National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for type ia supernova

  1. Dust around Type Ia supernovae

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Lifan

    2005-01-01

    Dust around Type Ia supernovae Lifan Wang 1,2 LawrenceIa. Subject headings: Supernovae: General, Dust, Extinctionline) bands for Type Ia supernovae. (a), upper panel, shows

  2. New approaches for modeling type Ia supernovae

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zingale, Michael; Almgren, Ann S.; Bell, John B.; Day, Marcus S.; Rendleman, Charles A.; Woosley, Stan

    2007-01-01

    runaway in Type Ia supernovae: How to run away? oIgnition in Type Ia Supernovae. II. A Three- dimensionalnumber modeling of type Ia supernovae. I. hydrodynamics.

  3. Type Ia Supernovae

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home RoomPreservationBio-Inspired SolarAbout /Two Electron Holes in HematiteType Ia Supernovae Type Ia

  4. Rates and progenitors of type Ia supernovae

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wood-Vasey, William Michael

    2004-01-01

    Supernovae . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Supernovae Found 5.1 Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . .1.2 Non-Type Ia Supernovae . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1.3

  5. Ideal bandpasses for type Ia supernova cosmology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Davis, Tamara M.; Schmidt, Brian P.; Kim, Alex G.

    2005-01-01

    diversity of type Ia Supernovae, in preparation. Kim, A.error in measurements of supernovae depends on a periodicABSTRACT To use type Ia supernovae as standard candles for

  6. Type Ia Supernovae: Spectroscopic Surprises

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    David Branch

    2003-10-23

    Recent observations have extended the range of diversity among spectra of Type Ia supernovae. I briefly discuss SN Ia explosion models in the spectroscopic context, the observed diversity, and some recent results from direct analysis with the Synow code for one normal and two peculiar SNe Ia. Relating the observational manifestations of diversity to their physical causes is looking like an ever more challenging problem.

  7. Type Ia Supernova Explosion Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    W. Hillebrandt; J. C. Niemeyer

    2000-06-21

    Because calibrated light curves of Type Ia supernovae have become a major tool to determine the local expansion rate of the Universe and also its geometrical structure, considerable attention has been given to models of these events over the past couple of years. There are good reasons to believe that perhaps most Type Ia supernovae are the explosions of white dwarfs that have approached the Chandrasekhar mass, M_ch ~ 1.39 M_sun, and are disrupted by thermonuclear fusion of carbon and oxygen. However, the mechanism whereby such accreting carbon-oxygen white dwarfs explode continues to be uncertain. Recent progress in modeling Type Ia supernovae as well as several of the still open questions are addressed in this review. Although the main emphasis will be on studies of the explosion mechanism itself and on the related physical processes, including the physics of turbulent nuclear combustion in degenerate stars, we also discuss observational constraints.

  8. Turbulence-Flame Interactions in Type Ia Supernovae

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aspden, Andrew J; Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, 1 Cyclotron Road, MS 50A-1148, Berkeley, CA 94720 (Authors 1, 2 & 3); Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of California at Santa Cruz, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (Author 4); Department of Physics and Astronomy, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY 11794 (Author 5)

    2008-01-01

    Interactions in Type Ia Supernovae A. J. Aspden 1 , J. B.involved in type Ia supernovae (SN Ia) requires the use of ?generated by RT in type Ia supernovae should obey Bolgiano-

  9. Type Ia Supernova Carbon Footprints

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas, R C; Aragon, C; Antilogus, P; Bailey, S; Baltay, C; Bongard, S; Buton, C; Canto, A; Childress, M; Chotard, N; Copin, Y; Fakhouri, H K; Gangler, E; Hsiao, E Y; Kerschhaggl, M; Kowalski, M; Loken, S; Nugent, P; Paech, K; Pain, R; Pecontal, E; Pereira, R; Perlmutter, S; Rabinowitz, D; Rigault, M; Rubin, D; Runge, K; Scalzo, R; Smadja, G; Tao, C; Weaver, B A; Wu, C; Brown, P J; Milne, P A

    2011-01-01

    We present convincing evidence of unburned carbon at photospheric velocities in new observations of 5 Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) obtained by the Nearby Supernova Factory. These SNe are identified by examining 346 spectra from 124 SNe obtained before +2.5 d relative to maximum. Detections are based on the presence of relatively strong C II 6580 absorption "notches" in multiple spectra of each SN, aided by automated fitting with the SYNAPPS code. Four of the 5 SNe in question are otherwise spectroscopically unremarkable, with ions and ejection velocities typical of SNe Ia, but spectra of the fifth exhibits high-velocity (v > 20,000 km/s) Si II and Ca II features. On the other hand, the light curve properties are preferentially grouped, strongly suggesting a connection between carbon-positivity and broad band light curve/color behavior: Three of the 5 have relatively narrow light curves but also blue colors, and a fourth may be a dust-reddened member of this family. Accounting for signal-to-noise and phase, we ...

  10. Turbulent Combustion in Type Ia Supernova Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    F. K. Roepke; W. Hillebrandt

    2006-09-15

    We review the astrophysical modeling of type Ia supernova explosions and describe numerical methods to implement numerical simulations of these events. Some results of such simulations are discussed.

  11. ASTRONOMY AND ASTROPHYSICS Dark Energy, Type Ia supernovae, radiative

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    of Oklahoma Univ. of Oklahoma 79 ASTRONOMY AND ASTROPHYSICS Dark Energy, Type Ia supernovae, radiative transfer, Dark Energy, Type Ia supernovae, radiative transfer, The...

  12. Type Ia Supernovae: Toward the Standard Model?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    David Branch

    2000-12-13

    In this short review I suggest that recent developments support the conjecture that Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) are the complete disruptions of Chandrasekhar-mass carbon-oxygen white dwarfs in single-degenerate binary systems. The causes of the observational diversity of SNe Ia within the context of this standard model, and the implications of the model for young remnants of SNe Ia, are briefly discussed.

  13. Rates and progenitors of type Ia supernovae

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wood-Vasey, William Michael

    2004-08-16

    The remarkable uniformity of Type Ia supernovae has allowed astronomers to use them as distance indicators to measure the properties and expansion history of the Universe. However, Type Ia supernovae exhibit intrinsic variation in both their spectra and observed brightness. The brightness variations have been approximately corrected by various methods, but there remain intrinsic variations that limit the statistical power of current and future observations of distant supernovae for cosmological purposes. There may be systematic effects in this residual variation that evolve with redshift and thus limit the cosmological power of SN Ia luminosity-distance experiments. To reduce these systematic uncertainties, we need a deeper understanding of the observed variations in Type Ia supernovae. Toward this end, the Nearby Supernova Factory has been designed to discover hundreds of Type Ia supernovae in a systematic and automated fashion and study them in detail. This project will observe these supernovae spectrophotometrically to provide the homogeneous high-quality data set necessary to improve the understanding and calibration of these vital cosmological yardsticks. From 1998 to 2003, in collaboration with the Near-Earth Asteroid Tracking group at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, a systematic and automated searching program was conceived and executed using the computing facilities at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and the National Energy Research Supercomputing Center. An automated search had never been attempted on this scale. A number of planned future large supernovae projects are predicated on the ability to find supernovae quickly, reliably, and efficiently in large datasets. A prototype run of the SNfactory search pipeline conducted from 2002 to 2003 discovered 83 SNe at a final rate of 12 SNe/month. A large, homogeneous search of this scale offers an excellent opportunity to measure the rate of Type Ia supernovae. This thesis presents a new method for analyzing the true sensitivity of a multi-epoch supernova search and finds a Type Ia supernova rate from z {approx} 0.01-0.1 of r{sub V} = 4.26{sub -1.93 -0.10}{sup +1.39 +0.10} h{sup 3} x 10{sup -4} SNe Ia/yr/Mpc{sup 3} from a preliminary analysis of a subsample of the SNfactory prototype search. Several unusual supernovae were found in the course of the SNfactory prototype search. One in particular, SN 2002ic, was the first SN Ia to exhibit convincing evidence for a circumstellar medium and offers valuable insight into the progenitors of Type Ia supernovae.

  14. Nucleosynthesis in Type Ia Supernovae

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    K. Nomoto; K. Iwamoto; N. Nakasato; F. -K. Thielemann; F. Brachwitz; T. Tsujimoto; Y. Kubo; N. Kishimoto

    1997-06-03

    Among the major uncertainties involved in the Chandrasekhar mass models for Type Ia supernovae are the companion star of the accreting white dwarf (or the accretion rate that determines the carbon ignition density) and the flame speed after ignition. We present nucleosynthesis results from relatively slow deflagration (1.5 - 3 % of the sound speed) to constrain the rate of accretion from the companion star. Because of electron capture, a significant amount of neutron-rich species such as ^{54}Cr, ^{50}Ti, ^{58}Fe, ^{62}Ni, etc. are synthesized in the central region. To avoid the too large ratios of ^{54}Cr/^{56}Fe and ^{50}Ti/^{56}Fe, the central density of the white dwarf at thermonuclear runaway must be as low as \\ltsim 2 \\e9 \\gmc. Such a low central density can be realized by the accretion as fast as $\\dot M \\gtsim 1 \\times 10^{-7} M_\\odot yr^{-1}$. These rapidly accreting white dwarfs might correspond to the super-soft X-ray sources.

  15. Low Mach Number Modeling of Type Ia Supernovae. II. Energy Evolution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Almgren, Ann S.; Bell, John B.; Rendleman, Charles A.; Zingale, Mike

    2006-01-01

    Number Modeling of Type Ia Supernovae. II. Energy EvolutionIa. Subject headings: supernovae: general — white dwarfs —the ignition of Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) is critical to

  16. Defining photometric peculiar type Ia supernovae

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    González-Gaitán, S.; Pignata, G.; Förster, F.; Gutiérrez, C. P.; Bufano, F.; Galbany, L.; Hamuy, M.; De Jaeger, T. [Millennium Institute of Astrophysics, Casilla 36-D, Santiago (Chile); Hsiao, E. Y.; Phillips, M. M. [Carnegie Observatories, Las Campanas Observatory, Casilla 601, La Serena (Chile); Folatelli, G. [Kavli Institute for the Physics and Mathematics of the Universe, the University of Tokyo, Kashiwa 277-8583 (Kavli IPMU, WPI) (Japan); Anderson, J. P., E-mail: sgonzale@das.uchile.cl [European Southern Observatory, Alonso de Córdova 3107, Casilla 19, Santiago (Chile)

    2014-11-10

    We present a new photometric identification technique for SN 1991bg-like type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia), i.e., objects with light curve characteristics such as later primary maxima and the absence of a secondary peak in redder filters. This method is capable of selecting this sub-group from the normal type Ia population. Furthermore, we find that recently identified peculiar sub-types such as SNe Iax and super-Chandrasekhar SNe Ia have photometric characteristics similar to 91bg-like SNe Ia, namely, the absence of secondary maxima and shoulders at longer wavelengths, and can also be classified with our technique. The similarity of these different SN Ia sub-groups perhaps suggests common physical conditions. This typing methodology permits the photometric identification of peculiar SNe Ia in large upcoming wide-field surveys either to study them further or to obtain a pure sample of normal SNe Ia for cosmological studies.

  17. K-corrections and spectral templates of Type Ia supernovae

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hsiao, E. Y.

    2008-01-01

    templates of Type Ia supernovae E. Y. Hsiao 1 , A. Conleyobservations of low-redshift supernovae are less a?ected byobservations, stars: supernovae Department of Physics and

  18. Type Ia Supernova Hubble Residuals and Host-Galaxy Properties

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, A. G.

    2014-01-01

    magnitudes of type Ia supernovae from multi-band lightsuch an analysis on the supernovae of the Nearby Supernovaheadings: distance scale, supernovae: general 1 Physics

  19. Cosmic Supernova Rate History and Type Ia Supernova Progenitors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chiaki Kobayashi; Ken'ichi Nomoto; Takuji Tsujimoto

    2001-02-14

    Adopting a single degenerate scenario for Type Ia supernova progenitors with the metallicity effect, we make a prediction of the cosmic supernova rate history as a composite of the supernova rates in spiral and elliptical galaxies, and compare with the recent observational data up to z ~ 0.55.

  20. Type Ia Supernova Intrinsic Magnitude Dispersion and the Fitting of Cosmological Parameters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Alex G

    2011-01-01

    Applied to Type Ia supernovae, my strategy provides adata sets. Subject headings: Supernovae: Data Analysis andhomogeneous nature of Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) makes them

  1. Verifying the Cosmological Utility of Type Ia Supernovae: Implications of a Dispersion in the Ultraviolet Spectra

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ellis, R. S.

    2008-01-01

    Utility of Type Ia Supernovae: Implications of a Dispersionheadings: surveys – supernovae: general – cosmologicalparameters Introduction Supernovae of Type Ia (SNe Ia) are

  2. A SEARCH FOR NEW CANDIDATE SUPER-CHANDRASEKHAR-MASS TYPE Ia SUPERNOVAE...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    TYPE Ia SUPERNOVAE IN THE NEARBY SUPERNOVA FACTORY DATA SET We present optical photometry and spectroscopy of five Type Ia supernovae discovered by the Nearby Supernova...

  3. The distant type Ia supernova rate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pain, R.; Fabbro, S.; Sullivan, M.; Ellis, R.S.; Aldering, G.; Astier, P.; Deustua, S.E.; Fruchter, A.S.; Goldhaber, G.; Goobar, A.; Groom, D.E.; Hardin, D.; Hook, I.M.; Howell, D.A.; Irwin, M.J.; Kim, A.G.; Kim, M.Y.; Knop, R.A.; Lee, J.C.; Perlmutter, S.; Ruiz-Lapuente, P.; Schahmaneche, K.; Schaefer, B.; Walton, N.A.

    2002-05-20

    We present a measurement of the rate of distant Type Ia supernovae derived using 4 large subsets of data from the Supernova Cosmology Project. Within this fiducial sample,which surveyed about 12 square degrees, thirty-eight supernovae were detected at redshifts 0.25--0.85. In a spatially flat cosmological model consistent with the results obtained by the Supernova Cosmology Project, we derive a rest-frame Type Ia supernova rate at a mean red shift z {approx_equal} 0.55 of 1.53 {sub -0.25}{sub -0.31}{sup 0.28}{sup 0.32} x 10{sup -4} h{sup 3} Mpc{sup -3} yr{sup -1} or 0.58{sub -0.09}{sub -0.09}{sup +0.10}{sup +0.10} h{sup 2} SNu(1 SNu = 1 supernova per century per 10{sup 10} L{sub B}sun), where the first uncertainty is statistical and the second includes systematic effects. The dependence of the rate on the assumed cosmological parameters is studied and the redshift dependence of the rate per unit comoving volume is contrasted with local estimates in the context of possible cosmic star formation histories and progenitor models.

  4. Thermonuclear supernova models, and observations of Type Ia supernovae

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    E. Bravo; C. Badenes; D. Garcia-Senz

    2004-12-07

    In this paper, we review the present state of theoretical models of thermonuclear supernovae, and compare their predicitions with the constraints derived from observations of Type Ia supernovae. The diversity of explosion mechanisms usually found in one-dimensional simulations is a direct consequence of the impossibility to resolve the flame structure under the assumption of spherical symmetry. Spherically symmetric models have been successful in explaining many of the observational features of Type Ia supernovae, but they rely on two kinds of empirical models: one that describes the behaviour of the flame on the scales unresolved by the code, and another that takes account of the evolution of the flame shape. In contrast, three-dimensional simulations are able to compute the flame shape in a self-consistent way, but they still need a model for the propagation of the flame in the scales unresolved by the code. Furthermore, in three dimensions the number of degrees of freedom of the initial configuration of the white dwarf at runaway is much larger than in one dimension. Recent simulations have shown that the sensitivity of the explosion output to the initial conditions can be extremely large. New paradigms of thermonuclear supernovae have emerged from this situation, as the Pulsating Reverse Detonation. The resolution of all these issues must rely on the predictions of observational properties of the models, and their comparison with current Type Ia supernova data, including X-ray spectra of Type Ia supernova remnants.

  5. Three-dimensional Numerical Simulations of Rayleigh-Taylor Unstable Flames in Type Ia Supernovae

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bell, John B.

    ) instability and turbulence in accelerating a thermonuclear flame in Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) is well

  6. The Photometric Properties of Nearby Type Ia Supernovae

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ganeshalingam, Mohan

    2012-01-01

    The Rise-Time Distribution of Nearby Type Ia Supernovae 3.1Highlight: The Physics of Supernovae, ed. W. Hillebrandt &1.1 Supernovae . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1.1.1

  7. Improving Type Ia Supernova Standard Candle Cosmology Measurements Using Observations of Early-Type Host Galaxies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meyers, Joshua Evan

    2012-01-01

    Host Galaxies of Type Ia Supernovae Introduction SN Ia Hosts109 C HAPTER 1 Cosmology, Type Ia Supernovae and HostGalaxies Observations of supernovae have played a role in

  8. Direct numerical simulations of type Ia supernovae flames I: The landau-darrieus instability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bell, J.B.; Day, M.S.; Rendleman, C.A.; Woosley, S.E.; Zingale, M.

    2003-01-01

    Simulations of Type Ia Supernovae Flames I: The Landau-Subject headings: supernovae: general — white dwarfs —could occur in Type Ia supernovae (Niemeyer & Woosley 1997),

  9. Type Ia Supernova Progenitors, Environmental Effects, and Cosmic Supernova Rates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ken'ichi Nomoto; Hideyuki Umeda; Izumi Hachisu; Mariko Kato; Chiaki Kobayashi; Takuji Tsujimoto

    1999-07-27

    Relatively uniform light curves and spectral evolution of Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) have led to the use of SNe Ia as a ``standard candle'' to determine cosmological parameters, such as the Hubble constant, the density parameter, and the cosmological constant. Whether a statistically significant value of the cosmological constant can be obtained depends on whether the peak luminosities of SNe Ia are sufficiently free from the effects of cosmic and galactic evolutions. Here we first review the single degenerate scenario for the Chandrasekhar mass white dwarf (WD) models of SNe Ia. We identify the progenitor's evolution and population with two channels: (1) the WD+RG (red-giant) and (2) the WD+MS (near main-sequence He-rich star) channels. In these channels, the strong wind from accreting white dwarfs plays a key role, which yields important age and metallicity effects on the evolution. We then address the questions whether the nature of SNe Ia depends systematically on environmental properties such as metallicity and age of the progenitor system and whether significant evolutionary effects exist. We suggest that the variation of the carbon mass fraction $X$(C) in the C+O WD (or the variation of the initial WD mass) causes the diversity of the brightness of SNe Ia. This model can explain the observed dependence of SNe Ia brighness on the galaxy types. Finally, applying the metallicity effect on the evolution of SN Ia progenitors, we make a prediction of the cosmic supernova rate history as a composite of the supernova rates in different types of galaxies.

  10. New approaches for modeling type Ia supernovae

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zingale, Michael; Almgren, Ann S.; Bell, John B.; Day, Marcus S.; Rendleman, Charles A.; Woosley, Stan

    2007-01-01

    ich and J. Stein. On the thermonuclear runaway in Type IaSmall-Scale Stability of Thermonuclear Flames o in Type IaS. E. Woosley. The thermonuclear explosion of chandrasekhar

  11. Type Ia Supernovae and the Hubble Constant

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. Branch

    1998-01-08

    The focus of this review is the work that has been done during the 1990s on using Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) to measure the Hubble constant ($H_0$). SNe Ia are well suited for measuring $H_0$. A straightforward maximum-light color criterion can weed out the minority of observed events that are either intrinsically subluminous or substantially extinguished by dust, leaving a majority subsample that has observational absolute-magnitude dispersions of less than $\\sigma_{obs}(M_B) \\simeq \\sigma_{obs}(M_V) \\simeq 0.3$ mag. Correlations between absolute magnitude and one or more distance-independent SN Ia or parent-galaxy observables can be used to further standardize the absolute magnitudes to better than 0.2 mag. The absolute magnitudes can be calibrated in two independent ways --- empirically, using Cepheid-based distances to parent galaxies of SNe Ia, and physically, by light curve and spectrum fitting. At present the empirical and physical calibrations are in agreement at $M_B \\simeq M_V \\simeq -19.4$ or -19.5. Various ways that have been used to match Cepheid-calibrated SNe Ia or physical models to SNe Ia that have been observed out in the Hubble flow have given values of $H_0$ distributed throughout the range 54 to 67 km/s Mpc$^{-1}$. Astronomers who want a consensus value of $H_0$ from SNe Ia with conservative errors could, for now, use $60 \\pm 10$ km/s Mpc^{-1}$.

  12. Nearby Supernova Factory Observations of SN 2006D: On Sporadic Carbon Signatures in Early Type Ia Supernova Spectra

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2006-01-01

    with low volume-?lling factor. Subject headings: supernovae:general — supernovae: individual (SN 2006D)Introduction Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) make valuable

  13. Neutronization During Type Ia Supernova Simmering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Piro, Anthony L

    2007-01-01

    Prior to the incineration of a white dwarf (WD) that makes a Type Ia supernova (SN Ia), the star "simmers" for ~1000 years in a convecting, carbon burning region. We have found that weak interactions during this time increase the neutron excess by an amount that depends on the total quantity of carbon burned prior to the explosion. This contribution is in addition to the metallicity (Z) dependent neutronization through the 22Ne abundance (as studied by Timmes, Brown, & Truran). The main consequence is that we expect a floor to the level of neutronization that dominates over the metallicity contribution when Z/Z_\\odot<2/3, and it can be important for even larger metallicities if substantial energy is lost to neutrinos via the convective Urca process. This would mask any correlations between SN Ia properties and galactic environments at low metallicities. In addition, we show that recent observations of the dependences of SNe Ia on galactic environments make it clear that metallicity alone cannot provide...

  14. Neutronization During Type Ia Supernova Simmering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anthony L. Piro; Lars Bildsten

    2007-10-08

    Prior to the incineration of a white dwarf (WD) that makes a Type Ia supernova (SN Ia), the star "simmers" for ~1000 years in a convecting, carbon burning region. We have found that weak interactions during this time increase the neutron excess by an amount that depends on the total quantity of carbon burned prior to the explosion. This contribution is in addition to the metallicity (Z) dependent neutronization through the 22Ne abundance (as studied by Timmes, Brown, & Truran). The main consequence is that we expect a floor to the level of neutronization that dominates over the metallicity contribution when Z/Z_\\odot<2/3, and it can be important for even larger metallicities if substantial energy is lost to neutrinos via the convective Urca process. This would mask any correlations between SN Ia properties and galactic environments at low metallicities. In addition, we show that recent observations of the dependences of SNe Ia on galactic environments make it clear that metallicity alone cannot provide for the full observed diversity of events.

  15. Three-dimensional numerical simulations of Rayleigh-Taylor unstable flames in type Ia supernovae

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zingale, M.; Woosley, S.E.; Rendleman, C.A.; Day, M.S.; Bell, J.B.

    2005-01-01

    Unstable Flames in Type Ia Supernovae M. Zingale 1 , S. E.Subject headings: supernovae: general — white dwarfs —ame in Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) is well recognized (M¨

  16. Dark matter ignition of type Ia supernovae

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bramante, Joseph

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies of low redshift type Ia supernovae (SNIa) indicate that half explode from less than Chandrasekhar mass white dwarfs, implying ignition must proceed from something besides the canonical criticality of Chandrasekhar mass SNIa progenitors. We show that $0.1-10$ PeV mass asymmetric dark matter, with imminently detectable nucleon scattering interactions, can accumulate to the point of self-gravitation in a white dwarf and collapse, shedding gravitational potential energy by scattering off nuclei, thereby heating the white dwarf and igniting the flame front that precedes SNIa. We combine data on SNIa masses with data on the ages of SNIa-adjacent stars. This combination reveals a $ 3 \\sigma$ inverse correlation between SNIa masses and ignition ages, which could result from increased capture of dark matter in 1.4 versus 1.1 solar mass white dwarfs. Future studies of SNIa in galactic centers will provide additional tests of dark-matter-induced type Ia ignition. Remarkably, both bosonic and fermionic SNI...

  17. SPECTROSCOPY OF TYPE Ia SUPERNOVAE BY THE CARNEGIE SUPERNOVA PROJECT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Folatelli, Gaston [Kavli Institute for the Physics and Mathematics of the Universe (Kavli IPMU, WPI), Todai Institutes for Advanced Study, the University of Tokyo, 277-8583 Kashiwa (Japan); Morrell, Nidia; Phillips, Mark M.; Hsiao, Eric; Campillay, Abdo; Contreras, Carlos; Castellon, Sergio; Roth, Miguel [Las Campanas Observatory, Carnegie Observatories, Casilla 601, La Serena (Chile); Hamuy, Mario; Anderson, Joseph P. [Departamento de Astronomia, Universidad de Chile, Casilla 36-D, Santiago (Chile); Krzeminski, Wojtek [N. Copernicus Astronomical Center, ul. Bartycka 18, 00-716 Warszawa (Poland); Stritzinger, Maximilian [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Aarhus University, Ny Munkegade 120, DK-8000 Aarhus C (Denmark); Burns, Christopher R.; Freedman, Wendy L.; Madore, Barry F.; Murphy, David; Persson, S. E. [Observatories of the Carnegie Institution of Washington, 813 Santa Barbara Street, Pasadena, CA 91101 (United States); Prieto, Jose L. [Department of Astrophysical Sciences, Princeton University, 4 Ivy Ln., Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States); Suntzeff, Nicholas B.; Krisciunas, Kevin, E-mail: gaston.folatelli@ipmu.jp [George P. and Cynthia Woods Mitchell Institute for Fundamental Physics and Astronomy, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Texas A and M University, College Station, TX 77843 (United States); and others

    2013-08-10

    This is the first release of optical spectroscopic data of low-redshift Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) by the Carnegie Supernova Project including 604 previously unpublished spectra of 93 SNe Ia. The observations cover a range of phases from 12 days before to over 150 days after the time of B-band maximum light. With the addition of 228 near-maximum spectra from the literature, we study the diversity among SNe Ia in a quantitative manner. For that purpose, spectroscopic parameters are employed such as expansion velocities from spectral line blueshifts and pseudo-equivalent widths (pW). The values of those parameters at maximum light are obtained for 78 objects, thus providing a characterization of SNe Ia that may help to improve our understanding of the properties of the exploding systems and the thermonuclear flame propagation. Two objects, namely, SNe 2005M and 2006is, stand out from the sample by showing peculiar Si II and S II velocities but otherwise standard velocities for the rest of the ions. We further study the correlations between spectroscopic and photometric parameters such as light-curve decline rate and color. In agreement with previous studies, we find that the pW of Si II absorption features are very good indicators of light-curve decline rate. Furthermore, we demonstrate that parameters such as pW2 (Si II 4130) and pW6 (Si II 5972) provide precise calibrations of the peak B-band luminosity with dispersions of Almost-Equal-To 0.15 mag. In the search for a secondary parameter in the calibration of peak luminosity for SNe Ia, we find a Almost-Equal-To 2{sigma}-3{sigma} correlation between B-band Hubble residuals and the velocity at maximum light of S II and Si II lines.

  18. The Carnegie Supernova Project: Intrinsic colors of type Ia supernovae

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burns, Christopher R.; Persson, S. E.; Freedman, Wendy L.; Madore, Barry F. [Observatories of the Carnegie Institution for Science, 813 Santa Barbara Street, Pasadena, CA 91101 (United States); Stritzinger, Maximilian; Contreras, Carlos [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Aarhus University, Ny Munkegade 120, DK-8000 Aarhus C (Denmark); Phillips, M. M.; Hsiao, E. Y.; Boldt, Luis; Campillay, Abdo; Castellón, Sergio; Morrell, Nidia; Salgado, Francisco [Carnegie Institution of Washington, Las Campanas Observatory, Colina El Pino, Casilla 601 (Chile); Folatelli, Gaston [Kavli Institute for the Physics and Mathematics of the Universe, Todai Institutes for Advanced Study, the University of Tokyo, 277-8583 Kashiwa (Japan); Suntzeff, Nicholas B. [George P. and Cynthia Woods Mitchell Institute for Fundamental Physics and Astronomy, Texas A and M University, Department of Physics and Astronomy, College Station, TX 77843 (United States)

    2014-07-01

    We present an updated analysis of the intrinsic colors of Type Ia supernova (SNe Ia) using the latest data release of the Carnegie Supernova Project. We introduce a new light-curve parameter very similar to stretch that is better suited for fast-declining events, and find that these peculiar types can be seen as extensions to the population of 'normal' SNe Ia. With a larger number of objects, an updated fit to the Lira relation is presented along with evidence for a dependence on the late-time slope of the B – V light-curves with stretch and color. Using the full wavelength range from u to H band, we place constraints on the reddening law for the sample as a whole and also for individual events/hosts based solely on the observed colors. The photometric data continue to favor low values of R{sub V} , though with large variations from event to event, indicating an intrinsic distribution. We confirm the findings of other groups that there appears to be a correlation between the derived reddening law, R{sub V} , and the color excess, E(B – V), such that larger E(B – V) tends to favor lower R{sub V} . The intrinsic u-band colors show a relatively large scatter that cannot be explained by variations in R{sub V} or by the Goobar power-law for circumstellar dust, but rather is correlated with spectroscopic features of the supernova and is therefore likely due to metallicity effects.

  19. Sweetspot: Near-infrared observations of 13 type Ia supernovae...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    of 13 type Ia supernovae from a new NOAO survey probing the nearby smooth Hubble flow Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Sweetspot: Near-infrared observations of 13...

  20. Dark Matter Admixed Type Ia Supernovae

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leung, S -C; Lin, L -M

    2015-01-01

    We perform two-dimensional hydrodynamic simulations for the thermonuclear explosion of Chandrasekhar-mass white dwarfs with dark matter (DM) cores in Newtonian gravity. We include a 19-isotope nuclear reaction network and make use of the pure turbulent deflagration model as the explosion mechanism in our simulations. Our numerical results show that the general properties of the explosion depend quite sensitively on the mass of the DM core M$_{{\\rm DM}}$: a larger M$_{{\\rm DM}}$ generally leads to a weaker explosion and a lower mass of synthesized iron-peaked elements. In particular, the total mass of $^{56}$Ni produced can drop from about 0.3 to 0.03 $M_{\\odot}$ as M$_{{\\rm DM}}$ increases from 0.01 to 0.03 $M_{\\odot}$. We have also constructed the bolometric light curves obtained from our simulations and found that our results match well with the observational data of sub-luminous Type-Ia supernovae.

  1. High-Redshift Type Ia Supernova Rates in Galaxy Cluster and Field Environments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barbary, Kyle Harris

    2011-01-01

    29 Candidates classified as supernovae . . . . . . . .1.1 Type Ia Supernovae as Standard Candles . . . . . . . .4.2.3 Supernovae . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4.2.4

  2. Direct numerical simulations of type Ia supernovae flames II: The rayleigh-taylor instability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bell, J.B.; Day, M.S.; Rendleman, C.A.; Woosley, S.E.; Zingale, M.

    2004-01-01

    Weaver, T. A. 1994, in Supernovae, Les Houches, Session LIV,Simulations of Type Ia Supernovae Flames II: The Rayleigh-Subject headings: supernovae: general — white dwarfs —

  3. Timescale stretch parameterization of Type Ia supernova B-band light curves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2001-01-01

    the light curve of Type Ia supernovae discovered by theof the high-redshift supernovae. This work was supported inobjects. Subject headings: supernovae: general – cosmology:

  4. Feasibility of Measuring the Cosmological Constant [LAMBDA] and Mass Density [Omega] using Type Ia Supernovae

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goobar, A.

    2008-01-01

    at z = 1. uncertainty for supernovae at z = 1. mR Adding theMass Density .Q Using Type Ia Supernovae A. Goobar and S.Density Q Using Type Ia Supernovae Ariel Goobar l and Saul

  5. UV Spectroscopy of Type Ia Supernovae at Low- and High-Redshift

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nugent, Peter

    2005-01-01

    Spectroscopy of Type Ia Supernovae at Low- and High-RedshiftUV properties of Type Ia Supernovae. The low-redshift studyULDA Access Guide No. 6: Supernovae, The Netherlands: ESA

  6. Strong Ultraviolet Pulse From a Newborn Type Ia Supernova

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cao, Yi; Howell, D Andrew; Gal-Yam, Avishay; Kasliwal, Mansi M; Valenti, Stefano; Johansson, J; Amanullah, R; Goobar, A; Sollerman, J; Taddia, F; Horesh, Assaf; Sagiv, Ilan; Cenko, S Bradley; Nugent, Peter E; Arcavi, Iair; Surace, Jason; Wo?niak, P R; Moody, Daniela I; Rebbapragada, Umaa D; Bue, Brian D; Gehrels, Neil

    2015-01-01

    Type Ia supernovae are destructive explosions of carbon oxygen white dwarfs. Although they are used empirically to measure cosmological distances, the nature of their progenitors remains mysterious, One of the leading progenitor models, called the single degenerate channel, hypothesizes that a white dwarf accretes matter from a companion star and the resulting increase in its central pressure and temperature ignites thermonuclear explosion. Here we report observations of strong but declining ultraviolet emission from a Type Ia supernova within four days of its explosion. This emission is consistent with theoretical expectations of collision between material ejected by the supernova and a companion star, and therefore provides evidence that some Type Ia supernovae arise from the single degenerate channel.

  7. Simulations of Turbulent Thermonuclear Burning in Type Ia Supernovae

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    W. Hillebrandt; M. Reinecke; W. Schmidt; F. K. Roepke; C. Travaglio; J. C. Niemeyer

    2004-05-11

    Type Ia supernovae have recently received considerable attention because it appears that they can be used as "standard candles" to measure cosmic distances out to billions of light years away from us. Observations of type Ia supernovae seem to indicate that we are living in a universe that started to accelerate its expansion when it was about half its present age. These conclusions rest primarily on phenomenological models which, however, lack proper theoretical understanding, mainly because the explosion process, initiated by thermonuclear fusion of carbon and oxygen into heavier elements, is difficult to simulate even on supercomputers. Here, we investigate a new way of modeling turbulent thermonuclear deflagration fronts in white dwarfs undergoing a type Ia supernova explosion. Our approach is based on a level set method which treats the front as a mathematical discontinuity and allows for full coupling between the front geometry and the flow field. New results of the method applied to the problem of type Ia supernovae are obtained. It is shown that in 2-D with high spatial resolution and a physically motivated subgrid scale model for the nuclear flames numerically "converged" results can be obtained, but for most initial conditions the stars do not explode. In contrast, simulations in 3-D, do give the desired explosions and many of their properties, such as the explosion energies, lightcurves and nucleosynthesis products, are in very good agreement with observed type Ia supernovae.

  8. Could there be a hole in type Ia supernovae?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kasen, Daniel; Nugent, Peter; Thomas, R.C.; Wang, Lifan

    2004-04-23

    In the favored progenitor scenario, Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) arise from a white dwarf accreting material from a non-degenerate companion star. Soon after the white dwarf explodes, the ejected supernova material engulfs the companion star; two-dimensional hydrodynamical simulations by Marietta et al. (2001) show that, in the interaction, the companion star carves out a conical hole of opening angle 30-40 degrees in the supernova ejecta. In this paper we use multi-dimensional Monte Carlo radiative transfer calculations to explore the observable consequences of an ejecta-hole asymmetry. We calculate the variation of the spectrum, luminosity, and polarization with viewing angle for the aspherical supernova near maximum light. We find that the supernova looks normal from almost all viewing angles except when one looks almost directly down the hole. In the latter case, one sees into the deeper, hotter layers of ejecta. The supernova is relatively brighter and has a peculiar spectrum characterized by more highly ionized species, weaker absorption features, and lower absorption velocities. The spectrum viewed down the hole is comparable to the class of SN 1991T-like supernovae. We consider how the ejecta-hole asymmetry may explain the current spectropolarimetric observations of SNe Ia, and suggest a few observational signatures of the geometry. Finally, we discuss the variety currently seen in observed SNe Ia and how an ejecta-hole asymmetry may fit in as one of several possible sources of diversity.

  9. Search for surviving companions in type Ia supernova remnants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pan, Kuo-Chuan [Physik Department, Universität Basel, Klingelbergstrasse 82, CH-4056 Basel (Switzerland); Ricker, Paul M. [Department of Astronomy, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 1002 West Green Street, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States); Taam, Ronald E., E-mail: kuo-chuan.pan@unibas.ch, E-mail: pmricker@illinois.edu, E-mail: r-taam@northwestern.edu, E-mail: taam@asiaa.sinica.edu.tw [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Northwestern University, 2145 Sheridan Road, Evanston, IL 60208 (United States)

    2014-09-01

    The nature of the progenitor systems of type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) is still unclear. One way to distinguish between the single-degenerate scenario and double-degenerate scenario for their progenitors is to search for the surviving companions (SCs). Using a technique that couples the results from multi-dimensional hydrodynamics simulations with calculations of the structure and evolution of main-sequence- (MS-) and helium-rich SCs, the color and magnitude of MS- and helium-rich SCs are predicted as functions of time. The SC candidates in Galactic type Ia supernova remnants (Ia SNR) and nearby extragalactic Ia SNRs are discussed. We find that the maximum detectable distance of MS SCs (helium-rich SCs) is 0.6-4 Mpc (0.4-16 Mpc), if the apparent magnitude limit is 27 in the absence of extinction, suggesting that the Large and Small Magellanic Clouds and the Andromeda Galaxy are excellent environments in which to search for SCs. However, only five Ia SNRs have been searched for SCs, showing little support for the standard channels in the singe-degenerate scenario. To better understand the progenitors of SNe Ia, we encourage the search for SCs in other nearby Ia SNRs.

  10. Type Ia Supernovae: Progenitors and Evolution with Redshift

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ken'ichi Nomoto; Hideyuki Umeda; Chiaki Kobayashi; Izumi Hachisu; Mariko Kato; Takuji Tsujimoto

    2000-03-09

    Relatively uniform light curves and spectral evolution of Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) have led to the use of SNe Ia as a ``standard candle'' to determine cosmological parameters. Whether a statistically significant value of the cosmological constant can be obtained depends on whether the peak luminosities of SNe Ia are sufficiently free from the effects of cosmic and galactic evolutions. Here we first review the single degenerate scenario for the Chandrasekhar mass white dwarf (WD) models of SNe Ia. We identify the progenitor's evolution and population with two channels: (1) the WD+RG (red-giant) and (2) the WD+MS (near main-sequence He-rich star) channels. In these channels, the strong wind from accreting WDs plays a key role, which yields important age and metallicity effects on the evolution. We then address the questions whether the nature of SNe Ia depends systematically on environmental properties such as metallicity and age of the progenitor system and whether significant evolutionary effects exist. We suggest that the variation of the carbon mass fraction $X$(C) in the C+O WD (or the variation of the initial WD mass) causes the diversity of the brightness of SNe Ia. This model can explain the observed dependences of SNe Ia brightness on the galaxy types and the distance from the galactic center. Finally, applying the metallicity effect on the evolution of SN Ia progenitors, we make a prediction of the cosmic supernova rate history as a composite of the supernova rates in different types of galaxies.

  11. A static universe is consistent with type Ia supernovae observations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    David F. Crawford

    2015-04-18

    This paper considers the hypothesis that the universe is static and demonstrates that type Ia supernova observations which appear to provide strong support for time dilation (and thus for an expanding universe) are equally consistent with a static universe. It is shown that a property of the standard calibration method means that regardless of what redshift dependence the measured light curve widths may have the calibrated widths always have little or no redshift dependence. An important consideration is the Phillips relation, a correlation between the peak-luminosity and the width of type Ia supernovae. Using the Phillips relation the analysis of a recent compilation of type Ia supernova observations is re-examined and it is shown that these observations are fully consistent with a static universe. It is also argued that the photometric redshift relation and spectroscopic ages are fully consistent with a static universe. As a separate but related issue it is shown that in the static model the density distribution of type Ia supernovae as a function of redshift agrees with the observations. All the evidence shows that the hypothesis is consistent with a static universe.

  12. NEAR-ULTRAVIOLET PROPERTIES OF A LARGE SAMPLE OF TYPE Ia SUPERNOVAE...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    SUPERNOVAE AS OBSERVED WITH THE Swift UVOT We present ultraviolet (UV) and optical photometry of 26 Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) observed from 2005 March to 2008 March with the...

  13. The Diversity of Variations in the Spectra of Type Ia Supernovae 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wagers, Andrew James

    2012-10-19

    Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) are currently the best probe of the expansion history of the universe. Their usefulness is due chiefly to their uniformity between supernovae (SNe). However, there are some slight variations amongst SNe that have yet...

  14. No evidence for bulk velocity from type Ia supernovae

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huterer, Dragan; Schmidt, Fabian

    2015-01-01

    We revisit the effect of peculiar velocities on low-redshift type Ia supernovae. Velocities introduce an additional guaranteed source of correlations between supernova magnitudes that should be considered in all analyses of nearby supernova samples but has largely been neglected in the past. Applying a likelihood analysis to the latest compilation of nearby supernovae, we find no evidence for the presence of these correlations, although, given the significant noise, the data is also consistent with the correlations predicted for the standard LCDM model. We then consider the dipolar component of the velocity correlations - the frequently studied "bulk velocity" - and explicitly demonstrate that including the velocity correlations in the data covariance matrix is crucial for drawing correct and unambiguous conclusions about the bulk flow. In particular, current supernova data is consistent with no excess bulk flow on top of what is expected in LCDM and effectively captured by the covariance. We further clarify ...

  15. Type Ia Supernovae Project at NERSC

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of star called a white dwarf. The majority of SN Ia explosions occur far away from our galaxy; yet, due to their enormous intrinsic brightness, outshining billions of stars, we can...

  16. SALT2: using distant supernovae to improve the use of Type Ia supernovae as distance indicators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Guy; P. Astier; S. Baumont; D. Hardin; R. Pain; N. Regnault; S. Basa; R. G. Carlberg; A. Conley; S. Fabbro; D. Fouchez; I. M. Hook; D. A. Howell; K. Perrett; C. J. Pritchet; J. Rich; M. Sullivan; P. Antilogus; E. Aubourg; G. Bazin; J. Bronder; M. Filiol; N. Palanque-Delabrouille; P. Ripoche; V. Ruhlmann-Kleider

    2007-01-29

    We present an empirical model of Type Ia supernovae spectro-photometric evolution with time. The model is built using a large data set including light-curves and spectra of both nearby and distant supernovae, the latter being observed by the SNLS collaboration. We derive the average spectral sequence of Type Ia supernovae and their main variability components including a color variation law. The model allows us to measure distance moduli in the spectral range 2500-8000 A with calculable uncertainties, including those arising from variability of spectral features. Thanks to the use of high-redshift SNe to model the rest-frame UV spectral energy distribution, we are able to derive improved distance estimates for SNe Ia in the redshift range 0.8Type Ia supernovae.

  17. THE ULTRAVIOLET BRIGHTEST TYPE Ia SUPERNOVA 2011de

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, Peter J., E-mail: pbrown@physics.tamu.edu [George P. and Cynthia Woods Mitchell Institute for Fundamental Physics and Astronomy, Texas A and M University, Department of Physics and Astronomy, 4242 TAMU, College Station, TX 77843 (United States)

    2014-11-20

    We present and discuss the ultraviolet (UV)/optical photometric light curves and absolute magnitudes of the Type Ia supernova (SN Ia) 2011de from the Swift Ultraviolet/Optical Telescope. We find it to be the UV brightest SN Ia yet observed—more than a factor of 10 brighter than normal SNe Ia in the mid-ultraviolet. We find that the UV/optical brightness and broad light curve evolution can be modeled with additional flux from the shock of the ejecta hitting a relatively large red giant companion separated by 6 × 10{sup 13} cm. However, the post-maximum behavior of other UV-bright SNe Ia can also be modeled in a similar manner, including objects with UV spectroscopy or pre-maximum photometry which is inconsistent with this model. This suggests that similar UV luminosities can be intrinsic or caused by other forms of shock interaction. The high velocities reported for SN 2011de make it distinct from the UV-bright ''super-Chandrasekhar'' SNe Ia and the NUV-blue group of normal SNe Ia. SN 2011de is an extreme example of the UV variations in SNe Ia.

  18. Diversity of Type Ia Supernovae Imprinted in Chemical Abundances

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsujimoto, Takuji

    2012-01-01

    A time delay of Type Ia supernova (SN Ia) explosions hinders the imprint of their nucleosynthesis on stellar abundances. However, some occasional cases give birth to stars that avoid enrichment of their chemical compositions by massive stars and thereby exhibit a SN Ia-like elemental feature including a very low [Mg/Fe] (~-1). We highlight the elemental feature of Fe-group elements for two low-Mg/Fe objects detected in nearby galaxies, and propose the presence of a class of SNe Ia that yield the low abundance ratios of [Cr,Mn,Ni/Fe]. Our novel models of chemical evolution reveal that our proposed class of SNe Ia (slow SNe Ia) is associated with ones exploding on a long timescale after their stellar birth, and gives a significant impact on the chemical enrichment in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC). In the Galaxy, on the other hand, this effect is unseen due to the overwhelming enrichment by the major class of SNe Ia that explode promptly (prompt SNe Ia) and eject a large amount of Fe-group elements. This nice...

  19. Single-Degenerate Type Ia Supernovae Are Preferentially Overluminous

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fisher, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Recent observational and theoretical progress has favored merging and helium-accreting sub-Chandrasekhar mass white dwarfs in the double-degenerate and the double-detonation channels, respectively, as the most promising progenitors of normal Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia). Thus the fate of rapidly-accreting Chandrasekhar mass white dwarfs in the single-degenerate channel remains more mysterious then ever. In this paper, we clarify the nature of ignition in Chandrasekhar-mass single-degenerate SNe Ia by analytically deriving the existence of a characteristic length scale which establishes a transition from central ignitions to buoyancy-driven ignitions. Using this criterion, combined with data from three-dimensional simulations of convection and ignition, we demonstrate that the overwhelming majority of ignition events within Chandrasekhar-mass white dwarfs in the single-degenerate channel are buoyancy-driven, and consequently lack a vigorous deflagration phase. We thus infer that single-degenerate SNe Ia are gen...

