrared (NIR) time-series spectroscopy, as well as complementary ultraviolet (UV), optical, and NIR data, of the Type Ia supernova (SN Ia) iPTF13ebh, which was discovered within two days from the estimated time of explosion. The first NIR spectrum was taken merely 2.3 days after explosion and may be the earliest NIR spectrum yet obtained of a SN Ia. The most striking features in the spectrum are several NIR C I lines, and the C I {\\lambda}1.0693 {\\mu}m line is the strongest ever observed in a SN Ia. Interestingly, no strong optical C II counterparts were found, even though the optical spectroscopic time series began early and is densely-cadenced. Except at the very early epochs, within a few days from the time of explosion, we show that the strong NIR C I compared to the weaker optical C II appears to be general in SNe Ia. iPTF13ebh is a fast decliner with {\\Delta}m15(B) = 1.79 $\\pm$ 0.01, and its absolute magnitude obeys the linear part of the width-luminosity relation. It is therefore categ...

Hsiao, E Y; Contreras, C; Höflich, P; Sand, D; Marion, G H; Phillips, M M; Stritzinger, M; González-Gaitán, S; Mason, R E; Folatelli, G; Parent, E; Gall, C; Amanullah, R; Anupama, G C; Arcavi, I; Banerjee, D P K; Beletsky, Y; Blanc, G A; Bloom, J S; Brown, P J; Campillay, A; Cao, Y; De Cia, A; Diamond, T; Freedman, W L; Gonzalez, C; Goobar, A; Holmbo, S; Howell, D A; Johansson, J; Kasliwal, M M; Kirshner, R P; Krisciunas, K; Kulkarni, S R; Maguire, K; Milne, P A; Morrell, N; Nugent, P E; Ofek, E O; Osip, D; Palunas, P; Perley, D A; Persson, S E; Piro, A L; Rabus, M; Roth, M; Schiefelbein, J M; Srivastav, S; Sullivan, M; Suntzeff, N B; Surace, J; Wo?nia, P R; Yaron, O

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Constraining the Type Ia Supernova Progenitor: The Search for Hydrogen in Nebular Spectra  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Despite intense scrutiny, the progenitor system(s) that gives rise to Type Ia supernovae remains unknown. The favored theory invokes a carbon-oxygen white dwarf accreting hydrogen-rich material from a close companion until a thermonuclear runaway ensues that incinerates the white dwarf. However, simulations resulting from this single-degenerate, binary channel demand the presence of low-velocity H-alpha emission in spectra taken during the late nebular phase, since a portion of the companion's envelope becomes entrained in the ejecta. This hydrogen has never been detected, but has only rarely been sought. Here we present results from a campaign to obtain deep, nebular-phase spectroscopy of nearby Type Ia supernovae, and include multi-epoch observations of two events: SN 2005am (slightly subluminous) and SN 2005cf (normally bright). No H-alpha emission is detected in the spectra of either object. An upper limit of 0.01 M_Sun of solar abundance material in the ejecta is established from the models of Mattila et al. which, when coupled with the mass-stripping simulations of Marietta et al. and Meng et al. effectively rules out progenitor systems for these supernovae with secondaries close enough to the white dwarf to be experiencing Roche lobe overflow at the time of explosion. Alternative explanations for the absence of H-alpha emission, along with suggestions for future investigations necessary to confidently exclude them as possibilities, are critically evaluated.

Douglas C. Leonard

2007-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

99

Type Ia Supernova Intrinsic Magnitude Dispersion and the Fitting of Cosmological Parameters  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

I present an analysis for fitting cosmological parameters from a Hubble Diagram of a standard candle with unknown intrinsic magnitude dispersion. The dispersion is determined from the data themselves, simultaneously with the cosmological parameters. This contrasts with the strategies used to date. The advantages of the presented analysis are that it is done in a single fit (it is not iterative), it provides a statistically founded and unbiased estimate of the intrinsic dispersion, and its cosmological-parameter uncertainties account for the intrinsic dispersion uncertainty. Applied to Type Ia supernovae, my strategy provides a statistical measure to test for sub-types and assess the significance of any magnitude corrections applied to the calibrated candle. Parameter bias and differences between likelihood distributions produced by the presented and currently-used fitters are negligibly small for existing and projected supernova data sets.

Kim, Alex G

2010-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

100

Revealing progenitors of type Ia supernovae from their light curves and spectra  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In the single degenerate (SD) scenario of type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia), the collision of the ejecta with its companion results in stripping hydrogen rich matter from the companion star. This hydrogen rich matter might leave its trace in the light curves and/or spectra. In this paper, we perform radiation hydrodynamical simulations of this collision for three binary systems. As a result, we find that the emission from the shock-heated region is not as strong as in the previous study. This weak emission, however, may be a result of our underestimate of the coupling between the gas and radiation in the shock interaction. Therefore, though our results suggest that the observed early light curves of SNe Ia can not rule out binary systems with a short separation as the progenitor system, more elaborate numerical studies will be needed to reach a fair conclusion. Alternatively, our results indicate that the feature observed in the early phase of a recent type Ia SN 2014J might result from interaction of the ejecta wi...

Kutsuna, Masamichi

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

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101

ON THE LIRA LAW AND THE NATURE OF EXTINCTION TOWARD TYPE Ia SUPERNOVAE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We have studied the relation between the color evolution of Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) from maximum light to the Lira law regime and the presence of narrow absorption features. Based on a nearby sample of 89 SNe Ia, we have found that the rate of change of B - V colors at late phases (between 35 and 80 days after maximum) varies significantly among different SNe Ia. At maximum light, faster Lira law B - V decliners have significantly higher equivalent widths of blended Na I D1 and D2 narrow absorption lines, redder colors, and lower R{sub V} reddening laws. We do not find faster Lira law B - V decliners to have a strong preference for younger galaxy environments, where higher interstellar material (ISM) column densities would be expected. We interpret these results as evidence for the presence of circumstellar material. The differences in colors and reddening laws found at maximum light are also present 55 days afterward, but unlike the colors at maximum they show a significant variation among different host galaxy morphological types. This suggests that the effect of ISM on the colors is more apparent at late times. Finally, we discuss how the transversal expansion of the ejecta in an inhomogeneous ISM could mimic some of these findings.

Foerster, Francisco; Gonzalez-Gaitan, Santiago [Departamento de Astronomia, Universidad de Chile, Casilla 36-D, Santiago (Chile); Folatelli, Gaston [Kavli Institute for the Physics and Mathematics of the Universe, Todai Institutes for Advanced Study (TODIAS), University of Tokyo, 5-1-5 Kashiwanoha, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8583 (Japan); Morrell, Nidia [Las Campanas Observatory, Carnegie Observatories, Casilla 601, La Serena (Chile)

2013-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

102

Testing the isotropy of the Universe by using the JLA compilation of type-Ia supernovae  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We probe the possible anisotropy in the accelerated expanding Universe by using the JLA compilation of type-Ia supernovae. We constrain the amplitude and direction of anisotropy in the anisotropic cosmological models. For the dipole-modulated $\\Lambda$CDM model, the anisotropic amplitude has an upper bound $D<1.04\\times10^{-3}$ at the $68\\%$ confidence level. Similar results are found in the dipole-modulated $w$CDM and CPL models. Our studies show that there are no significant evidence for the anisotropic expansion of the Universe. Thus the Universe is still well compatible with the isotropy.

Lin, Hai-Nan; Chang, Zhe; Li, Xin

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Reconstruction of Hessence Dark Energy and the Latest Type Ia Supernovae Gold Dataset  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Recently, many efforts have been made to build dark energy models whose equation-of-state parameter can cross the so-called phantom divide $w_{de}=-1$. One of them is the so-called hessence dark energy model in which the role of dark energy is played by a non-canonical complex scalar field. In this work, we develop a simple method based on Hubble parameter $H(z)$ to reconstruct the hessence dark energy. As examples, we use two familiar parameterizations for $H(z)$ and fit them to the latest 182 type Ia supernovae Gold dataset. In the reconstruction, measurement errors are fully considered.

Hao Wei; Ningning Tang; Shuang Nan Zhang

2007-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

104

Reconstruction of a Deceleration Parameter from the Latest Type Ia Supernovae Gold Dataset  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this paper, a parameterized deceleration parameter $q(z)= 1/2 - a/(1 + z)^b$ is reconstructed from the latest type Ia supernovae gold dataset. It is found out that the transition redshift from decelerated expansion to accelerated expansion is at $z_T=0.35^{+0.14}_{-0.07}$ with $1\\sigma$ confidence level in this parameterized deceleration parameter. And, the best fit values of parameters in $1\\sigma$ errors are $a=1.56^{+0.99}_{-0.55}$ and $b=3.82^{+3.70}_{-2.27}$.

Lixin Xu; Chengwu Zhang; Baorong Chang; Hongya Liu

2007-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

105

Gamma-Rays as Probes for the Multi-Dimensionality of Type Ia Supernovae  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present $\\gamma $-ray spectra for a set of Type Ia supernovae models. Our study is based on a detailed Monte Carlo transport scheme for both spherical and full 3-D geometries. Classical and new challenges of the $\\gamma $ ray astronomy are addressed. We find that $\\gamma $-rays are very suitable to reveal the structure of the envelope and, thus, they allow to probe properties of the nuclear burning front and the progenitor, namely its central density and global asphericities. The potential problems are discussed for the quantitative comparison between theoretical and observed line fluxes during the first few months after the explosion.

P. Hoeflich

2001-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

106

Small-scale Interaction of Turbulence with Thermonuclear Flames in Type Ia Supernovae  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Microscopic turbulence-flame interactions of thermonuclear fusion flames occuring in Type Ia Supernovae were studied by means of incompressible direct numerical simulations with a highly simplified flame description. The flame is treated as a single diffusive scalar field with a nonlinear source term. It is characterized by its Prandtl number, Pr << 1, and laminar flame speed, S_L. We find that if S_L ~ u', where u' is the rms amplitude of turbulent velocity fluctuations, the local flame propagation speed does not significantly deviate from S_L even in the presence of velocity fluctuations on scales below the laminar flame thickness. This result is interpreted in the context of subgrid-scale modeling of supernova explosions and the mechanism for deflagration-detonation-transitions.

J. C. Niemeyer; W. K. Bushe; G. R. Ruetsch

1999-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

107

METALLICITY DIFFERENCES IN TYPE Ia SUPERNOVA PROGENITORS INFERRED FROM ULTRAVIOLET SPECTRA  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Two ''twin'' Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia), SNe 2011by and 2011fe, have extremely similar optical light-curve shapes, colors, and spectra, yet have different ultraviolet (UV) continua as measured in Hubble Space Telescope spectra and measurably different peak luminosities. We attribute the difference in the UV continua to significantly different progenitor metallicities. This is the first robust detection of different metallicities for SN Ia progenitors. Theoretical reasoning suggests that differences in metallicity also lead to differences in luminosity. SNe Ia with higher progenitor metallicities have lower {sup 56}Ni yields and lower luminosities for the same light-curve shape. SNe 2011by and 2011fe have different peak luminosities ({Delta}M{sub V} Almost-Equal-To 0.6 mag), which correspond to different {sup 56}Ni yields: M{sub 11fe}({sup 56}Ni) / M{sub 11by}({sup 56}Ni) = 1.7{sup +0.7}{sub -0.5}. From theoretical models that account for different neutron-to-proton ratios in progenitors, the differences in {sup 56}Ni yields for SNe 2011by and 2011fe imply that their progenitor stars were above and below solar metallicity, respectively. Although we can distinguish progenitor metallicities in a qualitative way from UV data, the quantitative interpretation in terms of abundances is limited by the present state of theoretical models.

Foley, Ryan J.; Kirshner, Robert P. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States)

2013-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

108

High-Velocity Features of Calcium and Silicon in the Spectra of Type Ia Supernovae  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

"High-velocity features" (HVFs) are spectral features in Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) that have minima indicating significantly higher (by greater than about 6000 km/s) velocities than typical "photospheric-velocity features" (PVFs). The PVFs are absorption features with minima indicating typical photospheric (i.e., bulk ejecta) velocities (usually ~9000-15,000 km/s near B-band maximum brightness). In this work we undertake the most in-depth study of HVFs ever performed. The dataset used herein consists of 445 low-resolution optical and near-infrared (NIR) spectra (at epochs up to 5 d past maximum brightness) of 210 low-redshift SNe Ia that follow the "Phillips relation." A series of Gaussian functions is fit to the data in order to characterise possible HVFs of Ca II H&K, Si II {\\lambda}6355, and the Ca II NIR triplet. The temporal evolution of the velocities and strengths of the PVFs and HVFs of these three spectral features is investigated, as are possible correlations with other SN Ia observables. We f...

Silverman, Jeffrey M; Marion, G H; Wheeler, J Craig; Barna, Barnabas; Szalai, Tamas; Mulligan, Brian; Filippenko, Alexei V

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

CfA4: LIGHT CURVES FOR 94 TYPE Ia SUPERNOVAE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present multi-band optical photometry of 94 spectroscopically confirmed Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) in the redshift range 0.0055-0.073, obtained between 2006 and 2011. There are a total of 5522 light-curve points. We show that our natural-system SN photometry has a precision of {approx}< 0.03 mag in BVr'i', {approx}< 0.06 mag in u', and {approx}< 0.07 mag in U for points brighter than 17.5 mag and estimate that it has a systematic uncertainty of 0.014, 0.010, 0.012, 0.014, 0.046, and 0.073 mag in BVr'i'u'U, respectively. Comparisons of our standard-system photometry with published SN Ia light curves and comparison stars reveal mean agreement across samples in the range of {approx}0.00-0.03 mag. We discuss the recent measurements of our telescope-plus-detector throughput by direct monochromatic illumination by Cramer et al. This technique measures the whole optical path through the telescope, auxiliary optics, filters, and detector under the same conditions used to make SN measurements. Extremely well characterized natural-system passbands (both in wavelength and over time) are crucial for the next generation of SN Ia photometry to reach the 0.01 mag accuracy level. The current sample of low-z SNe Ia is now sufficiently large to remove most of the statistical sampling error from the dark-energy error budget. But pursuing the dark-energy systematic errors by determining highly accurate detector passbands, combining optical and near-infrared (NIR) photometry and spectra, using the nearby sample to illuminate the population properties of SNe Ia, and measuring the local departures from the Hubble flow will benefit from larger, carefully measured nearby samples.

Hicken, Malcolm; Challis, Peter; Kirshner, Robert P.; Bakos, Gaspar; Berlind, Perry; Brown, Warren R.; Caldwell, Nelson; Calkins, Mike; Falco, Emilio; Fernandez, Jose; Friedman, Andrew S.; Groner, Ted; Hartman, Joel [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Rest, Armin [Space Telescope Science Institute, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Cramer, Claire E. [NIST (National Institute of Standards and Technology), Gaithersburg, MD 20899 (United States); Wood-Vasey, W. Michael [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 15260 (United States); Currie, Thayne [NASA, Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); De Kleer, Kathy [Department of Physics, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Esquerdo, Gil; Everett, Mark, E-mail: mhicken@cfa.harvard.edu [Planetary Science Institute, 1700 East Fort Lowell Road, Tucson, AZ 85719 (United States); and others

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

The Rise and Fall of Type Ia Supernova Light Curves in the SDSS-II Supernova Survey  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We analyze the rise and fall times of Type Ia supernova (SN Ia) light curves discovered by the Sloan Digital Sky Survey-II (SDSS-II) Supernova Survey. From a set of 391 light curves k-corrected to the rest-frame B and V bands, we find a smaller dispersion in the rising portion of the light curve compared to the decline. This is in qualitative agreement with computer models which predict that variations in radioactive nickel yield have less impact on the rise than on the spread of the decline rates. The differences we find in the rise and fall properties suggest that a single 'stretch' correction to the light curve phase does not properly model the range of SN Ia light curve shapes. We select a subset of 105 light curves well observed in both rise and fall portions of the light curves and develop a '2-stretch' fit algorithm which estimates the rise and fall times independently. We find the average time from explosion to B-band peak brightness is 17.38 {+-} 0.17 days, but with a spread of rise times which range from 13 days to 23 days. Our average rise time is shorter than the 19.5 days found in previous studies; this reflects both the different light curve template used and the application of the 2-stretch algorithm. The SDSS-II supernova set and the local SNe Ia with well-observed early light curves show no significant differences in their average rise-time properties. We find that slow-declining events tend to have fast rise times, but that the distribution of rise minus fall time is broad and single peaked. This distribution is in contrast to the bimodality in this parameter that was first suggested by Strovink (2007) from an analysis of a small set of local SNe Ia. We divide the SDSS-II sample in half based on the rise minus fall value, t{sub r} - t{sub f} {approx}< 2 days and t{sub r} - t{sub f} > 2 days, to search for differences in their host galaxy properties and Hubble residuals; we find no difference in host galaxy properties or Hubble residuals in our sample.

Hayden, Brian T.; /Notre Dame U.; Garnavich, Peter M.; /Notre Dame U.; Kessler, Richard; /KICP, Chicago /Chicago U., EFI; Frieman, Joshua A.; /KICP, Chicago /Chicago U. /Fermilab; Jha, Saurabh W.; /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /Rutgers U., Piscataway; Bassett, Bruce; /Cape Town U., Dept. Math. /South African Astron. Observ.; Cinabro, David; /Wayne State U.; Dilday, Benjamin; /Rutgers U., Piscataway; Kasen, Daniel; /UC, Santa Cruz; Marriner, John; /Fermilab; Nichol, Robert C.; /Portsmouth U., ICG /Baltimore, Space Telescope Sci. /Johns Hopkins U.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

TIDAL TAIL EJECTION AS A SIGNATURE OF TYPE Ia SUPERNOVAE FROM WHITE DWARF MERGERS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The merger of two white dwarfs may be preceded by the ejection of some mass in ''tidal tails,'' creating a circumstellar medium around the system. We consider the variety of observational signatures from this material, which depend on the lag time between the start of the merger and the ultimate explosion (assuming one occurs) of the system in a Type Ia supernova (SN Ia). If the time lag is fairly short, then the interaction of the supernova ejecta with the tails could lead to detectable shock emission at radio, optical, and/or X-ray wavelengths. At somewhat later times, the tails produce relatively broad NaID absorption lines with velocity widths of the order of the white dwarf escape speed ({approx}1000 km s{sup -1}). That none of these signatures have been detected in normal SNe Ia constrains the lag time to be either very short ({approx}< 100 s) or fairly long ({approx}> 100 yr). If the tails have expanded and cooled over timescales {approx}10{sup 4} yr, then they could be observable through narrow NaID and Ca II H and K absorption lines in the spectra, which are seen in some fraction of SNe Ia. Using a combination of three-dimensional and one-dimensional hydrodynamical codes, we model the mass loss from tidal interactions in binary systems, and the subsequent interactions with the interstellar medium, which produce a slow-moving, dense shell of gas. We synthesize NaID line profiles by ray casting through this shell, and show that in some circumstances tidal tails could be responsible for narrow absorptions similar to those observed.

Raskin, Cody; Kasen, Daniel [Nuclear Science Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA (United States)

2013-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

112

Inference for the dark energy equation of state using Type IA supernova data  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The surprising discovery of an accelerating universe led cosmologists to posit the existence of "dark energy"--a mysterious energy field that permeates the universe. Understanding dark energy has become the central problem of modern cosmology. After describing the scientific background in depth, we formulate the task as a nonlinear inverse problem that expresses the comoving distance function in terms of the dark-energy equation of state. We present two classes of methods for making sharp statistical inferences about the equation of state from observations of Type Ia Supernovae (SNe). First, we derive a technique for testing hypotheses about the equation of state that requires no assumptions about its form and can distinguish among competing theories. Second, we present a framework for computing parametric and nonparametric estimators of the equation of state, with an associated assessment of uncertainty. Using our approach, we evaluate the strength of statistical evidence for various competing models of dark energy. Consistent with current studies, we find that with the available Type Ia SNe data, it is not possible to distinguish statistically among popular dark-energy models, and that, in particular, there is no support in the data for rejecting a cosmological constant. With much more supernova data likely to be available in coming years (e.g., from the DOE/NASA Joint Dark Energy Mission), we address the more interesting question of whether future data sets will have sufficient resolution to distinguish among competing theories.

Christopher Genovese; Peter Freeman; Larry Wasserman; Robert Nichol; Christopher Miller

2009-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

113

HIGH-VELOCITY LINE FORMING REGIONS IN THE TYPE Ia SUPERNOVA 2009ig  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We report measurements and analysis of high-velocity (HVF) (>20,000 km s{sup –1}) and photospheric absorption features in a series of spectra of the Type Ia supernova (SN) 2009ig obtained between –14 days and +13 days with respect to the time of maximum B-band luminosity (B-max). We identify lines of Si II, Si III, S II, Ca II, and Fe II that produce both HVF and photospheric-velocity (PVF) absorption features. SN 2009ig is unusual for the large number of lines with detectable HVF in the spectra, but the light-curve parameters correspond to a slightly overluminous but unexceptional SN Ia (M{sub B} = –19.46 mag and ?m{sub 15}(B) = 0.90 mag). Similarly, the Si II ?6355 velocity at the time of B-max is greater than 'normal' for an SN Ia, but it is not extreme (v{sub Si} = 13,400 km s{sup –1}). The –14 days and –13 days spectra clearly resolve HVF from Si II ?6355 as separate absorptions from a detached line forming region. At these very early phases, detached HVF are prevalent in all lines. From –12 days to –6 days, HVF and PVF are detected simultaneously, and the two line forming regions maintain a constant separation of about 8000 km s{sup –1}. After –6 days all absorption features are PVF. The observations of SN 2009ig provide a complete picture of the transition from HVF to PVF. Most SNe Ia show evidence for HVF from multiple lines in spectra obtained before –10 days, and we compare the spectra of SN 2009ig to observations of other SNe. We show that each of the unusual line profiles for Si II ?6355 found in early-time spectra of SNe Ia correlate to a specific phase in a common development sequence from HVF to PVF.

Marion, G. H.; Foley, Ryan J.; Challis, Peter; Kirshner, Robert P. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Vinko, Jozsef; Wheeler, J. Craig; Silverman, Jeffrey M. [University of Texas at Austin, 1 University Station C1400, Austin, TX 78712-0259 (United States); Hsiao, Eric Y. [Carnegie Observatories, Las Campanas Observatory, Colina El Pino, Casilla 601 (Chile); Brown, Peter J. [George P. and Cynthia Woods Mitchell Institute for Fundamental Physics and Astronomy, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Texas A and M University, 4242 AMU, College Station, TX 77843 (United States); Filippenko, Alexei V. [Department of Astronomy, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720-3411 (United States); Garnavich, Peter [Department of Physics, University of Notre Dame, 225 Nieuwland Science Hall, Notre Dame, IN 46556 (United States); Landsman, Wayne B. [Adnet Systems, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Parrent, Jerod T. [Las Cumbres Observatory Global Telescope Network, Goleta, CA 93117 (United States); Pritchard, Tyler A.; Roming, Peter W. A. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Penn State University, 525 Davey Lab, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Wang, Xiaofeng, E-mail: gmarion@cfa.harvard.edu [Physics Department and Tsinghua Center for Astrophysics (THCA), Tsinghua University, Beijing 1,00084 (China)

2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics simulations of the core-degenerate scenario for Type Ia supernovae  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The core-degenerate (CD) scenario for type Ia supernovae (SN Ia) involves the merger of the hot core of an asymptotic giant branch (AGB) star and a white dwarf, and might contribute a non-negligible fraction of all thermonuclear supernovae. Despite its potential interest, very few studies, and based on only crude simplifications, have been devoted to investigate this possible scenario, compared with the large efforts invested to study some other scenarios. Here we perform the first three-dimensional simulations of the merger phase, and find that this process can lead to the formation of a massive white dwarf, as required by this scenario. We consider two situations, according to the mass of the circumbinary disk formed around the system during the final stages of the common envelope phase. If the disk is massive enough, the stars merge on a highly eccentric orbit. Otherwise, the merger occurs after the circumbinary disk has been ejected and gravitational wave radiation has brought the stars close to the Roche...

Aznar-Siguán, G; Lorén-Aguilar, P; Soker, N; Kashi, A

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

On the thermonuclear runaway in Type Ia supernovae: How to run away  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Type Ia Supernovae are thought to be thermonuclear explosions of massive white dwarfs (WD). We present the first study of multi-dimensional effects during the final hours prior to the thermonuclear runaway which leads to the explosion. The calculations utilize an implicit, 2-D hydrodynamical code. Mixing and the ignition process are studied in detail. We find that the initial chemical structure of the WD is changed but the material is not fully homogenized. In particular, the exploding WD sustains a central region with a low C/O ratio. This implies that the explosive nuclear burning will begin in a partially carbon-depleted environment. The thermonuclear runaway happens in a well defined region close to the center. It is induced by compressional heat when matter is brought inwards by convective flows. We find no evidence for multiple spot or strong off-center ignition. Convective velocities in the WD are of the order of 100 km/sec which is well above the effective burning speeds in SNe Ia previously expected right after the runaway. For ? 0.5 to 1 sec, the speed of the burning front will neither be determined by the laminar speed nor the Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities but by convective flows produced prior to the runaway. The consequences are discussed for our understanding of the detailed physics of the flame propagation, the deflagration detonation transition, and the nucleosynthesis in the central layers. Our results strongly suggest the pre-conditioning of the progenitor as a key factor for our understanding of the diversity in Type Ia Supernovae.

P. Höflich; J. Stein

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Sensitivity study of explosive nucleosynthesis in Type Ia supernovae: I. Modification of individual thermonuclear reaction rates  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We explore the sensitivity of the nucleosynthesis due to type Ia supernovae with respect to uncertainties in nuclear reaction rates. We have adopted a standard one-dimensional delayed detonation model of the explosion of a Chandrasekhar-mass white dwarf, and have post-processed the thermodynamic trajectories of every mass-shell with a nucleosynthetic code, with increases (decreases) by a factor of ten on the rates of 1196 nuclear reactions. We have computed as well hydrodynamic models for different rates of the fusion reactions of 12C and of 16O. For selected reactions, we have recomputed the nucleosynthesis with alternative prescriptions for their rates taken from the JINA REACLIB database, and have analyzed the temperature ranges where modifications of their rates have the strongest effect on nucleosynthesis. The nucleosynthesis resulting from the Type Ia supernova models is quite robust with respect to variations of nuclear reaction rates, with the exception of the reaction of fusion of 12C nuclei. The energy of the explosion changes by less than \\sim4%. The changes in the nucleosynthesis due to the modification of the rates of fusion reactions are as well quite modest, for instance no species with a mass fraction larger than 0.02 experiences a variation of its yield larger than a factor of two. We provide the sensitivity of the yields of the most abundant species with respect to the rates of the most intense reactions with protons, neutrons, and alphas. In general, the yields of Fe-group nuclei are more robust than the yields of intermediate-mass elements. Among the charged particle reactions, the most influential on supernova nucleosynthesis are 30Si + p \\rightleftarrows 31P + {\\gamma}, 20Ne + {\\alpha} \\rightleftarrows 24Mg + {\\gamma}, and 24Mg + {\\alpha} \\rightleftarrows 27Al + p. The temperatures at which a modification of their rate has a larger impact are in the range 2 < T < 4 GK. (abridged)

Eduardo Bravo; Gabriel Martínez-Pinedo

2012-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

117

Is the X-ray pulsating companion of HD 49798 a possible type Ia supernova progenitor?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

HD 49798 (a hydrogen depleted subdwarf O6 star) with its massive white dwarf (WD) companion has been suggested to be a progenitor candidate of type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia). However, it is still uncertain whether the companion of HD 49798 is a carbon-oxygen (CO) WD or an oxygen-neon (ONe) WD. A CO WD will explode as an SN Ia when its mass grows approach to Chandrasekhar mass, while the outcome of an accreting ONe WD is likely to be a neutron star. We followed a series of Monte Carlo binary population synthesis approach to simulate the formation of ONe WD + He star systems. We found that there is almost no orbital period as large as HD 49798 with its WD companion in these ONe WD + He star systems based on our simulations, which means that the companion of HD 49798 might not be an ONe WD. We suggest that the companion of HD 49798 is most likely a CO WD, which can be expected to increase its mass to the Chandrasekhar mass limit by accreting He-rich material from HD 49798. Thus, HD 49798 with its companion may prod...

Liu, Dong-Dong; Wu, Cheng-Yuan; Wang, Bo

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Observations of Type Ia Supernova 2014J with FLITECAM/SOFIA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present medium resolution near-infrared (NIR) spectra, covering 1.1 to 3.4 microns, of the normal Type Ia supernova (SN Ia) SN 2014J in M82 obtained with the FLITECAM instrument aboard SOFIA approximately 17-25 days after maximum B light. Our 2.8-3.4 micron spectra may be the first ~3 micron spectra of a SN Ia ever published. The spectra spanning the 1.5-2.7 micron range are characterized by a strong emission feature at ~1.77 microns with a full width at half maximum of ~11,000-13,000 km/s. We compare the observed FLITECAM spectra to the recent non-LTE delayed detonation models of Dessart et al. (2014) and find that the models agree with the spectra remarkably well in the 1.5-2.7 micron wavelength range. Based on this comparison we identify the ~1.77 micron emission peak as a blend of permitted lines of Co II. Other features seen in the 2.0 - 2.5 micron spectra are also identified as emission from permitted transitions of Co II. However, the models are not as successful at reproducing the spectra in the 1....

Vacca, William D; Savage, Maureen; Shenoy, Sachindev; Becklin, E E; McLean, Ian S; Logsdon, Sarah E; Gehrz, R D; Spyromilio, J; Garnavich, P; Marion, G H; Fox, O D

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

A TYPE Ia SUPERNOVA AT REDSHIFT 1.55 IN HUBBLE SPACE TELESCOPE INFRARED OBSERVATIONS FROM CANDELS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We report the discovery of a Type Ia supernova (SN Ia) at redshift z = 1.55 with the infrared detector of the Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3-IR) on the Hubble Space Telescope (HST). This object was discovered in CANDELS imaging data of the Hubble Ultra Deep Field and followed as part of the CANDELS+CLASH Supernova project, comprising the SN search components from those two HST multi-cycle treasury programs. This is the highest redshift SN Ia with direct spectroscopic evidence for classification. It is also the first SN Ia at z > 1 found and followed in the infrared, providing a full light curve in rest-frame optical bands. The classification and redshift are securely defined from a combination of multi-band and multi-epoch photometry of the SN, ground-based spectroscopy of the host galaxy, and WFC3-IR grism spectroscopy of both the SN and host. This object is the first of a projected sample at z > 1.5 that will be discovered by the CANDELS and CLASH programs. The full CANDELS+CLASH SN Ia sample will enable unique tests for evolutionary effects that could arise due to differences in SN Ia progenitor systems as a function of redshift. This high-z sample will also allow measurement of the SN Ia rate out to z Almost-Equal-To 2, providing a complementary constraint on SN Ia progenitor models.

Rodney, Steven A.; Riess, Adam G.; Jones, David O. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Dahlen, Tomas; Ferguson, Henry C.; Casertano, Stefano; Grogin, Norman A. [Space Telescope Science Institute, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Strolger, Louis-Gregory [Department of Physics, Western Kentucky University, Bowling Green, KY 42101 (United States); Hjorth, Jens; Frederiksen, Teddy F. [Dark Cosmology Centre, Niels Bohr Institute, University of Copenhagen, Juliane Maries Vej 30, DK-2100 Copenhagen (Denmark); Weiner, Benjamin J. [Department of Astronomy, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Mobasher, Bahram [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Riverside, CA 92521 (United States); Challis, Peter; Kirshner, Robert P. [Harvard/Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Faber, S. M. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA 92064 (United States); Filippenko, Alexei V. [Department of Astronomy, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720-3411 (United States); Garnavich, Peter; Hayden, Brian [Department of Physics, University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, IN 46556 (United States); Graur, Or [Department of Astrophysics, Tel Aviv University, 69978 Tel Aviv (Israel); Jha, Saurabh W. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Rutgers, State University of New Jersey, Piscataway, NJ 08854 (United States); and others

2012-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

120

Measurements of the Rate of Type Ia Supernovae at Redshift z < ~0.3 from the SDSS-II Supernova Survey  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present a measurement of the volumetric Type Ia supernova (SN Ia) rate based on data from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey II (SDSS-II) Supernova Survey. The adopted sample of supernovae (SNe) includes 516 SNe Ia at redshift z {approx}< 0.3, of which 270 (52%) are spectroscopically identified as SNe Ia. The remaining 246 SNe Ia were identified through their light curves; 113 of these objects have spectroscopic redshifts from spectra of their host galaxy, and 133 have photometric redshifts estimated from the SN light curves. Based on consideration of 87 spectroscopically confirmed non-Ia SNe discovered by the SDSS-II SN Survey, we estimate that 2.04{sub -0.95}{sup +1.61}% of the photometric SNe Ia may be misidentified. The sample of SNe Ia used in this measurement represents an order of magnitude increase in the statistics for SN Ia rate measurements in the redshift range covered by the SDSS-II Supernova Survey. If we assume a SN Ia rate that is constant at low redshift (z < 0.15), then the SN observations can be used to infer a value of the SN rate of r{sub V} = (2.69{sub -0.30-0.01}{sup +0.34+0.21}) x 10{sup -5} SNe yr{sup -1} Mpc{sup -3} (H{sub 0}/(70 km s{sup -1} Mpc{sup -1})){sup 3} at a mean redshift of {approx} 0.12, based on 79 SNe Ia of which 72 are spectroscopically confirmed. However, the large sample of SNe Ia included in this study allows us to place constraints on the redshift dependence of the SN Ia rate based on the SDSS-II Supernova Survey data alone. Fitting a power-law model of the SN rate evolution, r{sub V} (z) = A{sub p} x ((1+z)/(1+z{sub 0})){sup {nu}}, over the redshift range 0.0 < z < 0.3 with z{sub 0} = 0.21, results in A{sub p} = (3.43{sub -0.15}{sup +0.15}) x 10{sup -5} SNe yr{sup -1} Mpc{sup -3} (H{sub 0}/(70 km s{sup -1} Mpc{sup -1})){sup 3} and {nu} = 2.04{sub -0.89}{sup +0.90}.

Dilday, Benjamin; /Rutgers U., Piscataway /Chicago U. /KICP, Chicago; Smith, Mathew; /Cape Town U., Dept. Math. /Portsmouth U.; Bassett, Bruce; /Cape Town U., Dept. Math. /South African Astron. Observ.; Becker, Andrew; /Washington U., Seattle, Astron. Dept.; Bender, Ralf; /Munich, Tech. U. /Munich U. Observ.; Castander, Francisco; /Barcelona, IEEC; Cinabro, David; /Wayne State U.; Filippenko, Alexei V.; /UC, Berkeley; Frieman, Joshua A.; /Chicago U. /Fermilab; Galbany, Lluis; /Barcelona, IFAE; Garnavich, Peter M.; /Notre Dame U. /Stockholm U., OKC /Stockholm U.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

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121

First Evidence of Globular Cluster Formation from the Ejecta of Prompt Type Ia Supernovae  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Recent spectroscopic observations of globular clusters (GCs) in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) have discovered that one of the intermediate-age GC, NGC 1718 with [Fe/H]=-0.7 has an extremely low [Mg/Fe] ratio of ~-0.9. We propose that NGC 1718 was formed from the ejecta of type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) mixed with very metal-poor ([Fe/H] <-1.3) gas about ~ 2 Gyr ago. The proposed scenario is shown to be consistent with the observed abundances of Fe-group elements such as Cr, Mn, and Ni. In addition, compelling evidence for asymptotic giant branch stars playing a role in chemical enrichment during this GC formation is found. We suggest that the origin of the metal-poor gas is closely associated with the efficient gas-transfer from the outer gas disk of the Small Magellanic Cloud to the LMC disk. We anticipate that the outer part of the LMC disk contains field stars exhibiting significantly low [Mg/Fe] ratios, formed through the same process as NGC 1718.

Tsujimoto, Takuji

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Direct numerical simulations of type Ia supernovae flames I: The landau-darrieus instability  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Planar flames are intrinsically unstable in open domains due to the thermal expansion across the burning front--the Landau-Darrieus instability. This instability leads to wrinkling and growth of the flame surface, and corresponding acceleration of the flame, until it is stabilized by cusp formation. We look at the Landau-Darrieus in stability for C/O thermonuclear flames at conditions relevant to the late stages of a Type Ia supernova explosion. Two-dimensional direct numerical simulations of both single-mode and multi-mode perturbations using a low Mach number hydrodynamics code are presented. We show the effect of the instability on the flame speed as a function of both the density and domain size, demonstrate the existence of the small scale cutoff to the growth of the instability, and look for the proposed breakdown of the non-linear stabilization at low densities. The effects of curvature on the flame as quantified through measurements of the growth rate and computation of the corresponding Markstein number. While accelerations of a few percent are observed, they are too small to have any direct outcome on the supernova explosion.

Bell, J.B.; Day, M.S.; Rendleman, C.A.; Woosley, S.E.; Zingale, M.

2003-11-24T23:59:59.000Z

123

IS WX CEN A POSSIBLE TYPE Ia SUPERNOVA PROGENITOR WITH WIND-DRIVEN MASS TRANSFER?  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

WX Cen is one of a few compact binary supersoft X-ray sources (CBSS) in the Galaxy that is a possible Type Ia supernova (SN Ia) progenitor. The supersoft X-ray radiation is explained as hydrostatic nuclear burning on the surface of the white dwarf component that is accreting hydrogen from a stellar companion at a high rate. If the mass donor in this system has a low mass, as has been suggested in the literature, one would expect a high wind-driven mass transfer rate. In that case, the orbital period of the system should increase. To test this theoretical prediction, we have monitored the system photometrically since 2010. By using four newly determined eclipse timings together with those collected from the literature, we discovered that the orbital period is decreasing at a rate of dP/dt = -5.15 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -7} days yr{sup -1}. The long-term decrease in the orbital period is contrary to the prediction that the system is powered by wind-driven accretion. It therefore seems plausible that the mass donor could be more massive than the white dwarf, and that the mass transfer is driven by the thermal instability of the donor star. This finding suggests that WX Cen is a key object to check the physical mechanisms of mass accretion in CBSS. The corresponding timescale of the period change is about P/P-dot {approx} 0.81 x 10{sup 6} yr, indicating that WX Cen may evolve into an SNe Ia within one million years in the Galaxy.

Qian, S.-B.; Shi, G.; Zhu, L.-Y.; Liu, L.; Zhao, E.-G.; Li, L.-J. [Yunnan Observatories, Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS), P.O. Box 110, 650011 Kunming (China); Fernandez Lajus, E.; Di Sisto, R. P., E-mail: qsb@ynao.ac.cn [Facultad de Ciencias Astronomicas y Geofisicas, Universidad Nacional de La Plata, 1900 La Plata, Buenos Aires (Argentina)

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

On the Thermonuclear Runaway in Type Ia Supernovae: How to run away?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Type Ia Supernovae are thought to be thermonuclear explosions of massive white dwarfs (WD). We present the first study of multi-dimensional effects during the final hours prior to the thermonuclear runaway which leads to the explosion. The calculations utilize an implicit, 2-D hydro code.Mixing and the ignition process are studied in detail. We find that the initial chemical structure of the WD is changed but the material is not fully homogenized. The exploding WD sustains a central region with a low C/O ratio. This implies that the explosive nuclear burning will begin in a partially C-depleted environment. The thermonuclear runaway happens in a well defined region close to the center. It is induced by compressional heat when matter is brought inwards by convective flows. We find no evidence for multiple spot or strong off-center ignition. Convective velocities are of the order of 100 km/sec which is well above the effective burning speeds in SNe Ia previously expected right after the runaway. For about 0.5 to 1 sec, the speed of the burning front will neither be determined by the laminar speed nor the Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities but by convective flows produced prior to the runaway. The consequences are discussed for our under- standing of the detailed physics of the flame propagation, the deflagration detonation transition, and the nucleosynthesis in the central layers. Our results strongly suggest the pre-conditioning of the progenitor as a key-factor for our understanding of the diversity in SNeIa.

P. Hoeflich; J. Stein

2001-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

125

Evaluating systematic dependencies of type Ia supernovae : the influence of deflagration to detonation density.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We explore the effects of the deflagration to detonation transition (DDT) density on the production of {sup 56}Ni in thermonuclear supernova (SN) explosions (Type Ia supernovae). Within the DDT paradigm, the transition density sets the amount of expansion during the deflagration phase of the explosion and therefore the amount of nuclear statistical equilibrium (NSE) material produced. We employ a theoretical framework for a well-controlled statistical study of two-dimensional simulations of thermonuclear SNe with randomized initial conditions that can, with a particular choice of transition density, produce a similar average and range of {sup 56}Ni masses to those inferred from observations. Within this framework, we utilize a more realistic 'simmered' white dwarf progenitor model with a flame model and energetics scheme to calculate the amount of {sup 56}Ni and NSE material synthesized for a suite of simulated explosions in which the transition density is varied in the range (1-3) x 10{sup 7} g cm{sup -3}. We find a quadratic dependence of the NSE yield on the log of the transition density, which is determined by the competition between plume rise and stellar expansion. By considering the effect of metallicity on the transition density, we find the NSE yield decreases by 0.055 {+-} 0.004 M {circle_dot} for a 1 Z {circle_dot} increase in metallicity evaluated about solar metallicity. For the same change in metallicity, this result translates to a 0.067 {+-} 0.004 M {circle_dot} decrease in the {sup 56}Ni yield, slightly stronger than that due to the variation in electron fraction from the initial composition. Observations testing the dependence of the yield on metallicity remain somewhat ambiguous, but the dependence we find is comparable to that inferred from some studies.

Jackson, A. P.; Calder, A. C.; Townsley, D. M.; Chamulak, D. A.; Brown, E. F.; Timmes, F. X. (Physics); (State Univ. of New York); (Univ. of Alabama); (Michigan State Univ.); (Arizona State Univ.); (Joint Inst. for Nuclear Astrophysics)

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

EVALUATING SYSTEMATIC DEPENDENCIES OF TYPE Ia SUPERNOVAE: THE INFLUENCE OF DEFLAGRATION TO DETONATION DENSITY  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We explore the effects of the deflagration to detonation transition (DDT) density on the production of {sup 56}Ni in thermonuclear supernova (SN) explosions (Type Ia supernovae). Within the DDT paradigm, the transition density sets the amount of expansion during the deflagration phase of the explosion and therefore the amount of nuclear statistical equilibrium (NSE) material produced. We employ a theoretical framework for a well-controlled statistical study of two-dimensional simulations of thermonuclear SNe with randomized initial conditions that can, with a particular choice of transition density, produce a similar average and range of {sup 56}Ni masses to those inferred from observations. Within this framework, we utilize a more realistic 'simmered' white dwarf progenitor model with a flame model and energetics scheme to calculate the amount of {sup 56}Ni and NSE material synthesized for a suite of simulated explosions in which the transition density is varied in the range (1-3) x10{sup 7} g cm{sup -3}. We find a quadratic dependence of the NSE yield on the log of the transition density, which is determined by the competition between plume rise and stellar expansion. By considering the effect of metallicity on the transition density, we find the NSE yield decreases by 0.055 {+-} 0.004 M {sub sun} for a 1 Z{sub sun} increase in metallicity evaluated about solar metallicity. For the same change in metallicity, this result translates to a 0.067 {+-} 0.004 M{sub sun} decrease in the {sup 56}Ni yield, slightly stronger than that due to the variation in electron fraction from the initial composition. Observations testing the dependence of the yield on metallicity remain somewhat ambiguous, but the dependence we find is comparable to that inferred from some studies.

Jackson, Aaron P.; Calder, Alan C. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, State University of New York-Stony Brook, Stony Brook, NY (United States); Townsley, Dean M. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, AL (United States); Chamulak, David A. [Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL (United States); Brown, Edward F.; Timmes, F. X. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Astrophysics, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States)

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

THE HUBBLE SPACE TELESCOPE CLUSTER SUPERNOVA SURVEY. III. CORRELATED PROPERTIES OF TYPE Ia SUPERNOVAE AND THEIR HOSTS AT 0.9 < z < 1.46  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Using the sample of Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) discovered by the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Cluster Supernova Survey and augmented with HST-observed SNe Ia in the Great Observatories Origins Deep Survey (GOODS) fields, we search for correlations between the properties of SNe and their host galaxies at high redshift. We use galaxy color and quantitative morphology to determine the red sequence in 25 clusters and develop a model to distinguish passively evolving early-type galaxies from star-forming galaxies in both clusters and the field. With this approach, we identify 6 SN Ia hosts that are early-type cluster members and 11 SN Ia hosts that are early-type field galaxies. We confirm for the first time at z > 0.9 that SNe Ia hosted by early-type galaxies brighten and fade more quickly than SNe Ia hosted by late-type galaxies. We also show that the two samples of hosts produce SNe Ia with similar color distributions. The relatively simple spectral energy distributions expected for passive galaxies enable us to measure stellar masses of early-type SN hosts. In combination with stellar mass estimates of late-type GOODS SN hosts from Thomson and Chary, we investigate the correlation of host mass with Hubble residual observed at lower redshifts. Although the sample is small and the uncertainties are large, a hint of this relation is found at z > 0.9. By simultaneously fitting the average cluster galaxy formation history and dust content to the red-sequence scatters, we show that the reddening of early-type cluster SN hosts is likely E(B - V) {approx}< 0.06. The similarity of the field and cluster early-type host samples suggests that field early-type galaxies that lie on the red sequence may also be minimally affected by dust. Hence, the early-type-hosted SNe Ia studied here occupy a more favorable environment to use as well-characterized high-redshift standard candles than other SNe Ia.

Meyers, J.; Barbary, K.; Fakhouri, H. K.; Goldhaber, G. [Department of Physics, University of California Berkeley, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Aldering, G.; Faccioli, L.; Hsiao, E. [E.O. Lawrence Berkeley National Lab, 1 Cyclotron Rd., Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Barrientos, L. F. [Departmento de Astronomia, Pontificia Universidad Catolica de Chile, Santiago (Chile); Brodwin, M. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Dawson, K. S. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT 84112 (United States); Deustua, S.; Fruchter, A. S. [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Doi, M.; Ihara, Y. [Institute of Astronomy, Graduate School of Science, University of Tokyo, 2-21-1 Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-0015 (Japan); Eisenhardt, P. [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States); Gilbank, D. G. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University Of Waterloo, Waterloo, Ontario, N2L 3G1 (Canada); Gladders, M. D. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States); Gonzalez, A. H. [Department of Astronomy, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611 (United States); Hattori, T. [Subaru Telescope, National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, 650 North Aohaku Place, Hilo, HI 96720 (United States); Kashikawa, N., E-mail: jmeyers314@berkeley.edu [National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, 2-21-1 Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan); Collaboration: Supernova Cosmology Project; and others

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

LATE-TIME SPECTRAL OBSERVATIONS OF THE STRONGLY INTERACTING TYPE Ia SUPERNOVA PTF11kx  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

PTF11kx was a Type Ia supernova (SN Ia) that showed time-variable absorption features, including saturated Ca II H and K lines that weakened and eventually went into emission. The strength of the emission component of H{alpha} gradually increased, implying that the SN was undergoing significant interaction with its circumstellar medium (CSM). These features, and many others, were blueshifted slightly and showed a P-Cygni profile, likely indicating that the CSM was directly related to, and probably previously ejected by, the progenitor system itself. These and other observations led Dilday et al. to conclude that PTF11kx came from a symbiotic nova progenitor like RS Oph. In this work we extend the spectral coverage of PTF11kx to 124-680 rest-frame days past maximum brightness. The late-time spectra of PTF11kx are dominated by H{alpha} emission (with widths of full width at half-maximum intensity Almost-Equal-To 2000 km s{sup -1}), strong Ca II emission features ({approx}10,000 km s{sup -1} wide), and a blue 'quasi-continuum' due to many overlapping narrow lines of Fe II. Emission from oxygen, He I, and Balmer lines higher than H{alpha} is weak or completely absent at all epochs, leading to large observed H{alpha}/H{beta} intensity ratios. The H{alpha} emission appears to increase in strength with time for {approx}1 yr, but it subsequently decreases significantly along with the Ca II emission. Our latest spectrum also indicates the possibility of newly formed dust in the system as evidenced by a slight decrease in the red wing of H{alpha}. During the same epochs, multiple narrow emission features from the CSM temporally vary in strength. The weakening of the H{alpha} and Ca II emission at late times is possible evidence that the SN ejecta have overtaken the majority of the CSM and agrees with models of other strongly interacting SNe Ia. The varying narrow emission features, on the other hand, may indicate that the CSM is clumpy or consists of multiple thin shells.

Silverman, Jeffrey M. [Department of Astronomy, University of Texas, Austin, TX 78712-0259 (United States); Nugent, Peter E.; Filippenko, Alexei V.; Cenko, S. Bradley [Department of Astronomy, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720-3411 (United States); Gal-Yam, Avishay [Benoziyo Center for Astrophysics, The Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovot 76100 (Israel); Sullivan, Mark [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Southampton, Southampton SO17 1BJ (United Kingdom); Howell, D. Andrew [Las Cumbres Observatory Global Telescope Network, Goleta, CA 93117 (United States); Pan, Yen-Chen; Hook, Isobel M., E-mail: jsilverman@astro.as.utexas.edu [Department of Physics (Astrophysics), University of Oxford, Keble Road, Oxford OX1 3RH (United Kingdom)

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

A Test of Tully-Fisher Distance Estimates Using Cepheids and Type Ia Supernovae  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We update and extend the results of Shanks (1997, MNRAS, 290, L77) by making a direct test of Tully-Fisher distance estimates to thirteen spiral galaxies with HST Cepheid distances and to ten spiral galaxies with Type Ia supernova (SNIa) distances. The results show that the Tully-Fisher distance moduli are too short with respect to the Cepheid distances by 0.46+-0.11mag and too short with respect to the SNIa distances by 0.49+-0.18mag. Combining the HST Cepheid and the best SNIa data suggests that, overall, previous Tully-Fisher distances at v~1000 kms-1 were too short by 0.43+-0.09mag, a result which is significant at the 4.6 sigma level. These data therefore indicate that previous Tully-Fisher distances should be revised upwards by 22+-5% implying, for example, a Virgo distance of 19.0+-1.8Mpc. The value of Ho from Tully-Fisher estimates is correspondingly revised downwards from Ho=84+-10kms-1Mpc-1 to Ho=69+-8kms-1Mpc-1. There is evidence that the Tully-Fisher relation at large distances is affected by Malmquist bias. In this case, we argue that Ho<50kms-1Mpc-1 cannot be ruled out by Tully-Fisher considerations.

T. Shanks

1999-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

130

FIRST EVIDENCE OF GLOBULAR CLUSTER FORMATION FROM THE EJECTA OF PROMPT TYPE Ia SUPERNOVAE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Recent spectroscopic observations of globular clusters (GCs) in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) have discovered that one of the intermediate-age GCs, NGC 1718, with [Fe/H] = -0.7 has an extremely low [Mg/Fe] ratio of {approx}-0.9. We propose that NGC 1718 was formed from the ejecta of Type Ia supernovae mixed with very metal-poor ([Fe/H] <-1.3) gas about {approx}2 Gyr ago. The proposed scenario is shown to be consistent with the observed abundances of Fe-group elements such as Cr, Mn, and Ni. In addition, compelling evidence for asymptotic giant branch stars playing a role in chemical enrichment during this GC formation is found. We suggest that the origin of the metal-poor gas is closely associated with efficient gas transfer from the outer gas disk of the Small Magellanic Cloud to the LMC disk. We anticipate that the outer part of the LMC disk contains field stars exhibiting significantly low [Mg/Fe] ratios, formed through the same process as NGC 1718.

Tsujimoto, Takuji [National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, Mitaka-shi, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan); Bekki, Kenji, E-mail: taku.tsujimoto@nao.ac.jp [ICRAR, M468, The University of Western Australia, 35 Stirling Highway, Crawley, WA 6009 (Australia)

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

The type Ia supernova SNLS-03D3bb from a super-Chandrasekhar-masswhite dwarf star  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The acceleration of the expansion of the universe, and theneed for Dark Energy, were inferred from the observations of Type Iasupernovae (SNe Ia) 1;2. There is consensus that SNeIa are thermonuclearexplosions that destroy carbon-oxygen white dwarf stars that accretematter from a companion star3, although the nature of this companionremains uncertain. SNe Ia are thought to be reliable distance indicatorsbecause they have a standard amount of fuel and a uniform trigger theyare predicted to explode when the mass of the white dwarf nears theChandrasekhar mass 4 - 1.4 solar masses. Here we show that the highredshift supernova SNLS-03D3bb has an exceptionally high luminosity andlow kinetic energy that both imply a super-Chandrasekhar mass progenitor.Super-Chandrasekhar mass SNeIa shouldpreferentially occur in a youngstellar population, so this may provide an explanation for the observedtrend that overluminous SNe Ia only occur in young environments5;6. Sincethis supernova does not obey the relations that allow them to becalibrated as standard candles, and since no counterparts have been foundat low redshift, future cosmology studies will have to considercontamination from such events.

Howell, D.Andrew; Sullivan, Mark; Nugent, Peter E.; Ellis,Richard S.; Conley, Alexander J.; Le Borgne, Damien; Carlberg, RaymondG.; Guy, Julien; Balam, David; Basa, Stephane; Fouchez, Dominique; Hook,Isobel M.; Hsiao, Eric Y.; Neill, James D.; Pain, Reynald; Perrett,Kathryn M.; Pritchet, Christopher J.

2006-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Explosion Models for Type Ia Supernovae: A Comparison with Observed Light Curves, distances, H_o and q_o  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Theoretical monochromatic light curves and photospheric expansion velocities are compared with observations of 27 Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia). A set of 37 models has been considered which encompasses all currently discussed explosion scenarios for Type Ia supernovae including deflagrations, detonations, delayed detonations, pulsating delayed detonations and tamped detonations of Chandra- mass, and Helium detonations of low mass white dwarfs. The explosions are calculated using one-dimensional Lagrangian hydro and radiation-hydro codes with incorporated nuclear networks. Subsequently, light curves are constructed using our LC scheme which includes an implicit radiation transport, expansion opacities, a Monte-Carlo $\\gamma $-ray transport, and molecular and dust formation. For some supernovae, results of detailed non-LTE calculations have been considered. Observational properties of our series of models are discussed, the relation between the absolute brightness, post-maximum decline rates, the colors at several moments of time, etc. All models with a Ni production larger than 0.4 solar masses produce light curves of similar brightness. The influence of the cosmological red shift on the light curves and on the correction for interstellar reddening is discussed. Based on data rectification of the standard deviation, a quantitative procedure to fit the observations has been used to the determine the free parameters, i.e. the correct model, the distance, the reddening, and the time of the explosion. The results are discussed in detail and applied to determine Ho and qo.

P. Hoeflich; A. Khokkhlov

1996-02-06T23:59:59.000Z

133

Subclasses of Type Ia Supernovae as the origin of [\\alpha/Fe] ratios in dwarf spheroidal galaxies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Recent extensive observations of Type Ia Supernovae (SNe Ia) have revealed the existence of a diversity of SNe Ia, including SN 2002cx-like objects (also called SN Iax). We introduce two possible channels in the single degenerate scenario: 1) double detonations in sub-Chandrasekhar (Ch) mass CO white dwarfs (WDs), where a thin He envelope is developed with relatively low accretion rates after He novae even at low metallicities, and 2) carbon deflagrations in Ch-mass possibly hybrid C+O+Ne WDs, where WD winds occur at [Fe/H] ~ -2.5 at high accretion rates. These subclasses of SNe Ia are rarer than `normal' SNe Ia and do not affect the chemical evolution in the solar neighborhood, but can be very important in metal-poor systems with stochastic star formation. In dwarf spheroidal galaxies in the Local Group, the decrease of [\\alpha/Fe] ratios at [Fe/H] ~ -2 to -1.5 can be produced depending on the star formation history. SNe Iax give high [Mn/Fe], while sub-Ch-mass SNe Ia give low [Mn/Fe], and thus a model inclu...

Kobayashi, Chiaki; Hachisu, Izumi

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Verifying the Cosmological Utility of Type Ia Supernovae:Implications of a Dispersion in the Ultraviolet Spectra  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We analyze the mean rest-frame ultraviolet (UV) spectrum ofType Ia Supernovae(SNe) and its dispersion using high signal-to-noiseKeck-I/LRIS-B spectroscopyfor a sample of 36 events at intermediateredshift (z=0.5) discoveredby the Canada-France-Hawaii TelescopeSupernova Legacy Survey (SNLS). Weintroduce a new method for removinghost galaxy contamination in our spectra,exploiting the comprehensivephotometric coverage of the SNLS SNe and theirhost galaxies, therebyproviding the first quantitative view of the UV spectralproperties of alarge sample of distant SNe Ia. Although the mean SN Ia spectrumhas notevolved significantly over the past 40 percent of cosmic history,preciseevolutionary constraints are limited by the absence of acomparable sample ofhigh quality local spectra. The mean UV spectrum ofour z 0.5 SNe Ia and itsdispersion is tabulated for use in futureapplications. Within the high-redshiftsample, we discover significant UVspectral variations and exclude dust extinctionas the primary cause byexamining trends with the optical SN color. Although progenitormetallicity may drive some of these trends, the variations we see aremuchlarger than predicted in recent models and do not follow expectedpatterns.An interesting new result is a variation seen in the wavelengthof selected UVfeatures with phase. We also demonstrate systematicdifferences in the SN Iaspectral features with SN lightcurve width inboth the UV and the optical. Weshow that these intrinsic variations couldrepresent a statistical limitation in thefuture use of high-redshift SNeIa for precision cosmology. We conclude thatfurther detailed studies areneeded, both locally and at moderate redshift wherethe rest-frame UV canbe studied precisely, in order that future missions canconfidently beplanned to fully exploit SNe Ia as cosmological probes.

Ellis, R.S.; Sullivan, M.; Nugent, P.E.; Howell, D.A.; Gal-Yam,A.; Astier, P.; Balam, D.; Balland, C.; Basa, S.; Carlberg, R.G.; Conley,A.; Fouchez, D.; Guy, J.; Hardin, D.; Hook, I.; Pain, R.; Perrett, K.; Pritchet, C.J.; Regnault, N.

2007-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

135

A super-Eddington wind scenario for the progenitors of type Ia supernovae: binary population synthesis calculations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The super-Eddington wind scenario has been proposed as an alternative way for producing type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia). The super-Eddington wind can naturally prevent the carbon--oxygen white dwarfs (CO WDs) with high mass-accretion rates from becoming red-giant-like stars. Furthermore, it works in low-metallicity environments, which may explain SNe Ia observed at high redshifts. In this article, we systematically investigated the most prominent single-degenerate WD+MS channel based on the super-Eddington wind scenario. We combined the Eggleton stellar evolution code with a rapid binary population synthesis (BPS) approach to predict SN Ia birthrates for the WD+MS channel by adopting the super-Eddington wind scenario and detailed mass-accumulation efficiencies of H-shell flashes on the WDs. Our BPS calculations found that the estimated SN Ia birthrates for the WD+MS channel are ~0.009-0.315*10^{-3}{yr}^{-1} if we adopt the Eddington accretion rate as the critical accretion rate, which are much lower than that of ...

Wang, Bo; Liu, Dongdong; Liu, Zhengwei; Wu, Chengyuan; Zhang, Jujia; Han, Zhanwen

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

EVOLUTION OF POST-IMPACT REMNANT HELIUM STARS IN TYPE Ia SUPERNOVA REMNANTS WITHIN THE SINGLE-DEGENERATE SCENARIO  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The progenitor systems of Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) are still under debate. Based on recent hydrodynamics simulations, non-degenerate companions in the single-degenerate scenario (SDS) should survive the supernova (SN) impact. One way to distinguish between the SDS and the double-degenerate scenario is to search for the post-impact remnant stars (PIRSs) in SN Ia remnants. Using a technique that combines multi-dimensional hydrodynamics simulations with one-dimensional stellar evolution simulations, we have examined the post-impact evolution of helium-rich binary companions in the SDS. It is found that these helium-rich PIRSs (He PIRSs) dramatically expand and evolve to a luminous phase (L {approx} 10{sup 4} L{sub Sun }) about 10 yr after an SN explosion. Subsequently, they contract and evolve to become hot blue-subdwarf-like (sdO-like) stars by releasing gravitational energy, persisting as sdO-like stars for several million years before evolving to the helium red-giant phase. We therefore predict that a luminous OB-like star should be detectable within {approx}30 yr after the SN explosion. Thereafter, it will shrink and become an sdO-like star in the central regions of SN Ia remnants within star-forming regions for SN Ia progenitors evolved via the helium-star channel in the SDS. These He PIRSs are predicted to be rapidly rotating (v{sub rot} {approx}> 50 km s{sup -1}) and to have high spatial velocities (v{sub linear} {approx}> 500 km s{sup -1}). Furthermore, if SN remnants have diffused away and are not recognizable at a later stage, He PIRSs could be an additional source of single sdO stars and/or hypervelocity stars.

Pan, Kuo-Chuan; Ricker, Paul M. [Department of Astronomy, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 1002 West Green Street, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States); Taam, Ronald E., E-mail: kpan2@illinois.edu, E-mail: pmricker@illinois.edu, E-mail: r-taam@northwestern.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Northwestern University, 2145 Sheridan Road, Evanston, IL 60208 (United States)

2013-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

137

The Joint Efficient Dark-energy Investigation (JEDI): Measuring the cosmic expansion history from type Ia supernovae  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

JEDI (Joint Efficient Dark-energy Investigation) is a candidate implementation of the NASA-DOE Joint Dark Energy Mission (JDEM). JEDI will probe dark energy in three independent methods: (1) type Ia supernovae, (2) baryon acoustic oscillations, and (3) weak gravitational lensing. In an accompanying paper, an overall summary of the JEDI mission is given. In this paper, we present further details of the supernova component of JEDI. To derive model-independent constraints on dark energy, it is important to precisely measure the cosmic expansion history, H(z), in continuous redshift bins from z \\~ 0-2 (the redshift range in which dark energy is important). SNe Ia at z > 1 are not readily accessible from the ground because the bulk of their light has shifted into the near-infrared where the sky background is overwhelming; hence a space mission is required to probe dark energy using SNe. Because of its unique near-infrared wavelength coverage (0.8-4.2 microns), JEDI has the advantage of observing SNe Ia in the rest frame J band for the entire redshift range of 0 energy are discussed, with special emphasis on the improved precision afforded by the rest frame near-infrared data.

M. M. Phillips; Peter Garnavich; Yun Wang; David Branch; Edward Baron; Arlin Crotts; J. Craig Wheeler; Edward Cheng; Mario Hamuy; for the JEDI Team

2006-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

138

Is the central binary system of the planetary nebula Henize 2-428 a Type Ia supernova progenitor?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We account for recent observations of the binary system at the center of the bipolar planetary nebula Henize 2-428 by the presence of one degenerate core with a low-mass main sequence companion, rather than by two degenerate objects. We argue that the variability of the He II 5412A spectral line can be accounted for by a time-varying broad absorption line from the central star on top of which there is a time-varying narrow emission line from the compact nebula. The two (almost) symmetric broad minima in the light curve are attributed to tidal distortion caused by a companion. We find problems in the recently proposed and competing explanation of two equal-mass degenerate objects that supposedly will eventually merge, possibly leading to a SN Ia. We conclude that Henize 2-428 cannot be claimed yet to support the double-degenerate scenario for Type Ia supernovae.

Garcia-Berro, Enrique; Althaus, Leandro G

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Spectral Observations and Analyses of Low-Redshift Type Ia Supernovae  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1.2 Why Study Supernovae? . . . . . . . . . . . . .1.3 What are Supernovae? . . . . . . . .Core-Collapse Supernovae . . . . . . . . 1.3.2 Thermonuclear

Silverman, Jeffrey Michael

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Utilizing the Updated Gamma-Ray Bursts and Type Ia Supernovae to Constrain the Cardassian Expansion Model and Dark Energy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We update gamma-ray burst (GRB) luminosity relations among certain spectral and light-curve features with 139 GRBs. The distance modulus of 82 GRBs at $z>1.4$ can be calibrated with the sample at $z\\leq1.4$ by using the cubic spline interpolation method from the Union2.1 Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) set. We investigate the joint constraints on the Cardassian expansion model and dark energy with 580 Union2.1 SNe Ia sample ($z<1.4$) and 82 calibrated GRBs data ($1.4Ia significantly improves the constrain on $\\Omega_{m}-\\Omega_{\\Lambda}$ plane. In the Cardassian expansion model, the best fit is $\\Omega_{m}= 0.24_{-0.15}^{+0.15}$ and $n=0.16_{-0.52}^{+0.30}$ $(1\\sigma)$, which is consistent with the $\\Lambda$CDM cosmology $(n=0)$ in the $1\\sigma$ confidence region. We also discuss two dark energy models in which the equation of state $w(z)$ is parametrized as $w(z)=w_{0}$ and $w(z)=w_{0}+w_{1}z/(1+z)$, respectively. Based on o...

Wei, Jun-Jie; Wu, Xue-Feng

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "type ia supernovae" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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141

THE IMPACT OF TYPE Ia SUPERNOVA EXPLOSIONS ON HELIUM COMPANIONS IN THE CHANDRASEKHAR-MASS EXPLOSION SCENARIO  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the version of the single-degenerate scenario of Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) studied here, a carbon-oxygen white dwarf explodes close to the Chandrasekhar limit after accreting material from a non-degenerate helium (He) companion star. In the present study, we employ the STELLAR GADGET code to perform three-dimensional hydrodynamical simulations of the interaction of the SN Ia ejecta with the He companion star taking into account its orbital motion and spin. It is found that only 2%-5% of the initial companion mass is stripped off from the outer layers of He companion stars due to the supernova (SN) impact. The dependence of the unbound mass (or the kick velocity) on the orbital separation can be fitted to a good approximation by a power law for a given companion model. After the SN impact, the outer layers of a He donor star are significantly enriched with heavy elements from the low-expansion-velocity tail of SN Ia ejecta. The total mass of accumulated SN-ejecta material on the companion surface reaches about {approx}> 10{sup -3} M{sub Sun} for different companion models. This enrichment with heavy elements provides a potential way to observationally identify the surviving companion star in SN remnants. Finally, by artificially adjusting the explosion energy of the W7 explosion model, we find that the total accumulation of SN ejecta on the companion surface is also dependent on the explosion energy with a power-law relation to a good approximation.

Liu Zhengwei; Wang, B.; Han, Z. W. [Yunnan Observatories, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Kunming 650011 (China); Pakmor, R. [Heidelberger Institut fuer Theoretische Studien, Schloss-Wolfsbrunnenweg 35, D-69118 Heidelberg (Germany); Seitenzahl, I. R.; Hillebrandt, W.; Kromer, M.; Edelmann, P.; Taubenberger, S. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Astrophysik, Karl-Schwarzschild-Str. 1, D-85741 Garching (Germany); Roepke, F. K. [Institut fuer Theoretische Physik und Astrophysik, Universitaet Wuerzburg, Am Hubland, D-97074 Wuerzburg (Germany); Maeda, K., E-mail: zwliu@ynao.ac.cn [Kavli Institute for the Physics and Mathematics of the Universe (Kavli-IPMU), Todai Institutes for Advanced Study (TODIAS), University of Tokyo, 5-1-5 Kashiwanoha, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8583 (Japan)

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

String Landscape and Supernovae Ia  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present a model for the triggering of Supernovae Ia (SN Ia) by a phase transition to exact supersymmetry (susy) in the core of a white dwarf star. The model, which accomodates the data on SN Ia and avoids the problems of the standard astrophysical accretion based picture, is based on string landscape ideas and assumes that the decay of the false broken susy vacuum is enhanced at high density. In a slowly expanding susy bubble, the conversion of pairs of fermions to pairs of degenerate scalars releases a significant amount of energy which induces fusion in the surrounding normal matter shell. After cooling, the absence of degeneracy pressure causes the susy bubble to collapse to a black hole of about 0.1 solar mass or to some other stable susy object.

L. Clavelli

2011-10-09T23:59:59.000Z

143

HELIUM-IGNITED VIOLENT MERGERS AS A UNIFIED MODEL FOR NORMAL AND RAPIDLY DECLINING TYPE Ia SUPERNOVAE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The progenitors of Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) are still unknown, despite significant progress during the past several years in theory and observations. Violent mergers of two carbon-oxygen (CO) white dwarfs (WDs) are a candidate scenario suggested to be responsible for at least a significant fraction of normal SNe Ia. Here, we simulate the merger of two CO WDs using a moving-mesh code that allows for the inclusion of thin helium (He) shells (0.01 M{sub Sun }) on top of the WDs at an unprecedented numerical resolution. The accretion of He onto the primary WD leads to the formation of a detonation in its He shell. This detonation propagates around the CO WD and sends a converging shock wave into its core, known to robustly trigger a second detonation, as in the well-known double-detonation scenario for He-accreting CO WDs. However, in contrast to that scenario where a massive He shell is required to form a detonation through thermal instability, here the He detonation is ignited dynamically. Accordingly the required He-shell mass is significantly smaller, and hence its burning products are unlikely to affect the optical display of the explosion. We show that this scenario, which works for CO primary WDs with CO- as well as He-WD companions, has the potential to explain the different brightness distributions, delay times, and relative rates of normal and fast declining SNe Ia. Finally, we discuss extensions to our unified merger model needed to obtain a comprehensive picture of the full observed diversity of SNe Ia.

Pakmor, R.; Springel, V. [Heidelberger Institut fuer Theoretische Studien, Schloss-Wolfsbrunnenweg 35, D-69118 Heidelberg (Germany); Kromer, M. [Kavli Institute for the Physics and Mathematics of the Universe, University of Tokyo, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8583 (Japan); Taubenberger, S. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Astrophysik, Karl-Schwarzschild-Str. 1, D-85748 Garching (Germany)

2013-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

144

Measuring Type Ia Supernova Distances and Redshifts From Their Multi-band Light Curves  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

curve, http://supernovae.in2p3.fr/ ? guy/salt/index.htmlfor large numbers of supernovae; so many that it would becosmology:distance scale, supernovae:general Introduction

Kim, Alex G.; Miquel, Ramon

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Type Ia supernova rate at a redshift of ~;0.1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

since the Big Bang: Supernovae and Gamma-Ray Bursts, held 3-rst the EROS search for supernovae is reviewed in Sect. 2.2. The EROS search for supernovae The EROS experiment used a

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

EVALUATING SYSTEMATIC DEPENDENCIES OF TYPE Ia SUPERNOVAE: THE INFLUENCE OF PROGENITOR {sup 22}Ne CONTENT ON DYNAMICS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present a theoretical framework for formal study of systematic effects in supernovae Type Ia (SNe Ia) that utilizes two-dimensional simulations to implement a form of the deflagration-detonation transition (DDT) explosion scenario. The framework is developed from a randomized initial condition that leads to a sample of simulated SNe Ia whose {sup 56}Ni masses have a similar average and range to those observed, and have many other modestly realistic features such as the velocity extent of intermediate-mass elements. The intended purpose is to enable statistically well defined studies of both physical and theoretical parameters of the SNe Ia explosion simulation. We present here a thorough description of the outcome of the SNe Ia explosions produced by our current simulations. A first application of this framework is utilized to study the dependence of the SNe Ia on the {sup 22}Ne content, which is known to be directly influenced by the progenitor stellar population's metallicity. Our study is very specifically tailored to measure how the {sup 22}Ne content influences the competition between the rise of plumes of burned material and the expansion of the star before these plumes reach DDT conditions. This influence arises from the dependence of the energy release, progenitor structure, and laminar flame speed on {sup 22}Ne content. For this study, we explore these three effects for a fixed carbon content and DDT density. By setting the density at which nucleosynthesis takes place during the detonation phase of the explosion, the competition between plume rise and stellar expansion controls the amount of material in nuclear statistical equilibrium (NSE) and therefore {sup 56}Ni produced. Of particular interest is how this influence of {sup 22}Ne content compares to the direct modification of the {sup 56}Ni mass via the inherent neutron excess as discussed by Timmes et al. Although the outcome following from any particular ignition condition can change dramatically with {sup 22}Ne content, with a sample of 20 ignition conditions we find that the systematic change in the expansion of the star prior to detonation is not large enough to compete with the dependence discussed by Timmes et al. In fact, our results show no statistically significant dependence of the predetonation expansion on {sup 22}Ne content, pointing to the morphology of the ignition condition as being the dominant dynamical driver of the {sup 56}Ni yield of the explosion. However, variations in the DDT density, which were specifically excluded here, are also expected to be important and to depend systematically on {sup 22}Ne content.

Townsley, Dean M. [Department of Astronomy/Steward Observatory, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ (United States); Jackson, Aaron P.; Calder, Alan C. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, State University of New York - Stony Brook, Stony Brook, NY (United States); Chamulak, David A.; Brown, Edward F. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI (United States); Timmes, F. X. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Astrophysics, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States)], E-mail: townsley@as.arizona.edu

2009-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

147

Cosmological-model-parameter determination from satellite-acquired type Ia and IIP Supernova Data  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Since the B i g B a n g : Supernovae a n d G a m m a - R a ythe universe—space vehicles—supernovae: general Introductionbased on T y p e l a supernovae (hereafter S N e la) have

Podariu, Silviu; Nugent, Peter; Ratra, Bharat

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Diversity in extinction laws of Type Ia supernovae measured between $0.2$ and $2\\,\\mu\\mathrm{m}$  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present ultraviolet (UV) observations of six nearby Type~Ia supernovae (SNe~Ia) obtained with the Hubble Space Telescope, three of which were also observed in the near-IR (NIR) with Wide-Field Camera~3. UV observations with the Swift satellite, as well as ground-based optical and near-infrared data provide complementary information. The combined data-set covers the wavelength range $0.2$--$2~\\mu$m. By also including archival data of SN 2014J, we analyse a sample spanning observed colour excesses up to $E(B-V)=1.4~$mag. We study the wavelength dependent extinction of each individual SN and find a diversity of reddening laws when characterised by the total-to-selective extinction $R_V$. In particular, we note that for the two SNe with $E(B-V)\\gtrsim1~$mag, for which the colour excess is dominated by dust extinction, we find $R_V=1.4\\pm0.1$ and $R_V=2.8\\pm0.1$. Adding UV photometry reduces the uncertainty of fitted $R_V$ by $\\sim50\\,$% allowing us to also measure $R_V$ of individual low-extinction objects whi...

Amanullah, R; Goobar, A; Ferretti, R; Papadogiannakis, S; Petrushevska, T; Brown, P J; Cao, Y; Contreras, C; Dahle, H; Elias-Rosa, N; Fynbo, J P U; Gorosabel, J; Guaita, L; Hangard, L; Howell, D A; Hsiao, E Y; Kankare, E; Kasliwal, M; Leloudas, G; Lundqvist, P; Mattila, S; Nugent, P; Phillips, M M; Sandberg, A; Stanishev, V; Sullivan, M; Taddia, F; Östlin, G; Asadi, S; Herrero-Illana, R; Jensen, J J; Karhunen, K; Lazarevi, S; Varenius, E; Santos, P; Sridhar, S Seethapuram; Wallström, S H J; Wiegert, J

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Testing Models of Intrinsic Brightness Variations in Type Ia Supernovae, and their Impact on Measuring Cosmological Parameters  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

For spectroscopically confirmed type Ia supernovae we evaluate models of intrinsic brightness variations with detailed data/Monte-Carlo comparisons of the dispersion in the following quantities: Hubble-diagram scatter, color difference (B-V-c) between the true B-V color and the fitted color (c) from the SALT-II light curve model, and photometric redshift residual. The data sample includes 251 ugriz light curves from the 3-season Sloan Digital Sky Survey-II, and 191 griz light curves from the Supernova Legacy Survey 3-year data release. We find that the simplest model of a wavelength independent (coherent) scatter is not adequate, and that to describe the data the intrinsic scatter model must have wavelength-dependent variations. We use Monte Carlo simulations to examine the standard approach of adding a coherent scatter term in quadrature to the distance-modulus uncertainty in order to bring the reduced chi2 to unity when fitting a Hubble diagram. If the light curve fits include model uncertainties with the c...

Kessler, Richard; Marriner, John; Betoule, Marc; Brinkmann, Jon; Cinabro, David; El-Hage, Patrick; Frieman, Joshua; Jha, Saurabh; Mosher, Jennifer; Schneider, Donald P

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Nebular spectra and abundance tomography of the type Ia supernova SN 2011fe: a normal SN Ia with a stable Fe core  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A series of optical and one near-infrared nebular spectra covering the first year of the Type Ia supernova SN 2011fe are presented and modelled. The density profile that proved best for the early optical/ultraviolet spectra, "rho-11fe", was extended to lower velocities to include the regions that emit at nebular epochs. Model rho-11fe is intermediate between the fast deflagration model W7 and a low-energy delayed-detonation. Good fits to the nebular spectra are obtained if the innermost ejecta are dominated by neutron-rich, stable Fe-group species, which contribute to cooling but not to heating. The correct thermal balance can thus be reached for the strongest [FeII] and [FeIII] lines to be reproduced with the observed ratio. The 56Ni mass thus obtained is 0.47 +/- 0.05 Mo. The bulk of 56Ni has an outermost velocity of ~8500 km/s. The mass of stable iron is 0.23 +/- 0.03 Mo. Stable Ni has low abundance, ~10^{-2} Mo. This is sufficient to reproduce an observed emission line near 7400 A. A sub-Chandrasekhar exp...

Mazzali, P A; Filippenko, A V; Garnavich, P M; Clubb, K I; Maguire, K; Pan, Y -C; Shappee, R; Silverman, J M; Benetti, S; Hachinger, S; Nomoto, K; Pian, E

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Identification of the feature that causes the I-band secondary maximum of a type Ia supernova  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We obtained a time series of spectra covering the secondary maximum in the I-band of the bright Type Ia supernova 2014J in M82 with the TIGRE telescope. Comparing the observations with theoretical models calculated with the time dependent extension of the PHOENIX code, we identify the feature that causes the secondary maximum in the I-band light curve. Fe II 3d6(3D)4s-3d6(5D)4p and similar high excitation transitions produce a blended feature at 7500 {\\AA}, which causes the rise of the light curve towards the secondary maximum. The series of observed spectra of SN 2014J and archival data of SN 2011fe confirm this conclusion. We further studied the plateau phase of the Rband light curve of SN 2014J and searched for features which contribute to the flux. The theoretical models do not clearly indicate a new feature that may cause the Rband plateau phase. However, Co II features in the range of 6500 - 7000 {\\AA} and the Fe II feature of the I-band are clearly seen in the theoretical spectra, but do not appear to ...

Jack, D; Hauschildt, P H

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

ROLE OF EJECTA CLUMPING AND BACK-REACTION OF ACCELERATED COSMIC RAYS IN THE EVOLUTION OF TYPE Ia SUPERNOVA REMNANTS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We investigate the role played by initial clumping of ejecta and by efficient acceleration of cosmic rays (CRs) in determining the density structure of the post-shock region of a Type Ia supernova remnant (SNR) through detailed three-dimensional MHD modeling. Our model describes the expansion of an SNR through a magnetized interstellar medium, including the initial clumping of ejecta and the effects on shock dynamics due to back-reaction of accelerated CRs. The model predictions are compared to the observations of SN 1006. We found that the back-reaction of accelerated CRs alone cannot reproduce the observed separation between the forward shock and the contact discontinuity unless the energy losses through CR acceleration and escape are very large and independent of the obliquity angle. On the contrary, the clumping of ejecta can naturally reproduce the observed small separation and the occurrence of protrusions observed in SN 1006, even without the need of accelerated CRs. We conclude that forward shock-contact discontinuity separation is a probe of the ejecta structure at the time of explosion rather than a probe of the efficiency of CR acceleration in young SNRs.

Orlando, S.; Bocchino, F.; Miceli, M. [INAF-Osservatorio Astronomico di Palermo 'G. S. Vaiana', Piazza del Parlamento 1, 90134 Palermo (Italy); Petruk, O. [Institute for Applied Problems in Mechanics and Mathematics, Naukova Street, 3-b Lviv 79060 (Ukraine); Pumo, M. L., E-mail: orlando@astropa.inaf.it [INAF-Osservatorio Astronomico di Padova, Vicolo dell'Osservatorio 5, 35122 Padova (Italy)

2012-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

153

Exploring the Properties of Dark Energy Using Type Ia Supernovae and Other Datasets  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We reconstruct dark energy properties from two complementary supernova datasets -- the newly released Gold+HST sample and SNLS. The results obtained are consistent with standard $\\Lambda$CDM model within $2\\sigma$ error bars although the Gold+HST data favour evolving dark energy slightly more than SNLS. Using complementary data from baryon acoustic oscillations and the cosmic microwave background to constrain dark energy, we find that our results in this case are strongly dependent on the present value of the matter density $\\Omega_m$. Consequently, no firm conclusions regarding constancy or variability of dark energy density can be drawn from these data alone unless the value of $\\Omega_m$ is known to an accuracy of a few percent. However, possible variability is significantly restricted if this data is used in conjunction with supernova data.

Ujjaini Alam; Varun Sahni; Alexei A. Starobinsky

2006-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

154

TESTING MODELS OF INTRINSIC BRIGHTNESS VARIATIONS IN TYPE Ia SUPERNOVAE AND THEIR IMPACT ON MEASURING COSMOLOGICAL PARAMETERS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

For spectroscopically confirmed Type Ia supernovae we evaluate models of intrinsic brightness variations with detailed data/Monte Carlo comparisons of the dispersion in the following quantities: Hubble-diagram scatter, color difference (B - V - c) between the true B - V color and the fitted color (c) from the SALT-II light curve model, and photometric redshift residual. The data sample includes 251 ugriz light curves from the three-season Sloan Digital Sky Survey-II and 191 griz light curves from the Supernova Legacy Survey 3 year data release. We find that the simplest model of a wavelength-independent (coherent) scatter is not adequate, and that to describe the data the intrinsic-scatter model must have wavelength-dependent variations resulting in a {approx}0.02 mag scatter in B - V - c. Relatively weak constraints are obtained on the nature of intrinsic scatter because a variety of different models can reasonably describe this photometric data sample. We use Monte Carlo simulations to examine the standard approach of adding a coherent-scatter term in quadrature to the distance-modulus uncertainty in order to bring the reduced {chi}{sup 2} to unity when fitting a Hubble diagram. If the light curve fits include model uncertainties with the correct wavelength dependence of the scatter, we find that this approach is valid and that the bias on the dark energy equation-of-state parameter w is much smaller ({approx}0.001) than current systematic uncertainties. However, incorrect model uncertainties can lead to a significant bias on the distance moduli, with up to {approx}0.05 mag redshift-dependent variation. This bias is roughly reduced in half after applying a Malmquist bias correction. For the recent SNLS3 cosmology results, we estimate that this effect introduces an additional systematic uncertainty on w of {approx}0.02, well below the total uncertainty. This uncertainty depends on the choice of viable scatter models and the choice of supernova (SN) samples, and thus this small w-uncertainty is not guaranteed in future cosmology results. For example, the w-uncertainty for SDSS+SNLS (dropping the nearby SNe) increases to {approx}0.04.

Kessler, Richard; Frieman, Joshua A. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of Chicago, 5640 South Ellis Avenue, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States)] [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of Chicago, 5640 South Ellis Avenue, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States); Guy, Julien; Betoule, Marc; El-Hage, Patrick [Laboratoire de Physique Nucleaire et des Hautes Energies, UPMC Univ. Paris 6, UPD Univ. Paris 7, CNRS IN2P3, 4 place Jussieu, F-75005 Paris (France)] [Laboratoire de Physique Nucleaire et des Hautes Energies, UPMC Univ. Paris 6, UPD Univ. Paris 7, CNRS IN2P3, 4 place Jussieu, F-75005 Paris (France); Marriner, John [Center for Particle Astrophysics, Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, P.O. Box 500, Batavia, IL 60510 (United States)] [Center for Particle Astrophysics, Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, P.O. Box 500, Batavia, IL 60510 (United States); Brinkmann, Jon [Apache Point Observatory, P.O. Box 59, Sunspot, NM 88349 (United States)] [Apache Point Observatory, P.O. Box 59, Sunspot, NM 88349 (United States); Cinabro, David [Department of Physics, Wayne State University, Detroit, MI 48202 (United States)] [Department of Physics, Wayne State University, Detroit, MI 48202 (United States); Jha, Saurabh [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Rutgers University, 136 Frelinghuysen Road, Piscataway, NJ 08854 (United States)] [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Rutgers University, 136 Frelinghuysen Road, Piscataway, NJ 08854 (United States); Mosher, Jennifer [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Pennsylvania, 203 South 33rd Street, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States)] [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Pennsylvania, 203 South 33rd Street, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); Schneider, Donald P., E-mail: kessler@kicp.uchicago.edu [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States)

2013-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

155

The Diversity of Variations in the Spectra of Type Ia Supernovae  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and recorded worldwide would occur. In 1572 and 1604, Tycho Brahe and Johannes Kepler respectively each observed a supernova. Tycho wrote a detailed account of his observations in a book entitled, De Stella Nova, meaning \\the new star," this was the rst... that the stars should show parallax | a shift of position in relation to background objects | if the earth moved about the sun. Almost 2,000 years latter, similar reasoning lead Tycho Brahe to believe that the earth was stationary, the sun orbited the earth...

Wagers, Andrew James

2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

156

SPECTROSCOPIC OBSERVATIONS OF SN 2012fr: A LUMINOUS, NORMAL TYPE Ia SUPERNOVA WITH EARLY HIGH-VELOCITY FEATURES AND A LATE VELOCITY PLATEAU  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present 65 optical spectra of the Type Ia SN 2012fr, 33 of which were obtained before maximum light. At early times, SN 2012fr shows clear evidence of a high-velocity feature (HVF) in the Si II {lambda}6355 line that can be cleanly decoupled from the lower velocity ''photospheric'' component. This Si II {lambda}6355 HVF fades by phase -5; subsequently, the photospheric component exhibits a very narrow velocity width and remains at a nearly constant velocity of {approx}12,000 km s{sup -1} until at least five weeks after maximum brightness. The Ca II infrared triplet exhibits similar evidence for both a photospheric component at v Almost-Equal-To 12,000 km s{sup -1} with narrow line width and long velocity plateau, as well as an HVF beginning at v Almost-Equal-To 31,000 km s{sup -1} two weeks before maximum. SN 2012fr resides on the border between the ''shallow silicon'' and ''core-normal'' subclasses in the Branch et al. classification scheme, and on the border between normal and high-velocity Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) in the Wang et al. system. Though it is a clear member of the ''low velocity gradient'' group of SNe Ia and exhibits a very slow light-curve decline, it shows key dissimilarities with the overluminous SN 1991T or SN 1999aa subclasses of SNe Ia. SN 2012fr represents a well-observed SN Ia at the luminous end of the normal SN Ia distribution and a key transitional event between nominal spectroscopic subclasses of SNe Ia.

Childress, M. J.; Scalzo, R. A.; Sim, S. A.; Tucker, B. E.; Yuan, F.; Schmidt, B. P. [Research School of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Australian National University, Canberra, ACT 2611 (Australia); Cenko, S. B.; Filippenko, A. V. [Department of Astronomy, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720-3411 (United States); Silverman, J. M. [Department of Astronomy, University of Texas, Austin, TX 78712-0259 (United States); Contreras, C.; Hsiao, E. Y.; Phillips, M.; Morrell, N. [Las Campanas Observatory, Carnegie Observatories, Casilla 601, La Serena (Chile); Jha, S. W.; McCully, C. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Rutgers, State University of New Jersey, 136 Frelinghuysen Road, Piscataway, NJ 08854 (United States); Anderson, J. P.; De Jaeger, T.; Forster, F. [Departamento de Astronomia, Universidad de Chile, Casilla 36-D, Santiago (Chile); Benetti, S. [INAF Osservatorio Astronomico di Padova, Vicolo dell'Osservatorio 5, I-35122 Padova (Italy); Bufano, F., E-mail: mjc@mso.anu.edu.au [Departamento de Ciencias Fisicas, Universidad Andres Bello, Avda. Republica 252, Santiago (Chile); and others

2013-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

157

Four Papers by the Supernova Cosmology Project  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

K CORRECTIONS FOR TYPE IA SUPERNOVAE AND A TEST FOR SPATIALDILATION USING TYPE IA SUPERNOVAE AS CLOCKS The SupernovaInstitute Thermonuclear Supernovae Conference, Aiguablava,

Perlmutter, S.; Deustua, S.; Gabi, S.; Goldhaber, G.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

THE EFFECT OF THE PRE-DETONATION STELLAR INTERNAL VELOCITY PROFILE ON THE NUCLEOSYNTHETIC YIELDS IN TYPE Ia SUPERNOVA  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A common model of the explosion mechanism of Type Ia supernovae is based on a delayed detonation of a white dwarf. A variety of models differ primarily in the method by which the deflagration leads to a detonation. A common feature of the models, however, is that all of them involve the propagation of the detonation through a white dwarf that is either expanding or contracting, where the stellar internal velocity profile depends on both time and space. In this work, we investigate the effects of the pre-detonation stellar internal velocity profile and the post-detonation velocity of expansion on the production of {alpha}-particle nuclei, including {sup 56}Ni, which are the primary nuclei produced by the detonation wave. We perform one-dimensional hydrodynamic simulations of the explosion phase of the white dwarf for center and off-center detonations with five different stellar velocity profiles at the onset of the detonation. In order to follow the complex flows and to calculate the nucleosynthetic yields, approximately 10,000 tracer particles were added to every simulation. We observe two distinct post-detonation expansion phases: rarefaction and bulk expansion. Almost all the burning to {sup 56}Ni occurs only in the rarefaction phase, and its expansion timescale is influenced by pre-existing flow structure in the star, in particular by the pre-detonation stellar velocity profile. We find that the mass fractions of the {alpha}-particle nuclei, including {sup 56}Ni, are tight functions of the empirical physical parameter {rho}{sub up}/v{sub down}, where {rho}{sub up} is the mass density immediately upstream of the detonation wave front and v{sub down} is the velocity of the flow immediately downstream of the detonation wave front. We also find that v{sub down} depends on the pre-detonation flow velocity. We conclude that the properties of the pre-existing flow, in particular the internal stellar velocity profile, influence the final isotopic composition of burned matter produced by the detonation.