  20. Quantitative comparison between Type Ia supernova spectra at low and high redshifts: A case study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Garavini, G.; Supernova Cosmology Project

    2008-01-01

    Highlight - The Physics of Supernovae, ESO/MPA/MPE Workshop,Evolution in high-redshift supernovae Fig. 8 “Ca ii H&K”SN 1991T/SN 1999aa-like supernovae. 1. Introduction Type Ia

  1. Marginal evidence for cosmic acceleration from Type Ia supernovae

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jeppe Trøst Nielsen; Alberto Guffanti; Subir Sarkar

    2015-06-09

    The "standard" model of cosmology is founded on the basis that the expansion rate of the universe is accelerating at present --- as was inferred originally from the Hubble diagram of Type Ia supernovae. There exists now a much bigger database of supernovae so we can perform rigorous statistical tests to check whether these "standardisable candles" indeed indicate cosmic acceleration. Taking account of the empirical procedure by which corrections are made to their absolute magnitudes to allow for the varying shape of the light curve and extinction by dust, we find, rather surprisingly, that the data are still quite consistent with a constant rate of expansion.

  2. Marginal evidence for cosmic acceleration from Type Ia supernovae

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nielsen, Jeppe Trøst; Sarkar, Subir

    2015-01-01

    The `standard' model of cosmology is founded on the basis that the expansion rate of the universe is accelerating at present --- as was inferred originally from the Hubble diagram of Type Ia supernovae. There exists now a much bigger database of supernovae so we can perform rigorous statistical tests to check whether these `standardisable candles' indeed indicate cosmic acceleration. Taking account of the empirical procedure by which corrections are made to their absolute magnitudes to allow for the varying shape of the light curve and extinction by dust, we find, rather surprisingly, that the data are still quite consistent with a constant rate of expansion.

  3. DIVERSITY OF TYPE Ia SUPERNOVAE IMPRINTED IN CHEMICAL ABUNDANCES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tsujimoto, Takuji [National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, Mitaka-shi, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan); Shigeyama, Toshikazu, E-mail: taku.tsujimoto@nao.ac.jp [Research Center for the Early Universe, Graduate School of Science, University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan)

    2012-12-01

    A time delay of Type Ia supernova (SN Ia) explosions hinders the imprint of their nucleosynthesis on stellar abundances. However, some occasional cases give birth to stars that avoid enrichment of their chemical compositions by massive stars and thereby exhibit an SN-Ia-like elemental feature including a very low [Mg/Fe] ( Almost-Equal-To - 1). We highlight the elemental feature of Fe-group elements for two low-Mg/Fe objects detected in nearby galaxies, and propose the presence of a class of SNe Ia that yield the low abundance ratios of [Cr, Mn, Ni/Fe]. Our novel models of chemical evolution reveal that our proposed class of SNe Ia (slow SNe Ia) is associated with ones exploding on a long timescale after their stellar birth and give a significant impact on the chemical enrichment in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC). In the Galaxy, on the other hand, this effect is unseen due to the overwhelming enrichment by the major class of SNe Ia that explode promptly (prompt SNe Ia) and eject a large amount of Fe-group elements. This nicely explains the different [Cr, Mn, Ni/Fe] features between the two galaxies as well as the puzzling feature seen in the LMC stars exhibiting very low Ca but normal Mg abundances. Furthermore, the corresponding channel of slow SN Ia is exemplified by performing detailed nucleosynthesis calculations in the scheme of SNe Ia resulting from a 0.8 + 0.6 M{sub Sun} white dwarf merger.

  4. Type Ia Supernova Scenarios and the Hubble Sequence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. Ruiz-Lapuente; A. Burkert; R. Canal

    1995-05-19

    The dependence of the Type Ia supernova (SN Ia) rate on galaxy type is examined for three currently proposed scenarios: merging of a Chandrasekhar--mass CO white dwarf (WD) with a CO WD companion, explosion of a sub--Chandrasekhar mass CO WD induced by accretion of material from a He star companion, and explosion of a sub--Chandrasekhar CO WD in a symbiotic system. The variation of the SNe Ia rate and explosion characteristics with time is derived, and its correlation with parent population age and galaxy redshift is discussed. Among current scenarios, CO + He star systems should be absent from E galaxies. Explosion of CO WDs in symbiotic systems could account for the SNe Ia rate in these galaxies. The same might be true for the CO + CO WD scenario, depending on the value of the common envelope parameter. A testable prediction of the sub--Chandrasekhar WD model is that the average brightness and kinetic energy of the SN Ia events should increase with redshift for a given Hubble type. Also for this scenario, going along the Hubble sequence from E to Sc galaxies SNe Ia events should be brighter on average and should show larger mean velocities of the ejecta. The observational correlations strongly suggest that the characteristics of the SNe Ia explosion are linked to parent population age. The scenario in which WDs with masses below the Chandrasekhar mass explode appears the most promising one to explain the observed variation of the SN Ia rate with galaxy type together with the luminosity--expansion velocity trend.

  5. The type Ia supernova SNLS-03D3bb from a super-Chandrasekhar-mass white dwarf star

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2008-01-01

    magnitudes of Type IA supernovae. Astrophys. J. Lett. 413,from 42 High-Redshift Supernovae. Astrophys. J. 517, 565–Observational Evidence from Supernovae for an Accelerating

  6. A New Determination of the High Redshift Type Ia Supernova Rates with the Hubble Space Telescope Advanced Camera for Surveys

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2008-01-01

    Schmidt, B. P. , 2003, in Supernovae and Gamma Ray Bursts,for identifying Type Ia supernovae (although spectroscopicfor future high-statistics supernovae searches in which

  7. Measurement of Omega_m, Omega_Lambda from a blind analysis of Type Ia supernovae with CMAGIC: Using color information to verify the acceleration of the Universe

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2006-01-01

    analysis of Type Ia supernovae with CMAGIC: Using colorof 21 high redshift supernovae using a new technique (lightcurves of Type Ia supernovae, ?rst introduced in Wang

  8. Identification of the companion stars of Type Ia supernovae

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. Canal; J. Mendez; P. Ruiz-Lapuente

    2000-10-10

    The nature of the binary systems giving rise to Type Ia supernovae (SNeIa) remains an unsolved problem. In this {\\it Letter} we calculate, from the statistics of initial conditions (masses and binary separations), the mass, luminosity, and velocity distributions of the possible binary companions (main-sequence star, subgiant, red giant) following the explosion of the white dwarf which gives rise to the SNeIa. Those companions could be detected from either their proper or their radial motions, by means of high-precision astrometric and radial-velocity measurements in young, nearby supernova remnants. Peculiar velocities typically ranging from 100 to 450 km s$^{-1}$ should be expected, which places proper-motion measurements within reach of HST instruments and makes radial-velocity ones feasible with 2.5-4m class telescopes from the ground. Detections would solve the long-standing problem of which kind of binaries do produce SNeIa and clear up the way to accurate physical modeling of the explosions.

  9. Bolometric Light Curves of Type Ia Supernovae G. Contardo 1;2 , B. Leibundgut 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leibundgut, Bruno

    Bolometric Light Curves of Type Ia Supernovae G. Contardo 1;2 , B. Leibundgut 1 1 European Southern, Karl­Schwarzschild­Straße 1, D­85748 Garch­ ing, Germany 1.1 Light Curves of Type Ia Supernovae Substantial information about the processes in supernovae is contained in their light curves. They track

  10. Could there be a hole in type Ia supernovae?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kasen, Daniel; Nugent, Peter; Thomas, R.C.; Wang, Lifan

    2004-01-01

    Highlight: The Physics of Supernovae. Pro- ceedings of the EThere Be A Hole In Type l a Supernovae? Daniel Kasen, Peterscenario, Type l a Supernovae (SNe la) arise from a white

  11. Type Ia Supernova Spectral Line Ratios as LuminosityIndicators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bongard, Sebastien; Baron, E.; Smadja, G.; Branch, David; Hauschildt, Peter H.

    2005-12-07

    Type Ia supernovae have played a crucial role in thediscovery of the dark energy, via the measurement of their light curvesand the determination of the peak brightness via fitting templates to theobserved lightcurve shape. Two spectroscopic indicators are also known tobe well correlated with peak luminosity. Since the spectroscopicluminosity indicators are obtained directly from observed spectra, theywill have different systematic errors than do measurements usingphotometry. Additionally, these spectroscopic indicators may be usefulfor studies of effects of evolution or age of the SNe~;Ia progenitorpopulation. We present several new variants of such spectroscopicindicators which are easy to automate and which minimize the effects ofnoise. We show that these spectroscopic indicators can be measured byproposed JDEM missions such as snap and JEDI.

  12. Type Ia supernovae from exploding oxygen-neon white dwarfs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marquardt, Kai S; Ruiter, Ashley J; Seitenzahl, Ivo R; Ohlmann, Sebastian T; Kromer, Markus; Pakmor, Ruediger; Roepke, Friedrich K

    2015-01-01

    The progenitor problem of Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) is still unsolved. Most of these events are thought to be explosions of carbon-oxygen (CO) white dwarfs (WDs), but for many of the explosion scenarios, particularly those involving the externally triggered detonation of a sub-Chandrasekhar mass WD (sub-M Ch WD), there is also a possibility of having an oxygen-neon (ONe) WD as progenitor. We simulate detonations of ONe WDs and calculate synthetic observables from these models. The results are compared with detonations in CO WDs of similar mass and observational data of SNe Ia. We perform hydrodynamic explosion simulations of detonations in initially hydrostatic ONe WDs for a range of masses below the Chandrasekhar mass (M Ch), followed by detailed nucleosynthetic postprocessing with a 384-isotope nuclear reaction network. The results are used to calculate synthetic spectra and light curves, which are then compared with observations of SNe Ia. We also perform binary evolution calculations to determine the nu...

  13. Type Ia supernovae from merging white dwarfs. I. Prompt detonations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moll, R.; Woosley, S. E. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Raskin, C.; Kasen, D. [Nuclear Science Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)

    2014-04-20

    Merging white dwarfs are a possible progenitor of Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia). Numerical models suggest that a detonation might be initiated before the stars have coalesced to form a single compact object. Here we study such prompt detonations by means of numerical simulations, modeling the disruption and nucleosynthesis of the stars until the ejecta reach the coasting phase, and generating synthetic light curves and spectra. Three models are considered with primary masses 0.96 M {sub ?}, 1.06 M {sub ?}, and 1.20 M {sub ?}. Of these, the 0.96 M {sub ?} dwarf merging with a 0.81 M {sub ?} companion, with an {sup 56}Ni yield of 0.58 M {sub ?}, is the most promising candidate for reproducing common SNe Ia. The more massive mergers produce unusually luminous SNe Ia with peak luminosities approaching those attributed to 'super-Chandrasekhar' mass SNe Ia. While the synthetic light curves and spectra of some of the models resemble observed SNe Ia, the significant asymmetry of the ejecta leads to large orientation effects. The peak bolometric luminosity varies by more than a factor of two with the viewing angle, and the velocities of the spectral absorption features are lower when observed from angles where the light curve is brightest. The largest orientation effects are seen in the ultraviolet, where the flux varies by more than an order of magnitude. The set of three models roughly obeys a width-luminosity relation, with the brighter light curves declining more slowly in the B band. Spectral features due to unburned carbon from the secondary star are also seen in some cases.

  14. On silicon group elements ejected by supernovae type IA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    De, Soma; Timmes, F. X. [School of Earth and Space Exploration, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ (United States); Brown, Edward F. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Astrophysics, University of Notre Dame, IN 46556 (United States); Calder, Alan C. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY (United States); Townsley, Dean M. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, The University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, AL (United States); Athanassiadou, Themis [Swiss National Supercomputing Centre, Via Trevano 131, 6900 Lugano (Switzerland); Chamulak, David A. [Physics Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL (United States); Hawley, Wendy [Laboratoire d'Astrophysique de Marseille, Marseille cedex 13 F-13388 (France); Jack, Dennis, E-mail: somad@asu.edu [Departamento de Astronomía, Universidad de Guanajuato, Apartado Postal 144, 36000 Guanajuato (Mexico)

    2014-06-01

    There is evidence that the peak brightness of a Type Ia supernova is affected by the electron fraction Y {sub e} at the time of the explosion. The electron fraction is set by the aboriginal composition of the white dwarf and the reactions that occur during the pre-explosive convective burning. To date, determining the makeup of the white dwarf progenitor has relied on indirect proxies, such as the average metallicity of the host stellar population. In this paper, we present analytical calculations supporting the idea that the electron fraction of the progenitor systematically influences the nucleosynthesis of silicon group ejecta in Type Ia supernovae. In particular, we suggest the abundances generated in quasi-nuclear statistical equilibrium are preserved during the subsequent freeze-out. This allows potential recovery of Y {sub e} at explosion from the abundances recovered from an observed spectra. We show that measurement of {sup 28}Si, {sup 32}S, {sup 40}Ca, and {sup 54}Fe abundances can be used to construct Y {sub e} in the silicon-rich regions of the supernovae. If these four abundances are determined exactly, they are sufficient to recover Y {sub e} to 6%. This is because these isotopes dominate the composition of silicon-rich material and iron-rich material in quasi-nuclear statistical equilibrium. Analytical analysis shows the {sup 28}Si abundance is insensitive to Y {sub e}, the {sup 32}S abundance has a nearly linear trend with Y {sub e}, and the {sup 40}Ca abundance has a nearly quadratic trend with Y {sub e}. We verify these trends with post-processing of one-dimensional models and show that these trends are reflected in the model's synthetic spectra.

  15. Signatures of a companion star in type Ia supernovae

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maeda, Keiichi [Department of Astronomy, Kyoto University, Kitashirakawa-Oiwake-cho, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan); Kutsuna, Masamichi; Shigeyama, Toshikazu, E-mail: keiichi.maeda@kusastro.kyoto-u.ac.jp [Research Center for the Early Universe, School of Science, University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan)

    2014-10-10

    Although type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) have been used as precise cosmological distance indicators, their progenitor systems remain unresolved. One of the key questions is whether there is a nondegenerate companion star at the time of a thermonuclear explosion of a white dwarf. In this paper, we investigate whether an interaction between the SN ejecta and the companion star may result in observable footprints around the maximum brightness and thereafter, by performing multidimensional radiation transfer simulations based on hydrodynamic simulations of the interaction. We find that such systems result in variations in various observational characteristics due to different viewing directions, and the predicted behaviors (redder and fainter for the companion direction) are the opposite of what were suggested by the previous study. The variations are generally modest and within observed scatters. However, the model predicts trends between some observables different from those observationally derived, so a large sample of SNe Ia with small calibration errors may be used to constrain the existence of such a companion star. The variations in different colors in optical band passes can be mimicked by external extinctions, so such an effect could be a source of scatter in the peak luminosity and derived distance. After the peak, hydrogen-rich materials expelled from the companion will manifest themselves in hydrogen lines, but H? is extremely difficult to identify. Alternatively, we find that P{sub ?} in postmaximum near-infrared spectra can potentially provide a powerful diagnostic.

  16. CARBON DEFLAGRATION IN TYPE Ia SUPERNOVA. I. CENTRALLY IGNITED MODELS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ma, H.; Woosley, S. E.; Malone, C. M. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Almgren, A.; Bell, J. [Center for Computational Sciences and Engineering, Lawrence Berkeley National Lab, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)

    2013-07-01

    A leading model for Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) begins with a white dwarf near the Chandrasekhar mass that ignites a degenerate thermonuclear runaway close to its center and explodes. In a series of papers, we shall explore the consequences of ignition at several locations within such dwarfs. Here we assume central ignition, which has been explored before, but is worth revisiting, if only to validate those previous studies and to further elucidate the relevant physics for future work. A perturbed sphere of hot iron ash with a radius of {approx}100 km is initialized at the middle of the star. The subsequent explosion is followed in several simulations using a thickened flame model in which the flame speed is either fixed-within the range expected from turbulent combustion-or based on the local turbulent intensity. Global results, including the explosion energy and bulk nucleosynthesis (e.g., {sup 56}Ni of 0.48-0.56 M{sub Sun }) turn out to be insensitive to this speed. In all completed runs, the energy released by the nuclear burning is adequate to unbind the star, but not enough to give the energy and brightness of typical SNe Ia. As found previously, the chemical stratification observed in typical events is not reproduced. These models produce a large amount of unburned carbon and oxygen in central low velocity regions, which is inconsistent with spectroscopic observations, and the intermediate mass elements and iron group elements are strongly mixed during the explosion.

  17. Photometric selection of Type Ia supernovae in the Supernova Legacy Survey

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bazin, G; Palanque-Delabrouille, N; Rich, J; Aubourg, E; Astier, P; Balland, C; Basa, S; Carlberg, R G; Conley, A; Fouchez, D; Guy, J; Hardin, D; Hook, I M; Howell, D A; Pain, R; Perrett, K; Pritchet, C J; Regnault, N; Sullivan, M; Fourmanoit, N; Gonzalez-Gaitan, S; Lidman, C; Perlmutter, S; Ripoche, P; Walker, E S

    2011-01-01

    We present a sample of 485 photometrically identified Type Ia supernova candidates mined from the first three years of data of the CFHT SuperNova Legacy Survey (SNLS). The images were submitted to a deferred processing independent of the SNLS real-time detection pipeline. Light curves of all transient events were reconstructed in the g_M, r_M, i_M and z_M filters and submitted to automated sequential cuts in order to identify possible supernovae. Pure noise and long-term variable events were rejected by light curve shape criteria. Type Ia supernova identification relied on event characteristics fitted to their light curves assuming the events to be normal SNe Ia. The light curve fitter SALT2 was used for this purpose, assigning host galaxy photometric redshifts to the tested events. The selected sample of 485 candidates is one magnitude deeper than that allowed by the SNLS spectroscopic identification. The contamination by supernovae of other types is estimated to be 4%. Testing Hubble diagram residuals with ...

  18. Supernova progenitor constraints from circumstellar interaction: Type Ia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peter Lundqvist; Robert J. Cumming

    1996-10-03

    Searching for the presence of a circumstellar medium is a direct observational way to discriminate between different types of progenitor systems for Type Ia supernovae. We have modeled whether such gas may give rise to detectable emission, especially in H-alpha, and compare the models with observations of SN 1994D. We obtain a mass loss rate less than about 2.5 10^{-5} solar masses per year for a wind speed of 10 km/s. We find that X-ray observations in the range 5-10 keV, e.g., with AXAF, provide the most useful limits on the mass loss, while high-resolution optical spectroscopy offers the only direct way of identifying circumstellar hydrogen.

  19. Type Ia supernova Hubble residuals and host-galaxy properties

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, A. G.; Aldering, G.; Aragon, C.; Bailey, S.; Fakhouri, H. K. [Physics Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Antilogus, P.; Bongard, S.; Canto, A.; Cellier-Holzem, F.; Fleury, M.; Guy, J. [Laboratoire de Physique Nucléaire et des Hautes Énergies, Université Pierre et Marie Curie Paris 6, Université Paris Diderot Paris 7, CNRS-IN2P3, 4 place Jussieu, F-75252 Paris Cedex 05 (France); Baltay, C. [Department of Physics, Yale University, New Haven, CT 06250-8121 (United States); Buton, C.; Feindt, U.; Greskovic, P.; Kowalski, M. [Physikalisches Institut, Universität Bonn, Nußallee 12, D-53115 Bonn (Germany); Childress, M. [Research School of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Australian National University, Canberra, ACT 2611 (Australia); Chotard, N.; Copin, Y.; Gangler, E. [Université de Lyon, F-69622 Lyon (France); Université de Lyon 1, Villeurbanne (France); CNRS/IN2P3, Institut de Physique Nucléaire de Lyon (France); and others

    2014-03-20

    Kim et al. introduced a new methodology for determining peak-brightness absolute magnitudes of type Ia supernovae from multi-band light curves. We examine the relation between their parameterization of light curves and Hubble residuals, based on photometry synthesized from the Nearby Supernova Factory spectrophotometric time series, with global host-galaxy properties. The K13 Hubble residual step with host mass is 0.013 ± 0.031 mag for a supernova subsample with data coverage corresponding to the K13 training; at <<1?, the step is not significant and lower than previous measurements. Relaxing the data coverage requirement of the Hubble residual step with the host mass is 0.045 ± 0.026 mag for the larger sample; a calculation using the modes of the distributions, less sensitive to outliers, yields a step of 0.019 mag. The analysis of this article uses K13 inferred luminosities, as distinguished from previous works that use magnitude corrections as a function of SALT2 color and stretch parameters: steps at >2? significance are found in SALT2 Hubble residuals in samples split by the values of their K13 x(1) and x(2) light-curve parameters. x(1) affects the light-curve width and color around peak (similar to the ?m {sub 15} and stretch parameters), and x(2) affects colors, the near-UV light-curve width, and the light-curve decline 20-30 days after peak brightness. The novel light-curve analysis, increased parameter set, and magnitude corrections of K13 may be capturing features of SN Ia diversity arising from progenitor stellar evolution.

  20. On Measuring the Metallicity of Supernovae Type Ia Progenitors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miles, Broxton J; Townsley, Dean M; Timmes, F X; Jackson, Aaron P; Calder, Alan C; Brown, Edward F

    2015-01-01

    In Type Ia Supernovae (\\sneia), the relative abundances of chemical elements are affected by the neutron excess in the composition of the progenitor white dwarf. Since these products leave signatures in the spectra near maximum light, spectral features may be used to constrain the composition of the progenitor. We calculate the nucleosynthetic yields for three \\snia simulations for a wide range of progenitor metallicities, and calculate synthetic light curves and spectra to explore correlations between progenitor metallicity and the strength of spectral features. We use two 2D simulations of the deflagration-detonation-transition scenario with different $^{56}$Ni yields and the W7 simulation to control for differences between explosion models and total yields. While the overall yields of intermediate mass elements (16 $<$ A $\\leq$ 40) differ between the three cases, trends in the yields are similar. With increasing metallicity, $^{28}$Si yields remain nearly constant, $^{40}$Ca yields decline, and Ti and $...

  1. A new hydrodynamics code for Type Ia Supernovae

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leung, S -C; Lin, L -M

    2015-01-01

    A two-dimensional hydrodynamics code for Type Ia supernovae (SNIa) simulations is presented. The code includes a fifth-order shock-capturing scheme WENO, detailed nuclear reaction network, flame-capturing scheme and sub-grid turbulence. For post-processing we have developed a tracer particle scheme to record the thermodynamical history of the fluid elements. We also present a one-dimensional radiative transfer code for computing observational signals. The code solves the Lagrangian hydrodynamics and moment-integrated radiative transfer equations. A local ionization scheme and composition dependent opacity are included. Various verification tests are presented, including standard benchmark tests in one and two dimensions. SNIa models using the pure turbulent deflagration model and the delayed-detonation transition model are studied. The results are consistent with those in the literature. We compute the detailed chemical evolution using the tracer particles' histories, and we construct corresponding bolometric...

  2. Cosmology with Photometrically-Classified Type Ia Supernovae from the SDSS-II Supernova Survey

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Campbell, Heather; Nichol, Robert C; Sako, Masao; Smith, Mathew; Lampeitl, Hubert; Olmstead, Matthew D; Bassett, Bruce; Biswas, Rahul; Brown, Peter; Cinabro, David; Dawson, Kyle S; Dilday, Ben; Foley, Ryan J; Frieman, Joshua A; Garnavich, Peter; Hlozek, Renee; Jha, Saurabh W; Kuhlmann, Steve; Kunz, Martin; Marriner, John; Miquel, Ramon; Richmond, Michael; Riess, Adam; Schneider, Donald P; Sollerman, Jesper; Taylor, Matt; Zhao, Gong-Bo

    2012-01-01

    We present the cosmological analysis of 752 photometrically-classified Type Ia Supernovae (SNe Ia) obtained from the full Sloan Digital Sky Survey II (SDSS-II) Supernova (SN) Survey, supplemented with host-galaxy spectroscopy from the SDSS-III Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS). Our photometric-classification method is based on the SN typing technique of Sako et al. (2011), aided by host galaxy redshifts (0.05Ia typing efficiency of 70.8%, with only 3.9% contamination from core-collapse (non-Ia) SNe. We demonstrate that this level of contamination has no effect on our cosmological constraints. We quantify and correct for our selection effects (e.g., Malmquist bias) using simulations. When fitting to a flat LambdaCDM cosmological model, we find that our photometric sample alone gives omega_m=0.24+0.07-0.05 (statistical errors only). If we relax the constraint on flatness, then our sample provides competitive joint stati...

  3. The rates of Type Ia Supernovae. I. Analytical Formulations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laura Greggio

    2005-04-29

    This paper provides a handy tool to compute the impact of Type Ia Supernova (SNIa) on the evolution of stellar systems. An effective formalism is presented to couple the SNIa rate to the star formation history, which rests upon the definition of two key properties of the progenitor's model: the realization probability of the SNIa event from a single stellar generation and the distribution function of the delay times. It is shown that the current SNIa rate in late type galaxies implies that the realization probability is on the order of 0.001. Analytical formulations for the distribution function of the delay times for Single (SD) and Double Degenerate (DD) progenitors are derived, based on stellar evolution arguments. These formulations, which agree well with the results of Monte Carlo simulations for the evolution of close binaries, have a built in parametrization of the key properties of the alternative candidates. The various models for the progenitors have different impact on the large scales. In particular, the paper examines the systematic trend of the SNIa rate per unit mass with the color of the parent galaxy, and shows that the recent observations favor the DD model. The SD scenario can reproduce the data only if the distribution of the primordial mass ratios is flat, and the accretion efficiency onto the WD is close to 100%. The timescale for the Fe release from SNIa to the interstellar medium ranges between 0.3 and 3 Gyr for a wide variety of hypothesis on the SNIa progenitors. (ABRIDGED)

  4. Restframe I-band Hubble diagram for type Ia supernovae up to redshift z ~; 0.5

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2005-01-01

    in STScI Symposium Ser. 13, Supernovae and gamma-ray bursts:Highlight: The Physics of Supernovae, ed. W. Hillebrandt &diagram for type Ia supernovae up to redshift z ? 0.5 ? S.

  5. A STUDY OF PROPERTIES OF TYPE IA SUPERNOVA AND THE CALIBRATION OF MULTIBAND PHOTOMETRY 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bastola, Deepak 1988-

    2012-04-27

    The peak luminosity of Type Ia Supernova (SN) can be calibrated using a distance independent luminosity parameter called the decline rate parameter (?m15 (B) to get accurate distances to the galaxies. The photometry gathered from the telescopes...

  6. submitted to ApJ Direct Numerical Simulations of Type Ia Supernovae Flames I

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bell, John B.

    for C/O thermonuclear flames at conditions relevant to the late stages of a Type Ia supernova explosion and results relevant for thermonuclear flames. Sivashinsky (1977) and Michelson & Sivashinsky (1977) studied

  7. Rates, Progenitors and Cosmic Mix of Type Ia Supernovae

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laura Greggio; Alvio Renzini; Emanuele Daddi

    2008-05-29

    Following an episode of star formation, Type Ia supernova events occur over an extended period of time, following a distribution of delay times (DDT). We critically discuss some empirically-based DDT functions that have been proposed in recent years, some favoring very early (prompt) events, other very late (tardy) ones, and therefore being mutually exclusive. We point out that in both cases the derived DDT functions are affected by dubious assumptions, and therefore there is currently no ground for claiming either a DDT strongly peaked at early times, or at late ones. Theoretical DDT functions are known to accommodate both prompt as well as late SNIa events, and can account for all available observational constraints. Recent observational evidence exists that both single degenerate and double degenerate precursors may be able of producing SNIa events. We then explore on the basis of plausible theoretical models the possible variation with cosmic time of the mix between the events produced by the two different channels, which in principle could lead to systematics effects on the SNIa properties with redshift.

  8. The Hubble Constant from Type Ia Supernovae in Early-Type Galaxies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tom Richtler; Georg Drenkhahn

    1999-09-07

    Type Ia supernovae (SNe) are the best standard candles available today in spite of an appreciable intrinsic variation of their luminosities at maximum phase, and of probably non-uniform progenitors. For an unbiased use of type Ia SNe as distance indicators it is important to know accurately how the decline rate and colour at maximum phase correlate with the peak brightness. In order to calibrate the Hubble diagram of type Ia SNe, i.e. to derive the Hubble constant, one needs to determine the absolute brightness of nearby type Ia SNe. Globular cluster systems of early type Ia host galaxies provide suitable distance indicators. We discuss how Ia SNe can be calibrated and explain the method of Globular Cluster Luminosity Functions (GCLFs). At present, the distance to the Fornax galaxy cluster is most important for deriving the Hubble constant. Our present data indicate a Hubble constant of H_0=72+-4 km/s/Mpc. As an appendix, we summarise what is known about absolute magnitudes of Ia's in late-type galaxies.

  9. Multi-color light curves of type Ia supernovae on the color-magnitude diagram: A novel step toward more precise distance and extinction estimates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Lifan; Goldhaber, Gerson; Aldering, Greg; Perlmutter, Saul

    2003-01-01

    Date is earlier than for supernovae with smaller ?m 15 . SeeLight Curves of Type Ia Supernovae on the Color-Magnituderelation of Type Ia supernovae after optical maximum can

  10. From Convection to Explosion: End-to-End Simulation of Type Ia Supernovae

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bell, John B.

    Ia supernova is the thermonuclear runaway and subsequent explosion of a white dwarf that is accreting

  11. Comparing the host galaxies of type Ia, type II, and type Ibc supernovae

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shao, X.; Liang, Y. C.; Chen, X. Y.; Zhong, G. H.; Deng, L. C.; Zhang, B.; Shi, W. B.; Zhou, L. [Key Laboratory of Optical Astronomy, National Astronomical Observatories, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 20A Datun Road, Chaoyang District, Beijing 100012 (China); Dennefeld, M. [Institut d'Astrophysique de Paris, CNRS, and Universite P. et M. Curie, 98bis Bd Arago, F-75014 Paris (France); Hammer, F.; Flores, H., E-mail: xshao@bao.ac.cn, E-mail: ycliang@bao.ac.cn [GEPI, Observatoire de Paris-Meudon, F-92195 Meudon (France)

    2014-08-10

    We compare the host galaxies of 902 supernovae (SNe), including SNe Ia, SNe II, and SNe Ibc, which are selected by cross-matching the Asiago Supernova Catalog with the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Data Release 7. We selected an additional 213 galaxies by requiring the light fraction of spectral observations to be >15%, which could represent well the global properties of the galaxies. Among these 213 galaxies, 135 appear on the Baldwin-Phillips-Terlevich diagram, which allows us to compare the hosts in terms of whether they are star-forming (SF) galaxies, active galactic nuclei (AGNs; including composites, LINERs, and Seyfert 2s) or absorption-line galaxies (Absorps; i.e., their related emission lines are weak or non-existent). The diagrams related to the parameters D{sub n}(4000), H?{sub A}, stellar masses, star formation rates (SFRs), and specific SFRs for the SNe hosts show that almost all SNe II and most of the SNe Ibc occur in SF galaxies, which have a wide range of stellar masses and low D{sub n}(4000). The SNe Ia hosts as SF galaxies following similar trends. A significant fraction of SNe Ia occurs in AGNs and absorption-line galaxies, which are massive and have high D{sub n}(4000). The stellar population analysis from spectral synthesis fitting shows that the hosts of SNe II have a younger stellar population than hosts of SNe Ia. These results are compared with those of the 689 comparison galaxies where the SDSS fiber captures less than 15% of the total light. These comparison galaxies appear biased toward higher 12+log(O/H) (?0.1 dex) at a given stellar mass. Therefore, we believe the aperture effect should be kept in mind when the properties of the hosts for different types of SNe are discussed.

  12. Prospective Type Ia supernova surveys from Dome A

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, A.

    2010-01-01

    time series of ?1000 z supernovae. These can serve tocapable of discovering supernovae shortly after explosion§4. 2. Low-Redshift Supernovae A nearby sample is essential

  13. Analytical Expressions For Light-Curves Of Ordinary And Superluminous Supernovae Type Ia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shlomo Dado; Arnon Dar

    2015-06-25

    Supernovae of type Ia (SNeIa) can be produced by the explosion of slowly-rotating carbon-oxygen white dwarfs whose mass increases beyond a critical value by mass accretion. Collision with circumstellar material during their photospheric and early nebular phase can enhance the bolometric luminosity of otherwise ordinary SNeIa to become superluminous. A few simplifying assumptions lead to a simple analytic master formula, which describes quite well the bolometric light-curves of ordinary SNeIa and supeluminous SNeIa in terms of few initial physical parameters. Other main properties of SNeIa, including the empirical 'brighter-slower' Phillips' relation that was used to standardize ordinary SNeIa as distance indicators and led to the discovery of the accelerating expansion of the universe, are reproduced

  14. Reesman, summer 2007 1 Summer 2007 Research on The Effect of Galaxy Properties on Type Ia Supernova

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cinabro, David

    Reesman, summer 2007 1 Summer 2007 Research on The Effect of Galaxy Properties on Type Ia Supernova, we wanted to compare super nova type 1A host galaxy trends to results previously obtained was investigated. Type Ia Supernova are of great interest to cosmologist since they are standardize able candles

  15. Gravitational Wave Emission from the Single-Degenerate Channel of Type Ia Supernovae

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    David Falta; Robert T. Fisher; Gaurav Khanna

    2011-05-28

    The thermonuclear explosion of a C/O white dwarf as a Type Ia supernova (SN Ia) generates a kinetic energy comparable to that released by a massive star during a SN II event. Current observations and theoretical models have established that SNe Ia are asymmetric, and therefore--like SNe II--potential sources of gravitational wave (GW) radiation. We perform the first detailed calculations of the GW emission for a SN Ia of any type within the single-degenerate channel. The gravitationally-confined detonation (GCD) mechanism predicts a strongly-polarized GW burst in the frequency band around 1 Hz. Third-generation spaceborne GW observatories currently in planning may be able to detect this predicted signal from SNe Ia at distances up to 1 Mpc. If observable, GWs may offer a direct probe into the first few seconds of the SNe Ia detonation.

  16. Type Ia Supernova Hubble Residuals and Host-Galaxy Properties...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Tao, C.; Thomas, R. C.; Weaver, B. A. 79 ASTRONOMY AND ASTROPHYSICS distance scale, supernovae: general distance scale, supernovae: general Kim et al. (2013) K13 introduced a...

  17. On the Brightness of Surviving Companions in Type Ia Supernova Remnants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Noda, Kazuhiro; Shigeyama, Toshikazu

    2015-01-01

    The progenitor systems for type Ia supernovae are still controversial. One of the methods to test the proposed scenario for the progenitor systems is to identify companions that are supposed to survive according to the so-called single degenerate scenario. These companions might be affected by supernova ejecta. We present several numerical simulations of surviving red-giant companions whose envelopes were stripped and heated. We find that red-giants with less-massive helium cores ($\\lesssim0.30\\,M_{\\odot}$) can be so faint after the supernovae that we cannot detect them. In addition, we apply the results to the case of SNR 0509-67.5, and put constraints on the helium core mass, envelope stripping, and energy injection under the single degenerate scenario for type Ia supernovae.

  18. Low-Metallicity Inhibition of Type Ia Supernovae and Galactic and Cosmic Chemical Evolution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chiaki Kobayashi; Takuji Tsujimoto; Ken'ich Nomoto; Izumi Hachisu; Mariko Kato

    1998-06-25

    We introduce a metallicity dependence of Type Ia supernova (SN Ia) rate into the Galactic and cosmic chemical evolution models. In our SN Ia progenitor scenario, the accreting white dwarf (WD) blows a strong wind to reach the Chandrasekhar mass limit. If the iron abundance of the progenitors is as low as [Fe/H] 1-2, SNe Ia can be found only in the environments where the timescale of metal enrichment is sufficiently short as in starburst galaxies and ellipticals. The low-metallicity inhibition of SNe Ia can shed new light on the following issues: 1) The limited metallicity range of the SN Ia progenitors would imply that ``evolution effects'' are relatively small for the use of high redshift SNe Ia to determine the cosmological parameters. 2) WDs of halo populations are poor producers of SNe Ia, so that the WD contribution to the halo mass is not constrained from the iron abundance in the halo. 3) The abundance patterns of globular clusters and field stars in the Galactic halo lack of SN Ia signatures in spite of their age difference of several Gyrs, which can be explained by the low-metallicity inhibition of SNe Ia. 4) It could also explain why the SN Ia contamination is not seen in the damped Ly\\alpha systems for over a wide range of redshift.

  19. The ESO/VLT 3rd year Type Ia supernova data set from the Supernova Legacy Survey

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Balland, C; Basa, S; Mouchet, M; Howell, D A; Astier, P; Carlberg, R G; Conley, A; Fouchez, D; Guy, J; Hardin, D; Hook, I M; Pain, R; Perrett, K; Pritchet, C J; Regnault, N; Rich, J; Sullivan, M; Antilogus, P; Arsenijevic, V; Du, J Le; Fabbro, S; Lidman, C; Mourao, A; Palanque-Delabrouille, Nathalie; Pécontal, E; Ruhlmann-Kleider, V

    2009-01-01

    We present 139 spectra of 124 Type Ia supernovae (SNeIa) that were observed at the ESO/VLT during the first three years of the Canada-France-Hawai Telescope (CFHT) Supernova Legacy Survey (SNLS). This homogeneous data set is used to test for redshift evolution of SNeIa spectra, and will be used in the SNLS 3rd year cosmological analyses. Spectra have been reduced and extracted with a dedicated pipeline that uses photometric information from deep CFHT Legacy Survey (CFHT-LS) reference images to trace, at sub-pixel accuracy, the position of the supernova on the spectrogram as a function of wavelength. It also separates the supernova and its host light in 60% of cases. The identification of the supernova candidates is performed using a spectrophotometric SNIa model. A total of 124 SNeIa, roughly 50% of the overall SNLS spectroscopic sample, have been identified using the ESO/VLT during the first three years of the survey. Their redshifts range from z=0.149 to z=1.031. The average redshift of the sample is z=0.63...

  20. LOW MACH NUMBER MODELING OF TYPE Ia SUPERNOVAE. I. HYDRODYNAMICS A. S. Almgren,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bell, John B.

    LOW MACH NUMBER MODELING OF TYPE Ia SUPERNOVAE. I. HYDRODYNAMICS A. S. Almgren,1 J. B. Bell,1 C. A. Rendleman,1 and M. Zingale2 Received 2005 August 5; accepted 2005 September 29 ABSTRACT We introduce a low is derived from the fully compressible equations using low Mach number asymptotics, but without any

  1. Type Ia supernovae observations support the hypothesis of a static universe

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    David F. Crawford

    2015-09-24

    This paper considers the hypothesis that the universe is static and demonstrates that type Ia supernova observations which appear to provide strong support for time dilation (and thus for an expanding universe) are in agreement with a static universe. An important anomaly is discovered in the standard calibration method which is that the reference template light curves have widths that are proportional to the rest-frame wavelength. The implication is that the observed light-curve widths do not show time dilation. Thus the time-dilation corrections are unwarranted and the universe is static. An important consideration is the Phillips relation, a correlation between the peak luminosity and the width of type Ia supernovae. Using the Phillips relation the analysis of a recent compilation of type Ia supernova observations is re-examined and it is shown that these observations are consistent with a static universe. It is also argued that the photometric redshift relation and spectroscopic ages are consistent with a static universe. As a separate but related issue it is shown that in the static model the density distribution of type Ia supernovae as a function of redshift agrees with the observations. All the evidence shows that the hypothesis of a static universe is supported.

  2. THE HYBRID CONe WD + He STAR SCENARIO FOR THE PROGENITORS OF TYPE Ia SUPERNOVAE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, B.; Meng, X.; Liu, D.-D.; Han, Z. [Yunnan Observatories, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Kunming 650011 (China); Liu, Z.-W., E-mail: wangbo@ynao.ac.cn [Argelander-Institut für Astronomie, Auf dem Hügel 71, D-53121, Bonn (Germany)

    2014-10-20

    Hybrid CONe white dwarfs (WDs) have been suggested to be possible progenitors of type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia). In this Letter, we systematically studied the hybrid CONe WD + He star scenario for the progenitors of SNe Ia, in which a hybrid CONe WD increases its mass to the Chandrasekhar mass limit by accreting He-rich material from a non-degenerate He star. We obtained the SN Ia birthrates and delay times for this scenario using to a series of detailed binary population synthesis simulations. The SN Ia birthrates for this scenario are ?0.033-0.539 × 10{sup –3} yr{sup –1}, which roughly accounts for 1%-18% of all SNe Ia. The estimated delay times are ?28 Myr-178 Myr, which makes these the youngest SNe Ia predicted by any progenitor model so far. We suggest that SNe Ia from this scenario may provide an alternative explanation for type Iax SNe. We also presented some properties of the donors at the point when the WDs reach the Chandrasekhar mass. These properties may be a good starting point for investigating the surviving companions of SNe Ia and for constraining the progenitor scenario studied in this work.

  3. Grouping normal type Ia supernovae by UV to optical color differences

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Milne, Peter A.; Brown, Peter J.; Roming, Peter W. A.; Bufano, Filomena; Gehrels, Neil

    2013-12-10

    Observations of many Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) for multiple epochs per object with the Swift Ultraviolet Optical Telescope instrument have revealed that there exists order to the differences in the UV-optical colors of optically normal supernovae (SNe). We examine UV-optical color curves for 23 SNe Ia, dividing the SNe into four groups, and find that roughly one-third of 'NUV-blue' SNe Ia have bluer UV-optical colors than the larger 'NUV-red' group. Two minor groups are recognized, 'MUV-blue' and 'irregular' SNe Ia. While we conclude that the latter group is a subset of the NUV-red group, containing the SNe with the broadest optical peaks, we conclude that the 'MUV-blue' group is a distinct group. Separating into the groups and accounting for the time evolution of the UV-optical colors lowers the scatter in two NUV-optical colors (e.g., u – v and uvw1 – v) to the level of the scatter in b – v. This finding is promising for extending the cosmological utilization of SNe Ia into the NUV. We generate spectrophotometry of 33 SNe Ia and determine the correct grouping for each. We argue that there is a fundamental spectral difference in the 2900-3500 Å wavelength range, a region suggested to be dominated by absorption from iron-peak elements. The NUV-blue SNe Ia feature less absorption than the NUV-red SNe Ia. We show that all NUV-blue SNe Ia in this sample also show evidence of unburned carbon in optical spectra, whereas only one NUV-red SN Ia features that absorption line. Every NUV-blue event also exhibits a low gradient of the Si II ?6355 absorption feature. Many NUV-red events also exhibit a low gradient, perhaps suggestive that NUV-blue events are a subset of the larger low-velocity gradient group.

  4. The Peculiar SN 2005hk: Do Some Type Ia Supernovae Explode as Deflagrations?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Phillips, M M; Frieman, J A; Blinnikov, S I; De Poy, D L; Prieto, J L; Milne, P; Contreras, C; Folatelli, G; Morrell, N; Hamuy, M; Suntzeff, N B; Roth, M; González, S; Krzeminski, W; Filippenko, A V; Freedman, W L; Chornock, R; Jha, S; Madore, B F; Persson, S E; Burns, C R; Wyatt, P; Murphy, D; Foley, R J; Ganeshalingam, M; Serduke, F J D; Krisciunas, K; Bassett, B; Becker, A; Dilday, B; Eastman, J; Garnavich, P M; Holtzman, J; Kessler, R; Lampeitl, H; Marriner, J P; Frank, S; Marshall, J L; Miknaitis, G; Sako, M; Schneider, D P; Van der Heyden, K J; Yasuda, N; Yasuda, Naoki

    2006-01-01

    We present extensive u'g'r'i'BVRIYJHKs photometry and optical spectroscopy of SN 2005hk. These data reveal that SN 2005hk was nearly identical in its observed properties to SN 2002cx, which has been called ``the most peculiar known type Ia supernova.'' Both supernovae exhibited high ionization SN 1991T-like pre-maximum spectra, yet low peak luminosities like SN 1991bg. The spectra reveal that SN 2005hk, like SN 2002cx, exhibited expansion velocities that were roughly half those of typical type Ia supernovae. The R and I light curves of both supernovae were also peculiar in not displaying the secondary maximum observed for normal type Ia supernovae. Our YJH photometry of SN 2005hk reveals the same peculiarity in the near-infrared. By combining our optical and near-infrared photometry of SN 2005hk with published ultraviolet light curves obtained with the Swift satellite, we are able to construct a bolometric light curve from ~10 days before to ~60 days after B maximum. The shape and unusually low peak luminosit...

  5. The Peculiar SN 2005hk: Do Some Type Ia Supernovae Explode as Deflagrations?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. M. Phillips; W. Li; J. A. Frieman; S. I. Blinnikov; D. DePoy; J. L. Prieto; P. Milne; C. Contreras; G. Folatelli; N. Morrell; M. Hamuy; N. B. Suntzeff; M. Roth; S. Gonzalez; W. Krzeminski; A. V. Filippenko; W. L. Freedman; R. Chornock; S. Jha; B. F. Madore; S. E. Persson; C. R. Burns; P. Wyatt; D. Murphy; R. J. Foley; M. Ganeshalingam; F. J. D. Serduke; K. Krisciunas; B. Bassett; A. Becker; B. Dilday; J. Eastman; P. M. Garnavich; J. Holtzman; R. Kessler; H. Lampeitl; J. Marriner; S. Frank; J. L. Marshall; G. Miknaitis; M. Sako; D. P. Schneider; K. van der Heyden; Naoki Yasuda

    2007-03-26

    We present extensive u'g'r'i'BVRIYJHKs photometry and optical spectroscopy of SN 2005hk. These data reveal that SN 2005hk was nearly identical in its observed properties to SN 2002cx, which has been called ``the most peculiar known type Ia supernova.'' Both supernovae exhibited high ionization SN 1991T-like pre-maximum spectra, yet low peak luminosities like SN 1991bg. The spectra reveal that SN 2005hk, like SN 2002cx, exhibited expansion velocities that were roughly half those of typical type Ia supernovae. The R and I light curves of both supernovae were also peculiar in not displaying the secondary maximum observed for normal type Ia supernovae. Our YJH photometry of SN 2005hk reveals the same peculiarity in the near-infrared. By combining our optical and near-infrared photometry of SN 2005hk with published ultraviolet light curves obtained with the Swift satellite, we are able to construct a bolometric light curve from ~10 days before to ~60 days after B maximum. The shape and unusually low peak luminosity of this light curve, plus the low expansion velocities and absence of a secondary maximum at red and near-infrared wavelengths, are all in reasonable agreement with model calculations of a 3D deflagration which produces ~0.25 M_sun of 56Ni.