Kim, Yeunjin; Jordan, G. C. IV; Graziani, Carlo; Lamb, D. Q.; Truran, J. W. [Astronomy Department, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States); Meyer, B. S. [Physics and Astronomy Department, Clemson University, Clemson, SC 29634 (United States)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

The nearby supernova factory  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

cadence gives fewer supernovae but better constraints on thein 2003. Key words: supernovae, galaxies Preprint submitted2004 Introduction Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) have proven

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Plasma Redshift, Time Dilation, and Supernovas Ia  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The measurements of the absolute magnitudes and redshifts of supernovas Ia show that conventional physics, which includes plasma redshift, fully explains the observed magnitude-redshift relation of the supernovas. The only parameter that is required is the Hubble constant, which in principle can be measured independently. The contemporary theory of the expansion of the universe (Big Bang) requires in addition to the Hubble constant several adjustable parameters, such as an initial explosion, the dark matter parameter, and a time adjustable dark energy parameter for explaining the supernova Ia data. The contemporary Big Bang theory also requires time dilation of distant events as an inherent premise. The contention is usually that the light curves of distant supernovas show or even prove the time dilation. In the present article, we challenge this assertion. We document and show that the previously reported data in fact indicate that there is no time dilation. The data reported by Riess et al. in the Astrophysical Journal in June 2004 confirm the plasma redshift, the absence of time dilation, dark matter, and dark energy.

Ari Brynjolfsson

2004-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "type ia supernovae" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

THE TIP OF THE RED GIANT BRANCH DISTANCES TO TYPE Ia SUPERNOVA HOST GALAXIES. II. M66 AND M96 IN THE LEO I GROUP  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

M66 and M96 in the Leo I Group are nearby spiral galaxies hosting Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia). We estimate the distances to these galaxies from the luminosity of the tip of the red giant branch (TRGB). We obtain VI photometry of resolved stars in these galaxies from F555W and F814W images in the Hubble Space Telescope archive. From the luminosity function of these red giants, we find the TRGB I-band magnitude to be I{sub TRGB} = 26.20 {+-} 0.03 for M66 and 26.21 {+-} 0.03 for M96. These values yield distance modulus (m - M){sub 0} = 30.12 {+-} 0.03(random) {+-} 0.12(systematic) for M66 and (m - M){sub 0} = 30.15 {+-} 0.03(random) {+-} 0.12(systematic) for M96. These results show that they are indeed the members of the same group. With these results we derive absolute maximum magnitudes of two SNe (SN 1989B in M66 and SN 1998bu in M96). V-band magnitudes of these SNe Ia are {approx}0.2 mag fainter than SN 2011fe in M101, one of the nearest recent SNe Ia. We also derive near-infrared magnitudes for SN 1998bu. Optical magnitudes of three SNe Ia (SN 1989B, SN 1998bu, and SN 2011fe) based on TRGB analysis yield a Hubble constant, H{sub 0} = 68.4 {+-} 2.6(random) {+-} 3.7(systematic) km s{sup -1} Mpc{sup -1}. This value is similar to the values derived from recent WMAP9 results, H{sub 0} = 69.32 {+-} 0.80 km s{sup -1} Mpc{sup -1}, and from Planck results, H{sub 0} = 67.3 {+-} 1.2 km s{sup -1} Mpc{sup -1}, but smaller than other recent determinations based on Cepheid calibration for SNe Ia luminosity, H{sub 0} = 74 {+-} 3 km s{sup -1} Mpc{sup -1}.

Lee, Myung Gyoon; Jang, In Sung, E-mail: mglee@astro.snu.ac.kr, E-mail: isjang@astro.snu.ac.kr [Astronomy Program, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Seoul National University, Gwanak-gu, Seoul 151-742 (Korea, Republic of)

2013-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

162

TURBULENCE IN A THREE-DIMENSIONAL DEFLAGRATION MODEL FOR TYPE Ia SUPERNOVAE. II. INTERMITTENCY AND THE DEFLAGRATION-TO-DETONATION TRANSITION PROBABILITY  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The delayed detonation model describes the observational properties of the majority of Type Ia supernovae very well. Using numerical data from a three-dimensional deflagration model for Type Ia supernovae, the intermittency of the turbulent velocity field and its implications on the probability of a deflagration-to-detonation (DDT) transition are investigated. From structure functions of the turbulent velocity fluctuations, we determine intermittency parameters based on the log-normal and the log-Poisson models. The bulk of turbulence in the ash regions appears to be less intermittent than predicted by the standard log-normal model and the She-Leveque model. On the other hand, the analysis of the turbulent velocity fluctuations in the vicinity of the flame front by Roepke suggests a much higher probability of large velocity fluctuations on the grid scale in comparison to the log-normal intermittency model. Following Pan et al., we computed probability density functions for a DDT for the different distributions. The determination of the total number of regions at the flame surface, in which DDTs can be triggered, enables us to estimate the total number of events. Assuming that a DDT can occur in the stirred flame regime, as proposed by Woosley et al., the log-normal model would imply a delayed detonation between 0.7 and 0.8 s after the beginning of the deflagration phase for the multi-spot ignition scenario used in the simulation. However, the probability drops to virtually zero if a DDT is further constrained by the requirement that the turbulent velocity fluctuations reach about 500 km s{sup -1}. Under this condition, delayed detonations are only possible if the distribution of the velocity fluctuations is not log-normal. From our calculations follows that the distribution obtained by Roepke allow for multiple DDTs around 0.8 s after ignition at a transition density close to 1 x 10{sup 7} g cm{sup -3}.

Schmidt, W.; Niemeyer, J. C. [Institut fuer Astrophysik, Universitaet Goettingen, Friedrich-Hund-Platz 1, D-37077 Goettingen (Germany); Ciaraldi-Schoolmann, F. [Lehrstuhl fuer Astronomie und Astrophysik, Universitaet Wuerzburg, Am Hubland, D-97074 Wuerzburg (Germany); Roepke, F. K.; Hillebrandt, W., E-mail: schmidt@astro.physik.uni-goettingen.d [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Astrophysik, Karl-Schwarzschild-Str. 1, D-85741 Garching (Germany)

2010-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

163

RELATIVISTIC SHOCK BREAKOUTS-A VARIETY OF GAMMA-RAY FLARES: FROM LOW-LUMINOSITY GAMMA-RAY BURSTS TO TYPE Ia SUPERNOVAE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The light from a shock breakout of stellar explosions, which carries a wealth of information, strongly depends on the shock velocity at the time of the breakout. The emission from Newtonian breakouts, typical in regular core-collapse supernovae (SNe), has been explored extensively. However, a large variety of explosions result in mildly or ultrarelativistic breakouts, where the observed signature is unknown. Here we calculate the luminosity and spectrum produced by relativistic breakouts. In order to do so, we improve the analytic description of relativistic radiation-mediated shocks and follow the system from the breakout itself, through the planar phase and into the spherical phase. We limit our calculation to cases where the post-breakout acceleration of the gas ends during the planar phase (i.e., the final gas Lorentz factor {approx}< 30). We find that spherical relativistic breakouts produce a flash of gamma rays with energy, E{sub bo}, temperature, T{sub bo}, and duration, t{sup obs} b{sub o}, that provide the breakout radius ( Almost-Equal-To 5 R{sub Sun }(t{sup obs}{sub bo}/10 s)(T{sub bo}/50 keV){sup 2}) and the Lorentz factor ( Almost-Equal-To T{sub bo}/50 keV). They also always satisfy a relativistic breakout relation (t{sup obs}{sub bo}/20 s) {approx} (E{sub bo}/10{sup 46} erg){sup 1/2}(T{sub bo}/50 keV){sup -2.68}. The breakout flare is typically followed, on longer timescales, by X-rays that carry a comparable energy. We apply our model to a variety of explosions, including Type Ia and .Ia SNe, accretion-induced collapse, energetic SNe, and gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). We find that all these events produce detectable gamma-ray signals, some of which may have already been seen. Some particular examples are: (1) relativistic shock breakouts provide a natural explanation to the energy, temperature, and timescales of low-luminosity GRBs. Indeed, all observed low-luminosity GRBs satisfy the relativistic breakout relation. (2) Nearby broad-line Type Ib/c (like SN 2002ap) may produce a detectable {gamma}-ray signal. (3) Galactic Type Ia SNe may produce detectable {gamma}-ray flares. We conclude that relativistic shock breakouts provide a generic process for the production of gamma-ray flares.

Nakar, Ehud [Raymond and Beverly Sackler School of Physics and Astronomy, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv 69978 (Israel); Sari, Re'em [Racah Institute for Physics, Hebrew University, Jerusalem 91904 (Israel)

2012-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

164

TYPE Ia SUPERNOVA REMNANT SHELL AT z = 3.5 SEEN IN THE THREE SIGHTLINES TOWARD THE GRAVITATIONALLY LENSED QSO B1422+231  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Using the Subaru 8.2 m Telescope with the IRCS Echelle spectrograph, we obtained high-resolution (R = 10,000) near-infrared (1.01-1.38 {mu}m) spectra of images A and B of the gravitationally lensed QSO B1422+231 (z = 3.628) consisting of four known lensed images. We detected Mg II absorption lines at z = 3.54, which show a large variance of column densities ({approx}0.3 dex) and velocities ({approx}10 km s{sup -1}) between sightlines A and B with a projected separation of only 8.4h{sup -1}{sub 70} pc at that redshift. This is the smallest spatial structure of the high-z gas clouds ever detected after Rauch et al. found a 20 pc scale structure for the same z = 3.54 absorption system using optical spectra of images A and C. The observed systematic variances imply that the system is an expanding shell as originally suggested by Rauch et al. By combining the data for three sightlines, we managed to constrain the radius and expansion velocity of the shell ({approx}50-100 pc, 130 km s{sup -1}), concluding that the shell is truly a supernova remnant (SNR) rather than other types of shell objects, such as a giant H II region. We also detected strong Fe II absorption lines for this system, but with much broader Doppler width than that of {alpha}-element lines. We suggest that this Fe II absorption line originates in a localized Fe II-rich gas cloud that is not completely mixed with plowed ambient interstellar gas clouds showing other {alpha}-element low-ion absorption lines. Along with the Fe richness, we conclude that the SNR is produced by an SN Ia explosion.

Hamano, Satoshi; Kobayashi, Naoto [Institute of Astronomy, University of Tokyo, 2-21-1 Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-0015 (Japan); Kondo, Sohei [Koyama Astronomical Observatory, Kyoto-Sangyo University, Motoyama, Kamigamo, Kita-Ku, Kyoto 603-8555 (Japan); Tsujimoto, Takuji [National Astronomical Observatory of Japan and Department of Astronomical Science, Graduate University for Advanced Studies, 2-21-1 Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-0015 (Japan); Okoshi, Katsuya [Faculty of Industrial Science and Technology, Tokyo University of Science, 102-1 Tomino, Oshamanbe, Hokkaido 049-3514 (Japan); Shigeyama, Toshikazu, E-mail: hamano@ioa.s.u-tokyo.ac.jp [Research Center for the Early Universe, University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan)

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Probing the Type Ia environment with Light Echoes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In general, Light Echoes (LE) are beautiful, rather academical and therefore unavoidably useless phenomena. In some cases, however, they can give interesting information about the environment surrounding the exploding star. After giving a brief introduction to the subject, I describe its application to the case of Type Ia Supernovae and discuss the implications for progenitors and their location within the host galaxies.

F. Patat

2004-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

166

THE POST-MERGER MAGNETIZED EVOLUTION OF WHITE DWARF BINARIES: THE DOUBLE-DEGENERATE CHANNEL OF SUB-CHANDRASEKHAR TYPE Ia SUPERNOVAE AND THE FORMATION OF MAGNETIZED WHITE DWARFS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) play a crucial role as standardizable cosmological candles, though the nature of their progenitors is a subject of active investigation. Recent observational and theoretical work has pointed to merging white dwarf binaries, referred to as the double-degenerate channel, as the possible progenitor systems for some SNe Ia. Additionally, recent theoretical work suggests that mergers which fail to detonate may produce magnetized, rapidly rotating white dwarfs. In this paper, we present the first multidimensional simulations of the post-merger evolution of white dwarf binaries to include the effect of the magnetic field. In these systems, the two white dwarfs complete a final merger on a dynamical timescale, and are tidally disrupted, producing a rapidly rotating white dwarf merger surrounded by a hot corona and a thick, differentially rotating disk. The disk is strongly susceptible to the magnetorotational instability (MRI), and we demonstrate that this leads to the rapid growth of an initially dynamically weak magnetic field in the disk, the spin-down of the white dwarf merger, and to the subsequent central ignition of the white dwarf merger. Additionally, these magnetized models exhibit new features not present in prior hydrodynamic studies of white dwarf mergers, including the development of MRI turbulence in the hot disk, magnetized outflows carrying a significant fraction of the disk mass, and the magnetization of the white dwarf merger to field strengths {approx}2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 8} G. We discuss the impact of our findings on the origins, circumstellar media, and observed properties of SNe Ia and magnetized white dwarfs.

Ji Suoqing; Fisher, Robert T. [University of Massachusetts Dartmouth, Department of Physics, 285 Old Westport Road, North Dartmouth, MA 02740 (United States); Garcia-Berro, Enrique [Departament de Fisica Aplicada, Universitat Politecnica de Catalunya, c/Esteve Terrades, 5, E-08860 Castelldefels (Spain); Tzeferacos, Petros; Jordan, George; Lee, Dongwook [Center for Astrophysical Thermonuclear Flashes, The University of Chicago, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States); Loren-Aguilar, Pablo [School of Physics, University of Exeter, Stocker Road, Exeter EX4 4QL (United Kingdom); Cremer, Pascal [Bethe Center for Theoretical Physics, Universitaet Bonn, Nussallee 12, D-53115 Bonn (Germany); Behrends, Jan [Fachbereich Physik, Freie Universitaet Berlin, Arnimallee 14, D-14195 Berlin (Germany)

2013-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

167

A Probabilistic Approach to Classifying Supernovae Using Photometric Information  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ciency of selecting type Ia supernovae for p cut = 0.98 (weApproach to Classifying Supernovae Using Photometricstudies). Subject headings: supernovae: general Introduction

Kuznetsova, Natalia V.; Connolly, Brian M.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

A fast contour descriptor algorithm for supernova image classification  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

from 42 High-Redshift Supernovae," Astrophysical JournalObservational Evidence from Supernovae for an Acceleratingand Progenitors of Type Ia Supernovae," PhD dissertation,

Aragon, Cecilia R.; Aragon, David Bradburn

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Optical Spectra of Thermonuclear Supernovae in the Local and Distant Universe.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??This thesis is devoted to the study of optical spectra of thermonuclear supernovae, known as ``Type Ia'' supernovae (SN Ia). These violent stellar explosions, visible… (more)

Blondin, Stephane

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

An integral field spectrograph for SNAP supernova studies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

identification of Type Ia supernovae and to standardize theof the mission. Keywords: SNAP, Supernovae, Integral field,measurement of some 2000 supernovae (SNe) of Type Ia up to a

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Progress Report on the Berkeley/Anglo-Australian Observatory High-Redshift Supernova Search  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

photometry curve for type Ia supernovae and the redshift vsdistributions for observed supernovae. Figure 5 from Millermain efforts related to supernovae in progress at Berkeley.

Goldhaber, G.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Type-Ia Supernova Remnant Shell At $Z=3.5$ Seen In The Three Sightlines Toward The Gravitationally Lensed Qso B1422+231  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Using the Subaru 8.2m Telescope with an IRCS Echelle spectrograph, we obtained high-resolution (R=10,000) near-infrared (1.01-1.38 \\mu m) spectra of images A and B of the gravitationally lensed QSO B1422+231 (z=3.628) consisting of four known lensed images. We detected MgII absorption lines at z=3.54, which show a large variance of column densities (~ 0.3 dex) and velocities (~ 10 km/s) between the sightlines A and B with a projected separation of only 8.4h_{70}^{-1} pc at the redshift. This is the smallest spatial structure of the high-z gas clouds ever detected after Rauch et al. found a 20-pc scale structure for the same z=3.54 absorption system using optical spectra of images A and C. The observed systematic variances imply that the system is an expanding shell as originally suggested by Rauch et al. By combining the data for three sightlines, we managed to constrain the radius and expansion velocity of the shell (~ 50-100 pc, 130 km/s), concluding that the shell is truly a supernova remnant (SNR) rather ...

Hamano, Satoshi; Kondo, Sohei; Tsujimoto, Takuji; Okoshi, Katsuya; Shigeyama, Toshikazu

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

The farthest known supernova: Support for an accelerating universe and a glimpse of the epoch of deceleration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ULDA Access Guide No. 6: Supernovae (The Netherlands: ESA)Livio, M. 2000, in Type Ia Supernovae: Theory and Cosmology,T. 2000, in Type Ia Supernovae: Theory and Cosmology, eds.

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Type Ia Supernovae: Simulations and Nucleosynthesis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present our first nucleosynthesis results from a numerical simulation of the thermonuclear disruption of a static cold Chandrasekhar-mass C/O white dwarf. The two-dimensional simulation was performed with an adaptive-mesh Eulerian hydrodynamics code, FLASH, that uses as a flame capturing scheme the evolution of a passive scaler. To compute the isotopic yields and their velocity distribution, 10,000 massless tracer particles are embedded in the star. The particles are advected along streamlines and provide a Lagrangian description of the explosion. We briefly describe our verification tests and preliminary results from post-processing the particle trajectories with a modest (214 isotopes) reaction network.

E. F. Brown; A. C. Calder; T. Plewa; P. M. Ricker; K. Robinson; J. B. Gallagher

2005-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

175

Type Ia Supernovae Project at NERSC  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas ConchasPassiveSubmittedStatusButlerTransportation6/14/11 Page 1Two NovelTwo

176

Visualizing Type Ia Supernova Explosions at NERSC  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLasDelivered energy consumption by sectorlongUpdatesValley

177

THE POWER OF THERMONUCLEAR SUPERNOVAE AFTER ONE YEAR.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia), the thermonuclear explosion of a white dwarf, shape our understanding of the expansion of the universe with the use of… (more)

Bryngelson, Ginger

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Incompatibility of a comoving Ly-alpha forest with supernova-Ia luminosity distances  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Recently Perlmutter et al. suggested a positive value of Einstein's cosmological constant Lambda on the basis of luminosity distances from type-Ia supernovae. However, Lambda world models had earlier been proposed by Hoell & Priester and Liebscher et al. on the basis of quasar absorption-line data. Employing more general repulsive fluids ("dark energy") encompassing the Lambda component we quantitatively compare both approaches with each other. Fitting the SN-data by a minimum-component model consisting of dark energy + dust yields a closed universe with a large amount of dust exceeding the baryonic content constrained by big-bang nucleosynthesis. The nature of the dark energy is hardly constrained. Only when enforcing a flat universe there is a clear tendency to a dark-energy Lambda fluid and the `canonical' value Omega_M = 0.3 for dust. Conversely, fitting the quasar-data by a minimum-component model yields a sharply defined, slightly closed model with a low dust density ruling out significant pressureless dark matter. The dark-energy component obtains an equation-of-state P = -0.96 epsilon close to that of a Lambda-fluid. Omega_M = 0.3 or a precisely flat spatial geometry are inconsistent with minimum-component models. It is found that quasar and supernova data sets cannot be reconciled with each other via (repulsive ideal fluid+dust+radiation)-world models. Compatibility could be reached by drastic expansion of the parameter space with at least two exotic fluids added to dust and radiation as world constituents. If considering such solutions as far-fetched one has to conclude that the quasar absorption line and the SN-Ia constraints are incompatible.

Jens Thomas; Hartmut Schulz

2001-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

179

Overview of the nearby supernova factory  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

from 42 High-Redshift Supernovae,” Astrophys J. 517, pp.Observational Evidence from Supernovae for an AcceleratingCalan/Tololo Type Ia Supernovae,” Astron. J. 112, p. 2391,

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Snapping Supernovae at z>1.7  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

LBNL-61879 Snapping Supernovae at z > 1.7 Greg Aldering,of California. Snapping Supernovae at z > 1.7 Greg Aldering,of very high redshift Type Ia supernovae for cosmology and

Aldering, Greg

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "type ia supernovae" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Hydrogen in Type Ic Supernovae?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

By definition, a Type Ic supernova (SN Ic) does not have conspicuous lines of hydrogen or helium in its optical spectrum. SNe Ic usually are modelled in terms of the gravitational collapse of bare carbon-oxygen cores. We consider the possibility that the spectra of ordinary (SN 1994I-like) SNe Ic have been misinterpreted, and that SNe Ic eject hydrogen. An absorption feature usually attributed to a blend of Si II 6355 and C II 6580 may be produced by H-alpha. If SN 1994I-like SNe Ic eject hydrogen, the possibility that hypernova (SN 1998bw-like) SNe Ic, some of which are associated with gamma-ray bursts, also eject hydrogen should be considered. The implications of hydrogen for SN Ic progenitors and explosion models are briefly discussed.

David Branch; David J. Jeffery; Timothy R. Young; E. Baron

2006-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

182

A Supernova Riddle  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Analysis of the polarization of light from supernovae can reveal the shape and distribution of matter ejected from exploding stars. Here we review the young field of Type Ia supernova spectropolarimetry and critically evaluate, and place in context, the recent work of Wang et al. (2007, Science, 315, 212) in which a suggestive trend is found in data from 17 Type Ia events.

Douglas C. Leonard

2007-12-24T23:59:59.000Z

183

THE LATE-TIME REBRIGHTENING OF TYPE Ia SN 2005gj IN THE MID-INFRARED  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A growing number of observations reveal a subset of Type Ia supernovae undergoing circumstellar interaction (SNe Ia-CSM). We present unpublished archival Spitzer Space Telescope data on SNe Ia-CSM 2002ic and 2005gj obtained >1300 and 500 days post-discovery, respectively. Both SNe show evidence for late-time mid-infrared (mid-IR) emission from warm dust. The dust parameters are most consistent with a preexisting dust shell that lies beyond the forward-shock radius, most likely radiatively heated by optical and X-ray emission continuously generated by late-time CSM interaction. In the case of SN 2005gj, the mid-IR luminosity more than doubles after 1 yr post-discovery. While we are not aware of any late-time optical-wavelength observations at these epochs, we attribute this rebrightening to renewed shock interaction with a dense circumstellar shell.

Fox, Ori D.; Filippenko, Alexei V., E-mail: ofox@berkeley.edu [Department of Astronomy, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720-3411 (United States)

2013-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

184

Spectropolarimetric diagnostics of thermonuclear supernova explosions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Even at extragalactic distances, the shape of supernova ejecta can be effectively diagnosed by spectropolarimetry. We present here results for 17 Type Ia supernovae that allow a statistical study of the correlation among the geometric structures and other observable parameters of Type Ia supernovae. These observations suggest that their ejecta typically consist of a smooth, central iron rich core and an outer layer with chemical asymmetries. The degree of this peripheral asphericity is correlated with the light-curve decline rate of Type Ia supernovae. These observations lend strong support to delayed-detonation models of Type Ia supernovae.

Lifan Wang; Dietrich Baade; Ferdinando Patat

2006-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

185

Nucleosynthesis in Type II Supernovae  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Presupernova evolution and explosive nucleosynthesis in massive stars for main-sequence masses from 13 $M_\\odot$ to 70 $M_\\odot$ are calculated. We examine the dependence of the supernova yields on the stellar mass, $^{12}C(\\alpha, \\gamma) ^{16}O}$ rate, and explosion energy. The supernova yields integrated over the initial mass function are compared with the solar abundances.

K. Nomoto; M. Hashimoto; T. Tsujimoto; F. -K. Thielemann; N. Kishimoto; Y. Kubo

1997-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

186

Type IIP supernovae as cosmological probes: A SEAM distance to SN 1999em  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Type IIP Supernovae as Cosmological Probes: A SEAM Distanceintrinsic brightness, supernovae make excellent cosmologicalstars: atmospheres — supernovae: 1999em Distances from

Baron, E.; Nugent, Peter E.; Branch, David; Hauschildt, Peter H.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Stellar Populations and the White Dwarf Mass Function: Connections To Supernova Ia Luminosities  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We discuss the luminosity function of SNe Ia under the assumption that recent evidence for dispersion in this standard candle is related to variations in the white dwarf mass function (WDMF) in the host galaxies. We develop a simple parameterization of the WDMF as a function of age of a stellar population and apply this to galaxies of different morphological types. We show that this simplified model is consistent with the observed WDMF of Bergeron et al. (1992) for the solar neighborhood. Our simple models predict that WDMF variations can produce a range of more than 1.8 mag in M$_B$(SN Ia), which is comparable to the observed value using the data of Phillips (1993) and van den Bergh (1996). We also predict a galaxy type dependence of M$_B$(SN Ia) under standard assumptions of the star formation history in these galaxies and show that M$_B$(SN Ia) can evolve with redshift. In principle both evolutionary and galaxy type corrections should be applied to recover the intrinsic range of M$_B$(SN Ia) from the observed values. Our current inadequate knowledge of the star formation history of galaxies coupled with poor physical understanding of the SN Ia mechanism makes the reliable estimation of these corrections both difficult and controversial. The predictions of our models combined with the observed galaxy and redshift correlations may have the power to discriminate between the Chandrasekhar and the sub-Chandrasekhar progenitor scenarios for SNe Ia.

Ted von Hippel; G. D. Bothun; R. A. Schommer

1997-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

188

The late emission of thermonuclear supernovae  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The subject of late-time emission of Type Ia supernovae and its implications for the understanding of the explosions of C+O WDs is reviewed.

Pilar Ruiz-Lapuente

1996-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

189

Exploring Systematic Effects in Thermonuclear Supernovae.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

?? Type Ia supernovae (SNe) are bright astrophysical explosions that form a remarkably homogeneous class of objects serving as the premier distance indicators for studying… (more)

Jackson, Aaron Perry

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Aspherical supernovae  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Although we know that many supernovae are aspherical, the exact nature of their geometry is undetermined. Because all the supernovae we observe are too distant to be resolved, the ejecta structure can't be directly imaged, and asymmetry must be inferred from signatures in the spectral features and polarization of the supernova light. The empirical interpretation of this data, however, is rather limited--to learn more about the detailed supernova geometry, theoretical modeling must been undertaken. One expects the geometry to be closely tied to the explosion mechanism and the progenitor star system, both of which are still under debate. Studying the 3-dimensional structure of supernovae should therefore provide new break throughs in our understanding. The goal of this thesis is to advance new techniques for calculating radiative transfer in 3-dimensional expanding atmospheres, and use them to study the flux and polarization signatures of aspherical supernovae. We develop a 3-D Monte Carlo transfer code and use it to directly fit recent spectropolarimetric observations, as well as calculate the observable properties of detailed multi-dimensional hydrodynamical explosion simulations. While previous theoretical efforts have been restricted to ellipsoidal models, we study several more complicated configurations that are tied to specific physical scenarios. We explore clumpy and toroidal geometries in fitting the spectropolarimetry of the Type Ia supernova SN 2001el. We then calculate the observable consequences of a supernova that has been rendered asymmetric by crashing into a nearby companion star. Finally, we fit the spectrum of a peculiar and extraordinarily luminous Type Ic supernova. The results are brought to bear on three broader astrophysical questions: (1) What are the progenitors and the explosion processes of Type Ia supernovae? (2) What effect does asymmetry have on the observational diversity of Type Ia supernovae, and hence their use in cosmology? (3) And , what are some of the physical properties of Type Ic supernovae, believed to be associated with gamma-ray bursts?

Kasen, Daniel Nathan

2004-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

191

Multi-layered Spectral Formation in SNe Ia Around Maximum Light  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

stars: atmospheres — supernovae DISCLAIMER This document wasIntroduction Type Ia supernovæ have been used as “spanning the “normal” supernovæ blue magnitudes. Single Ion

Bongard, Sebastien

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

High Rate for Type IC Supernovae  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Wheeler, J. C. 1990, in Supernovae, ed. A. G. Petschek (New4959. Tamrnann, G. A. 1977, in Supernovae, ed. D. Schramm (Wheeler, J. C. 1990, in Supernovae, ed. J. C. Wheeler, T.

Muller, R.A.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Phenomenology for Supernova Ia Data Based on a New Cosmic Time  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A new phenomenological theory for the expansion of our universe is presented. Because fundamental supporting theory is still in development, its discussion is not presented in this paper. The theory is based on a new algebraic expression for cosmic time G Rho t^2=3/32Pi, which correctly predicts the WMAP measured cosmological constants and the fundamental Hubble parameter H(t) for the expansion of the universe. A replacement for dark matter, called here "dark mass", is proposed which scales as with the expansion and incorporated. It does not react with ordinary matter, except gravitationally, and produces flat rotational curves for spiral galaxies. Also a new expression for the approaching velocity of radiation in a closed 3-sphere expanding universe is given that accounts for the early degrading negative approach of radiation for z > 1.7. The expression is v = Hr-c. Combining these three elements produces a luminosity distance dL that successfully predicts the apparent magnitude of exploding supernova Ia stars and even the new gamma ray bursts with no need for dark energy or acceleration of the expansion of the universe.

Charles B. Leffert

2007-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

194

Spectroscopic Observations and Analysis of the Unusual Type Ia SN1999ac  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The authors present optical spectra of the peculiar Type Ia supernova (SN Ia) 1999ac. The data extend from -15 to +42 days with respect to B-band maximum and reveal an event that is unusual in several respects. prior to B-band maximum, the spectra resemble those of SN 1999aa, a slowly declining event, but possess stronger Si II and Ca II signatures (more characteristic of a spectroscopically normal SN). Spectra after B-band maximum appear more normal. The expansion velocities inferred from the Iron lines appear to be lower than average; whereas, the expansion velocity inferred from Calcium H and K are higher than average. The expansion velocities inferred from the Iron lines appear to be lower than average; whereas, the expansion velocity inferred from Calcium H and K are higher than average. The expansion velocities inferred from Si II are among the slowest ever observed, though SN 1999ac is not particularly dim. The analysis of the parameters v{sub 10}(Si II), R(Si II), v, and {Delta}m{sub 15} further underlines the unique characteristics of SN 1999ac. They find convincing evidence of C II {lambda}6580 in the day -15 spectrum with ejection velocity v > 16,000 km s{sup -1}, but this signature disappears by day -9. This rapid evolution at early times highlights the importance of extremely early-time spectroscopy.

Garavini, G.; Aldering, G.; Amadon, A.; Amanullah, R.; Astier,P.; Balland, C.; Blanc, G.; Conley, A.; Dahlen, T.; Deustua, S.E.; Ellis,R.; Fabbro, S.; Fadeyev, V.; Fan, X.; Folatelli, G.; Frye, B.; Gates,E.L.; Gibbons, R.; Goldhaber, G.; Goldman, B.; Goobar, A.; Groom, D.E.; Haissinski, J.; Hardin, D.; Hook, I.; Howell, D.A.; Kent, S.; Kim, A.G.; Knop, R.A.; Kowalski, M.; Kuznetsova, N.; Lee, B.C.; Lidman, C.; Mendez,J.; Miller, G.J.; Moniez, M.; Mouchet, M.; Mourao, A.; Newberg, H.; Nobili, S.; Nugent, P.E.; Pain, R.; Perdereau, O.; Perlmutter, S.; Quimby, R.; Regnault, N.; Rich, J.; Richards, G.T.; Ruiz-Lapuente, P.; Schaefer, B.E.; Schahmaneche, K.; Smith, E.; Spadafora, A.L.; Stanishev,V.; Thomas, R.C.; Walton, N.A.; Wang, L.; Wood-Vasey, W.M.

2005-07-12T23:59:59.000Z

195

PoS(NICX)047 Type Ia supernovae  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the runaway in a carbon-oxygen white dwarf; the possible transition of burning to detonation; and the light up a dipole-flow that implies off-center, lopsided ignition with an offset that depends on the ro to the runaway and the specific ignition kernel. In a carbon-oxygen white dwarf of nearly the Chandrasekhar mass

196

Burning Thermals in Type Ia Supernovae A. J. Aspden1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. It is generally agreed that they result from the thermonuclear explosion of a white dwarf accreting matter from that a thermonuclear explosion is involved means that a realistic model requires an understanding of both the ignition

197

The Photometric Properties of Nearby Type Ia Supernovae  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1.1.1 Thermonuclear SNe . . . . . . 1.1.2 Core-Collapseby which they explode: thermonuclear and core collapse.thesis is focused on thermonuclear SNe, I describe the two

Ganeshalingam, Mohan

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

LES Simulations of Turbulent Combustion in a Type Ia Supernovae  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to be thermonuclear explosions of white dwarfs. SNIa are important sources of energy and chemical elements deposited of the burning are all determined by the speed of thermonuclear burning [27]. The problem of turbulent combustion. The mechanism and the speed of thermonuclear burning in SNIa remain an unsolved theoretical problem. A recent

New York at Stoney Brook, State University of

199

Visualizing Buoyant Burning Bubbles in Type Ia Supernovae at...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

simulation was conducted using a specialized low Mach number hydrodynamics code for thermonuclear flames. Adaptive mesh refinement was used to focus resolution on the bubble,...

200

Visualizing Buoyant Burning Bubbles in Type Ia Supernovae at NERSC  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "type ia supernovae" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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201

CONSTRAINING EXPLOSION TYPE OF YOUNG SUPERNOVA REMNANTS USING 24 {mu}m EMISSION MORPHOLOGY  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Determination of the explosion type of supernova remnants (SNRs) can be challenging, as SNRs are hundreds to thousands of years old and supernovae are classified based on spectral properties days after explosion. Previous studies of thermal X-ray emission from Milky Way and Large Magellanic Cloud SNRs have shown that Type Ia and core-collapse (CC) SNRs have statistically different symmetries, and thus these sources can be typed based on their X-ray morphologies. In this Letter, we extend the same technique, a multipole expansion technique using power ratios, to infrared (IR) images of SNRs to test whether they can be typed using the symmetry of their warm dust emission as well. We analyzed archival Spitzer Space Telescope Multiband Imaging Photometer 24 {mu}m observations of the previously used X-ray sample, and we find that the two classes of SNRs separate according to their IR morphologies. The Type Ia SNRs are statistically more circular and mirror symmetric than the CC SNRs, likely due to the different circumstellar environments and explosion geometries of the progenitors. Broadly, our work indicates that the IR emission retains information of the explosive origins of the SNR and offers a new method to type SNRs based on IR morphology.

Peters, Charee L.; Stassun, Keivan G. [Department of Physics, Fisk University, 1000 17th Ave N Nashville, TN 37208 (United States); Lopez, Laura A.; Figueroa-Feliciano, Enectali [MIT-Kavli Institute for Astrophysics and Space Research, 77 Massachusetts Avenue, 37-664H, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Ramirez-Ruiz, Enrico, E-mail: charee.l.peters@vanderbilt.edu [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of California Santa Cruz, 1156 High Street, Santa Cruz, CA 95060 (United States)

2013-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

202

Cosmological Insights from Supernovae  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

While low-z Type Ia supernovae are used to measure the present rate of expansion of the Universe, high-z Type Ia measure its variation due to the cosmic matter-energy content. Results from those determinations imply a low matter density Universe with a non-zero cosmological constant (vacuum-energy component). The expansion rate of the Universe accelerates, according to these determinations. The validity of the Type Ia supernova approach for this cosmological research is addressed. An account is given of additional prospects to further investigate through supernovae what the Universe is made of. Those attempts range from constraining the large scale dark matter distribution to further test and interpret the presence of a vacuum energy component.

P. Ruiz-Lapuente

1998-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

203

Semi-supervised Learning for Photometric Supernova Classification  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present a semi-supervised method for photometric supernova typing. Our approach is to first use the nonlinear dimension reduction technique diffusion map to detect structure in a database of supernova light curves and subsequently employ random forest classification on a spectroscopically confirmed training set to learn a model that can predict the type of each newly observed supernova. We demonstrate that this is an effective method for supernova typing. As supernova numbers increase, our semi-supervised method efficiently utilizes this information to improve classification, a property not enjoyed by template based methods. Applied to supernova data simulated by Kessler et al. (2010b) to mimic those of the Dark Energy Survey, our methods achieve (cross-validated) 96% Type Ia purity and 86% Type Ia efficiency on the spectroscopic sample, but only 56% Type Ia purity and 48% efficiency on the photometric sample due to their spectroscopic followup strategy. To improve the performance on the photometric sample...

Richards, Joseph W; Freeman, Peter E; Schafer, Chad M; Poznanski, Dovi

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

PECULIAR OPTICAL AND IR BEHAVIOUR IN TYPE I SUPERNOVAE, AND THE ORIGIN OF THE 1.2 ABSORPTION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Wheeler, le. , 1984. In "Supernovae as distance indicators",lR. , 1985. In "Dust in supernovae and supernova remnants",and IR behaviour in type I supernovae, and the origin of the

Graham, J.R.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Thermonuclear Supernovae  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The application of Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) as distance indicators in cosmology calls for a sound understanding of these objects. Recent years have seen a brisk development of astrophysical models which explain SNe Ia as thermonuclear explosions of white dwarf stars. While the evolution of the progenitor is still uncertain, the explosion mechanism certainly involves the propagation of a thermonuclear flame through the white dwarf star. Three-dimensional hydrodynamical simulations allowed to study a wide variety of possibilities involving subsonic flame propagation (deflagrations), flames accelerated by turbulence, and supersonic detonations. These possibilities lead to a variety of scenarios. I review the currently discussed approaches and present some recent results from simulations of the turbulent deflagration model and the delayed detonation model.

F. K. Roepke

2008-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

206

Aspherical supernovae  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

g h t : T h e Physics of Supernovae, ed. W . H i l l e b r ar a n c h , D . 1990, i n Supernovae, Jerusalem W i n t e ri o , M . 2000, i n T y p e Ia Supernovae, T h e o r y a n d

Kasen, Daniel Nathan

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

A faint type of supernova from a white dwarf with a helium-rich companion  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Supernovae (SNe) are thought to arise from two different physical processes. The cores of massive, short-lived stars undergo gravitational core collapse and typically eject a few solar masses during their explosion. These are thought to appear as as type Ib/c and II SNe, and are associated with young stellar populations. A type Ia SN is thought to arise from the thermonuclear detonation of a white dwarf star composed mainly of carbon and oxygen, whose mass approaches the Chandrasekhar limit. Such SNe are observed in both young and old stellar environments. Here we report our discovery of the faint type Ib SN 2005E in the halo of the nearby isolated galaxy, NGC 1032. The lack of any trace of recent star formation near the SN location (Fig. 1), and the very low derived ejected mass (~0.3 M_sun), argue strongly against a core-collapse origin for this event. Spectroscopic observations and the derived nucleosynthetic output show that the SN ejecta have high velocities and are dominated by helium-burning products, indicating that SN 2005E was neither a subluminous nor a regular SN Ia (Fig. 2). We have therefore found a new type of stellar explosion, arising from a low-mass, old stellar system, likely involving a binary with a primary white dwarf and a helium-rich secondary. The SN ejecta contain more calcium than observed in any known type of SN and likely additional large amounts of radioactive 44Ti. Such SNe may thus help resolve fundamental physical puzzles, extending from the composition of the primitive solar system and that of the oldest stars, to the Galactic production of positrons.

H. B. Perets; A. Gal-Yam; P. Mazzali; D. Arnett; D. Kagan; A. V. Filippenko; W. Li; I. Arcavi; S. B. Cenko; D. B. Fox; D. C. Leonard; D. -S. Moon; D. J. Sand; A. M. Soderberg; R. J. Foley; M. Ganeshalingam; J. P. Anderson; P. A. James; E. O. Ofek; L. Bildsten; G. Nelemans; K. J. Shen; N. N. Weinberg; B. D. Metzger; A. L. Piro; E. Quataert; M. Kiewe; D. Poznanski

2010-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

208

Investigations of supernovae and supernova remnants in the era of SKA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Two main physical mechanisms are used to explain supernova explosions: thermonuclear explosion of a white dwarf(Type Ia) and core collapse of a massive star (Type II and Type Ib/Ic). Type Ia supernovae serve as distance indicators that led to the discovery of the accelerating expansion of the Universe. The exact nature of their progenitor systems however remain unclear. Radio emission from the interaction between the explosion shock front and its surrounding CSM or ISM provides an important probe into the progenitor star's last evolutionary stage. No radio emission has yet been detected from Type Ia supernovae by current telescopes. The SKA will hopefully detect radio emission from Type Ia supernovae due to its much better sensitivity and resolution. There is a 'supernovae rate problem' for the core collapse supernovae because the optically dim ones are missed due to being intrinsically faint and/or due to dust obscuration. A number of dust-enshrouded optically hidden supernovae should be discovered via SKA1-...

Wang, Lingzhi; Zhu, Hui; Tian, Wenwu; Wang, Xiaofeng

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

The statistical investigation of type Ib/c and II supernovae and their host galaxies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This is a statistical study of the properties of type Ib/c and II supernovae and of the integral parameters of their spiral host galaxies. The methods of one-dimensional and multivariate statistics were applied to the data sample. It was found that the Ib/c supernovae are more concentrated radially toward the centers of the galaxies than those of type II. The distributions of the radial distances R(SN)/R(25) for the type Ib/c and II supernovae in active galaxies are more concentrated toward the center than in normal galaxies. This effect is stronger for type Ib/c than for type II supernovae.

A. A. Hakobyan

2008-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

210

THE FAST AND FURIOUS DECAY OF THE PECULIAR TYPE Ic SUPERNOVA 2005ek  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present extensive multi-wavelength observations of the extremely rapidly declining Type Ic supernova (SN Ic), SN 2005ek. Reaching a peak magnitude of M{sub R} = -17.3 and decaying by {approx}3 mag in the first 15 days post-maximum, SN 2005ek is among the fastest Type I supernovae observed to date. The spectra of SN 2005ek closely resemble those of normal SN Ic, but with an accelerated evolution. There is evidence for the onset of nebular features at only nine days post-maximum. Spectroscopic modeling reveals an ejecta mass of {approx}0.3 M{sub Sun} that is dominated by oxygen ({approx}80%), while the pseudo-bolometric light curve is consistent with an explosion powered by {approx}0.03 M{sub Sun} of radioactive {sup 56}Ni. Although previous rapidly evolving events (e.g., SN 1885A, SN 1939B, SN 2002bj, SN 2010X) were hypothesized to be produced by the detonation of a helium shell on a white dwarf, oxygen-dominated ejecta are difficult to reconcile with this proposed mechanism. We find that the properties of SN 2005ek are consistent with either the edge-lit double detonation of a low-mass white dwarf or the iron-core collapse of a massive star, stripped by binary interaction. However, if we assume that the strong spectroscopic similarity of SN 2005ek to other SNe Ic is an indication of a similar progenitor channel, then a white-dwarf progenitor becomes very improbable. SN 2005ek may be one of the lowest mass stripped-envelope core-collapse explosions ever observed. We find that the rate of such rapidly declining Type I events is at least 1%-3% of the normal SN Ia rate.

Drout, M. R.; Soderberg, A. M.; Margutti, R.; Milisavljevic, D.; Sanders, N. E.; Chornock, R.; Foley, R. J.; Kirshner, R. P.; Chakraborti, S.; Challis, P.; Friedman, A.; Hicken, M.; Jensen, C. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Mazzali, P. A. [Astrophysics Research Institute, Liverpool John Moores University, CH41 1LD Liverpool (United Kingdom); Parrent, J. T. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Dartmouth College, 6127 Wilder Laboratory, Hanover, NH 03755 (United States); Filippenko, A. V.; Li, W.; Cenko, S. B.; Ganeshalingam, M. [Department of Astronomy, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720-3411 (United States); Brown, P. J., E-mail: mdrout@cfa.harvard.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Texas A and M University, College Station, TX 77843-4242 (United States); and others

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Constraints on Type IIn Supernova Progenitor Outbursts from the Lick Observatory Supernova Search  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We searched through roughly 12 years of archival survey data acquired by the Katzman Automatic Imaging Telescope (KAIT) as part of the Lick Observatory Supernova Search (LOSS) in order to detect or place limits on possible progenitor outbursts of Type IIn supernovae (SNe~IIn). The KAIT database contains multiple pre-SN images for 5 SNe~IIn (plus one ambiguous case of a SN IIn/imposter) within 50 Mpc. No progenitor outbursts are found using the false discovery rate (FDR) statistical method in any of our targets. Instead, we derive limiting magnitudes (LMs) at the locations of the SNe. These limiting magnitudes (typically reaching $m_R \\approx 19.5\\,\\mathrm{mag}$) are compared to outbursts of SN 2009ip and $\\eta$ Car, plus additional simulated outbursts. We find that the data for SN 1999el and SN 2003dv are of sufficient quality to rule out events $\\sim40$ days before the main peak caused by initially faint SNe from blue supergiant (BSG) precursor stars, as in the cases of SN 2009ip and SN 2010mc. These SNe~IIn...

Bilinski, Christopher; Li, Weidong; Williams, G Grant; Zheng, WeiKang; Filippenko, Alexei V

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Direct Analysis of Spectra of Type Ic Supernovae  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Synthetic spectra generated with the parameterized supernova synthetic-spectrum code SYNOW are compared with observed photospheric-phase optical spectra of the normal Type Ic SN 1994I and the peculiar Type Ic SNe 1997ef and 1998bw. The observed spectra can be matched fairly well with synthetic spectra that are based on spherical symmetry and that include lines of just a few ions that are expected to appear on the basis of LTE calculations. Spectroscopic estimates of the mass and kinetic energy of the line-forming layers of the ejected matter give conventional values for SN 1994I but high kinetic energy ($\\sim 30 \\times 10^{51}$ erg) for SN 1997ef and even higher ($\\sim 60 \\times 10^{51}$ erg) for SN 1998bw. It is likely that even if SNe 1997ef and 1998bw were non-spherical, they also were hyper-energetic.

D. Branch

1999-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

213

Large Late-time Asphericities in Three Type IIP Supernovae  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Type II-plateau supernovae (SNe IIP) are the result of the explosions of red supergiants and are the most common subclass of core-collapse supernovae. Past observations have shown that the outer layers of the ejecta of SNe IIP are largely spherical, but the degree of asphericity increases toward the core. We present evidence for high degrees of asphericity in the inner cores of three recent SNe IIP (SNe 2006my, 2006ov, and 2007aa), as revealed by late-time optical spectropolarimetry. The three objects were all selected to have very low interstellar polarization (ISP), which minimizes the uncertainties in ISP removal and allows us to use the continuum polarization as a tracer of asphericity. The three objects have intrinsic continuum polarizations in the range of 0.83-1.56% in observations taken after the end of the photometric plateau, with the polarization dropping to almost zero at the wavelengths of strong emission lines. Our observations of SN 2007aa at earlier times, taken on the photometric plateau, sho...

Chornock, Ryan; Li, Weidong; Silverman, Jeffrey M; ;,

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Deflagrations and Detonations in Thermonuclear Supernovae  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We study a type Ia supernova explosion using three-dimensional numerical simulations based on reactive fluid dynamics. We consider a delayed-detonation model that assumes a deflagration-to-detonation transition. In contrast to the pure deflagration model, the delayed-detonation model releases enough energy to account for a healthy explosion, and does not leave carbon, oxygen, and intermediate-mass elements in central parts of a white dwarf. This removes the key disagreement between simulations and observations, and makes a delayed detonation the mostly likely mechanism for type Ia supernovae.

Vadim N. Gamezo; Alexei M. Khokhlov; Elaine S. Oran

2004-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

215

Confirmed: Stellar Behemoth Self-Destructs in Type IIb Supernova  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab), to expose fleeting cosmic events such as supernovae. For the first time ever, scientists have direct confirmation that a Wolf-Rayet...

216

ANALYTIC APPROXIMATION OF CARBON CONDENSATION ISSUES IN TYPE II SUPERNOVAE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

I present analytic approximations for some issues related to condensation of graphite, TiC, and silicon carbide in oxygen-rich cores of supernovae of Type II. Increased understanding, which mathematical analysis can support, renders researchers more receptive to condensation in O-rich supernova gases. Taking SN 1987A as typical, my first analysis shows why the abundance of CO molecules reaches an early maximum in which free carbon remains more abundant than CO. This analysis clarifies why O-rich gas cannot oxidize C if {sup 56}Co radioactivity is as strong as in SN 1987A. My next analysis shows that the CO abundance could be regarded as being in chemical equilibrium if the CO molecule is given an effective binding energy rather than its laboratory dissociation energy. The effective binding energy makes the thermal dissociation rate of CO equal to its radioactive dissociation rate. This preserves possible relevance for the concept of chemical equilibrium. My next analysis shows that the observed abundances of CO and SiO molecules in SN 1987A rule out frequent suggestions that equilibrium condensation of SUNOCONs has occurred following atomic mixing of the He-burning shell with more central zones in such a way as to reproduce roughly the observed spectrum of isotopes in SUNOCONs while preserving C/O > 1. He atoms admixed along with the excess carbon would destroy CO and SiO molecules, leaving their observed abundances unexplained. The final analysis argues that a chemical quasiequilibrium among grains (but not gas) may exist approximately during condensation, so that its computational use is partially justified as a guide to which mineral phases would be stable against reactions with gas. I illustrate this point with quasiequilibrium calculations by Ebel and Grossman that have shown that graphite is stable even when O/C >1 if prominent molecules are justifiably excluded from the calculation of chemical equilibrium.

Clayton, Donald D., E-mail: claydonald@gmail.com [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Clemson University, Clemson, SC (United States)

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Direct Analysis of Spectra of Type Ib Supernovae  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Synthetic spectra generated with the parameterized supernova synthetic-spectrum code SYNOW are compared to photospheric-phase spectra of Type Ib supernovae (SNe Ib). Although the synthetic spectra are based on many simplifying approximations, including spherical symmetry, they account well for the observed spectra. Our sample of SNe Ib obeys a tight relation between the velocity at the photosphere, as determined from the Fe II features, and the time relative to that of maximum light. From this we infer that the masses and the kinetic energies of the events in this sample were similar. After maximum light the minimum velocity at which the He I features form usually is higher than the velocity at the photosphere, but the minimum velocity of the ejected helium is at least as low as 7000 kms. Previously unpublished spectra of SN 2000H reveal the presence of hydrogen absorption features, and we conclude that hydrogen lines also were present in SNe 1999di and 1954A. Hydrogen appears to be present in SNe Ib in general, although in most events it becomes too weak to identify soon after maximum light. The hydrogen-line optical depths that we use to fit the spectra of SNe 2000H, 1999di, and 1954A are not high, so only a mild reduction in the hydrogen optical depths would be required to make these events look like typical SNe Ib. Similarly, the He I line optical depths are not very high, so a moderate reduction would make SNe Ib look like SNe Ic.

David Branch

2001-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

218

Hydrogen and helium traces in type Ib-c supernovae  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The spectroscopic properties of a selected optical photospheric spectra of core collapse supernovae (CCSNe) are investigated.Special attention is devoted to traces of hydrogen at early phases. The generated spectra are found to match the observed ones reasonably well, including a list of only 23 candidate ions. Guided by SN Ib 1990I, the observed trough near 6300\\AA is attributed to H$\\alpha$ in almost all Type Ib events, although in some objects it becomes too weak to be discernible, especially at later phases. Alternative line identifications are discussed. Differences in the way hydrogen manifests its presence within CCSNe are highlighted. In Type Ib SNe, the H$\\alpha$ contrast velocity (i.e. line velocity minus the photospheric velocity) seems to increase with time at early epochs, reaching values as high as 8000 km s$^{-1}$ around 15-20 days after maximum and then remains almost constant. The derived photospheric velocities, indicate a lower velocity for Type II SNe 1987A and 1999em as compared to SN Ic 1994I and SN IIb 1993J, while Type Ib events display a somewhat larger variation. The scatter, around day 20, is measured to be $\\sim$5000 km s$^{-1}$. Following two simple approaches, rough estimates of ejecta and hydrogen masses are given. A mass of hydrogen of approximately 0.02 $M_\\odot$ is obtained for SN 1990I, while SNe 1983N and 2000H ejected $\\sim$0.008 $M_\\odot$ and $\\sim$0.08 $M_\\odot$ of hydrogen, respectively. SN 1993J has a higher hydrogen mass, $\\sim 0.7$ $M_\\odot$ with a large uncertainty. A low mass and thin hydrogen layer with very high ejection velocities above the helium shell, is thus the most likely scenario for Type Ib SNe. Some interesting and curious issues relating to oxygen lines suggest future investigations.

A. Elmhamdi; I. J. Danziger; D. Branch; B. Leibundgut; E. Baron; R. P. Kirshner

2006-04-04T23:59:59.000Z

219

Testing Cosmological Models with Type Ic Super Luminous Supernovae  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The use of type Ic Super Luminous Supernovae (SLSN Ic) to examine the cosmological expansion introduces a new standard ruler with which to test theoretical models. The sample suitable for this kind of work now includes 11 SLSNe Ic, which have thus far been used solely in tests involving $\\Lambda$CDM. In this paper, we broaden the base of support for this new, important cosmic probe by using these observations to carry out a one-on-one comparison between the $R_{\\rm h}=ct$ and $\\Lambda$CDM cosmologies. We individually optimize the parameters in each cosmological model by minimizing the $\\chi^{2}$ statistic. We also carry out Monte Carlo simulations based on these current SLSN Ic measurements to estimate how large the sample would have to be in order to rule out either model at a $\\sim 99.7\\%$ confidence level. The currently available sample indicates a likelihood of $\\sim$$70-80\\%$ that the $R_{\\rm h}=ct$ Universe is the correct cosmology versus $\\sim$$20-30\\%$ for the standard model. These results are suggest...

Wei, Jun-Jie; Melia, Fulvio

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Evolutionary Models for Type Ib/c Supernova Progenitors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Type Ib/c supernovae (SNe Ib/c) mark the deaths of hydrogen-deficient massive stars. The evolutionary scenarios for SNe Ib/c progenitors involve many important physical processes including mass loss by winds and its metallicity dependence, stellar rotation, and binary interactions. This makes SNe Ib/c an excellent test bed for stellar evolution theory. We review the main results of evolutionary models for SN Ib/c progenitors available in the literature and their confrontation with recent observations. We argue that the nature of SN Ib/c progenitors can be significantly different for single and binary systems, and that binary evolution models can explain the ejecta masses derived from SN Ib/c light curves, the distribution of SN Ib/c sites in their host galaxies, and the optical magnitudes of the tentative progenitor candidate of iPTF13bvn. We emphasize the importance of early-time observations of light curves and spectra, accurate measurements of helium mass in SN Ib/c ejecta, and systematic studies about the...

Yoon, Sung-Chul

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "type ia supernovae" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Type II-P supernovae as standardized candles: improvements using near-infrared data .  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??We present the first near-infrared Hubble diagram for Type II-P supernovae (SNe), to further explore their value as distance indicators.We use a modified version of… (more)

Maguire, K.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

CONDENSATION IN EJECTA FROM DENSE THERMONUCLEAR SUPERNOVAE. T. Yu1, B. S. Meyer1, A. V. Fedkin2, and L. Grossman2,3, 1Department of Physics and Astronomy, Clemson University, Clemson, SC  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CONDENSATION IN EJECTA FROM DENSE THERMONUCLEAR SUPERNOVAE. T. Yu1, B. S. Meyer1, A. V. Fedkin2 Thermonuclear Supernova Model: Thermonuclear (Type Ia) supernovae are explosions of white dwarf stars. Our model and then oxy- gen burning proceed under degenerate conditions, a thermonuclear runaway occurs, which leads

Grossman, Lawrence

223

A LUMINOUS AND FAST-EXPANDING TYPE Ib SUPERNOVA SN 2012au  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present a set of photometric and spectroscopic observations of a bright Type Ib supernova SN 2012au from -6 days until {approx} + 150 days after maximum. The shape of its early R-band light curve is similar to that of an average Type Ib/c supernova. The peak absolute magnitude is M{sub R} = -18.7 {+-} 0.2 mag, which suggests that this supernova belongs to a very luminous group among Type Ib supernovae. The line velocity of He I {lambda}5876 is about 15,000 km s{sup -1} around maximum, which is much faster than that in a typical Type Ib supernova. From the quasi-bolometric peak luminosity of (6.7 {+-} 1.3) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 42} erg s{sup -1}, we estimate the {sup 56}Ni mass produced during the explosion as {approx}0.30 M{sub Sun }. We also give a rough constraint to the ejecta mass 5-7 M{sub Sun} and the kinetic energy (7-18) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 51} erg. We find a weak correlation between the peak absolute magnitude and He I velocity among Type Ib SNe. The similarities to SN 1998bw in the density structure inferred from the light-curve model as well as the large peak bolometric luminosity suggest that SN 2012au had properties similar to energetic Type Ic supernovae.

Takaki, Katsutoshi; Fukazawa, Yasushi; Itoh, Ryosuke; Ueno, Issei; Ui, Takahiro; Urano, Takeshi [Department of Physical Science, Hiroshima University, 1-3-1 Kagamiyama, Higashi-Hiroshima, Hiroshima 739-8526 (Japan); Kawabata, Koji S.; Akitaya, Hiroshi; Moritani, Yuki; Ohsugi, Takashi; Uemura, Makoto; Yoshida, Michitoshi [Hiroshima Astrophysical Science Center, Hiroshima University, 1-3-1 Kagamiyama, Higashi-Hiroshima, Hiroshima 739-8526 (Japan); Yamanaka, Masayuki [Kwasan Observatory, Kyoto University, Ohmine-cho Kita Kazan, Yamashina-ku, Kyoto 607-8471 (Japan); Maeda, Keiichi; Nomoto, Ken'ichi [Kavli Institute for the Physics and Mathematics of the Universe (WPI), Todai Institutes for Advanced Study, The University of Tokyo, 5-1-5 Kashiwanoha, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8583 (Japan); Tanaka, Masaomi [National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, 2-21-1 Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan); Kinugasa, Kenzo [Nobeyama Radio Observatory, National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, 462-2 Nobeyama, Minamimaki, Nagano 384-1305 (Japan); Sasada, Mahito, E-mail: takaki@hep01.hepl.hiroshima-u.ac.jp [Department of Astronomy, Kyoto University, Kitashirakawa-Oiwake-cho, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan)

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Determination of Primordial Metallicity and Mixing in the Type IIP Supernova 1993W  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present the results of a large grid of synthetic spectra and compare them to early spectroscopic observations of SN 1993W. This supernova was discovered close to its explosion date and at a recession velocity of 5400 km/s is located in the Hubble flow. We focus here on two early spectra that were obtained approximately 5 and 9 days after explosion. We parameterize the outer supernova envelope as a power-law density profile in homologous expansion. In order to extract information on the value of the parameters a large number of models was required. We show that very early spectra combined with detailed models can provide constraints on the value of the power law index, the ratio of hydrogen to helium in the surface of the progenitor, the progenitor metallicity and the amount of radioactive nickel mixed into the outer envelope of the supernova. The spectral fits reproduce the observed spectra exceedingly well. The spectral results combined with the early photometry predict that the explosion date was 4.7 {+-} 0.7 days before the first spectrum was obtained. The ability to obtain the metallicity from early spectra make SN IIP attractive probes of chemical evolution in the universe and by showing that we have the ability to pin down the parameters of the progenitor and mixing during the supernova explosion, it is likely to make SN IIP useful cosmological distance indicators which are at the same time complementary to SNe Ia.

Baron, E.; Nugent, Peter E.; Branch, David; Hauschildt, Peter H.; Turatto, M.; Cappellaro, E.

2002-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

225

The ESSENCE Supernova Survey: Survey Optimization, Observations, and Supernova Photometry  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We describe the implementation and optimization of the ESSENCE supernova survey, which we have undertaken to measure the equation of state parameter of the dark energy. We present a method for optimizing the survey exposure times and cadence to maximize our sensitivity to the dark energy equation of state parameter w = P/{rho}c{sup 2} for a given fixed amount of telescope time. For our survey on the CTIO 4m telescope, measuring the luminosity distances and redshifts for supernovae at modest redshifts (z {approx} 0.5 {+-} 0.2) is optimal for determining w. We describe the data analysis pipeline based on using reliable and robust image subtraction to find supernovae automatically and in near real-time. Since making cosmological inferences with supernovae relies crucially on accurate measurement of their brightnesses, we describe our efforts to establish a thorough calibration of the CTIO 4m natural photometric system. In its first four years, ESSENCE has discovered and spectroscopically confirmed 102 type Ia SNe, at redshifts from 0.10 to 0.78, identified through an impartial, effective methodology for spectroscopic classification and redshift determination. We present the resulting light curves for the all type Ia supernovae found by ESSENCE and used in our measurement of w, presented in Wood-Vasey et al. (2007).

Miknaitis, Gajus; Pignata, G.; Rest, A.; Wood-Vasey, W.M.; Blondin, S.; Challis, P.; Smith, R.C.; Stubbs, C.W.; Suntzeff, N.B.; Foley, R.J.; Matheson, T.; Tonry, J.L.; Aguilera, C.; Blackman, J.W.; Becker, A.C.; Clocchiatti, A.; Covarrubias, R.; Davis, T.M.; Filippenko, A.V.; Garg, A.; Garnavich, P.M.; /Fermilab /Chile U., Catolica /Cerro-Tololo

2007-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

226

Nearby Supernova Factory Observations of SN 2005gj: Another Type Ia Supernova in a Massive Circumstellar Envelope  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

scenarios both involve the thermonuclear disruption of whitelead to new channels for thermonuclear SNe. For example,thermonuclear SNe inside a dense

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

A STUDY OF PROPERTIES OF TYPE IA SUPERNOVA AND THE CALIBRATION OF MULTIBAND PHOTOMETRY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

should be transformed to a standard scale for uniformity and should be corrected for precision in measurements. The sources of systematic errors are correctly identified and remedied using S-corrections and extinction corrections. The study found a larger...

Bastola, Deepak 1988-

2012-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

228

SciTech Connect: Type Ia Supernova Hubble Residuals and Host-Galaxy  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administrationcontroller systemsBi (2) Sr (2) CawithMicrofluidic MembranelessProperties Journal

229

SEARCH FOR TYPE Ia SUPERNOVAE AT REDSHIFT z 0:1 WITH EROS2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ignites the carbon thermonuclear fusion, which leads to the explosive disruption of the white dwarf. This model involving the thermonuclear burning of a Chandrasekhar-mass white dwarf explains that the total

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

230

Oxygen emission in remnants of thermonuclear supernovae as a probe for their progenitor system  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Recent progress in numerical simulations of thermonuclear supernova explosions brings up a unique opportunity in studying the progenitors of Type Ia supernovae. Coupling state-of-the-art explosion models with detailed hydrodynamical simulations of the supernova remnant evolution and the most up-to-date atomic data for X-ray emission calculations makes it possible to create realistic synthetic X-ray spectra for the supernova remnant phase. Comparing such spectra with high quality observations of supernova remnants could allow to constrain the explosion mechanism and the progenitor of the supernova. The present study focuses in particular on the oxygen emission line properties in young supernova remnants, since different explosion scenarios predict a different amount and distribution of this element. Analysis of the soft X-ray spectra from supernova remnants in the Large Magellanic Cloud and confrontation with remnant models for different explosion scenarios suggests that SNR 0509-67.5 could originate from a de...

Kosenko, D; Kromer, M; Blinnikov, S I; Pakmor, R; Kaastra, J S

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Circumstellar Interaction Around Type Ib/c Supernovae and the GRB Connection  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Radio observations of Type Ib/c supernovae suggest that circumstellar interaction takes place with a wide range of wind densities, comparable to that seen in Galactic Wolf-Rayet stars. Efficient production of magnetic field in the shocked region is needed. The X-ray emission observed from some Type Ib/c supernovae is higher than would be expected by the thermal or inverse Compton mechanisms; a synchrotron interpretation requires a flattening of the electron energy spectrum at high energies, as might occur in a cosmic ray dominated shock wave. The wind density variations that are indicated in two supernovae may be due to a binary companion, although variable mass loss from a single star remains a possibility. Other than the optical supernova radiation, the emission from the nearby SN 2006aj/GRB 060218 appears to be powered by a central engine, while that from SN 1998bw/GRB 980425 could be powered by either a central engine or the outer supernova ejecta.

R. A. Chevalier

2006-12-26T23:59:59.000Z

232

Towards a Cosmological Hubble Diagram for Type II-P Supernovae  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Supernova 1987A and other supernovae, ed. I. J. Danziger &I.A.U. Colloquium 192: Supernovae (10 years of SN1993J), ed.A. V. 2005, in 1604-2004: Supernovae as Cosmological Light-

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Numerical simulations of super-luminous supernovae of type IIn  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present numerical simulations that include 1-D Eulerian multi-group radiation-hydrodynamics, 1-D non-LTE radiative transfer, and 2-D polarised radiative transfer for super-luminous interacting supernovae (SNe). Our reference model is a ~10Msun inner shell with 10^51erg ramming into a ~3Msun cold outer shell (the circumstellar-medium, or CSM) that extends from 10^15cm to 2x10^16cm and moves at 100km/s. We discuss the light curve evolution, which cannot be captured adequately with a grey approach. In these interactions, the shock-crossing time through the optically-thick CSM is much longer than the photon diffusion time. Radiation is thus continuously leaking from the shock through the CSM, in disagreement with the shell-shocked model that is often invoked. Our spectra redden with time, with a peak distribution in the near-UV during the first month gradually shifting to the optical range over the following year. Initially Balmer lines exhibit a narrow line core and the broad line wings that are characteristi...

Dessart, Luc; Hillier, D John

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Thermonuclear supernova explosions and their remnants: the case of Tycho  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We propose to use the thermal X-ray emission from young supernova remnants (SNRs) originated in Type Ia supernovae (SNe) to extract relevant information concerning the explosion mechanism. We focus on the differences between numerical 1D and 3D explosion calculations, and the impact that these differences could have on young SNRs. We use the remnant of the Tycho supernova (SN 1572) as a test case to compare with our predictions, discussing the observational features that allow to accept or discard a given model.

Carles Badenes; Eduardo Bravo; Kazimierz J. Borkowski

2003-09-03T23:59:59.000Z

235

Cosmology with Supernovae  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This review gives an update of the cosmological use of SNe Ia and the progress made in testing their properties from the local universe to high-z. The cosmological road from high-z supernovae down to Galactic SNe Ia is followed in search of the answer to standing questions on their nature and their validity as cosmological indicators.

P. Ruiz-Lapuente

2003-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

236

"Cosmologists have used these supernovae very pro-  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

--the type II supernovae--presents theorists with another set of challenges. A type II supernova pops off

Zhang, Yi

237

Collisions of white dwarfs as a new progenitor channel for type Ia Stephan Rosswog1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

- nario, a shock-triggered thermonuclear explosion ensues from the collision of two white dwarfs systems should provide upcoming supernova surveys with hundreds of such collision-induced thermonuclear agreement that the disintegration of a white dwarf (WD) in a thermonuclear explosion constitutes

Rosswog, Stephan

238

Can Light Echoes Account for the Slow Decay of Type IIn Supernovae?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The spectra of type IIn supernovae indicate the presence of apre-existing slow, dense circumstellar wind (CSW). If the CSW extends sufficiently far from the progenitor star, then dust formation should occur in the wind. The light from the supernova explosion will scatter off this dust and produce a light echo. Continuum emission seen after the peak will have contributions from both this echo as well as from the shock of the ejecta colliding with the CSW, with a fundamental question of which source dominates the continuum. We calculate the brightness of the light echo as a function of time for a range of dust shell geometries, and use our calculations to fit to the light curves of SN 1988Z and SN 1997ab, the two slowest declining IIn supernovae on record. We find that the light curves of both objects can be reproduced by the echo model. However, their rate of decay from peak, color at peak and their observed peak absolute magnitudes when considered together are inconsistent with the echo model. Furthermore, when the observed values of M$_{B}$ are corrected for the effects of dust scattering, the values obtained imply that these supernovae have unrealistically high luminosities. We conclude that light echoes cannot properly account for the slow decline seen in some IIn's, and that the shock interaction is likely to dominate the continuum emission.

B. Roscherr; B. E. Schaefer

1999-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

239

HD188112: Supernova Ia progenitor?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

HD188112 is an extremely low mass white dwarf in a close binary system. According to a previous study, the mass of HD188112 is $\\sim$0.24 Msun and a lower limit of 0.73 Msun could be put for the mass of its unseen companion, a compact degenarate object. We used HST STIS spectra to measure the rotational broadening of UV metallic lines in HD188112, in order to put tighter constraints on the mass of its companion. By assuming that the system in is synchronous rotation, we derive a companion mass between 1.05 and 1.25 Msun. We also measure abundances for magnesium, silicon, and iron, respectively log $N$(X)/$N$(H) = $-$6.40, $-$7.25, and $-$5.81. The radial velocities measured from the UV spectra are found to be in very good agreement with the prediction based on the orbital parameters derived in the previous study made a decade ago.

Latour, M; Heber, U; Schaffenroth, V

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Radio and X-Ray Emission as Probes of Type IIP Supernovae and Red Supergiant Mass Loss  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Type IIP (plateau) supernovae are thought to come from stars with initial mass about 8-25 solar masses that end their lives as red supergiants. The expected stellar end points can be found from evolutionary calculations and the corresponding mass loss properties at this point can be estimated from typical values for Galactic stars. The mass loss densities of observed supernovae can be estimated from observations of the thermal X-ray and radio synchrotron emission that result from the interaction of the supernova with the surrounding wind. Type IIP supernovae are expected to have energy-conserving interaction during typical times of observation. Because Type IIP supernovae have an extended period of high optical luminosity, Compton cooling can affect the radio emitting electrons, giving rise to a relatively flat radio light curve in the optically thin regime. Alternatively, a high efficiency of magnetic field production results in synchrotron cooling of the radio emitting electrons. Both the X-ray and radio luminosities are sensitive to the mass loss and initial masses of the progenitor stars, although the turn-on of radio emission is probably the best estimator of circumstellar density. Both the mass loss density and the variation of density with stellar mass are consistent with expectations for the progenitor stars deduced from direct observations of recent supernovae. Current observations are consistent with mass being the only parameter; observations of a supernova in a metal poor region might show how the mass loss depends on metallicity.

Roger A. Chevalier; Claes Fransson; Tanja K. Nymark

2005-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "type ia supernovae" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

The Carnegie Supernova Project: The Low-Redshift Survey  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Supernovae are essential to understanding the chemical evolution of the Universe. Type Ia supernovae also provide the most powerful observational tool currently available for studying the expansion history of the Universe and the nature of dark energy. Our basic knowledge of supernovae comes from the study of their photometric and spectroscopic properties. However, the presently available data sets of optical and near-infrared light curves of supernovae are rather small and/or heterogeneous, and employ photometric systems that are poorly characterized. Similarly, there are relatively few supernovae whose spectral evolution has been well sampled, both in wavelength and phase, with precise spectrophotometric observations. The low-redshift portion of the Carnegie Supernova Project (CSP) seeks to remedy this situation by providing photometry and spectrophotometry of a large sample of supernovae taken on telescope/filter/detector systems that are well understood and well characterized. During a five-year program which began in September 2004, we expect to obtain high-precision u'g'r'i'BVYJHKs light curves and optical spectrophotometry for about 250 supernovae of all types. In this paper we provide a detailed description of the CSP survey observing and data reduction methodology. In addition, we present preliminary photometry and spectra obtained for a few representative supernovae during the first observing campaign.

Mario Hamuy; Gastón Folatelli; Nidia I. Morrell; Mark M. Phillips; Nicholas B. Suntzeff; S. E. Persson; Miguel Roth; Sergio Gonzalez; Wojtek Krzeminski; Carlos Contreras; Wendy L. Freedman; D. C. Murphy; Barry F. Madore; P. Wyatt; José Maza; Alexei V. Filippenko; Weidong Li; P. A. Pinto

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Direct Analysis of Spectra of the Type Ic Supernova 1994I  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Synthetic spectra generated with the parameterized supernova synthetic-spectrum code SYNOW are compared to observed photospheric-phase spectra of the Type Ic supernova 1994I. The observed optical spectra can be well matched by synthetic spectra that are based on the assumption of spherical symmetry. We consider the identification of the infrared absorption feature observed near 10,250 \\AA, which previously has been attributed to He I $\\lambda10830$ and regarded as strong evidence that SN 1994I ejected some helium. We have difficulty accounting for the infrared absorption with He I alone. It could be a blend of He I and C I lines. Alternatively, we find that it can be fit by Si I lines without compromising the fit in the optical region. In synthetic spectra that match the observed spectra, from 4 days before to 26 days after the time of maximum brightness, the adopted velocity at the photosphere decreases from 17,500 to 7000 \\kms. Simple estimates of the kinetic energy carried by the ejected mass give values that are near the canonical supernova energy of $10^{51}$ ergs. The velocities and kinetic energies that we find for SN 1994I in this way are much lower than those that we find elsewhere for the peculiar Type Ic SNe 1997ef and 1998bw, which therefore appear to have been hyper-energetic.

J. Millard; D. Branch; E. Baron; K. Hatano; A. Fisher; A. Filippenko; R. Kirshner; P. Challis; C. Fransson; N. Panagia; M. Phillips; G. Sonneborn; N. Suntzeff; R. Wagoner; J. Wheeler

1999-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

243

Are Models for Core-Collapse Supernova Progenitors Consistent with the Properties of Supernova Remnants?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The recent discovery that the Fe-K line luminosities and energy centroids observed in nearby SNRs are a strong discriminant of both progenitor type and circumstellar environment has implications for our understanding of supernova progenitor evolution. Using models for the chemical composition of core-collapse supernova ejecta, we model the dynamics and thermal X-ray emission from shocked ejecta and circumstellar material, modeled as an $r^{-2}$ wind, to ages of 3000 years. We compare the X-ray spectra expected from these models to observations made with the Suzaku satellite. We also model the dynamics and X-ray emission from Type Ia progenitor models. We find a clear distinction in Fe-K line energy centroid between core-collapse and Type Ia models. The core-collapse supernova models predict higher Fe-K line centroid energies than the Type Ia models, in agreement with observations. We argue that the higher line centroids are a consequence of the increased densities found in the circumstellar environment create...

Patnaude, Daniel J; Slane, Patrick O; Badenes, Carles; Heger, Alexander; Ellison, Donald C; Nagataki, Shigehiro

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

SN 2013ej - A type IIL supernova with weak signs of interaction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present optical photometric and spectroscopic observations of supernova 2013ej. It is one of the brightest type II supernovae exploded in a nearby ($\\sim 10$ Mpc) galaxy NGC 628. The light curve characteristics are similar to type II SNe, but with a relatively shorter ($ \\sim85 $ day) and steeper ($ \\sim1.7 $ mag (100 d)$^{-1} $ in V) plateau phase. The SN shows a large drop of 2.4 mag in V band brightness during plateau to nebular transition. The absolute ultraviolet (UV) light curves are identical to SN 2012aw, showing a similar UV plateau trend extending up to 85 days. The radioactive $^{56}$Ni mass estimated from the tail luminosity is $ 0.02 $M$_{\\odot}$ which is significantly lower than typical type IIP SNe. The characteristics of spectral features and evolution of line velocities indicate that SN 2013ej is a type II event. However, light curve characteristics and some spectroscopic features provide strong support in classifying it as a type IIL event. A detailed SYNOW modelling of spectra indicates ...

Bose, Subhash; Kumar, Brijesh; Duggal, Chetna; Misra, Kuntal; Brown, Peter J; Singh, Mridweeka; Dwarkadas, Vikram; York, Donald G; Chakraborti, Sayan; Chandola, H C; Dahlstrom, Julie; Ray, Alak; Safonova, Margarita

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

VLBI OBSERVATIONS OF THE TYPE I b/c SUPERNOVA 2009bb  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We report on VLBI as well as Very Large Array radio observations of the Type I b/c supernova 2009bb. The high radio luminosity of this supernova seems to require relativistic outflow, implying that the early radio emission was 'engine-driven', that is, driven by collimated outflow from a compact object, even though no gamma-ray emission was seen. The radio light curve shows a general decline, with a 'bump' near t = 52 d, seen most prominently at 5 GHz. The light-curve bump could be either engine-driven or it might represent the turn-on of the normal radio emission from a supernova, driven by interaction with the circumstellar material rather than by the engine. We undertook VLBI observations to resolve SN 2009bb's relativistic outflow. Our observations constrain the angular outer radius at an age of 85 d to be <0.64 mas, corresponding to <4 x 10{sup 17} cm and an average apparent expansion speed of <1.74 c. This result is consistent with the moderately relativistic ejecta speeds implied by the radio luminosity and spectrum.

Bietenholz, M. F. [Hartebeesthoek Radio Observatory, P.O. Box 443, Krugersdorp, 1740 (South Africa); Soderberg, A. M. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, Theory Division, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Bartel, N. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, York University, Toronto, M3J 1P3, Ontario (Canada); Ellingsen, S. P. [School of Mathematics and Physics, University of Tasmania, Hobart, Tasmania (Australia); Horiuchi, S. [Canberra Deep Space Communication Complex, P.O. Box 1035, Tuggeranong, ACT 2901 (Australia); Phillips, C. J.; Tzioumis, A. K.; Wieringa, M. H. [Australia Telescope National Facility, Epping NSW (Australia); Chugai, N. N. [Institute of Astronomy, RAS, Pyatnitskaya 48, Moscow 119017 (Russian Federation)

2010-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

246

Sloan Digital Sky Survey II (SDSS-II) Supernova Data  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

The Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) is a series of three interlocking imaging and spectroscopic surveys, carried out over an eight-year period with a dedicated 2.5m telescope located at Apache Point Observatory in Southern New Mexico. The SDSS Supernova Survey was one of those three components of SDSS and SDSS-II, a 3-year extension of the original SDSS that operated from July 2005 to July 2008. The Supernova Survey was a time-domain survey, involving repeat imaging of the same region of sky every other night, weather permitting. The primary scientific motivation was to detect and measure light curves for several hundred supernovae through repeat scans of the SDSS Southern equatorial stripe 82 (about 2.5? wide by ~120? long). Over the course of three 3-month campaigns SDSS-II SN discovered and measured multi-band lightcurves for ~500 spectroscopically confirmed Type Ia supernovae in the redshift range z=0.05-0.4. In addition, the project harvested a few hundred light curves for SNe Ia and discovered about 80 spectroscopically confirmed core-collapse supernovae (supernova types Ib/c and II).

247

Nebular phase observations of the type-Ib supernova iPTF13bvn favour a binary progenitor  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Aims. We present and analyse late-time observations of the type-Ib supernova with possible pre-supernova progenitor detection, iPTF13bvn, taken at $\\sim$300 days after the explosion, and discuss these in the context of constraints on the supernova's progenitor. Previous studies have proposed two possible natures for the progenitor of the supernova, i.e. a massive Wolf-Rayet star or a lower-mass star in close binary system. Methods. Our observations show that the supernova has entered the nebular phase, with the spectrum dominated by Mg~I]$\\lambda\\lambda$4571, [O~I]$\\lambda\\lambda$6300, 6364, and [Ca~II]$\\lambda\\lambda$7291, 7324 emission lines. We measured the emission line fluxes to estimate the core oxygen mass and compare the [O~I]/[Ca~II] line ratio with other supernovae. Results. The core oxygen mass of the supernova progenitor was estimated to be $\\lesssim$0.7 M$_\\odot$, which implies initial progenitor mass not exceeding $\\sim$15 -- 17 M$_\\odot$. Since the derived mass is too small for a single star to...

Kuncarayakti, H; Bersten, M C; Folatelli, G; Morrell, N; Hsiao, E Y; González-Gaitán, S; Anderson, J P; Hamuy, M; de Jaeger, T; Gutiérrez, C P; Kawabata, K S

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Hipparcos calibration of the peak brightness of four SNe Ia and the value of Ho  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Hipparcos geometrical parallaxes allowed us to calibrate the Cepheid Period-Luminosity relation and to compute the true distance moduli of 17 galaxies. Among these 17 galaxies, we selected those which generated type Ia Supernovae (SNe Ia). We found NGC 5253, parent galaxy of 1895B and 1972E, IC 4182 and NGC 4536 parents of 1937C and 1981B, respectively. We used the available B-band photometry to determine the peak brightness of these four SNe Ia. We obtained = -19.65 \\pm 0.09. Then, we built a sample of 57 SNe Ia in order to plot the Hubble diagram and determine its zero-point. Our result (ZP_{B} = -3.16 \\pm 0.10) is in agreement with other determinations and allows us to derive the following Hubble constant : Ho = 50 \\pm 3 (internal) km.s^-1.Mpc^-1.

P. Lanoix

1997-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

249

Comparison of Recent SnIa datasets  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We rank the six latest Type Ia supernova (SnIa) datasets (Constitution (C), Union (U), ESSENCE (Davis) (E), Gold06 (G), SNLS 1yr (S) and SDSS-II (D)) in the context of the Chevalier-Polarski-Linder (CPL) parametrization $w(a)=w_0+w_1 (1-a)$, according to their Figure of Merit (FoM), their consistency with the cosmological constant ($\\Lambda$CDM), their consistency with standard rulers (Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) and Baryon Acoustic Oscillations (BAO)) and their mutual consistency. We find a significant improvement of the FoM (defined as the inverse area of the 95.4% parameter contour) with the number of SnIa of these datasets ((C) highest FoM, (U), (G), (D), (E), (S) lowest FoM). Standard rulers (CMB+BAO) have a better FoM by about a factor of 3, compared to the highest FoM SnIa dataset (C). We also find that the ranking sequence based on consistency with $\\Lambda$CDM is identical with the corresponding ranking based on consistency with standard rulers ((S) most consistent, (D), (C), (E), (U), (G) least consistent). The ranking sequence of the datasets however changes when we consider the consistency with an expansion history corresponding to evolving dark energy $(w_0,w_1)=(-1.4,2)$ crossing the phantom divide line $w=-1$ (it is practically reversed to (G), (U), (E), (S), (D), (C)). The SALT2 and MLCS2k2 fitters are also compared and some peculiar features of the SDSS-II dataset when standardized with the MLCS2k2 fitter are pointed out. Finally, we construct a statistic to estimate the internal consistency of a collection of SnIa datasets. We find that even though there is good consistency among most samples taken from the above datasets, this consistency decreases significantly when the Gold06 (G) dataset is included in the sample.

J. C. Bueno Sanchez; S. Nesseris; L. Perivolaropoulos

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Supernova rates and stellar populations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We discuss the results about the nature of type Ia Supernovae that can be derived by studying their rates in different stellar populations. While the evolution of SN photometry and spectra can constrain the explosion mechanism, the SN rate depends on the progenitor system. We review the current available data on rates as a function of parent galaxy color, morphology, star formation rate, radio luminosity and environment. By studying the variation of the rates with the color of the parent galaxy, a strong evidence was established that type Ia SNe come from both young and old stars. The dependence of the rates with the radio power of the parent galaxy is best reproduced by a bimodal distribution of delay time between the formation of the progenitor and its explosion as a SN. Cluster early-type galaxies show higher type Ia SN rate with respect to field galaxies, and this effect can be due either to traces of young stars or to differences in the delay time distribution.

F. Mannucci

2007-08-03T23:59:59.000Z

251

The History of the Comic Supernova Rate Derived from the Evolution of the Host Galaxies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We make a prediction of the cosmic supernova rate history as a composite of the supernova rates in spiral and elliptical galaxies. We include the metallicity effect on the evolution of Type Ia supernova (SN Ia) progenitors, and construct detailed models for the evolutions of spiral and elliptical galaxies in clusters and field to meet the latest observational constraints. In the cluster environment, the synthesized cosmic star formation rate (SFR) has an excess at $z \\gtsim 3$ corresponding to the early star burst in ellipticals and a shallower slope from the present to the peak at the redshift of $z \\sim 1.4$ compared with Madau's plot. In the field environment, we assume that ellipticals form over a wide range of redshifts as $1 \\ltsim z \\ltsim 4$. The synthesized cosmic SFR has a broad peak around $z \\sim 3$, which is in good agreement with the observed one. The resultant cosmic SFRs lead to the following predictions for the cosmic SN Ia rate: 1) The SN Ia rate in spirals has a break at $z \\sim 2$ due to the low-metallicity inhibition of SNe Ia, regardless of clusters or field. 2) At high redshifts, the SN Ia rate has a strong peak around $z \\sim 3$ in clusters, whereas in field much lower rate is expected, reflecting the difference in the formation epochs of ellipticals.

Chiaki Kobayashi; Takuji Tsujimoto; Ken'ichi Nomoto

2000-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

252

Constraining the Lattice Fluid Dark Energy from SNe Ia, BAO and OHD  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Sanchez and Lacombe have ever developed a lattice fluid theory based on a well-defined statistical mechanical model. Taking the lattice fluid as a candidate of dark energy, we investigate the cosmic evolution of this fluid. Using the combined observational data of Type Ia Supernova (SNe Ia), Baryon Acoustic Oscillations (BAO) and Observational Hubble Data (OHD), we find the best fit value of the parameter in the model, $A = -0.3_{-0.1}^{+0.1}$. Then the cosmological implications of the model are presented.

Duan, Xiaoxian; Gao, Changjun

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Constraining the Lattice Fluid Dark Energy from SNe Ia, BAO and OHD  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Sanchez and Lacombe have ever developed a lattice fluid theory based on a well-defined statistical mechanical model. Taking the lattice fluid as a candidate of dark energy, we investigate the cosmic evolution of this fluid. Using the combined observational data of Type Ia Supernova (SNe Ia), Baryon Acoustic Oscillations (BAO) and Observational Hubble Data (OHD), we find the best fit value of the parameter in the model, $A = -0.3_{-0.1}^{+0.1}$. Then the cosmological implications of the model are presented.

Xiaoxian Duan; Yichao Li; Changjun Gao

2011-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

254

Radio and X-Ray Emission as Probes of Type IIP Supernovae and Red Supergiant Mass Loss  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Type IIP (plateau) supernovae are thought to come from stars with initial mass about 8-25 solar masses that end their lives as red supergiants. The expected stellar end points can be found from evolutionary calculations and the corresponding mass loss properties at this point can be estimated from typical values for Galactic stars. The mass loss densities of observed supernovae can be estimated from observations of the thermal X-ray and radio synchrotron emission that result from the interaction of the supernova with the surrounding wind. Type IIP supernovae are expected to have energy-conserving interaction during typical times of observation. Because Type IIP supernovae have an extended period of high optical luminosity, Compton cooling can affect the radio emitting electrons, giving rise to a relatively flat radio light curve in the optically thin regime. Alternatively, a high efficiency of magnetic field production results in synchrotron cooling of the radio emitting electrons. Both the X-ray and radio lu...

Chevalier, R A; Nymark, T K; Chevalier, Roger A.; Fransson, Claes; Nymark, Tanja K.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

First-Year Spectroscopy for the SDSS-II Supernova Survey  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper presents spectroscopy of supernovae discovered in the first season of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey-II Supernova Survey. This program searches for and measures multi-band light curves of supernovae in the redshift range z = 0.05-0.4, complementing existing surveys at lower and higher redshifts. Our goal is to better characterize the supernova population, with a particular focus on SNe Ia, improving their utility as cosmological distance indicators and as probes of dark energy. Our supernova spectroscopy program features rapid-response observations using telescopes of a range of apertures, and provides confirmation of the supernova and host-galaxy types as well as precise redshifts. We describe here the target identification and prioritization, data reduction, redshift measurement, and classification of 129 SNe Ia, 16 spectroscopically probable SNe Ia, 7 SNe Ib/c, and 11 SNe II from the first season. We also describe our efforts to measure and remove the substantial host galaxy contamination existing in the majority of our SN spectra.