  6. Spectroscopic Determination of the Low Redshift Type Ia Supernova Rate from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krughoff, K. S.; Connolly, Andrew J.; Frieman, Joshua; SubbaRao, Mark; Kilper, Gary; Schneider, Donald P.

    2011-04-10

    Supernova rates are directly coupled to high mass stellar birth and evolution. As such, they are one of the few direct measures of the history of cosmic stellar evolution. In this paper we describe an probabilistic technique for identifying supernovae within spectroscopic samples of galaxies. We present a study of 52 type Ia supernovae ranging in age from -14 days to +40 days extracted from a parent sample of \\simeq 50,000 spectra from the SDSS DR5. We find a Supernova Rate (SNR) of 0.472^{+0.048}_{-0.039}(Systematic)^{+0.081}_{-0.071}(Statistical)SNu at a redshift of = 0.1. This value is higher than other values at low redshift at the 1{\\sigma}, but is consistent at the 3{\\sigma} level. The 52 supernova candidates used in this study comprise the third largest sample of supernovae used in a type Ia rate determination to date. In this paper we demonstrate the potential for the described approach for detecting supernovae in future spectroscopic surveys.

  7. Type-Ia supernova rates to redshift 2.4 from clash: The cluster lensing and supernova survey with Hubble

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Graur, O.; Rodney, S. A.; Riess, A. G.; Medezinski, E. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, The Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Maoz, D. [School of Physics and Astronomy, Tel-Aviv University, Tel-Aviv 69978 (Israel); Jha, S. W.; Holoien, T. W.-S.; McCully, C.; Patel, B. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, Piscataway, NJ 08854 (United States); Postman, M.; Dahlen, T.; Strolger, L.-G.; Coe, D.; Bradley, L.; Koekemoer, A. [Space Telescope Science Institute, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Benítez, N.; Molino, A. [Instituto de Astrofísica de Andalucía (CSIC), E-18080 Granada (Spain); Jouvel, S. [Institut de Ciencies de l'Espai, (IEEC-CSIC), E-08193 Bellaterra (Barcelona) (Spain); Nonino, M.; Balestra, I., E-mail: orgraur@jhu.edu [INAF-Osservatorio Astronomico di Trieste, I-34143 Trieste (Italy); and others

    2014-03-01

    We present the supernova (SN) sample and Type-Ia SN (SN Ia) rates from the Cluster Lensing And Supernova survey with Hubble (CLASH). Using the Advanced Camera for Surveys and the Wide Field Camera 3 on the Hubble Space Telescope (HST), we have imaged 25 galaxy-cluster fields and parallel fields of non-cluster galaxies. We report a sample of 27 SNe discovered in the parallel fields. Of these SNe, ?13 are classified as SN Ia candidates, including four SN Ia candidates at redshifts z > 1.2. We measure volumetric SN Ia rates to redshift 1.8 and add the first upper limit on the SN Ia rate in the range 1.8 < z < 2.4. The results are consistent with the rates measured by the HST/GOODS and Subaru Deep Field SN surveys. We model these results together with previous measurements at z < 1 from the literature. The best-fitting SN Ia delay-time distribution (DTD; the distribution of times that elapse between a short burst of star formation and subsequent SN Ia explosions) is a power law with an index of ?1.00{sub ?0.06(0.10)}{sup +0.06(0.09)} (statistical){sub ?0.08}{sup +0.12} (systematic), where the statistical uncertainty is a result of the 68% and 95% (in parentheses) statistical uncertainties reported for the various SN Ia rates (from this work and from the literature), and the systematic uncertainty reflects the range of possible cosmic star-formation histories. We also test DTD models produced by an assortment of published binary population synthesis (BPS) simulations. The shapes of all BPS double-degenerate DTDs are consistent with the volumetric SN Ia measurements, when the DTD models are scaled up by factors of 3-9. In contrast, all BPS single-degenerate DTDs are ruled out by the measurements at >99% significance level.

  8. Type Ia Supernovae M100 in Early 2006

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Crenshaw, Michael

    ://rsdwww.nrl.navy.mil/7212/montes/snetax.html 2.) http://www.lbl.gov/ScienceArticles/Archive/sabl/2005/October/04supernovae.html

  9. [O I] ??6300, 6364 IN THE NEBULAR SPECTRUM OF A SUBLUMINOUS TYPE Ia SUPERNOVA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Taubenberger, S.; Kromer, M.; Hillebrandt, W. [Max-Planck-Institut für Astrophysik, Karl-Schwarzschild-Str. 1, D-85741 Garching (Germany)] [Max-Planck-Institut für Astrophysik, Karl-Schwarzschild-Str. 1, D-85741 Garching (Germany); Pakmor, R. [Heidelberger Institut für Theoretische Studien, Schloss-Wolfsbrunnenweg 35, D-69118 Heidelberg (Germany)] [Heidelberger Institut für Theoretische Studien, Schloss-Wolfsbrunnenweg 35, D-69118 Heidelberg (Germany); Pignata, G. [Departamento de Ciencias Fisicas, Universidad Andres Bello, Avda. Republica 252, Santiago (Chile)] [Departamento de Ciencias Fisicas, Universidad Andres Bello, Avda. Republica 252, Santiago (Chile); Maeda, K. [Kavli Institute for the Physics and Mathematics of the Universe (WPI), Todai Institutes for Advanced Study, University of Tokyo, 5-1-5 Kashiwanoha, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8583 (Japan)] [Kavli Institute for the Physics and Mathematics of the Universe (WPI), Todai Institutes for Advanced Study, University of Tokyo, 5-1-5 Kashiwanoha, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8583 (Japan); Hachinger, S. [Julius-Maximilians-Universität Würzburg, Emil-Fischer-Str. 31, D-97074 Würzburg (Germany)] [Julius-Maximilians-Universität Würzburg, Emil-Fischer-Str. 31, D-97074 Würzburg (Germany); Leibundgut, B. [European Southern Observatory, Karl-Schwarzschild-Str. 2, D-85748 Garching (Germany)] [European Southern Observatory, Karl-Schwarzschild-Str. 2, D-85748 Garching (Germany)

    2013-10-01

    In this Letter, a late-phase spectrum of SN 2010lp, a subluminous Type Ia supernova (SN Ia), is presented and analyzed. As in 1991bg-like SNe Ia at comparable epochs, the spectrum is characterized by relatively broad [Fe II] and [Ca II] emission lines. However, instead of narrow [Fe III] and [Co III] lines that dominate the emission from the innermost regions of 1991bg-like supernovae (SNe), SN 2010lp shows [O I] ??6300, 6364 emission, usually associated with core-collapse SNe and never previously observed in a subluminous thermonuclear explosion. The [O I] feature has a complex profile with two strong, narrow emission peaks. This suggests that oxygen is distributed in a non-spherical region close to the center of the ejecta, severely challenging most thermonuclear explosion models discussed in the literature. We conclude that, given these constraints, violent mergers are presently the most promising scenario to explain SN 2010lp.

  10. CfAIR2: Near Infrared Light Curves of 94 Type Ia Supernovae

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Friedman, Andrew S; Marion, G H; Challis, Peter; Mandel, Kaisey S; Bloom, Joshua S; Modjaz, Maryam; Narayan, Gautham; Hicken, Malcolm; Foley, Ryan; Klein, Christopher R; Starr, Dan L; Morgan, Adam; Rest, Armin; Blake, Cullen H; Miller, Adam A; Falco, Emilio E; Wyatt, William F; Mink, Jessica; Skrutskie, Michael F; Kirshner, Robert P

    2014-01-01

    CfAIR2 is a large homogeneously reduced set of near-infrared (NIR) light curves for Type Ia supernovae (SN Ia) obtained with the 1.3m PAIRITEL (Peters Automated InfraRed Imaging TELescope). This data set includes 4607 measurements of 94 SN Ia and 4 additional SN Iax observed from 2005-2011 at the Fred Lawrence Whipple Observatory on Mount Hopkins, Arizona. CfAIR2 includes JHKs photometric measurements for 88 normal and 6 spectroscopically peculiar SN Ia in the nearby universe, with a median redshift of z~0.021 for the normal SN Ia. CfAIR2 data span the range from -13 days to +127 days from maximum in the B-band. More than half of the light curves begin before the time of maximum and the coverage typically contains ~13-18 epochs of observation, depending on the filter. We present extensive tests that verify the fidelity of the CfAIR2 data pipeline, including comparison to the excellent data of the Carnegie Supernova Project. CfAIR2 contributes to a firm local anchor for supernova cosmology studies in the NIR. ...

  11. Imprint of modified Einstein's gravity on white dwarfs: Unifying type Ia supernovae

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Das, Upasana

    2015-01-01

    We establish the importance of modified Einstein's gravity (MG) in white dwarfs (WDs) for the first time in the literature. We show that MG leads to significantly sub- and super-Chandrasekhar limiting mass WDs, depending on a single model parameter. However, conventional WDs on approaching Chandrasekhar's limit are expected to trigger type Ia supernovae (SNeIa), a key to unravel the evolutionary history of the universe. Nevertheless, observations of several peculiar, under- and over-luminous SNeIa argue for the limiting mass widely different from Chandrasekhar's limit. Explosions of MG induced sub- and super-Chandrasekhar limiting mass WDs explain under- and over-luminous SNeIa respectively, thus unifying these two apparently disjoint sub-classes. Our discovery questions both the global validity of Einstein's gravity and the uniqueness of Chandrasekhar's limit.

  12. Type Ia supernovae in a hierarchical galaxy formation model: the Milky Way

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Masahiro Nagashima; Takashi Okamoto

    2006-02-03

    We investigate chemical evolution in Milky Way-like galaxies based on the cold dark matter model in which cosmic structures form via hierarchical merging. We introduce chemical enrichment due to type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) into the Mitaka semi-analytic galaxy formation model developed by Nagashima & Yoshii. For the first time we derive distributions of stellar metallicities and their ratios in Milky Way-like galaxies treating chemical enrichment due to SNe Ia in a hierarchical galaxy formation model self-consistently. As a first attempt, we assume all SNe Ia to have the same lifetime, and assume instantaneous recycling for type II supernovae (SNe II). We find that our model reproduces well the metal abundance ratio [O/Fe] against [Fe/H] and the {iron metallicity distribution function} in the solar neighborhood. This means that the so-called G-dwarf problem is resolved by the hierarchical formation of galaxies, and a gas infall term introduced in traditional monolithic collapse models to solve this problem is well explained by the mixture of some physical processes such as hierarchical merging of dark halos, gas cooling, energy feedback and injection of gas and metals into hot gas due to supernovae. Our model predicts more oxygen-enhanced stars in bulges at [Fe/H] $\\simeq 0$ than in disks. This trend seems to be supported by recent observations while they have still uncertainties. More data in number and accuracy will provide independent and important constraints on galaxy formation. (abridged)

  13. Spectral Observations and Analyses of Low-Redshift Type Ia Supernovae

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Silverman, Jeffrey Michael

    2011-01-01

    1.3.2 Thermonuclear Supernovae . . . . . . . . 1.4 Why WriteIa are the result of thermonuclear explosions of C/O whiteIa are the result of thermonuclear explosions of C/O white

  14. STANDARDIZING TYPE Ia SUPERNOVA ABSOLUTE MAGNITUDES USING GAUSSIAN PROCESS DATA REGRESSION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, A. G.; Aldering, G.; Aragon, C.; Bailey, S.; Childress, M.; Fakhouri, H. K.; Nordin, J. [Physics Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)] [Physics Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Thomas, R. C. [Computational Cosmology Center, Computational Research Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, 1 Cyclotron Road MS 50B-4206, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)] [Computational Cosmology Center, Computational Research Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, 1 Cyclotron Road MS 50B-4206, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Antilogus, P.; Bongard, S.; Canto, A.; Cellier-Holzem, F.; Guy, J. [Laboratoire de Physique Nucleaire et des Hautes Energies, Universite Pierre et Marie Curie Paris 6, Universite Denis Diderot Paris 7, CNRS-IN2P3, 4 place Jussieu, F-75252 Paris Cedex 05 (France)] [Laboratoire de Physique Nucleaire et des Hautes Energies, Universite Pierre et Marie Curie Paris 6, Universite Denis Diderot Paris 7, CNRS-IN2P3, 4 place Jussieu, F-75252 Paris Cedex 05 (France); Baltay, C. [Department of Physics, Yale University, New Haven, CT 06250-8121 (United States)] [Department of Physics, Yale University, New Haven, CT 06250-8121 (United States); Buton, C.; Kerschhaggl, M.; Kowalski, M. [Physikalisches Institut, Universitaet Bonn, Nussallee 12, D-53115 Bonn (Germany)] [Physikalisches Institut, Universitaet Bonn, Nussallee 12, D-53115 Bonn (Germany); Chotard, N. [Tsinghua Center for Astrophysics, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China)] [Tsinghua Center for Astrophysics, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Copin, Y.; Gangler, E. [Universite de Lyon, F-69622 Lyon (France)] [Universite de Lyon, F-69622 Lyon (France); and others

    2013-04-01

    We present a novel class of models for Type Ia supernova time-evolving spectral energy distributions (SEDs) and absolute magnitudes: they are each modeled as stochastic functions described by Gaussian processes. The values of the SED and absolute magnitudes are defined through well-defined regression prescriptions, so that data directly inform the models. As a proof of concept, we implement a model for synthetic photometry built from the spectrophotometric time series from the Nearby Supernova Factory. Absolute magnitudes at peak B brightness are calibrated to 0.13 mag in the g band and to as low as 0.09 mag in the z = 0.25 blueshifted i band, where the dispersion includes contributions from measurement uncertainties and peculiar velocities. The methodology can be applied to spectrophotometric time series of supernovae that span a range of redshifts to simultaneously standardize supernovae together with fitting cosmological parameters.

  15. Constraining spacetime variations of nuclear decay rates from light curves of type Ia supernovae

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ivan Karpikov; Maxim Piskunov; Anton Sokolov; Sergey Troitsky

    2015-05-12

    The luminosity of fading type Ia supernovae is governed by radioactive decays of 56Ni and 56Co. The decay rates are proportional to the Fermi coupling constant G_F and, therefore, are determined by the vacuum expectation value v of the Brout-Englert-Higgs field. We use publicly available sets of light curves of type Ia supernova at various redshifts to constrain possible spacetime variations of the 56Ni decay rate. The resulting constraint is not very tight; however, it is the only direct bound on the variation of the decay rate for redshifts up to z~1. We discuss potential applications of the result to searches for non-constancy of G_F and v.

  16. On the small-scale stability of thermonuclear flames in Type Ia supernovae

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    F. K. Roepke; J. C. Niemeyer; W. Hillebrandt

    2003-05-02

    We present a numerical model which allows us to investigate thermonuclear flames in Type Ia supernova explosions. The model is based on a finite-volume explicit hydrodynamics solver employing PPM. Using the level-set technique combined with in-cell reconstruction and flux-splitting schemes we are able to describe the flame in the discontinuity approximation. We apply our implementation to flame propagation in Chandrasekhar-mass Type Ia supernova models. In particular we concentrate on intermediate scales between the flame width and the Gibson-scale, where the burning front is subject to the Landau-Darrieus instability. We are able to reproduce the theoretical prediction on the growth rates of perturbations in the linear regime and observe the stabilization of the flame in a cellular shape. The increase of the mean burning velocity due to the enlarged flame surface is measured. Results of our simulation are in agreement with semianalytical studies.

  17. On the Stability of Thermonuclear Burning Fronts in Type Ia Supernovae

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    F. K. Roepke; W. Hillebrandt

    2004-04-26

    The propagation of cellularly stabilized thermonuclear flames is investigated by means of numerical simulations. In Type Ia supernova explosions the corresponding burning regime establishes at scales below the Gibson length. The cellular flame stabilization - which is a result of an interplay between the Landau-Darrieus instability and a nonlinear stabilization mechanism - is studied for the case of propagation into quiescent fuel as well as interaction with vortical fuel flows. Our simulations indicate that in thermonuclear supernova explosions stable cellular flames develop around the Gibson scale and that deflagration-to-detonation transition is unlikely to be triggered from flame evolution effects here.

  18. The cosmic rate of supernovae and the range of stars ending as Type Ia SNe

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. Ruiz-Lapuente; R. Canal

    2000-09-20

    The present cosmic rate of Type Ia supernovae (SNeIa) suggests that about 6% of all stars in binary systems with primaries in the initial mass range $3-9\\ M\\sun$ end up as SNeIa. If that is confirmed, the unavoidable conclusion is that SNeIa can only be explained by the single degenerate scenario. At most 1% of stars in binary systems in the above range end up as CO + CO WD pairs, with total mass equal to or larger than the Chandrasekhar mass. Given that the number of mergers from pairs of CO + He WDs that reach the Chandrasekhar mass is even lower, the conclusion strongly favors binaries containing just one CO WD as the progenitors of SNeIa, since the SNeIa production efficiency (relative to the instantaneous star formation rate) predicted for double degenerate (DD) pairs lies more than $3\\sigma$ below the observational data, and the DD scenario can be rejected at more than 99% confidence level. Only if the SFR measurements from $z\\sim 0.1$ to $z\\sim 0.5$ are being underestimated by a factor of 6 while SNeIa rates are not, can we escape the above conclusion. We evaluate the numbers and characteristics of double WD systems with different chemical compositions (CO and He WDs) that should form and compare them with the observations, in order to check our predictions. Our conclusions appear robust after that test.

  19. Optical and NIR observations of the nearby type Ia supernova SN 2014J

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Srivastav, Shubham; Kumar, Brajesh; Anupama, G C; Sahu, D K; Ojha, D K; Prabhu, T P

    2016-01-01

    Optical and NIR observations of the type Ia supernova SN 2014J in M82 are presented. The observed light curves are found to be similar to normal SNe Ia, with a decline rate parameter $\\Delta m_{15}(B) = 1.08 \\pm 0.03$. The supernova reached $B$-band maximum on JD 2456690.14, at an apparent magnitude $m_B(max) = 11.94$. The optical spectra show a red continuum with deep interstellar Na~{\\sc i} absorption, but otherwise resemble those of normal SNe Ia. The Si~{\\sc ii} $\\lambda 6355$ feature indicates a velocity of $\\sim 12\\,000$ km s$^{-1}$ at $B$-band maximum, which places SN 2014J at the border of the Normal Velocity and High Velocity group of SNe Ia. The velocity evolution of SN 2014J places it in the Low Velocity Gradient subclass, whereas the equivalent widths of Si~{\\sc ii} features near $B$-band maximum place it at the border of the Core Normal and Broad Line subclasses of SNe Ia. An analytic model fit to the bolometric light curve indicates that a total of $\\sim 1.3$ M$_{\\odot}$ was ejected in the explo...

  20. Utilizing Type Ia Supernovae in a Large, Fast, Imaging Survey to Constrain Dark Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andrew R. Zentner; Suman Bhattacharya

    2008-12-01

    We study the utility of a large sample of type Ia supernovae that might be observed in an imaging survey that rapidly scans a large fraction of the sky for constraining dark energy. We consider information from the traditional luminosity distance test as well as the spread in SNeIa fluxes at fixed redshift induced by gravitational lensing. We include a treatment of photometric redshift uncertainties in our analysis. Our primary result is that the information contained in the mean distance moduli of SNeIa and the dispersion among SNeIa distance moduli complement each other, breaking a degeneracy between the present dark energy equation of state and its time variation without the need for a high-redshift supernova sample. To address photometric redshift uncertainties, we present dark energy constraints as a function of the size of an external set of spectroscopically-observed SNeIa that may be used for redshift calibration, nspec. We find that an imaging survey can constrain the dark energy equation of state at the epoch where it is best constrained with a 1-sigma error of sigma(wpiv)~0.03-0.09$, depending upon various assumptions. In addition, the marginal improvement in the error sigma(wpiv) from an increase in the spectroscopic calibration sample drops once nspec ~ 10^3. This result is important because it is of the order of the size of calibration samples likely to be compiled in the coming decade and because, for samples of this size, the spectroscopic and imaging surveys individually place comparable constraints on the dark energy equation of state. In all cases, it is best to calibrate photometric redshifts with a set of spectroscopically-observed SNeIa with relatively more objects at high redshift than the parent sample of imaging SNeIa.

  1. Low Mach Number Modeling of Type Ia Supernovae. II. Energy Evolution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. S. Almgren; J. B. Bell; C. A. Rendleman; M. Zingale

    2006-06-21

    The convective period leading up to a Type Ia supernova (SN Ia) explosion is characterized by very low Mach number flows, requiring hydrodynamical methods well-suited to long-time integration. We continue the development of the low Mach number equation set for stellar scale flows by incorporating the effects of heat release due to external sources. Low Mach number hydrodynamics equations with a time-dependent background state are derived, and a numerical method based on the approximate projection formalism is presented. We demonstrate through validation with a fully compressible hydrodynamics code that this low Mach number model accurately captures the expansion of the stellar atmosphere as well as the local dynamics due to external heat sources. This algorithm provides the basis for an efficient simulation tool for studying the ignition of SNe Ia.

  2. Cosmological parameter uncertainties from SALT-II type Ia supernova light curve models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mosher, J.; Sako, M. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Pennsylvania, 209 South 33rd Street, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); Guy, J.; Astier, P.; Betoule, M.; El-Hage, P.; Pain, R.; Regnault, N. [LPNHE, CNRS/IN2P3, Université Pierre et Marie Curie Paris 6, Universié Denis Diderot Paris 7, 4 place Jussieu, F-75252 Paris Cedex 05 (France); Kessler, R.; Frieman, J. A. [Kavli Institute for Cosmological Physics, University of Chicago, 5640 South Ellis Avenue, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States); Marriner, J. [Center for Particle Astrophysics, Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, P.O. Box 500, Batavia, IL 60510 (United States); Biswas, R.; Kuhlmann, S. [Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 South Cass Avenue, Lemont, IL 60439 (United States); Schneider, D. P., E-mail: kessler@kicp.chicago.edu [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States)

    2014-09-20

    We use simulated type Ia supernova (SN Ia) samples, including both photometry and spectra, to perform the first direct validation of cosmology analysis using the SALT-II light curve model. This validation includes residuals from the light curve training process, systematic biases in SN Ia distance measurements, and a bias on the dark energy equation of state parameter w. Using the SN-analysis package SNANA, we simulate and analyze realistic samples corresponding to the data samples used in the SNLS3 analysis: ?120 low-redshift (z < 0.1) SNe Ia, ?255 Sloan Digital Sky Survey SNe Ia (z < 0.4), and ?290 SNLS SNe Ia (z ? 1). To probe systematic uncertainties in detail, we vary the input spectral model, the model of intrinsic scatter, and the smoothing (i.e., regularization) parameters used during the SALT-II model training. Using realistic intrinsic scatter models results in a slight bias in the ultraviolet portion of the trained SALT-II model, and w biases (w {sub input} – w {sub recovered}) ranging from –0.005 ± 0.012 to –0.024 ± 0.010. These biases are indistinguishable from each other within the uncertainty; the average bias on w is –0.014 ± 0.007.

  3. Measuring nickel masses in Type Ia supernovae using cobalt emission in nebular phase spectra

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Childress, Michael J; Seitenzahl, Ivo; Sullivan, Mark; Maguire, Kate; Taubenberger, Stefan; Scalzo, Richard; Ruiter, Ashley; Blagorodnova, Nadejda; Camacho, Yssavo; Castillo, Jayden; Elias-Rosa, Nancy; Fraser, Morgan; Gal-Yam, Avishay; Graham, Melissa; Howell, D Andrew; Inserra, Cosimo; Jha, Saurabh W; Kumar, Sahana; Mazzali, Paolo A; McCully, Curtis; Morales-Garoffolo, Antonia; Pandya, Viraj; Polshaw, Joe; Schmidt, Brian; Smartt, Stephen; Smith, Ken W; Sollerman, Jesper; Spyromilio, Jason; Tucker, Brad; Valenti, Stefano; Walton, Nicholas; Wolf, Christian; Yaron, Ofer; Young, D R; Yuan, Fang; Zhang, Bonnie

    2015-01-01

    The light curves of Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) are powered by the radioactive decay of $^{56}$Ni to $^{56}$Co at early times, and the decay of $^{56}$Co to $^{56}$Fe from ~60 days after explosion. We examine the evolution of the [Co III] 5892 A emission complex during the nebular phase for SNe Ia with multiple nebular spectra and show that the line flux follows the square of the mass of $^{56}$Co as a function of time. This result indicates both efficient local energy deposition from positrons produced in $^{56}$Co decay, and long-term stability of the ionization state of the nebula. We compile 77 nebular spectra of 25 SN Ia from the literature and present 17 new nebular spectra of 7 SNe Ia, including SN2014J. From these we measure the flux in the [Co III] 5892 A line and remove its well-behaved time dependence to infer the initial mass of $^{56}$Ni ($M_{Ni}$) produced in the explosion. We then examine $^{56}$Ni yields for different SN Ia ejected masses ($M_{ej}$ - calculated using the relation between light...

  4. Nearby Supernova Factory Observations of SN 2005gj: Another TypeIa Supernova in a Massive Circumstellar Envelope

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aldering, G.; Antilogus, P.; Bailey, S.; Baltay, C.; Bauer, A.; Blanc, N.; Bongard, S.; Copin, Y.; Gangler, E.; Gilles, S.; Kessler, R.; Kocevski, D.; Lee, B.C.; Loken, S.; Nugent, P.; Pain, R.; Pecontal, E.; Pereira, R.; Perlmutter, S.; Rabinowitz, D.; Rigaudier, G.; Scalzo, R.; Smadja, G.; Thomas, R.C.; Wang, L.; Weaver, B.A.; Rabinowitz, D.; Bauer, A.

    2006-06-01

    We report the independent discovery and follow-up observations of supernova 2005gj by the Nearby Supernova Factory. This is the second confirmed case of a ''hybrid'' Type Ia/IIn supernova, which like the prototype SN 2002ic, we interpret as the explosion of a white dwarf interacting with a circumstellar medium. Our early-phase photometry of SN 2005gj shows that the strength of the interaction between the supernova ejecta and circumstellar material is much stronger than for SN 2002ic. Our .rst spectrum shows a hot continuum with broad and narrow H{alpha} emission. Later spectra, spanning over 4 months from outburst, show clear Type Ia features combined with broad and narrow H{gamma}, H{beta},H{alpha} and He I {lambda}{lambda}5876,7065 in emission. At higher resolution, P Cygni profiles are apparent. Surprisingly, we also observe an inverted P Cygni profile for [O III] {lambda}5007. We find that the lightcurve and measured velocity of the unshocked circumstellar material imply mass loss as recently as 8 years ago. This is in contrast to SN 2002ic, for which an inner cavity in the circumstellar material was inferred. Within the context of the thin-shell approximation, the early lightcurve is well-described by a flat radial density profile for the circumstellar material. However, our decomposition of the spectra into Type Ia and shock emission components allows for little obscuration of the supernova, suggesting an aspherical or clumpy distribution for the circumstellar material. We suggest that the emission line velocity profiles arise from electron scattering rather than the kinematics of the shock. This is supported by the inferred high densities, and the lack of evidence for evolution in the line widths. Ground- and space-based photometry, and Keck spectroscopy, of the host galaxy are used to ascertain that the host galaxy has low metallicity (Z/Z{sub {circle_dot}} < 0.3; 95% confidence) and that this galaxy is undergoing a significant star formation event that began roughly 200 {+-} 70 Myr ago. We discuss the implications of these observations for progenitor models and cosmology using Type Ia supernovae.

  5. TYPE Ia SUPERNOVA COLORS AND EJECTA VELOCITIES: HIERARCHICAL BAYESIAN REGRESSION WITH NON-GAUSSIAN DISTRIBUTIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mandel, Kaisey S.; Kirshner, Robert P. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Foley, Ryan J., E-mail: kmandel@cfa.harvard.edu [Astronomy Department, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 1002 West Green Street, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States)

    2014-12-20

    We investigate the statistical dependence of the peak intrinsic colors of Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) on their expansion velocities at maximum light, measured from the Si II ?6355 spectral feature. We construct a new hierarchical Bayesian regression model, accounting for the random effects of intrinsic scatter, measurement error, and reddening by host galaxy dust, and implement a Gibbs sampler and deviance information criteria to estimate the correlation. The method is applied to the apparent colors from BVRI light curves and Si II velocity data for 79 nearby SNe Ia. The apparent color distributions of high-velocity (HV) and normal velocity (NV) supernovae exhibit significant discrepancies for B – V and B – R, but not other colors. Hence, they are likely due to intrinsic color differences originating in the B band, rather than dust reddening. The mean intrinsic B – V and B – R color differences between HV and NV groups are 0.06 ± 0.02 and 0.09 ± 0.02 mag, respectively. A linear model finds significant slopes of –0.021 ± 0.006 and –0.030 ± 0.009 mag (10{sup 3} km s{sup –1}){sup –1} for intrinsic B – V and B – R colors versus velocity, respectively. Because the ejecta velocity distribution is skewed toward high velocities, these effects imply non-Gaussian intrinsic color distributions with skewness up to +0.3. Accounting for the intrinsic-color-velocity correlation results in corrections to A{sub V} extinction estimates as large as –0.12 mag for HV SNe Ia and +0.06 mag for NV events. Velocity measurements from SN Ia spectra have the potential to diminish systematic errors from the confounding of intrinsic colors and dust reddening affecting supernova distances.

  6. A Generalized {ital K} Correction for Type Ia Supernovae: Comparing {ital R}-band Photometry Beyond {ital z=9.2} with B,V, and {ital R}-band Nearby Photometry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goodbar, Ariel

    2008-01-01

    spectroscopically peculiar supernovae, and to search for anyK Correction for Type Ia Supernovae: Comparing R-bandK Correction for Type Ia Supernovae: Comparing R-band

  7. Variable Selection for Modeling the Absolute Magnitude at Maximum of Type Ia Supernovae

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Uemura, Makoto; Kawabata, S; Ikeda, Shiro; Maeda, Keiichi

    2015-01-01

    We discuss what is an appropriate set of explanatory variables in order to predict the absolute magnitude at the maximum of Type Ia supernovae. In order to have a good prediction, the error for future data, which is called the "generalization error," should be small. We use cross-validation in order to control the generalization error and LASSO-type estimator in order to choose the set of variables. This approach can be used even in the case that the number of samples is smaller than the number of candidate variables. We studied the Berkeley supernova database with our approach. Candidates of the explanatory variables include normalized spectral data, variables about lines, and previously proposed flux-ratios, as well as the color and light-curve widths. As a result, we confirmed the past understanding about Type Ia supernova: i) The absolute magnitude at maximum depends on the color and light-curve width. ii) The light-curve width depends on the strength of Si II. Recent studies have suggested to add more va...

  8. Wind-driven evolution of white dwarf binaries to type Ia supernovae

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ablimit, Iminhaji; Xu, Xiao-jie; Li, X.-D. [Department of Astronomy, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China)

    2014-01-01

    In the single-degenerate scenario for the progenitors of Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia), a white dwarf rapidly accretes hydrogen- or helium-rich material from its companion star and appears as a supersoft X-ray source. This picture has been challenged by the properties of the supersoft X-ray sources with very low mass companions and the observations of several nearby SNe Ia. It has been pointed out that the X-ray radiation or the wind from the accreting white dwarf can excite winds or strip mass from the companion star, thus significantly influencing the mass transfer processes. In this paper, we perform detailed calculations of the wind-driven evolution of white dwarf binaries. We present the parameter space for the possible SN Ia progenitors and for the surviving companions after the SNe. The results show that the ex-companion stars of SNe Ia have characteristics more compatible with the observations, compared with those in the traditional single-degenerate scenario.

  9. Type Ia supernovae from merging white dwarfs. II. Post-merger detonations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Raskin, Cody; Kasen, Daniel [Nuclear Science Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA (United States); Moll, Rainer; Woosley, Stan [Department of Physics and Department of Astronomy, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA (United States); Schwab, Josiah [Department of Physics and Department of Astronomy, University of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2014-06-10

    Merging carbon-oxygen (CO) white dwarfs are a promising progenitor system for Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia), but the underlying physics and timing of the detonation are still debated. If an explosion occurs after the secondary star is fully disrupted, the exploding primary will expand into a dense CO medium that may still have a disk-like structure. This interaction will decelerate and distort the ejecta. Here we carry out multidimensional simulations of 'tamped' SN Ia models, using both particle and grid-based codes to study the merger and explosion dynamics and a radiative transfer code to calculate synthetic spectra and light curves. We find that post-merger explosions exhibit an hourglass-shaped asymmetry, leading to strong variations in the light curves with viewing angle. The two most important factors affecting the outcome are the scale height of the disk, which depends sensitively on the binary mass ratio, and the total {sup 56}Ni yield, which is governed by the central density of the remnant core. The synthetic broadband light curves rise and decline very slowly, and the spectra generally look peculiar, with weak features from intermediate mass elements but relatively strong carbon absorption. We also consider the effects of the viscous evolution of the remnant and show that a longer time delay between merger and explosion probably leads to larger {sup 56}Ni yields and more symmetrical remnants. We discuss the relevance of this class of aspherical 'tamped' SN Ia for explaining the class of 'super-Chandrasekhar' SN Ia.

  10. COMPARING THE LIGHT CURVES OF SIMULATED TYPE Ia SUPERNOVAE WITH OBSERVATIONS USING DATA-DRIVEN MODELS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Diemer, Benedikt; Kessler, Richard; Graziani, Carlo; Jordan, George C. IV; Lamb, Donald Q.; Long, Min; Van Rossum, Daniel R., E-mail: bdiemer@oddjob.uchicago.edu [Flash Center for Computational Science, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States)

    2013-08-20

    We propose a robust, quantitative method to compare the synthetic light curves of a Type Ia supernova (SN Ia) explosion model with a large set of observed SNe Ia, and derive a figure of merit for the explosion model's agreement with observations. The synthetic light curves are fit with the data-driven model SALT2 which returns values for stretch, color, and magnitude at peak brightness, as well as a goodness-of-fit parameter. Each fit is performed multiple times with different choices of filter bands and epoch range in order to quantify the systematic uncertainty on the fitted parameters. We use a parametric population model for the distribution of observed SN Ia parameters from large surveys, and extend it to represent red, dim, and bright outliers found in a low-redshift SN Ia data set. We discuss the potential uncertainties of this population model and find it to be reliable given the current uncertainties on cosmological parameters. Using our population model, we assign each set of fitted parameters a likelihood of being observed in nature, and a figure of merit based on this likelihood. We define a second figure of merit based on the quality of the light curve fit, and combine the two measures into an overall figure of merit for each explosion model. We compute figures of merit for a variety of one-, two-, and three-dimensional explosion models and show that our evaluation method allows meaningful inferences across a wide range of light curve quality and fitted parameters.

  11. The Host Galaxies of Type Ia Supernovae Discovered by the Palomar Transient Factory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pan, Y -C; Maguire, K; Hook, I M; Nugent, P E; Howell, D A; Arcavi, I; Botyanszki, J; Cenko, S B; DeRose, J; Fakhouri, H K; Gal-Yam, A; Hsiao, E; Kulkarni, S R; Laher, R R; Lidman, C; Nordin, J; Walker, E S; Xu, D

    2013-01-01

    We present spectroscopic observations of the host galaxies of 82 low-redshift type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) discovered by the Palomar Transient Factory (PTF). We determine star-formation rates, gas-phase/stellar metallicities, and stellar masses and ages of these objects. As expected, strong correlations between the SN Ia light-curve width (stretch) and the host age/mass/metallicity are found: fainter, faster-declining events tend to be hosted by older/massive/metal-rich galaxies. There is some evidence that redder SNe Ia explode in higher metallicity galaxies, but we found no relation between the SN colour and host galaxy extinction based on the Balmer decrement, suggesting that the colour variation of these SNe does not primarily arise from this source. SNe Ia in higher-mass/metallicity galaxies also appear brighter after stretch/colour corrections than their counterparts in lower mass hosts, and the stronger correlation is with gas-phase metallicity suggesting this may be the more important variable. We also...

  12. Gamma rays from a supernova of type Ia: SN2014J

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Diehl, Roland

    2015-01-01

    SN2014J is the closest supernova of type Ia that occured in the last 40 years. This provides an opportunity for unprecedented observational detail and coverage in many astronomical bands, which will help to better understand the still unknown astrophysics of these supernovae. For the first time, such an event occurs sufficiently nearby so that also gamma rays are able to contribute to such investigations. This is important, as the primary source of the supernova light is the radioactive energy from about 0.5 M$_\\odot$ of $^{56}$Ni produced in the explosion, and the gamma rays associated with this decay make the supernova shine for months. The INTEGRAL gamma-ray observatory of ESA has followed the supernova emission for almost 5 months. The characteristic gamma ray lines from the $^{56}$Ni decay chain through $^{56}$Co to $^{56}$Fe have been measured. We discuss these observations, and the implications of the measured gamma-ray line characteristics as they evolve.

  13. Revealing progenitors of type Ia supernovae from their light curves and spectra

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kutsuna, Masamichi

    2015-01-01

    In the single degenerate (SD) scenario of type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia), the collision of the ejecta with its companion results in stripping hydrogen rich matter from the companion star. This hydrogen rich matter might leave its trace in the light curves and/or spectra. In this paper, we perform radiation hydrodynamical simulations of this collision for three binary systems. As a result, we find that the emission from the shock-heated region is not as strong as in the previous study. This weak emission, however, may be a result of our underestimate of the coupling between the gas and radiation in the shock interaction. Therefore, though our results suggest that the observed early light curves of SNe Ia can not rule out binary systems with a short separation as the progenitor system, more elaborate numerical studies will be needed to reach a fair conclusion. Alternatively, our results indicate that the feature observed in the early phase of a recent type Ia SN 2014J might result from interaction of the ejecta wi...

  14. Small-scale Interaction of Turbulence with Thermonuclear Flames in Type Ia Supernovae

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. C. Niemeyer; W. K. Bushe; G. R. Ruetsch

    1999-05-07

    Microscopic turbulence-flame interactions of thermonuclear fusion flames occuring in Type Ia Supernovae were studied by means of incompressible direct numerical simulations with a highly simplified flame description. The flame is treated as a single diffusive scalar field with a nonlinear source term. It is characterized by its Prandtl number, Pr << 1, and laminar flame speed, S_L. We find that if S_L ~ u', where u' is the rms amplitude of turbulent velocity fluctuations, the local flame propagation speed does not significantly deviate from S_L even in the presence of velocity fluctuations on scales below the laminar flame thickness. This result is interpreted in the context of subgrid-scale modeling of supernova explosions and the mechanism for deflagration-detonation-transitions.

  15. Near-infrared line identification in type Ia supernovae during the transitional phase

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Friesen, Brian; Baron, E.; Wisniewski, John P.; Miller, Timothy R. [Homer L. Dodge Department of Physics and Astronomy, 440 West Brooks Street, Room 100, Norman, OK 73019 (United States); Parrent, Jerod T. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Thomas, R. C. [Computational Cosmology Center, Computational Research Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, 1 Cyclotron Road MS 50B-4206, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Marion, G. H. [University of Texas at Austin, 1 University Station C1400, Austin, TX 78712-0259 (United States)

    2014-09-10

    We present near-infrared synthetic spectra of a delayed-detonation hydrodynamical model and compare them to observed spectra of four normal Type Ia supernovae ranging from day +56.5 to day +85. This is the epoch during which supernovae are believed to be undergoing the transition from the photospheric phase, where spectra are characterized by line scattering above an optically thick photosphere, to the nebular phase, where spectra consist of optically thin emission from forbidden lines. We find that most spectral features in the near-infrared can be accounted for by permitted lines of Fe II and Co II. In addition, we find that [Ni II] fits the emission feature near 1.98 ?m, suggesting that a substantial mass of {sup 58}Ni exists near the center of the ejecta in these objects, arising from nuclear burning at high density.

  16. Properties and alignment of interstellar dust grains toward Type Ia Supernovae with anomalous polarization curves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hoang, Thiem

    2015-01-01

    Recent photometric and polarimetric observations of type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) show unusually low total-to-selective extinction ratio ($R_{V}<2$) and wavelength of maximum polarization ($\\lambda_{max}<0.4\\mu m$) for several SNe Ia, which indicates peculiar properties of interstellar (IS) dust in the SN hosted galaxies and/or the presence of circumstellar (CS) dust. In this paper, we use inversion technique to infer best-fit grain size distribution and alignment function of interstellar grains along the lines of sight toward four SNe Ia with anomalous extinction and polarization data (SNe 1986G, 2006X, 2008fp, and 2014J). We find that to reproduce low values of $R_{V}$, a significant enhancement in the mass of small grains of radius $a< 0.1\\mu m$ is required. For SN 2014J, a simultaneous fit to observed extinction and polarization data is unsuccessful if the entire data is attributed to IS dust (model 1), but a good fit is obtained when accounting for the contribution of CS dust (model 2). For SN 200...

  17. G-Mode Excitation During the Pre-explosive Simmering of Type Ia Supernovae

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Piro, Anthony L

    2011-01-01

    Prior to the explosive burning of a white dwarf (WD) that makes a Type Ia supernova (SN Ia), the star "simmers" for ~10^3 yrs in a convecting, carbon burning region. I estimate the excitation of g-modes by convection during this phase and explore their possible affect on the WD. As these modes propagate from the core of the WD toward its surface, their amplitudes grow with decreasing density. Once the modes reach nonlinear amplitudes, they break and deposit their energy into a shell of mass ~10^{-4}M_\\odot. This raises the surface temperature by 6*10^8 K, which is sufficient to ignite a layer of helium, as is expected to exist for some SN Ia scenarios. This predominantly synthesizes 28Si, 32S, 40Ca, and some 44Ti. These ashes are expanded out with the subsequent explosion up to velocities of ~20,000 km/s, which may explain the high velocity features (HVFs) seen in many SNe Ia. The appearance of HVFs would therefore be a useful discriminant for determining between progenitors, since a flammable helium-rich lay...

  18. Ultraviolet observations of Super-Chandrasekhar mass type Ia supernova candidates with swift UVOT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, Peter J.; Smitka, Michael T.; Krisciunas, Kevin; Wang, Lifan [George P. and Cynthia Woods Mitchell Institute for Fundamental Physics and Astronomy, Texas A and M University, Department of Physics and Astronomy, 4242 TAMU, College Station, TX 77843 (United States); Kuin, Paul; De Pasquale, Massimiliano [Mullard Space Science Laboratory, University College London, Holmbury St. Mary, Dorking Surrey, RH5 6NT (United Kingdom); Scalzo, Richard [Research School of Astronomy and Astrophysics, The Australian National University, Mount Stromlo Observatory, Cotter Road, Weston Creek, ACT 2611 (Australia); Holland, Stephen [Space Telescope Science Center 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Milne, Peter, E-mail: pbrown@physics.tamu.edu [Steward Observatory, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85719 (United States)

    2014-05-20

    Among Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia), a class of overluminous objects exist whose ejecta mass is inferred to be larger than the canonical Chandrasekhar mass. We present and discuss the UV/optical photometric light curves, colors, absolute magnitudes, and spectra of three candidate Super-Chandrasekhar mass SNe—2009dc, 2011aa, and 2012dn—observed with the Swift Ultraviolet/Optical Telescope. The light curves are at the broad end for SNe Ia, with the light curves of SN 2011aa being among the broadest ever observed. We find all three to have very blue colors which may provide a means of excluding these overluminous SNe from cosmological analysis, though there is some overlap with the bluest of 'normal' SNe Ia. All three are overluminous in their UV absolute magnitudes compared to normal and broad SNe Ia, but SNe 2011aa and 2012dn are not optically overluminous compared to normal SNe Ia. The integrated luminosity curves of SNe 2011aa and 2012dn in the UVOT range (1600-6000 Å) are only half as bright as SN 2009dc, implying a smaller {sup 56}Ni yield. While it is not enough to strongly affect the bolometric flux, the early time mid-UV flux makes a significant contribution at early times. The strong spectral features in the mid-UV spectra of SNe 2009dc and 2012dn suggest a higher temperature and lower opacity to be the cause of the UV excess rather than a hot, smooth blackbody from shock interaction. Further work is needed to determine the ejecta and {sup 56}Ni masses of SNe 2011aa and 2012dn and to fully explain their high UV luminosities.

  19. Spectroscopic Properties of Star-Forming Host Galaxies and Type Ia Supernova Hubble Residuals in a Nearly Unbiased Sample

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D'Andrea, Chris B.; et al.

    2011-12-20

    We examine the correlation between supernova host galaxy properties and their residuals on the Hubble diagram. We use supernovae discovered during the Sloan Digital Sky Survey II - Supernova Survey, and focus on objects at a redshift of z < 0.15, where the selection effects of the survey are known to yield a complete Type Ia supernova sample. To minimize the bias in our analysis with respect to measured host-galaxy properties, spectra were obtained for nearly all hosts, spanning a range in magnitude of -23 < M_r < -17. In contrast to previous works that use photometric estimates of host mass as a proxy for global metallicity, we analyze host-galaxy spectra to obtain gas-phase metallicities and star-formation rates from host galaxies with active star formation. From a final sample of ~ 40 emission-line galaxies, we find that light-curve corrected Type Ia supernovae are ~ 0.1 magnitudes brighter in high-metallicity hosts than in low-metallicity hosts. We also find a significant (> 3{\\sigma}) correlation between the Hubble residuals of Type Ia supernovae and the specific star-formation rate of the host galaxy. We comment on the importance of supernova/host-galaxy correlations as a source of systematic bias in future deep supernova surveys.

  20. On type IIn/Ia-CSM supernovae as exemplified by SN 2012ca

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Inserra, C; Smartt, S J; Benetti, S; Chen, T -W; Childress, M; Gal-Yam, A; Howell, D A; Kangas, T; Pignata, G; Polshaw, J; Sullivan, M; Smith, K W; Valenti, S; Young, D R; Parker, S; Seccull, T; McCrum, M

    2015-01-01

    We present the complete set of ultra-violet, optical and near-infrared photometry and spectroscopy for SN 2012ca, covering the period from 6 days prior to maximum light, until 531 days after maximum. The spectroscopic time series for SN 2012ca is essentially unchanged over 1.5 years, and appear to be dominated at all epochs by signatures of interaction with a dense circumstellar medium rather than the underlying supernova (SN). SN 2012ca is a member of the class of type Ia-CSM/IIn SNe, the nature of which have been debated extensively in the literature. The two leading scenarios are either a type Ia SN exploding within a dense CSM from a non-degenerate, evolved companion, or a core-collapse SN from a massive star. While some members of the class have been unequivocally associated with type Ia SNe, in other cases the association is less certain. While it is possible that Sn 2012ca does arise from a thermonuclear SN, this would require a relatively high (between 20 and 70 per cent) efficiency in converting kine...

  1. A Test for the Nature of the Type Ia Supernova Explosion Mechanism

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Philip A. Pinto; Ronald G. Eastman; Tamara Rogers

    2000-08-21

    Currently popular models for Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) fall into two general classes. The first comprises explosions of nearly pure carbon/oxygen (C/O) white dwarfs at the Chandrasekhar limit which ignite near their centers. The second consists of lower-mass C/O cores which are ignited by the detonation of an accreted surface helium layer. Explosions of the latter type produce copious Fe, Co and Ni K-alpha emission from 56Ni and 56Co decay in the detonated surface layers, emission which is much weaker from Chandrasekhar-mass models. The presence of this emission provides a simple and unambiguous discriminant between these two models for SNe Ia. Both mechanisms may produce 0.1-0.6 solar masses of 56Ni, making them bright gamma-ray line emitters. The time to maximum brightness of 56Ni decay lines is distinctly shorter in the sub-Chandrasekhar mass class of model (approximately 15 days) than in the Chandrasekhar mass model (approximately 30 days), making gamma-ray line evolution another direct test of the explosion mechanism. It should just be possible to detect K-shell emission from a sub-Chandrasekhar explosion from SNe Ia as far away as the Virgo cluster with the XMM Observatory. A 1 to 2 square meter X-ray telescope such as the proposed Con-X Observatory could observe K-alpha emission from sub-Chandrasekhar mass SNe Ia in the Virgo cluster, providing not just a detection, but high-accuracy flux and kinematic information.

  2. HIGH-VELOCITY LINE FORMING REGIONS IN THE TYPE Ia SUPERNOVA 2009ig

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marion, G. H.; Foley, Ryan J.; Challis, Peter; Kirshner, Robert P. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Vinko, Jozsef; Wheeler, J. Craig; Silverman, Jeffrey M. [University of Texas at Austin, 1 University Station C1400, Austin, TX 78712-0259 (United States); Hsiao, Eric Y. [Carnegie Observatories, Las Campanas Observatory, Colina El Pino, Casilla 601 (Chile); Brown, Peter J. [George P. and Cynthia Woods Mitchell Institute for Fundamental Physics and Astronomy, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Texas A and M University, 4242 AMU, College Station, TX 77843 (United States); Filippenko, Alexei V. [Department of Astronomy, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720-3411 (United States); Garnavich, Peter [Department of Physics, University of Notre Dame, 225 Nieuwland Science Hall, Notre Dame, IN 46556 (United States); Landsman, Wayne B. [Adnet Systems, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Parrent, Jerod T. [Las Cumbres Observatory Global Telescope Network, Goleta, CA 93117 (United States); Pritchard, Tyler A.; Roming, Peter W. A. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Penn State University, 525 Davey Lab, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Wang, Xiaofeng, E-mail: gmarion@cfa.harvard.edu [Physics Department and Tsinghua Center for Astrophysics (THCA), Tsinghua University, Beijing 1,00084 (China)

    2013-11-01

    We report measurements and analysis of high-velocity (HVF) (>20,000 km s{sup –1}) and photospheric absorption features in a series of spectra of the Type Ia supernova (SN) 2009ig obtained between –14 days and +13 days with respect to the time of maximum B-band luminosity (B-max). We identify lines of Si II, Si III, S II, Ca II, and Fe II that produce both HVF and photospheric-velocity (PVF) absorption features. SN 2009ig is unusual for the large number of lines with detectable HVF in the spectra, but the light-curve parameters correspond to a slightly overluminous but unexceptional SN Ia (M{sub B} = –19.46 mag and ?m{sub 15}(B) = 0.90 mag). Similarly, the Si II ?6355 velocity at the time of B-max is greater than 'normal' for an SN Ia, but it is not extreme (v{sub Si} = 13,400 km s{sup –1}). The –14 days and –13 days spectra clearly resolve HVF from Si II ?6355 as separate absorptions from a detached line forming region. At these very early phases, detached HVF are prevalent in all lines. From –12 days to –6 days, HVF and PVF are detected simultaneously, and the two line forming regions maintain a constant separation of about 8000 km s{sup –1}. After –6 days all absorption features are PVF. The observations of SN 2009ig provide a complete picture of the transition from HVF to PVF. Most SNe Ia show evidence for HVF from multiple lines in spectra obtained before –10 days, and we compare the spectra of SN 2009ig to observations of other SNe. We show that each of the unusual line profiles for Si II ?6355 found in early-time spectra of SNe Ia correlate to a specific phase in a common development sequence from HVF to PVF.

  3. Constraining Dark Energy and Cosmological Transition Redshift with Type Ia Supernovae

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    F. Y. Wang; Z. G. Dai

    2007-08-30

    The property of dark energy and the physical reason for acceleration of the present universe are two of the most difficult problems in modern cosmology. The dark energy contributes about two-thirds of the critical density of the present universe from the observations of type-Ia supernova (SNe Ia) and anisotropy of cosmic microwave background (CMB).The SN Ia observations also suggest that the universe expanded from a deceleration to an acceleration phase at some redshift, implying the existence of a nearly uniform component of dark energy with negative pressure. We use the ``gold'' sample containing 157 SNe Ia and two recent well-measured additions, SNe Ia 1994ae and 1998aq to explore the properties of dark energy and the transition redshift. For a flat universe with the cosmological constant, we measure $\\Omega_{M}=0.28_{-0.05}^{+0.04}$, which is consistent with Riess et al. The transition redshift is $z_{T}=0.60_{-0.08}^{+0.06}$. We also discuss several dark energy models that define the $w(z)$ of the parameterized equation of state of dark energy including one parameter and two parameters ($w(z)$ being the ratio of the pressure to energy density). Our calculations show that the accurately calculated transition redshift varies from $z_{T}=0.29_{-0.06}^{+0.07}$ to $z_{T}=0.60_{-0.08}^{+0.06}$ across these models. We also calculate the minimum redshift $z_{c}$ at which the current observations need the universe to accelerate.

  4. Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics simulations of the core-degenerate scenario for Type Ia supernovae

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aznar-Siguán, G; Lorén-Aguilar, P; Soker, N; Kashi, A

    2015-01-01

    The core-degenerate (CD) scenario for type Ia supernovae (SN Ia) involves the merger of the hot core of an asymptotic giant branch (AGB) star and a white dwarf, and might contribute a non-negligible fraction of all thermonuclear supernovae. Despite its potential interest, very few studies, and based on only crude simplifications, have been devoted to investigate this possible scenario, compared with the large efforts invested to study some other scenarios. Here we perform the first three-dimensional simulations of the merger phase, and find that this process can lead to the formation of a massive white dwarf, as required by this scenario. We consider two situations, according to the mass of the circumbinary disk formed around the system during the final stages of the common envelope phase. If the disk is massive enough, the stars merge on a highly eccentric orbit. Otherwise, the merger occurs after the circumbinary disk has been ejected and gravitational wave radiation has brought the stars close to the Roche...

  5. Sensitivity study of explosive nucleosynthesis in Type Ia supernovae: I. Modification of individual thermonuclear reaction rates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eduardo Bravo; Gabriel Martínez-Pinedo

    2012-04-09

    We explore the sensitivity of the nucleosynthesis due to type Ia supernovae with respect to uncertainties in nuclear reaction rates. We have adopted a standard one-dimensional delayed detonation model of the explosion of a Chandrasekhar-mass white dwarf, and have post-processed the thermodynamic trajectories of every mass-shell with a nucleosynthetic code, with increases (decreases) by a factor of ten on the rates of 1196 nuclear reactions. We have computed as well hydrodynamic models for different rates of the fusion reactions of 12C and of 16O. For selected reactions, we have recomputed the nucleosynthesis with alternative prescriptions for their rates taken from the JINA REACLIB database, and have analyzed the temperature ranges where modifications of their rates have the strongest effect on nucleosynthesis. The nucleosynthesis resulting from the Type Ia supernova models is quite robust with respect to variations of nuclear reaction rates, with the exception of the reaction of fusion of 12C nuclei. The energy of the explosion changes by less than \\sim4%. The changes in the nucleosynthesis due to the modification of the rates of fusion reactions are as well quite modest, for instance no species with a mass fraction larger than 0.02 experiences a variation of its yield larger than a factor of two. We provide the sensitivity of the yields of the most abundant species with respect to the rates of the most intense reactions with protons, neutrons, and alphas. In general, the yields of Fe-group nuclei are more robust than the yields of intermediate-mass elements. Among the charged particle reactions, the most influential on supernova nucleosynthesis are 30Si + p \\rightleftarrows 31P + {\\gamma}, 20Ne + {\\alpha} \\rightleftarrows 24Mg + {\\gamma}, and 24Mg + {\\alpha} \\rightleftarrows 27Al + p. The temperatures at which a modification of their rate has a larger impact are in the range 2 < T < 4 GK. (abridged)

  6. Late-Time Photometry of Type Ia Supernova SN2012cg Reveals the Radioactive Decay of $^{57}$Co

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Graur, Or; Shara, Michael M; Riess, Adam G

    2015-01-01

    Seitenzahl et al. (2009) have predicted that $\\sim 3$ years after its explosion, the light we receive from a Type Ia supernova will come mostly from reprocessing of electrons and X-rays emitted by the radioactive decay chain $^{57}{\\rm Co}~\\to~^{57}{\\rm Fe}$, instead of positrons from the decay chain $^{56}{\\rm Co}~\\to~^{56}{\\rm Fe}$ that dominates the supernova light at earlier times. Using the Hubble Space Telescope, we followed the light curve of the Type Ia supernova SN2012cg out to $1055$ days after maximum light. Our measurements are consistent with the light curves predicted by the contribution of energy from the reprocessing of electrons and X-rays emitted by the decay of $^{57}$Co. This provides conclusive evidence that $^{57}$Co is produced in Type Ia supernova explosions. The ratio of luminosities produced by the decays of $^{57}$Co and $^{56}$Co, a strong constraint on any Type Ia supernova explosion model, is in the range $(0.4$ - $8.5)\\times10^{-3}$.

  7. Convection during the Late Stages of Simmering in Type Ia Supernovae

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anthony L. Piro; Philip Chang

    2008-01-08

    Following unstable ignition of carbon, but prior to explosion, a white dwarf (WD) in a Type Ia supernova (SN Ia) undergoes a simmering phase. During this time, a central convective region grows and encompasses ~1 Msun of the WD over a timescale of ~1000 yrs, which sets the thermal and turbulent profile for the subsequent explosion. We study this time-dependent convection and summarize some of the key features that differ from the traditional, steady-state case. We show that the long conductive timescale above the convective zone and the extraction of energy to heat the WD core leads to a decrease of the convective luminosity and characteristic velocities near the convective zone's top boundary. In addition, differences in the composition between the convective core and the conductive exterior will significantly alter the location of this boundary. In this respect, we find the biggest effect due to complete 22Ne sedimentation prior to carbon ignition. These effects add diversity to the possible WD models, which may alter the properties of the SN Ia explosion.

  8. Probing the isotropy of cosmic acceleration traced by Type Ia supernovae

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Javanmardi, Behnam; Kroupa, Pavel; Pflamm-Altenburg, Jan

    2015-01-01

    We present a method to test the isotropy of the magnitude-redshift relation of Type Ia Supernovae (SNe Ia) and single out the most discrepant direction (in terms of the signal-to-noise ratio) with respect to the all-sky data. Our technique accounts for possible directional variations of the corrections for SNe Ia and yields all-sky maps of the best-fit cosmological parameters with arbitrary angular resolution. To show its potential, we apply our method to the recent Union2.1 compilation, building maps with three different angular resolutions. We use a Monte Carlo method to estimate the statistical significance with which we could reject the null hypothesis that the magnitude-redshift relation is isotropic based on the properties of the observed most discrepant directions. We find that, based on pure signal-to-noise arguments, the null hypothesis cannot be rejected at any meaningful confidence level. However, if we also consider that the strongest deviations in the Union2.1 sample closely align with the dipole...

  9. The $m$-$z$ relation for Type Ia supernovae: safety in numbers or safely without worry?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Helbig, Phillip

    2015-01-01

    The $m$-$z$ relation for Type Ia supernovae is compatible with the cosmological concordance model if one assumes that the Universe is homogeneous, at least with respect to light propagation. This could be due to the density along each line of sight being equal to the overall cosmological density, or to `safety in numbers', with variation in the density along all lines of sight averaging out if the sample is large enough. Statistical correlations (or lack thereof) between redshifts, residuals (differences between the observed distance moduli and those calculated from the best-fitting cosmological model), and observational uncertainties suggest that the former scenario is the better description, so that one can use the traditional formula for the luminosity distance safely without worry.

  10. The Internal Shear of Type Ia Supernova Progenitors During Accretion and Simmering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Piro, Anthony L

    2008-01-01

    A white dwarf (WD) gains substantial angular momentum during the accretion process that grows it toward a Chandrasekhar mass. It is therefore expected to be quickly rotating when it ignites as a Type Ia supernova. The thermal and shearing profile are important for subsequent flame propagation. We highlight processes that could affect the WD shear, during accretion as well as during the ~1000 years of pre-explosive simmering. Baroclinic instabilities and/or the shear growth of small magnetic fields provide sufficient torque to bring the WD very close to solid body rotation during accretion. The lack of significant shear makes it difficult to grow a WD substantially past the typical Chandrasekhar mass. Once carbon ignites, a convective region spreads from the WD's center. This phase occurs regardless of progenitor scenario, and therefore it is of great interest for understanding how the WD interior is prepared before the explosive burning begins. We summarize some of the key properties of the convective region,...

  11. Consistent use of type Ia supernovae highly magnified by galaxy clusters to constrain the cosmological parameters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zitrin, Adi [Cahill Center for Astronomy and Astrophysics, California Institute of Technology, MS 249-17, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Redlich, Matthias [Universität Heidelberg, Zentrum für Astronomie, Institut für Theoretische Astrophysik, Philosophenweg 12, D-69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Broadhurst, Tom, E-mail: adizitrin@gmail.com [Department of Theoretical Physics, University of Basque Country UPV/EHU, Bilbao (Spain)

    2014-07-01

    We discuss how Type Ia supernovae (SNe) strongly magnified by foreground galaxy clusters should be self-consistently treated when used in samples fitted for the cosmological parameters. While the cluster lens magnification of a SN can be well constrained from sets of multiple images of various background galaxies with measured redshifts, its value is typically dependent on the fiducial set of cosmological parameters used to construct the mass model. In such cases, one should not naively demagnify the observed SN luminosity by the model magnification into the expected Hubble diagram, which would create a bias, but instead take into account the cosmological parameters a priori chosen to construct the mass model. We quantify the effect and find that a systematic error of typically a few percent, up to a few dozen percent per magnified SN may be propagated onto a cosmological parameter fit unless the cosmology assumed for the mass model is taken into account (the bias can be even larger if the SN is lying very near the critical curves). We also simulate how such a bias propagates onto the cosmological parameter fit using the Union2.1 sample supplemented with strongly magnified SNe. The resulting bias on the deduced cosmological parameters is generally at the few percent level, if only few biased SNe are included, and increases with the number of lensed SNe and their redshift. Samples containing magnified Type Ia SNe, e.g., from ongoing cluster surveys, should readily account for this possible bias.

  12. Supercal: Cross-Calibration of Multiple Photometric Systems to Improve Cosmological Measurements with Type Ia Supernovae

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scolnic, D; Riess, A G; Rest, A; Schlafly, E; Foley, R J; Finkbeiner, D; Tang, C; Burgett, W S; Chambers, K C; Draper, P W; Hodapp, K W; Huber, M E; Kaiser, N; Kudritzki, R P; Magnier, E A; Metcalfe, N; Stubbs, C W

    2015-01-01

    Current cosmological analyses which use Type Ia supernova (SN Ia) observations combine SN samples to expand the redshift range beyond that of a single sample and increase the overall sample size. The inhomogeneous photometric calibration between different SN samples is one of the largest systematic uncertainties of the cosmological parameter estimation. To place these different samples on a single system, analyses currently use observations of a small sample of very bright flux standards on the $HST$ system. We propose a complementary method, called `Supercal', in which we use measurements of secondary standards in each system, compare these to measurements of the same stars in the Pan-STARRS1 (PS1) system, and determine offsets for each system relative to PS1, placing all SN observations on a single, consistent photometric system. PS1 has observed $3\\pi$ of the sky and has a relative calibration of better than 5 mmag (for $\\sim15

  13. Convection during the Late Stages of Simmering in Type Ia Supernovae

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Piro, Anthony L

    2008-01-01

    Following unstable ignition of carbon, but prior to explosion, a white dwarf (WD) in a Type Ia supernova (SN Ia) undergoes a simmering phase. During this time, a central convective region grows and encompasses ~1 Msun of the WD over a timescale of ~1000 yrs, which sets the thermal and turbulent profile for the subsequent explosion. We study this time-dependent convection and summarize some of the key features that differ from the traditional, steady-state case. We show that the long conductive timescale above the convective zone and the extraction of energy to heat the WD core leads to a decrease of the convective luminosity and characteristic velocities near the convective zone's top boundary. In addition, differences in the composition between the convective core and the conductive exterior will significantly alter the location of this boundary. In this respect, we find the biggest effect due to complete 22Ne sedimentation prior to carbon ignition. These effects add diversity to the possible WD models, whic...

  14. First Evidence of Globular Cluster Formation from the Ejecta of Prompt Type Ia Supernovae

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsujimoto, Takuji

    2012-01-01

    Recent spectroscopic observations of globular clusters (GCs) in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) have discovered that one of the intermediate-age GC, NGC 1718 with [Fe/H]=-0.7 has an extremely low [Mg/Fe] ratio of ~-0.9. We propose that NGC 1718 was formed from the ejecta of type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) mixed with very metal-poor ([Fe/H] <-1.3) gas about ~ 2 Gyr ago. The proposed scenario is shown to be consistent with the observed abundances of Fe-group elements such as Cr, Mn, and Ni. In addition, compelling evidence for asymptotic giant branch stars playing a role in chemical enrichment during this GC formation is found. We suggest that the origin of the metal-poor gas is closely associated with the efficient gas-transfer from the outer gas disk of the Small Magellanic Cloud to the LMC disk. We anticipate that the outer part of the LMC disk contains field stars exhibiting significantly low [Mg/Fe] ratios, formed through the same process as NGC 1718.

  15. On Iron Enrichment, Star Formation, and Type Ia Supernovae in Galaxy Clusters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michael Loewenstein

    2006-05-04

    The nature of star formation and Type Ia supernovae (SNIa) in galaxies in the field and in rich galaxy clusters are contrasted by juxtaposing the build-up of heavy metals in the universe inferred from observed star formation and supernovae rate histories with data on the evolution of Fe abundances in the intracluster medium (ICM). Models for the chemical evolution of Fe in these environments are constructed, subject to observational constraints, for this purpose. While models with a mean delay for SNIa of 3 Gyr and standard initial mass function (IMF) are consistent with observations in the field, cluster Fe enrichment immediately tracks a rapid, top-heavy phase of star formation -- although transport of Fe into the ICM may be more prolonged and star formation likely continues to redshifts formation mode. Star formation is >3 times more efficient in rich clusters than in the field, mitigating the overcooling problem in numerical cluster simulations. Both the fraction of baryons cycled through stars, and the fraction of the total present-day stellar mass in the form of stellar remnants, are substantially greater in clusters than in the field.

  16. Constraints on shallow {sup 56}Ni from the early light curves of type Ia supernovae

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Piro, Anthony L. [Theoretical Astrophysics, California Institute of Technology, 1200 E California Boulevard, M/C 350-17, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Nakar, Ehud, E-mail: piro@caltech.edu [Raymond and Beverly Sackler School of Physics and Astronomy, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv 69978 (Israel)

    2014-03-20

    Ongoing transient surveys are presenting an unprecedented account of the rising light curves of Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia). This early emission probes the shallowest layers of the exploding white dwarf (WD), which can provide constraints on the progenitor star and the properties of the explosive burning. We use semianalytic models of radioactively powered rising light curves to analyze these observations. As we have summarized in previous work, the main limiting factor in determining the surface distribution of {sup 56}Ni is the lack of an unambiguously identified time of explosion, as would be provided by detection of shock breakout or shock-heated cooling. Without this the SN may in principle exhibit a 'dark phase' for a few hours to days, where the only emission is from shock-heated cooling that is too dim to be detected. We show that by assuming a theoretically motivated time-dependent velocity evolution, the explosion time can be better constrained, albeit with potential systematic uncertainties. This technique is used to infer the surface {sup 56}Ni distributions of three recent SNe Ia that were caught especially early in their rise. In all three we find fairly similar {sup 56}Ni distributions. Observations of SN 2011fe and SN 2012cg probe shallower depths than SN 2009ig, and in these two cases {sup 56}Ni is present merely ?10{sup –2} M {sub ?} from the WDs' surfaces. The uncertainty in this result is up to an order of magnitude given the difficulty of precisely constraining the explosion time. We also use our conclusions about the explosion times to reassess radius constraints for the progenitor of SN 2011fe, as well as discuss the roughly t {sup 2} power law that is inferred for many observed rising light curves.

  17. IS WX CEN A POSSIBLE TYPE Ia SUPERNOVA PROGENITOR WITH WIND-DRIVEN MASS TRANSFER?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Qian, S.-B.; Shi, G.; Zhu, L.-Y.; Liu, L.; Zhao, E.-G.; Li, L.-J. [Yunnan Observatories, Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS), P.O. Box 110, 650011 Kunming (China); Fernandez Lajus, E.; Di Sisto, R. P., E-mail: qsb@ynao.ac.cn [Facultad de Ciencias Astronomicas y Geofisicas, Universidad Nacional de La Plata, 1900 La Plata, Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    2013-08-01

    WX Cen is one of a few compact binary supersoft X-ray sources (CBSS) in the Galaxy that is a possible Type Ia supernova (SN Ia) progenitor. The supersoft X-ray radiation is explained as hydrostatic nuclear burning on the surface of the white dwarf component that is accreting hydrogen from a stellar companion at a high rate. If the mass donor in this system has a low mass, as has been suggested in the literature, one would expect a high wind-driven mass transfer rate. In that case, the orbital period of the system should increase. To test this theoretical prediction, we have monitored the system photometrically since 2010. By using four newly determined eclipse timings together with those collected from the literature, we discovered that the orbital period is decreasing at a rate of dP/dt = -5.15 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -7} days yr{sup -1}. The long-term decrease in the orbital period is contrary to the prediction that the system is powered by wind-driven accretion. It therefore seems plausible that the mass donor could be more massive than the white dwarf, and that the mass transfer is driven by the thermal instability of the donor star. This finding suggests that WX Cen is a key object to check the physical mechanisms of mass accretion in CBSS. The corresponding timescale of the period change is about P/P-dot {approx} 0.81 x 10{sup 6} yr, indicating that WX Cen may evolve into an SNe Ia within one million years in the Galaxy.

  18. On the Thermonuclear Runaway in Type Ia Supernovae: How to run away?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. Hoeflich; J. Stein

    2001-12-07

    Type Ia Supernovae are thought to be thermonuclear explosions of massive white dwarfs (WD). We present the first study of multi-dimensional effects during the final hours prior to the thermonuclear runaway which leads to the explosion. The calculations utilize an implicit, 2-D hydro code.Mixing and the ignition process are studied in detail. We find that the initial chemical structure of the WD is changed but the material is not fully homogenized. The exploding WD sustains a central region with a low C/O ratio. This implies that the explosive nuclear burning will begin in a partially C-depleted environment. The thermonuclear runaway happens in a well defined region close to the center. It is induced by compressional heat when matter is brought inwards by convective flows. We find no evidence for multiple spot or strong off-center ignition. Convective velocities are of the order of 100 km/sec which is well above the effective burning speeds in SNe Ia previously expected right after the runaway. For about 0.5 to 1 sec, the speed of the burning front will neither be determined by the laminar speed nor the Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities but by convective flows produced prior to the runaway. The consequences are discussed for our under- standing of the detailed physics of the flame propagation, the deflagration detonation transition, and the nucleosynthesis in the central layers. Our results strongly suggest the pre-conditioning of the progenitor as a key-factor for our understanding of the diversity in SNeIa.

  19. Type Ia supernova rate measurements to redshift 2.5 from CANDELS: Searching for prompt explosions in the early universe

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rodney, Steven A.; Riess, Adam G.; Graur, Or; Jones, David O. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, The Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Strolger, Louis-Gregory; Dahlen, Tomas; Casertano, Stefano; Ferguson, Henry C.; Koekemoer, Anton M. [Space Telescope Science Institute, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Dickinson, Mark E. [National Optical Astronomy Observatory, 950 North Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85719 (United States); Garnavich, Peter [Department of Physics, University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, IN 46556 (United States); Hayden, Brian [E.O. Lawrence Berkeley National Lab, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Jha, Saurabh W.; McCully, Curtis; Patel, Brandon [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, Piscataway, NJ 08854 (United States); Kirshner, Robert P. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Mobasher, Bahram [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Riverside, CA 92521 (United States); Weiner, Benjamin J. [Department of Astronomy, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Cenko, S. Bradley [Astrophysics Science Division, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Mail Code 661, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Clubb, Kelsey I. [Department of Astronomy, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); and others

    2014-07-01

    The Cosmic Assembly Near-infrared Deep Extragalactic Legacy Survey (CANDELS) was a multi-cycle treasury program on the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) that surveyed a total area of ?0.25 deg{sup 2} with ?900 HST orbits spread across five fields over three years. Within these survey images we discovered 65 supernovae (SNe) of all types, out to z ? 2.5. We classify ?24 of these as Type Ia SNe (SNe Ia) based on host galaxy redshifts and SN photometry (supplemented by grism spectroscopy of six SNe). Here we present a measurement of the volumetric SN Ia rate as a function of redshift, reaching for the first time beyond z = 2 and putting new constraints on SN Ia progenitor models. Our highest redshift bin includes detections of SNe that exploded when the universe was only ?3 Gyr old and near the peak of the cosmic star formation history. This gives the CANDELS high redshift sample unique leverage for evaluating the fraction of SNe Ia that explode promptly after formation (<500 Myr). Combining the CANDELS rates with all available SN Ia rate measurements in the literature we find that this prompt SN Ia fraction is f{sub P} = 0.53{sub stat0.10}{sup ±0.09}{sub sys0.26}{sup ±0.10}, consistent with a delay time distribution that follows a simple t {sup –1} power law for all times t > 40 Myr. However, mild tension is apparent between ground-based low-z surveys and space-based high-z surveys. In both CANDELS and the sister HST program CLASH (Cluster Lensing And Supernova Survey with Hubble), we find a low rate of SNe Ia at z > 1. This could be a hint that prompt progenitors are in fact relatively rare, accounting for only 20% of all SN Ia explosions—though further analysis and larger samples will be needed to examine that suggestion.

  20. SN~2012cg: Evidence for Interaction Between a Normal Type Ia Supernova and a Non-Degenerate Binary Companion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marion, G H; Vinkó, Jozsef; Silverman, Jeffrey M; Sand, David J; Challis, Peter; Kirshner, Robert P; Wheeler, J Craig; Berlind, Perry; Brown, Warren R; Calkins, Michael L; Dhungana, Govinda; Foley, Ryan J; Friedman, Andrew S; Graham, Melissa L; Howell, D Andrew; Hsiao, Eric Y; Irwin, Jonathan M; Kehoe, Robert; Macri, Lucas M; Mandel, Kaisey; McCully, Curtis; Rines, Kenneth J; Wilhelmy, Steven; Zheng, Weikang

    2015-01-01

    We report evidence for excess blue light from the Type Ia supernova SN~2012cg at fifteen and sixteen days before maximum B-band brightness. The emission is consistent with predictions for the impact of the supernova on a non-degenerate binary companion. This is the first evidence for emission from a companion to a normal SN~Ia. Sixteen days before maximum light, the B-V color of SN~2012cg is 0.2 mag bluer than for other normal SN~Ia. At later times, this supernova has a typical SN~Ia light curve, with extinction-corrected M_B = -19.62 \\pm 0.02 mag and Delta m_{15}(B) = 0.86 \\pm 0.02. Our data set is extensive, with photometry in 7 filters from 5 independent sources. Early spectra also show the effects of blue light, and high-velocity features are observed at early times. Near maximum, the spectra are normal with a silicon velocity v_{Si} = -10,500 km/s. Comparing the early data with models by Kasen (2010) favors a main-sequence companion of about 6 solar masses. It is possible that many other SN Ia have main-...

  1. LATE-TIME SPECTRAL OBSERVATIONS OF THE STRONGLY INTERACTING TYPE Ia SUPERNOVA PTF11kx

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Silverman, Jeffrey M. [Department of Astronomy, University of Texas, Austin, TX 78712-0259 (United States); Nugent, Peter E.; Filippenko, Alexei V.; Cenko, S. Bradley [Department of Astronomy, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720-3411 (United States); Gal-Yam, Avishay [Benoziyo Center for Astrophysics, The Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovot 76100 (Israel); Sullivan, Mark [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Southampton, Southampton SO17 1BJ (United Kingdom); Howell, D. Andrew [Las Cumbres Observatory Global Telescope Network, Goleta, CA 93117 (United States); Pan, Yen-Chen; Hook, Isobel M., E-mail: jsilverman@astro.as.utexas.edu [Department of Physics (Astrophysics), University of Oxford, Keble Road, Oxford OX1 3RH (United Kingdom)

    2013-08-01

    PTF11kx was a Type Ia supernova (SN Ia) that showed time-variable absorption features, including saturated Ca II H and K lines that weakened and eventually went into emission. The strength of the emission component of H{alpha} gradually increased, implying that the SN was undergoing significant interaction with its circumstellar medium (CSM). These features, and many others, were blueshifted slightly and showed a P-Cygni profile, likely indicating that the CSM was directly related to, and probably previously ejected by, the progenitor system itself. These and other observations led Dilday et al. to conclude that PTF11kx came from a symbiotic nova progenitor like RS Oph. In this work we extend the spectral coverage of PTF11kx to 124-680 rest-frame days past maximum brightness. The late-time spectra of PTF11kx are dominated by H{alpha} emission (with widths of full width at half-maximum intensity Almost-Equal-To 2000 km s{sup -1}), strong Ca II emission features ({approx}10,000 km s{sup -1} wide), and a blue 'quasi-continuum' due to many overlapping narrow lines of Fe II. Emission from oxygen, He I, and Balmer lines higher than H{alpha} is weak or completely absent at all epochs, leading to large observed H{alpha}/H{beta} intensity ratios. The H{alpha} emission appears to increase in strength with time for {approx}1 yr, but it subsequently decreases significantly along with the Ca II emission. Our latest spectrum also indicates the possibility of newly formed dust in the system as evidenced by a slight decrease in the red wing of H{alpha}. During the same epochs, multiple narrow emission features from the CSM temporally vary in strength. The weakening of the H{alpha} and Ca II emission at late times is possible evidence that the SN ejecta have overtaken the majority of the CSM and agrees with models of other strongly interacting SNe Ia. The varying narrow emission features, on the other hand, may indicate that the CSM is clumpy or consists of multiple thin shells.

  2. Color dispersion and Milky-Way-like reddening among type Ia supernovae

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scolnic, Daniel M.; Riess, Adam G.; Rodney, Steven A.; Brout, Dillon J.; Jones, David O. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Johns Hopkins University, 3400 North Charles Street, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Foley, Ryan J. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Rest, Armin [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Past analyses of Type Ia supernovae have identified an irreducible scatter of 5%-10% in distance, widely attributed to an intrinsic dispersion in luminosity. Another equally valid source of this scatter is intrinsic dispersion in color. Misidentification of the true source of this scatter can bias both the retrieved color-luminosity relation and cosmological parameter measurements. The size of this bias depends on the magnitude of the intrinsic color dispersion relative to the distribution of colors that correlate with distance. We produce a realistic simulation of a misattribution of intrinsic scatter and find a negative bias in the recovered color-luminosity relation, ?, of ?? ? –1.0 (?33%) and a positive bias in the equation of state parameter, w, of ?w ? +0.04 (?4%). We re-analyze current published datasets with the assumption that the distance scatter is predominantly the result of color. Unlike previous analyses, we find that the data are consistent with a Milky-Way-like reddening law (R{sub V} = 3.1) and that a Milky-Way dust model better predicts the asymmetric color-luminosity trends than the conventional luminosity scatter hypothesis. We also determine that accounting for color variation reduces the correlation between various host galaxy properties and Hubble residuals by ?20%.

  3. A Test of Tully-Fisher Distance Estimates Using Cepheids and Type Ia Supernovae

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. Shanks

    1999-01-24

    We update and extend the results of Shanks (1997, MNRAS, 290, L77) by making a direct test of Tully-Fisher distance estimates to thirteen spiral galaxies with HST Cepheid distances and to ten spiral galaxies with Type Ia supernova (SNIa) distances. The results show that the Tully-Fisher distance moduli are too short with respect to the Cepheid distances by 0.46+-0.11mag and too short with respect to the SNIa distances by 0.49+-0.18mag. Combining the HST Cepheid and the best SNIa data suggests that, overall, previous Tully-Fisher distances at v~1000 kms-1 were too short by 0.43+-0.09mag, a result which is significant at the 4.6 sigma level. These data therefore indicate that previous Tully-Fisher distances should be revised upwards by 22+-5% implying, for example, a Virgo distance of 19.0+-1.8Mpc. The value of Ho from Tully-Fisher estimates is correspondingly revised downwards from Ho=84+-10kms-1Mpc-1 to Ho=69+-8kms-1Mpc-1. There is evidence that the Tully-Fisher relation at large distances is affected by Malmquist bias. In this case, we argue that Ho<50kms-1Mpc-1 cannot be ruled out by Tully-Fisher considerations.

  4. Revised photometry and color distribution of Type Ia supernovae observed at Asiago in the seventies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    F. Patat; R. Barbon; E. Cappellaro M. Turatto

    1996-05-29

    Following recent claims regarding possible errors in the photometry of SNe carried out at Asiago observatory during the 70's, which produced very blue $(B-V)$ color at maximum for some objects, we present the result of new CCD photometry of the sequences around 16 type Ia supernovae. Except for a few cases, e.g. SN1970J and SN1972J for which a large zero point error has been found, the new data show that the old Asiago observations have been carried out properly and that their accuracy was comparable to that expected for a photometry based on photographic transfers. This result is also substantiated by comparison with the re-calibration of some Asiago sequences made photo-electrically by Tsvetkov. New light curves of the SNe have been determined and B magnitudes and (B-V) colors at light peak derived. With the new data the color distribution of the SNe studied here becomes narrower and moves to the red by only 0.06 mag, showing no more very blue objects except for one, still uncertain, case. As far as the use of SNIa as standard candles is concerned, we show that the utilization of all SNe in the M$_B$ vs. (B-V)$^{max}_0$ plane reduces the uncertainties due to the photometry.

  5. Type Ia Supernovae: Can Coriolis force break the symmetry of the gravitational confined detonation explosion mechanism?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    García-Senz, D; Domínguez, I; Thielemann, F K

    2015-01-01

    Nowadays the number of models aimed at explaining the Type Ia supernova phenomenon is high and discriminating between them is a must-do. In this work we explore the influence of rotation in the evolution of the nuclear flame which drives the explosion in the so called gravitational confined detonation models. Assuming that the flame starts in a point-like region slightly above the center of the white dwarf (WD) and adding a moderate amount of angular velocity to the star we follow the evolution of the deflagration using a smoothed particle hydrodynamics code. We find that the results are very dependent on the angle between the rotational axis and the line connecting the initial bubble of burned material with the center of the white dwarf at the moment of the ignition. The impact of rotation is larger for angles close to 90{\\deg} because the Coriolis force on a floating element of fluid is maximum, and its principal effect is to break the symmetry of the deflagration. Such symmetry breaking weakens the converg...

  6. The Internal Shear of Type Ia Supernova Progenitors During Accretion and Simmering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anthony L. Piro

    2008-01-07

    A white dwarf (WD) gains substantial angular momentum during the accretion process that grows it toward a Chandrasekhar mass. It is therefore expected to be quickly rotating when it ignites as a Type Ia supernova. The thermal and shearing profile are important for subsequent flame propagation. We highlight processes that could affect the WD shear, during accretion as well as during the ~1000 years of pre-explosive simmering. Baroclinic instabilities and/or the shear growth of small magnetic fields provide sufficient torque to bring the WD very close to solid body rotation during accretion. The lack of significant shear makes it difficult to grow a WD substantially past the typical Chandrasekhar mass. Once carbon ignites, a convective region spreads from the WD's center. This phase occurs regardless of progenitor scenario, and therefore it is of great interest for understanding how the WD interior is prepared before the explosive burning begins. We summarize some of the key properties of the convective region, which includes demonstrating that the mass enclosed by convection at any given time depends most sensitively on a single parameter that can be expressed as either the ratio of temperatures or densities at the top and bottom of the convection zone. At low Rossby numbers the redistribution of angular momentum by convection may result in significant shearing at the convective/non-convective boundary.

  7. SN1994D in NGC4526: a normally bright type Ia supernova

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Georg Drenkhahn; Tom Richtler

    1999-09-07

    SN1994D of type Ia has been suspected not to fit into the relation between decline rate, colour, and brightness. However, an individual distance of its host galaxy, NGC4526, other than that of the Virgo cluster, has not yet been published. We determined the distance by the method of globular cluster luminosity functions on the basis of HST archive data. A maximum-likelihood fit returns apparent turn-over magnitudes of 23.16+-0.16mag in V and 21.96+-0.09mag in I. The corresponding distance modulus is 30.4+-0.3mag, where the error reflects our estimation of the absolute distance scale. The absolute magnitudes (not corrected for decline rate and colour) are -18.67+-0.30mag, -18.62+-0.30mag, and -18.40+-0.30mag for B, V, and I, respectively. The corrected magnitudes are -18.69+-0.31mag, -18.69+-0.31mag, and -18.44+-0.31mag. Compared with other supernovae with reliably determined distances, SN1994D fits within the errors. It is therefore not a counter-example against a uniform decline-rate-colour-brightness relation.

  8. FIRST EVIDENCE OF GLOBULAR CLUSTER FORMATION FROM THE EJECTA OF PROMPT TYPE Ia SUPERNOVAE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tsujimoto, Takuji [National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, Mitaka-shi, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan); Bekki, Kenji, E-mail: taku.tsujimoto@nao.ac.jp [ICRAR, M468, The University of Western Australia, 35 Stirling Highway, Crawley, WA 6009 (Australia)

    2012-06-01

    Recent spectroscopic observations of globular clusters (GCs) in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) have discovered that one of the intermediate-age GCs, NGC 1718, with [Fe/H] = -0.7 has an extremely low [Mg/Fe] ratio of {approx}-0.9. We propose that NGC 1718 was formed from the ejecta of Type Ia supernovae mixed with very metal-poor ([Fe/H] <-1.3) gas about {approx}2 Gyr ago. The proposed scenario is shown to be consistent with the observed abundances of Fe-group elements such as Cr, Mn, and Ni. In addition, compelling evidence for asymptotic giant branch stars playing a role in chemical enrichment during this GC formation is found. We suggest that the origin of the metal-poor gas is closely associated with efficient gas transfer from the outer gas disk of the Small Magellanic Cloud to the LMC disk. We anticipate that the outer part of the LMC disk contains field stars exhibiting significantly low [Mg/Fe] ratios, formed through the same process as NGC 1718.

  9. Optical and Infrared Photometry of the Nearby Type Ia Supernovae 1999ee, 2000bh, 2000ca, and 2001ba

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kevin Krisciunas; Mark M. Phillips; Nicholas B. Suntzeff; S. E. Persson; Mario Hamuy; Roberto Antezana; Pablo Candia; Alejandro Clocchiatti; Darren L. DePoy; Lisa M. Germany; Luis Gonzalez; Sergio Gonzalez; Wojtek Krzeminski; Jose Maza; Peter E. Nugent; Yulei Qiu; Armin Rest; Miguel Roth; Maximilian Stritzinger; L. -G. Strolger; Ian Thompson; T. B. Williams; Marina Wischnjewsky

    2003-11-18

    We present near infrared photometry of the Type Ia supernova 1999ee; also, optical and infrared photometry of the Type Ia SNe 2000bh, 2000ca, and 2001ba. For SNe 1999ee and 2000bh we present the first-ever SN photometry at 1.035 microns (the Y-band). We present K-corrections which transform the infrared photometry in the observer's frame to the supernova rest frame. Using our infrared K-corrections and stretch factors derived from optical photometry, we construct JHK templates which can be used to determine the apparent magnitudes at maximum if one has some data in the window -12 to +10 d with respect to T(B_max). Following up previous work on the uniformity of V minus IR loci of Type Ia supernovae of mid-range decline rates, we present unreddened loci for slow decliners. We also discuss evidence for a continuous change of color at a given epoch as a function of decline rate.

  10. The Silicon and Calcium High-Velocity Features in Type Ia Supernovae from Early to Maximum Phases

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhao, Xulin; Maeda, Keiichi; Sai, Hanna; Zhang, Tianmeng; Zhang, Jujia; Huang, Fang; Rui, Liming; Zhou, Qi; Mo, Jun

    2015-01-01

    The high-velocity features (HVFs) in optical spectra of type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) are examined with a large sample including very early-time spectra (e.g., t < -7 days). Multiple Gaussian fits are applied to examine the HVFs and their evolutions, using constraints on expansion velocities for the same species (i.e., SiII 5972 and SiII 6355). We find that strong HVFs tend to appear in SNe Ia with smaller decline rates (e.g., dm15(B)<1.4 mag), clarifying that the finding by Childress et al. (2014) for the Ca-HVFs in near-maximum-light spectra applies both to the Si-HVFs and Ca-HVFs in the earlier phase. The Si-HVFs seem to be more common in fast-expanding SNe Ia, which is different from the earlier result that the Ca-HVFs are associated with SNe Ia having slower SiII 6355 velocities at maximum light (i.e., Vsi). This difference can be due to that the HVFs in fast-expanding SNe Ia usually disappear more rapidly and are easily blended with the photospheric components when approaching the maximum light. Mor...

  11. Reconciliation of the Surface Brightness Fluctuations and Type Ia Supernovae Distance Scales

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Edward A. Ajhar; John L. Tonry; John P. Blakeslee; Adam G. Riess; Brian P. Schmidt

    2001-05-21

    We present Hubble Space Telescope measurements of surface brightness fluctuations (SBF) distances to early-type galaxies that have hosted Type Ia supernovae (SNIa). The agreement in the relative SBF and SNIa multicolor light curve shape and delta-m_15 distances is excellent. There is no systematic scale error with distance, and previous work has shown that SBF and SNIa give consistent ties to the Hubble flow. However, we confirm a systematic offset of about 0.25 mag in the distance zero points of the two methods, and we trace this offset to their respective Cepheid calibrations. SBF has in the past been calibrated with Cepheid distances from the H_0 Key Project team, while SNIa have been calibrated with Cepheid distances from the team composed of Sandage, Saha, and collaborators. When the two methods are calibrated in a consistent way, their distances are in superb agreement. Until the conflict over the ``long'' and ``short'' extragalactic Cepheid distances among many galaxies is resolved, we cannot definitively constrain the Hubble constant to better than about 10%, even leaving aside the additional uncertainty in the distance to the Large Magellanic Cloud, common to both Cepheid scales. However, recent theoretical SBF predictions from stellar population models favor the Key Project Cepheid scale, while the theoretical SNIa calibration lies between the long and short scales. In addition, while the current SBF distance to M31/M32 is in good agreement with the RR Lyrae and red giant branch distances, calibrating SBF with the longer Cepheid scale would introduce a 0.3 mag offset with respect to the RR Lyrae scale.

  12. The Joint Efficient Dark-energy Investigation (JEDI): Measuring the cosmic expansion history from type Ia supernovae

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. M. Phillips; Peter Garnavich; Yun Wang; David Branch; Edward Baron; Arlin Crotts; J. Craig Wheeler; Edward Cheng; Mario Hamuy; for the JEDI Team

    2006-06-28

    JEDI (Joint Efficient Dark-energy Investigation) is a candidate implementation of the NASA-DOE Joint Dark Energy Mission (JDEM). JEDI will probe dark energy in three independent methods: (1) type Ia supernovae, (2) baryon acoustic oscillations, and (3) weak gravitational lensing. In an accompanying paper, an overall summary of the JEDI mission is given. In this paper, we present further details of the supernova component of JEDI. To derive model-independent constraints on dark energy, it is important to precisely measure the cosmic expansion history, H(z), in continuous redshift bins from z \\~ 0-2 (the redshift range in which dark energy is important). SNe Ia at z > 1 are not readily accessible from the ground because the bulk of their light has shifted into the near-infrared where the sky background is overwhelming; hence a space mission is required to probe dark energy using SNe. Because of its unique near-infrared wavelength coverage (0.8-4.2 microns), JEDI has the advantage of observing SNe Ia in the rest frame J band for the entire redshift range of 0 operations, spectra and light curves will be obtained for ~4,000 SNe Ia at z < 2. The resulting constraints on dark energy are discussed, with special emphasis on the improved precision afforded by the rest frame near-infrared data.