Zheng, Chen; Romani, Roger W.; Sako, Masao; Marriner, John; Bassett, Bruce; Becker, Andrew; Choi, Changsu; Cinabro, David; DeJongh, Fritz; Depoy, Darren L.; Dilday, Ben; Doi, Mamoru; Frieman, Joshua A.; Garnavich, Peter M.; Hogan, Craig J.; Holtzman, Jon; Im, Myungshin; Jha, Saurabh; Kessler, Richard; Konishi, Kohki; Lampeitl, Hubert

2008-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

256

THE BERKELEY AUTOMATED SUPERNOVA SEARCH  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Dordrecht L . Rosino, in Supernovae, ed. D . Schramm, p.Texas Workshop on Type I Supernovae, ed. J . C . Wheeler, p.Studies Institute on Supernovae, (Reidel, Dordrecht 1981),

Kare, J.T.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

LATE-TIME DUST EMISSION FROM THE TYPE IIn SUPERNOVA 1995N  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Type IIn supernovae (SNe IIn) have been found to be associated with significant amounts of dust. These core-collapse events are generally expected to be the final stage in the evolution of highly massive stars, either while in an extreme red supergiant phase or during a luminous blue variable phase. Both evolutionary scenarios involve substantial pre-supernova mass loss. I have analyzed the SN IIn 1995N in MCG -02-38-017 (Arp 261), for which mid-infrared archival data obtained with the Spitzer Space Telescope in 2009 ({approx}14.7 yr after explosion) and with the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer in 2010 ({approx}15.6-16.0 yr after explosion) reveal a luminous ({approx}2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 7} L{sub Sun }) source detected from 3.4 to 24 {mu}m. These observations probe the circumstellar material, set up by pre-SN mass loss, around the progenitor star and indicate the presence of {approx}0.05-0.12 M{sub Sun} of pre-existing, cool dust at {approx}240 K. This is at least a factor {approx}10 lower than the dust mass required to be produced from SNe at high redshift, but the case of SN 1995N lends further evidence that highly massive stars could themselves be important sources of dust.

Van Dyk, Schuyler D., E-mail: vandyk@ipac.caltech.edu [Spitzer Science Center/Caltech, Mailcode 220-6, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States)

2013-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

258

Shock Breakout Emission from a Type Ib/c Supernova: XRF 080109/SN 2008D  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The X-ray flash 080109, associated with SN 2008D, can be attributed to the shock breakout emission from a normal Type Ib/c supernova. If the observed emission is interpreted as blackbody emission, the temperature and radiated energy are close to expectations, considering that scattering dominates absorption processes so that spectrum formation occurs deep within the photosphere. The X-ray emission observed at ~10 days is attributed to inverse Compton scattering of photospheric photons with relativistic electrons produced in the interaction of the supernova with the progenitor wind. A simple model for the optical/ultraviolet emission from shock breakout is developed and applied to SN 1987A, SN 1999ex, SN 2008D, and SN 2006aj, all of which have optical emission observed at t~1 day. The emission from the first three can plausibly be attributed to shock breakout emission. The photospheric temperature is most sensitive to the radius of the progenitor star core and the radii in these cases are in line with expectat...

Chevalier, Roger A

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

The Sloan Digital Sky Survey-II Supernova Survey: Technical Summary  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Sloan Digital Sky Survey-II (SDSS-II) has embarked on a multi-year project to identify and measure light curves for intermediate-redshift (0.05 < z < 0.35) Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) using repeated five-band (ugriz) imaging over an area of 300 sq. deg. The survey region is a stripe 2.5 degrees wide centered on the celestial equator in the Southern Galactic Cap that has been imaged numerous times in earlier years, enabling construction of a deep reference image for discovery of new objects. Supernova imaging observations are being acquired between 1 September and 30 November of 2005-7. During the first two seasons, each region was imaged on average every five nights. Spectroscopic follow-up observations to determine supernova type and redshift are carried out on a large number of telescopes. In its first two three-month seasons, the survey has discovered and measured light curves for 327 spectroscopically confirmed SNe Ia, 30 probable SNe Ia, 14 confirmed SNe Ib/c, 32 confirmed SNe II, plus a large number of photometrically identified SNe Ia, 94 of which have host-galaxy spectra taken so far. This paper provides an overview of the project and briefly describes the observations completed during the first two seasons of operation.

Frieman, Joshua A.; /Fermilab /KICP, Chicago /Chicago U., Astron. Astrophys. Ctr.; Bassett, Bruce; /Cape Town U. /South African Astron. Observ.; Becker, Andrew; /Washington; Choi, Changsu; /Seoul Natl. U.; Cinabro, David; /Wayne State U.; DeJongh, Don Frederic; /Fermilab; Depoy, Darren L.; /Ohio State U.; Doi, Mamoru; /Tokyo U.; Garnavich, Peter M.; /Notre Dame U.; Hogan, Craig J.; /Washington U., Seattle, Astron. Dept.; Holtzman, Jon; /New Mexico State U.; Im, Myungshin; /Seoul Natl. U.; Jha, Saurabh; /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Konishi, Kohki; /Tokyo U.; Lampeitl, Hubert; /Baltimore, Space Telescope Sci.; Marriner, John; /Fermilab; Marshall, Jennifer L.; /Ohio State U.; McGinnis,; /Fermilab; Miknaitis, Gajus; /Fermilab; Nichol, Robert C.; /Portsmouth U.; Prieto, Jose Luis; /Ohio State U. /Rochester Inst. Tech. /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /Pennsylvania U.

2007-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

260

SN 2005at - A neglected type Ic supernova at 10 Mpc  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present a photometric and spectroscopic study of a reddened type Ic supernova (SN) 2005at. We report our results based on the available data of SN 2005at, including late-time observations from the Spitzer Space Telescope and the Hubble Space Telescope. In particular, late-time mid-infrared observations are something rare for type Ib/c SNe. In our study we find SN 2005at to be very similar photometrically and spectroscopically to another nearby type Ic SN 2007gr, underlining the prototypical nature of this well-followed type Ic event. The spectroscopy of both events shows similar narrow spectral line features. The radio observations of SN 2005at are consistent with fast evolution and low luminosity at radio wavelengths. The late-time Spitzer data suggest the presence of an unresolved light echo from interstellar dust and dust formation in the ejecta, both of which are unique observations for a type Ic SN. The late-time Hubble observations reveal a faint point source coincident with SN 2005at, which is very ...

Kankare, E; Ryder, S; Romero-Canizales, C; Mattila, S; Kotak, R; Laursen, P; Monard, L A G; Salvo, M; Vaisanen, P

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "type ia supernovae" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Probing Shock Breakout with Serendipitous GALEX Detections of Two SNLS Type II-P Supernovae  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We report the serendipitous detection by GALEX of fast (1 mag) UV emission from two Type II plateau (II-P) supernovae (SNe) at z=0.185 and 0.324 discovered by the Supernova Legacy Survey. Optical photometry and VLT spectroscopy 2 weeks after the GALEX detections link the onset of UV emission to the time of shock breakout. Using radiation hydrodynamics and non-LTE radiative transfer simulations, and starting from a standard red supergiant (RSG; Type II-P SN progenitor) star evolved self-consistently from the main sequence to iron core collapse, we model the shock breakout phase and the 55 hr that follow. The small scale height of our RSG atmosphere model suggests that the breakout signature is a thermal soft X-ray burst (lambda_peak ~ 90\\AA) with a duration of <~ 2000 s. Longer durations are possible but require either an extended and tenuous non-standard envelope, or an unusually dense RSG wind with \\dot{M} ~ 10^(-3) Msun yr^(-1). The GALEX observations miss the peak of the luminous (M_FUV ~ -20) UV burst but unambiguously capture the rise of the emission and a subsequent 2 day long plateau. The postbreakout, UV-bright plateau is a prediction of our model in which the shift of the peak of the spectral energy distribution (SED) from ~100 to ~1000\\AA and the ejecta expansion both counteract the decrease in bolometric luminosity from ~10^11 to ~10^9 L_sun over that period. Based on the observed detection efficiency of our study we make predictions for the breakout detection rate of the GALEX Time Domain Survey.

Suvi Gezari; Luc Dessart; Stephane Basa; D. Chris Martin; James D. Neill; S. E. Woosley; D. John Hillier; Gurvan Bazin; Karl Forster; Peter G. Friedman; Jeremy Le Du; Alain Mazure; Patrick Morrissey; Susan G. Neff; David Schiminovich; Ted K. Wyder

2008-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

262

CAN STELLAR MIXING EXPLAIN THE LACK OF TYPE Ib SUPERNOVAE IN LONG-DURATION GAMMA-RAY BURSTS?  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The discovery of supernovae associated with long-duration gamma-ray burst observations is primary evidence that the progenitors of these outbursts are massive stars. One of the principle mysteries in understanding these progenitors has been the fact that all of these gamma-ray-burst-associated supernovae are Type Ic supernovae with no evidence of helium in the stellar atmosphere. Many studies have focused on whether or not this helium is simply hidden from spectral analyses. In this Letter, we show results from recent stellar models using new convection algorithms based on our current understanding of stellar mixing. We demonstrate that enhanced convection may lead to severe depletion of stellar helium layers, suggesting that the helium is not observed simply because it is not in the star. We also present light curves and spectra of these compact helium-depleted stars compared to models with more conventional helium layers.

Frey, Lucille H. [HPC-3, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Fryer, Chris L. [CCS-2, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Young, Patrick A. [School of Earth and Space Exploration, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 85276 (United States)

2013-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

263

Probing thermonuclear supernova explosions with neutrinos  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Aims: We present neutrino light curves and energy spectra for two representative type Ia supernova explosion models: a pure deflagration and a delayed detonation. Methods: We calculate the neutrino flux from $\\beta$ processes using nuclear statistical equilibrium abundances convoluted with approximate neutrino spectra of the individual nuclei and the thermal neutrino spectrum (pair+plasma). Results: Although the two considered thermonuclear supernova explosion scenarios are expected to produce almost identical electromagnetic output, their neutrino signatures appear vastly different, which allow an unambiguous identification of the explosion mechanism: a pure deflagration produces a single peak in the neutrino light curve, while the addition of the second maximum characterizes a delayed-detonation. We identified the following main contributors to the neutrino signal: (1) weak electron neutrino emission from electron captures (in particular on the protons Co55 and Ni56) and numerous beta-active nuclei produced by the thermonuclear flame and/or detonation front, (2) electron antineutrinos from positron captures on neutrons, and (3) the thermal emission from pair annihilation. We estimate that a pure deflagration supernova explosion at a distance of 1 kpc would trigger about 14 events in the future 50 kt liquid scintillator detector and some 19 events in a 0.5 Mt water Cherenkov-type detector. Conclusions: While in contrast to core-collapse supernovae neutrinos carry only a very small fraction of the energy produced in the thermonuclear supernova explosion, the SN Ia neutrino signal provides information that allows us to unambiguously distinguish between different possible explosion scenarios. These studies will become feasible with the next generation of proposed neutrino observatories.

A. Odrzywolek; T. Plewa

2011-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

264

Observational Constraints on the Nature of the Dark Energy: First Cosmological Results From the ESSENCE Supernova Survey  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present constraints on the dark energy equation-of-state parameter, w = P/({rho}c{sup 2}), using 60 Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) from the ESSENCE supernova survey. We derive a set of constraints on the nature of the dark energy assuming a flat Universe. By including constraints on ({Omega}{sub M}, w) from baryon acoustic oscillations, we obtain a value for a static equation-of-state parameter w = -1.05{sub -0.12}{sup +0.13} (stat 1{sigma}) {+-} 0.13 (sys) and {Omega}{sub M} = 0.274{sub -0.020}{sup +0.033} (stat 1{sigma}) with a best-fit {chi}{sup 2}/DoF of 0.96. These results are consistent with those reported by the Super-Nova Legacy Survey in a similar program measuring supernova distances and redshifts. We evaluate sources of systematic error that afflict supernova observations and present Monte Carlo simulations that explore these effects. Currently, the largest systematic currently with the potential to affect our measurements is the treatment of extinction due to dust in the supernova host galaxies. Combining our set of ESSENCE SNe Ia with the SuperNova Legacy Survey SNe Ia, we obtain a joint constraint of w = -1.07{sub -0.09}{sup +0.09} (stat 1{sigma}) {+-} 0.13 (sys), {Omega}{sub M} = 0.267{sub -0.018}{sup +0.028} (stat 1{sigma}) with a best-fit {chi}{sup 2}/DoF of 0.91. The current SNe Ia data are fully consistent with a cosmological constant.

Wood-Vasey, W.Michael; Miknaitis, G.; Stubbs, C.W.; Jha, S.; Riess, A.G.; Garnavich, P.M.; Kirshner, R.P.; Aguilera, C.; Becker, A.C.; Blackman, J.W.; Blondin, S.; Challis, P.; Clocchiatti, A.; Conley, A.; Covarrubias, R.; Davis, T.M.; Filippenko, A.V.; Foley, R.J.; Garg, A.; Hicken, M.; Krisciunas, K.; /Harvard-Smithsonian Ctr. Astrophys.

2007-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

265

Large Scale Computing and Storage Requirements for High Energy Physics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

number modeling of type ia supernovae. I. Hydrodynamics.number modeling of type ia supernovae. II. Energy evolution.Mach number modeling of type ia supernovae. III. Reactions.

Gerber, Richard A.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Exploring Dark Energy with SNAP  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

experiment to use Type Ia supernovae and weak gravitationalon the use of Type Ia supernovae as a means of measuring thenewer data from Type Ia supernovae (including constraints

Aldering, G.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

PROPERTIES OF NEWLY FORMED DUST GRAINS IN THE LUMINOUS TYPE IIn SUPERNOVA 2010jl  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Supernovae (SNe) have been proposed to be the main production sites of dust grains in the universe. However, our knowledge of their importance to dust production is limited by observationally poor constraints on the nature and amount of dust particles produced by individual SNe. In this paper, we present a spectrum covering optical through near-Infrared (NIR) light of the luminous Type IIn supernova 2010jl around one and a half years after the explosion. This unique data set reveals multiple signatures of newly formed dust particles. The NIR portion of the spectrum provides a rare example where thermal emission from newly formed hot dust grains is clearly detected. We determine the main population of the dust species to be carbon grains at a temperature of ?1350-1450 K at this epoch. The mass of the dust grains is derived to be ?(7.5-8.5) × 10{sup –4} M{sub ?}. Hydrogen emission lines show wavelength-dependent absorption, which provides a good estimate of the typical size of the newly formed dust grains (?< 0.1 ?m, and most likely ?< 0.01 ?m). We believe the dust grains were formed in a dense cooling shell as a result of a strong SN-circumstellar media (CSM) interaction. The dust grains occupy ?10% of the emitting volume, suggesting an inhomogeneous, clumpy structure. The average CSM density must be ?> 3 × 10{sup 7} cm{sup –3}, corresponding to a mass loss rate of ?> 0.02 M{sub ?} yr{sup –1} (for a mass loss wind velocity of ?100 km s{sup –1}). This strongly supports a scenario in which SN 2010jl and probably other luminous SNe IIn are powered by strong interactions within very dense CSM, perhaps created by Luminous-Blue-Variable-like eruptions within the last century before the explosion.

Maeda, K.; Nozawa, T.; Folatelli, G.; Moriya, T. J.; Nomoto, K.; Bersten, M.; Quimby, R. [Kavli Institute for the Physics and Mathematics of the Universe (WPI), Todai Institutes for Advanced Study, University of Tokyo, 5-1-5 Kashiwanoha, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8583 (Japan); Sahu, D. K.; Anupama, G. C. [Indian Institute of Astrophysics, Koramangala, Bangalore 560 034 (India); Minowa, Y.; Pyo, T.-S. [Subaru Telescope, National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, 650 North A'ohoku Place, Hilo, HI 96720 (United States); Motohara, K.; Kitagawa, Y. [Institute of Astronomy, University of Tokyo, 2-21-1 Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-0015 (Japan); Ueno, I.; Kawabata, K. S.; Yamanaka, M. [Hiroshima Astrophysical Science Center, Hiroshima University, 1-3-1 Kagamiyama, Higashi-Hiroshima, Hiroshima 739-8526 (Japan); Kozasa, T. [Department of Cosmosciences, Graduate School of Science, Hokkaido University, Sapporo 060-0810 (Japan); Iye, M., E-mail: keiichi.maeda@ipmu.jp [National Astronomical Observatory, Mitaka, Tokyo (Japan)

2013-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

268

The binary progenitor of Tycho Brahe's 1572 supernova  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The brightness of type Ia supernovae, and their homogeneity as a class, makes them powerful tools in cosmology, yet little is known about the progenitor systems of these explosions. They are thought to arise when a white dwarf accretes matter from a companion star, is compressed and undergoes a thermonuclear explosion Unless the companion star is another white dwarf (in which case it should be destroyed by the mass-transfer process itself), it should survive and show distinguishing properties. Tycho's supernova is one of the only two type Ia supernovae observed in our Galaxy, and so provides an opportunity to address observationally the identification of the surviving companion. Here we report a survey of the central region of its remnant, around the position of the explosion, which excludes red giants as the mass donor of the exploding white dwarf. We found a type G0--G2 star, similar to our Sun in surface temperature and luminosity (but lower surface gravity), moving at more than three times the mean velocity of the stars at that distance, which appears to be the surviving companion of the supernova.

Pilar Ruiz-Lapuente; Fernando Comeron; Javier Mendez; Ramon Canal; Stephen J. Smartt; Alexei V. Filippenko; Robert L. Kurucz; Ryan Chornock; Ryan J. Foley; Vallery Stanishev; Rodrigo Ibata

2004-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

269

Faint Thermonuclear Supernovae from AM Canum Venaticorum Binaries  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Helium that accretes onto a Carbon/Oxygen white dwarf in the double white dwarf AM Canum Venaticorum (AM CVn) binaries undergoes unstable thermonuclear flashes when the orbital period is in the 3.5-25 minute range. At the shortest orbital periods (and highest accretion rates, Mdot > 10^-7 Msol/yr), the flashes are weak and likely lead to the Helium equivalent of classical nova outbursts. However, as the orbit widens and Mdot drops, the mass required for the unstable ignition increases, leading to progressively more violent flashes up to a final flash with Helium shell mass ~ 0.02-0.1 Msol. The high pressures of these last flashes allow the burning to produce the radioactive elements 48Cr, 52Fe, and 56Ni that power a faint (M_V in the range of -15 to -18) and rapidly rising (few days) thermonuclear supernova. Current galactic AM CVn space densities imply one such explosion every 5,000-15,000 years in 10^11 Msol of old stars (~ 2-6% of the Type Ia rate in E/SO galaxies). These ".Ia" supernovae (one-tenth as bright for one-tenth the time as a Type Ia supernovae) are excellent targets for deep (e.g. V=24) searches with nightly cadences, potentially yielding an all-sky rate of 1,000 per year.

Lars Bildsten; Ken J. Shen; Nevin N. Weinberg; Gijs Nelemans

2007-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

270

Signatures of Explosion Models for SN ~Ia & Cosmology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We give an overview of the current understanding of Type Ia supernovae relevant for their use as cosmological distance indicators. We present the physical basis to understand their homogeneity of the observed light curves and spectra and the observed correlations. SNe Ia have been well established as distance indicators on the 10 % level. However, the quest for the nature of the dark energy requires improvements in the accuracy to the 2 to 3 % level, we must understand the diversity within the SNe Ia population, and its evolution with redshift. Based on detailed models for the progenitors, explosions, light curves and spectra, we discuss signatures of thermonuclear explosions, and the implications for cosmology. We emphasize the relation between LC properties and spectra because, for local SNe~Ia, the diversity becomes apparent the combination of spectra and LCs whereas, by enlarge, we have to for high-z objects. At some examples, we show how we can actually probe the properties of the progenitor, its environment, and details of the explosion physics.

P. Hoeflich

2004-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

271

Does merger-induced core-collapse produce gamma-ray bursts in type Ib & Ic supernovae?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Gamma-ray bursts, discovered over three decades ago, can appear to be a hundred times as luminous as the brightest supernovae. However, there has been evidence for some time now of an association of gamma-ray bursts with supernovae of type Ib and Ic. Here we interpret the overabundance of millisecond pulsars in globular clusters and the details of supernova 1987A to reveal the energy source, which powers at least some long-duration gamma-ray bursts, as core-collapse following the merger of two white dwarfs, either as stars or stellar cores. In order for the beams/jets associated with gamma-ray bursts to form in mergers within massive common envelopes (as with SN1987A), much of the intervening stellar material in the polar directions must be cleared out by the time of core-collapse, or the beams/jets themselves must clear their own path. The core-collapse produces supernovae of type Ib, Ic, or II (as with SN1987A, a SNa IIp), leaving a weakly magnetized neutron star remnant with a spin period near 2 milliseconds. There is no compelling reason to invoke any other model for gamma-ray bursts.

John Middleditch

2003-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

272

SN 2009ib: A Type II-P Supernova with an Unusually Long Plateau  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present optical and near-infrared photometry and spectroscopy of SN 2009ib, a Type II-P supernova in NGC 1559. This object has moderate brightness, similar to those of the intermediate-luminosity SNe 2008in and 2009N. Its plateau phase is unusually long, lasting for about 130 days after explosion. The spectra are similar to those of the subluminous SN 2002gd, with moderate expansion velocities. We estimate the $^{56}$Ni mass produced as $0.046 \\pm 0.015\\,{\\rm M}_{\\sun}$. We determine the distance to SN 2009ib using both the expanding photosphere method (EPM) and the standard candle method. We also apply EPM to SN 1986L, a type II-P SN that exploded in the same galaxy. Combining the results of different methods, we conclude the distance to NGC 1559 as $D=19.8 \\pm 2.8$ Mpc. We examine archival, pre-explosion images of the field taken with the Hubble Space Telescope, and find a faint source at the position of the SN, which has a yellow colour ($(V-I)_0 = 0.85$ mag). Assuming it is a single star, we estimate i...

Takats, K; Pumo, M L; Paillas, E; Zampieri, L; Elias-Rosa, N; Benetti, S; Bufano, F; Cappellaro, E; Ergon, M; Fraser, M; Hamuy, M; Inserra, C; Kankare, E; Smartt, S J; Stritzinger, M D; Van Dyk, S D; Haislip, J B; LaCluyze, A P; Moore, J P; Reichart, D

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

SN 2013ab : A normal type IIP supernova in NGC 5669  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present densely-sampled ultraviolet/optical photometric and low-resolution optical spectroscopic observations of the type IIP supernova 2013ab in the nearby ($\\sim$24 Mpc) galaxy NGC 5669, from 2 to 190d after explosion. Continuous photometric observations, with the cadence of typically a day to one week, were acquired with the 1-2m class telescopes in the LCOGT network, ARIES telescopes in India and various other telescopes around the globe. The light curve and spectra suggest that the SN is a normal type IIP event with a plateau duration of $ \\sim80 $ days with mid plateau absolute visual magnitude of -16.7, although with a steeper decline during the plateau (0.92 mag 100 d$ ^{-1} $ in $ V $ band) relative to other archetypal SNe of similar brightness. The velocity profile of SN 2013ab shows striking resemblance with those of SNe 1999em and 2012aw. Following the Rabinak & Waxman (2011) prescription, the initial temperature evolution of the SN emission allows us to estimate the progenitor radius to be...

Bose, Subhash; Misra, Kuntal; Pumo, Maria Letizia; Zampieri, Luca; Sand, David; Kumar, Brijesh; Pastorello, Andrea; Sutaria, Firoza; Maccarone, Thomas J; Kumar, Brajesh; Graham, M L; Howell, D Andy; Ochner, Paolo; Chandola, H C; Pandey, Shashi B

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

A frequent tyrosinase gene mutation associated with type I-A (tyroinase-negative) oculocutaneous albinism in Puerto Rico  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The authors have determined the mutations in the tyrosinase gene from 12 unrelated Puerto Rican individuals who have type I-A (tyrosinase-negative) oculocutaneous albinism (OCA). All but one individual are of Hispanic descent. Nine individuals were homozygous for a missense mutation (G47D) in exon I at codon 47. Two individuals were heterozygous for the G47D mutation, with one having a missense mutation at codon 373 (T373K) in the homologous allele and the other having an undetermined mutation in the homologous allele. One individual with negroid features was homozygous for a nonsense mutation (W236X). The population migration between Puerto Rico and the Canary Islands is well recognized. Analysis of three individuals with OCA from the Canary Islands showed that one was a compound heterozygote for the G47D mutation and for a novel missense mutation (L216M), one was homozygous for a missense mutation (P81L), and one was heterozygous for the missense mutation P81L. The G47D and P81L missense mutations have been previously described in extended families in the United States. Haplotypes were determined using four polymorphisms linked to the tyrosinase locus. Haplotype analysis showed that the G47D mutation occurred on a single haplotype, consistent with a common founder for all individuals having this mutation. Two different haplotypes were found associated with the P81L mutation, suggesting that this may be either a recurring mutation for the tyrosinase gene or a recombination between haplotypes. 28 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

Oetting, W.S.; Witkop, C.J. Jr.; Brown, S.A.; Fryer, J.P.; Bloom, K.E.; King, R.A. (Univ. of Minnesota, Minneapolis (United States)); Colomer, R. (Servicio Medico de Empressa de la ONCE, Canary Islands (Spain))

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

CoreCollapseSupernovasVSGalaxyColor WayneStateUniversity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

,IbeganfilteringdatausingtheprogramlanguagePerl.Ifirststarted filteringallthesupernovaedatafilesintoTypeIIsupernovae.Thisincludedall supernovaeexceptforTypeIa.Thefilteringprocessismadepossiblebyeachsupernova

Cinabro, David

276

A BINARY PROGENITOR FOR THE TYPE IIb SUPERNOVA 2011dh IN M51  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We perform binary stellar evolutionary calculations following the simultaneous evolution of both stars in the system to study a potential progenitor system for the Type IIb supernova 2011dh. Pre-explosion photometry as well as light-curve modeling has provided constraints on the physical properties of the progenitor system. Here, we present a close binary system (CBS) that is compatible with such constraints. The system is formed by stars of solar composition with 16 M {sub Sun} + 10 M {sub Sun} on a circular orbit with an initial period of 125 days. The primary star ends its evolution as a yellow supergiant with a mass of Almost-Equal-To 4 M {sub Sun }, a final hydrogen content of Almost-Equal-To (3-5) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -3} M {sub Sun }, and with an effective temperature and luminosity in agreement with the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) pre-explosion observations of SN 2011dh. These results are nearly insensitive to the adopted accretion efficiency factor {beta}. At the time of explosion, the companion star has an effective temperature of 22,000-40,000 K, depending on the value of {beta}, and lies near the zero-age main sequence. Considering the uncertainties in the HST pre-SN photometry, the secondary star is only marginally detectable in the bluest observed band. CBSs, as opposed to single stars, provide a natural frame to explain the properties of SN 2011dh.

Benvenuto, Omar G. [Facultad de Ciencias Astronomicas y Geofisicas, Universidad Nacional de La Plata, Paseo del Bosque S/N, B1900FWA La Plata (Argentina)] [Facultad de Ciencias Astronomicas y Geofisicas, Universidad Nacional de La Plata, Paseo del Bosque S/N, B1900FWA La Plata (Argentina); Bersten, Melina C.; Nomoto, Ken'ichi, E-mail: obenvenu@fcaglp.unlp.edu.ar, E-mail: melina.bersten@ipmu.jp [Kavli Institute for the Physics and Mathematics of the Universe, Todai Institutes for Advanced Study, University of Tokyo, 5-1-5 Kashiwanoha, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8583 (Japan)] [Kavli Institute for the Physics and Mathematics of the Universe, Todai Institutes for Advanced Study, University of Tokyo, 5-1-5 Kashiwanoha, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8583 (Japan)

2013-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

277

Optical Photometry of Type II-P Supernova 2004dj in NGC 2403  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present photometric data of the type II-P supernova (SN) 2004dj in NGC 2403. The multicolor light curves cover the SN from $\\sim$ 60 to 200 days after explosion, and are measured with a set of intermediate-band filters that have the advantage of tracing the strength variations of some spectral features. The light curves show a flat evolution in the middle of the plateau phase, then decline exponentially at the late times, with a rate of 0.10$\\pm$0.03 mag (10 days)$^{-1}$ in most of the filters. In the nebular phase, the spectral energy distribution (SED) of SN 2004dj shows a steady increase in the flux near 6600 \\AA and 8500 \\AA, which may correspond to the emission lines of H$\\alpha$ and Ca II near-IR triplet, respectively. The photometric behavior suggests that SN 2004dj is a normal SN II-P. Compared with the light curves of another typical SN II-P 1999em, we estimate the explosion date to be June 10$\\pm$21 UT, 2004 (JD 2453167$\\pm$21) for SN 2004dj. We also estimate the ejected nickel mass during the ex...

Zhang, T; Li, W; Zhou, X; Ma, J; Jiang, Z; Chen, J; Zhang, Tianmeng; Wang, Xiaofeng; Li, Weidong; Zhou, Xu; Ma, Jun; Jiang, Zhaoji; Chen, Jiansheng

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

The supernova cosmology cookbook: Bayesian numerical recipes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Theoretical and observational cosmology have enjoyed a number of significant successes over the last two decades. Cosmic microwave background measurements from the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe and Planck, together with large-scale structure and supernova (SN) searches, have put very tight constraints on cosmological parameters. Type Ia supernovae (SNIa) played a central role in the discovery of the accelerated expansion of the Universe, recognised by the Nobel Prize in Physics in 2011. The last decade has seen an enormous increase in the amount of high quality SN observations, with SN catalogues now containing hundreds of objects. This number is expected to increase to thousands in the next few years, as data from next-generation missions, such as the Dark Energy Survey and Large Synoptic Survey Telescope become available. In order to exploit the vast amount of forthcoming high quality data, it is extremely important to develop robust and efficient statistical analysis methods to answer cosmological q...

Karpenka, N V

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Silicon carbide grains of type C provide evidence for the production of the unstable isotope $^{32}$Si in supernovae  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Carbon-rich grains are observed to condense in the ejecta of recent core-collapse supernovae, within a year after the explosion. Silicon carbide grains of type X are C-rich grains with isotpic signatures of explosive supernova nucleosynthesis have been found in primitive meteorites. Much rarer silicon carbide grains of type C are a special sub-group of SiC grains from supernovae. They show peculiar abundance signatures for Si and S, isotopically heavy Si and isotopically light S, which appear to to be in disagreement with model predictions. We propose that C grains are formed mostly from C-rich stellar material exposed to lower SN shock temperatures than the more common type X grains. In this scenario, extreme $^{32}$S enrichments observed in C grains may be explained by the presence of short-lived $^{32}$Si ($\\tau$$_{1/2}$ = 153 years) in the ejecta, produced by neutron capture processes starting from the stable Si isotopes. No mixing from deeper Si-rich material and/or fractionation of Si from S due to mole...

Pignatari, M; Bertolli, M G; Trappitsch, R; Hoppe, P; Rauscher, T; Fryer, C; Herwig, F; Hirschi, R; Timmes, F X; Thielemann, F -K

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Tracked Flame Simulation for Type Ia Yongmin Zhang 1 , James Glimm 1;2 , Srabasti Dutta 1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

thermonuclear combustion. Keywords: front tracking, supernova, combustion 1 #12; 1 Introduction We study of the ejecta, and the strength and brightness of the burning are all determined by the speed of thermonuclear. To predict the explosion outcome, one needs to model the propagation of thermonuclear burning inside

New York at Stoney Brook, State University of

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281

Thermonuclear Supernovae: Simulations of the Deflagration Stage and Their Implications  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Large-scale three-dimensional numerical simulations of the deflagration stage of a thermonuclear supernova explosion show the formation and evolution of a highly convoluted turbulent flame in a gravitational field of an expanding carbon-oxygen white dwarf. The flame dynamics is dominated by the gravity-induced Rayleigh-Taylor instability that controls the burning rate. The thermonuclear deflagration releases enough energy to produce a healthy explosion. The turbulent flame, however, leaves large amounts of unburnt and partially burnt material near the star center, whereas observations imply these materials only in outer layers. This disagreement could be resolved if the deflagration triggers a detonation. 1 According to observations and models, many stars that steadily burn their nuclear fuel for millions or billions of years suddenly end their lives with a powerful explosion that produces a bright object called a supernova. A supernova explosion can be powered either by the gravitational energy released during the core collapse of a massive star, or by the nuclear energy released by explosive thermonuclear burning of a star. Here, we focus on thermonuclear supernovae that belong to the Type Ia (SN Ia) in the observation-based classification (1-3).

V. N. Gamezo; A. M. Khokhlov; E. S. Oran; A. Y. Chtchelkanova; R. O. Rosenberg

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

SUPER-LUMINOUS TYPE Ic SUPERNOVAE: CATCHING A MAGNETAR BY THE TAIL  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We report extensive observational data for five of the lowest redshift Super-Luminous Type Ic Supernovae (SL-SNe Ic) discovered to date, namely, PTF10hgi, SN2011ke, PTF11rks, SN2011kf, and SN2012il. Photometric imaging of the transients at +50 to +230 days after peak combined with host galaxy subtraction reveals a luminous tail phase for four of these SL-SNe. A high-resolution, optical, and near-infrared spectrum from xshooter provides detection of a broad He I {lambda}10830 emission line in the spectrum (+50 days) of SN2012il, revealing that at least some SL-SNe Ic are not completely helium-free. At first sight, the tail luminosity decline rates that we measure are consistent with the radioactive decay of {sup 56}Co, and would require 1-4 M{sub Sun} of {sup 56}Ni to produce the luminosity. These {sup 56}Ni masses cannot be made consistent with the short diffusion times at peak, and indeed are insufficient to power the peak luminosity. We instead favor energy deposition by newborn magnetars as the power source for these objects. A semi-analytical diffusion model with energy input from the spin-down of a magnetar reproduces the extensive light curve data well. The model predictions of ejecta velocities and temperatures which are required are in reasonable agreement with those determined from our observations. We derive magnetar energies of 0.4 {approx}< E(10{sup 51} erg) {approx}< 6.9 and ejecta masses of 2.3 {approx}< M{sub ej}(M{sub Sun }) {approx}< 8.6. The sample of five SL-SNe Ic presented here, combined with SN 2010gx-the best sampled SL-SNe Ic so far-points toward an explosion driven by a magnetar as a viable explanation for all SL-SNe Ic.

Inserra, C.; Smartt, S. J.; Jerkstrand, A.; Fraser, M.; Wright, D.; Smith, K.; Chen, T.-W.; Kotak, R.; Nicholl, M. [Astrophysics Research Centre, School of Mathematics and Physics, Queens University Belfast, Belfast BT7 1NN (United Kingdom); Valenti, S. [Las Cumbres Observatory Global Telescope Network, 6740 Cortona Dr., Suite 102 Goleta, CA 93117 (United States); Pastorello, A.; Benetti, S. [INAF, Osservatorio Astronomico di Padova, vicolo dell'Osservatorio 5, I-35122 Padova (Italy); Bresolin, F.; Kudritzki, R. P.; Burgett, W. S.; Chambers, K. C.; Flewelling, H. [Institute of Astronomy, University of Hawaii, 2680 Woodlawn Drive, Honolulu, HI 96822 (United States); Botticella, M. T. [INAF-Osservatorio Astronomico di Capodimonte, Salita Moiariello 16, I-80131 Napoli (Italy); Ergon, M. [The Oskar Klein Centre, Department of Astronomy, AlbaNova, Stockholm University, SE-10691 Stockholm (Sweden); Fynbo, J. P. U., E-mail: c.inserra@qub.ac.uk [Dark Cosmology Centre, Niels Bohr Institute, University of Copenhagen, DK-2100 Copenhagen (Denmark); and others

2013-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

283

RADIO AND X-RAY OBSERVATIONS OF SN 2006jd: ANOTHER STRONGLY INTERACTING TYPE IIn SUPERNOVA  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We report four years of radio and X-ray monitoring of the Type IIn supernova SN 2006jd at radio wavelengths with the Very Large Array, Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope, and Expanded Very Large Array; at X-ray wavelengths with Chandra, XMM-Newton, and Swift-XRT. We assume that the radio and X-ray emitting particles are produced by shock interaction with a dense circumstellar medium. The radio emission shows an initial rise that can be attributed to free-free absorption by cool gas mixed into the nonthermal emitting region; external free-free absorption is disfavored because of the shape of the rising light curves and the low gas column density inferred along the line of sight to the emission region. The X-ray luminosity implies a preshock circumstellar density {approx}10{sup 6} cm{sup -3} at a radius r {approx} 2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 16} cm, but the column density inferred from the photoabsorption of X-rays along the line of sight suggests a significantly lower density. The implication may be an asymmetry in the interaction. The X-ray spectrum shows Fe line emission at 6.9 keV that is stronger than is expected for the conditions in the X-ray emitting gas. We suggest that cool gas mixed into the hot gas plays a role in the line emission. Our radio and X-ray data both suggest the density profile is flatter than r{sup -2} because of the slow evolution of the unabsorbed emission.

Chandra, Poonam [Department of Physics, Royal Military College of Canada, Kingston, ON K7K 7B4 (Canada); Chevalier, Roger A.; Irwin, Christopher M. [Department of Astronomy, University of Virginia, P.O. Box 400325, Charlottesville, VA 22904-4325 (United States); Chugai, Nikolai [Institute of Astronomy of Russian Academy of Sciences, Pyatnitskaya Street 48, 109017 Moscow (Russian Federation); Fransson, Claes [Department of Astronomy, Stockholm University, AlbaNova, SE-106 91 Stockholm (Sweden); Soderberg, Alicia M. [Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory, 60 Garden Street, MS-20, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Chakraborti, Sayan [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, 1 Homi Bhabha Road, Colaba, Mumbai 400005 (India); Immler, Stefan, E-mail: Poonam.Chandra@rmc.ca [Astrophysics Science Division, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States)

2012-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

284

THE CHEMICALLY CONTROLLED SYNTHESIS OF DUST IN TYPE II-P SUPERNOVAE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We study the formation of molecules and dust clusters in the ejecta of solar metallicity, Type II-P supernovae (SNe) using a chemical kinetic approach. We follow the evolution of molecules and small dust cluster masses from day 100 to day 1500 after explosion. We consider stellar progenitors with initial masses of 12, 15, 19, and 25 M{sub ?} that explode as SNe with stratified ejecta. The molecular precursors to dust grains comprise molecular chains, rings and small clusters of silica, silicates, metal oxides, sulfides and carbides, pure metals, and carbon, where the nucleation of silicate clusters is described by a two-step process of metal and oxygen addition. We study the impact of the {sup 56}Ni mass on the type and amount of synthesized dust. We predict that large masses of molecules including CO, SiO, SiS, O{sub 2}, and SO form in the ejecta. We show that the discrepancy between the small dust masses detected at infrared wavelengths some 500 days post-explosion and the larger amounts of dust recently detected with Herschel in SN remnants can be explained by the non-equilibrium chemistry linked to the formation of molecules and dust clusters in the ejected material. Dust gradually builds up from small (?10{sup –5} M{sub ?}) to large masses (?5 × 10{sup –2} M{sub ?}) over a 5 yr period after explosion. Subsequent dust formation and/or growth is hampered by the shortage of chemical agents participating in the dust nucleation and the long timescale for accretion. The results highlight the dependence of the dust chemical composition and mass on the amount of {sup 56}Ni synthesized during the explosion. This dependence may partly explain the diversity of epochs at which dust forms in SNe. More generally, our results indicate that Type II-P SNe are efficient but moderate dust producers with an upper limit on the mass of synthesized dust ranging from ?0.03 to 0.09 M{sub ?}. Other dust sources must then operate at high redshift to explain the large quantities of dust present in young galaxies in the early universe.

Sarangi, Arkaprabha; Cherchneff, Isabelle, E-mail: arkaprabha.sarangi@unibas.ch, E-mail: isabelle.cherchneff@unibas.ch [Departement Physik, Universität Basel, CH-4056 Basel (Switzerland)

2013-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

285

The binary progenitor of Tycho Brahe's 1572 supernova  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The brightness of type Ia supernovae, and their homogeneity as a class, makes them powerful tools in cosmology, yet little is known about the progenitor systems of these explosions. They are thought to arise when a white dwarf accretes matter from a companion star, is compressed and undergoes a thermonuclear explosion Unless the companion star is another white dwarf (in which case it should be destroyed by the mass-transfer process itself), it should survive and show distinguishing properties. Tycho's supernova is one of the only two type Ia supernovae observed in our Galaxy, and so provides an opportunity to address observationally the identification of the surviving companion. Here we report a survey of the central region of its remnant, around the position of the explosion, which excludes red giants as the mass donor of the exploding white dwarf. We found a type G0--G2 star, similar to our Sun in surface temperature and luminosity (but lower surface gravity), moving at more than three times the mean veloci...

Ruiz-Lapuente, P; Méndez, J; Canal, R; Smartt, S J; Filippenko, A V; Kurucz, R L; Chornock, R; Foley, R J; Stanishev, V; Ibata, R; Ruiz-Lapuente, Pilar; Comeron, Fernando; Mendez, Javier; Canal, Ramon; Smartt, Stephen J.; Filippenko, Alexei V.; Kurucz, Robert L.; Chornock, Ryan; Foley, Ryan J.; Stanishev, Vallery; Ibata, Rodrigo

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

LATE-TIME CIRCUMSTELLAR INTERACTION IN A SPITZER SELECTED SAMPLE OF TYPE IIn SUPERNOVAE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Type IIn supernovae (SNe IIn) are a rare (<10%) subclass of core-collapse SNe that exhibit relatively narrow emission lines from a dense, pre-existing circumstellar medium (CSM). In 2009, a warm Spitzer Space Telescope survey observed 30 SNe IIn discovered in 2003-2008 and detected 10 SNe at distances out to 175 Mpc with unreported late-time infrared emission, in some cases more than 5 yr post-discovery. For this single epoch of data, the warm-dust parameters suggest the presence of a radiative heating source consisting of optical and X-ray emission continuously generated by ongoing CSM interaction. Here we present multi-wavelength follow-up observations of this sample of 10 SNe IIn and the well-studied Type IIn SN 2010jl. A recent epoch of Spitzer observations reveals ongoing mid-infrared emission from nine of the SNe in this sample. We also detect three of the SNe in archival Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer data, in addition to SNe 1987A, 2004dj, and 2008iy. For at least five of the SNe in the sample, optical and/or X-ray emission confirms the presence of radiative emission from ongoing CSM interaction. The two Spitzer nondetections are consistent with the forward shock overrunning and destroying the dust shell, a result that places upper limits on the dust-shell size. The optical and infrared observations confirm the radiative heating model and constrain a number of model parameters, including progenitor mass-loss characteristics. All of the SNe in this sample experienced an outburst on the order of tens to hundreds of years prior to the SN explosion followed by periods of less intense mass loss. Although all evidence points to massive progenitors, the variation in the data highlights the diversity in SN IIn progenitor evolution. While these observations do not identify a particular progenitor system, they demonstrate that future, coordinated, multi-wavelength campaigns can constrain theoretical mass-loss models.

Fox, Ori D.; Filippenko, Alexei V.; Silverman, Jeffrey M.; Ganeshalingam, Mohan; Cenko, S. Bradley; Clubb, Kelsey I. [Department of Astronomy, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720-3411 (United States); Skrutskie, Michael F., E-mail: ofox@berkeley.edu [Department of Astronomy, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA 22903 (United States)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

INTEGRAL FIELD SPECTROSCOPY OF SUPERNOVA EXPLOSION SITES: CONSTRAINING THE MASS AND METALLICITY OF THE PROGENITORS. II. TYPE II-P AND II-L SUPERNOVAE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Thirteen explosion sites of Type II-P and II-L supernovae (SNe) in nearby galaxies have been observed using integral field spectroscopy, enabling both spatial and spectral study of the explosion sites. We used the properties of the parent stellar population of the coeval SN progenitor star to derive its metallicity and initial mass. The spectrum of the parent stellar population yields estimates of metallicity via the strong-line method and age via a comparison with simple stellar population models. These metallicity and age parameters are adopted for the progenitor star. Age, or lifetime of the star, was used to derive the initial (zero-age main sequence) mass of the star using comparisons with stellar evolution models. With this technique, we were able to determine the metallicities and initial masses of the SN progenitors in our sample. Our results indicate that some Type II SN progenitors may have been stars with masses comparable to those of SN Ib/c progenitors.