  13. The deflagration stage of Chandrasekhar mass models for type Ia supernovae. I. Early evolution

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Malone, C. M.; Woosley, S. E.; Dong, S. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, The University of California, Santa Cruz, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Nonaka, A.; Almgren, A. S.; Bell, J. B. [Center for Computational Sciences and Engineering, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Zingale, M. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY 11794 (United States)

    2014-02-10

    We present high-resolution, full-star simulations of the post-ignition phase of Type Ia supernovae using the compressible hydrodynamics code Castro. Initial conditions, including the turbulent velocity field and ignition site, are imported directly from a simulation of the last few hours of presupernova convection using a low Mach number code, Maestro. Adaptive mesh refinement allows the initial burning front to be modeled with an effective resolution of 36,864{sup 3} zones (136 m zone{sup –1}). The initial rise and expansion of the deflagration front are tracked until burning reaches the star's edge and the role of the background turbulence on the flame is investigated. The effect of artificially moving the ignition location closer to the star's center is explored. The degree to which turbulence affects the burning front decreases with increasing ignition radius since the buoyancy force is stronger at larger radii. Even central ignition—in the presence of a background convective flow field—is rapidly carried off-center as the flame is carried by the flow field. We compare our results to analytic models for burning thermals, and find that they reproduce the general trends of the bubble's size and mass, but underpredict the amount of buoyant acceleration due to simplifying assumptions of the bubble's properties. Overall, we find that the amount of mass that burns prior to flame break out is small, consistent with a gravitationally confined detonation' occurring at a later epoch, but additional burning will occur following breakout that may modify this conclusion.

  14. Persistent C II absorption in the normal type Ia supernova 2002fk

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cartier, Régis; Zelaya, Paula [Millennium Institute of Astrophysics, Casilla 36-D, Santiago (Chile); Hamuy, Mario; Maza, José; González, Luis; Huerta, Leonor [Departamento de Astronomía, Universidad de Chile, Casilla 36-D, Santiago (Chile); Pignata, Giuliano [Departamento Ciencias Fisicas, Universidad Andres Bello, Av. República 252, Santiago (Chile); Förster, Francisco [Center for Mathematical Modelling, Universidad de Chile, Avenida Blanco Encalada 2120, Piso 7, Santiago (Chile); Folatelli, Gaston [Institute for the Physics and Mathematics of the Universe (IPMU), University of Tokyo, 5-1-5 Kashiwanoha, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8583 (Japan); Phillips, Mark M.; Morrell, Nidia; Contreras, Carlos; Roth, Miguel; González, Sergio [Carnegie Institution of Washington, Las Campanas Observatory, Colina el Pino s/n, Casilla 601 (Chile); Krisciunas, Kevin; Suntzeff, Nicholas B. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Texas A and M University, 4242 TAMU, College Station, TX 77843 (United States); Clocchiatti, Alejandro [Departamento de Astronomía y Astrofísica, Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile, Casilla 306, Santiago (Chile); Coppi, Paolo [Department of Astronomy, Yale University, New Haven, CT 06520-8101 (United States); Koviak, Kathleen, E-mail: rcartier@das.uchile.cl [Carnegie Institution of Washington, 813 Santa Barbara Street, Pasadena, CA 911901 (United States)

    2014-07-01

    We present well-sampled UBVRIJHK photometry of SN 2002fk starting 12 days before maximum light through 122 days after peak brightness, along with a series of 15 optical spectra from –4 to +95 days since maximum. Our observations show the presence of C II lines in the early-time spectra of SN 2002fk, expanding at 11,000 km s{sup –1} and persisting until 8 days past maximum light with a velocity of ?9000 km s{sup –1}. SN 2002fk is characterized by a small velocity gradient of v-dot {sub Si} {sub II}=26 km s{sup –1} day{sup –1}, possibly caused by an off-center explosion with the ignition region oriented toward the observer. The connection between the viewing angle of an off-center explosion and the presence of C II in the early-time spectrum suggests that the observation of C II could be also due to a viewing angle effect. Adopting the Cepheid distance to NGC 1309 we provide the first H {sub 0} value based on near-infrared (near-IR) measurements of a Type Ia supernova (SN) between 63.0 ± 0.8 (±3.4 systematic) and 66.7 ± 1.0 (±3.5 systematic) km s{sup –1} Mpc{sup –1}, depending on the absolute magnitude/decline rate relationship adopted. It appears that the near-IR yields somewhat lower (6%-9%) H {sub 0} values than the optical. It is essential to further examine this issue by (1) expanding the sample of high-quality near-IR light curves of SNe in the Hubble flow, and (2) increasing the number of nearby SNe with near-IR SN light curves and precise Cepheid distances, which affords the promise to deliver a more precise determination of H {sub 0}.

  15. Sweetspot: Near-infrared observations of 13 type Ia supernovae from a new NOAO survey probing the nearby smooth Hubble flow

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weyant, Anja; Wood-Vasey, W. Michael [Pittsburgh Particle physics, Astrophysics, and Cosmology Center (PITT PACC), Physics and Astronomy Department, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 15260 (United States); Allen, Lori; Joyce, Richard; Matheson, Thomas [National Optical Astronomy Observatory, 950 North Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85719 (United States); Garnavich, Peter M. [Department of Physics, 225 Nieuwland Science Hall, Notre Dame, IN 46556 (United States); Jha, Saurabh W., E-mail: anw19@pitt.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Rutgers, the State University of New Jersey, 136 Frelinghuysen Road, Piscataway, NJ 08854 (United States)

    2014-04-01

    We present 13 Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) observed in the rest-frame near-infrared (NIR) from 0.02 < z < 0.09 with the WIYN High-resolution Infrared Camera on the WIYN 3.5 m telescope. With only one to three points per light curve and a prior on the time of maximum from the spectrum used to type the object, we measure an H-band dispersion of spectroscopically normal SNe Ia of 0.164 mag. These observations continue to demonstrate the improved standard brightness of SNe Ia in an H band, even with limited data. Our sample includes two SNe Ia at z ? 0.09, which represent the most distant rest-frame NIR H-band observations published to date. This modest sample of 13 NIR SNe Ia represent the pilot sample for {sup S}weetSpot{sup —}a 3 yr NOAO Survey program that will observe 144 SNe Ia in the smooth Hubble flow. By the end of the survey we will have measured the relative distance to a redshift of z ? 0.05%-1%. Nearby Type Ia supernova (SN Ia) observations such as these will test the standard nature of SNe Ia in the rest-frame NIR, allow insight into the nature of dust, and provide a critical anchor for future cosmological SN Ia surveys at higher redshift.

  16. The Impact of Supernovae of Type Ia on Large Scales through the Secular Evolution of their Rate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laura Greggio

    2004-10-07

    A straightforward formalism to evaluate the impact of Type Ia Supernovae on large scale astrophysical issues is presented, together with analytical formulations for the SNIa rate following an instantaneous burst of Star Formation, for both single and double degenrates SNIa progenitors' models. Some applications of the parametrized formalism are illustrated. In particular, it is shown that the current SNIa rates measured in early and late type galaxies, as well as the Fe Mass-to-Light ratio in clusters of galaxies, favour the double degenerate model.

  17. EVOLUTION OF POST-IMPACT REMNANT HELIUM STARS IN TYPE Ia SUPERNOVA REMNANTS WITHIN THE SINGLE-DEGENERATE SCENARIO

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pan, Kuo-Chuan; Ricker, Paul M. [Department of Astronomy, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 1002 West Green Street, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States); Taam, Ronald E., E-mail: kpan2@illinois.edu, E-mail: pmricker@illinois.edu, E-mail: r-taam@northwestern.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Northwestern University, 2145 Sheridan Road, Evanston, IL 60208 (United States)

    2013-08-10

    The progenitor systems of Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) are still under debate. Based on recent hydrodynamics simulations, non-degenerate companions in the single-degenerate scenario (SDS) should survive the supernova (SN) impact. One way to distinguish between the SDS and the double-degenerate scenario is to search for the post-impact remnant stars (PIRSs) in SN Ia remnants. Using a technique that combines multi-dimensional hydrodynamics simulations with one-dimensional stellar evolution simulations, we have examined the post-impact evolution of helium-rich binary companions in the SDS. It is found that these helium-rich PIRSs (He PIRSs) dramatically expand and evolve to a luminous phase (L {approx} 10{sup 4} L{sub Sun }) about 10 yr after an SN explosion. Subsequently, they contract and evolve to become hot blue-subdwarf-like (sdO-like) stars by releasing gravitational energy, persisting as sdO-like stars for several million years before evolving to the helium red-giant phase. We therefore predict that a luminous OB-like star should be detectable within {approx}30 yr after the SN explosion. Thereafter, it will shrink and become an sdO-like star in the central regions of SN Ia remnants within star-forming regions for SN Ia progenitors evolved via the helium-star channel in the SDS. These He PIRSs are predicted to be rapidly rotating (v{sub rot} {approx}> 50 km s{sup -1}) and to have high spatial velocities (v{sub linear} {approx}> 500 km s{sup -1}). Furthermore, if SN remnants have diffused away and are not recognizable at a later stage, He PIRSs could be an additional source of single sdO stars and/or hypervelocity stars.

  18. Constraints on the progenitor system of the type Ia supernova 2014J from pre-explosion Hubble space telescope imaging

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kelly, Patrick L.; Fox, Ori D.; Filippenko, Alexei V.; Shen, Ken J.; Zheng, WeiKang; Graham, Melissa L.; Tucker, Brad E. [Department of Astronomy, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720-3411 (United States); Cenko, S. Bradley [NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center, Code 662, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Prato, Lisa [Lowell Observatory, 1400 West Mars Hill Road, Flagstaff, AZ 86001 (United States); Schaefer, Gail, E-mail: pkelly@astro.berkeley.edu [The CHARA Array of Georgia State University, Mount Wilson Observatory, Mount Wilson, CA 91023 (United States)

    2014-07-20

    We constrain the properties of the progenitor system of the highly reddened Type Ia supernova (SN Ia) 2014J in Messier 82 (M82; d ? 3.5 Mpc). We determine the supernova (SN) location using Keck-II K-band adaptive optics images, and we find no evidence for flux from a progenitor system in pre-explosion near-ultraviolet through near-infrared Hubble Space Telescope (HST) images. Our upper limits exclude systems having a bright red giant companion, including symbiotic novae with luminosities comparable to that of RS Ophiuchi. While the flux constraints are also inconsistent with predictions for comparatively cool He-donor systems (T ? 35,000 K), we cannot preclude a system similar to V445 Puppis. The progenitor constraints are robust across a wide range of R{sub V} and A{sub V} values, but significantly greater values than those inferred from the SN light curve and spectrum would yield proportionally brighter luminosity limits. The comparatively faint flux expected from a binary progenitor system consisting of white dwarf stars would not have been detected in the pre-explosion HST imaging. Infrared HST exposures yield more stringent constraints on the luminosities of very cool (T < 3000 K) companion stars than was possible in the case of SN Ia 2011fe.

  19. PRODUCTION OF THE p-PROCESS NUCLEI IN THE CARBON-DEFLAGRATION MODEL FOR TYPE Ia SUPERNOVAE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kusakabe, Motohiko; Iwamoto, Nobuyuki; Nomoto, Ken'ichi E-mail: iwamoto.nobuyuki@jaea.go.jp

    2011-01-01

    We calculate the nucleosynthesis of proton-rich isotopes in the carbon-deflagration model for Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia). The seed abundances are obtained by calculating the s-process nucleosynthesis that is expected to occur in the repeating helium shell flashes on the carbon-oxygen (CO) white dwarf (WD) during mass accretion from a binary companion. When the deflagration wave passes through the outer layer of the CO WD, p-nuclei are produced by photodisintegration reactions on s-nuclei in a region where the peak temperature ranges from 1.9 to 3.6 x 10{sup 9} K. We confirm the sensitivity of the p-process on the initial distribution of s-nuclei. We show that the initial C/O ratio in the WD does not affect much the yield of p-nuclei. On the other hand, the abundance of {sup 22}Ne left after s-processing has a large influence on the p-process via the {sup 22}Ne({alpha},n) reaction. We find that about 50% of p-nuclides are co-produced when normalized to their solar abundances in all adopted cases of seed distribution. Mo and Ru, which are largely underproduced in Type II supernovae (SNe II), are produced more than in SNe II although they are underproduced with respect to the yield levels of other p-nuclides. The ratios between p-nuclei and iron in the ejecta are larger than the solar ratios by a factor of 1.2. We also compare the yields of oxygen, iron, and p-nuclides in SNe Ia and SNe II and suggest that SNe Ia could make a larger contribution than SNe II to the solar system content of p-nuclei.

  20. Spectral Observations and Analyses of Low-Redshift Type Ia Supernovae

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Silverman, Jeffrey Michael

    2011-01-01

    1.2 Why Study Supernovae? . . . . . . . . . . . . .1.3 What are Supernovae? . . . . . . . .Core-Collapse Supernovae . . . . . . . . 1.3.2 Thermonuclear

  1. Significantly super-Chandrasekhar limiting mass white dwarfs as progenitors for peculiar over-luminous type Ia supernovae

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mukhopadhyay, Banibrata

    2015-01-01

    Since 2012, we have initiated developing systematically the simplistic to rigorous models to prove that highly super-Chandrasekhar, as well as highly sub-Chandrasekhar, limiting mass white dwarfs are possible to exist. We show that the mass of highly magnetized or modified Einstein's gravity induced white dwarfs could be significantly super-Chandrasekhar and such white dwarfs could altogether have a different mass-limit. On the other hand, type Ia supernovae (SNeIa), a key to unravel the evolutionary history of the universe, are believed to be triggered in white dwarfs having mass close to the Chandrasekhar-limit. However, observations of several peculiar, over- and under-luminous SNeIa argue for exploding masses widely different from this limit. We argue that explosions of super-Chandrasekhar limiting mass white dwarfs result in over-luminous SNeIa. We arrive at this revelation, first by considering simplistic, spherical, Newtonian white dwarfs with constant magnetic fields. Then we relax the Newtonian assum...

  2. Utilizing the Updated Gamma-Ray Bursts and Type Ia Supernovae to Constrain the Cardassian Expansion Model and Dark Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wei, Jun-Jie; Wu, Xue-Feng

    2015-01-01

    We update gamma-ray burst (GRB) luminosity relations among certain spectral and light-curve features with 139 GRBs. The distance modulus of 82 GRBs at $z>1.4$ can be calibrated with the sample at $z\\leq1.4$ by using the cubic spline interpolation method from the Union2.1 Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) set. We investigate the joint constraints on the Cardassian expansion model and dark energy with 580 Union2.1 SNe Ia sample ($z<1.4$) and 82 calibrated GRBs data ($1.4Ia significantly improves the constrain on $\\Omega_{m}-\\Omega_{\\Lambda}$ plane. In the Cardassian expansion model, the best fit is $\\Omega_{m}= 0.24_{-0.15}^{+0.15}$ and $n=0.16_{-0.52}^{+0.30}$ $(1\\sigma)$, which is consistent with the $\\Lambda$CDM cosmology $(n=0)$ in the $1\\sigma$ confidence region. We also discuss two dark energy models in which the equation of state $w(z)$ is parametrized as $w(z)=w_{0}$ and $w(z)=w_{0}+w_{1}z/(1+z)$, respectively. Based on o...

  3. THE IMPACT OF TYPE Ia SUPERNOVA EXPLOSIONS ON HELIUM COMPANIONS IN THE CHANDRASEKHAR-MASS EXPLOSION SCENARIO

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu Zhengwei; Wang, B.; Han, Z. W. [Yunnan Observatories, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Kunming 650011 (China); Pakmor, R. [Heidelberger Institut fuer Theoretische Studien, Schloss-Wolfsbrunnenweg 35, D-69118 Heidelberg (Germany); Seitenzahl, I. R.; Hillebrandt, W.; Kromer, M.; Edelmann, P.; Taubenberger, S. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Astrophysik, Karl-Schwarzschild-Str. 1, D-85741 Garching (Germany); Roepke, F. K. [Institut fuer Theoretische Physik und Astrophysik, Universitaet Wuerzburg, Am Hubland, D-97074 Wuerzburg (Germany); Maeda, K., E-mail: zwliu@ynao.ac.cn [Kavli Institute for the Physics and Mathematics of the Universe (Kavli-IPMU), Todai Institutes for Advanced Study (TODIAS), University of Tokyo, 5-1-5 Kashiwanoha, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8583 (Japan)

    2013-09-01

    In the version of the single-degenerate scenario of Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) studied here, a carbon-oxygen white dwarf explodes close to the Chandrasekhar limit after accreting material from a non-degenerate helium (He) companion star. In the present study, we employ the STELLAR GADGET code to perform three-dimensional hydrodynamical simulations of the interaction of the SN Ia ejecta with the He companion star taking into account its orbital motion and spin. It is found that only 2%-5% of the initial companion mass is stripped off from the outer layers of He companion stars due to the supernova (SN) impact. The dependence of the unbound mass (or the kick velocity) on the orbital separation can be fitted to a good approximation by a power law for a given companion model. After the SN impact, the outer layers of a He donor star are significantly enriched with heavy elements from the low-expansion-velocity tail of SN Ia ejecta. The total mass of accumulated SN-ejecta material on the companion surface reaches about {approx}> 10{sup -3} M{sub Sun} for different companion models. This enrichment with heavy elements provides a potential way to observationally identify the surviving companion star in SN remnants. Finally, by artificially adjusting the explosion energy of the W7 explosion model, we find that the total accumulation of SN ejecta on the companion surface is also dependent on the explosion energy with a power-law relation to a good approximation.

  4. Two Type Ia Supernovae at Redshift ~2 : Improved Classification and Redshift Determination with Medium-band Infrared Imaging

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rodney, Steven A; Scolnic, Daniel M; Jones, David O; Hemmati, Shoubaneh; Molino, Alberto; McCully, Curtis; Mobasher, Bahram; Strolger, Louis-Gregory; Graur, Or; Hayden, Brian; Casertano, Stefano

    2015-01-01

    We present two supernovae (SNe) discovered with the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) in the Cosmic Assembly Near-infrared Deep Extragalactic Legacy Survey (CANDELS), an HST multi-cycle treasury program. We classify both objects as Type Ia SNe and find redshifts of z = 1.80+-0.02 and 2.26 +0.02 -0.10, the latter of which is the highest redshift Type Ia SN yet seen. Using light curve fitting we determine luminosity distances and find that both objects are consistent with a standard Lambda-CDM cosmological model. These SNe were observed using the HST Wide Field Camera 3 infrared detector (WFC3-IR), with imaging in both wide- and medium-band filters. We demonstrate that the classification and redshift estimates are significantly improved by the inclusion of single-epoch medium-band observations. This medium-band imaging approximates a very low resolution spectrum (lambda/delta lambda ~ 100) which can isolate broad spectral absorption features that differentiate Type Ia SNe from their most common core collapse cousins...

  5. Type Ia supernova rate at a redshift of ~;0.1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2004-01-01

    since the Big Bang: Supernovae and Gamma-Ray Bursts, held 3-rst the EROS search for supernovae is reviewed in Sect. 2.2. The EROS search for supernovae The EROS experiment used a

  6. Measuring Type Ia Supernova Distances and Redshifts From Their Multi-band Light Curves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Alex G.; Miquel, Ramon

    2007-01-01

    curve, http://supernovae.in2p3.fr/ ? guy/salt/index.htmlfor large numbers of supernovae; so many that it would becosmology:distance scale, supernovae:general Introduction

  7. On the source of the dust extinction in type Ia supernovae and the discovery of anomalously strong Na I absorption

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Phillips, M. M.; Morrell, Nidia; Hsiao, E. Y.; Campillay, Abdo; Contreras, Carlos [Carnegie Observatories, Las Campanas Observatory, Casilla 601, La Serena (Chile); Simon, Joshua D.; Burns, Christopher R.; Persson, Sven E.; Thompson, I. B.; Freedman, Wendy L. [Observatories of the Carnegie Institution for Science, 813 Santa Barbara St., Pasadena, CA 91101 (United States); Cox, Nick L. J. [Instituut voor Sterrenkunde, KU Leuven, Celestijnenlaan 200D bus 2401, 3001 Leuven (Belgium); Foley, Ryan J. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Karakas, Amanda I. [Research School of Astronomy and Astrophysics, The Australian National University, Weston, ACT 2611 (Australia); Patat, F. [European Southern Observatory (ESO), Karl Schwarschild Strasse 2, D-85748, Garching bei München (Germany); Sternberg, A. [Max Planck Institute for Astrophysics, Karl Schwarzschild Strasse 1, D-85741 Garching bei München (Germany); Williams, R. E. [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Gal-Yam, A. [Benoziyo Center for Astrophysics, Faculty of Physics, Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovot 76100 (Israel); Leonard, D. C. [Department of Astronomy, San Diego State University, San Diego, CA 92182 (United States); Stritzinger, Maximilian [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Aarhus University, Ny Munkegade 120, DK-8000 Aarhus C (Denmark); Folatelli, Gastón, E-mail: mmp@lco.cl [Kavli Institute for the Physics and Mathematics of the Universe, Todai Institutes for Advanced Study, the University of Tokyo, Kashiwa 277-8583 (Japan); and others

    2013-12-10

    High-dispersion observations of the Na I D ??5890, 5896 and K I ??7665, 7699 interstellar lines, and the diffuse interstellar band at 5780 Å in the spectra of 32 Type Ia supernovae are used as an independent means of probing dust extinction. We show that the dust extinction of the objects where the diffuse interstellar band at 5780 Å is detected is consistent with the visual extinction derived from the supernova colors. This strongly suggests that the dust producing the extinction is predominantly located in the interstellar medium of the host galaxies and not in circumstellar material associated with the progenitor system. One quarter of the supernovae display anomalously large Na I column densities in comparison to the amount of dust extinction derived from their colors. Remarkably, all of the cases of unusually strong Na I D absorption correspond to 'Blueshifted' profiles in the classification scheme of Sternberg et al. This coincidence suggests that outflowing circumstellar gas is responsible for at least some of the cases of anomalously large Na I column densities. Two supernovae with unusually strong Na I D absorption showed essentially normal K I column densities for the dust extinction implied by their colors, but this does not appear to be a universal characteristic. Overall, we find the most accurate predictor of individual supernova extinction to be the equivalent width of the diffuse interstellar band at 5780 Å, and provide an empirical relation for its use. Finally, we identify ways of producing significant enhancements of the Na abundance of circumstellar material in both the single-degenerate and double-degenerate scenarios for the progenitor system.

  8. Type Ia supernovae yielding distances with 3-4% precision (Journal Article)

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfateSciTechtail.Theory of rare Kaon and(Conference) | SciTech(2D-CARS):| SciTech Connect Type Ia

  9. Type Ia supernovae yielding distances with 3-4% precision (Journal Article)

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfateSciTechtail.Theory of rare Kaon and(Conference) | SciTech(2D-CARS):| SciTech Connect Type Ia|

  10. Systematic uncertainties associated with the cosmological analysis of the first Pan-STARRS1 type Ia supernova sample

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scolnic, D.; Riess, A.; Brout, D.; Rodney, S. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Johns Hopkins University, 3400 North Charles Street, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Rest, A. [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Huber, M. E.; Tonry, J. L. [Institute for Astronomy, University of Hawaii, 2680 Woodlawn Drive, Honolulu, HI 96822 (United States); Foley, R. J.; Chornock, R.; Berger, E.; Soderberg, A. M.; Stubbs, C. W.; Kirshner, R. P.; Challis, P.; Czekala, I.; Drout, M. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Narayan, G. [Department of Physics, Harvard University, 17 Oxford Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Smartt, S. J.; Botticella, M. T. [Astrophysics Research Centre, School of Mathematics and Physics, Queens University Belfast, Belfast BT7 1NN (United Kingdom); Schlafly, E. [Max Planck Institute for Astronomy, Konigstuhl 17, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); and others

    2014-11-01

    We probe the systematic uncertainties from the 113 Type Ia supernovae (SN Ia) in the Pan-STARRS1 (PS1) sample along with 197 SN Ia from a combination of low-redshift surveys. The companion paper by Rest et al. describes the photometric measurements and cosmological inferences from the PS1 sample. The largest systematic uncertainty stems from the photometric calibration of the PS1 and low-z samples. We increase the sample of observed Calspec standards from 7 to 10 used to define the PS1 calibration system. The PS1 and SDSS-II calibration systems are compared and discrepancies up to ?0.02 mag are recovered. We find uncertainties in the proper way to treat intrinsic colors and reddening produce differences in the recovered value of w up to 3%. We estimate masses of host galaxies of PS1 supernovae and detect an insignificant difference in distance residuals of the full sample of 0.037 ± 0.031 mag for host galaxies with high and low masses. Assuming flatness and including systematic uncertainties in our analysis of only SNe measurements, we find w =?1.120{sub ?0.206}{sup +0.360}(Stat){sub ?0.291}{sup +0.269}(Sys). With additional constraints from Baryon acoustic oscillation, cosmic microwave background (CMB) (Planck) and H {sub 0} measurements, we find w=?1.166{sub ?0.069}{sup +0.072} and ?{sub m}=0.280{sub ?0.012}{sup +0.013} (statistical and systematic errors added in quadrature). The significance of the inconsistency with w = –1 depends on whether we use Planck or Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe measurements of the CMB: w{sub BAO+H0+SN+WMAP}=?1.124{sub ?0.065}{sup +0.083}.

  11. Determining the motion of the solar system relative to the cosmic microwave background using type Ia supernovae

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Christopher Gordon; Kate Land; Anze Slosar

    2008-04-04

    We estimate the solar system motion relative to the cosmic microwave background using type Ia supernovae (SNe) measurements. We take into account the correlations in the error bars of the SNe measurements arising from correlated peculiar velocities. Without accounting for correlations in the peculiar velocities, the SNe data we use appear to detect the peculiar velocity of the solar system at about the 3.5 sigma level. However, when the correlations are correctly accounted for, the SNe data only detects the solar system peculiar velocity at about the 2.5 sigma level. We forecast that the solar system peculiar velocity will be detected at the 9 sigma level by GAIA and the 11 sigma level by the LSST. For these surveys we find the correlations are much less important as most of the signal comes from higher redshifts where the number density of SNe is insufficient for the correlations to be important.

  12. Cosmological-model-parameter determination from satellite-acquired type Ia and IIP Supernova Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Podariu, Silviu; Nugent, Peter; Ratra, Bharat

    2000-01-01

    Since the B i g B a n g : Supernovae a n d G a m m a - R a ythe universe—space vehicles—supernovae: general Introductionbased on T y p e l a supernovae (hereafter S N e la) have

  13. Super-Eddington wind scenario for the progenitors of type Ia supernovae: Accreting He-rich matter onto white dwarfs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Bo; Ma, Xin; Liu, Dongdong; Cui, Xiao; Han, Zhanwen

    2015-01-01

    Supernovae of type Ia (SNe Ia) are believed to be thermonuclear explosions of carbon-oxygen white dwarfs (CO WDs). However, the mass accretion process onto CO WDs is still not completely understood. In this paper, we study the accretion of He-rich matter onto CO WDs and explore a scenario in which a strong wind forms on the surface of the WD if the total luminosity exceeds the Eddington limit. Using a stellar evolution code called modules for experiments in stellar astrophysics (MESA), we simulated the He accretion process onto CO WDs for WDs with masses of 0.6-1.35Msun and various accretion rates of 10^{-8}-10^{-5}Msun/yr. If the contribution of the total luminosity is included when determining the Eddington accretion rate, then a super-Eddington wind could be triggered at relatively lower accretion rates than those of previous studies based on steady-state models. The super-Eddington wind can prevent the WDs with high accretion rates from evolving into red-giant-like He stars. We found that the contribution...

  14. Type Ia supernovae from merging white dwarfs. II. Post-merger...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    out multidimensional simulations of 'tamped' SN Ia models, using both particle and grid-based codes to study the merger and explosion dynamics and a radiative transfer code to...

  15. Multi-Color Light Curves of Type Ia Supernovae on the Color-Magnitude Diagram a Novel Step Toward More Precise Distance and Extinction Estimates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, L; Aldering, G; Perlmutter, S; Wang, Lifan; Goldhaber, Gerson; Aldering, Greg; Perlmutter, Saul

    2003-01-01

    We show empirically that fits to the color-magnitude relation of Type Ia supernovae after optical maximum can provide accurate relative extragalactic distances. We report the discovery of an empirical color relation for Type Ia light curves: During much of the first month past maximum, the magnitudes of Type Ia supernovae defined at a given value of color index have a very small magnitude dispersion; moreover, during this period the relation between $B$ magnitude and $B-V$ color (or $B-R$ or $B-I$ color) is strikingly linear, to the accuracy of existing well-measured data. These linear relations can provide robust distance estimates, in particular, by using the magnitudes when the supernova reaches a given color. After correction for light curve strech factor or decline rate, the dispersion of the magnitudes taken at the intercept of the linear color-magnitude relation are found to be around 0$^m$.08 for the sub-sample of supernovae with \\BVm $\\le 0^m.05$, and around 0$^m$.11 for the sub-sample with \\BVm $\\le...

  16. The INTEGRAL/SPI 511 keV Signal from Hidden Valleys in Type Ia and Core Collapse Supernova Explosions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hooman Davoudiasl; Gilad Perez

    2010-04-03

    We examine under what circumstances the INTEGRAL/SPI 511 keV signal can originate from decays of MeV-scale composite states produced by: (A) thermonuclear (type Ia) or (B) core collapse supernovae (SNe). The requisite dynamical properties that would account for the observed data are quite distinct, for cases (A) and (B). We determine these requirements in simple hidden valley models, where the escape fraction problem is naturally addressed, due to the long lifetime of the new composite states. A novel feature of scenario (A) is that the dynamics of type Ia SNe, standard candles for cosmological measurements, might be affected by our mechanism. In case (A), the mass of the state mediating between the hidden sector and the SM $\\ee$ could be a few hundred GeV and within the reach of a 500 GeV $\\ee$ linear collider. We also note that kinetic mixing of the photon with a light vector state may provide an interesting alternate mediation mechanism in this case. Scenarios based on case (B) are challenged by the need for a mechanism to transport some of the produced positrons toward the Galactic bulge, due to the inferred distribution of core collapse sources. The mass of the mediator in case (B) is typically hundreds of TeV, leading to long-lived particles that could, under certain circumstances, include a viable dark matter candidate. The appearance of long-lived particles in typical models leads to cosmological constraints and we address how a consistent cosmic history may be achieved.

  17. Multi-Color Light Curves of Type Ia Supernovae on the Color-Magnitude Diagram: a Novel Step Toward More Precise Distance and Extinction Estimates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lifan Wang; Gerson Goldhaber; Greg Aldering; Saul Perlmutter

    2003-02-17

    We show empirically that fits to the color-magnitude relation of Type Ia supernovae after optical maximum can provide accurate relative extragalactic distances. We report the discovery of an empirical color relation for Type Ia light curves: During much of the first month past maximum, the magnitudes of Type Ia supernovae defined at a given value of color index have a very small magnitude dispersion; moreover, during this period the relation between $B$ magnitude and $B-V$ color (or $B-R$ or $B-I$ color) is strikingly linear, to the accuracy of existing well-measured data. These linear relations can provide robust distance estimates, in particular, by using the magnitudes when the supernova reaches a given color. After correction for light curve strech factor or decline rate, the dispersion of the magnitudes taken at the intercept of the linear color-magnitude relation are found to be around 0$^m$.08 for the sub-sample of supernovae with \\BVm $\\le 0^m.05$, and around 0$^m$.11 for the sub-sample with \\BVm $\\le 0^m.2$. This small dispersion is consistent with being mostly due to observational errors. The method presented here and the conventional light curve fitting methods can be combined to further improve statistical dispersions of distance estimates. It can be combined with the magnitude at maximum to deduce dust extinction. The slopes of the color-magnitude relation may also be used to identify intrinsically different SN Ia systems. The method provides a tool that is fundamental to using SN Ia to estimate cosmological parameters such as the Hubble constant and the mass and dark energy content of the universe.

  18. ASYMMETRY IN THE OBSERVED METAL-RICH EJECTA OF THE GALACTIC TYPE IA SUPERNOVA REMNANT G299.2–2.9

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Post, Seth; Park, Sangwook [Department of Physics, University of Texas at Arlington, Arlington, Box 19059, TX 76019 (United States); Badenes, Carles [Department of Physics and Astronomy and Pittsburgh Particle Physics, Astrophysics, and Cosmology Center (PITT-PACC), University of Pittsburgh, 3941 OHara Street, Pittsburgh, PA 15260 (United States); Burrows, David N. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Pennsylvania State University, 525 Davey Laboratory, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Hughes, John P. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Rutgers University, 136 Frelinghuysen Road, Piscataway, NJ 08854-8019 (United States); Lee, Jae-Joon [Korea Astronomy and Space Science Institute, Daejeon 305-348 (Korea, Republic of); Mori, Koji [Department of Applied Physics, University of Miyazaki, 1-1 Gakuen Kibana-dai Nishi, Miyazaki 889-2192 (Japan); Slane, Patrick O., E-mail: seth.post@mavs.uta.edu, E-mail: badenes@pitt.edu, E-mail: burrows@astro.psu.edu, E-mail: jph@physics.rutgers.edu, E-mail: mori@astro.miyazaki-u.ac.jp, E-mail: slane@cfa.harvard.edu [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States)

    2014-09-01

    We have performed a deep Chandra observation of the Galactic Type Ia supernova remnant G299.2–2.9. Here we report the initial results from our imaging and spectral analysis. The observed abundance ratios of the central ejecta are in good agreement with those predicted by delayed-detonation Type Ia supernovae models. We reveal inhomogeneous spatial and spectral structures of metal-rich ejecta in G299.2–2.9. The Fe/Si abundance ratio in the northern part of the central ejecta region is higher than that in the southern part. A significant continuous elongation of ejecta material extends out to the western outermost boundary of the remnant. In this western elongation, both the Si and Fe are enriched with a similar abundance ratio to that in the southern part of the central ejecta region. These structured distributions of metal-rich ejecta material suggest that this Type Ia supernova might have undergone a significantly asymmetric explosion and/or has been expanding into a structured medium.

  19. Radiogenic p-isotopes from type Ia supernova, nuclear physics uncertainties, and galactic chemical evolution compared with values in primitive meteorites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Travaglio, C.; Gallino, R.; Rauscher, T.; Dauphas, N.; Röpke, F. K.; Hillebrandt, W. E-mail: claudia.travaglio@b2fh.org

    2014-11-10

    The nucleosynthesis of proton-rich isotopes is calculated for multi-dimensional Chandrasekhar-mass models of Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) with different metallicities. The predicted abundances of the short-lived radioactive isotopes {sup 92}Nb, {sup 97,} {sup 98}Tc, and {sup 146}Sm are given in this framework. The abundance seeds are obtained by calculating s-process nucleosynthesis in the material accreted onto a carbon-oxygen white dwarf from a binary companion. A fine grid of s-seeds at different metallicities and {sup 13}C-pocket efficiencies is considered. A galactic chemical evolution model is used to predict the contribution of SN Ia to the solar system p-nuclei composition measured in meteorites. Nuclear physics uncertainties are critical to determine the role of SNe Ia in the production of {sup 92}Nb and {sup 146}Sm. We find that, if standard Chandrasekhar-mass SNe Ia are at least 50% of all SN Ia, they are strong candidates for reproducing the radiogenic p-process signature observed in meteorites.

  20. Hubble Space Telescope spectra of the type Ia supernova SN 2011fe: A low-energy delayed detonation of a white dwarf with Zsolar

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mazzali, Paolo; Hachinger, Stephan; Ellis, Richard; Nugent, Peter E; Howell, D Andrew; Gal-Yam, Avishay; Maguire, Kate; Cooke, Jeff; Thomas, Rollin

    2013-01-01

    Hubble Space Telescope spectroscopic observations of the nearby type Ia supernova (SN Ia) SN 2011fe, taken on 10 epochs from -13.5 to +41 days relative to B-band maximum light, and spanning the far-ultraviolet (UV) to the near-infrared (IR) are presented. This spectroscopic coverage makes SN 2011fe the best-studied local SN Ia to date. SN 2011fe is a typical moderately-luminous SN Ia with no evidence for dust extinction. Its near-UV spectral properties are representative of a larger sample of local events studied in Maguire et al. (2012). As a result, conclusions inferred from our detailed investigations are likely representative of those for other normal SNe Ia. The near-UV to optical spectra of SN 2011fe are modelled with a Monte Carlo radiative transfer code using the technique of 'abundance tomography', providing tight constraints on the density structure and abundance stratification of the event. SN 2011fe was a relatively weak explosion, with moderate Fe-group yields. Although its density structure is c...

  1. Four Papers by the Supernova Cosmology Project

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Perlmutter, S.; Deustua, S.; Gabi, S.; Goldhaber, G.

    2008-01-01

    K CORRECTIONS FOR TYPE IA SUPERNOVAE AND A TEST FOR SPATIALDILATION USING TYPE IA SUPERNOVAE AS CLOCKS The SupernovaInstitute Thermonuclear Supernovae Conference, Aiguablava,

  2. Expectations for the hard x-ray continuum and gamma-ray line fluxes from the typE IA supernova SN 2014J in M82

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    The, Lih-Sin [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Clemson University, SC 29634 (United States); Burrows, Adam, E-mail: tlihsin@clemson.edu, E-mail: burrows@astro.princeton.edu [Department of Astrophysical Sciences, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States)

    2014-05-10

    The hard X-ray continuum and gamma-ray lines from a Type Ia supernova dominate its integrated photon emissions and can provide unique diagnostics of the mass of the ejecta, the {sup 56}Ni yield and spatial distribution, its kinetic energy and expansion speed, and the mechanism of explosion. Such signatures and their time behavior 'X-ray' the bulk debris field in direct fashion, and do not depend on the ofttimes problematic and elaborate UV, optical, and near-infrared spectroscopy and radiative transfer that have informed the study of these events for decades. However, to date no hard photons have ever been detected from a Type Ia supernova in explosion. With the advent of the supernova SN 2014J in M82, at a distance of ?3.5 Mpc, this situation may soon change. Both NuSTAR and INTEGRAL have the potential to detect SN 2014J, and, if spectra and light curves can be measured, would usefully constrain the various explosion models published during the last ?30 yr. In support of these observational campaigns, we provide predictions for the hard X-ray continuum and gamma-line emissions for 15 Type Ia explosion models gleaned from the literature. The model set, containing as it does deflagration, delayed detonation, merger detonation, pulsational delayed detonation, and sub-Chandrasekhar helium detonation models, collectively spans a wide range of properties, and hence signatures. We provide a brief discussion of various diagnostics (with examples), but importantly make the spectral and line results available electronically to aid in the interpretation of the anticipated data.

  3. THE EFFECT OF THE PRE-DETONATION STELLAR INTERNAL VELOCITY PROFILE ON THE NUCLEOSYNTHETIC YIELDS IN TYPE Ia SUPERNOVA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, Yeunjin; Jordan, G. C. IV; Graziani, Carlo; Lamb, D. Q.; Truran, J. W.; Meyer, B. S.

    2013-07-01

    A common model of the explosion mechanism of Type Ia supernovae is based on a delayed detonation of a white dwarf. A variety of models differ primarily in the method by which the deflagration leads to a detonation. A common feature of the models, however, is that all of them involve the propagation of the detonation through a white dwarf that is either expanding or contracting, where the stellar internal velocity profile depends on both time and space. In this work, we investigate the effects of the pre-detonation stellar internal velocity profile and the post-detonation velocity of expansion on the production of {alpha}-particle nuclei, including {sup 56}Ni, which are the primary nuclei produced by the detonation wave. We perform one-dimensional hydrodynamic simulations of the explosion phase of the white dwarf for center and off-center detonations with five different stellar velocity profiles at the onset of the detonation. In order to follow the complex flows and to calculate the nucleosynthetic yields, approximately 10,000 tracer particles were added to every simulation. We observe two distinct post-detonation expansion phases: rarefaction and bulk expansion. Almost all the burning to {sup 56}Ni occurs only in the rarefaction phase, and its expansion timescale is influenced by pre-existing flow structure in the star, in particular by the pre-detonation stellar velocity profile. We find that the mass fractions of the {alpha}-particle nuclei, including {sup 56}Ni, are tight functions of the empirical physical parameter {rho}{sub up}/v{sub down}, where {rho}{sub up} is the mass density immediately upstream of the detonation wave front and v{sub down} is the velocity of the flow immediately downstream of the detonation wave front. We also find that v{sub down} depends on the pre-detonation flow velocity. We conclude that the properties of the pre-existing flow, in particular the internal stellar velocity profile, influence the final isotopic composition of burned matter produced by the detonation.

  4. The nearby supernova factory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2004-01-01

    cadence gives fewer supernovae but better constraints on thein 2003. Key words: supernovae, galaxies Preprint submitted2004 Introduction Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) have proven

  5. Cosmological constraints from measurements of type Ia supernovae discovered during the first 1.5 yr of the Pan-STARRS1 survey

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rest, A. [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Scolnic, D.; Riess, A.; Rodney, S.; Brout, D. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Johns Hopkins University, 3400 North Charles Street, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Foley, R. J.; Chornock, R.; Berger, E.; Soderberg, A. M.; Stubbs, C. W.; Kirshner, R. P.; Challis, P.; Czekala, I.; Drout, M. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Huber, M. E.; Tonry, J. L. [Institute for Astronomy, University of Hawaii, 2680 Woodlawn Drive, Honolulu, HI 96822 (United States); Narayan, G. [Department of Physics, Harvard University, 17 Oxford Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Smartt, S. J. [Astrophysics Research Centre, School of Mathematics and Physics, Queens University Belfast, Belfast BT71NN (United Kingdom); Schlafly, E. [Max Planck Institute for Astronomy, Königstuhl 17, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Botticella, M. T. [INAF-Osservatorio Astronomico di Capodimonte, Salita Moiariello 16, I-80131 Napoli (Italy); and others

    2014-11-01

    We present griz {sub P1} light curves of 146 spectroscopically confirmed Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia; 0.03 < z < 0.65) discovered during the first 1.5 yr of the Pan-STARRS1 Medium Deep Survey. The Pan-STARRS1 natural photometric system is determined by a combination of on-site measurements of the instrument response function and observations of spectrophotometric standard stars. We find that the systematic uncertainties in the photometric system are currently 1.2% without accounting for the uncertainty in the Hubble Space Telescope Calspec definition of the AB system. A Hubble diagram is constructed with a subset of 113 out of 146 SNe Ia that pass our light curve quality cuts. The cosmological fit to 310 SNe Ia (113 PS1 SNe Ia + 222 light curves from 197 low-z SNe Ia), using only supernovae (SNe) and assuming a constant dark energy equation of state and flatness, yields w=?1.120{sub ?0.206}{sup +0.360}(Stat){sub ?0.291}{sup +0.269}(Sys). When combined with BAO+CMB(Planck)+H {sub 0}, the analysis yields ?{sub M}=0.280{sub ?0.012}{sup +0.013} and w=?1.166{sub ?0.069}{sup +0.072} including all identified systematics. The value of w is inconsistent with the cosmological constant value of –1 at the 2.3? level. Tension endures after removing either the baryon acoustic oscillation (BAO) or the H {sub 0} constraint, though it is strongest when including the H {sub 0} constraint. If we include WMAP9 cosmic microwave background (CMB) constraints instead of those from Planck, we find w=?1.124{sub ?0.065}{sup +0.083}, which diminishes the discord to <2?. We cannot conclude whether the tension with flat ?CDM is a feature of dark energy, new physics, or a combination of chance and systematic errors. The full Pan-STARRS1 SN sample with ?three times as many SNe should provide more conclusive results.

  6. The 1999aa-like Type Ia Supernova iPTF14bdn in the Ultraviolet and Optical

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smitka, Michael T; Suntzeff, Nicholas B; Zhang, Jujia; Wang, Xiaofeng; Zhai, Qian; Mo, Jun; Zhang, Tianmeng

    2015-01-01

    We present ultraviolet (UV) and optical photometry and spectra of the 1999aa-like supernova (SN) iPTF14bdn. The UV data were observed using the Swift Ultraviolet/Optical Telescope (UVOT) and constitute the first UV spectral series of a 1999aa-like SN. From the photometry we measure $\\Delta m_{15}({\\it B})\\,=\\,0.84 \\pm0.05$ mag and blue UV colors at epochs earlier than $-5$ days. The spectra show that the early-time blue colors are the result of less absorption between $2800 - 3200 \\,\\AA~$ than is present in normal SNe Ia. Using model spectra fits of the data at $-10 $ and $+10 $ days, we identify the origin of this spectral feature to be a temperature effect in which doubly ionized iron group elements create an opacity 'window'. We determine that the detection of high temperatures and large quantities of iron group elements at early epochs imply the mixing of a high Ni mass into the outer layers of the SN ejecta. We also identify the source of the I-band secondary maximum in iPTF14bdn to be the decay of Fe II...

  7. THE TIP OF THE RED GIANT BRANCH DISTANCES TO TYPE Ia SUPERNOVA HOST GALAXIES. II. M66 AND M96 IN THE LEO I GROUP

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, Myung Gyoon; Jang, In Sung, E-mail: mglee@astro.snu.ac.kr, E-mail: isjang@astro.snu.ac.kr [Astronomy Program, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Seoul National University, Gwanak-gu, Seoul 151-742 (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-08-10

    M66 and M96 in the Leo I Group are nearby spiral galaxies hosting Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia). We estimate the distances to these galaxies from the luminosity of the tip of the red giant branch (TRGB). We obtain VI photometry of resolved stars in these galaxies from F555W and F814W images in the Hubble Space Telescope archive. From the luminosity function of these red giants, we find the TRGB I-band magnitude to be I{sub TRGB} = 26.20 {+-} 0.03 for M66 and 26.21 {+-} 0.03 for M96. These values yield distance modulus (m - M){sub 0} = 30.12 {+-} 0.03(random) {+-} 0.12(systematic) for M66 and (m - M){sub 0} = 30.15 {+-} 0.03(random) {+-} 0.12(systematic) for M96. These results show that they are indeed the members of the same group. With these results we derive absolute maximum magnitudes of two SNe (SN 1989B in M66 and SN 1998bu in M96). V-band magnitudes of these SNe Ia are {approx}0.2 mag fainter than SN 2011fe in M101, one of the nearest recent SNe Ia. We also derive near-infrared magnitudes for SN 1998bu. Optical magnitudes of three SNe Ia (SN 1989B, SN 1998bu, and SN 2011fe) based on TRGB analysis yield a Hubble constant, H{sub 0} = 68.4 {+-} 2.6(random) {+-} 3.7(systematic) km s{sup -1} Mpc{sup -1}. This value is similar to the values derived from recent WMAP9 results, H{sub 0} = 69.32 {+-} 0.80 km s{sup -1} Mpc{sup -1}, and from Planck results, H{sub 0} = 67.3 {+-} 1.2 km s{sup -1} Mpc{sup -1}, but smaller than other recent determinations based on Cepheid calibration for SNe Ia luminosity, H{sub 0} = 74 {+-} 3 km s{sup -1} Mpc{sup -1}.