Kuncarayakti, Hanindyo; Maeda, Keiichi [Kavli Institute for the Physics and Mathematics of the Universe (WPI), Todai Institutes for Advanced Study, University of Tokyo, 5-1-5 Kashiwanoha, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8583 (Japan); Doi, Mamoru; Morokuma, Tomoki; Hashiba, Yasuhito [Institute of Astronomy, Graduate School of Science, University of Tokyo, 2-21-1 Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-0015 (Japan); Aldering, Greg [Physics Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Arimoto, Nobuo [National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, 2-21-1 Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-0015 (Japan); Pereira, Rui [CNRS/IN2P3, Institut de Physique Nucleaire de Lyon, 4 Rue Enrico Fermi, F-69622 Villeurbanne Cedex (France); Usuda, Tomonori, E-mail: hanindyo.kuncarayakti@ipmu.jp [Subaru Telescope, National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, 650 North A'ohoku Place, Hilo, HI 96720 (United States)

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

MULTI-WAVELENGTH OBSERVATIONS OF SUPERNOVA 2011ei: TIME-DEPENDENT CLASSIFICATION OF TYPE IIb AND Ib SUPERNOVAE AND IMPLICATIONS FOR THEIR PROGENITORS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present X-ray, UV/optical, and radio observations of the stripped-envelope, core-collapse supernova (SN) 2011ei, one of the least luminous SNe IIb or Ib observed to date. Our observations begin with a discovery within {approx}1 day of explosion and span several months afterward. Early optical spectra exhibit broad, Type II-like hydrogen Balmer profiles that subside rapidly and are replaced by Type Ib-like He-rich features on a timescale of one week. High-cadence monitoring of this transition suggests absorption attributable to a high-velocity ({approx}> 12, 000 km s{sup -1}) H-rich shell, which is likely present in many Type Ib events. Radio observations imply a shock velocity of v Almost-Equal-To 0.13 c and a progenitor star average mass-loss rate of M-dot {approx}1.4 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -5} M{sub sun} yr{sup -1} (assuming wind velocity v{sub w} = 10{sup 3} km s{sup -1}). This is consistent with independent constraints from deep X-ray observations with Swift-XRT and Chandra. Overall, the multi-wavelength properties of SN 2011ei are consistent with the explosion of a lower-mass (3-4 M{sub Sun }), compact (R{sub *} {approx}< 1 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 11} cm), He-core star. The star retained a thin hydrogen envelope at the time of explosion, and was embedded in an inhomogeneous circumstellar wind suggestive of modest episodic mass loss. We conclude that SN 2011ei's rapid spectral metamorphosis is indicative of time-dependent classifications that bias estimates of the relative explosion rates for Type IIb and Ib objects, and that important information about a progenitor star's evolutionary state and mass loss immediately prior to SN explosion can be inferred from timely multi-wavelength observations.

Milisavljevic, Dan; Margutti, Raffaella; Soderberg, Alicia M.; Chomiuk, Laura; Sanders, Nathan E. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States)] [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Pignata, Giuliano; Bufano, Filomena [Departamento de Ciencias Fisicas, Universidad Andres Bello, Avda. Republica 252, Santiago (Chile)] [Departamento de Ciencias Fisicas, Universidad Andres Bello, Avda. Republica 252, Santiago (Chile); Fesen, Robert A.; Parrent, Jerod T. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Dartmouth College, 6127 Wilder Lab, Hanover, NH 03755 (United States)] [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Dartmouth College, 6127 Wilder Lab, Hanover, NH 03755 (United States); Parker, Stuart [Parkdale Observatory, 225 Warren Road, RDl Oxford, Canterbury 7495 (New Zealand)] [Parkdale Observatory, 225 Warren Road, RDl Oxford, Canterbury 7495 (New Zealand); Mazzali, Paolo [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Astrophysik, Karl-Schwarzschild-Strasse 1, D-85748 Garching (Germany)] [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Astrophysik, Karl-Schwarzschild-Strasse 1, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Pian, Elena [Kavli Institute for Theoretical Physics, Kohn Hall, University of California at Santa Barbara, Santa Barbara, CA 93106-4030 (United States)] [Kavli Institute for Theoretical Physics, Kohn Hall, University of California at Santa Barbara, Santa Barbara, CA 93106-4030 (United States); Pickering, Timothy; Buckley, David A. H.; Crawford, Steven M.; Gulbis, Amanda A. S.; Hettlage, Christian [South African Astronomical Observatory, P.O. Box 9, Observatory 7935, Cape Town (South Africa)] [South African Astronomical Observatory, P.O. Box 9, Observatory 7935, Cape Town (South Africa); Hooper, Eric; Nordsieck, Kenneth H. [Department of Astronomy, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI 53706 (United States)] [Department of Astronomy, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI 53706 (United States); O'Donoghue, Darragh, E-mail: dmilisav@cfa.harvard.edu [Southern African Large Telescope, P.O. Box 9, Observatory 7935, Cape Town (South Africa)] [Southern African Large Telescope, P.O. Box 9, Observatory 7935, Cape Town (South Africa); and others

2013-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

289

Supernova rates from the Southern inTermediate Redshift ESO Supernova Search (STRESS)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

To measure the supernova (SN) rates at intermediate redshift we performed the Southern inTermediate Redshift ESO Supernova Search (STRESS). Unlike most of the current high redshift SN searches, this survey was specifically designed to estimate the rate for both type Ia and core collapse (CC) SNe. We counted the SNe discovered in a selected galaxy sample measuring SN rate per unit blue band luminosity. Our analysis is based on a sample of ~43000 galaxies and on 25 spectroscopically confirmed SNe plus 64 selected SN candidates. Our approach is aimed at obtaining a direct comparison of the high redshift and local rates and at investigating the dependence of the rates on specific galaxy properties, most notably their colour. The type Ia SN rate, at mean redshift z=0.3, amounts to 0.22^{+0.10+0.16}_{-0.08 -0.14} h_{70}^2 SNu, while the CC SN rate, at z=0.21, is 0.82^{+0.31 +0.30}_{-0.24 -0.26} h_{70}^2 SNu. The quoted errors are the statistical and systematic uncertainties. With respect to local value, the CC SN rate at z=0.2 is higher by a factor of ~2 already at redshift, whereas the type Ia SN rate remains almost constant. This implies that a significant fraction of SN Ia progenitors has a lifetime longer than 2-3 Gyr. We also measured the SN rates in the red and blue galaxies and found that the SN Ia rate seems to be constant in galaxies of different colour, whereas the CC SN rate seems to peak in blue galaxies, as in the local Universe. SN rates per unit volume were found to be consistent with other measurements showing a steeper evolution with redshift for CC SNe with respect to SNe Ia. Finally we have exploited the link between star formation (SF) and SN rates to predict the evolutionary behaviour of the SN rates and compare it with the path indicated by observations.

M. T. Botticella; M. Riello; E. Cappellaro; S. Benetti; G. Altavilla; A. Pastorello; M. Turatto; L. Greggio; F. Patat; S. Valenti; L. Zampieri; A. Harutyunyan; G. Pignata; S. Taubenberger

2007-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

290

White dwarf mergers,White dwarf mergers, thermonuclear supernovae,thermonuclear supernovae,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

White dwarf mergers,White dwarf mergers, thermonuclear supernovae,thermonuclear supernovae fusion is ignited. Degenerate, hence runaway. #12;CO white dwarf accretes, either from companion, or from disk after merger. As it approaches maximum mass, C fusion is ignited. Degenerate, hence runaway. SN Ia

Hinton, Jim

291

INHOMOGENEITIES IN TYPE Ib/c SUPERNOVAE: AN INVERSE COMPTON SCATTERING ORIGIN OF THE X-RAY EMISSION  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Inhomogeneities in a synchrotron source can severely affect the conclusions drawn from observations regarding the source properties. However, their presence is not always easy to establish, since several other effects can give rise to similar observed characteristics. It is argued that the recently observed broadening of the radio spectra and/or light curves in some Type Ib/c supernovae is a direct indication of inhomogeneities. As compared to a homogeneous source, this increases the deduced velocity of the forward shock and the observed correlation between total energy and shock velocity could in part be due to a varying covering factor. The X-ray emission from at least some Type Ib/c supernovae is unlikely to be synchrotron radiation from an electron distribution accelerated in a nonlinear shock. Instead it is shown that the observed correlation during the first few hundred days between the radio, X-ray, and bolometric luminosities indicates that the X-ray emission is inverse Compton scattering of the photospheric photons. Inhomogeneities are consistent with equipartition between electrons and magnetic fields in the optically thin synchrotron emitting regions.

Bjoernsson, C.-I., E-mail: bjornsson@astro.su.se [Department of Astronomy, AlbaNova University Center, Stockholm University, SE-106 91 Stockholm (Sweden)

2013-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

292

Analytical solutions for energy spectra of electrons accelerated by nonrelativistic shock-waves in shell type supernova remnants  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

%context {Recent observations of hard X-rays and very high energy gamma-rays from a number of young shell type supernova remnants indicate the importance of detailed quantitative studies of energy spectra of relativistic electrons formed via diffusive shock acceleration accompanied by intense nonthermal emission through synchrotron radiation and inverse Compton scattering.} %aim {The aim of this work was derivation of exact asymptotic solutions of the kinetic equation which describes the energy distribution of shock-accelerated electrons for an arbitrary energy-dependence of the diffusion coefficient.} %method {The asymptotic solutions at low and very high energy domains coupled with numerical calculations in the intermediate energy range allow analytical presentations of energy spectra of electrons for the entire energy region.} %results {Under the assumption that the energy losses of electrons are dominated by synchrotron cooling, we derived the exact asymptotic spectra of electrons without any restriction on the diffusion coefficient. We also obtained simple analytical approximations which describe, with accuracy better than ten percent, the energy spectra of nonthermal emission of shock-accelerated electrons due to the synchrotron radiation and inverse Compton scattering.} %conclusions {The results can be applied for interpretation of X-ray and gamma-ray observations of shell type supernova remnants, as well as other nonthermal high energy source populations like microquasars and large scale synchrotron jets of active galactic nuclei.

V. N. Zirakashvili; F. Aharonian

2007-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

293

INTEGRAL FIELD SPECTROSCOPY OF SUPERNOVA EXPLOSION SITES: CONSTRAINING THE MASS AND METALLICITY OF THE PROGENITORS. I. TYPE Ib AND Ic SUPERNOVAE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Integral field spectroscopy of 11 Type Ib/Ic supernova (SN Ib/Ic) explosion sites in nearby galaxies has been obtained using UH88/SNIFS and Gemini-N/GMOS. The use of integral field spectroscopy enables us to obtain both spatial and spectral information about the explosion site, enabling the identification of the parent stellar population of the SN progenitor star. The spectrum of the parent population provides metallicity determination via strong-line method and age estimation obtained via comparison with simple stellar population models. We adopt this information as the metallicity and age of the SN progenitor, under the assumption that it was coeval with the parent stellar population. The age of the star corresponds to its lifetime, which in turn gives the estimate of its initial mass. With this method we were able to determine both the metallicity and initial (zero-age main sequence) mass of the progenitor stars of SNe Ib and Ic. We found that on average SN Ic explosion sites are more metal-rich and younger than SN Ib sites. The initial mass of the progenitors derived from parent stellar population age suggests that SN Ic has more massive progenitors than SN Ib. In addition, we also found indication that some of our SN progenitors are less massive than {approx}25 M{sub Sun }, indicating that they may have been stars in a close binary system that have lost their outer envelope via binary interactions to produce SNe Ib/Ic, instead of single Wolf-Rayet stars. These findings support the current suggestions that both binary and single progenitor channels are in effect in producing SNe Ib/Ic. This work also demonstrates the power of integral field spectroscopy in investigating SN environments and active star-forming regions.

Kuncarayakti, Hanindyo; Maeda, Keiichi [Kavli Institute for the Physics and Mathematics of the Universe (WPI), Todai Institutes for Advanced Study, The University of Tokyo, 5-1-5 Kashiwanoha, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8583 (Japan); Doi, Mamoru; Morokuma, Tomoki; Hashiba, Yasuhito [Institute of Astronomy, Graduate School of Science, The University of Tokyo, 2-21-1 Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-0015 (Japan); Aldering, Greg [Physics Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Arimoto, Nobuo [National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, 2-21-1 Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-0015 (Japan); Pereira, Rui [CNRS/IN2P3, Institut de Physique Nucleaire de Lyon, 4 Rue Enrico Fermi, F-69622 Villeurbanne Cedex (France); Usuda, Tomonori, E-mail: hanindyo.kuncarayakti@ipmu.jp [Subaru Telescope, National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, 650 North A'ohoku Place, Hilo, HI 96720 (United States)

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

Measuring dark energy spatial inhomogeneity with supernova data  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The gravitational lensing distortion of distant sources by the large-scale distribution of matter in the Universe has been extensively studied. In contrast, very little is known about the effects due to the large-scale distribution of dark energy. We discuss the use of Type Ia supernovae as probes of the spatial inhomogeneity and anisotropy of dark energy. We show that a shallow, almost all-sky survey can limit rms dark energy fluctuations at the horizon scale down to a fractional energy density of ~10^-4

Asantha Cooray; Daniel E. Holz; Robert Caldwell

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

The First Second of a Type-II Supernova: Convection, Accretion, and Shock Propagation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

One- and two-dimensional hydrodynamical simulations of neutrino-driven supernova explosions are discussed. The simulations cover the phase between the stagnation of the prompt shock and about one second after core bounce. Systematic variation of the neutrino fluxes from the neutrino sphere shows that the explosion energy, explosion time scale, initial mass of the protoneutron star, and explosive nucleosynthesis of iron-group elements depend sensitively on the strength of the neutrino heating during the first few 100 ms after shock formation. Convective overturn in the neutrino-heated region behind the shock is a crucial help for the explosion only in a narrow window of neutrino luminosities. Here powerful explosions can be obtained only in the multi-dimensional case. For higher core-neutrino fluxes also spherically symmetrical models yield energetic explosions, while for lower luminosities even with convection no strong explosions occur.

H. -Thomas Janka; Ewald Mueller

1995-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

296

The Sloan Digital Sky Survey-II Supernova Survey:Search Algorithm and Follow-up Observations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Sloan Digital Sky Survey-II Supernova Survey has identified a large number of new transient sources in a 300 deg2 region along the celestial equator during its first two seasons of a three-season campaign. Multi-band (ugriz) light curves were measured for most of the sources, which include solar system objects, Galactic variable stars, active galactic nuclei, supernovae (SNe), and other astronomical transients. The imaging survey is augmented by an extensive spectroscopic follow-up program to identify SNe, measure their redshifts, and study the physical conditions of the explosions and their environment through spectroscopic diagnostics. During the survey, light curves are rapidly evaluated to provide an initial photometric type of the SNe, and a selected sample of sources are targeted for spectroscopic observations. In the first two seasons, 476 sources were selected for spectroscopic observations, of which 403 were identified as SNe. For the Type Ia SNe, the main driver for the Survey, our photometric typing and targeting efficiency is 90%. Only 6% of the photometric SN Ia candidates were spectroscopically classified as non-SN Ia instead, and the remaining 4% resulted in low signal-to-noise, unclassified spectra. This paper describes the search algorithm and the software, and the real-time processing of the SDSS imaging data. We also present the details of the supernova candidate selection procedures and strategies for follow-up spectroscopic and imaging observations of the discovered sources.

Sako, Masao; /Pennsylvania U. /KIPAC, Menlo Park; Bassett, Bruce; /Cape Town U. /South African Astron. Observ.; Becker, Andrew; /Washington U., Seattle, Astron. Dept.; Cinabro, David; /Wayne State U.; DeJongh, Don Frederic; /Fermilab; Depoy, D.L.; /Ohio State U.; Doi, Mamoru; /Tokyo U.; Garnavich, Peter M.; /Notre Dame U.; Craig, Hogan, J.; /Washington U., Seattle, Astron. Dept.; Holtzman, Jon; /New Mexico State U.; Jha, Saurabh; /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Konishi, Kohki; /Tokyo U.; Lampeitl, Hubert; /Baltimore, Space; Marriner, John; /Fermilab; Miknaitis, Gajus; /Fermilab; Nichol, Robert C.; /Portsmouth U.; Prieto, Jose Luis; /Ohio State U.; Richmond, Michael W.; /Rochester Inst.; Schneider, Donald P.; /Penn State U., Astron. Astrophys.; Smith, Mathew; /Portsmouth U.; SubbaRao, Mark; /Chicago U. /Tokyo U. /Tokyo U. /South African Astron. Observ. /Tokyo

2007-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

297

SYSTEMATIC BLUESHIFT OF LINE PROFILES IN THE TYPE IIn SUPERNOVA 2010jl: EVIDENCE FOR POST-SHOCK DUST FORMATION?  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Type IIn supernovae (SNe) show spectral evidence for strong interaction between their blast wave and dense circumstellar material (CSM) around the progenitor star. SN 2010jl was the brightest core-collapse supernova in 2010, and it was a Type IIn explosion with strong CSM interaction. Andrews et al. recently reported evidence for an infrared (IR) excess in SN 2010jl, indicating either new dust formation or the heating of CSM dust in an IR echo. Here we report multi-epoch spectra of SN 2010jl that reveal the tell-tale signature of new dust formation: emission-line profiles becoming systematically more blueshifted as the red side of the line is blocked by increasing extinction. The effect is seen clearly in the intermediate-width (400-4000 km s{sup -1}) component of H{alpha} beginning roughly 30 days after explosion. Moreover, we present near-IR spectra demonstrating that the asymmetry in the hydrogen-line profiles is wavelength dependent, appearing more pronounced at shorter wavelengths. This evidence suggests that new dust grains had formed quickly in the post-shock shell of SN 2010jl arising from CSM interaction. Since the observed dust temperature has been attributed to an IR echo and not to new dust, either (1) IR excess emission at {lambda} < 5 {mu}m is not a particularly sensitive tracer of new dust formation in SNe, or (2) some assumptions about expected dust temperatures might require further study. Lastly, we discuss one possible mechanism other than dust that might lead to increasingly blueshifted line profiles in SNe IIn, although the wavelength dependence of the asymmetry argues against this hypothesis in the case of SN 2010jl.

Smith, Nathan; Bian, Fuyan; Weiner, Benjamin J. [Steward Observatory, University of Arizona, 933 North Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Silverman, Jeffrey M.; Filippenko, Alexei V. [Department of Astronomy, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720-3411 (United States); Cooper, Michael C. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, 4129 Frederick Reines Hall, Irvine, CA 92697-4575 (United States); Matheson, Thomas [National Optical Astronomy Observatory, 950 North Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85719-4933 (United States); Comerford, Julia M., E-mail: nathans@as.arizona.edu [Astronomy Department, University of Texas, Austin, TX 78712 (United States)

2012-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

298

The variation of the fine structure constant: testing the dipole model with thermonuclear supernovae  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The large-number hypothesis conjectures that fundamental constants may vary. Accordingly, the spacetime variation of fundamental constants has been an active subject of research for decades. Recently, using data obtained with large telescopes a phenomenological model in which the fine structure constant might vary spatially has been proposed. We test whether this hypothetical spatial variation of {\\alpha}, which follows a dipole law, is compatible with the data of distant thermonuclear supernovae. Unlike previous works, in our calculations we consider not only the variation of the luminosity distance when a varying {\\alpha} is adopted, but we also take into account the variation of the peak luminosity of Type Ia supernovae resulting from a variation of {\\alpha}. This is done using an empirical relation for the peak bolometric magnitude of thermonuclear supernovae that correctly reproduces the results of detailed numerical simulations. We find that there is no significant difference between the several phenome...

Kraiselburd, Lucila; Negrelli, Carolina; Berro, Enrique García

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

A comparative study of Type II-P and II-L supernova rise times as exemplified by the case of LSQ13cuw  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We report on our findings based on the analysis of observations of the Type II-L supernova LSQ13cuw within the framework of currently-accepted physical predictions of core-collapse supernova explosions. LSQ13cuw was discovered within a day of explosion, which is hitherto unprecedented for Type II-L supernovae. This motivated a comparative study of Type II-P and II-L supernovae with relatively well-constrained explosion epochs and rise times to maximium (optical) light. From our sample of 19 such events, we find evidence of a positive correlation between the duration of the rise and the peak brightness. On average, SNe II-L tend to have brighter peak magnitudes and longer rise times than SNe II-P. However, this difference is clearest only at the extreme ends of the rise-time versus peak brightness relation. Using two different analytical models, we performed a parameter study to investigate the physical parameters that control the rise-time behaviour. In general, the models qualitatively reproduce aspects of t...

Gall, E E E; Kotak, R; Jerkstrand, A; Leibundgut, B; Rabinowitz, D; Sollerman, J; Sullivan, M; Smartt, S J; Anderson, J P; Benetti, S; Baltay, C; Feindt, U; Fraser, M; González-Gaitán, S; Inserra, C; Maguire, K; McKinnon, R; Valenti, S; Young, D

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

THE CARNEGIE SUPERNOVA PROJECT: FIRST NEAR-INFRARED HUBBLE DIAGRAM TO z approx 0.7  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Carnegie Supernova Project (CSP) is designed to measure the luminosity distance for Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) as a function of redshift, and to set observational constraints on the dark energy contribution to the total energy content of the universe. The CSP differs from other projects to date in its goal of providing an I-band rest-frame Hubble diagram. Here, we present the first results from near-infrared observations obtained using the Magellan Baade telescope for SNe Ia with 0.1 Ia, and we compare these data to 21 new SNe Ia at low redshift. These data support the conclusion that the expansion of the universe is accelerating. When combined with independent results from baryon acoustic oscillations, these data yield OMEGA {sub m} = 0.27 +- 0.02(statistical) and OMEGA{sub DE} = 0.76 +- 0.13(statistical) +- 0.09(systematic), for the matter and dark energy densities, respectively. If we parameterize the data in terms of an equation of state, w (with no time dependence), assume a flat geometry, and combine with baryon acoustic oscillations, we find that w = -1.05 +- 0.13(statistical) +- 0.09(systematic). The largest source of systematic uncertainty on w arises from uncertainties in the photometric calibration, signaling the importance of securing more accurate photometric calibrations for future supernova cosmology programs. Finally, we conclude that either the dust affecting the luminosities of SNe Ia has a different extinction law (R{sub V} = 1.8) than that in the Milky Way (where R{sub V} = 3.1), or that there is an additional intrinsic color term with luminosity for SNe Ia, independent of the decline rate. Understanding and disentangling these effects is critical for minimizing the systematic uncertainties in future SN Ia cosmology studies.

Freedman, Wendy L.; Burns, Christopher R.; Wyatt, Pamela; Persson, S. E.; Madore, Barry F.; Kelson, Daniel D.; Murphy, D. C.; Sturch, Laura [Carnegie Observatories, 813 Santa Barbara Street, Pasadena, CA 91101 (United States); Phillips, M. M.; Contreras, Carlos; Folatelli, Gaston; Gonzalez, E. Sergio; Morrell, Nidia; Roth, Miguel; Stritzinger, Maximilian [Carnegie Institution of Washington, Las Campanas Observatory, Colina El Pino, Casilla 601 (Chile); Hamuy, Mario [Universidad de Chile, Departmento de Astronomia, Casilla 36-D, Santiago (Chile); Hsiao, Eric [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Victoria, P.O. Box 3055, Stn CSC, Victoria, BC V8W 3P6 (Canada); Suntzeff, Nick B. [Physics Department, Texas A and M University, College Station, TX 77843 (United States); Astier, P.; Balland, C. [LPNHE, CNRS-IN2P3 and Universites Paris VI and VII, 4 place Jussieu, 75252 Paris Cedex 05 (France)

2009-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "type ia supernovae" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Extragalactic distance scales: H0 from Hubble (Edwin) to Hubble (Hubble telescope)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1939) both noted that supernovae, being very bright andassuming that all type Ia supernovae VIRGINIA TRIMBLE flashthe luminosity of type Ia supernovae ( assuming them to be

Trimble, V

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

SILICON CARBIDE GRAINS OF TYPE C PROVIDE EVIDENCE FOR THE PRODUCTION OF THE UNSTABLE ISOTOPE {sup 32}Si IN SUPERNOVAE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Carbon-rich grains are observed to condense in the ejecta of recent core-collapse supernovae (SNe) within a year after the explosion. Silicon carbide grains of type X are C-rich grains with isotopic signatures of explosive SN nucleosynthesis have been found in primitive meteorites. Much rarer silicon carbide grains of type C are a special sub-group of SiC grains from SNe. They show peculiar abundance signatures for Si and S, isotopically heavy Si, and isotopically light S, which appear to be in disagreement with model predictions. We propose that C grains are formed mostly from C-rich stellar material exposed to lower SN shock temperatures than the more common type X grains. In this scenario, extreme {sup 32}S enrichments observed in C grains may be explained by the presence of short-lived {sup 32}Si ({tau}{sub 1/2} = 153 yr) in the ejecta, produced by neutron capture processes starting from the stable Si isotopes. No mixing from deeper Si-rich material and/or fractionation of Si from S due to molecular chemistry is needed to explain the {sup 32}S enrichments. The abundance of {sup 32}Si in the grains can provide constraints on the neutron density reached during the SN explosion in the C-rich He shell material. The impact of the large uncertainty of the neutron capture cross sections in the {sup 32}Si region is discussed.

Pignatari, M.; Rauscher, T.; Thielemann, F.-K. [Department of Physics, University of Basel, Klingelbergstrasse 82, CH-4056 Basel (Switzerland); Zinner, E. [Laboratory for Space Sciences and the Physics Department, Washington University, St. Louis, MO 63130 (United States); Bertolli, M. G. [Theoretical Division (T-2), LANL, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Trappitsch, R. [Department of the Geophysical Sciences, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States); Hoppe, P. [Max Planck Institute for Chemistry, Hahn-Meitner-Weg 1, D-55128 Mainz (Germany); Fryer, C. [Computational Physics and Methods (CCS-2), LANL, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Herwig, F. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Victoria, Victoria, BC (Canada); Hirschi, R. [Keele University, Keele, Staffordshire ST5 5BG (United Kingdom); Timmes, F. X. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Astrophysics, Notre Dame, IN 46556 (United States)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

CALTECH CORE-COLLAPSE PROJECT (CCCP) OBSERVATIONS OF TYPE II SUPERNOVAE: EVIDENCE FOR THREE DISTINCT PHOTOMETRIC SUBTYPES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present R-band light curves of Type II supernovae (SNe) from the Caltech Core-Collapse Project (CCCP). With the exception of interacting (Type IIn) SNe and rare events with long rise times, we find that most light curve shapes belong to one of three apparently distinct classes: plateau, slowly declining, and rapidly declining events. The last class is composed solely of Type IIb SNe which present similar light curve shapes to those of SNe Ib, suggesting, perhaps, similar progenitor channels. We do not find any intermediate light curves, implying that these subclasses are unlikely to reflect variance of continuous parameters, but rather might result from physically distinct progenitor systems, strengthening the suggestion of a binary origin for at least some stripped SNe. We find a large plateau luminosity range for SNe IIP, while the plateau lengths seem rather uniform at approximately 100 days. As analysis of additional CCCP data goes on and larger samples are collected, demographic studies of core-collapse SNe will likely continue to provide new constraints on progenitor scenarios.

Arcavi, Iair; Gal-Yam, Avishay; Yaron, Ofer [Department of Particle Physics and Astrophysics, Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovot 76100 (Israel); Cenko, S. Bradley; Becker, Adam B. [Department of Astronomy, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720-3411 (United States); Fox, Derek B. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Leonard, Douglas C. [Department of Astronomy, San Diego State University, San Diego, CA 92182 (United States); Moon, Dae-Sik [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON M5S 3H4 (Canada); Sand, David J. [Las Cumbres Observatory Global Telescope Network, Santa Barbara, CA 93117 (United States); Soderberg, Alicia M. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Kiewe, Michael [Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Scheps, Raphael [King's College, University of Cambridge, Cambridge CB2 1ST (United Kingdom); Birenbaum, Gali [12 Amos St, Ramat Chen, Ramat Gan 52233 (Israel); Chamudot, Daniel [20 Chen St, Petach Tikvah 49520 (Israel); Zhou, Jonathan, E-mail: iair.arcavi@weizmann.ac.il [101 Dunster Street, Box 398, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States)

2012-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

304

Reducing Zero-point Systematics in Dark Energy Supernova Experiments  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Schmidt, B . P. 2003, i n Supernovae a n d G a m m a - R a ynumber of observed supernovae, m a x i m u m surveyObservations of type l a Supernovae (SNe la) have allowed

Faccioli, Lorenzo

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Deflagrations in hybrid CONe white dwarfs: a route to explain the faint Type Iax supernova 2008ha  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Stellar evolution models predict the existence of hybrid white dwarfs (WDs) with a carbon-oxygen core surrounded by an oxygen-neon mantle. Being born with masses ~1.1 Msun, hybrid WDs in a binary system may easily approach the Chandrasekhar mass (MCh) by accretion and give rise to a thermonuclear explosion. Here, we investigate an off-centre deflagration in a near-MCh hybrid WD under the assumption that nuclear burning only occurs in carbon-rich material. Performing hydrodynamics simulations of the explosion and detailed nucleosynthesis post-processing calculations, we find that only 0.014 Msun of material is ejected while the remainder of the mass stays bound. The ejecta consist predominantly of iron-group elements, O, C, Si and S. We also calculate synthetic observables for our model and find reasonable agreement with the faint Type Iax SN 2008ha. This shows for the first time that deflagrations in near-MCh WDs can in principle explain the observed diversity of Type Iax supernovae. Leaving behind a near-MCh...

Kromer, M; Pakmor, R; Ruiter, A J; Hillebrandt, W; Marquardt, K S; Roepke, F K; Seitenzahl, I R; Sim, S A; Taubenberger, S

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

SN 2013ej in M74: A Luminous and Fast-declining Type II-P Supernova  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present extensive ultraviolet, optical, and near-infrared observations of the type IIP supernova (SN IIP) 2013ej in the nearby spiral galaxy M74. The multicolor light curves, spanning from $\\sim$ 8--185 days after explosion, show that it has a higher peak luminosity (i.e., M$_{V}$ $\\sim$$-$17.83 mag at maximum light), a faster post-peak decline, and a shorter plateau phase (i.e., $\\sim$ 50 days) compared to the normal type IIP SN 1999em. The mass of $^{56}$Ni is estimated as 0.02$\\pm$0.01 M$_{\\odot}$ from the radioactive tail of the bolometric light curve. The spectral evolution of SN 2013ej is similar to that of SN 2004et and SN 2007od, but shows a larger expansion velocity (i.e., $v_{Fe II} \\sim$ 4600 km s$^{-1}$ at t $\\sim$ 50 days) and broader line profiles. In the nebular phase, the emission of H$\\alpha$ line displays a double-peak structure, perhaps due to the asymmetric distribution of $^{56}$Ni produced in the explosion. With the constraints from the main observables such as bolometric light curve,...

Huang, Fang; Zhang, Jujia; Brown, Peter J; Zampieri, Luca; Pumo, Maria Letizia; Zhang, Tianmeng; Chen, Juncheng; Mo, Jun; Zhao, Xulin

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

The circumstellar matter of supernova 2014J and the core-degenerate scenario  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

I show that the circumstellar matter (CSM) of the type Ia supernova 2014J is too massive and its momentum too large to be accounted for by any but the core-degenerate (CD) scenario for type Ia supernovae. Assuming the absorbing gas is of CSM origin, the several shells responsible of the absorption potassium lines are accounted for by a mass loss episode from a massive asymptotic giant branch star during a common envelope phase with a white dwarf companion. The time-varying potassium lines can be accounted for by ionization of neutral potassium and the Na-from-dust absorption (NaDA) model. Before explosion some of the potassium resides in the gas phase and some in dust. Weakening in absorption strength is caused by potassium-ionizing radiation of the supernova, while release of atomic potassium from dust increases the absorption. I conclude that if the absorbing gas originated from the progenitor of SN 2014J, then a common envelope phase took place about 15,000 years ago, leading to the merging of the core wit...

Soker, Noam

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

A HIGH-RESOLUTION SPECTROSCOPIC SEARCH FOR THE REMAINING DONOR FOR TYCHO'S SUPERNOVA  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this paper, we report on our analysis using Hubble Space Telescope astrometry and Keck-I HIRES spectroscopy of the central six stars of Tycho's supernova remnant (SN 1572). With these data, we measured the proper motions, radial velocities, rotational velocities, and chemical abundances of these objects. Regarding the chemical abundances, we do not confirm the unusually high [Ni/Fe] ratio previously reported for Tycho-G. Rather, we find that for all metrics in all stars, none exhibit the characteristics expected from traditional Type Ia supernova single-degenerate-scenario calculations. The only possible exception is Tycho-B, a rare, metal-poor A-type star; however, we are unable to find a suitable scenario for it. Thus, we suggest that SN 1572 cannot be explained by the standard single-degenerate model.

Kerzendorf, Wolfgang E.; Yong, David; Schmidt, Brian P.; Murphy, Simon J.; Bessell, Michael S. [Research School of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Mount Stromlo Observatory, Cotter Road, Weston Creek, ACT 2611 (Australia); Simon, Joshua D. [Observatories of the Carnegie Institution for Science, 813 Santa Barbara Street, Pasadena, CA 91101 (United States); Jeffery, C. Simon [Armagh Observatory, College Hill, Armagh BT61 9DG (United Kingdom); Anderson, Jay [Space Telescope Science Institute, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Podsiadlowski, Philipp [Department of Astrophysics, University of Oxford, Oxford, OX1 3RH (United Kingdom); Gal-Yam, Avishay [Benoziyo Center for Astrophysics, Faculty of Physics, Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovot 76100 (Israel); Silverman, Jeffrey M.; Filippenko, Alexei V. [Department of Astronomy, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720-3411 (United States); Nomoto, Ken'ichi [Kavli Institute for the Physics and Mathematics of the Universe, University of Tokyo, 5-1-5 Kashiwanoha, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8583 (Japan); Venn, Kim A. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Victoria, Elliott Building, 3800 Finnerty Road, Victoria, BC V8P 5C2 (Canada); Foley, Ryan J., E-mail: wkerzend@mso.anu.edu.au [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States)

2013-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

309

Low-mass helium star models for type Ib supernovae - Light curves, mixing, and nucleosynthesis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The applicability of theoretical models of He-star explosions to type Ib SN explosions is explored. Particular attention is given to light curves and mixing, Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities and mixing, and nucleosynthesis and the mass of Ni-56. Typical numerical results are presented in graphs, and it is concluded that the explosions of SN 1983N and SN 1983I can be accurately represented in terms of explosions of He stars with M(alpha) of 3-4 solar mass. A strong M(alpha) dependence of light-curve shape, photospheric velocity, and Ni-56 mass is found. 44 refs.

Shigeyama, Toshikazu; Nomoto, Kenichi; Tsujimoto, Takuji; Hashimoto, Masaki (Tokyo Univ. (Japan) Kyushu Univ., Fukuoka (Japan))

1990-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

OPTICAL AND INFRARED PHOTOMETRY OF THE TYPE Ia SUPERNOVAE 1991T, 1991bg, 1999ek, 2001bt, 2001cn, 2001cz, AND 2002bo  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Vladimir D. Ivanov,10 Wojtek Krzemin´ski,1 Craig Kulesa,11 Patrick McCarthy,12 Amaya Moro-Marti´n,11 Ce´sar the time of B-band maximum. The use of Ám15(B) is now one of many methods used to calibrate absolute mag multicolor technique using a continuous set of multi- color templates with the important additions of a self-calibrated

Moro-Martin, Amaya

311

A Unified Energy-Reservoir Model Containing Contributions from $^{56}$Ni and Neutron Stars and Its Implication to Luminous Type Ic Supernovae  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Most type-Ic core-collapse supernovae (CCSNe) produce $^{56}$Ni and neutron stars (NSs) or black holes (BHs). The dipole radiation of nascent NSs has usually been neglected in explaining supernovae (SNe) with peak absolute magnitude $M_{\\rm peak}$ in any band are $\\gtrsim -19.5$~mag, while the $^{56}$Ni can be neglected in fitting most type-Ic superluminous supernovae (SLSNe Ic) whose $M_{\\rm peak}$ in any band are $\\lesssim -21$~mag, since the luminosity from a magnetar (highly magnetized NS) can outshine that from a moderate amount of $^{56}$Ni. For luminous SNe Ic with $-21 \\lesssim M_{\\rm peak}\\lesssim -19.5$~mag, however, both contributions from $^{56}$Ni and NSs cannot be neglected without serious modeling, since they are not SLSNe and the $^{56}$Ni mass could be up to $\\sim 0.5 M_{\\odot}$. In this paper we propose a unified model that contain contributions from both $^{56}$Ni and a nascent NS. We select three luminous SNe Ic-BL, SN~2010ay, SN~2006nx, and SN~14475, and show that, if these SNe are powere...

Wang, S Q; Dai, Z G; Wu, X F

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

SN 2009js AT THE CROSSROADS BETWEEN NORMAL AND SUBLUMINOUS TYPE IIP SUPERNOVAE: OPTICAL AND MID-INFRARED EVOLUTION  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present a study of SN 2009js in NGC 918. Multi-band Kanata optical photometry covering the first {approx}120 days shows the source to be a Type IIP SN. Reddening is dominated by that due to our Galaxy. One-year-post-explosion photometry with the New Technology Telescope and a Subaru optical spectrum 16 days post-discovery both imply a good match with the well-studied subluminous SN 2005cs. The plateau-phase luminosity of SN 2009js and its plateau duration are more similar to the intermediate luminosity IIP SN 2008in. Thus, SN 2009js shares characteristics with both subluminous and intermediate luminosity supernovae (SNe). Its radioactive tail luminosity lies between SN 2005cs and SN 2008in, whereas its quasi-bolometric luminosity decline from peak to plateau (quantified by a newly defined parameter {Delta}logL, which measures adiabatic cooling following shock breakout) is much smaller than both the others'. We estimate the ejected mass of {sup 56}Ni to be low ({approx}0.007 M{sub Sun }). The SN explosion energy appears to have been small, similar to that of SN 2005cs. SN 2009js is the first subluminous SN IIP to be studied in the mid-infrared. It was serendipitously caught by Spitzer at very early times. In addition, it was detected by WISE 105 days later with a significant 4.6 {mu}m flux excess above the photosphere. The infrared excess luminosity relative to the photosphere is clearly smaller than that of SN 2004dj, which has been extensively studied in the mid-infrared. The excess may be tentatively assigned to heated dust with mass {approx}3 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -5} M{sub Sun }, or to CO fundamental emission as a precursor to dust formation.

Gandhi, P. [Institute of Space and Astronautical Science, Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency, 3-1-1 Yoshinodai, chuo-ku, Sagamihara, Kanagawa 252-5210 (Japan); Yamanaka, M.; Itoh, R. [Department of Physical Science, Hiroshima University, Kagamiyama 1-3-1, Higashi-Hiroshima 739-8526 (Japan); Tanaka, M. [National Astronomical Observatory, Mitaka, Tokyo (Japan); Nozawa, T.; Maeda, K.; Moriya, T. J. [Kavli Institute for the Physics and Mathematics of the Universe, University of Tokyo, Kashiwa (Japan); Kawabata, K. S. [Hiroshima Astrophysical Science Center, Hiroshima University, Higashi-Hiroshima, Hiroshima 739-8526 (Japan); Saviane, I. [European Southern Observatory, Alonso de Cordova 3107, Santiago 19 (Chile); Hattori, T. [Subaru Telescope, National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, Hilo, HI 96720 (United States); Sasada, M. [Department of Astronomy, Graduate School of Science, Kyoto University, Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan)

2013-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

313

On the cosmic ray spectrum from type II Supernovae expanding in their red giant presupernova wind  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

While from the energetic point of view SNRs are viable sources of Galactic CRs, the issue of whether they can accelerate protons up to PeV remains unsolved. Here we discuss particle acceleration at the forward shock of SN and discuss the possibility that the escaping particle current may excite a non-resonant instability that in turn leads to the formation of resonant modes confining particles close to the shock and increasing the maximum energy. This mechanism works throughout the expansion of the SN explosion, from the ejecta dominated (ED) to the Sedov-Taylor (ST) phase. Because of their higher explosion rate,we focus on type II SNae expanding in the slow, dense red supergiant wind. When the explosion occurs in such winds, the transition between the ED and the ST phase is likely to take place within a few tens of years. As a result, the spectrum of accelerated particles shows a break in the slope, at the maximum energy (Em) achieved at the beginning of the ST phase. Above this energy, the spectrum becomes ...

Cardillo, Martina; Blasi, Pasquale

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

The Massive Progenitor of the Possible Type II-Linear Supernova 2009hd in Messier 66  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present observations of SN2009hd in the nearby galaxy M66. This SN is one of the closest to us in recent years but heavily obscured by dust, rendering it unusually faint in the optical, given its proximity. We find that the observed properties of SN2009hd support its classification as a possible Type II-L SN, a relatively rare subclass of CC-SNe. High-precision relative astrometry has been employed to attempt to identify a SN progenitor candidate, based on a pixel-by-pixel comparison between HST F555W and F814W images of the SN site prior to explosion and at late times. A progenitor candidate is identified in the F814W images only; this object is undetected in F555W. Significant uncertainty exists in the astrometry, such that we cannot definitively identify this object as the SN progenitor. Via insertion of artificial stars into the pre-SN HST images, we are able to constrain the progenitor's properties to those of a possible supergiant, with M(F555W)0>-7.6 mag and (V-I) 0>0.99 mag. The magnitude and color...

Elias-Rosa, Nancy; Li, Weidong; Silverman, Jeffrey M; Foley, Ryan J; Ganeshalingam, Mohan; Mauerhan, Jon C; Kankare, Erkki; Jha, Saurabh; Filippenko, Alexei V; Beckman, John E; Berger, Edo; Cuillandre, Jean-Charles; Smith, Nathan

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Pair-Production Supernovae: Theory and Observation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

I review the physical properties of pair-production supernovae (PPSNe) as well as the prospects for them to be constrained observationally. In very massive (140-260 solar mass) stars, much of the pressure support comes from the radiation field, meaning that they are loosely bound, with an adiabatic coefficient that is close to the minimum stable value. Near the end of C/O burning, the central temperature increases to the point that photons begin to be converted into electron-positron pairs, softening gamma below this critical value. The result is a runaway collapse, followed by explosive burning that completely obliterates the star. While these explosions can be up to 100 times more energetic that core collapse and Type Ia supernovae, their peak luminosities are only slightly greater. However, due both to copious Ni-56 production and hydrogen recombination, they are brighter much longer, and remain observable for ~ 1 year. Since metal enrichment is a local process, PPSNe should occur in pockets of metal-free gas over a broad range of redshifts, greatly enhancing their detectability, and distributing their nucleosyntehtic products about the Milky Way. This means that measurements of the abundances of metal-free stars should be thought of as directly constraining these objects. It also means that ongoing supernova searches, already provide weak constraints for PPSN models. A survey with the NIRCam instrument on JWST, on the other hand, would be able to extend these limits to z ~ 10. Observing a 0.3 deg^2 patch of sky for one week per year for three consecutive years, such a program would either detect or rule out the existence of these remarkable objects.

Evan Scannapieco

2006-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

316

GRB 020410: A Gamma-ray burst afterglow discovered by its supernova light  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

high-velocity Type Ib/c supernovae such as SN 1998bw. Otherwith the luminous Type Ic supernovae 1998bw (Galama et al.a link between GRBs and supernovae. However GRB 980425 was a

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Discovery of a Supernova Explosion at Half the Age of the Universe and its Cosmological Implications  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ULDA Access Guide No.6: Supernovae (eds Cappellaro, E. ,of light curves of supernovae type 1. Astra. Astrophys.magnitudes of Type la supernovae. Astrophys. J. 413, LI05-

Perlmutter, S.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Optimal Extraction of Cosmological Information from Supernova Data in the Presence of Calibration Uncertainties  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The study of type-la supernovae provided the firstResults from more recent supernovae surveys [5, 6] further8] techniques to turn type-la supernovae into standardized

Kim, Alex G.; Miquel, Ramon

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

A NEW X-RAY VIEW OF THE SUPERNOVA REMNANT G272.2-3.2 AND ITS ENVIRONMENT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present an analysis of Chandra X-Ray Observatory data detailing a Galactic supernova remnant, G272.2-3.2. A clear shell of emission is resolved as a series of filaments and knots around the entire rim of the remnant. Spectral analysis of these features show that they are consistent with shock heating of interstellar material in a clumpy medium. We contrast these X-ray images with 22 {mu}m Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) data to verify this interaction. Spatially separated from the shell we see a central diffuse region dominated by harder, hotter emission. Spatial spectroscopy shows a clear enhancement of metals consistent with a Type Ia explosion, namely S, Si, and Fe. We find no clear evidence for a compact object or pulsar wind nebula and argue for a Type Ia origin. Consideration of the ionization timescales suggest an age of 11,000 yr for G272.2-3.2.

McEntaffer, R. L.; Grieves, N.; DeRoo, C.; Brantseg, T., E-mail: randall-mcentaffer@uiowa.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA 52242 (United States)

2013-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

320

Snacktime for Hungry Black Holes: Theoretical Studies of the Tidal Disruption of Stars  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

law tail . . . . . . . 3.5 Rates of supernovae close to thein color to be Type Ia supernovae, gamma-ray bursts, or AGN.Type II supernovae (bluer than Type Ia’s) are not expected

Strubbe, Linda Elisabeth

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "type ia supernovae" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

The Nuclear Equation of State and Supernovae James M. Lattimer  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

type of supernova is powered by thermonuclear energy. This type of event involves the end product will be devoted to them. We will point out, however, that because thermonuclear supernovae occur from a quite

Lattimer, James M.

322

What We Know About Dark Energy From Supernovae  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

The measured distances of type Ia (white dwarf) supernovae as a function of redshift (z) have shown that the expansion of the Universe is currently accelerating, probably due to the presence of dark energy (X) having a negative pressure. Combining all of the data with existing results from large-scale structure surveys, we find a best fit for Omega M and Omega X of 0.28 and 0.72 (respectively), in excellent agreement with the values derived independently from WMAP measurements of the cosmic microwave background radiation. Thus far, the best-fit value for the dark energy equation-of-state parameter is -1, and its first derivative is consistent with zero, suggesting that the dark energy may indeed be Einstein's cosmological constant.

Alex Filippenko

2010-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

323

PROBING THE LOW-REDSHIFT STAR FORMATION RATE AS A FUNCTION OF METALLICITY THROUGH THE LOCAL ENVIRONMENTS OF TYPE II SUPERNOVAE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Type II supernovae (SNe) can be used as a star formation tracer to probe the metallicity distribution of global low-redshift star formation. We present oxygen and iron abundance distributions of Type II SN progenitor regions that avoid many previous sources of bias. Because iron abundance, rather than oxygen abundance, is of key importance for the late stage evolution of the massive stars that are the progenitors of core-collapse supernovae, and because iron enrichment lags oxygen enrichment, we find a general conversion from oxygen abundance to iron abundance. The distributions we present here are the best yet observational standard of comparison for evaluating how different classes of supernovae depend on progenitor metallicity. We spectroscopically measure the gas-phase oxygen abundance near a representative subsample of the hosts of Type II SNe from the first-year Palomar Transient Factory (PTF) SN search, using a combination of Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) spectra near the SN location (9 hosts) and new longslit spectroscopy (25 hosts). The median metallicity of these 34 hosts at or near the SN location is 12+log(O/H) = 8.65, with a median error of 0.09. The median host galaxy stellar mass from fits to SDSS photometry is 10{sup 9.9} M{sub Sun }. They do not show a systematic offset in metallicity or mass from a redshift-matched sample of the MPA/JHU value-added catalog. In contrast to previous SN host metallicity studies, this sample is drawn from a single survey. It is also drawn from an areal rather than a targeted survey, so SNe in the lowest-mass galaxies are not systematically excluded. Indeed, the PTF SN search has a slight bias toward following up transients in low mass galaxies. The progenitor region metallicity distribution we find is statistically indistinguishable from the metallicity distribution of Type II SN hosts found by targeted surveys and by samples from multiple surveys with different selection functions. Using the relationship between iron and oxygen abundances found for Milky Way disk, bulge, and halo stars, we translate our distribution of Type II SN environments as a function of oxygen abundance into an estimate of the iron abundance, since iron varies more steeply than oxygen. We find that though this sample spans only 0.65 dex in oxygen abundance, the gap between the iron and oxygen abundance is 50% wider at the low-metallicity end of our sample than at the high-metallicity end.

Stoll, R.; Stanek, K. Z.; Pogge, R. W. [Department of Astronomy, Ohio State University, 140 West 18th Avenue, Columbus, OH 43210-1173 (United States); Prieto, J. L. [Department of Astrophysical Sciences, Princeton University, 4 Ivy Lane, Peyton Hall, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States)

2013-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

324

Supernova constraints on multi-coupled dark energy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The persisting consistency of ever more accurate observational data with the predictions of the standard ?CDM cosmological model puts severe constraints on possible alternative scenarios, but still does not shed any light on the fundamental nature of the cosmic dark sector. As large deviations from a ?CDM cosmology are ruled out by data, the path to detect possible features of alternative models goes necessarily through the definition of cosmological scenarios that leave almost unaffected the background and — to a lesser extent — the linear perturbations evolution of the universe. In this context, the Multi-coupled DE (McDE) model was proposed by Baldi [9] as a particular realization of an interacting Dark Energy field characterized by an effective screening mechanism capable of suppressing the effects of the coupling at the background and linear perturbation level. In the present paper, for the first time, we challenge the McDE scenario through a direct comparison with real data, in particular with the luminosity distance of Type Ia supernovae. By studying the existence and stability conditions of the critical points of the associated background dynamical system, we select only the cosmologically consistent solutions, and confront their background expansion history with data. Confirming previous qualitative results, the McDE scenario appears to be fully consistent with the adopted sample of Type Ia supernovae, even for coupling values corresponding to an associated scalar fifth-force about four orders of magnitude stronger than standard gravity. Our analysis demonstrates the effectiveness of the McDE background screening, and shows some new non-trivial asymptotic solutions for the future evolution of the universe. Clearly, linear perturbation data and, even more, nonlinear structure formation properties are expected to put much tighter constraints on the allowed coupling range. Nonetheless, our results show how the background expansion history might be highly insensitive to the fundamental nature and to the internal complexity of the dark sector.

Piloyan, Arpine [Yerevan State University, Alex Manoogian 1, Yerevan 0025 (Armenia); Marra, Valerio; Amendola, Luca [Institut für Theoretische Physik, Universität Heidelberg, Philosophenweg 16, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Baldi, Marco, E-mail: arpine.piloyan@ysu.am, E-mail: valerio.marra@me.com, E-mail: marco.baldi5@unibo.it, E-mail: l.amendola@thphys.uni-heidelberg.de [Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Università di Bologna, Viale C. Berti-Pichat 6/2, I-40127, Bologna (Italy)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

A Super-Solar Metallicity for the Progenitor of Kepler's Supernova  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We have performed deep X-ray observations of the remnant of Kepler's supernova (SN 1604) as a Key Project of the Suzaku Observatory. Our main goal is to detect secondary Fe-peak elements in the SN ejecta to gain insights into the Type Ia supernova explosion mechanism and the nature of the progenitor. Here we report our initial results. We made a conclusive detection of X-ray emission lines from highly ionized Mn, Cr, and Ni as well as Fe. The observed Mn-to-Cr line flux ratio is ~0.60, ~30% larger than that measured in Tycho's remnant. We estimate a Mn-to-Cr mass ratio of ~0.77, which is strongly suggestive of a large neutron excess in the progenitor star before the onset of the thermonuclear runaway. The observed Ni-to-Fe line flux ratio (~0.03) corresponds to a mass ratio of ~0.06, which is generally consistent with the products of explosive Si-burning regime in Type Ia explosion models, and rules out contamination from the products of neutron-rich nuclear statistical equilibrium in the shocked ejecta. Toge...

Park, Sangwook; Mori, Koji; Kaida, Ryohei; Bravo, Eduardo; Schenck, Andrew; Eriksen, Kristoffer A; Hughes, John P; Slane, Patrick O; Burrows, David N; Lee, Jae-Joon

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Hubble's variable parameter: The long and short of it  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

supernovae Key project Type Ia supernovae Globular clustersType I supernovae Gravitational lensing Surface brightnessratio” method) Type Ia supernovae method 75 f 8 47 f 7 87.3

Trimble, V

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Tycho Brahe's supernova: light from centuries past  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The light curve of SN 1572 is described in the terms used nowadays to characterize SNeIa. By assembling the records of the observations done in 1572--74 and evaluating their uncertainties, it is possible to recover the light curve and the color evolution of this supernova. It is found that, within the SNe Ia family, the event should have been a SNIa with a normal rate of decline, its stretch factor being {\\it s} $\\sim$ 0.9. Visual light curve near maximum, late--time decline and the color evolution sustain this conclusion. After correcting for extinction, the luminosity of this supernova is found to be M$_{V}$ $=$ --19.58 --5 log (D/3.5 kpc) $\\pm$ 0.42.

Pilar Ruiz-Lapuente

2003-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

328

Tycho Brahe's supernova: light from centuries past  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The light curve of SN 1572 is described in the terms used nowadays to characterize SNeIa. By assembling the records of the observations done in 1572--74 and evaluating their uncertainties, it is possible to recover the light curve and the color evolution of this supernova. It is found that, within the SNe Ia family, the event should have been a SNIa with a normal rate of decline, its stretch factor being {\\it s} $\\sim$ 0.9. Visual light curve near maximum, late--time decline and the color evolution sustain this conclusion. After correcting for extinction, the luminosity of this supernova is found to be M$_{V}$ $=$ --19.58 --5 log (D/3.5 kpc) $\\pm$ 0.42.

Ruiz-Lapuente, P

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Supernovae. Part II: The aftermath  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

R. Viswanathan, 1980, As- Supernovae. Part II ExperimentalSmith, 1982, Astrophys. Supernovae. Chevalier, R. A. , andC. B. , 1974, Ed. , Supernovae and Supernova Rem- nants,

Trimble, V

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

The farthest known supernova: Support for an accelerating universeand a glimpse of the epoch of deceleration  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present photometric observations of an apparent Type Iasupernova (SN Ia) at a redshift of approximately 1.7, the farthest SNobserved to date. The supernova, SN 1997, was discovered in a repeatobservation by the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) of the Hubble DeepField{North (HDF-N), and serendipitously monitored with NICMOS on HSTthroughout the Thompson et al. GTO campaign. The SN type can bedetermined from the host galaxy type: an evolved, red elliptical lackingenough recent star formation to provide a significant population ofcore-collapse supernovae. The classification is further supported bydiagnostics available from the observed colors and temporal behavior ofthe SN, both of which match a typical SN Ia. The photometric record ofthe SN includes a dozen flux measurements in the I, J, and H bandsspanning 35 days in the observed frame. The redshift derived from the SNphotometry, z = 1:7 plus or minus 0:1, is in excellent agreement with theredshift estimate of z = 1:65 plus or minus 0:15 derived from the U_300B_450 V_-606 I_814 J_110 J_125 H_160 H_165 K_s photometry of the galaxy.Optical and near-infrared spectra of the host provide a very tentativespectroscopic redshift of 1.755. Fits to observations of the SN provideconstraints for the redshift-distance relation of SNe Ia and a powerfultest of the current accelerating Universe hypothesis. The apparent SNbrightness is consistent with that expected in the decelerating phase ofthe preferred cosmological model, Omega_M approximately equal to 1/3;Omega_Lambda approximately equal to 2/3. It is inconsistent with greydust or simple luminosity evolution, candidate astrophysical effectswhich could mimic previous evidence for an accelerating Universe from SNeIa at z approximately equal to 0:5. We consider several sources ofpotential systematic error including gravitational lensing, supernovamisclassification, sample selection bias, and luminosity calibrationerrors. Currently, none of these effects alone appears likely tochallenge our conclusions. Additional SNe Ia at z>1 will be requiredto test more exotic alternatives to the accelerating Universe hypothesisand to probe the nature of dark energy.

Riess, Adam G.; Nugent, Peter E.; Schmidt, Brian P.; Tonry, John; Dickinson, Mark; Gilliland, Ronald L.; Thompson, Rodger I.; Budavari,Tamas; Casertano, Stefano; Evans, Aaron S.; Filippenko, Alexei V.; Livio,Mario; Sanders, David B.; Shapley, Alice E.; Spinrad, Hyron; Steidel,Charles C.; Stern, Daniel; Surace, Jason; Veilleux, Sylvain

2001-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

The magnification of SN 1997ff, the farthest known supernova  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

With a redshift of z {approx} 1.7, SN 1997ff is the most distant type Ia supernova discovered so far. This SN is close to several bright, z = 0.6-0.9 galaxies, and we consider the effects of lensing by those objects on the magnitude of SN 1997ff. We estimate their velocity dispersions using the Tully-Fisher and Faber-Jackson relations corrected for evolution effects, and calculate, applying the multiple-plane lensing formalism, that SN 1997ff is magnified by 0.34{+-}0.12 mag. Due to the spatial configuration of the foreground galaxies, the shear from individual lenses partially cancels out,and the total distortion induced on the host galaxy is considerably smaller than that produced by a single lens having the same magnification. After correction for lensing, the revised distance to SN 1997ff is m-M = 45.49 {+-} 0.34 mag, which improves the agreement with the {Omega}{sub M} = 0.35, {Omega}{Lambda} = 0.65 cosmology expected from lower-redshift SNe Ia, and is inconsistent at the {approx} 3 sigma confidence level with a uniform gray dust model or a simple evolution model.

Benitez, Narciso; Riess, Adam; Nugent, Peter; Dickinson, Mark; Chornock, Ryan; Filippenko, Alexei V.

2002-09-03T23:59:59.000Z

332

Supernova Remnant Progenitor Masses in M31  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Using HST photometry, we age-date 59 supernova remnants (SNRs) in the spiral galaxy M31 and use these ages to estimate zero-age main sequence masses (MZAMS) for their progenitors. To accomplish this, we create color-magnitude diagrams (CMDs) and use CMD fitting to measure the recent star formation history (SFH) of the regions surrounding cataloged SNR sites. We identify any young coeval population that likely produced the progenitor star and assign an age and uncertainty to that population. Application of stellar evolution models allows us to infer the MZAMS from this age. Because our technique is not contingent on precise location of the progenitor star, it can be applied to the location of any known SNR. We identify significant young SF around 53 of the 59 SNRs and assign progenitor masses to these, representing a factor of 2 increase over currently measured progenitor masses. We consider the remaining 6 SNRs as either probable Type Ia candidates or the result of core-collapse progenitors that have escaped ...

Jennings, Zachary G; Murphy, Jeremiah W; Dalcanton, Julianne J; Gilbert, Karoline M; Dolphin, Andrew E; Fouesneau, Morgan; Weisz, Daniel R

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

The Detectability of Pair-Production Supernovae at z < 6  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Nonrotating, zero metallicity stars with initial masses 140 production supernovae (PPSNe), in which an electron-positron pair-production instability triggers explosive nuclear burning. Interest in such stars has been rekindled by recent theoretical studies that suggest primordial molecular clouds preferentially form stars with these masses. Since metal enrichment is a local process, the resulting PPSNe could occur over a broad range of redshifts, in pockets of metal-free gas. Using the implicit hydrodynamics code KEPLER, we have calculated a set of PPSN light curves that addresses the theoretical uncertainties and allows us to assess observational strategies for finding these objects at intermediate redshifts. The peak luminosities of typical PPSNe are only slightly greater than those of Type Ia, but they remain bright much longer (~ 1 year) and have hydrogen lines. Ongoing supernova searches may soon be able to limit the contribution of these very massive stars to < 1% of the total star formation rate density out to z=2 which already provides useful constraints for theoretical models. The planned Joint Dark Energy Mission satellite will be able to extend these limits out to z=6.

Evan Scannapieco; Piero Madau; Stan Woosley; Alexander Heger; Andrea Ferrara

2005-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

334

ELECTRON-CAPTURE SUPERNOVAE AS ORIGIN OF {sup 48}Ca  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We report that electron-capture supernovae (ECSNe), arising from collapsing oxygen-neon-magnesium cores, are a possible source of {sup 48}Ca, whose origin has remained a longstanding puzzle. Our two-dimensional, self-consistent explosion model of an ECSN predicts ejection of neutron-rich matter with electron fractions Y{sub e} Almost-Equal-To 0.40-0.42 and relatively low entropies, s Almost-Equal-To 13-15 k{sub B} per nucleon (k{sub B} is the Boltzmann constant). Post-processing nucleosynthesis calculations result in appreciable production of {sup 48}Ca in such neutron-rich and low-entropy matter during the quasi-nuclear equilibrium and subsequent freezeout phases. The amount of ejected {sup 48}Ca can account for that in the solar inventory when we consider possible uncertainties in the entropies. ECSNe could thus be a site of {sup 48}Ca production in addition to a hypothetical, rare class of high-density Type Ia supernovae.

Wanajo, Shinya [National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, 2-21-1 Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan); Janka, Hans-Thomas; Mueller, Bernhard, E-mail: shinya.wanajo@nao.ac.jp [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Astrophysik, Karl-Schwarzschild-Str. 1, D-85748 Garching (Germany)

2013-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

335

Supernova Sweeping and Black-Hole Feedback in Elliptical Galaxies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Most of the massive elliptical galaxies in the universe stopped forming stars billions of years ago, even though plenty of hot gas remains available for star formation. Here we present compelling evidence indicating that quenching of star formation depends on both black-hole feedback and Type Ia supernova heating. We analyze Chandra X-ray observations of ten massive ellipticals, five with extended, potentially star-forming multiphase gas and five single-phase ellipticals with no star formation. The ratio of cooling time to freefall time at 1--10 kpc in the multiphase galaxies is tc/tff ~10, indicating that precipitation-driven feedback limits cooling but does not eliminate condensation. In the same region of the single-phase galaxies, the radial profiles of gas entropy are consistent with a thermally stable (tc/tff > 20) supernova-driven outflow that sweeps stellar ejecta out of the galaxy. However, in one of those single-phase ellipticals (NGC 4261) we find tc/tff < 10 at < 300 pc. Notably, its jets ar...

Voit, G M; O'Shea, B W; Bryan, G L; Sun, M; Werner, N

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

Detonating Failed Deflagration Model of Thermonuclear Supernovae I. Explosion Dynamics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present a detonating failed deflagration model of Type Ia supernovae. In this model, the thermonuclear explosion of a massive white dwarf follows an off-center deflagration. We conduct a survey of asymmetric ignition configurations initiated at various distances from the stellar center. In all cases studied, we find that only a small amount of stellar fuel is consumed during deflagration phase, no explosion is obtained, and the released energy is mostly wasted on expanding the progenitor. Products of the failed deflagration quickly reach the stellar surface, polluting and strongly disturbing it. These disturbances eventually evolve into small and isolated shock-dominated regions which are rich in fuel. We consider these regions as seeds capable of forming self-sustained detonations that, ultimately, result in the thermonuclear supernova explosion. Preliminary nucleosynthesis results indicate the model supernova ejecta are typically composed of about 0.1-0.25 Msun of silicon group elements, 0.9-1.2 Msun of iron group elements, and are essentially carbon-free. The ejecta have a composite morphology, are chemically stratified, and display a modest amount of intrinsic asymmetry. The innermost layers are slightly egg-shaped with the axis ratio ~1.2-1.3 and dominated by the products of silicon burning. This central region is surrounded by a shell of silicon-group elements. The outermost layers of ejecta are highly inhomogeneous and contain products of incomplete oxygen burning with only small admixture of unburned stellar material. The explosion energies are ~1.3-1.5 10^51 erg.

Tomasz Plewa

2006-11-24T23:59:59.000Z

337

GALEX Detection of Shock Breakout in Type II-P Supernova PS1-13arp: Implications for the Progenitor Star Wind  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present the GALEX detection of a UV burst at the time of explosion of an optically normal Type II-P supernova (PS1-13arp) from the Pan-STARRS1 survey at z=0.1665. The temperature and luminosity of the UV burst match the theoretical predictions for shock breakout in a red supergiant, but with a duration a factor of ~50 longer than expected. We compare the $NUV$ light curve of PS1-13arp to previous GALEX detections of Type IIP SNe, and find clear distinctions that indicate that the UV emission is powered by shock breakout, and not by the subsequent cooling envelope emission previously detected in these systems. We interpret the ~ 1 d duration of the UV signal with a shock breakout in the wind of a red supergiant with a pre-explosion mass-loss rate of ~ 10^-3 Msun yr^-1. This mass-loss rate is enough to prolong the duration of the shock breakout signal, but not enough to produce an excess in the optical plateau light curve or narrow emission lines powered by circumstellar interaction. This detection of non-st...

Gezari, S; Sanders, N E; Soderberg, A M; Hung, T; Heinis, S; Smartt, S J; Rest, A; Scolnic, D; Chornock, R; Berger, E; Foley, R J; Huber, M E; Stubbs, P Price C W; Riess, A G; Kirshner, R P; Smith, K; Wood-Vasey, W M; Schiminovich, D; Martin, D C; Burgett, W S; Chambers, K C; Flewelling, H; Kaiser, N; Tonry, J L; Wainscoat, R

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

IA Blog Archive  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of Energy Power.pdf11-161-LNG | Department ofHTS Cable ProjectsHistoryia/802871 IA Blog Archive en DOE and

339

IA News Archive  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of Energy Power.pdf11-161-LNG | Department ofHTS Cable ProjectsHistoryia/802871 IA Blog Archive en DOE and66

340

Uncorrelated Measurements of the Cosmic Expansion History and Dark Energy from Supernovae  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present a method for measuring the cosmic expansion history H(z) in uncorrelated redshift bins, and apply it to current and simulated type Ia supernova data assuming spatial flatness. If the matter density parameter Omega_m can be accurately measured from other data, then the dark energy density history X(z)=rho_X(z)/rho_X(0) can trivially be derived from this expansion history H(z). In contrast to customary ``black box'' parameter fitting, our method is transparent and easy to interpret: the measurement of H(z)^{-1} in a redshift bin is simply a linear combination of the measured comoving distances for supernovae in that bin, making it obvious how systematic errors propagate from input to output. We find the Riess et al. (2004) ``gold'' sample to be consistent with the ``vanilla'' concordance model where the dark energy is a cosmological constant. We compare two mission concepts for the NASA/DOE Joint Dark Energy Mission (JDEM), the Joint Efficient Dark-energy Investigation (JEDI), and the Supernova Accelaration Probe (SNAP), using simulated data including the effect of weak lensing (based on numerical simulations) and a systematic bias from K-corrections. Estimating H(z) in seven uncorrelated redshift bins, we find that both provide dramatic improvements over current data: JEDI can measure H(z) to about 10% accuracy and SNAP to 30-40% accuracy.

Yun Wang; Max Tegmark

2005-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "type ia supernovae" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

The HI shell G132.6-0.7-25.3: A Supernova Remnant or an Old Wind-Blown Bubble?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Data from the Canadian Galactic Plane Survey reveal an abundance of HI shells and arcs in the disk of our galaxy. While their shape is suggestive of stellar winds or supernovae influence, very few of these structures have been examined in detail thus far. A fine example is an HI shell in the outer Galaxy with no continuum counterpart discovered in the survey's pilot project. Its size and kinematics suggest that it was created by the winds of a single late-type O star which has since evolved off the main sequence or by a supernova explosion. A B1 Ia star at the centre of the shell, in projection, is a possible candidate for energy source if the shell is assumed to be wind-blown. The shell's shape implies a surprisingly small scale height of less than about 30 pc for the surrounding gas if the elongation is due to evolution in a density gradient.

Magdalen Normandeau; A. R. Taylor; P. E. Dewdney; Shantanu Basu

2000-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

342

Young Collapsed Supernova Remnants: Similarities and Differences in Neutron Stars, Black Holes, and More Exotic Objects  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Type Ia supernovae are thought to explode completely, leaving no condensed remnant, only an expanding shell. Other types of supernovae are thought to involve core collapse and are expected to leave a condensed remnant, which could be either a neutron star or a black hole, or just possibly, something more exotic, such as a quark orstrange star, a naked singularity, a frozen star, a wormhole or a red hole. It has proven surprisingly difficult to determine which type of condensed remnant has been formed in those cases where the diagnostic highly regular pulsar signature of a neutron star is absent. We consider possible observational differences between the two standard candidates, as well as the more speculative alternatives. We classify condensed remnants according to whether they do or do not possess three major features: 1)a hard surface, 2)an event horizon, and 3)a singularity. Black holes and neutron stars differ on all three criteria. Some of the less frequently considered alternatives are "intermediate," in the sense that they possess some of the traits of a black hole and some of the traits of a neutron star. This possibility makes distinguishing the various possibilities even more difficult.

James S. Graber

2000-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

343

Supernova/Acceleration Probe: A Satellite Experiment to Study the Nature of the Dark Energy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Supernova/Acceleration Probe (SNAP) is a proposed space-based experiment designed to study the dark energy and alternative explanations of the acceleration of the Universes expansion by performing a series of complementary systematics-controlled astrophysical measurements. We here describe a self-consistent reference mission design that can accomplish this goal with the two leading measurement approaches being the Type Ia supernova Hubble diagram and a wide-area weak gravitational lensing survey. This design has been optimized to first order and is now under study for further modification and optimization. A 2-m three-mirror anastigmat wide-field telescope feeds a focal plane consisting of a 0.7 square-degree imager tiled with equal areas of optical CCDs and near infrared sensors, and a high efficiency low-resolution integral field spectrograph. The instrumentation suite provides simultaneous discovery and light-curve measurements of supernovae and then can target individual objects for detailed spectral characterization. The SNAP mission will discover thousands of Type Ia supernovae out to z = 3 and will obtain high-signal-to-noise calibrated light-curves and spectra for a subset of > 2000 supernovae at redshifts between z = 0.1 and 1.7 in a northern field and in a southern field. A wide-field survey covering one thousand square degrees in both northern and southern fields resolves {approx} 100 galaxies per square arcminute, or a total of more than 300 million galaxies. With the PSF stability afforded by a space observatory, SNAP will provide precise and accurate measurements of gravitational lensing. The high-quality data available in space, combined with the large sample of supernovae, will enable stringent control of systematic uncertainties. The resulting data set will be used to determine the energy density of dark energy and parameters that describe its dynamical behavior. The data also provide a direct test of theoretical models for the dark energy, including discrimination of vacuum energy due to the cosmological constant and various classes of dynamical scalar fields. If we assume we live in a cosmological-constant-dominated Universe, the matter density, dark energy density, and flatness of space can all be measured with SNAP supernova and weak-lensing measurements to a systematics-limited accuracy of 1 percent. For a flat universe, the density-to-pressure ratio of dark energy or equation of state w(z) can be similarly measured to 5 percent for the present value w0 and {approx} 0.1 for the time variation w' is defined as dw/d ln a bar z = 1. For a fiducial SUGRA-inspired universe, w0 and w' can be measured to an even tighter uncertainty of 0.03 and 0.06 respectively. Note that no external priors are needed. As more accurate theoretical predictions for the small-scale weak-lensing shear develop, the conservative estimates adopted here for space-based systematics should improve, allowing even tighter constraints. While the survey strategy is tailored for supernova and weak gravitational lensing observations, the large survey area, depth, spatial resolution, time-sampling, and nine-band optical to NIR photometry will support additional independent and/or complementary dark-energy measurement approaches as well as a broad range of auxiliary science programs.

Aldering, G.; Althouse, W.; Amanullah, R.; Annis, J.; Astier, P.; Baltay, C.; Barrelet, E.; Basa, E.; Bebek, C.; Bergstrom, L.; Bernstein, G.; Bester, M.; Bigelow, C.; Blandford, R.; Bohlin, R.; Bonissent, A.; Bower, C.; Brown, M.; Campbell, M.; Carithers, W.; Commins, E.; Craig, W.; Day, C.; DeJongh, F.; Deustua, S.; Diehl, T.; Dodelson, S.; Ealet, A.; Ellis, R.; Emmet, W.; Fouchez, D.; Frieman, J.; Fruchter, A.; Gerdes, D.; Gladney, L.; Goldhaber, G.; Goobar, A.; Groom, D.; Heetderks, H.; Hoff, M.; Holland, S.; Huffer, M.; Hui, L.; Huterer, D.; Jain, B.; Jelinsky, P.; Karcher, A.; Kent, S.; Kahn, S.; Kim, A.; Kolbe, W.; Krieger, B.; Kushner, G.; Kuznetsova, N.; Lafever, R.; Lamoureux, J.; Lampton, M.; Le Fevre, O.; Levi, M.; Limon, P.; Lin, H.; Linder, E.; Loken, S.; Lorenzon, W.; Malina, R.; Marriner, J.; Marshall, P.; Massey, R.; Mazure, A.; McKay, T.; McKee, S.; Miquel, R.; Morgan, N.; Mortsell, E.; Mostek, N.; Mufson, S.; Musser, J.; Nugent, P.; Oluseyi, H.; Pain, R.; Palaio, N.; Pankow, D.; Peoples, J.; Perlmutter, S.; Prieto, E.; Rabinowitz, D.; Refregier, A.; Rhodes, J.; Roe, N.; Rusin, D.; Scarpine, V.; Schubnell, M.; Sholl, M.; Samdja, G.; Smith, R.M.; Smoot, G.; Snyder, J.; Spadafora, A.; Stebbine, A.; Stoughton, C.; Szymkowiak, A.; Tarle, G.; Taylor, K.; Tilquin, A.; Tomasch, A.; Tucker, D.; Vincent, D.; von der Lippe, H.; Walder, J-P.; Wang, G.; Wester, W.

2004-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

344

CRD Report  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

cosmology, from supernovae to dark energy Increase ins. The study of Type Ia supernovae marks the other key areathe universe. These supernovae are fundamental in measuring

Wang, Ucilia

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Astrophysics in 2006  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

· Active galaxies · Supernovae 1 Introduction Astrophysicsproduction by Type Ia supernovae, and so large values of [?/from local events like supernovae and pulsars (Goldreich and

Trimble, V; Aschwanden, MJ; Hansen, CJ

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

Sunfall: a collaborative visual analytics system for astrophysics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

from 42 High-Redshift Supernovae Astrophys. J. 519 565-Observational Evidence from Supernovae for an AcceleratingProgenitors of Type Ia Supernovae (Ph.D. dissertation, Univ.

Aragon, Cecilia R.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

PTF11iqb: Cool supergiant mass loss that bridges the gap between Type IIn and normal supernovae  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PTF11iqb was initially classified as a TypeIIn event caught very early after explosion. It showed narrow Wolf-Rayet (WR) spectral features on day 2, but the narrow emission weakened quickly and the spectrum morphed to resemble those of Types II-L and II-P. At late times, Halpha emission exhibited a complex, multipeaked profile reminiscent of SN1998S. In terms of spectroscopic evolution, we find that PTF11iqb was a near twin of SN~1998S, although with weaker interaction with circumstellar material (CSM) at early times, and stronger CSM interaction at late times. We interpret the spectral changes as caused by early interaction with asymmetric CSM that is quickly (by day 20) enveloped by the expanding SN ejecta photosphere, but then revealed again after the end of the plateau when the photosphere recedes. The light curve can be matched with a simple model for weak CSM interaction added to the light curve of a normal SN~II-P. This plateau requires that the progenitor had an extended H envelope like a red supergia...

Smith, Nathan; Cenko, S Bradley; Kasliwal, Mansi M; Silverman, Jeffrey M; Filippenko, Alexei V; Gal-Yam, Avishay; Clubb, Kelsey I; Graham, Melissa L; Leonard, Douglas C; Horst, J Chuck; Williams, G Grant; Andrews, Jennifer E; Kulkarni, Shrinivas R; Nugent, Peter; Sullivan, Mark; Maguire, Kate; Xu, Dong; Ben-Ami, Sagi

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Hot Coal for Christmas: Dust Formation in the Swept-Up Shell Around The Peculiar Type Ib Supernova 2006jc  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present evidence for the formation of dust grains in an unusual Type Ib SN based on late-time spectra of SN 2006jc. The progenitor suffered a giant outburst qualitatively similar to those seen in LBVs just 2 years prior to the SN, and we speculate that the dust formation we observe is an indirect consequence of that event. The key evidence for dust formation seen in our optical spectra is (1) the appearance of a strong continuum emission source at red wavelengths, and (2) fading of the redshifted sides of narrow HeI emission lines. These two observed characteristics provide the strongest case yet for dust formation in any Type Ib/c SN. Both developments occurred simultaneously between 51 and 75 days after peak brightness, which is quick compared to other dusty SNe. The high temperature of the dust implies carbon and not silicates, and we describe how infrared photometry may test this conjecture. Geometric considerations indicate dust formation occurring in the dense gas swept-up by the forward shock, and n...

Smith, Nathan; Filippenko, Alexei V

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

DISCOVERY AND EARLY MULTI-WAVELENGTH MEASUREMENTS OF THE ENERGETIC TYPE IC SUPERNOVA PTF12GZK: A MASSIVE-STAR EXPLOSION IN A DWARF HOST GALAXY  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present the discovery and extensive early-time observations of the Type Ic supernova (SN) PTF12gzk. Our light curves show a rise of 0.8 mag within 2.5 hr. Power-law fits (f(t){proportional_to}(t - t{sub 0}) {sup n}) to these data constrain the explosion date to within one day. We cannot rule out a quadratic fireball model, but higher values of n are possible as well for larger areas in the fit parameter space. Our bolometric light curve and a dense spectral sequence are used to estimate the physical parameters of the exploding star and of the explosion. We show that the photometric evolution of PTF12gzk is slower than that of most SNe Ic. The high ejecta expansion velocities we measure ({approx}30, 000 km s{sup -1} derived from line minima four days after explosion) are similar to the observed velocities of broad-lined SNe Ic associated with gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) rather than to normal SN Ic velocities. Yet, this SN does not show the persistent broad lines that are typical of broad-lined SNe Ic. The host-galaxy characteristics are also consistent with GRB-SN hosts, and not with normal SN Ic hosts. By comparison with the spectroscopically similar SN 2004aw, we suggest that the observed properties of PTF12gzk indicate an initial progenitor mass of 25-35 M{sub Sun} and a large ((5-10) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 51} erg) kinetic energy, the later being close to the regime of GRB-SN properties.

Ben-Ami, Sagi; Gal-Yam, Avishay; Yaron, Ofer; Arcavi, Iair [Department of Particle Physics and Astrophysics, The Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovot 76100 (Israel); Filippenko, Alexei V.; Cenko, S. Bradley [Department of Astronomy, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720-3411 (United States); Mazzali, Paolo A. [INAF, Osservatorio Astronomico di Padova, Vicolo Osservatorio 5, I-35122 Padova (Italy); Modjaz, Maryam [New York University, Center for Cosmology and Particle Physics, Department of Physics, 4 Washington Place, New York, NY 10003 (United States); Horesh, Assaf; Kulkarni, Shrinivas R.; Perley, Daniel [Cahill Center for Astrophysics, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Howell, D. Andrew; Graham, Melissa L.; Sand, David J. [Las Cumbres Observatory Global Telescope Network, 6740 Cortona Drive, Suite 102, Santa Barbara, CA 93117 (United States); Horst, J. Chuck; Leonard, Douglas C. [Department of Astronomy, San Diego State University, San Diego, CA 92182 (United States); Im, Myunshin; Jeon, Yiseul [CEOU/Astronomy Program, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Pian, Elena [Kavli Institute for Theoretical Physics, Kohn Hall, University of California, Santa Barbara, CA 93106-4030 (United States); Sullivan, Mark, E-mail: sagi.ben-ami@weizmann.ac.il [Department of Physics (Astrophysics), University of Oxford, DWB, Keble Road, Oxford, OX1 3RH (United Kingdom); and others

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

A SUPER-SOLAR METALLICITY FOR THE PROGENITOR OF KEPLER'S SUPERNOVA  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We have performed deep X-ray observations of the remnant of Kepler's supernova (SN 1604) as a Key Project of the Suzaku Observatory. Our main goal is to detect secondary Fe-peak elements in the supernova (SN) ejecta to gain insights into the Type Ia SN explosion mechanism and the nature of the progenitor. Here, we report our initial results. We made a conclusive detection of X-ray emission lines from highly ionized Mn, Cr, and Ni as well as Fe. The observed Mn-to-Cr line flux ratio is {approx}0.60, {approx}30% larger than that measured in Tycho's remnant. We estimate an Mn-to-Cr mass ratio of {approx}0.77, which is strongly suggestive of a large neutron excess in the progenitor star before the onset of the thermonuclear runaway. The observed Ni-to-Fe line flux ratio ({approx}0.03) corresponds to a mass ratio of {approx}0.06, which is generally consistent with the products of the explosive Si-burning regime in Type Ia explosion models, and rules out contamination from the products of neutron-rich nuclear statistical equilibrium in the shocked ejecta. Together with the previously suggested luminous nature of the explosion, these mass ratios provide strong evidence for a super-solar metallicity in the SN progenitor ({approx}3 Z{sub Sun }). Kepler's SN was likely the thermonuclear explosion of a white dwarf formed in the recent past that must have exploded through a relatively prompt channel.

Park, Sangwook; Schenck, Andrew [Department of Physics, University of Texas at Arlington, Box 19059, Arlington, TX 76019 (United States); Badenes, Carles [Department of Physics and Astronomy and Pittsburgh Particle Physics, Astrophysics, and Cosmology Center (PITT-PACC), University of Pittsburgh, 3941 O'Hara Street, Pittsburgh, PA 15260 (United States); Mori, Koji; Kaida, Ryohei [Department of Applied Physics, University of Miyazaki, 1-1 Gakuen Kibana-dai Nishi, Miyazaki 889-2192 (Japan); Bravo, Eduardo [Department Fisica i Enginyeria Nuclear, Univ. Politecnica de Catalunya, Carrer Pere Serra 1-15, E-08173 Sant Cugat del Valles (Spain); Eriksen, Kristoffer A. [XDT-6, Los Alamos National Laboratory, P.O. Box 1663, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Hughes, John P. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Rutgers University, 136 Frelinghuysen Road, Piscataway, NJ 08854-8019 (United States); Slane, Patrick O. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Burrows, David N. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Pennsylvania State University, 525 Davey Laboratory, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Lee, Jae-Joon, E-mail: s.park@uta.edu, E-mail: badenes@pitt.edu [Korea Astronomy and Space Science Institute, Daejeon 305-348 (Korea, Republic of)

2013-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

351

A Comparative Analysis of the Supernova Legacy Survey Sample with {\\Lambda}CDM and the $R_{\\rm h}=ct$ Universe  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The use of Type~Ia SNe has thus far produced the most reliable measurement of the expansion history of the Universe, suggesting that $\\Lambda$CDM offers the best explanation for the redshift--luminosity distribution observed in these events. But the analysis of other kinds of source, such as cosmic chronometers, gamma ray bursts, and high-$z$ quasars, conflicts with this conclusion, indicating instead that the constant expansion rate implied by the $R_{\\rm h}=ct$ Universe is a better fit to the data. The central difficulty with the use of Type~Ia SNe as standard candles is that one must optimize three or four nuisance parameters characterizing supernova luminosities simultaneously with the parameters of an expansion model. Hence in comparing competing models, one must reduce the data independently for each. We carry~out such a comparison of $\\Lambda$CDM and the $R_{\\rm h}=ct$ Universe, using the Supernova Legacy Survey (SNLS) sample of 252 SN~events, and show that each model fits its individually reduced data...

Wei, Jun-Jie; Melia, Fulvio; Maier, Robert S

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Towards a Cosmological Hubble Diagram for Type II-PSupernovae  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present the first high-redshift Hubble diagram for Type II-P supernovae (SNe II-P) based upon five events at redshift upto z {approx}0.3. This diagram was constructed using photometry from the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope Supernova Legacy Survey and absorption line spectroscopy from the Keck observatory. The method used to measure distances to these supernovae is based on recent work by Hamuy&Pinto (2002) and exploits a correlation between the absolute brightness of SNeII-P and the expansion velocities derived from the minimum of the Fe II 516.9 nm P-Cygni feature observed during the plateau phases. We present three refinements to this method which significantly improve the practicality of measuring the distances of SNe II-P at cosmologically interesting redshifts. These are an extinction correction measurement based on the V-I colors at day 50, across-correlation measurement for the expansion velocity and the ability to extrapolate such velocities accurately over almost the entire plateau phase. We apply this revised method to our dataset of high-redshift SNe II-P and find that the resulting Hubble diagram has a scatter of only 0.26 magnitudes, thus demonstrating the feasibility of measuring the expansion history, with present facilities, using a method independent of that based upon supernovae of Type Ia.

Nugent, Peter; Sullivan, Mark; Ellis, Richard; Gal-Yam, Avishay; Leonard, Douglas C.; Howell, D. Andrew; Astier, Pierre; Carlberg, RaymondG.; Conley, Alex; Fabbro, Sebastien; Fouchez, Dominique; Neill, James D.; Pain, Reynald; Perrett, Kathy; Pritchet, Chris J; Regnault, Nicolas

2006-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

353

Nuclear astrophysics of supernovae  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this paper, I'll give a general introduction to Supernova Theory, beginning with the presupernova evolution and ending with the later stages of the explosion. This will be distilled from a colloquium type of talk. It is necessary to have the whole supernova picture in one's mind's eye when diving into some of its nooks and crannies, as it is quite a mess of contradictory ingredients. We will have some discussion of supernova 1987a, but will keep our discussion more general. Second, we'll look at the infall and bounce of the star, seeing why it goes unstable, what dynamics it follows as it collapses, and how and why it bounces back. From there, we will go on to look at the equation of state (EOS) in more detail. We'll consider the cases T = 0 and T > 0. We'll focus on /rho/ < /rho//sub 0/, and then /rho/ > /rho//sub 0/ and the EOS of neutron stars, and whether or not they contain cores of strange matter. There are many things we could discuss here and not enough time. If I had more lectures, the remaining time would focus on two more questions of special interest to nuclear physicists: the electron capture reactions and neutrino transport. If time permitted, we'd have some discussion of the nucleosynthetic reactions in the explosion's debris as well. However, we cannot cover such material adequately, and I have chosen these topics because they are analytically tractable, pedagogically useful, and rather important. 23 refs., 14 figs., 3 tabs.

Cooperstein, J.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Study of Supernovae Important for Cosmology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The dense shell method for the determination of distances to type IIn supernovae has been briefly reviewed. Applying our method to SN 2006gy, SN 2009ip, and SN 2010jl supernovae, we have obtained distances in excellent agreement with the previously known distances to the parent galaxies. The dense shell method is based on the radiation hydrodynamic model of a supernova. The method of the blackbody model, as well as the correctness of its application for simple estimates of distances from observation data, has been justified.

Baklanov, P V; Potashov, M Sh; Dolgov, A D

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

Magnitude-Redshift Relation for SNe Ia, Time Dilation, and Plasma Redshift  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We have previously shown that the type Ia supernovae data by Riess et al. match the prediction of the magnitude-redshift relation in the plasma-redshift cosmology. In this article, we also show that the recent SNLS data, which have a slightly narrower distribution as reported by Astier et al. in 2005, match the predictions of the plasma-redshift cosmology. The standard deviation of the SNLS-magnitude from the predicted curve is only about 0.14. The data indicate that there is no cosmic time dilation. The big-bang cosmology therefore appears false. The plasma redshift, which follows from exact evaluation of photons interaction with hot sparse electron plasma, leads to a quasi-static, infinite, and everlasting universe. It does not need big bang, dark energy, or dark matter for describing the observations. It predicts intrinsic redshifts of galaxies consistent with what is observed. The Hubble constant that best fits the SNLS data is about 63 km per sec per Mpc. This corresponds to an average electron density of about 0.0002 per cubic centimeter in intergalactic space. This density together with the plasma redshift heating to an average plasma temperature in intergalactic space of about 3 million K explains the observed isotropic cosmic microwave background (CMB) and the cosmic X-ray background.

Ari Brynjolfsson

2006-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

356

From SupernovaeFrom Supernovae to Inflationto Inflation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

From SupernovaeFrom Supernovae to Inflationto Inflation Katsuhiko SatoKatsuhiko Sato 1)Department.4. NucleosynthesisNucleosynthesis in supernovaein supernovae II.II. ParticleParticle cosmologycosmology andand Early

Yamamoto, Hirosuke

357

Neutrino flavor transformation in core-collapse supernovae  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in Supernovae . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Collapse Supernovae . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Mechanisms of Core-Collapse Supernovae: Simulation Results

Cherry, John F.; Cherry, John F.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

Supernovae. Part I: The events  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Barkat, Z. , 1977, in Supernovae, edited by D. N. Schramm {Sci. Rev. 27, Canal, Supernovae. R. A. , 1981f, in NATO81.C. B. , Ed. , 1974, Supernovae and Their Remnants,

Trimble, V

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Acquiring information about neutrino parameters by detecting supernova neutrinos  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We consider the supernova shock effects, the Mikheyev-Smirnov-Wolfenstein effects, the collective effects, and the Earth matter effects in the detection of type II supernova neutrinos on the Earth. It is found that the event number of supernova neutrinos depends on the neutrino mass hierarchy, the neutrino mixing angle {theta}{sub 13}, and neutrino masses. Therefore, we propose possible methods to identify the mass hierarchy and acquire information about {theta}{sub 13} and neutrino masses by detecting supernova neutrinos. We apply these methods to some current neutrino experiments.