  8. A Uniform Contribution of Core-Collapse and Type Ia Supernovae to the Chemical Enrichment Pattern in the Outskirts of the Virgo Cluster

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Simionescu, A; Urban, O; Allen, S W; Ichinohe, Y; Zhuravleva, I

    2015-01-01

    We present the first measurements of the abundances of alpha-elements (Mg, Si, and S) extending out to beyond the virial radius of a cluster of galaxies. Our results, based on Suzaku Key Project observations of the Virgo Cluster, show that the chemical composition of the intra-cluster medium is constant on large scales, with a flat distribution of the Si/Fe, S/Fe, and Mg/Fe ratios as a function of radius and azimuth out to 1.4 Mpc (1.3 r200). Chemical enrichment of the intergalactic medium due solely to core collapse supernovae (SNcc) is excluded with very high significance; instead, the measured S/Fe and Mg/Fe ratios are consistent with the Solar value, with a sub-solar Si/Fe ratio. The uniform metal abundance ratios observed today are likely the result of an early phase of enrichment and mixing, with both SNcc and type Ia supernovae (SNIa) contributing to the metal budget during the period of peak star formation activity at redshifts of 2-3. We estimate the ratio between the number of SNIa and the total num...

  9. Final Evolution and Delayed Explosions of Spinning White Dwarfs in Single Degenerate Models for Type Ia Supernovae

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Benvenuto, Omar G; Kitamura, Hikaru; Hachisu, Izumi

    2015-01-01

    We study the occurrence of delayed SNe~Ia in the single degenerate (SD) scenario. We assume that a massive carbon-oxygen (CO) white dwarf (WD) accretes matter coming from a companion star, making it to spin at the critical rate. We assume uniform rotation due to magnetic field coupling. The carbon ignition mass for non-rotating WDs is M_{ig}^{NR} \\approx 1.38 M_{\\odot}; while for the case of uniformly rotating WDs it is a few percent larger (M_{ig}^{R} \\approx 1.43 M_{\\odot}). When accretion rate decreases, the WD begins to lose angular momentum, shrinks, and spins up; however, it does not overflow its critical rotation rate, avoiding mass shedding. Thus, angular momentum losses can lead the CO WD interior to compression and carbon ignition, which would induce an SN~Ia. The delay, largely due to the angular momentum losses timescale, may be large enough to allow the companion star to evolve to a He WD, becoming undetectable at the moment of explosion. This scenario supports the occurrence of delayed SNe~Ia if...

  10. OPTICAL AND NEAR-INFRARED POLARIMETRY OF HIGHLY REDDENED Type Ia SUPERNOVA 2014J: PECULIAR PROPERTIES OF DUST IN M82

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kawabata, K. S.; Akitaya, H.; Itoh, R.; Moritani, Y. [Hiroshima Astrophysical Science Center, Hiroshima University, Kagamiyama, Higashi-Hiroshima, Hiroshima 739-8526 (Japan); Yamanaka, M. [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science and Engineering, Konan University, Okamoto, Kobe, Hyogo 658-8501 (Japan); Maeda, K.; Nogami, D. [Department of Astronomy, Graduate School of Science, Kyoto University, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan); Ui, T.; Kawabata, M.; Mori, K.; Takaki, K.; Ueno, I.; Chiyonobu, S.; Harao, T.; Matsui, R.; Miyamoto, H.; Nagae, O. [Department of Physical Science, Hiroshima University, Kagamiyama, Higashi-Hiroshima 739-8526 (Japan); Nomoto, K.; Suzuki, N. [Kavli Institute for the Physics and Mathematics of the Universe (WPI), The University of Tokyo, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8583 (Japan); Tanaka, M., E-mail: kawabtkj@hiroshima-u.ac.jp [National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan); and others

    2014-11-01

    We present optical and near-infrared multi-band linear polarimetry of the highly reddened Type Ia supernova (SN) 2014J that appeared in M82. SN 2014J exhibits large polarization at shorter wavelengths, e.g., 4.8% in the B band, which decreases rapidly at longer wavelengths, while the position angle of the polarization remains at approximately 40° over the observed wavelength range. These polarimetric properties suggest that the observed polarization is likely predominantly caused by the interstellar dust within M82. Further analysis shows that the polarization peaks at a wavelengths much shorter than those obtained for the Galactic dust. The wavelength dependence of the polarization can be better described by an inverse power law rather than by the Serkowski law for Galactic interstellar polarization. These points suggest that the nature of the dust in M82 may be different from that in our Galaxy, with polarizing dust grains having a mean radius of <0.1 ?m.

  11. A high-resolution X-ray and optical study of SN 1006: asymmetric expansion and small-scale structure in a type IA supernova remnant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Winkler, P. Frank [Department of Physics, Middlebury College, Middlebury, VT 05753 (United States); Williams, Brian J.; Petre, Robert; Hwang, Una [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Reynolds, Stephen P. [Physics Department, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27695 (United States); Long, Knox S. [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Katsuda, Satoru, E-mail: winkler@middlebury.edu, E-mail: brian.j.williams@nasa.gov, E-mail: robert.petre-1@nasa.gov, E-mail: reynolds@ncsu.edu, E-mail: long@stsci.edu [RIKEN (The Institute of Physical and Chemical Research), 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan)

    2014-02-01

    We introduce a deep (670 ks) X-ray survey of the entire SN 1006 remnant from the Chandra X-Ray Observatory, together with a deep H? image of SN 1006 from the 4 m Blanco telescope at CTIO. Comparison with Chandra images from 2003 gives the first measurement of the X-ray proper motions around the entire periphery, carried out over a 9 yr baseline. We find that the expansion velocity varies significantly with azimuth. The highest velocity of ?7400 km s{sup –1} (almost 2.5 times that in the northwest (NW)) is found along the southeast (SE) periphery, where both the kinematics and the spectra indicate that most of the X-ray emission stems from ejecta that have been decelerated little, if at all. Asymmetries in the distribution of ejecta are seen on a variety of spatial scales. Si-rich ejecta are especially prominent in the SE quadrant, while O and Mg are more uniformly distributed, indicating large-scale asymmetries arising from the explosion itself. Neon emission is strongest in a sharp filament just behind the primary shock along the NW rim, where the pre-shock density is highest. Here the Ne is likely interstellar, while Ne within the shell may include a contribution from ejecta. Within the interior of the projected shell we find a few isolated 'bullets' of what appear to be supernova ejecta that are immediately preceded by bowshocks seen in H?, features that we interpret as ejecta knots that have reached relatively dense regions of the surrounding interstellar medium, but that appear in the interior in projection. Recent three-dimensional hydrodynamic models for Type Ia supernovae display small-scale features that strongly resemble the ones seen in X-rays in SN 1006; an origin in the explosion itself or from subsequent hydrodynamic instabilities both remain viable options. We have expanded the search for precursor X-ray emission ahead of a synchrotron-dominated shock front, as expected from diffusive shock acceleration theory, to numerous regions along both the northeast and southwest rims of the shell. Our data require that a precursor be thinner than about 3'', and fainter than about 5% of the post-shock peak. These limits suggest that the magnetic field is amplified by a factor of seven or more in a narrow precursor region, promoting diffusive particle acceleration.

  12. TYPE Ia SUPERNOVA REMNANT SHELL AT z = 3.5 SEEN IN THE THREE SIGHTLINES TOWARD THE GRAVITATIONALLY LENSED QSO B1422+231

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hamano, Satoshi; Kobayashi, Naoto [Institute of Astronomy, University of Tokyo, 2-21-1 Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-0015 (Japan); Kondo, Sohei [Koyama Astronomical Observatory, Kyoto-Sangyo University, Motoyama, Kamigamo, Kita-Ku, Kyoto 603-8555 (Japan); Tsujimoto, Takuji [National Astronomical Observatory of Japan and Department of Astronomical Science, Graduate University for Advanced Studies, 2-21-1 Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-0015 (Japan); Okoshi, Katsuya [Faculty of Industrial Science and Technology, Tokyo University of Science, 102-1 Tomino, Oshamanbe, Hokkaido 049-3514 (Japan); Shigeyama, Toshikazu, E-mail: hamano@ioa.s.u-tokyo.ac.jp [Research Center for the Early Universe, University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan)

    2012-08-01

    Using the Subaru 8.2 m Telescope with the IRCS Echelle spectrograph, we obtained high-resolution (R = 10,000) near-infrared (1.01-1.38 {mu}m) spectra of images A and B of the gravitationally lensed QSO B1422+231 (z = 3.628) consisting of four known lensed images. We detected Mg II absorption lines at z = 3.54, which show a large variance of column densities ({approx}0.3 dex) and velocities ({approx}10 km s{sup -1}) between sightlines A and B with a projected separation of only 8.4h{sup -1}{sub 70} pc at that redshift. This is the smallest spatial structure of the high-z gas clouds ever detected after Rauch et al. found a 20 pc scale structure for the same z = 3.54 absorption system using optical spectra of images A and C. The observed systematic variances imply that the system is an expanding shell as originally suggested by Rauch et al. By combining the data for three sightlines, we managed to constrain the radius and expansion velocity of the shell ({approx}50-100 pc, 130 km s{sup -1}), concluding that the shell is truly a supernova remnant (SNR) rather than other types of shell objects, such as a giant H II region. We also detected strong Fe II absorption lines for this system, but with much broader Doppler width than that of {alpha}-element lines. We suggest that this Fe II absorption line originates in a localized Fe II-rich gas cloud that is not completely mixed with plowed ambient interstellar gas clouds showing other {alpha}-element low-ion absorption lines. Along with the Fe richness, we conclude that the SNR is produced by an SN Ia explosion.

  13. flray Transport in Type Ia In order to solve the rate equations in a consistent manner, PHOENIX must include

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nugent, Peter

    in a consistent manner, PHOENIX must include the effects of non­thermal ionization. In Type Ia supernovae the non

  14. Tracked Flame Simulation for Type Ia Yongmin Zhang1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New York at Stoney Brook, State University of

    tracking of the ame front which is critically important to the accurate modeling of turbulent thermonuclear to be thermonu- clear explosions of white dwarfs. Type Ia supernovae are important sources of energy and chemical, and the strength and brightness of the burning are all determined by the speed of thermonuclear burning 12, 13

  15. THE POST-MERGER MAGNETIZED EVOLUTION OF WHITE DWARF BINARIES: THE DOUBLE-DEGENERATE CHANNEL OF SUB-CHANDRASEKHAR TYPE Ia SUPERNOVAE AND THE FORMATION OF MAGNETIZED WHITE DWARFS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ji Suoqing; Fisher, Robert T. [University of Massachusetts Dartmouth, Department of Physics, 285 Old Westport Road, North Dartmouth, MA 02740 (United States); Garcia-Berro, Enrique [Departament de Fisica Aplicada, Universitat Politecnica de Catalunya, c/Esteve Terrades, 5, E-08860 Castelldefels (Spain); Tzeferacos, Petros; Jordan, George; Lee, Dongwook [Center for Astrophysical Thermonuclear Flashes, The University of Chicago, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States); Loren-Aguilar, Pablo [School of Physics, University of Exeter, Stocker Road, Exeter EX4 4QL (United Kingdom); Cremer, Pascal [Bethe Center for Theoretical Physics, Universitaet Bonn, Nussallee 12, D-53115 Bonn (Germany); Behrends, Jan [Fachbereich Physik, Freie Universitaet Berlin, Arnimallee 14, D-14195 Berlin (Germany)

    2013-08-20

    Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) play a crucial role as standardizable cosmological candles, though the nature of their progenitors is a subject of active investigation. Recent observational and theoretical work has pointed to merging white dwarf binaries, referred to as the double-degenerate channel, as the possible progenitor systems for some SNe Ia. Additionally, recent theoretical work suggests that mergers which fail to detonate may produce magnetized, rapidly rotating white dwarfs. In this paper, we present the first multidimensional simulations of the post-merger evolution of white dwarf binaries to include the effect of the magnetic field. In these systems, the two white dwarfs complete a final merger on a dynamical timescale, and are tidally disrupted, producing a rapidly rotating white dwarf merger surrounded by a hot corona and a thick, differentially rotating disk. The disk is strongly susceptible to the magnetorotational instability (MRI), and we demonstrate that this leads to the rapid growth of an initially dynamically weak magnetic field in the disk, the spin-down of the white dwarf merger, and to the subsequent central ignition of the white dwarf merger. Additionally, these magnetized models exhibit new features not present in prior hydrodynamic studies of white dwarf mergers, including the development of MRI turbulence in the hot disk, magnetized outflows carrying a significant fraction of the disk mass, and the magnetization of the white dwarf merger to field strengths {approx}2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 8} G. We discuss the impact of our findings on the origins, circumstellar media, and observed properties of SNe Ia and magnetized white dwarfs.

  16. Supernova Hunting with Supercomputers

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Supercomputers Supernova Hunting with Supercomputers Berkeley researchers provide "roadmap" and tools for finding and studying Type Ia supernovae in their natural habitat May...

  17. A Probabilistic Approach to Classifying Supernovae Using Photometric Information

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kuznetsova, Natalia V.; Connolly, Brian M.

    2008-01-01

    ciency of selecting type Ia supernovae for p cut = 0.98 (weApproach to Classifying Supernovae Using Photometricstudies). Subject headings: supernovae: general Introduction

  18. A fast contour descriptor algorithm for supernova image classification

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aragon, Cecilia R.; Aragon, David Bradburn

    2006-01-01

    from 42 High-Redshift Supernovae," Astrophysical JournalObservational Evidence from Supernovae for an Acceleratingand Progenitors of Type Ia Supernovae," PhD dissertation,

  19. The Young and Bright Type Ia Supernova ASASSN-14lp: Discovery, Early-Time Observations, First-Light Time, Distance to NGC 4666, and Progenitor Constraints

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shappee, B J; Holoien, T W -S; Prieto, J L; Contreras, C; Itagaki, K; Burns, C R; Kochanek, C S; Stanek, K Z; Alper, E; Basu, U; Beacom, J F; Bersier, D; Brimacombe, J; Conseil, E; Danilet, A B; Dong, Subo; Falco, E; Grupe, D; Hsiao, E Y; Kiyota, S; Morrell, N; Nicolas, J; Phillips, M M; Pojmanski, G; Simonian, G; Stritzinger, M; Szczygie?, D M; Thompson, T A; Thorstensen, J; Wagner, M; Wo?niak, P R

    2015-01-01

    On 2014 Dec. 9.61, the All-Sky Automated Survey for SuperNovae (ASAS-SN or "Assassin") discovered ASASSN-14lp just $\\sim2$ days after first light using a global array of 14-cm diameter telescopes. ASASSN-14lp went on to become a bright supernova ($V = 11.94$ mag), second only to SN 2014J for the year. We present prediscovery photometry (with a detection less than a day after first light) and ultraviolet through near-infrared photometric and spectroscopic data covering the rise and fall of ASASSN-14lp for more than 100 days. We find that ASASSN-14lp had a broad light curve ($\\Delta m_{15}(B) = 0.796 \\pm 0.001_{\\textrm{stat}}$), a $B$-band maximum at $2457015.823 \\pm 0.030_{\\textrm{stat}}$, a rise time of $16.94^{+ 0.11 }_{- 0.11 }$ days, and moderate host--galaxy extinction ($E(B-V)_{\\textrm{host}} = 0.329 \\pm 0.001_{\\textrm{stat}}$). Using ASASSN-14lp we derive a distance modulus for NGC 4666 of $\\mu = 30.834 \\pm 0.003_{\\textrm{stat}} \\pm 0.16_{\\textrm{syst}}$ corresponding to a distance of $14.68 \\pm 0.02_{\\...

  20. Supernova progenitor constraints from circumstellar interaction: Type II

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robert J. Cumming; Peter Lundqvist

    1996-10-03

    All types of supernovae (SNe), except Type Ia, have been observed to interact with their immediate circumstellar medium (CSM). This interaction can reveal their progenitor's histories, and constrain our ideas about the evolution of massive stars. As examples of the latest progress in this areas, we present some new results on two SNe: a 3D picture of the triple-ring nebula around SN 1987A, and observations of the less well-known but rather intriguing SN 1994W. In the process we introduce Type IIn supernovae (SN IIn; Schlegel 1990) as an important new probe of massive star evolution.

  1. Progress Report on the Berkeley/Anglo-Australian Observatory High-Redshift Supernova Search

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goldhaber, G.

    2008-01-01

    photometry curve for type Ia supernovae and the redshift vsdistributions for observed supernovae. Figure 5 from Millermain efforts related to supernovae in progress at Berkeley.

  2. Type-Ia Supernova Remnant Shell At $Z=3.5$ Seen In The Three Sightlines Toward The Gravitationally Lensed Qso B1422+231

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hamano, Satoshi; Kondo, Sohei; Tsujimoto, Takuji; Okoshi, Katsuya; Shigeyama, Toshikazu

    2012-01-01

    Using the Subaru 8.2m Telescope with an IRCS Echelle spectrograph, we obtained high-resolution (R=10,000) near-infrared (1.01-1.38 \\mu m) spectra of images A and B of the gravitationally lensed QSO B1422+231 (z=3.628) consisting of four known lensed images. We detected MgII absorption lines at z=3.54, which show a large variance of column densities (~ 0.3 dex) and velocities (~ 10 km/s) between the sightlines A and B with a projected separation of only 8.4h_{70}^{-1} pc at the redshift. This is the smallest spatial structure of the high-z gas clouds ever detected after Rauch et al. found a 20-pc scale structure for the same z=3.54 absorption system using optical spectra of images A and C. The observed systematic variances imply that the system is an expanding shell as originally suggested by Rauch et al. By combining the data for three sightlines, we managed to constrain the radius and expansion velocity of the shell (~ 50-100 pc, 130 km/s), concluding that the shell is truly a supernova remnant (SNR) rather ...

  3. TYCHO SN 1572: A NAKED Ia SUPERNOVA REMNANT WITHOUT AN ASSOCIATED AMBIENT MOLECULAR CLOUD

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tian, W. W.; Leahy, D. A.

    2011-03-10

    The historical supernova remnant (SNR) Tycho SN 1572 originates from the explosion of a normal Type Ia supernova that is believed to have originated from a carbon-oxygen white dwarf in a binary system. We analyze the 21 cm continuum, H I, and {sup 12}CO-line data from the Canadian Galactic Plane Survey in the direction of SN 1572 and the surrounding region. We construct H I absorption spectra to SN 1572 and three nearby compact sources. We conclude that SN 1572 has no molecular cloud interaction, which argues against previous claims that a molecular cloud is interacting with the SNR. This new result does not support a recent claim that dust, newly detected by AKARI, originates from such an SNR-cloud interaction. We suggest that the SNR has a kinematic distance of 2.5-3.0 kpc based on a nonlinear rotational curve model. Very high energy {gamma}-ray emission from the remnant has been detected by the VERITAS telescope, so our result shows that its origin should not be an SNR-cloud interaction. Both radio and X-ray observations support that SN 1572 is an isolated Type Ia SNR.

  4. The farthest known supernova: Support for an accelerating universe and a glimpse of the epoch of deceleration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2001-01-01

    ULDA Access Guide No. 6: Supernovae (The Netherlands: ESA)Livio, M. 2000, in Type Ia Supernovae: Theory and Cosmology,T. 2000, in Type Ia Supernovae: Theory and Cosmology, eds.

  5. New approaches for modeling type Ia supernovae

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zingale, Michael; Almgren, Ann S.; Bell, John B.; Day, Marcus S.; Rendleman, Charles A.; Woosley, Stan

    2007-01-01

    e?ects due to thermonuclear energy release and thermal di?a thermonuclear carbon de?agration can release enough energy

  6. Incompatibility of a comoving Ly-alpha forest with supernova-Ia luminosity distances

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jens Thomas; Hartmut Schulz

    2001-03-18

    Recently Perlmutter et al. suggested a positive value of Einstein's cosmological constant Lambda on the basis of luminosity distances from type-Ia supernovae. However, Lambda world models had earlier been proposed by Hoell & Priester and Liebscher et al. on the basis of quasar absorption-line data. Employing more general repulsive fluids ("dark energy") encompassing the Lambda component we quantitatively compare both approaches with each other. Fitting the SN-data by a minimum-component model consisting of dark energy + dust yields a closed universe with a large amount of dust exceeding the baryonic content constrained by big-bang nucleosynthesis. The nature of the dark energy is hardly constrained. Only when enforcing a flat universe there is a clear tendency to a dark-energy Lambda fluid and the `canonical' value Omega_M = 0.3 for dust. Conversely, fitting the quasar-data by a minimum-component model yields a sharply defined, slightly closed model with a low dust density ruling out significant pressureless dark matter. The dark-energy component obtains an equation-of-state P = -0.96 epsilon close to that of a Lambda-fluid. Omega_M = 0.3 or a precisely flat spatial geometry are inconsistent with minimum-component models. It is found that quasar and supernova data sets cannot be reconciled with each other via (repulsive ideal fluid+dust+radiation)-world models. Compatibility could be reached by drastic expansion of the parameter space with at least two exotic fluids added to dust and radiation as world constituents. If considering such solutions as far-fetched one has to conclude that the quasar absorption line and the SN-Ia constraints are incompatible.

  7. Snapping Supernovae at z>1.7

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aldering, Greg

    2009-01-01

    LBNL-61879 Snapping Supernovae at z > 1.7 Greg Aldering,of California. Snapping Supernovae at z > 1.7 Greg Aldering,of very high redshift Type Ia supernovae for cosmology and

  8. Overview of the nearby supernova factory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2002-01-01

    from 42 High-Redshift Supernovae,” Astrophys J. 517, pp.Observational Evidence from Supernovae for an AcceleratingCalan/Tololo Type Ia Supernovae,” Astron. J. 112, p. 2391,

  9. Hydrogen in Type Ic Supernovae?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    David Branch; David J. Jeffery; Timothy R. Young; E. Baron

    2006-05-09

    By definition, a Type Ic supernova (SN Ic) does not have conspicuous lines of hydrogen or helium in its optical spectrum. SNe Ic usually are modelled in terms of the gravitational collapse of bare carbon-oxygen cores. We consider the possibility that the spectra of ordinary (SN 1994I-like) SNe Ic have been misinterpreted, and that SNe Ic eject hydrogen. An absorption feature usually attributed to a blend of Si II 6355 and C II 6580 may be produced by H-alpha. If SN 1994I-like SNe Ic eject hydrogen, the possibility that hypernova (SN 1998bw-like) SNe Ic, some of which are associated with gamma-ray bursts, also eject hydrogen should be considered. The implications of hydrogen for SN Ic progenitors and explosion models are briefly discussed.

  10. Nucleosynthesis in Type II Supernovae

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    K. Nomoto; M. Hashimoto; T. Tsujimoto; F. -K. Thielemann; N. Kishimoto; Y. Kubo

    1997-06-03

    Presupernova evolution and explosive nucleosynthesis in massive stars for main-sequence masses from 13 $M_\\odot$ to 70 $M_\\odot$ are calculated. We examine the dependence of the supernova yields on the stellar mass, $^{12}C(\\alpha, \\gamma) ^{16}O}$ rate, and explosion energy. The supernova yields integrated over the initial mass function are compared with the solar abundances.

  11. The Late-Time Rebrightening of Type Ia SN 2005gj in the Mid-Infrared

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fox, Ori D

    2013-01-01

    A growing number of observations reveal a subset of Type Ia supernovae undergoing circumstellar interaction (SNe Ia-CSM). We present unpublished archival Spitzer Space Telescope data on SNe Ia-CSM 2002ic and 2005gj obtained > 1300 and 500 days post-discovery, respectively. Both SNe show evidence for late-time mid-infrared (mid-IR) emission from warm dust. The dust parameters are most consistent with a pre-existing dust shell that lies beyond the forward-shock radius, most likely radiatively heated by optical and X-ray emission continuously generated by late-time CSM interaction. In the case of SN 2005gj, the mid-IR luminosity more than doubles after 1 year post-discovery. While we are not aware of any late-time optical-wavelength observations at these epochs, we attribute this rebrightening to renewed shock interaction with a dense circumstellar shell.

  12. A Generalized {ital K} Correction for Type Ia Supernovae: Comparing {ital R}-band Photometry Beyond {ital z=9.2} with B,V, and {ital R}-band Nearby Photometry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goodbar, Ariel

    2008-01-01

    Supernovae: Comparing R-band Photometry Beyond z = 0.2 withB, V, and R-band Nearby Photometry Alex Kim, Ariel Goobar,Supernovae: Comparing R-band Photometry Beyond z =0.2 with

  13. Spectropolarimetric diagnostics of thermonuclear supernova explosions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lifan Wang; Dietrich Baade; Ferdinando Patat

    2006-11-29

    Even at extragalactic distances, the shape of supernova ejecta can be effectively diagnosed by spectropolarimetry. We present here results for 17 Type Ia supernovae that allow a statistical study of the correlation among the geometric structures and other observable parameters of Type Ia supernovae. These observations suggest that their ejecta typically consist of a smooth, central iron rich core and an outer layer with chemical asymmetries. The degree of this peripheral asphericity is correlated with the light-curve decline rate of Type Ia supernovae. These observations lend strong support to delayed-detonation models of Type Ia supernovae.

  14. Type IIP supernovae as cosmological probes: A SEAM distance to SN 1999em

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baron, E.; Nugent, Peter E.; Branch, David; Hauschildt, Peter H.

    2004-01-01

    Type IIP Supernovae as Cosmological Probes: A SEAM Distanceintrinsic brightness, supernovae make excellent cosmologicalstars: atmospheres — supernovae: 1999em Distances from

  15. Pre-explosion companion stars in Type Iax supernovae

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Zheng-Wei; Abate, Carlo; Wang, Bo

    2015-01-01

    Type Iax supernovae (SNe Iax) are proposed as one new sub-class of SNe Ia since they present sufficiently distinct observational properties from the bulk of SNe Ia. SNe Iax are the most common of all types of peculiar SNe by both number and rate, with an estimated rate of occurrence of about 5-30% of the total SN Ia rate. However, the progenitor systems of SNe Iax are still uncertain. Analyzing pre-explosion images at SN Iax positions provides a direct way to place strong constraints on the nature of progenitor systems of SNe Iax. In this work, we predict pre-explosion properties of binary companion stars in a variety of potential progenitor systems by performing detailed binary evolution calculations with the one-dimensional stellar evolution code STARS. This will be helpful for constraining progenitor systems of SNe Iax from their pre-explosion observations. With our binary evolution calculations, it is found that the non-degenerate helium (He) companion star to both a massive C/O WD (> 1.1 solar mass) and ...

  16. Stellar Populations and the White Dwarf Mass Function: Connections To Supernova Ia Luminosities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ted von Hippel; G. D. Bothun; R. A. Schommer

    1997-06-11

    We discuss the luminosity function of SNe Ia under the assumption that recent evidence for dispersion in this standard candle is related to variations in the white dwarf mass function (WDMF) in the host galaxies. We develop a simple parameterization of the WDMF as a function of age of a stellar population and apply this to galaxies of different morphological types. We show that this simplified model is consistent with the observed WDMF of Bergeron et al. (1992) for the solar neighborhood. Our simple models predict that WDMF variations can produce a range of more than 1.8 mag in M$_B$(SN Ia), which is comparable to the observed value using the data of Phillips (1993) and van den Bergh (1996). We also predict a galaxy type dependence of M$_B$(SN Ia) under standard assumptions of the star formation history in these galaxies and show that M$_B$(SN Ia) can evolve with redshift. In principle both evolutionary and galaxy type corrections should be applied to recover the intrinsic range of M$_B$(SN Ia) from the observed values. Our current inadequate knowledge of the star formation history of galaxies coupled with poor physical understanding of the SN Ia mechanism makes the reliable estimation of these corrections both difficult and controversial. The predictions of our models combined with the observed galaxy and redshift correlations may have the power to discriminate between the Chandrasekhar and the sub-Chandrasekhar progenitor scenarios for SNe Ia.

  17. How frequently will a Supernova dangerous to life on Earth explode in our galaxy? Michael Richmond

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richmond, Michael W.

    How frequently will a Supernova dangerous to life on Earth explode in our galaxy? Michael Richmond of the disk ... How frequently do ``dangerous'' Type II supernovae occur? 3. Type Ia Supernovae in the halo concentrated in the spheroid ... How frequently do ``dangerous'' Type Ia supernovae occur? 4. Conclusion 1

  18. The late emission of thermonuclear supernovae

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pilar Ruiz-Lapuente

    1996-04-16

    The subject of late-time emission of Type Ia supernovae and its implications for the understanding of the explosions of C+O WDs is reviewed.

  19. Aspherical supernovae

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kasen, Daniel Nathan

    2004-05-21

    Although we know that many supernovae are aspherical, the exact nature of their geometry is undetermined. Because all the supernovae we observe are too distant to be resolved, the ejecta structure can't be directly imaged, and asymmetry must be inferred from signatures in the spectral features and polarization of the supernova light. The empirical interpretation of this data, however, is rather limited--to learn more about the detailed supernova geometry, theoretical modeling must been undertaken. One expects the geometry to be closely tied to the explosion mechanism and the progenitor star system, both of which are still under debate. Studying the 3-dimensional structure of supernovae should therefore provide new break throughs in our understanding. The goal of this thesis is to advance new techniques for calculating radiative transfer in 3-dimensional expanding atmospheres, and use them to study the flux and polarization signatures of aspherical supernovae. We develop a 3-D Monte Carlo transfer code and use it to directly fit recent spectropolarimetric observations, as well as calculate the observable properties of detailed multi-dimensional hydrodynamical explosion simulations. While previous theoretical efforts have been restricted to ellipsoidal models, we study several more complicated configurations that are tied to specific physical scenarios. We explore clumpy and toroidal geometries in fitting the spectropolarimetry of the Type Ia supernova SN 2001el. We then calculate the observable consequences of a supernova that has been rendered asymmetric by crashing into a nearby companion star. Finally, we fit the spectrum of a peculiar and extraordinarily luminous Type Ic supernova. The results are brought to bear on three broader astrophysical questions: (1) What are the progenitors and the explosion processes of Type Ia supernovae? (2) What effect does asymmetry have on the observational diversity of Type Ia supernovae, and hence their use in cosmology? (3) And , what are some of the physical properties of Type Ic supernovae, believed to be associated with gamma-ray bursts?

  20. ASYMMETRY IN THE OBSERVED METAL-RICH EJECTA OF THE GALACTIC TYPE...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    EJECTA OF THE GALACTIC TYPE IA SUPERNOVA REMNANT G299.2-2.9 We have performed a deep Chandra observation of the Galactic Type Ia supernova remnant G299.2-2.9. Here we...

  1. High Rate for Type IC Supernovae

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Muller, R.A.

    2008-01-01

    Wheeler, J. C. 1990, in Supernovae, ed. A. G. Petschek (New4959. Tamrnann, G. A. 1977, in Supernovae, ed. D. Schramm (Wheeler, J. C. 1990, in Supernovae, ed. J. C. Wheeler, T.

  2. Optical and ultraviolet observations of the narrow-lined type Ia SN 2012fr in NGC 1365

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Ju-Jia; Bai, Jin-Ming; Wang, Bo; Liu, Zheng-Wei [Yunnan Observatories (YNAO), Chinese Academy of Sciences, Kunming 650011 (China); Wang, Xiao-Feng; Zhao, Xu-Lin; Chen, Jun-Cheng [Physics Department and Tsinghua Center for Astrophysics (THCA), Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Zhang, Tian-Meng, E-mail: jujia@ynao.ac.cn, E-mail: baijinming@ynao.ac.cn, E-mail: wang_xf@mail.tsinghua.edu.cn [National Astronomical Observatories of China (NAOC), Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100012 (China)

    2014-07-01

    Extensive optical and ultraviolet (UV) observations of the type Ia supernova (SN Ia) 2012fr are presented in this paper. It has a relatively high luminosity, with an absolute B-band peak magnitude of about –19.5 mag and a smaller post-maximum decline rate than normal SNe Ia (e.g., ?m {sub 15}(B) =0.85 ± 0.05 mag). Based on the UV and optical light curves, we derived that a {sup 56}Ni mass of about 0.88 M {sub ?} was synthesized in the explosion. The earlier spectra are characterized by noticeable high-velocity features of Si II ?6355 and Ca II with velocities in the range of ?22, 000-25, 000 km s{sup –1}. At around the maximum light, these spectral features are dominated by the photospheric components which are noticeably narrower than normal SNe Ia. The post-maximum velocity of the photosphere remains almost constant at ?12,000 km s{sup –1} for about one month, reminiscent of the behavior of some luminous SNe Ia like SN 1991T. We propose that SN 2012fr may represent a subset of the SN 1991T-like SNe Ia viewed in a direction with a clumpy or shell-like structure of ejecta, in terms of a significant level of polarization reported in Maund et al. in 2013.

  3. Multi-layered Spectral Formation in SNe Ia Around Maximum Light

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bongard, Sebastien

    2008-01-01

    stars: atmospheres — supernovae DISCLAIMER This document wasIntroduction Type Ia supernovæ have been used as “spanning the “normal” supernovæ blue magnitudes. Single Ion

  4. Revealing the binary origin of Type Ic superluminous supernovae through nebular hydrogen emission

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moriya, Takashi J; Mackey, Jonathan; Chen, Ting-Wan; Langer, Norbert

    2015-01-01

    We propose that nebular Halpha emission as detected in the Type Ic superluminous supernova iPTF13ehe stems from matter which is stripped from a companion star when the supernova ejecta collide with it. The temporal evolution, the line broadening, and the overall blueshift of the emission are consistent with this interpretation. We scale the nebular Halpha luminosity predicted for Type Ia supernovae in single-degenerate systems to derive the stripped mass required to explain the Halpha luminosity of iPTF13ehe. We find a stripped mass of 0.1 - 0.9 solar masses, assuming that the supernova luminosity is powered by radioactivity or magnetar spin down. Because a central heating source is required to excite the Halpha emission, an interaction-powered model is not favored for iPTF13ehe. We derive a companion mass of more than 20 solar masses and a binary separation of less than about 20 companion radii based on the stripping efficiency during the collision, indicating that the supernova progenitor and the companion ...

  5. Spectroscopic Observations and Analysis of the Unusual Type Ia SN1999ac

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Garavini, G.; Aldering, G.; Amadon, A.; Amanullah, R.; Astier,P.; Balland, C.; Blanc, G.; Conley, A.; Dahlen, T.; Deustua, S.E.; Ellis,R.; Fabbro, S.; Fadeyev, V.; Fan, X.; Folatelli, G.; Frye, B.; Gates,E.L.; Gibbons, R.; Goldhaber, G.; Goldman, B.; Goobar, A.; Groom, D.E.; Haissinski, J.; Hardin, D.; Hook, I.; Howell, D.A.; Kent, S.; Kim, A.G.; Knop, R.A.; Kowalski, M.; Kuznetsova, N.; Lee, B.C.; Lidman, C.; Mendez,J.; Miller, G.J.; Moniez, M.; Mouchet, M.; Mourao, A.; Newberg, H.; Nobili, S.; Nugent, P.E.; Pain, R.; Perdereau, O.; Perlmutter, S.; Quimby, R.; Regnault, N.; Rich, J.; Richards, G.T.; Ruiz-Lapuente, P.; Schaefer, B.E.; Schahmaneche, K.; Smith, E.; Spadafora, A.L.; Stanishev,V.; Thomas, R.C.; Walton, N.A.; Wang, L.; Wood-Vasey, W.M.

    2005-07-12

    The authors present optical spectra of the peculiar Type Ia supernova (SN Ia) 1999ac. The data extend from -15 to +42 days with respect to B-band maximum and reveal an event that is unusual in several respects. prior to B-band maximum, the spectra resemble those of SN 1999aa, a slowly declining event, but possess stronger Si II and Ca II signatures (more characteristic of a spectroscopically normal SN). Spectra after B-band maximum appear more normal. The expansion velocities inferred from the Iron lines appear to be lower than average; whereas, the expansion velocity inferred from Calcium H and K are higher than average. The expansion velocities inferred from the Iron lines appear to be lower than average; whereas, the expansion velocity inferred from Calcium H and K are higher than average. The expansion velocities inferred from Si II are among the slowest ever observed, though SN 1999ac is not particularly dim. The analysis of the parameters v{sub 10}(Si II), R(Si II), v, and {Delta}m{sub 15} further underlines the unique characteristics of SN 1999ac. They find convincing evidence of C II {lambda}6580 in the day -15 spectrum with ejection velocity v > 16,000 km s{sup -1}, but this signature disappears by day -9. This rapid evolution at early times highlights the importance of extremely early-time spectroscopy.

  6. High Statistics Study of Nearby Type 1a Supernovae. QUEST Camera...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Statistics Study of Nearby Type 1a Supernovae. QUEST Camera Short Term Maintenance: Final Technical Report Baltay, Charles 79 ASTRONOMY AND ASTROPHYSICS Study of Type 1a Supernovae...

  7. The Photometric Properties of Nearby Type Ia Supernovae

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ganeshalingam, Mohan

    2012-01-01

    of thermonuclear SNe is powered by the energy deposition ofenergy to unbind the outer layers of the star. Unlike thermonuclear

  8. LES Simulations of Turbulent Combustion in a Type Ia Supernovae

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New York at Stoney Brook, State University of

    to be thermonuclear explosions of white dwarfs. SNIa are important sources of energy and chemical elements deposited of the burning are all determined by the speed of thermonuclear burning [27]. The problem of turbulent combustionE= _ S. Here #21; is the electron mean free path, E is a characteristic energy per unit mass, c

  9. The Photometric Properties of Nearby Type Ia Supernovae

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ganeshalingam, Mohan

    2012-01-01

    5.2.1 Photometry . . . . . .5.3.1 Photometry . . . . . . . .photometry . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

  10. PoS(NICX)047 Type Ia supernovae

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bell, John B.

    thermonuclear explosions in the modern universe and respon- sible for making about 2/3 of the iron in our blood

  11. Burning Thermals in Type Ia Supernovae A. J. Aspden1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bell, John B.

    . It is generally agreed that they result from the thermonuclear explosion of a white dwarf accreting matter from that a thermonuclear explosion is involved means that a realistic model requires an understanding of both the ignition

  12. Visualizing Buoyant Burning Bubbles in Type Ia Supernovae at...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    simulation was conducted using a specialized low Mach number hydrodynamics code for thermonuclear flames. Adaptive mesh refinement was used to focus resolution on the bubble,...

  13. The Photometric Properties of Nearby Type Ia Supernovae

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ganeshalingam, Mohan

    2012-01-01

    1.1.1 Thermonuclear SNe . . . . . . 1.1.2 Core-Collapseby which they explode: thermonuclear and core collapse.thesis is focused on thermonuclear SNe, I describe the two

  14. Flames in Type Ia Supernova: Deflagration-Detonation Transition...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States) Sponsoring Org: USDOE National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) Country of Publication: United States Language: English...

  15. Improved Distances to Type Ia Supernovae withMulticolor Light...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    on Rsub V. less Authors: Jha, Saurabh ; KIPAC, Menlo Park ; Riess, Adam G. ; Baltimore, Space Telescope Sci. ; Kirshner, Robert P. ; Harvard-Smithsonian Ctr. Astrophys....

  16. CEPHEID CALIBRATIONS OF MODERN TYPE Ia SUPERNOVAE: IMPLICATIONS...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Author Affiliations Department of Physics and Astronomy, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States) George P. and Cynthia W. Mitchell Institute for...

  17. Turbulence-Flame Interactions in Type Ia Supernovae

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aspden, Andrew J; Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, 1 Cyclotron Road, MS 50A-1148, Berkeley, CA 94720 (Authors 1, 2 & 3); Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of California at Santa Cruz, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (Author 4); Department of Physics and Astronomy, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY 11794 (Author 5)

    2008-01-01

    dynamics of turbulent thermonuclear ?ames are essential tostudy of turbulent thermonuclear ? ames that explores aadapted to the study of thermonuclear ?ames, as described in

  18. Improved Constraints on Type Ia Supernova Host Galaxy Properties...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Masao ; Pennsylvania U. ; Conroy, Charlie ; Harvard-Smithsonian Ctr. Astrophys. ; Smith, Mathew ; Cape Town U. ; Bassett, Bruce ; South African Astron. Observ. Cape Town...

  19. HUBBLE RESIDUALS OF NEARBY TYPE Ia SUPERNOVAE ARE CORRELATED...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    and HigherZ SNe with 30 nearby SNe whose host masses are less than 10sup 10.8 M sub sun in a cosmology fit yields 1 + w 0.22sup +0.152 sub -0.108, more while a...

  20. Closest Type Ia Supernova in Decades Solves a Cosmic Mystery

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    observations of SN 2011fe were carried out at the Liverpool Telescope at La Palma in the Canary Islands, followed within hours by the Shane Telescope at Lick Observatory in...

  1. CEPHEID CALIBRATIONS OF MODERN TYPE Ia SUPERNOVAE: IMPLICATIONS FOR THE

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfate Reducing Bacteria (TechnicalTransmission, Distribution and--HUBBLE CONSTANT (Journal Article) |

  2. Constraining Cosmic Evolution of Type Ia Supernovae (Journal Article) |

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfate Reducing BacteriaConnect Collider Tests ofO y''Softening-Bipolaron''Article)SciTechSciTech

  3. Constraining Cosmic Evolution of Type Ia Supernovae (Journal Article) |

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfate Reducing BacteriaConnect Collider Tests ofO

  4. Improved Constraints on Type Ia Supernova Host Galaxy Properties using

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfate Reducing(Journal Article)lasers(Journal Article)

  5. Turbulence-Flame Interactions in Type Ia Supernovae (Journal Article) |

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfateSciTechtail.Theory of rare Kaon and PionExperimentsConnect(Technical(Journalpriority

  6. Turbulence-Flame Interactions in Type Ia Supernovae (Journal Article) |

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfateSciTechtail.Theory of rare Kaon and PionExperimentsConnect(Technical(JournalprioritySciTech

  7. PROGENITORS AND BIRTH-RATES OF CATACLYSMIC VARIABLES AND TYPE-I SUPER-NOVAE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    TRIMBLE, V

    1982-01-01

    1981. (I2) G. Tammann, in Supernovae, edited by M. J. Rees4) J. C. Wheeler, Type I Supernovae (University of Texas,production of Type I supernovae from the ancestral systems,

  8. Confirmed: Stellar Behemoth Self-Destructs in Type IIb Supernova

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    in a violent explosion known as a Type IIb supernova. Using the iPTF pipeline, researchers at Israel's Weizmann Institute of Science led by Avishay Gal-Yam caught...

  9. Systematic Effects in Type-1a Supernovae Surveys from Host Galaxy...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Systematic Effects in Type-1a Supernovae Surveys from Host Galaxy Spectra Strauss, Michael A. Princeton University 79 ASTRONOMY AND ASTROPHYSICS Cosmology, supernovae, stellar...

  10. EARLY OBSERVATIONS AND ANALYSIS OF THE TYPE Ia SN 2014J IN M82

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marion, G. H.; Vinkó, J. [University of Texas at Austin, 1 University Station C1400, Austin, TX 78712-0259 (United States); Sand, D. J. [Physics Department, Texas Tech University, Lubbock, TX 79409 (United States); Hsiao, E. Y. [Carnegie Observatories, Las Campanas Observatory, Colina El Pino, Casilla 601 (Chile); Banerjee, D. P. K.; Joshi, V.; Venkataraman, V.; Ashok, N. M. [Astronomy and Astrophysics Division, Physical Research Laboratory, Navrangapura, Ahmedabad - 380009, Gujarat (India); Valenti, S.; Howell, D. A. [Las Cumbres Observatory Global Telescope Network, 6740 Cortona Drive, Suite 102, Santa Barbara, CA 93117 (United States); Stritzinger, M. D. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Aarhus University, Ny Munkegade 120, DK-8000 Aarhus C (Denmark); Amanullah, R.; Johansson, J. [The Oskar Klein Centre, Physics Department, Stockholm University, Albanova University Center, SE 106 91 Stockholm (Sweden); Binzel, R. P. [Department of Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Bochanski, J. J. [Haverford College, 370 Lancaster Avenue, Haverford, PA 19041 (United States); Bryngelson, G. L. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Francis Marion University, 4822 East Palmetto Street, Florence, SC 29506 (United States); Burns, C. R. [Observatories of the Carnegie Institution for Science, 813 Santa Barbara Street, Pasadena, CA 91101 (United States); Drozdov, D. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Clemson University, 8304 University Station, Clemson, SC 29634 (United States); Fieber-Beyer, S. K. [Department of Space Studies, University of North Dakota, University Stop 9008, ND 58202 (United States); Graham, M. L., E-mail: hman@astro.as.utexas.edu [Astronomy Department, University of California at Berkeley, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); and others

    2015-01-01

    We present optical and near infrared (NIR) observations of the nearby Type Ia SN 2014J. Seventeen optical and 23 NIR spectra were obtained from 10 days before (–10d) to 10 days after (+10d) the time of maximum B-band brightness. The relative strengths of absorption features and their patterns of development can be compared at one day intervals throughout most of this period. Carbon is not detected in the optical spectra, but we identify C I ?1.0693 in the NIR spectra. Mg II lines with high oscillator strengths have higher initial velocities than other Mg II lines. We show that the velocity differences can be explained by differences in optical depths due to oscillator strengths. The spectra of SN 2014J show that it is a normal SN Ia, but many parameters are near the boundaries between normal and high-velocity subclasses. The velocities for O I, Mg II, Si II, S II, Ca II, and Fe II suggest that SN 2014J has a layered structure with little or no mixing. That result is consistent with the delayed detonation explosion models. We also report photometric observations, obtained from –10d to +29d, in the UBVRIJH and K{sub s} bands. The template fitting package SNooPy is used to interpret the light curves and to derive photometric parameters. Using R{sub V} = 1.46, which is consistent with previous studies, SNooPy finds that A{sub V} = 1.80 for E(B – V){sub host} = 1.23 ± 0.06 mag. The maximum B-band brightness of –19.19 ± 0.10 mag was reached on February 1.74 UT ± 0.13 days and the supernova has a decline parameter, ?m {sub 15}, of 1.12 ± 0.02 mag.

  11. Supernova Discoveries from the Nearby Supernova Factory (SNfactory)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    SNfactory International Collaboration,

    The Nearby Supernova Factory is an experiment designed to collect data on more Type Ia supernovae than have ever been studied in a single project before, and in so doing, to answer some fundamental questions about the nature of the universe. Type Ia supernovae are extraordinarily bright, remarkably uniform objects which make excellent "standard candles" for measuring the expansion rate of the universe. However, such stellar explosions are very rare, occurring only a couple of times per millenium in a typical galaxy, and remaining bright enough to detect only for a few weeks. Previous studies of Type Ia supernovae led to the discovery of the mysterious "dark energy" that is causing the universe to expand at an accelerating rate. To reduce the statistical uncertainties in previous experimental data, extensive spectral and photometric monitoring of more Type Ia supernovae is required. The SNfactory collaboration has built an automated system consisting of specialized software and custom-built hardware that systematically searches the sky for new supernovae, screens potential candidates, then performs multiple spectral and photometric observations on each supernova. These observations are stored in a database to be made available to supernova researchers world-wide for further study and analysis [copied from http://snfactory.lbl.gov/snf/snf-about.html]. Users must register and agree to the open access honor system. Finding charts are in FITS format and may not be accessible through normal browser settings.

  12. Supernovae

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Trimble, V; Trimble, V

    1981-01-01

    Young extragalactic supernovae have now been seen as radio,about 2 years, finding supernovae out to the Virgo clusterprobe nucleosynthesis by supernovae. E. Kibblewhite and M.

  13. PECULIAR OPTICAL AND IR BEHAVIOUR IN TYPE I SUPERNOVAE, AND THE ORIGIN OF THE 1.2 ABSORPTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Graham, J.R.

    2011-01-01

    Wheeler, le. , 1984. In "Supernovae as distance indicators",lR. , 1985. In "Dust in supernovae and supernova remnants",and IR behaviour in type I supernovae, and the origin of the

  14. On the nature of rapidly fading Type II supernovae

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moriya, Takashi J; Ergon, Mattias; Blinnikov, Sergei I

    2015-01-01

    It has been suggested that Type II supernovae with rapidly fading light curves (a.k.a. Type IIL supernovae) are explosions of progenitors with low-mass hydrogen-rich envelopes which are of the order of 1 Msun. We investigate light-curve properties of supernovae from such progenitors. We confirm that such progenitors lead to rapidly fading Type II supernovae. We find that the luminosity of supernovae from such progenitors with the canonical explosion energy of 1e51 erg and 56Ni mass of 0.05 Msun can increase temporarily shortly before all the hydrogen in the envelope recombines. As a result, a bump appears in their light curves. The bump appears because the heating from the nuclear decay of 56Ni can keep the bottom of hydrogen-rich layers in the ejecta ionized, and thus the photosphere can stay there for a while. We find that the light-curve bump becomes less significant when we make explosion energy larger (>~ 2e51 erg), 56Ni mass smaller (<~ 0.01 Msun), 56Ni mixed in the ejecta, or the progenitor radius l...

  15. Systematic Effects in Type-1a Supernovae Surveys from Host Galaxy...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Systematic Effects in Type-1a Supernovae Surveys from Host Galaxy Spectra Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Systematic Effects in Type-1a Supernovae Surveys from Host...

  16. Type IIn supernovae as sources of high energy neutrinos

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zirakashvili, V N

    2015-01-01

    It is shown that high-energy astrophysical neutrinos observed in the IceCube experiment can be produced by protons accelerated in extragalactic Type IIn supernova remnants by shocks propagating in the dense circumstellar medium. The nonlinear diffusive shock acceleration model is used for description of particle acceleration.

  17. Thermonuclear Supernovae

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    F. K. Roepke

    2008-04-14

    The application of Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) as distance indicators in cosmology calls for a sound understanding of these objects. Recent years have seen a brisk development of astrophysical models which explain SNe Ia as thermonuclear explosions of white dwarf stars. While the evolution of the progenitor is still uncertain, the explosion mechanism certainly involves the propagation of a thermonuclear flame through the white dwarf star. Three-dimensional hydrodynamical simulations allowed to study a wide variety of possibilities involving subsonic flame propagation (deflagrations), flames accelerated by turbulence, and supersonic detonations. These possibilities lead to a variety of scenarios. I review the currently discussed approaches and present some recent results from simulations of the turbulent deflagration model and the delayed detonation model.

  18. Host Galaxies of Type Ia Supernovae from the Nearby Supernova Factory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Childress, Michael Joseph

    2011-01-01

    Photometry . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3.2.2 Host Galaxy Common Aperture Photometry . . . . . . . .and Star-Formation Rates from Photometry 3.3 Host Galaxy

  19. Type IIb supernova SN 2011dh: Spectra and photometry from the...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    IIb supernova SN 2011dh: Spectra and photometry from the ultraviolet to the near-infrared Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Type IIb supernova SN 2011dh: Spectra and...

  20. A faint type of supernova from a white dwarf with a helium-rich companion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    H. B. Perets; A. Gal-Yam; P. Mazzali; D. Arnett; D. Kagan; A. V. Filippenko; W. Li; I. Arcavi; S. B. Cenko; D. B. Fox; D. C. Leonard; D. -S. Moon; D. J. Sand; A. M. Soderberg; R. J. Foley; M. Ganeshalingam; J. P. Anderson; P. A. James; E. O. Ofek; L. Bildsten; G. Nelemans; K. J. Shen; N. N. Weinberg; B. D. Metzger; A. L. Piro; E. Quataert; M. Kiewe; D. Poznanski

    2010-05-24

    Supernovae (SNe) are thought to arise from two different physical processes. The cores of massive, short-lived stars undergo gravitational core collapse and typically eject a few solar masses during their explosion. These are thought to appear as as type Ib/c and II SNe, and are associated with young stellar populations. A type Ia SN is thought to arise from the thermonuclear detonation of a white dwarf star composed mainly of carbon and oxygen, whose mass approaches the Chandrasekhar limit. Such SNe are observed in both young and old stellar environments. Here we report our discovery of the faint type Ib SN 2005E in the halo of the nearby isolated galaxy, NGC 1032. The lack of any trace of recent star formation near the SN location (Fig. 1), and the very low derived ejected mass (~0.3 M_sun), argue strongly against a core-collapse origin for this event. Spectroscopic observations and the derived nucleosynthetic output show that the SN ejecta have high velocities and are dominated by helium-burning products, indicating that SN 2005E was neither a subluminous nor a regular SN Ia (Fig. 2). We have therefore found a new type of stellar explosion, arising from a low-mass, old stellar system, likely involving a binary with a primary white dwarf and a helium-rich secondary. The SN ejecta contain more calcium than observed in any known type of SN and likely additional large amounts of radioactive 44Ti. Such SNe may thus help resolve fundamental physical puzzles, extending from the composition of the primitive solar system and that of the oldest stars, to the Galactic production of positrons.

  1. Possible detection of the stellar donor or remnant for the type Iax supernova 2008ha

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Foley, Ryan J. [Astronomy Department, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 1002 West Green Street, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States); McCully, Curtis; Jha, Saurabh W. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, 136 Frelinghuysen Road, Piscataway, NJ 08854 (United States); Bildsten, Lars [Department of Physics, University of California, Santa Barbara, CA 93106 (United States); Fong, Wen-fai [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Narayan, Gautham [National Optical Astronomy Observatory, 950 North Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85719-4933 (United States); Rest, Armin [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Stritzinger, Maximilian D. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Aarhus University, Ny Munkegade, DK-8000 Aarhus C (Denmark)

    2014-09-01

    Type Iax supernovae (SNe Iax) are thermonuclear explosions that are related to SNe Ia, but are physically distinct. The most important differences are that SNe Iax have significantly lower luminosity (1%-50% that of typical SNe Ia), lower ejecta mass (?0.1-0.5 M {sub ?}), and may leave a bound remnant. The most extreme SN Iax is SN 2008ha, which peaked at M{sub V} = –14.2 mag, about 5 mag below that of typical SNe Ia. Here, we present Hubble Space Telescope (HST) images of UGC 12682, the host galaxy of SN 2008ha, taken 4.1 yr after the peak brightness of SN 2008ha. In these deep, high-resolution images, we detect a source coincident (0.86 HST pixels; 0.''043; 1.1?) with the position of SN 2008ha with M {sub F814W} = –5.4 mag. We determine that this source is unlikely to be a chance coincidence, but that scenario cannot be completely ruled out. If this source is directly related to SN 2008ha, it is either the luminous bound remnant of the progenitor white dwarf (WD) or its companion star. The source is consistent with being an evolved >3 M {sub ?} initial mass star, and is significantly redder than the SN Iax 2012Z progenitor system, the first detected progenitor system for a thermonuclear SN. If this source is the companion star for SN 2008ha, there is a diversity in SN Iax progenitor systems, perhaps related to the diversity in SN Iax explosions. If the source is the bound remnant of the WD, it must have expanded significantly. Regardless of the nature of this source, we constrain the progenitor system of SN 2008ha to have an age of <80 Myr.

  2. Aspherical supernovae

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kasen, Daniel Nathan

    2004-01-01

    g h t : T h e Physics of Supernovae, ed. W . H i l l e b r ar a n c h , D . 1990, i n Supernovae, Jerusalem W i n t e ri o , M . 2000, i n T y p e Ia Supernovae, T h e o r y a n d

  3. SNe Ia as a cosmological probe

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meng, Xiangcun; Han, Zhanwen

    2015-01-01

    Type Ia supernovae luminosities can be corrected to render them useful as standard candles able to probe the expansion history of the universe. This technique was successful applied to discover the present acceleration of the universe. As the number of SNe Ia observed at high redshift increases and analysis techniques are perfected, people aim to use this technique to probe the equation of state of the dark energy. Nevertheless, the nature of SNe Ia progenitors remains controversial and concerns persist about possible evolution effects that may be larger and harder to characterize than the more obvious statistical uncertainties.

  4. Investigations of supernovae and supernova remnants in the era of SKA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Lingzhi; Zhu, Hui; Tian, Wenwu; Wang, Xiaofeng

    2015-01-01

    Two main physical mechanisms are used to explain supernova explosions: thermonuclear explosion of a white dwarf(Type Ia) and core collapse of a massive star (Type II and Type Ib/Ic). Type Ia supernovae serve as distance indicators that led to the discovery of the accelerating expansion of the Universe. The exact nature of their progenitor systems however remain unclear. Radio emission from the interaction between the explosion shock front and its surrounding CSM or ISM provides an important probe into the progenitor star's last evolutionary stage. No radio emission has yet been detected from Type Ia supernovae by current telescopes. The SKA will hopefully detect radio emission from Type Ia supernovae due to its much better sensitivity and resolution. There is a 'supernovae rate problem' for the core collapse supernovae because the optically dim ones are missed due to being intrinsically faint and/or due to dust obscuration. A number of dust-enshrouded optically hidden supernovae should be discovered via SKA1-...

  5. THE FAST AND FURIOUS DECAY OF THE PECULIAR TYPE Ic SUPERNOVA 2005ek

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Drout, M. R.; Soderberg, A. M.; Margutti, R.; Milisavljevic, D.; Sanders, N. E.; Chornock, R.; Foley, R. J.; Kirshner, R. P.; Chakraborti, S.; Challis, P.; Friedman, A.; Hicken, M.; Jensen, C. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Mazzali, P. A. [Astrophysics Research Institute, Liverpool John Moores University, CH41 1LD Liverpool (United Kingdom); Parrent, J. T. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Dartmouth College, 6127 Wilder Laboratory, Hanover, NH 03755 (United States); Filippenko, A. V.; Li, W.; Cenko, S. B.; Ganeshalingam, M. [Department of Astronomy, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720-3411 (United States); Brown, P. J., E-mail: mdrout@cfa.harvard.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Texas A and M University, College Station, TX 77843-4242 (United States); and others

    2013-09-01

    We present extensive multi-wavelength observations of the extremely rapidly declining Type Ic supernova (SN Ic), SN 2005ek. Reaching a peak magnitude of M{sub R} = -17.3 and decaying by {approx}3 mag in the first 15 days post-maximum, SN 2005ek is among the fastest Type I supernovae observed to date. The spectra of SN 2005ek closely resemble those of normal SN Ic, but with an accelerated evolution. There is evidence for the onset of nebular features at only nine days post-maximum. Spectroscopic modeling reveals an ejecta mass of {approx}0.3 M{sub Sun} that is dominated by oxygen ({approx}80%), while the pseudo-bolometric light curve is consistent with an explosion powered by {approx}0.03 M{sub Sun} of radioactive {sup 56}Ni. Although previous rapidly evolving events (e.g., SN 1885A, SN 1939B, SN 2002bj, SN 2010X) were hypothesized to be produced by the detonation of a helium shell on a white dwarf, oxygen-dominated ejecta are difficult to reconcile with this proposed mechanism. We find that the properties of SN 2005ek are consistent with either the edge-lit double detonation of a low-mass white dwarf or the iron-core collapse of a massive star, stripped by binary interaction. However, if we assume that the strong spectroscopic similarity of SN 2005ek to other SNe Ic is an indication of a similar progenitor channel, then a white-dwarf progenitor becomes very improbable. SN 2005ek may be one of the lowest mass stripped-envelope core-collapse explosions ever observed. We find that the rate of such rapidly declining Type I events is at least 1%-3% of the normal SN Ia rate.

  6. High Statistics Study of Nearby Type 1a Supernovae. QUEST Camera...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Technical Report: High Statistics Study of Nearby Type 1a Supernovae. QUEST Camera Short Term Maintenance: Final Technical Report Citation Details In-Document Search Title: High...

  7. Search for precursor eruptions among Type IIb supernovae

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Strotjohann, Nora L; Gal-Yam, Avishay; Sullivan, Mark; Kulkarni, Shrinivas R; Shaviv, Nir J; Fremling, Christoffer; Kasliwal, Mansi M; Nugent, Peter E; Cao, Yi; Arcavi, Iair; Sollerman, Jesper; Filippenko, Alexei V; Yaron, Ofer; Laher, Russ; Surace, Jason

    2015-01-01

    The progenitor stars of several Type IIb supernovae (SNe) show indications for extended hydrogen envelopes. These envelopes might be the outcome of luminous energetic pre-explosion events, so-called precursor eruptions. We use the Palomar Transient Factory (PTF) pre-explosion observations of a sample of 27 nearby Type IIb SNe to look for such precursors during the final years prior to the SN explosion. No precursors are found when combining the observations in 15-day bins, and we calculate the absolute-magnitude-dependent upper limit on the precursor rate. At the 90% confidence level, Type IIb SNe have on average $energy required to unbind a low-mass stellar envelope is comparable to the radiated energy of a few-weeks-long precursor which would be detectable for the clos...

  8. Constraints on Type IIn Supernova Progenitor Outbursts from the Lick Observatory Supernova Search

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bilinski, Christopher; Li, Weidong; Williams, G Grant; Zheng, WeiKang; Filippenko, Alexei V

    2015-01-01

    We searched through roughly 12 years of archival survey data acquired by the Katzman Automatic Imaging Telescope (KAIT) as part of the Lick Observatory Supernova Search (LOSS) in order to detect or place limits on possible progenitor outbursts of Type IIn supernovae (SNe~IIn). The KAIT database contains multiple pre-SN images for 5 SNe~IIn (plus one ambiguous case of a SN IIn/imposter) within 50 Mpc. No progenitor outbursts are found using the false discovery rate (FDR) statistical method in any of our targets. Instead, we derive limiting magnitudes (LMs) at the locations of the SNe. These limiting magnitudes (typically reaching $m_R \\approx 19.5\\,\\mathrm{mag}$) are compared to outbursts of SN 2009ip and $\\eta$ Car, plus additional simulated outbursts. We find that the data for SN 1999el and SN 2003dv are of sufficient quality to rule out events $\\sim40$ days before the main peak caused by initially faint SNe from blue supergiant (BSG) precursor stars, as in the cases of SN 2009ip and SN 2010mc. These SNe~IIn...

  9. No X-rays from the very nearby type Ia SN 2014J: Constraints on its environment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Margutti, R.; Parrent, J.; Kamble, A.; Soderberg, A. M.; Milisavljevic, D.; Drout, M. R.; Kirshner, R. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden St., Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Foley, R. J. [Astronomy Department, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 1002 W. Green Street, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States)

    2014-07-20

    Deep X-ray observations of the post-explosion environment around the very nearby Type Ia SN 2014J (d{sub L} = 3.5 Mpc) reveal no X-ray emission down to a luminosity L{sub x} < 7 × 10{sup 36} erg s{sup –1} (0.3-10 keV) at ?t ? 20 days after the explosion. We interpret this limit in the context of inverse Compton emission from upscattered optical photons by the supernova shock and constrain the pre-explosion mass-loss rate of the stellar progenitor system to be M-dot <10{sup ?9} M{sub ?} yr{sup ?1} (for wind velocity v{sub w} = 100 km s{sup –1}). Alternatively, the SN shock might be expanding into a uniform medium with density n{sub CSM} < 3 cm{sup –3}. These results rule out single-degenerate (SD) systems with steady mass loss until the terminal explosion and constrain the fraction of transferred material lost at the outer Lagrangian point to be ?1%. The allowed progenitors are (1) white dwarf-white dwarf progenitors, (2) SD systems with unstable hydrogen burning experiencing recurrent nova eruptions with recurrence time t < 300 yr, and (3) stars where the mass loss ceases before the explosion.

  10. Improving Type Ia Supernova Standard Candle Cosmology Measurements Using Observations of Early-Type Host Galaxies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meyers, Joshua Evan

    2012-01-01

    G. S. et al. 1998, in VIII Canary Islands Winter School ofA. Herrerro, & F. Sanchez, Canary Islands Winter School ofof La Palma in the Canary Islands. On the night of the first

  11. OISTER Optical and Near-Infrared Observations of Type Iax Supernova 2012Z

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yamanaka, Masayuki; Kawabata, Koji S; Tanaka, Masaomi; Tominaga, Nozomu; Akitaya, Hiroshi; Nagayama, Takahiro; Kuroda, Daisuke; Takahashi, Jun; Saito, Yoshihiko; Yanagisawa, Kenshi; Fukui, Akihiko; Miyanoshita, Ryo; Watanabe, Makoto; Arai, Akira; Isogai, Mizuki; Hattori, Takashi; Hanayama, Hidekazu; Itoh, Ryosuke; Ui, Takahiro; Takaki, Katsutoshi; Ueno, Issei; Yoshida, Michitoshi; Ali, Gamal B; Essam, Ahmed; Ozaki, Akihito; Nakao, Hikaru; Hamamoto, Ko; Nogami, Daisaku; Morokuma, Tomoki; Oasa, Yumiko; Izumiura, Hideyuki; Sekiguchi, Kazuhiro

    2015-01-01

    We report observations of the Type Iax supernova (SN Iax) 2012Z at optical and near-infrared wavelengths from immediately after the explosion until $\\sim$ $260$ days after the maximum luminosity using the Optical and Infrared Synergetic Telescopes for Education and Research (OISTER) Target-of-Opportunity (ToO) program and the Subaru telescope. We found that the near-infrared (NIR) light curve evolutions and color evolutions are similar to those of SNe Iax 2005hk and 2008ha. The NIR absolute magnitudes ($M_{J}\\sim-18.1$ mag and $M_{H}\\sim-18.3$ mag) and the rate of decline of the light curve ($\\Delta$ $m_{15}$($B$)$=1.6 \\pm 0.1$ mag) are very similar to those of SN 2005hk ($M_{J}\\sim-17.7$ mag, $M_{H}\\sim$$-18.0$ mag, and $\\Delta$ $m_{15}$($B$)$\\sim1.6$ mag), yet differ significantly from SNe 2008ha and 2010ae ($M_{J}\\sim-14 - -15$ mag and $\\Delta$ $m_{15}$($B$)$\\sim2.4-2.7$ mag). The estimated rise time is $12.0 \\pm 3.0$ days, which is significantly shorter than that of SN 2005hk or any other Ia SNe. The rapi...

  12. The early phases of the type Iax supernova SN 2011ay

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Szalai, Tamás; Sárneczky, Krisztián; Takáts, Katalin; Benk?, József M; Kelemen, János; Kuli, Zoltán; Silverman, Jeffrey M; Marion, G Howie; Wheeler, J Craig

    2015-01-01

    We present a detailed study of the early phases of the peculiar supernova 2011ay based on BVRI photometry obtained at Konkoly Observatory, Hungary, and optical spectra taken with the Hobby-Eberly Telescope at McDonald Observatory, Texas. The spectral analysis carried out with SYN++ and SYNAPPS confirms that SN 2011ay belongs to the recently defined class of SNe Iax, which is also supported by the properties of its light and color curves. The estimated photospheric temperature around maximum light, T_{phot} ~8,000 K, is lower than in most Type Ia SNe, which results in the appearance of strong Fe II features in the spectra of SN 2011ay, even during the early phases. We also show that strong blending with metal features (those of Ti II, Fe II, Co II) makes the direct analysis of the broad spectral features very difficult, and this may be true for all SNe Iax. We find two alternative spectrum models that both describe the observed spectra adequately, but their photospheric velocities differ by at least 3,000 km/s...

  13. CAN STELLAR MIXING EXPLAIN THE LACK OF TYPE Ib SUPERNOVAE IN...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    CAN STELLAR MIXING EXPLAIN THE LACK OF TYPE Ib SUPERNOVAE IN LONG-DURATION GAMMA-RAY BURSTS? Citation Details In-Document Search Title: CAN STELLAR MIXING EXPLAIN THE LACK OF TYPE...

  14. Deflagrations and Detonations in Thermonuclear Supernovae

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vadim N. Gamezo; Alexei M. Khokhlov; Elaine S. Oran

    2004-06-03

    We study a type Ia supernova explosion using three-dimensional numerical simulations based on reactive fluid dynamics. We consider a delayed-detonation model that assumes a deflagration-to-detonation transition. In contrast to the pure deflagration model, the delayed-detonation model releases enough energy to account for a healthy explosion, and does not leave carbon, oxygen, and intermediate-mass elements in central parts of a white dwarf. This removes the key disagreement between simulations and observations, and makes a delayed detonation the mostly likely mechanism for type Ia supernovae.

  15. Hydrogen and helium traces in type Ib-c supernovae

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Elmhamdi; I. J. Danziger; D. Branch; B. Leibundgut; E. Baron; R. P. Kirshner

    2006-04-04

    The spectroscopic properties of a selected optical photospheric spectra of core collapse supernovae (CCSNe) are investigated.Special attention is devoted to traces of hydrogen at early phases. The generated spectra are found to match the observed ones reasonably well, including a list of only 23 candidate ions. Guided by SN Ib 1990I, the observed trough near 6300\\AA is attributed to H$\\alpha$ in almost all Type Ib events, although in some objects it becomes too weak to be discernible, especially at later phases. Alternative line identifications are discussed. Differences in the way hydrogen manifests its presence within CCSNe are highlighted. In Type Ib SNe, the H$\\alpha$ contrast velocity (i.e. line velocity minus the photospheric velocity) seems to increase with time at early epochs, reaching values as high as 8000 km s$^{-1}$ around 15-20 days after maximum and then remains almost constant. The derived photospheric velocities, indicate a lower velocity for Type II SNe 1987A and 1999em as compared to SN Ic 1994I and SN IIb 1993J, while Type Ib events display a somewhat larger variation. The scatter, around day 20, is measured to be $\\sim$5000 km s$^{-1}$. Following two simple approaches, rough estimates of ejecta and hydrogen masses are given. A mass of hydrogen of approximately 0.02 $M_\\odot$ is obtained for SN 1990I, while SNe 1983N and 2000H ejected $\\sim$0.008 $M_\\odot$ and $\\sim$0.08 $M_\\odot$ of hydrogen, respectively. SN 1993J has a higher hydrogen mass, $\\sim 0.7$ $M_\\odot$ with a large uncertainty. A low mass and thin hydrogen layer with very high ejection velocities above the helium shell, is thus the most likely scenario for Type Ib SNe. Some interesting and curious issues relating to oxygen lines suggest future investigations.

  16. CONSTRAINING PHYSICAL PROPERTIES OF TYPE IIn SUPERNOVAE THROUGH RISE TIMES AND PEAK LUMINOSITIES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moriya, Takashi J.; Maeda, Keiichi

    2014-08-01

    We investigate the diversity in the wind density, supernova ejecta energy, and ejecta mass in Type IIn supernovae based on their rise times and peak luminosities. We show that the wind density and supernova ejecta properties can be estimated independently if both the rise time and peak luminosity are observed. The peak luminosity is mostly determined by the supernova properties and the rise time can be used to estimate the wind density. We find that the ejecta energies of Type IIn supernovae need to vary by factors of 0.2-5 from the average if their ejecta masses are similar. The diversity in the observed rise times indicates that their wind densities vary by factors of 0.2-2 from the average. We show that Type IIn superluminous supernovae should have not only large wind density but also large ejecta energy and/or small ejecta mass to explain their large luminosities and the rise times at the same time. We also note that shock breakout does not necessarily occur in the wind even if it is optically thick, except for the case of superluminous supernovae, and we analyze the observational data both with and without assuming that the shock breakout occurs in the dense wind of Type IIn supernovae.

  17. Overview of the nearby supernova factory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aldering, Greg; Adam, Gilles; Antilogus, Pierre; Astier, Pierre; Bacon, Roland; Bongard, S.; Bonnaud, C.; Copin, Yannick; Hardin, D.; Howell, D. Andy; Lemmonnier, Jean-Pierre; Levy, J.-M.; Loken, S.; Nugent, Peter; Pain, Reynald; Pecontal, Arlette; Pecontal, Emmanuel; Perlmutter, Saul; Quimby, Robert; Schahmaneche, Kyan; Smadja, Gerard; Wood-Vasey, W. Michael

    2002-07-29

    The Nearby Supernova Factory (SNfactory) is an international experiment designed to lay the foundation for the next generation of cosmology experiments (such as CFHTLS, wP, SNAP and LSST) which will measure the expansion history of the Universe using Type Ia supernovae. The SNfactory will discover and obtain frequent lightcurve spectrophotometry covering 3200-10000 {angstrom} for roughly 300 Type Ia supernovae at the low-redshift end of the smooth Hubble flow. The quantity, quality, breadth of galactic environments, and homogeneous nature of the SNfactory dataset will make it the premier source of calibration for the Type Ia supernova width-brightness relation and the intrinsic supernova colors used for K-correction and correction for extinction by host-galaxy dust. This dataset will also allow an extensive investigation of additional parameters which possibly influence the quality of Type Ia supernovae as cosmological probes. The SNfactory search capabilities and follow-up instrumentation include wide-field CCD imagers on two 1.2-m telescopes (via collaboration with the Near Earth Asteroid Tracking team at JPL and the QUEST team at Yale), and a two-channel integral-field-unit optical spectrograph/imager being fabricated for the University of Hawaii 2.2-m telescope. In addition to ground-based follow-up, UV spectra for a subsample of these supernovae will be obtained with HST. The pipeline to obtain, transfer via wireless and standard internet, and automatically process the search images is in operation. Software and hardware development is now underway to enable the execution of follow-up spectroscopy of supernova candidates at the Hawaii 2.2-m telescope via automated remote control of the telescope and the IFU spectrograph/imager.

  18. A LUMINOUS AND FAST-EXPANDING TYPE Ib SUPERNOVA SN 2012au

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Takaki, Katsutoshi; Fukazawa, Yasushi; Itoh, Ryosuke; Ueno, Issei; Ui, Takahiro; Urano, Takeshi [Department of Physical Science, Hiroshima University, 1-3-1 Kagamiyama, Higashi-Hiroshima, Hiroshima 739-8526 (Japan); Kawabata, Koji S.; Akitaya, Hiroshi; Moritani, Yuki; Ohsugi, Takashi; Uemura, Makoto; Yoshida, Michitoshi [Hiroshima Astrophysical Science Center, Hiroshima University, 1-3-1 Kagamiyama, Higashi-Hiroshima, Hiroshima 739-8526 (Japan); Yamanaka, Masayuki [Kwasan Observatory, Kyoto University, Ohmine-cho Kita Kazan, Yamashina-ku, Kyoto 607-8471 (Japan); Maeda, Keiichi; Nomoto, Ken'ichi [Kavli Institute for the Physics and Mathematics of the Universe (WPI), Todai Institutes for Advanced Study, The University of Tokyo, 5-1-5 Kashiwanoha, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8583 (Japan); Tanaka, Masaomi [National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, 2-21-1 Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan); Kinugasa, Kenzo [Nobeyama Radio Observatory, National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, 462-2 Nobeyama, Minamimaki, Nagano 384-1305 (Japan); Sasada, Mahito, E-mail: takaki@hep01.hepl.hiroshima-u.ac.jp [Department of Astronomy, Kyoto University, Kitashirakawa-Oiwake-cho, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan)

    2013-08-01

    We present a set of photometric and spectroscopic observations of a bright Type Ib supernova SN 2012au from -6 days until {approx} + 150 days after maximum. The shape of its early R-band light curve is similar to that of an average Type Ib/c supernova. The peak absolute magnitude is M{sub R} = -18.7 {+-} 0.2 mag, which suggests that this supernova belongs to a very luminous group among Type Ib supernovae. The line velocity of He I {lambda}5876 is about 15,000 km s{sup -1} around maximum, which is much faster than that in a typical Type Ib supernova. From the quasi-bolometric peak luminosity of (6.7 {+-} 1.3) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 42} erg s{sup -1}, we estimate the {sup 56}Ni mass produced during the explosion as {approx}0.30 M{sub Sun }. We also give a rough constraint to the ejecta mass 5-7 M{sub Sun} and the kinetic energy (7-18) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 51} erg. We find a weak correlation between the peak absolute magnitude and He I velocity among Type Ib SNe. The similarities to SN 1998bw in the density structure inferred from the light-curve model as well as the large peak bolometric luminosity suggest that SN 2012au had properties similar to energetic Type Ic supernovae.

  19. CONDENSATION IN EJECTA FROM DENSE THERMONUCLEAR SUPERNOVAE. T. Yu1, B. S. Meyer1, A. V. Fedkin2, and L. Grossman2,3, 1Department of Physics and Astronomy, Clemson University, Clemson, SC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CONDENSATION IN EJECTA FROM DENSE THERMONUCLEAR SUPERNOVAE. T. Yu1, B. S. Meyer1, A. V. Fedkin2 Thermonuclear Supernova Model: Thermonuclear (Type Ia) supernovae are explosions of white dwarf stars. Our model and then oxy- gen burning proceed under degenerate conditions, a thermonuclear runaway occurs, which leads

  20. Supernovae as cosmological probes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nielsen, Jeppe Trost

    2015-01-01

    The cosmological standard model at present is widely accepted as containing mainly things we do not understand. In particular the appearance of a Cosmological Constant, or dark energy, is puzzling. This was first inferred from the Hubble diagram of a low number of Type Ia supernovae, and later corroborated by complementary cosmological probes. Today, a much larger collection of supernovae is available, and here I perform a rigorous statistical analysis of this dataset. Taking into account how the supernovae are calibrated to be standard candles, we run into some subtleties in the analysis. To our surprise, this new dataset - about an order of bigger than the size of the original dataset - shows, under standard assumptions, only mild evidence of an accelerated universe.

  1. Searching for Hydrogen in Type Ib Supernovae, and for Helium and Hydrogen in Type Ic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    David Branch

    2002-07-09

    Identifying the progenitors of Type Ib and Type Ic supernovae requires knowing, among other things, whether SNe Ib eject hydrogen, and whether SNe Ic eject helium, and perhaps even hydrogen. Recently it has become clear that some SNe Ib do eject hydrogen, and it may be that all SNe Ib do. Two arguments that have been made in the past that SNe Ic eject helium are difficult to confirm, but I discuss other possible evidence that SNe Ic eject helium, as well as hydrogen. If so, these elements extend to lower ejection velocities than in SNe Ib. The spectroscopic differences between SNe Ib and SNe Ic may depend on the radial distributions of the helium and hydrogen as well as on the ejected masses of helium and hydrogen. We should consider the possibility that SNe Ic are more mixed up.

  2. Nearby Supernova Factory Observations of SN 2005gj: Another Type Ia Supernova in a Massive Circumstellar Envelope

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2006-01-01

    scenarios both involve the thermonuclear disruption of whitelead to new channels for thermonuclear SNe. For example,thermonuclear SNe inside a dense

  3. Low Mach Number Modeling of Type Ia Supernovae. II. Energy Evolution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Almgren, Ann S.; Bell, John B.; Rendleman, Charles A.; Zingale, Mike

    2006-01-01

    Thermonuclear Flashes at the University of Chicago. Some calculations made use of resources of the National Energy

  4. Spectral Observations and Analyses of Low-Redshift Type Ia Supernovae

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Silverman, Jeffrey Michael

    2011-01-01

    1.1.2 Photometry . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1.1.3and Data Reduction 5.2.1 Photometry . . . . . . . . 5.2.2Early-time BVRI photometry of SN 2009dc . . . . Late-time

  5. High-Redshift Type Ia Supernova Rates in Galaxy Cluster and Field Environments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barbary, Kyle Harris

    2011-01-01

    SCP06F6 3.1 Photometry . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3.2Detection and Photometry . . . . . . . . . . 5.4.3 Galaxyfor galaxy detection and photometry Bright cutoff magnitudes

  6. Turbulence-Flame Interactions in Type Ia Supernovae A. J. Aspden1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bell, John B.

    . INTRODUCTION The complex small-scale dynamics of turbulent thermonuclear flames are essential to understanding

  7. Direct Numerical Simulations of Type Ia Supernovae Flames II: The Rayleigh-Taylor Instability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bell, John B.

    Accelerating a thermonuclear flame to a large fraction of the speed of sound (possibly supersonic) is one

  8. Type Ia supernova rate measurements to redshift 2.5 from CANDELS...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Affiliations Department of Physics and Astronomy, The Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States) Space Telescope Science Institute, Baltimore, MD 21218...

  9. Color dispersion and Milky-Way-like reddening among type Ia supernovae...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    of Physics and Astronomy, Johns Hopkins University, 3400 North Charles Street, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States) Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden...

  10. Turbulent Oxygen Flames in Type Ia Supernovae A. J. Aspden1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bell, John B.

    distance behind the carbon flame. However, for Da16 > 1, turbulence enhances heat transfer and drives layer, which we shall refer to as an oxygen "flame", is broadened and islands of nearly isothermal

  11. VARIABLE SODIUM ABSORPTION IN A LOW-EXTINCTION TYPE Ia SUPERNOVA...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    a total column density increase of approx2.5 x 10sup 12 cmsup -2. The data limit the typical timescale for the variability to be more than 2 days but less than 10...

  12. SEARCH FOR TYPE Ia SUPERNOVAE AT REDSHIFT z 0:1 WITH EROS2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    ignites the carbon thermonuclear fusion, which leads to the explosive disruption of the white dwarf. This model involving the thermonuclear burning of a Chandrasekhar-mass white dwarf explains that the total

  13. Spectral Observations and Analyses of Low-Redshift Type Ia Supernovae

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Silverman, Jeffrey Michael

    2011-01-01

    nuclear fusion during the life of a star are released onlystar becomes predominantly made of iron. Since iron fusionfusion. This results in the WD undergoing a runaway thermonuclear explosion which unbinds the star

  14. CfA4: LIGHT CURVES FOR 94 TYPE Ia SUPERNOVAE (Journal Article) | SciTech

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfate Reducing Bacteria (TechnicalTransmission,Textit ChandraSciTech Connect

  15. Color dispersion and Milky-Way-like reddening among type Ia supernovae

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfate Reducing BacteriaConnect Collider Tests of the Little Higgs Model CitationeVReport)

  16. A SEARCH FOR NEW CANDIDATE SUPER-CHANDRASEKHAR-MASS TYPE Ia SUPERNOVAE IN

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield MunicipalTechnicalInformation4563 LLNL(Technical Report) | SciTechMeasurements(Journal Article)

  17. A STUDY OF CARBON FEATURES IN TYPE Ia SUPERNOVA SPECTRA (Journal Article) |

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield MunicipalTechnicalInformation4563 LLNL(Technical Report) | SciTechMeasurements(Journal

  18. IMPROVED DARK ENERGY CONSTRAINTS FROM {approx}100 NEW CfA SUPERNOVA TYPE Ia

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfate Reducing(Journal Article)lasers(Journal Article) |

  19. Improved Dark Energy Constraints From ~ 100 New CfA Supernova Type Ia Light

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfate Reducing(Journal Article)lasers(Journal Article)Curves (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect

  20. Improved Distances to Type Ia Supernovae withMulticolor Light Curve Shapes:

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfate Reducing(Journal Article)lasers(Journal Article)Curves (Journal Article) | SciTech

  1. Improved Distances to Type Ia Supernovae withMulticolor Light Curve Shapes:

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfate Reducing(Journal Article)lasers(Journal Article)Curves (Journal Article) | SciTechMLCS2k2

  2. Flames in Type Ia Supernova: Deflagration-Detonation Transition in the

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfate Reducing(Journal Article) |production atmeasurement forces.comparison withcross-sections.Oxygen

  3. HIGH-VELOCITY LINE FORMING REGIONS IN THE TYPE Ia SUPERNOVA 2009ig (Journal

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfate Reducing(Journal Article)lasers (Journal Article) |different scalesTHE FIRST 1100EXTRUDED

  4. HUBBLE RESIDUALS OF NEARBY TYPE Ia SUPERNOVAE ARE CORRELATED WITH HOST

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfate Reducing(Journal Article)lasers (Journal Article) |different scalesTHEScale (Technical Report)

  5. NEAR-ULTRAVIOLET PROPERTIES OF A LARGE SAMPLE OF TYPE Ia SUPERNOVAE AS

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfate Reducing(JournalspectroscopyReport)Fermentativea(Patent) |center (JournalNDMAS

  6. New approaches for modeling type Ia supernovae (Conference) | SciTech

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfateSciTech Connect Nanomechanical switch for| SciTechPhase in

  7. New approaches for modeling type Ia supernovae (Conference) | SciTech

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfateSciTech Connect Nanomechanical switch for| SciTechPhase inConnect Conference: New

  8. Sweetspot: Near-infrared observations of 13 type Ia supernovae from a new

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfateSciTechtail. (Conference)Feedback System inStatusandArticle) | SciTech(Technical Report) |NOAO

  9. THE ABSOLUTE MAGNITUDES OF TYPE Ia SUPERNOVAE IN THE ULTRAVIOLET (Journal

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfateSciTechtail. (Conference)Feedback SystemGimbaled X-Ray Head (Journal Article) | SciTechTHE

  10. Type Ia Supernova Hubble Residuals and Host-Galaxy Properties (Journal

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfateSciTechtail.Theory of rare Kaon and(Conference) | SciTech(2D-CARS): simultaneousArticle)to

  11. Type Ia supernova rate measurements to redshift 2.5 from CANDELS: Searching

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfateSciTechtail.Theory of rare Kaon and(Conference) | SciTech(2D-CARS): simultaneousArticle)tofor

  12. Type Ia supernovae from merging white dwarfs. II. Post-merger detonations

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfateSciTechtail.Theory of rare Kaon and(Conference) | SciTech(2D-CARS):

  13. VARIABLE SODIUM ABSORPTION IN A LOW-EXTINCTION TYPE Ia SUPERNOVA (Journal

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfateSciTechtail.Theory of rare Kaonfor Direct Measurement of2012: GenomicsofArticle) | SciTech

  14. Type Ia Supernova Hubble Residuals and Host-Galaxy Properties (Journal

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effectWorking With WIPP UPDATE: April 15, 2014Twodimensional timeKurt's

  15. Improved Dark Energy Constraints From ~ 100 New CfA Supernova Type Ia Light

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would likeUniverseIMPACT EVALUATION PLAN FOR THE SITE-218 58 84 168 167 164Curves (Journal

  16. Hubble space telescope and ground-based observations of the type Iax supernovae SN 2005hk and SN 2008A

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McCully, Curtis; Jha, Saurabh W. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Rutgers, the State University of New Jersey, 136 Frelinghuysen Road, Piscataway, NJ 08854 (United States); Foley, Ryan J. [Astronomy Department, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 1002 West Green Street, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States); Chornock, Ryan [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Holtzman, Jon A. [Department of Astronomy, MSC 4500, New Mexico State University, P.O. Box 30001, Las Cruces, NM 88003 (United States); Balam, David D. [Dominion Astrophysical Observatory, Herzberg Institute of Astrophysics, 5071 West Saanich Road, Victoria, BC V9E 2E7 (Canada); Branch, David [Homer L. Dodge Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Oklahoma, Norman, OK 73019 (United States); Filippenko, Alexei V.; Ganeshalingam, Mohan; Li, Weidong [Department of Astronomy, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720-3411 (United States); Frieman, Joshua [Kavli Institute for Cosmological Physics and Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of Chicago, 5640 South Ellis Avenue, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States); Fynbo, Johan; Leloudas, Giorgos [Dark Cosmology Centre, Niels Bohr Institute, University of Copenhagen, Juliane Maries Vej 30, DK-2100 Copenhagen Ø (Denmark); Galbany, Lluis [Institut de Física d'Altes Energies, Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, E-08193 Bellaterra (Barcelona) (Spain); Garnavich, Peter M. [Department of Physics, University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, IN 46556 (United States); Graham, Melissa L. [Las Cumbres Observatory Global Telescope Network, Goleta, CA 93117 (United States); Hsiao, Eric Y. [Carnegie Observatories, Las Campanas Observatory, Colina El Pino, Casilla 601 (Chile); Leonard, Douglas C., E-mail: cmccully@physics.rutgers.edu [Department of Astronomy, San Diego State University, San Diego, CA 92182 (United States); and others

    2014-05-10

    We present Hubble Space Telescope (HST) and ground-based optical and near-infrared observations of SN 2005hk and SN 2008A, typical members of the Type Iax class of supernovae (SNe). Here we focus on late-time observations, where these objects deviate most dramatically from all other SN types. Instead of the dominant nebular emission lines that are observed in other SNe at late phases, spectra of SNe 2005hk and 2008A show lines of Fe II, Ca II, and Fe I more than a year past maximum light, along with narrow [Fe II] and [Ca II] emission. We use spectral features to constrain the temperature and density of the ejecta, and find high densities at late times, with n{sub e} ? 10{sup 9} cm{sup –3}. Such high densities should yield enhanced cooling of the ejecta, making these objects good candidates to observe the expected 'infrared catastrophe', a generic feature of SN Ia models. However, our HST photometry of SN 2008A does not match the predictions of an infrared catastrophe. Moreover, our HST observations rule out a 'complete deflagration' that fully disrupts the white dwarf for these peculiar SNe, showing no evidence for unburned material at late times. Deflagration explosion models that leave behind a bound remnant can match some of the observed properties of SNe Iax, but no published model is consistent with all of our observations of SNe 2005hk and 2008A.

  17. Supernova 2010as: the lowest-velocity member of a family of flat-velocity type IIb supernovae

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Folatelli, Gastón; Bersten, Melina C.; Nomoto, Ken'ichi [Kavli Institute for the Physics and Mathematics of the Universe (WPI), The University of Tokyo, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8583 (Japan); Kuncarayakti, Hanindyo; Hamuy, Mario [Departamento de Astronomía, Universidad de Chile, Casilla 36-D, Santiago (Chile); Olivares Estay, Felipe; Pignata, Giuliano [Departamento de Ciencias Fisicas, Universidad Andres Bello, Avda. Republica 252, Santiago (Chile); Anderson, Joseph P. [European Southern Observatory, Alonso de Cordova 3107, Vitacura, Santiago (Chile); Holmbo, Simon; Stritzinger, Maximilian [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Aarhus University, Ny Munkegade 120, DK-8000 Aarhus C (Denmark); Maeda, Keiichi [Department of Astronomy, Kyoto University, Kitashirakawa-Oiwake-cho, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan); Morrell, Nidia; Contreras, Carlos; Phillips, Mark M. [Las Campanas Observatory, Carnegie Observatories, Casilla 601, La Serena (Chile); Förster, Francisco [Center for Mathematical Modelling, Universidad de Chile, Avenida Blanco Encalada 2120 Piso 7, Santiago (Chile); Prieto, José Luis [Department of Astrophysical Sciences, Princeton University, 4 Ivy Lane, Peyton Hall, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States); Valenti, Stefano [Las Cumbres Observatory Global Telescope Network, 6740 Cortona Drive, Suite 102, Goleta, CA 93117 (United States); Afonso, Paulo; Altenmüller, Konrad; Elliott, Jonny, E-mail: gaston.folatelli@ipmu.jp [Max-Planck-Institut für extraterrestrische Physik, Giessenbachstraße 1, D-85740 Garching (Germany); and others

    2014-09-01

    We present extensive optical and near-infrared photometric and spectroscopic observations of the stripped-envelope supernova SN 2010as. Spectroscopic peculiarities such as initially weak helium features and low expansion velocities with a nearly flat evolution place this object in the small family of events previously identified as transitional Type Ib/c supernovae (SNe). There is ubiquitous evidence of hydrogen, albeit weak, in this family of SNe, indicating that they are in fact a peculiar kind of Type IIb SNe that we name 'flat-velocity' Type IIb. The flat-velocity evolution—which occurs at different levels between 6000 and 8000 km s{sup –1} for different SNe—suggests the presence of a dense shell in the ejecta. Despite the spectroscopic similarities, these objects show surprisingly diverse luminosities. We discuss the possible physical or geometrical unification picture for such diversity. Using archival Hubble Space Telescope images, we associate SN 2010as with a massive cluster and derive a progenitor age of ?6 Myr, assuming a single star-formation burst, which is compatible with a Wolf-Rayet progenitor. Our hydrodynamical modeling, on the contrary, indicates that the pre-explosion mass was relatively low, ?4 M {sub ?}. The seeming contradiction between a young age and low pre-SN mass may be solved by a massive interacting binary progenitor.