Huang, Ming-Yang; Guo, Xin-Heng [College of Nuclear Science and Technology, Beijing Normal University, Beijing 100875 (China); Young, Bing-Lin [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Iowa State University, Ames, Iowa 5001 (United States); Institute of Theoretical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China)

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Earth Matter Effects in Detection of Supernova Neutrinos  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We calculated the matter effect, including both the Earth and supernova, on the detection of neutrinos from type II supernovae at the proposed Daya Bay reactor neutrino experiment. It is found that apart from the dependence on the flip probability P_H inside the supernova and the mass hierarchy of neutrinos, the amount of the Earth matter effect depends on the direction of the incoming supernova neutrinos, and reaches the biggest value when the incident angle of neutrinos is around 93^\\circ. In the reaction channel \\bar{\

X. -H. Guo; Bing-Lin Young

2006-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "type ia supernovae" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Massive binaries, Wolf-Rayet stars and supernova progenitors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Binary stars are important for a full understanding of stellar evolution. We present a summary of how predictions of the relative supernova rates varies between single and binary stars. We also show how the parameter space of different supernova types differs between single and binary stars. We then consider an important question of how to infer a supernova progenitor's properties from pre-explosion imaging and present rescent work of producing synthe tic colours for our stellar models to make a direct comparison with any detections or limits obtained on supernova progentiors from pre-explosion images.

J. J. Eldridge

2006-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

362

SUPERNOVA REMNANT PROGENITOR MASSES IN M31  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Using Hubble Space Telescope photometry, we age-date 59 supernova remnants (SNRs) in the spiral galaxy M31 and use these ages to estimate zero-age main-sequence masses (M{sub ZAMS}) for their progenitors. To accomplish this, we create color-magnitude diagrams (CMDs) and employ CMD fitting to measure the recent star formation history of the regions surrounding cataloged SNR sites. We identify any young coeval population that likely produced the progenitor star, then assign an age and uncertainty to that population. Application of stellar evolution models allows us to infer the M{sub ZAMS} from this age. Because our technique is not contingent on identification or precise location of the progenitor star, it can be applied to the location of any known SNRs. We identify significant young star formation around 53 of the 59 SNRs and assign progenitor masses to these, representing a factor of {approx}2 increase over currently measured progenitor masses. We consider the remaining six SNRs as either probable Type Ia candidates or the result of core-collapse progenitors that have escaped their birth sites. In general, the distribution of recovered progenitor masses is bottom-heavy, showing a paucity of the most massive stars. If we assume a single power-law distribution, dN/dM{proportional_to}M{sup {alpha}}, then we find a distribution that is steeper than a Salpeter initial mass function (IMF) ({alpha} = -2.35). In particular, we find values of {alpha} outside the range -2.7 {>=} {alpha} {>=} -4.4 to be inconsistent with our measured distribution at 95% confidence. If instead we assume a distribution that follows a Salpeter IMF up to some maximum mass, then we find that values of M{sub Max} > 26 are inconsistent with the measured distribution at 95% confidence. In either scenario, the data suggest that some fraction of massive stars may not explode. The result is preliminary and requires more SNRs and further analysis. In addition, we use our distribution to estimate a minimum mass for core collapse between 7.0 and 7.8 M{sub Sun }.

Jennings, Zachary G.; Williams, Benjamin F.; Dalcanton, Julianne J.; Gilbert, Karoline M.; Fouesneau, Morgan; Weisz, Daniel R. [Department of Astronomy, University of Washington Seattle, Box 351580, WA 98195 (United States); Murphy, Jeremiah W. [Department of Astrophysical Sciences, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States); Dolphin, Andrew E., E-mail: zachjenn@uw.edu, E-mail: adolphin@raytheon.com [Raytheon, 1151 East Hermans Road, Tucson, AZ 85706 (United States)

2012-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

363

Spallation reactions in shock waves at supernova explosions and related problems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The isotopic anomalies of some extinct radionuclides testify to the outburst of a nearby supernova just before the collapse of the protosolar nebula, and to the fact that the supernova was Sn Ia, i.e. the carbon-detonation supernova. A key role of spallation reactions in the formation of isotopic anomalies in the primordial matter of the Solar System is revealed. It is conditioned by the diffusive acceleration of particles in the explosive shock waves, which leads to the amplification of rigidity of the energy spectrum of particles and its enrichment with heavier ions. The quantitative calculations of such isotopic anomalies of many elements are presented. It is well-grounded that the anomalous Xe-HL in meteoritic nanodiamonds was formed simultaneously with nanodiamonds themselves during the shock wave propagation at the Sn Ia explosion. The possible effects of shock wave fractionation of noble gases in the atmosphere of planets are considered. The origin of light elements Li, Be and B in spallation reactions, predicted by Fowler in the middle of the last century, is argued. All the investigated isotopic anomalies give the evidence for the extremely high magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) conditions at the initial stage of free expansion of the explosive shock wave from Sn Ia, which can be essential in solution of the problem of origin of cosmic rays. The specific iron-enriched matter of Sn Ia and its MHD-separation in turbulent processes must be taking into account in the models of origin of the Solar System.

Ustinova, G. K., E-mail: ustinova@dubna.net.ru [RAS, V.I. Vernadsky Institute of Geochemistry and Analytical Chemistry (Russian Federation)

2013-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

364

Hydrodynamical evolution of merging carbon-oxygen white dwarfs: their pre-supernova structure and observational counterparts  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We perform smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) simulations for merging binary carbon-oxygen (CO) white dwarfs (WDs) with masses of $1.1$ and $1.0$ $M_\\odot$, until the merger remnant reaches a dynamically steady state. Using these results, we assess whether the binary could induce a thermonuclear explosion, and whether the explosion could be observed as a type Ia supernova (SN Ia). We investigate three explosion mechanisms: a helium-ignition following the dynamical merger (`helium-ignited violent merger model'), a carbon-ignition (`carbon-ignited violent merger model'), and an explosion following the formation of the Chandrasekhar mass WD (`Chandrasekhar mass model'). An explosion of the helium-ignited violent merger model is possible, while we predict that the resulting SN ejecta are highly asymmetric since its companion star is fully intact at the time of the explosion. The carbon-ignited violent merger model can also lead to an explosion. However, the envelope of the exploding WD spreads out to $\\sim 0.1...

Tanikawa, Ataru; Sato, Yushi; Nomoto, Ken'ichi; Maeda, Keiichi; Hachisu, Izumi

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

Optical Observations of Gamma-Ray Bursts, the Discovery of Supernovae 2005bv, 2005ee, and 2006ak, and Searches for Transients Using the "MASTER" Robotic Telescope  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present the results of observations obtained using the MASTER robotic telescope in 2005 - 2006, including the earliest observations of the optical emission of the gamma-ray bursts GRB 050824 and GRB 060926. Together with later observations, these data yield the brightness-variation law t^{-0.55+-0.05} for GRB 050824. An optical flare was detected in GRB 060926 - a brightness enhancement that repeated the behavior observed in the X-ray variations. The spectrum of GRB 060926 is found to be F_E ~ E^-\\beta, where \\beta = 1.0+-0.2. Limits on the optical brightnesses of 26 gamma-ray bursts have been derived, 9 of these for the first time. Data for more than 90% of the accessible sky down to $19^m$ were taken and reduced in real time during the survey. A database has been composed based on these data. Limits have been placed on the rate of optical flares that are not associated with detected gamma-ray bursts, and on the opening angle for the beams of gamma-ray bursts. Three new supernovae have been discovered: SN 2005bv (type Ia) - the first to be discovered on Russian territory, SN 2005ee - one of the most powerful type II supernovae known, and SN 2006ak (type Ia). We have obtained an image of SN 2006X during the growth stage and a light curve that fully describes the brightness maximum and exponential decay. A new method for searching for optical transients of gamma-ray bursts detected using triangulation from various spacecraft is proposed and tested.

V. M. Lipunov; V. G. Kornilov; A. V. Krylov; N. V. Tyurina; A. A. Belinski; E. S. Gorbovskoy; D. A. Kuvshinov; P. A. Gritsyk; G. A. Antipov; G. V. Borisov; A. V. Sankovich; V. V. Vladimirov; V. I. Vybornov; A. S. Kuznetsov

2007-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

366

Supernova Recognition using Support Vector Machines  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

pected to contain real supernovae. Astrophysicists who inObservational Evi- dence from Supernovae for an Acceleratingi.e. to ?nd all potential supernovae, while reducing the

Romano, Raquel A.; Aragon, Cecilia R.; Ding, Chris

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

Four Papers by the Supernova Cosmology Project  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Study Institute Thermonuclear Supernovae Conference,STUDY INSTITUTE THERMONUCLEAR SUPERNOVAE Aiguablava, SPAIN20-30, 1995 To appear-in Thermonuclear Supernovae (NATO ASI)

Perlmutter, S.; Deustua, S.; Gabi, S.; Goldhaber, G.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

Hydrogen issue in Core Collapse Supernovae  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We discuss results of analyzing a time series of selected photospheric-optical spectra of core collapse supernovae (CCSNe). This is accomplished by means of the parameterized supernovae synthetic spectrum (SSp) code ``SYNOW''. Special attention is addressed to traces of hydrogen at early phases, especially for the stripped-envelope SNe (i.e. SNe Ib-c). A thin low mass hydrogen layer extending to very high ejection velocities above the helium shell, is found to be the most likely scenario for Type Ib SNe.

A. Elmhamdi; I. J. Danziger; D. Branch; B. Leibundgut

2006-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

369

3-D Model of Broadband Emission from Supernova Remnants Undergoing Non-linear Diffusive Shock Acceleration  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present a 3-dimensional model of supernova remnants (SNRs) where the hydrodynamical evolution of the remnant is modeled consistently with nonlinear diffusive shock acceleration occurring at the outer blast wave. The model includes particle escape and diffusion outside of the forward shock, and particle interactions with arbitrary distributions of external ambient material, such as molecular clouds. We include synchrotron emission and cooling, bremsstrahlung radiation, neutral pion production, inverse-Compton (IC), and Coulomb energy-loss. Boardband spectra have been calculated for typical parameters including dense regions of gas external to a 1000 year old SNR. In this paper, we describe the details of our model but do not attempt a detailed fit to any specific remnant. We also do not include magnetic field amplification (MFA), even though this effect may be important in some young remnants. In this first presentation of the model we don't attempt a detailed fit to any specific remnant. Our aim is to develop a flexible platform, which can be generalized to include effects such as MFA, and which can be easily adapted to various SNR environments, including Type Ia SNRs, which explode in a constant density medium, and Type II SNRs, which explode in a pre-supernova wind. When applied to a specific SNR, our model will predict cosmic-ray spectra and multi-wavelength morphology in projected images for instruments with varying spatial and spectral resolutions. We show examples of these spectra and images and emphasize the importance of measurements in the hard X-ray, GeV, and TeV gamma-ray bands for investigating key ingredients in the acceleration mechanism, and for deducing whether or not TeV emission is produced by IC from electrons or pion-decay from protons.

Lee, Shiu-Hang; Kamae, Tuneyoshi; Ellison, Donald C.

2008-07-02T23:59:59.000Z

370

Supernova Remnants And GLAST  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

It has long been speculated that supernova remnants represent a major source of cosmic rays in the Galaxy. Observations over the past decade have ceremoniously unveiled direct evidence of particle acceleration in SNRs to energies approaching the knee of the cosmic ray spectrum. Nonthermal X-ray emission from shell-type SNRs reveals multi-TeV electrons, and the dynamical properties of several SNRs point to efficient acceleration of ions. Observations of TeV gamma-ray emission have confirmed the presence of energetic particles in several remnants as well, but there remains considerable debate as to whether this emission originates with high energy electrons or ions. Equally uncertain are the exact conditions that lead to efficient particle acceleration. Based on the catalog of EGRET sources, we know that there is a large population of Galactic gamma-ray sources whose distribution is similar to that of SNRs.With the increased resolution and sensitivity of GLAST, the gamma-ray SNRs from this population will be identified. Their detailed emission structure, along with their spectra, will provide the link between their environments and their spectra in other wavebands to constrain emission models and to potentially identify direct evidence of ion acceleration in SNRs. Here I summarize recent observational and theoretical work in the area of cosmic ray acceleration by SNRs, and discuss the contributions GLAST will bring to our understanding of this problem.

Slane, Patrick; /Harvard-Smithsonian Ctr. Astrophys.

2011-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

371

Flash Center for Computational Science The University of Chicago  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Flash Center for Computational Science The University of Chicago What are Type Ia supernovae? Supernova Cosmology Project Flash Center for Computational Science The University...

372

578 NATURE PHYSICS | VOL 8 | AUGUST 2012 | www.nature.com/naturephysics books & arts  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-- a type-Ia in Cassiopeia, usually known as Tycho's supernova (Tycho Brahe saw it too) -- and he translated

Loss, Daniel

373

Added JWST Science Cases for the Timeframe 2012-2015 A SAR Study  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

role in their application. Observations of the brightness of type Ia supernovae provided the first empirical indication for dark energ

Sirianni, Marco

374

NONTHERMAL RADIATION FROM SUPERNOVA REMNANTS: EFFECTS OF MAGNETIC FIELD AMPLIFICATION AND PARTICLE ESCAPE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We explore nonlinear effects of wave-particle interactions on the diffusive shock acceleration (DSA) process in Type Ia-like supernova remnant (SNR) blast waves by implementing phenomenological models for magnetic field amplification (MFA), Alfvénic drift, and particle escape in time-dependent numerical simulations of nonlinear DSA. For typical SNR parameters, the cosmic-ray (CR) protons can be accelerated to PeV energies only if the region of amplified field ahead of the shock is extensive enough to contain the diffusion lengths of the particles of interest. Even with the help of Alfvénic drift, it remains somewhat challenging to construct a nonlinear DSA model for SNRs in which of the order of 10% of the supernova explosion energy is converted into CR energy and the magnetic field is amplified by a factor of 10 or so in the shock precursor, while, at the same time, the energy spectrum of PeV protons is steeper than E {sup –2}. To explore the influence of these physical effects on observed SNR emission, we also compute the resulting radio-to-gamma-ray spectra. Nonthermal emission spectra, especially in X-ray and gamma-ray bands, depend on the time-dependent evolution of the CR injection process, MFA, and particle escape, as well as the shock dynamic evolution. This result comes from the fact that the high-energy end of the CR spectrum is composed of particles that are injected in the very early stages of the blast wave evolution. Thus, it is crucial to better understand the plasma wave-particle interactions associated with collisionless shocks in detailed modeling of nonthermal radiation from SNRs.

Kang, Hyesung [Department of Earth Sciences, Pusan National University, Pusan 609-735 (Korea, Republic of); Jones, T. W. [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN 55455 (United States); Edmon, Paul P., E-mail: kang@uju.es.pusan.ac.kr, E-mail: twj@msi.umn.edu, E-mail: pedmon@cfa.harvard.edu [Research Computing, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States)

2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

SUPERNOVA LIGHT CURVES POWERED BY FALLBACK ACCRETION  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Some fraction of the material ejected in a core collapse supernova explosion may remain bound to the compact remnant, and eventually turn around and fall back. We show that the late time ({approx}>days) power potentially associated with the accretion of this 'fallback' material could significantly affect the optical light curve, in some cases producing super-luminous or otherwise peculiar supernovae. We use spherically symmetric hydrodynamical models to estimate the accretion rate at late times for a range of progenitor masses and radii and explosion energies. The accretion rate onto the proto-neutron star or black hole decreases as M-dot {proportional_to}t{sup -5/3} at late times, but its normalization can be significantly enhanced at low explosion energies, in very massive stars, or if a strong reverse shock wave forms at the helium/hydrogen interface in the progenitor. If the resulting super-Eddington accretion drives an outflow which thermalizes in the outgoing ejecta, the supernova debris will be re-energized at a time when photons can diffuse out efficiently. The resulting light curves are different and more diverse than previous fallback supernova models which ignored the input of accretion power and produced short-lived, dim transients. The possible outcomes when fallback accretion power is significant include super-luminous ({approx}> 10{sup 44} erg s{sup -1}) Type II events of both short and long durations, as well as luminous Type I events from compact stars that may have experienced significant mass loss. Accretion power may unbind the remaining infalling material, causing a sudden decrease in the brightness of some long duration Type II events. This scenario may be relevant for explaining some of the recently discovered classes of peculiar and rare supernovae.

Dexter, Jason; Kasen, Daniel, E-mail: jdexter@berkeley.edu [Departments of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)

2013-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

376

Supersoft Sources as SN Ia Progenitors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the existence of supersoft X­ray sources. It is argued that SNe Ia are thermonuclear explosions of accreting C is that they represent thermonuclear disruptions of mass accreting white dwarfs (WDs). Thus, the basic ingredient

Greiner, Jochen

377

ETODOS NUM ERICOS EN INGENIER IA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CONSERVATIVOS ENERG #19; IA-MOMENTO Jos#19;e M. Goicolea Ruig#19;omez y Juan Carlos Garc#19;#16;a Orden EscuelaM #19; ETODOS NUM #19; ERICOS EN INGENIER #19; IA R. Abascal, J. Dom#19;#16;nguez y G. Bugeda (Eds.upm.es Palabras clave: Din#19;amica no lineal, mecanismos, sistemas multicuerpo exibles, energ#19;#16;a- momento

Romero, Ignacio

378

Observational constraints from SNe Ia and Gamma-Ray Bursts on a clumpy universe  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The luminosity distance describing the effect of local inhomogeneities in the propagation of light proposed by Zeldovich-Kantowski-Dyer-Roeder (ZKDR) is tested with two probes for two distinct ranges of redshifts: supernovae Ia (SNe Ia) in 0.015 gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) in 1.547 < z < 3.57. Our analysis is performed by a Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) code that allows us to constrain the matter density parameter \\Omega_m as well as the smoothness parameter $\\alpha$ that measures the inhomogeneous-homogeneous rate of the cosmic fluid in a flat \\LambdaCDM model. The obtained best fits are (\\Omega_m=0.285^{+0.019}_{-0.018}, \\alpha= 0.856^{+0.106}_{-0.176}) from SNe Ia and (\\Omega_m=0.259^{+0.028}_{-0.028}, \\alpha=0.587^{+0.201}_{-0.202}) from GRBs, while from the joint analysis the best fits are (\\Omega_m=0.284^{+0.021}_{-0.020}, \\alpha= 0.685^{+0.164}_{-0.171}) with a \\chi^2_{\\rm red}=0.975. The value of the smoothness parameter $\\alpha$ indicates a clumped universe however it does not have an impact on the amount of dark energy (cosmological constant) needed to fit observations. This result may be an indication that the Dyer-Roeder approximation does not describe in a precise form the effects of clumpiness in the expansion of the universe.

Nora Bretón; Ariadna Montiel

2013-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

379

Beacons In the Dark: Using Novae and Supernovae to Detect Dwarf Galaxies in the Local Universe  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We propose that luminous transients, including novae and supernovae, can be used to detect the faintest galaxies in the universe. Beyond a few Mpc, dwarf galaxies with stellar masses $<10^6 M_{\\odot}$ will likely be too faint and/or too low in surface brightness to be directly detected in upcoming large area ground-based photometric surveys. However, single epoch LSST photometry will be able to detect novae to distances of $\\sim30$ Mpc and SNe to Gpc-scale distances. Depending on the form of the stellar mass-halo mass relation and the underlying star formation histories of low mass dwarfs, the expected nova rates will be a few to $\\sim100$ yr$^{-1}$ and the expected SN rates (including both type Ia and core-collapse) will be $\\sim10^2-10^4$ within the observable ($4\\pi$ sr) volume. The transient rate associated with intrahalo stars will be comparably large, but these transients will be located close to bright galaxies, in contrast to the dwarfs, which should trace the underlying large scale structure of th...

Conroy, Charlie

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Thermonuclear Supernovae: Probing Magnetic Fields by Late-Time IR Line Profiles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We study the imprint of magnetic fields B on late-time IR line profiles and light curves of Type Ia Supernovae. As a benchmark, we use the explosion of a Chandrasekhar mass M_{Ch White Dwarf (WD) and, specifically, a delayed detonation model. We assume WDs with initial magnetic surface fields between 1 and 1E9G. We discuss large-scale dipole and small-scale magnetic fields. We find that the [Fe II] line at 1.644 mu can be used to analyze the overall chemical and density structure of the exploding WD up to day 200 without considering B. Subsequently, positron transport and magnetic field effects become important. By day 500, the profile becomes sensitive to the morphology of B and directional dependent for dipole fields. Small or no directional dependence of the spectra is found for small-scale B. After about 200 days, persistent broad-line, flat-topped or stumpy profiles require high density burning which is the signature of a WD close to M_Ch. Narrow peaked profiles are a signature of chemical mixing or sub-...

Penney, R

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "type ia supernovae" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

The Hot Gas Content of Low-Luminosity Early-Type Galaxies and the Implications Regarding Supernova Heating and AGN Feedback  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We have analyzed Chandra observations of 18 low-luminosity early-type galaxies with L_B gas with temperatures between 0.2 and 0.8 keV comprises 5-70% of the total 0.5-2.0 keV emission from these galaxies. We find that the total X-ray luminosity from LMXBs (resolved plus the power-law component of the unresolved emission) scales roughly linearly with the K-band luminosity of the galaxies with a normalization comparable to that found in more luminous early-type galaxies. All of the galaxies in our sample are gas poor with gas masses much less than that expected from the accumulation of stellar mass loss over the life time of the galaxies. The average ratio of gas mass to stellar mass in our sample is M_{gas}/M_*=0.001, compared to more luminous early-type galaxies which typically have M_{gas}/M_*=0.01. The time required to accumulate the observed gas mass from stellar mass loss in these galaxies is typically 3 x 10e8 yr. Since the cooling time of the gas is longer than the replenishment time, the gas cannot be condensing out of the hot phase and forming stars, implying that the gas is most likely being expelled from these galaxies in a wind (abridged).

Laurence P. David; Christine Jones; William Forman; Iris Monica Vargas; Paul Nulsen

2006-09-05T23:59:59.000Z

382

Workflow management for a cosmology collaboratory  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

nuclear processes in supernovae and to improve our abilityType Ia and Type II supernovae as reference light sources (with the goal of identifying supernovae in their earliest

Loken, Stewart C.; McParland, Charles

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

1987A: The greatest supernova since Kepler  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Woosley, S. E. , 1988b, in Supernovae 19873 in the LargeGalactic Nuclei, and Supernovae, edited by S. Hayakawa andGalactic nuclei, and Supernovae, edited by S. Hayakawa and

Trimble, V

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

A Massive Stellar Burst Before the Supernova  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Burst Before the Supernova February 6, 2013 | Tags: Carver, High Energy Physics, supernovae Contact: Linda Vu, lvu@lbl.gov, +1 510 495 2402 An automated supernova hunt is...

385

Snapping Supernovae at z>1.7  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

redshift supernovae — both thermonuclear and core collapse —between core-collapse and thermonuclear supernovae (Iben &such SNe — both thermonuclear and core collapse — will be

Aldering, Greg

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

A Newly Recognized Very Young Supernova Remnant in M83  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

As part of a spectroscopic survey of supernova remnant candidates in M83 using the Gemini-South telescope and GMOS, we have discovered one object whose spectrum shows very broad lines at H$\\alpha$, [O~I] 6300,6363, and [O~III] 4959,5007, similar to those from other objects classified as `late time supernovae.' Although six historical supernovae have been observed in M83 since 1923, none were seen at the location of this object. Hubble Space Telescope Wide Field Camera 3 images show a nearly unresolved emission source, while Chandra and ATCA data reveal a bright X-ray source and nonthermal radio source at the position. Objects in other galaxies showing similar spectra are only decades post-supernova, which raises the possibility that the supernova that created this object occurred during the last century but was missed. Using photometry of nearby stars from the HST data, we suggest the precursor was at least 17 $\\rm M_{sun}$, and the presence of broad H$\\alpha$ in the spectrum makes a type II supernova likely....

Blair, William P; Long, Knox S; Whitmore, Bradley C; Kim, Hwihyun; Soria, Roberto; Kuntz, K D; Plucinsky, Paul P; Dopita, Michael A; Stockdale, Christopher

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Spectral Modeling of SNe Ia Near Maximum Light: Probing the Characteristics of Hydro Models  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We have performed detailed NLTE spectral synthesis modeling of 2 types of 1-D hydro models: the very highly parameterized deflagration model W7, and two delayed detonation models. We find that overall both models do about equally well at fitting well observed SNe Ia near to maximum light. However, the Si II 6150 feature of W7 is systematically too fast, whereas for the delayed detonation models it is also somewhat too fast, but significantly better than that of W7. We find that a parameterized mixed model does the best job of reproducing the Si II 6150 line near maximum light and we study the differences in the models that lead to better fits to normal SNe Ia. We discuss what is required of a hydro model to fit the spectra of observed SNe Ia near maximum light.

E. Baron; S. Bongard; David Branch; Peter H. Hauschildt

2006-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

388

China Today IAS 2123.001  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

China Today IAS 2123.001 Kevin Carrico Tuesdays & Thursdays 10:30 am -11:45 am Approved for Non-Western culture credit Everyone knows that China today is a "rising superpower," but the real story of China's modern history is considerably more complex. This course looks beyond the headlines to rediscover China

Oklahoma, University of

389

Observable fractions of core-collapse supernova light curves brightened by binary companions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Many core-collapse supernova progenitors are presumed to be in binary systems. If a star explodes in a binary system, the early supernova light curve can be brightened by the collision of the supernova ejecta with the companion star. The early brightening can be observed when the observer is in the direction of the hole created by the collision. Based on a population synthesis model, we estimate the fractions of core-collapse supernovae in which the light-curve brightening by the collision can be observed. We find that 0.19% of core-collapse supernova light curves can be observed with the collisional brightening. Type Ibc supernova light curves are more likely to be brightened by the collision (0.53%) because of the high fraction of the progenitors being in binary systems and their proximity to the companion stars. Type II and IIb supernova light curves are less affected (~1e-3% and ~1e-2%, respectively). Although the early, slow light-curve declines of some Type IIb and Ibc supernovae are argued to be caused...

Moriya, Takashi J; Izzard, Robert G

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Collective neutrino oscillations in supernovae  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In a dense neutrino medium neutrinos can experience collective flavor transformation through the neutrino-neutrino forward scattering. In this talk we present some basic features of collective neutrino flavor transformation in the context in core-collapse supernovae. We also give some qualitative arguments for why and when this interesting phenomenon may occur and how it may affect supernova nucleosynthesis.

Duan, Huaiyu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM 87131 (United States)

2014-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

391

Supernova Neutrinos Detection On Earth  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this paper, we first discuss the detection of supernova neutrino on Earth. Then we propose a possible method to acquire information about $\\theta_{13}$ smaller than $1.5^\\circ$ by detecting the ratio of the event numbers of different flavor supernova neutrinos. Such an sensitivity cannot yet be achieved by the Daya Bay reactor neutrino experiment.

Xin-Heng Guo; Ming-Yang Huang; Bing-Lin Young

2009-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

392

SNAP Satellite Focal Plane Development  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

from 42 High-Redshift Supernovae,” ApJ 517, p.565, 1999. A.Observational Evidence from Supernovae for an AcceleratingCorrections for Type Ia Supernovae,” PASP, 114, 803N (2002).

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Overview of the SuperNova/Acceleration probe (SNAP)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

from 42 High-Redshift Supernovae,” Astrophys J. 517, pp.Observational Evidence from Supernovae for an AcceleratingEnergy with Type Ia Supernovae and Large-Scale Structure,”

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

acceleration probe studying: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Supernova Acceleration Probe: Studying Dark Energy with Type Ia Supernovae Astrophysics (arXiv) Summary: The Supernova Acceleration Probe...

395

Cosmological and supernova neutrinos  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Big Bang nucleosynthesis (BBN) and the cosmic microwave background (CMB) anisotropies are the pillars of modern cosmology. It has recently been suggested that axion which is a dark matter candidate in the framework of the standard model could condensate in the early universe and induce photon cooling before the epoch of the photon last scattering. Although this may render a solution to the overproduction problem of primordial {sup 7}Li abundance, there arises another serious difficulty of overproducing D abundance. We propose a hybrid dark matter model with both axions and relic supersymmetric (SUSY) particles to solve both overproduction problems of the primordial D and {sup 7}Li abundances simultaneously. The BBN also serves to constrain the nature of neutrinos. Considering non-thermal photons produced in the decay of the heavy sterile neutrinos due to the magnetic moment, we explore the cosmological constraint on the strength of neutrino magnetic moment consistent with the observed light element abundances. Core-collapse supernovae eject huge flux of energetic neutrinos which affect explosive nucleosynthesis of rare isotopes like {sup 7}Li, {sup 11}B, {sup 92}Nb, {sup 138}La and {sup 180}Ta and r-process elements. Several isotopes depend strongly on the neutrino flavor oscillation due to the Mikheyev-Smirnov-Wolfenstein (MSW) effect. Combining the recent experimental constraints on ?{sub 13} with predicted and observed supernova-produced abundance ratio {sup 11}B/{sup 7}Li encapsulated in the presolar grains from the Murchison meteorite, we show a marginal preference for an inverted neutrino mass hierarchy. We also discuss supernova relic neutrinos (SRN) that may indicate the softness of the equation of state (EoS) of nuclear matter and adiabatic conditions of the neutrino oscillation.

Kajino, T. [National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, 2-21-1 Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588, Japan Department of Astronomy, University of Tokyo, Hongo 7-3-1, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan); Aoki, W. [National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, 2-21-1 Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan); Balantekin, A. B. [Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin - Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States); Cheoun, M.-K. [Department of Physics, Soongsil University, Seoul 156-743 (Korea, Republic of); Hayakawa, T. [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Shirakara-Shirane 2-4, Tokai-mura, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); Hidaka, J. [National Astronomical Observatory, 2-21-1 Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan); Hirai, Y.; Shibagaki, S. [National Astronomical Observatory, 2-21-1 Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588, Japan and Department of Astronomy, University of Tokyo, Hongo 7-3-1, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan); Kusakabe, M. [School of Liberal Arts and Science, Korea Aerospace University, Goyang 412-791 (Korea, Republic of); Mathews, G. J. [Department of Physics, University of Notre Dame, IN 46556 (United States); Nakamura, K. [Waseda University, Ohkubo 3-4-1, Shinjuku, Tokyo 169-8555 (Japan); Pehlivan, Y. [Mimar Sinan GSÜ, Department of Physics, ?i?li, ?stanbul 34380 (Turkey); Suzuki, T. [Nihon University, Sakurajosui 3-25-40, Setagaya-ku, Tokyo 156-8550 (Japan)

2014-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

396

Supernovae and the IGM  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

An energetic argument implies that a galaxy like the Milky Way is blowing a powerful wind that carries away most of the heavy elements currently synthesized and has impacted the IGM out to at least 180 kpc. Rich clusters of galaxies appear to be closed systems in which most heavy elements are ejected from galaxies. More supernovae are required than the yield of core-collapse SNe from a Salpeter IMF. X-ray observations imply that the IGM in groups and clusters as been strongly preheated. SNe probably cannot supply the required energy, which must come from AGN.

James Binney

2000-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

397

The Blast-Wave-Driven Instability as a Vehicle for Understanding Supernova Explosion Structure  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Blast-wave-driven instabilities play a rich and varied role throughout the evolution of supernovae from explosion to remnant, but interpreting their role is difficult due to the enormous complexity of the stellar systems. We consider the simpler and fundamental hydrodynamic instability problem of a material interface between two constant-density fluids perturbed from spherical and driven by a divergent central Taylor-Sedov blast wave. The existence of unified solutions at high Mach number and small density ratio suggests that general conclusions can be drawn about the likely asymptotic structure of the mixing zone. To this end we apply buoyancy-drag and bubble merger models modified to include the effects of divergence and radial velocity gradients. In general, these effects preclude the true self-similar evolution of classical Raleigh-Taylor, but can be incorporated into a quasi-self-similar growth picture. Loss of memory of initial conditions can occur in the quasi-self-similar model, but requires initial mode numbers higher than those predicted for pre-explosion interfaces in Type II SNe, suggesting that their late-time structure is likely strongly influenced by details of the initial perturbations. Where low-modes are dominant, as in the Type Ia Tycho remnant, they result from initial perturbations rather than generation from smaller scales. Therefore, structure observed now contains direct information about the explosion process. When large-amplitude modes are present in the initial conditions, the contribution to the perturbation growth from the Richtmyer-Meshkov instability is significant or dominant compared to Rayleigh-Taylor. Such Richtmyer-Meshkov growth can yield proximity of the forward shock to the growing spikes and structure that strongly resembles that observed in the Tycho. Laser-driven high-energy-density laboratory experiments offer a promising avenue for testing model and simulation descriptions of blast-wave-driven instabilities and making connections to their astrophysical counterparts.

Miles, A R

2008-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

398

Pineapples and crabs: When young supernova remnants were even younger  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1977. The Historical Supernovae, Oxford, Pergamon 7 Trimble,C.B. Cosmovici (Ed. ) Supernovae and their Remnants, Reidel,C.B. Cosmovici (ed. ) Supernovae and their Remnants, Reidel,

Trimble, V

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

How to See the Supernova Berkeley Lab Just Discovered  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

According to astronomers, this is the closest and brightest supernova of this type detected in the last 30 years and will be closely studied for years to come. In this video, Berkeley Lab's Peter Nugent explains how to find the event with a small telescope or pair of binoculars.

400

Error Analysis of Ia Supernova and Query on Cosmic Dark Energy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Some serious faults in error analysis of observations for SNIa have been found. Redoing the same error analysis of SNIa, by our idea, it is found that the average total observational error of SNIa is obviously greater than $0.55^m$, so we can't decide whether the universe is accelerating expansion or not.

Qiuhe Peng; Yiming Hu; Kun Wang; Yu Liang

2012-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "type ia supernovae" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Tracked Flame Simulation for Type Ia Yongmin Zhang1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

tracking of the ame front which is critically important to the accurate modeling of turbulent thermonuclear, and the strength and brightness of the burning are all determined by the speed of thermonuclear burning 12, 13 needs to model the propagation of thermonuclear burning inside the exploding star. The mech- anism

New York at Stoney Brook, State University of

402

Summary of JD 9 supernovae: Past, present, and future  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Summary of JD 9 Supernovae: past, present, and futureZwicky (separately! ) that supernovae could serve as better

Trimble, VL

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Category:Mason, IA | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of InspectorConcentrating SolarElectricEnergyCTBarreis aCallahanWind FarmAdd a newISGANMagnetotelluricsIA"

404

Rolling Hills (IA) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revisionEnvReviewNonInvasiveExplorationUT-g Grant ofRichardton Abbey Wind Farm It isRockwall,SectorIA) Jump to:

405

Steamboat IA Geothermal Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revisionEnvReviewNonInvasiveExplorationUT-g GrantAtlas (PACA RegionSpringviewNameGeothermal Facility JumpIA

406

The Supernovae Associated with Gamma-Ray Bursts  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Supernovae (SNe) were long suspected as possible progenitors of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). The arguments relied on circumstantial evidence. Several recent GRBs, notably GRB 030329, have provided direct, spectroscopic evidence that SNe and GRBs are related. The SNe associated with GRBs are all of Type Ic, implying a compact progenitor, which has implications for GRB models. Other peculiar Type Ic SNe may help to expand understanding of the mechanisms involved.

Thomas Matheson

2004-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

407

Electron-capture supernovae of super-asymptotic giant branch stars and the Crab supernova 1054  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An electron-capture supernova (ECSN) is a core-collapse supernova explosion of a super-asymptotic giant branch (SAGB) star with a main-sequence mass M{sub Ms} ? 7 - 9.5M{sub ?}. The explosion takes place in accordance with core bounce and subsequent neutrino heating and is a unique example successfully produced by first-principle simulations. This allows us to derive a first self-consistent multicolor light curves of a core-collapse supernova. Adopting the explosion properties derived by the first-principle simulation, i.e., the low explosion energy of 1.5 × 10{sup 50} erg and the small {sup 56}Ni mass of 2.5 × 10{sup ?3} M{sub ?}, we perform a multigroup radiation hydrodynamics calculation of ECSNe and present multicolor light curves of ECSNe of SAGB stars with various envelope mass and hydrogen abundance. We demonstrate that a shock breakout has peak luminosity of L ? 2 × 10{sup 44} erg s{sup ?1} and can evaporate circumstellar dust up to R ? 10{sup 17} cm for a case of carbon dust, that plateau luminosity and plateau duration of ECSNe are L ? 10{sup 42} erg s{sup ?1} and {sup t} ? 60 - 100 days, respectively, and that a plateau is followed by a tail with a luminosity drop by ? 4 mag. The ECSN shows a bright and short plateau that is as bright as typical Type II plateau supernovae, and a faint tail that might be influenced by spin-down luminosity of a newborn pulsar. Furthermore, the theoretical models are compared with ECSN candidates: SN 1054 and SN 2008S. We find that SN 1054 shares the characteristics of the ECSNe. For SN 2008S, we find that its faint plateau requires a ECSN model with a significantly low explosion energy of E ? 10{sup 48} erg.

Nomoto, Ken'ichi [Kavli Institute for Physics and Mathematics of the Universe (WPI), The University of Tokyo, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8583 (Japan); Tominaga, Nozomu [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science and Engineering, Konan University, 8-9-1 Okamoto, Kobe, Hyogo 658-8501, Japan and Kavli Institute for Physics and Mathematics of the Universe (WPI), The University of Tokyo, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8583 (Japan); Blinnikov, Sergei I. [Institute for Theoretical and Experimental Physics (ITEP), Moscow 117218, Russia and Kavli Institute for Physics and Mathematics of the Universe (WPI), The University of Tokyo, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8583 (Japan)

2014-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

408

Study of Envelope Velocity Evolution of Type Ib-c Core-Collapse Supernovae from Observations of XRF 080109 / SN 2008D and GRB 060218 / SN 2006aj with BTA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Results of modeling the spectra of two supernovae SN 2008D and SN 2006aj related to the X-ray flash XRF 080109 and gamma-ray burst GRB / XRF 060218, respectively, are studied. The spectra were obtained with the 6-meter BTA telescope of the Special Astrophysical Observatory of the Russian Academy of Sciences in 6.48 and 27.61 days after the explosion of SN 2008D, and in 2.55 and 3.55 days after the explosion of SN 2006aj. The spectra were interpreted in the Sobolev approximation with the SYNOW code. An assumption about the presence of envelopes around the progenitor stars is confirmed by an agreement between the velocities of lines interpreted as hydrogen and helium, and the empiric power-law velocity drop with time for the envelopes of classic core-collapse supernovae. Detection of a P Cyg profile of the H-beta line in the spectra of optical afterglows of GRBs can be a determinative argument in favor of this hypothesis.

Moskvitin, A S; Sokolov, V V; Fatkhullin, T A; Castro-Tirado, A J

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

New Magellanic Cloud R Coronae Borealis and DY Per type stars from the EROS-2 database: the connection between RCBs, DYPers and ordinary carbon stars  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

R Coronae Borealis stars (RCB) are a rare type of evolved carbon-rich supergiant stars that are increasingly thought to result from the merger of two white dwarfs, called the Double degenerate scenario. This scenario is also studied as a source, at higher mass, of type Ia Supernovae (SnIa) explosions. Therefore a better understanding of RCBs composition would help to constrain simulations of such events. We searched for and studied RCB stars in the EROS Magellanic Clouds database. We also extended our research to DY Per type stars (DYPers) that are expected to be cooler RCBs (T~3500 K) and much more numerous than their hotter counterparts. The light curves of ~70 millions stars have been analysed to search for the main signature of RCBs and DYPers: a large drop in luminosity. Follow-up optical spectroscopy was used to confirm each photometric candidate found. We have discovered and confirmed 6 new Magellanic Cloud RCB stars and 7 new DYPers, but also listed new candidates: 3 RCBs and 14 DYPers. We estimated a...

Tisserand, P; Marquette, J B; Afonso, C; Albert, J N; Andersen, J; Ansari, R; Aubourg, E; Bareyre, P; Beaulieu, J P; Charlot, X; Coutures, C; Ferlet, R; Fouqué, P; Glicenstein, J F; Goldman, B; Gould, A; Gros, M; De Kat, J; Lesquoy, E; Loup, C; Magneville, C; Maurice, E; Maury, A; Milsztajn, A; Moniez, M; Palanque-Delabrouille, Nathalie; Perdereau, O; Rich, J; Schwemling, P; Spiro, M; Vidal-Madjar, A

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

Supernova neutrinos and explosive nucleosynthesis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Core-collapse supernovae eject huge amount of flux of energetic neutrinos. We studied the explosive nucleosyn-thesis in supernovae and found that several isotopes {sup 7}Li, {sup 11}B, {sup 92}Nb, {sup 138}La and {sup 180}Ta as well as r-process nuclei are affected by the neutrino interactions. The abundance of these isotopes therefore depends strongly on the neutrino flavor oscillation due to the Mikheyev-Smirnov-Wolfenstein (MSW) effect. We discuss first how to determine the neutrino temperatures in order to explain the observed solar system abundances of these isotopes, combined with Galactic chemical evolution of the light nuclei and the heavy r-process elements. We then study the effects of neutrino oscillation on their abundances, and propose a novel method to determine the still unknown neutrino oscillation parameters, mass hierarchy and ?{sub 13}, simultaneously. There is recent evidence that SiC X grains from the Murchison meteorite may contain supernova-produced light elements {sup 11}B and {sup 7}Li encapsulated in the presolar grains. Combining the recent experimental constraints on ?{sub 13}, we show that our method sug-gests at a marginal preference for an inverted neutrino mass hierarchy. Finally, we discuss supernova relic neutrinos that may indicate the softness of the equation of state (EoS) of nuclear matter as well as adiabatic conditions of the neutrino oscillation.

Kajino, T. [National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, 2-21-1 Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588, Japan and Department of Astronomy, Graduate School of Science, The University of Tokyo, Hongo 7-3-1, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan); Aoki, W. [National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, 2-21-1 Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan); Cheoun, M.-K. [Department of Physics, Soongsil University, Seoul 156-743 (Korea, Republic of); Hayakawa, T. [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Shirakara-Shirane 2-4, Tokai-mura, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); Hidaka, J.; Hirai, Y.; Shibagaki, S. [National Astronomical Observatory, 2-21-1 Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan); Mathews, G. J. [Center for Astrophysics, Department of Physics, University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, IN 46556 (United States); Nakamura, K. [Faculty of Science and Engineering, Waseda University, Ohkubo 3-4-1, Shinjuku, Tokyo 169-8555 (Japan); Suzuki, T. [Department of Physics, College of Humanities and Sciences, Nihon University, Sakurajosui 3-25-40, Setagaya-ku, Tokyo 156-8550 (Japan)

2014-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

411

WHAT CAN WE LEARN FROM THE RISING LIGHT CURVES OF RADIOACTIVELY POWERED SUPERNOVAE?  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The light curve of the explosion of a star with a radius {approx}< 10-100 R{sub Sun} is powered mostly by radioactive decay. Observationally, such events are dominated by hydrogen-deficient progenitors and classified as Type I supernovae (SNe I), i.e., white dwarf thermonuclear explosions (Type Ia), and core collapses of hydrogen-stripped massive stars (Type Ib/c). Current transient surveys are finding SNe I in increasing numbers and at earlier times, allowing their early emission to be studied in unprecedented detail. Motivated by these developments, we summarize the physics that produces their rising light curves and discuss ways in which observations can be utilized to study these exploding stars. The early radioactive-powered light curves probe the shallowest deposits of {sup 56}Ni. If the amount of {sup 56}Ni mixing in the outermost layers of the star can be deduced, then it places important constraints on the progenitor and properties of the explosive burning. In practice, we find that it is difficult to determine the level of mixing because it is hard to disentangle whether the explosion occurred recently and one is seeing radioactive heating near the surface or whether the explosion began in the past and the radioactive heating is deeper in the ejecta. In the latter case, there is a ''dark phase'' between the moment of explosion and the first observed light emitted once the shallowest layers of {sup 56}Ni are exposed. Because of this, simply extrapolating a light curve from radioactive heating back in time is not a reliable method for estimating the explosion time. The best solution is to directly identify the moment of explosion, either through observing shock breakout (in X-ray/UV) or the cooling of the shock-heated surface (in UV/optical), so that the depth being probed by the rising light curve is known. However, since this is typically not available, we identify and discuss a number of other diagnostics that are helpful for deciphering how recently an explosion occurred. As an example, we apply these arguments to the recent SN Ic PTF 10vgv. We demonstrate that just a single measurement of the photospheric velocity and temperature during the rise places interesting constraints on its explosion time, radius, and level of {sup 56}Ni mixing.

Piro, Anthony L. [Theoretical Astrophysics, California Institute of Technology, 1200 E California Blvd., M/C 350-17, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Nakar, Ehud, E-mail: piro@caltech.edu [Raymond and Beverly Sackler School of Physics and Astronomy, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv 69978 (Israel)

2013-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

412

Excited-state OH Masers and Supernova Remnants  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The collisionally pumped, ground-state 1720 MHz maser line o