  18. H{sub ?} SPECTRAL DIVERSITY OF TYPE II SUPERNOVAE: CORRELATIONS WITH PHOTOMETRIC PROPERTIES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gutiérrez, Claudia P.; Hamuy, Mario; González-Gaitán, Santiago [Millennium Institute of Astrophysics, Casilla 36-D, Santiago (Chile); Anderson, Joseph P. [Departamento de Astronomía, Universidad de Chile, Casilla 36-D, Santiago (Chile); Folatelli, Gastón [Institute for the Physics and Mathematics of the Universe (IPMU), University of Tokyo, 5-1-5 Kashiwanoha, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8583 (Japan); Morrell, Nidia I.; Phillips, Mark M.; Thomas-Osip, Joanna [Carnegie Observatories, Las Campanas Observatory, Casilla 601, La Serena (Chile); Stritzinger, Maximilian D. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Aarhus University, Ny Munkegade 120, DK-8000 Aarhus C (Denmark); McCarthy, Patrick [Observatories of the Carnegie Institution for Science, Pasadena, CA 91101 (United States); Suntzeff, Nicholas B., E-mail: cgutierr@das.uchile.cl [George P. and Cynthia Woods Mitchell Institute for Fundamental Physics and Astronomy, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Texas A and M University, College Station, TX 77843 (United States)

    2014-05-10

    We present a spectroscopic analysis of the H{sub ?} profiles of hydrogen-rich Type II supernovae. A total of 52 Type II supernovae having well-sampled optical light curves and spectral sequences were analyzed. Concentrating on the H{sub ?} P-Cygni profile we measure its velocity from the FWHM of the emission and the ratio of absorption to emission (a/e) at a common epoch at the start of the recombination phase, and search for correlations between these spectral parameters and photometric properties of the V-band light curves. Testing the strength of various correlations we find that a/e appears to be the dominant spectral parameter in terms of describing the diversity in our measured supernova properties. It is found that supernovae with smaller a/e have higher H{sub ?} velocities, more rapidly declining light curves from maximum during the plateau and radioactive tail phase, are brighter at maximum light, and have shorter optically thick phase durations. We discuss possible explanations of these results in terms of physical properties of Type II supernovae, speculating that the most likely parameters that influence the morphologies of H{sub ?} profiles are the mass and density profile of the hydrogen envelope, together with additional emission components due to circumstellar interaction.

  19. Evidence for Microvariability in the Optical Light Curve of the Type Ia SN 2014J

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bonanos, A Z

    2015-01-01

    We present results of high-cadence monitoring of the optical light curve of the nearby, Type Ia SN 2014J in M82 using the 2.3m Aristarchos telescope. $B$ and $V$-band photometry on days 15-18 after $t_{max}(B)$, obtained with a cadence of 2 min per band, reveals evidence for variability at the 0.02-0.05 mag level on timescales of 15-60 min on all four nights. The decline slope was measured to be steeper in the $B$-band than in $V$-band, and to steadily decrease in both bands from 0.15 mag/day (night 1) to 0.04 mag/day (night 4) in V and from 0.19 mag/day (night 1) to 0.06 mag/day (night 4) in B, corresponding to the onset of the secondary maximum. We propose that microvariability could be due to one or a combination of the following scenarios: the clumpiness of the ejecta, their interaction with circumstellar material, the asymmetry of the explosion, or the mechanism causing the secondary maximum in the near-infrared light curve. We encourage the community to undertake high-cadence monitoring of future, nearb...

  20. Oxygen emission in remnants of thermonuclear supernovae as a probe for their progenitor system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kosenko, D; Kromer, M; Blinnikov, S I; Pakmor, R; Kaastra, J S

    2014-01-01

    Recent progress in numerical simulations of thermonuclear supernova explosions brings up a unique opportunity in studying the progenitors of Type Ia supernovae. Coupling state-of-the-art explosion models with detailed hydrodynamical simulations of the supernova remnant evolution and the most up-to-date atomic data for X-ray emission calculations makes it possible to create realistic synthetic X-ray spectra for the supernova remnant phase. Comparing such spectra with high quality observations of supernova remnants could allow to constrain the explosion mechanism and the progenitor of the supernova. The present study focuses in particular on the oxygen emission line properties in young supernova remnants, since different explosion scenarios predict a different amount and distribution of this element. Analysis of the soft X-ray spectra from supernova remnants in the Large Magellanic Cloud and confrontation with remnant models for different explosion scenarios suggests that SNR 0509-67.5 could originate from a de...

  1. Host galaxy spectra and consequences for supernova typing from the SDSS SN survey

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Olmstead, Matthew D.; Brown, Peter J.; Brownstein, Joel R.; Dawson, Kyle S. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT 84112 (United States); Sako, Masao; Gupta, Ravi R. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Pennsylvania, 209 South 33rd Street, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); Bassett, Bruce; Kunz, Martin [African Institute for Mathematical Sciences, 6 Melrose Road, Muizenberg, 7945 (South Africa); Bizyaev, Dmitry; Brinkmann, J.; Brewington, Howard; Ebelke, Garrett L. [Apache Point Observatory, P.O. Box 59, Sunspot, NM 88349 (United States); Campbell, Heather [Institute of Astronomy, Madingley Road, Cambridge CB4 0HA (United Kingdom); D'Andrea, Chris B.; Lampeitl, Hubert [Institute of Cosmology and Gravitation, Dennis Sciama Building, University of Portsmouth, Portsmouth, PO1 3FX (United Kingdom); Frieman, Joshua A. [Center for Particle Astrophysics, Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, P.O. Box 500, Batavia, IL 60510 (United States); Galbany, Lluís [Institut de Física d'Altes Energies, Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, E-08193 Bellaterra (Barcelona) (Spain); Garnavich, Peter [Department of Physics, University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, IN 46556 (United States); Hlozek, Renee [Department of Astrophysics, Peyton Hall, 4 Ivy Lane, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States); Jha, Saurabh W., E-mail: olmstead@physics.utah.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Rutgers, the State University of New Jersey, 136 Frelinghuysen Road, Piscataway, NJ 08854 (United States); and others

    2014-04-01

    We present the spectroscopy from 5254 galaxies that hosted supernovae (SNe) or other transient events in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey II (SDSS-II). Obtained during SDSS-I, SDSS-II, and the Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey, this sample represents the largest systematic, unbiased, magnitude limited spectroscopic survey of SN host galaxies. Using the host galaxy redshifts, we test the impact of photometric SN classification based on SDSS imaging data with and without using spectroscopic redshifts of the host galaxies. Following our suggested scheme, there are a total of 1166 photometrically classified SNe Ia when using a flat redshift prior and 1126 SNe Ia when the host spectroscopic redshift is assumed. For 1024 (87.8%) candidates classified as likely SNe Ia without redshift information, we find that the classification is unchanged when adding the host galaxy redshift. Using photometry from SDSS imaging data and the host galaxy spectra, we also report host galaxy properties for use in future analysis of SN astrophysics. Finally, we investigate the differences in the interpretation of the light curve properties with and without knowledge of the redshift. Without host galaxy redshifts, we find that SALT2 light curve fits are systematically biased toward lower photometric redshift estimates and redder colors in the limit of low signal-to-noise data. The general improvements in performance of the light curve fitter and the increased diversity of the host galaxy sample highlights the importance of host galaxy spectroscopy for current photometric SN surveys such as the Dark Energy Survey and future surveys such as the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope.

  2. Characterizing the V-band light-curves of hydrogen-rich type II supernovae

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anderson, Joseph P.; González-Gaitán, Santiago; Hamuy, Mario; Gutiérrez, Claudia P.; Antezana, Roberto; De Jaeger, Thomas; Förster, Francisco; González, Luis [Departamento de Astronomía, Universidad de Chile, Casilla 36-D, Santiago (Chile); Stritzinger, Maximilian D.; Contreras, Carlos [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Aarhus University, Ny Munkegade 120, DK-8000 Aarhus C (Denmark); Olivares E, Felipe [Departamento de Ciencias Fisicas, Universidad Andres Bello, Avda. Republica 252, Santiago (Chile); Phillips, Mark M.; Campillay, Abdo; Castellón, Sergio; Hsiao, Eric [Carnegie Observatories, Las Campanas Observatory, Casilla 601, La Serena (Chile); Schulze, Steve [Instituto de Astrofísica, Facultad de Física, Pontifícia Universidad Católica de Chile, Casilla 306, Santiago 22 (Chile); Bolt, Luis [Argelander Institut für Astronomie, Universität Bonn, Auf dem Hügel 71, D-53111 Bonn (Germany); Folatelli, Gastón [Institute for the Physics and Mathematics of the Universe (IPMU), University of Tokyo, 5-1-5 Kashiwanoha, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8583 (Japan); Freedman, Wendy L. [Observatories of the Carnegie Institution for Science, Pasadena, CA 91101 (United States); Krzemi?ski, Wojtek, E-mail: janderso@eso.org [N. Copernicus Astronomical Center, ul. Bartycka 18, 00-716 Warszawa (Poland); and others

    2014-05-01

    We present an analysis of the diversity of V-band light-curves of hydrogen-rich type II supernovae. Analyzing a sample of 116 supernovae, several magnitude measurements are defined, together with decline rates at different epochs, and time durations of different phases. It is found that magnitudes measured at maximum light correlate more strongly with decline rates than those measured at other epochs: brighter supernovae at maximum generally have faster declining light-curves at all epochs. We find a relation between the decline rate during the 'plateau' phase and peak magnitudes, which has a dispersion of 0.56 mag, offering the prospect of using type II supernovae as purely photometric distance indicators. Our analysis suggests that the type II population spans a continuum from low-luminosity events which have flat light-curves during the 'plateau' stage, through to the brightest events which decline much faster. A large range in optically thick phase durations is observed, implying a range in progenitor envelope masses at the epoch of explosion. During the radioactive tails, we find many supernovae with faster declining light-curves than expected from full trapping of radioactive emission, implying low mass ejecta. It is suggested that the main driver of light-curve diversity is the extent of hydrogen envelopes retained before explosion. Finally, a new classification scheme is introduced where hydrogen-rich events are typed as simply 'SN II' with an 's {sub 2}' value giving the decline rate during the 'plateau' phase, indicating its morphological type.

  3. Towards a Cosmological Hubble Diagram for Type II-P Supernovae

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2006-01-01

    Supernova 1987A and other supernovae, ed. I. J. Danziger &I.A.U. Colloquium 192: Supernovae (10 years of SN1993J), ed.A. V. 2005, in 1604-2004: Supernovae as Cosmological Light-

  4. Verifying the use of supernovae as probes of the cosmic expansion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ellis, R; Ellis, Richard; Sullivan, Mark

    2000-01-01

    We present preliminary results of a follow-up survey which aims to characterise in detail those galaxies which hosted Type Ia supernovae found by the Supernova Cosmology Project (SCP). Our survey has two components: Hubble Space Telescope imaging with STIS and Keck spectroscopy with ESI, the goal being to classify each host galaxy into one of three broad morphological/spectral classes and hence to investigate the dependence of supernovae properties on host galaxy type over a large range in redshift. Of particular interest is the supernova Hubble diagram characterised by host galaxy class which suggests that most of the scatter arises from those occurring in late-type irregulars. Supernovae hosted by (presumed dust-free) E/S0 galaxies closely follow the adopted SCP cosmological model. Although larger datasets are required, we cannot yet find any significant difference in the light curves of distant supernovae hosted in different galaxy types.

  5. Thermonuclear supernova explosions and their remnants: the case of Tycho

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carles Badenes; Eduardo Bravo; Kazimierz J. Borkowski

    2003-09-03

    We propose to use the thermal X-ray emission from young supernova remnants (SNRs) originated in Type Ia supernovae (SNe) to extract relevant information concerning the explosion mechanism. We focus on the differences between numerical 1D and 3D explosion calculations, and the impact that these differences could have on young SNRs. We use the remnant of the Tycho supernova (SN 1572) as a test case to compare with our predictions, discussing the observational features that allow to accept or discard a given model.

  6. X-ray and radio emission from Type In supernova SN 2010jl

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chandra, Poonam; Chugai, Nikolai; Fransson, Claes; Soderberg, Alicia M

    2015-01-01

    We present all X-ray and radio observations of the Type IIn supernova SN 2010jl. The X-ray observations cover a period up to day 1500 with Chandra, XMM-Newton, NuSTAR and Swift-XRT. The Chandra observations after 2012 June, the XMM-Newton observation in 2013 November, and most of the Swift-XRT observations until 2014 December are presented for the first time. All the spectra can be fitted by an absorbed hot thermal model except for \\chandra spectra on 2011 October and 2012 June when an additional component is needed. Although the origin of this component is uncertain, it is spatially coincident with the supernova and occurs when there are changes to the supernova spectrum in the energy range close to that of the extra component, indicating that the emission is related to the supernova. The X-ray light curve shows an initial plateau followed by a steep drop starting at day $\\sim 300$. We attribute the drop to a decrease in the circumstellar density. The column density to the X-ray emission drops rapidly with t...

  7. Can Light Echoes Account for the Slow Decay of Type IIn Supernovae?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. Roscherr; B. E. Schaefer

    1999-09-09

    The spectra of type IIn supernovae indicate the presence of apre-existing slow, dense circumstellar wind (CSW). If the CSW extends sufficiently far from the progenitor star, then dust formation should occur in the wind. The light from the supernova explosion will scatter off this dust and produce a light echo. Continuum emission seen after the peak will have contributions from both this echo as well as from the shock of the ejecta colliding with the CSW, with a fundamental question of which source dominates the continuum. We calculate the brightness of the light echo as a function of time for a range of dust shell geometries, and use our calculations to fit to the light curves of SN 1988Z and SN 1997ab, the two slowest declining IIn supernovae on record. We find that the light curves of both objects can be reproduced by the echo model. However, their rate of decay from peak, color at peak and their observed peak absolute magnitudes when considered together are inconsistent with the echo model. Furthermore, when the observed values of M$_{B}$ are corrected for the effects of dust scattering, the values obtained imply that these supernovae have unrealistically high luminosities. We conclude that light echoes cannot properly account for the slow decline seen in some IIn's, and that the shock interaction is likely to dominate the continuum emission.

  8. "Cosmologists have used these supernovae very pro-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Yi

    --the type II supernovae--presents theorists with another set of challenges. A type II supernova pops off

  9. ClassName MethodName FieldName(ParamsName)ClassType Period Mark Order Rank Comment ARS NewTypesNum NewTypes AllTypes AllTypesNum MCBINum minidraw.boardgame.BoardDrawing CLASS CL&IA 0 1 MICs 0 0 0 0

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abi-Antoun, Marwan

    Tips: ClassName MethodName FieldName(ParamsName)ClassType Period Mark Order Rank Comment ARS NewTypesNum NewTypes AllTypes AllTypesNum MCBINum minidraw.boardgame.BoardDrawing CLASS CL&IA 0 1 MICs 0 0 0 0 minidraw.standard.MiniDrawApplication CLASS CL&IA 0 2 MICs 0 0 0 0 minidraw.standard.SelectionTool CLASS CL

  10. SWIFT/BAT DETECTION OF HARD X-RAYS FROM TYCHO'S SUPERNOVA REMNANT: EVIDENCE FOR TITANIUM-44

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Troja, E.; Baumgartner, W.; Markwardt, C.; Barthelmy, S.; Gehrels, N. [NASA, Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Segreto, A.; La Parola, V.; Cusumano, G. [INAF—IASF Palermo, Via Ugo La Malfa, I-90146 Palermo (Italy); Hartmann, D., E-mail: eleonora.troja@nasa.gov [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Clemson University, Clemson, SC 29631-0978 (United States)

    2014-12-10

    We report Swift/Burst Alert Telescope survey observations of the Tycho's supernova remnant, performed over a period of 104 months since the mission's launch. The remnant is detected with high significance (>10?) below 50 keV. We detect significant hard X-ray emission in the 60-85 keV band, above the continuum level predicted by a simple synchrotron model. The location of the observed excess is consistent with line emission from radioactive titanium-44, so far reported only for Type II supernova explosions. We discuss the implications of these results in the context of the galactic supernova rate, and nucleosynthesis in Type Ia supernova.

  11. Radio observations reveal a smooth circumstellar environment around the extraordinary type Ib supernova 2012au

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kamble, Atish; Soderberg, Alicia M.; Margutti, Raffaella; Milisavljevic, Dan; Chakraborti, Sayan; Dittmann, Jason; Drout, Maria; Sanders, Nathan [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Chomiuk, Laura [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States); Medvedev, Mikhail [The Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Kansas, Lawrence, KS 66045 (United States); Chevalier, Roger [Department of Astronomy, University of Virginia, P.O. Box 400325, Charlottesville, VA 22904-4325 (United States); Chugai, Nikolai [Institute of Astronomy, Russian Academy of Sciences, Pyatnitskaya 48, 109017 Moscow (Russian Federation); Fransson, Claes [Department of Astronomy, The Oskar Klein Centre, Stockholm University, AlbaNova University Centre, SE-106 91 Stockholm (Sweden); Nakar, Ehud, E-mail: atish.vyas@gmail.com [Raymond and Beverly Sackler School of Physics and Astronomy, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv 69978 (Israel)

    2014-12-10

    We present extensive radio and X-ray observations of SN 2012au, an energetic, radio-luminous supernova of Type Ib that exhibits multi-wavelength properties bridging subsets of hydrogen-poor superluminous supernovae, hypernovae, and normal core-collapse supernovae. The observations closely follow models of synchrotron emission from a shock-heated circumburst medium that has a wind density profile (??r {sup –2}). We infer a sub-relativistic velocity for the shock wave v ? 0.2 c and a radius of r ? 1.4 × 10{sup 16}cm at 25 days after the estimated date of explosion. For a wind velocity of 1000 km s{sup –1}, we determine the mass-loss rate of the progenitor to be M-dot =3.6×10{sup ?6} M{sub ?} yr{sup ?1}, consistent with the estimates from X-ray observations. We estimate the total internal energy of the radio-emitting material to be E ? 10{sup 47} erg, which is intermediate to SN 1998bw and SN 2002ap. The evolution of the radio light curve of SN 2012au is in agreement with its interaction with a smoothly distributed circumburst medium and the absence of stellar shells ejected from previous outbursts out to r ? 10{sup 17} cm from the supernova site. We conclude that the bright radio emission from SN 2012au was not dissimilar from other core-collapse supernovae despite its extraordinary optical properties, and that the evolution of the SN 2012au progenitor star was relatively quiet, marked with a steady mass loss, during the final years preceding explosion.

  12. On the cosmic ray spectrum from type II Supernovae

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cardillo, Martina; Blasi, Pasquale

    2015-01-01

    One of the most important challenges for the largely accepted idea that Galactic CRs are accelerated in SNR shocks is the maximum energy at which particles can be accelerated. The resonant streaming instability, long invoked for magnetic field amplification at shocks, can not provide sufficiently high fields and efficient enough scattering so as to ensure particle acceleration up to the knee. Here we discuss the non-resonant version of this instability which, with its faster growth and larger value of the amplified field, increases the achievable maximum energy. Because of their higher explosion rate, we focus on type II SNe expanding in their red supergiant wind and we find that the transition between Ejecta Dominated (ED) and Sedov-Taylor (ST) phases takes place at very early times. In this environment, the accelerated particle spectrum shows no high energy exponential cut-off but a spectral break at the maximum energy (EM). Moreover, the maximum energy of protons can easily reach PeV energies. With this mo...

  13. The nearby supernova factory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wood-Vasey, W.M.; Aldering, G.; Lee, B.C.; Loken, S.; Nugent, P.; Perlmutter, S.; Siegrist, J.; Wang, L.; Antilogus, P.; Astier, P.; Hardin, D.; Pain, R.; Copin, Y.; Smadja, G.; Gangler, E.; Castera, A.; Adam, G.; Bacon, R.; Lemonnier, J.-P.; Pecontal, A.; Pecontal, E.; Kessler, R.

    2004-01-23

    The Nearby Supernova Factory (SNfactory) is an ambitious project to find and study in detail approximately 300 nearby Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) at redshifts 0.03 < z < 0.08. This program will provide an exceptional data set of well-studied SNe in the nearby smooth Hubble flow that can be used as calibration for the current and future programs designed to use SNe to measure the cosmological parameters. The first key ingredient for this program is a reliable supply of Hubble-flow SNe systematically discovered in unprecedented numbers using the same techniques as those used in distant SNe searches. In 2002, 35 SNe were found using our test-bed pipeline for automated SN search and discovery. The pipeline uses images from the asteroid search conducted by the Near Earth Asteroid Tracking group at JPL. Improvements in our subtraction techniques and analysis have allowed us to increase our effective SN discovery rate to {approx}12 SNe/month in 2003.

  14. Three gravitationally lensed supernovae behind clash galaxy clusters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Patel, Brandon; McCully, Curtis; Jha, Saurabh W.; Holoien, Thomas W.-S. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, Piscataway, NJ 08854 (United States); Rodney, Steven A.; Jones, David O.; Graur, Or; Riess, Adam G. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, The Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Merten, Julian [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, MS 169-327, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States); Zitrin, Adi [Cahill Center for Astronomy and Astrophysics, California Institute of Technology, MS 249-17, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Matheson, Thomas [National Optical Astronomy Observatory, 950 North Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85719 (United States); Sako, Masao [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); Postman, Marc; Coe, Dan; Bradley, Larry [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21208 (United States); Bartelmann, Matthias [Institut für Theoretische Astrophysik, Universität Heidelberg, Zentrum für Astronomie, Philosophenweg 12, D-69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Balestra, Italo [INAF-Osservatorio Astronomico di Trieste, Via G. B. Tiepolo 11, I-34131 Trieste (Italy); Benítez, Narciso [Instituto de Astrofísica de Andalucía (CSIC), Camino Bajo de Huétor 24, E-18008 Granada (Spain); Bouwens, Rychard [Leiden Observatory, Leiden University, NL-2300 RA Leiden (Netherlands); Broadhurst, Tom, E-mail: bpatel02@physics.rutgers.edu [Department of Theoretical Physics, University of the Basque Country, P.O. Box 644, E-48080 Bilbao (Spain); and others

    2014-05-01

    We report observations of three gravitationally lensed supernovae (SNe) in the Cluster Lensing And Supernova survey with Hubble (CLASH) Multi-Cycle Treasury program. These objects, SN CLO12Car (z = 1.28), SN CLN12Did (z = 0.85), and SN CLA11Tib (z = 1.14), are located behind three different clusters, MACSJ1720.2+3536 (z = 0.391), RXJ1532.9+3021 (z = 0.345), and A383 (z = 0.187), respectively. Each SN was detected in Hubble Space Telescope optical and infrared images. Based on photometric classification, we find that SNe CLO12Car and CLN12Did are likely to be Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia), while the classification of SN CLA11Tib is inconclusive. Using multi-color light-curve fits to determine a standardized SN Ia luminosity distance, we infer that SN CLO12Car was ?1.0 ± 0.2 mag brighter than field SNe Ia at a similar redshift and ascribe this to gravitational lens magnification. Similarly, SN CLN12Did is ?0.2 ± 0.2 mag brighter than field SNe Ia. We derive independent estimates of the predicted magnification from CLASH strong+weak-lensing maps of the clusters (in magnitude units, 2.5 log{sub 10}?): 0.83 ± 0.16 mag for SN CLO12Car, 0.28 ± 0.08 mag for SN CLN12Did, and 0.43 ± 0.11 mag for SN CLA11Tib. The two SNe Ia provide a new test of the cluster lens model predictions: we find that the magnifications based on the SN Ia brightness and those predicted by the lens maps are consistent. Our results herald the promise of future observations of samples of cluster-lensed SNe Ia (from the ground or space) to help illuminate the dark-matter distribution in clusters of galaxies, through the direct determination of absolute magnifications.

  15. Are Models for Core-Collapse Supernova Progenitors Consistent with the Properties of Supernova Remnants?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Patnaude, Daniel J; Slane, Patrick O; Badenes, Carles; Heger, Alexander; Ellison, Donald C; Nagataki, Shigehiro

    2015-01-01

    The recent discovery that the Fe-K line luminosities and energy centroids observed in nearby SNRs are a strong discriminant of both progenitor type and circumstellar environment has implications for our understanding of supernova progenitor evolution. Using models for the chemical composition of core-collapse supernova ejecta, we model the dynamics and thermal X-ray emission from shocked ejecta and circumstellar material, modeled as an $r^{-2}$ wind, to ages of 3000 years. We compare the X-ray spectra expected from these models to observations made with the Suzaku satellite. We also model the dynamics and X-ray emission from Type Ia progenitor models. We find a clear distinction in Fe-K line energy centroid between core-collapse and Type Ia models. The core-collapse supernova models predict higher Fe-K line centroid energies than the Type Ia models, in agreement with observations. We argue that the higher line centroids are a consequence of the increased densities found in the circumstellar environment create...

  16. Supernovae: Little bear's mass loss rate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Trimble, V; Trimble, V

    1985-01-01

    Williamson (Dalhousie Univ. ). Supernovae Little Bear’s massidentified and defined supernovae as a distinct astronomicalType II (hydrogen-rich) supernovae, on the other hand, end

  17. Predicting the amount of hydrogen stripped by the SN explosion for SN 2002cx-like SNe Ia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Zheng-Wei; Chen, X. F.; Wang, B.; Han, Z. W. [Yunnan Observatories, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Kunming 650011 (China); Kromer, M. [Max-Planck-Institut für Astrophysik, Karl-Schwarzschild-Str. 1, D-85741 Garching (Germany); Fink, M.; Röpke, F. K. [Institut für Theoretische Physik und Astrophysik, Universität Würzburg, Am Hubland, D-97074 Würzburg (Germany); Pakmor, R., E-mail: zwliu@ynao.ac.cn [Heidelberger Institut für Theoretische Studien, Schloss-Wolfsbrunnenweg 35, D-69118 Heidelberg (Germany)

    2013-12-01

    The most favored progenitor scenarios for Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) involve the single-degenerate (SD) scenario and the double-degenerate scenario. The absence of stripped hydrogen (H) in the nebular spectra of SNe Ia challenges the SD progenitor models. Recently, it was shown that pure deflagration explosion models of Chandrasekhar-mass white dwarfs, ignited off-center, reproduce the characteristic observational features of 2002cx-like SNe Ia very well. In this work we predict, for the first time, the amount of stripped H for the off-center, pure deflagration explosions. We find that their low kinetic energies lead to inefficient H mass stripping (? 0.01 M {sub ?}), indicating that the stripped H may be hidden in (observed) late-time spectra of SN 2002cx-like SNe Ia.

  18. PTF 12gzk—A rapidly declining, high-velocity type Ic radio supernova

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Horesh, Assaf; Kulkarni, Shrinivas R.; Corsi, Alessandra; Frail, Dale A.; Cenko, S. Bradley; Ben-Ami, Sagi; Gal-Yam, Avishay; Yaron, Ofer; Arcavi, Iair; Ofek, Eran O.; Kasliwal, Mansi M.

    2013-11-20

    Only a few cases of Type Ic supernovae (SNe) with high-velocity ejecta (?0.2 c) have been discovered and studied. Here, we present our analysis of radio and X-ray observations of the Type Ic SN PTF 12gzk. The radio emission declined less than 10 days after explosion, suggesting SN ejecta expanding at high velocity (?0.3 c). The radio data also indicate that the density of the circumstellar material (CSM) around the supernova is lower by a factor of ?10 than the CSM around normal Type Ic SNe. PTF 12gzk may therefore be an intermediate event between a 'normal' SN Ic and a gamma-ray-burst-SN-like event. Our observations of this rapidly declining radio SN at a distance of 58 Mpc demonstrates the potential to detect many additional radio SNe, given the new capabilities of the Very Large Array (improved sensitivity and dynamic scheduling), which are currently missed, leading to a biased view of radio SNe Ic. Early optical discovery followed by rapid radio observations would provide a full description of the ejecta velocity distribution and CSM densities around stripped massive star explosions as well as strong clues about the nature of their progenitor stars.

  19. Sloan Digital Sky Survey II (SDSS-II) Supernova Data

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    The Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) is a series of three interlocking imaging and spectroscopic surveys, carried out over an eight-year period with a dedicated 2.5m telescope located at Apache Point Observatory in Southern New Mexico. The SDSS Supernova Survey was one of those three components of SDSS and SDSS-II, a 3-year extension of the original SDSS that operated from July 2005 to July 2008. The Supernova Survey was a time-domain survey, involving repeat imaging of the same region of sky every other night, weather permitting. The primary scientific motivation was to detect and measure light curves for several hundred supernovae through repeat scans of the SDSS Southern equatorial stripe 82 (about 2.5? wide by ~120? long). Over the course of three 3-month campaigns SDSS-II SN discovered and measured multi-band lightcurves for ~500 spectroscopically confirmed Type Ia supernovae in the redshift range z=0.05-0.4. In addition, the project harvested a few hundred light curves for SNe Ia and discovered about 80 spectroscopically confirmed core-collapse supernovae (supernova types Ib/c and II).

  20. THE BIRTH RATE OF SNe Ia FROM HYBRID CONe WHITE DWARFS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meng, Xiangcun [Yunnan Observatories, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Kunming 650011 (China); Podsiadlowski, Philipp, E-mail: xiangcunmeng@ynao.ac.cn [Department of Astronomy, Oxford University, Oxford OX1 3RH (United Kingdom)

    2014-07-10

    Considering the uncertainties of the C-burning rate (CBR) and the treatment of convective boundaries, Chen et al. found that there is a regime where it is possible to form hybrid CONe white dwarfs (WDs), i.e., ONe WDs with carbon-rich cores. As these hybrid WDs can be as massive as 1.30 M {sub ?}, not much mass needs to be accreted for these objects to reach the Chandrasekhar limit and to explode as Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia). We have investigated their contribution to the overall SN Ia birth rate and found that such SNe Ia tend to be relatively young with typical time delays between 0.1 and 1 Gyr, where some may be as young as 30 Myr. SNe Ia from hybrid CONe WDs may contribute several percent to all SNe Ia, depending on the common-envelope ejection efficiency and the CBR. We suggest that these SNe Ia may produce part of the 2002cx-like SN Ia class.

  1. Extensive Spectroscopy and Photometry of the Type IIP Supernova 2013ej

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dhungana, G; Vinko, J; Silverman, J M; Wheeler, J C; Marion, G H; Zheng, W; Fox, O D; Akerlof, C; Biro, B I; Borkovits, T; Cenko, S B; Clubb, K I; Filippenko, A V; Ferrante, F V; Graham, M L; Hegedus, T; Kelly, P; Kelemen, J; Lee, W H; Marschalko, G; Molnár, L; Nagy, A P; Ordasi, A; Pal, A; Sarneczky, K; Shivvers, I; Szakats, R; Szalai, T; Szegedi-Elek, E; Székely, P; Szing, A; Takáts, K; Vida, K

    2015-01-01

    We present extensive optical (UBVRI, g'r'i'z', and open CCD) and near-infrared (ZYJH) photometry for the very nearby Type IIP supernova (SN) 2013ej extending from +1 to +215 days after shock breakout. Substantial time series ultraviolet and optical spectroscopic observations obtained from +8 to +135 days after the explosion are also presented. We use early optical photometry to determine the time of shock breakout to be MJD 56496.9+/-0.3. We calibrate unfiltered CCD observations to pseudo-bolometric UBVRI light curve data of Type IIP supernovae (SNe), obtaining 4% precision with a B-V color-dependent correction. Considering well-observed SNe from the literature, we derive a UBVRIJHK bolometric calibration from the UBVRI measurement to better than 2% precision. We observe moderately strong Si~II {\\lambda}6355 as early as 8 days after explosion. We model spectra in the vicinity of Fe~II {\\lambda}5169 whenever observed to determine the photospheric velocity, v{\\phi}, yielding 4500+/-500 km s^-1 50 days after exp...

  2. The Spectral SN-GRB Connection: Systematic Spectral Comparisons between Type Ic Supernovae, broad-lined Type Ic Supernovae with and without Gamma-Ray Bursts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Modjaz, Maryam; Bianco, Federica B; Graur, Or

    2015-01-01

    We present the first systematic investigation of spectral properties of 17 Type Ic Supernovae (SNe Ic), 10 broad-lined SNe Ic (SNe Ic-bl) without observed Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRBs) and 10 SNe Ic-bl with GRBs (SN-GRBs) as a function of time in order to probe their explosion conditions and progenitors. We analyze a total of 396 spectra, which were drawn from published spectra of individual SNe as well as from the densely time-sampled spectra data of Modjaz et al. (2014). In order to quantify the diversity of the SN spectra as a function of SN subtype, we construct average spectra of SNe Ic, SNe Ic-bl without GRBs and SNe Ic-bl with GRBs, along with standard deviation and maximum deviation contours. We find that SN~1994I is not a typical SN Ic, in contrast to common belief, while the spectra of SN 1998bw/GRB 980425 are representative of mean spectra of SNe Ic-bl. We measure the ejecta absorption and width velocities (as traced by FeII 5169) and find that SNe Ic-bl with GRBs, on average, have quantifiably higher ab...

  3. The History of the Comic Supernova Rate Derived from the Evolution of the Host Galaxies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chiaki Kobayashi; Takuji Tsujimoto; Ken'ichi Nomoto

    2000-03-17

    We make a prediction of the cosmic supernova rate history as a composite of the supernova rates in spiral and elliptical galaxies. We include the metallicity effect on the evolution of Type Ia supernova (SN Ia) progenitors, and construct detailed models for the evolutions of spiral and elliptical galaxies in clusters and field to meet the latest observational constraints. In the cluster environment, the synthesized cosmic star formation rate (SFR) has an excess at $z \\gtsim 3$ corresponding to the early star burst in ellipticals and a shallower slope from the present to the peak at the redshift of $z \\sim 1.4$ compared with Madau's plot. In the field environment, we assume that ellipticals form over a wide range of redshifts as $1 \\ltsim z \\ltsim 4$. The synthesized cosmic SFR has a broad peak around $z \\sim 3$, which is in good agreement with the observed one. The resultant cosmic SFRs lead to the following predictions for the cosmic SN Ia rate: 1) The SN Ia rate in spirals has a break at $z \\sim 2$ due to the low-metallicity inhibition of SNe Ia, regardless of clusters or field. 2) At high redshifts, the SN Ia rate has a strong peak around $z \\sim 3$ in clusters, whereas in field much lower rate is expected, reflecting the difference in the formation epochs of ellipticals.

  4. Type IIP supernovae as cosmological probes: A SEAM distance to SN1999em

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baron, E.; Nugent, Peter E.; Branch, David; Hauschildt, Peter H.

    2004-06-01

    Because of their intrinsic brightness, supernovae make excellent cosmological probes. We describe the spectral-fitting expanding atmosphere method (SEAM) for obtaining distances to Type IIP supernovae (SNe IIP) and present a distance to SN 1999em for which a Cepheid distance exists. Our models give results consistent with the Cepheid distance, even though we have not attempted to tune the underlying hydrodynamical model but have simply chosen the best fits. This is in contradistinction to the expanding photosphere method (EPM), which yields a distance to SN 1999em that is 50 percent smaller than the Cepheid distance. We emphasize the differences between the SEAM and the EPM. We show that the dilution factors used in the EPM analysis were systematically too small at later epochs. We also show that the EPM blackbody assumption is suspect. Since SNe IIP are visible to redshifts as high as z {approx}< 6, with the James Webb Space Telescope, the SEAM may be a valuable probe of the early universe.

  5. Nucleosynthesis Basics and Applications to Supernovae

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    F. -K. Thielemann; T. Rauscher; C. Freiburghaus; K. Nomoto; M. Hashimoto; B. Pfeiffer; K. -L. Kratz

    1998-02-06

    This review concentrates on nucleosynthesis processes in general and their applications to massive stars and supernovae. A brief initial introduction is given to the physics in astrophysical plasmas which governs composition changes. We present the basic equations for thermonuclear reaction rates and nuclear reaction networks. The required nuclear physics input for reaction rates is discussed, i.e. cross sections for nuclear reactions, photodisintegrations, electron and positron captures, neutrino captures, inelastic neutrino scattering, and beta-decay half-lives. We examine especially the present state of uncertainties in predicting thermonuclear reaction rates, while the status of experiments is discussed by others in this volume (see M. Wiescher). It follows a brief review of hydrostatic burning stages in stellar evolution before discussing the fate of massive stars, i.e. the nucleosynthesis in type II supernova explosions (SNe II). Except for SNe Ia, which are explained by exploding white dwarfs in binary stellar systems (which will not be discussed here), all other supernova types seem to be linked to the gravitational collapse of massive stars (M$>$8M$_\\odot$) at the end of their hydrostatic evolution. SN1987A, the first type II supernova for which the progenitor star was known, is used as an example for nucleosynthesis calculations. Finally, we discuss the production of heavy elements in the r-process up to Th and U and its possible connection to supernovae.

  6. Search for: supernovae | DOE PAGES

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    supernovae Find + Advanced Search Advanced Search All Fields: supernovae Title: Full Text: Bibliographic Data: Creator Author: Name Name ORCID Search Authors Type: All...

  7. First-Year Spectroscopy for the SDSS-II Supernova Survey

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zheng, Chen; Romani, Roger W.; Sako, Masao; Marriner, John; Bassett, Bruce; Becker, Andrew; Choi, Changsu; Cinabro, David; DeJongh, Fritz; Depoy, Darren L.; Dilday, Ben; Doi, Mamoru; Frieman, Joshua A.; Garnavich, Peter M.; Hogan, Craig J.; Holtzman, Jon; Im, Myungshin; Jha, Saurabh; Kessler, Richard; Konishi, Kohki; Lampeitl, Hubert

    2008-03-25

    This paper presents spectroscopy of supernovae discovered in the first season of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey-II Supernova Survey. This program searches for and measures multi-band light curves of supernovae in the redshift range z = 0.05-0.4, complementing existing surveys at lower and higher redshifts. Our goal is to better characterize the supernova population, with a particular focus on SNe Ia, improving their utility as cosmological distance indicators and as probes of dark energy. Our supernova spectroscopy program features rapid-response observations using telescopes of a range of apertures, and provides confirmation of the supernova and host-galaxy types as well as precise redshifts. We describe here the target identification and prioritization, data reduction, redshift measurement, and classification of 129 SNe Ia, 16 spectroscopically probable SNe Ia, 7 SNe Ib/c, and 11 SNe II from the first season. We also describe our efforts to measure and remove the substantial host galaxy contamination existing in the majority of our SN spectra.

  8. Diffusive Shock Acceleration of Electrons and Radio Emission from Large Diameter Shell-Type Supernova Remnants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. I. Asvarov

    2000-01-21

    In present study I examine the capability of diffusive shock acceleration mechanism to explain existing data on radio emission from evolved large diameter shell-type adiabatic supernova remnants (SNRs). Time-dependent ''onion-shell'' model for the radio emission of SNRs is developed, which is based on the assumptions: a) acceleration takes place from thermal energies and test-particle approximation is valid; b) the problem of injection is avoided by introducing, like Bell (1978), two injection parameters; c) to take into consideration very late stages of SNR evolution the analytic approximation of Cox and Andersen (1982) for the shell structure is used; c)no radiative cooling. Constructed Surface Brightness - Diameter $(\\Sigma -D)$ tracks are compared with the empirical $\\Sigma -D$ diagram. The main conclusion of the study is that the DSA mechanism is capable of explaining all the statistics of radio SNRs including very large diameter remnants and giant galactic loops.

  9. THE BERKELEY AUTOMATED SUPERNOVA SEARCH

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kare, J.T.

    2010-01-01

    Dordrecht L . Rosino, in Supernovae, ed. D . Schramm, p.Texas Workshop on Type I Supernovae, ed. J . C . Wheeler, p.Studies Institute on Supernovae, (Reidel, Dordrecht 1981),

  10. Stellar Evolution/Supernova Research Data Archives from the SciDAC Computational Astrophysics Consortium

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Woosley, Stan [University of California, Santa Cruz

    Theoretical high-energy astrophysics studies the most violent explosions in the universe - supernovae (the massive explosions of dying stars) and gamma ray bursts (mysterious blasts of intense radiation). The evolution of massive stars and their explosion as supernovae and/or gamma ray bursts describes how the "heavy" elements needed for life, such as oxygen and iron, are forged (nucleosynthesis) and ejected to later form new stars and planets. The Computational Astrophysics Consortium's project includes a Science Application Partnership on Adaptive Algorithms that develops software involved. The principal science topics are - in order of priority - 1) models for Type Ia supernovae, 2) radiation transport, spectrum formation, and nucleosynthesis in model supernovae of all types; 3) the observational implications of these results for experiments in which DOE has an interest, especially the Joint Dark Energy Mission, Supernova/Acceleration Probe (SNAP) satellite observatory, the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST), and ground based supernova searches; 4) core collapse supernovae; 5) gamma-ray bursts; 6) hypernovae from Population III stars; and 7) x-ray bursts. Models of these phenomena share a common need for nuclear reactions and radiation transport coupled to multi-dimensional fluid flow. The team has developed and used supernovae simulation codes to study Type 1A and core-collapse supernovae. (Taken from http://www.scidac.gov/physics/grb.html) The Stellar Evolution Data Archives contains more than 225 Pre-SN models that can be freely accessed.

  11. CAN STELLAR MIXING EXPLAIN THE LACK OF TYPE Ib SUPERNOVAE IN LONG-DURATION GAMMA-RAY BURSTS?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Frey, Lucille H. [HPC-3, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Fryer, Chris L. [CCS-2, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Young, Patrick A. [School of Earth and Space Exploration, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 85276 (United States)

    2013-08-10

    The discovery of supernovae associated with long-duration gamma-ray burst observations is primary evidence that the progenitors of these outbursts are massive stars. One of the principle mysteries in understanding these progenitors has been the fact that all of these gamma-ray-burst-associated supernovae are Type Ic supernovae with no evidence of helium in the stellar atmosphere. Many studies have focused on whether or not this helium is simply hidden from spectral analyses. In this Letter, we show results from recent stellar models using new convection algorithms based on our current understanding of stellar mixing. We demonstrate that enhanced convection may lead to severe depletion of stellar helium layers, suggesting that the helium is not observed simply because it is not in the star. We also present light curves and spectra of these compact helium-depleted stars compared to models with more conventional helium layers.

  12. The importance of 56Ni in shaping the light curves of type II supernovae

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nakar, Ehud; Katz, Boaz

    2015-01-01

    What intrinsic properties shape the light curves of Type II supernovae (SNe)? To address this question we derive observational measures that are robust (i.e., insensitive to detailed radiative transfer) and constrain the contribution from 56Ni, as well as a combination of the ejecta mass, progenitor radius, and explosion energy. By applying our methods to a sample of type II SNe from the literature we find that 56Ni contribution is often significant. It is typically the source of about 20% of the radiated energy during the photospheric phase, and in extreme cases it even dominates. We find that the 56Ni relative contribution is anti-correlated with the luminosity decline rate, while it is not significantly correlated with other properties of the light curve. When added to other clues, this in turn suggests that the flat plateaus often observed in type II SNe are not a generic feature of the cooling envelope emission, and that without 56Ni many of the SNe that are classified as II-P would have shown a decline ...

  13. Type II supernova energetics and comparison of light curves to shock-cooling models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rubin, Adam; De Cia, Annalisa; Horesh, Assaf; Khazov, Danny; Ofek, Eran O; Kulkarni, S R; Arcavi, Iair; Manulis, Ilan; Yaron, Ofer; Vreeswijk, Paul; Kasliwal, Mansi M; Ben-Ami, Sagi; Perley, Daniel A; Cao, Yi; Cenko, S Bradley; Rebbapragada, Umaa D; Wo?niak, P R; Filippenko, Alexei V; Clubb, K I; Nugent, Peter E; Pan, Y -C; Badenes, C; Howell, D Andrew; Valenti, Stefano; Sand, David; Sollerman, J; Johansson, Joel; Leonard, Douglas C; Horst, J Chuck; Armen, Stephen F; Fedrow, Joseph M; Quimby, Robert M; Mazzali, Paulo; Pian, Elena; Sternberg, Assaf; Matheson, Thomas; Sullivan, M; Maguire, K; Lazarevic, Sanja

    2015-01-01

    During the first few days after explosion, Type II supernovae (SNe) are dominated by relatively simple physics. Theoretical predictions regarding early-time SN light curves in the ultraviolet (UV) and optical bands are thus quite robust. We present, for the first time, a sample of $57$ $R$-band Type II SN light curves that are well monitored during their rise, having $>5$ detections during the first 10 days after discovery, and a well-constrained time of explosion to within $1-3$ days. We show that the energy per unit mass ($E/M$) can be deduced to roughly a factor of five by comparing early-time optical data to the model of Rabinak & Waxman (2011), while the progenitor radius cannot be determined based on $R$-band data alone. We find that Type II SN explosion energies span a range of $E/M=(0.2-20)\\times 10^{51} \\; \\rm{erg/(10 M}_\\odot$), and have a mean energy per unit mass of $\\left\\langle E/M \\right\\rangle = 0.85\\times 10^{51} \\; \\rm{erg/(10 M}_\\odot$), corrected for Malmquist bias. Assuming a small sp...

  14. PROPERTIES OF NEWLY FORMED DUST GRAINS IN THE LUMINOUS TYPE IIn SUPERNOVA 2010jl

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maeda, K.; Nozawa, T.; Folatelli, G.; Moriya, T. J.; Nomoto, K.; Bersten, M.; Quimby, R. [Kavli Institute for the Physics and Mathematics of the Universe (WPI), Todai Institutes for Advanced Study, University of Tokyo, 5-1-5 Kashiwanoha, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8583 (Japan); Sahu, D. K.; Anupama, G. C. [Indian Institute of Astrophysics, Koramangala, Bangalore 560 034 (India); Minowa, Y.; Pyo, T.-S. [Subaru Telescope, National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, 650 North A'ohoku Place, Hilo, HI 96720 (United States); Motohara, K.; Kitagawa, Y. [Institute of Astronomy, University of Tokyo, 2-21-1 Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-0015 (Japan); Ueno, I.; Kawabata, K. S.; Yamanaka, M. [Hiroshima Astrophysical Science Center, Hiroshima University, 1-3-1 Kagamiyama, Higashi-Hiroshima, Hiroshima 739-8526 (Japan); Kozasa, T. [Department of Cosmosciences, Graduate School of Science, Hokkaido University, Sapporo 060-0810 (Japan); Iye, M., E-mail: keiichi.maeda@ipmu.jp [National Astronomical Observatory, Mitaka, Tokyo (Japan)

    2013-10-10

    Supernovae (SNe) have been proposed to be the main production sites of dust grains in the universe. However, our knowledge of their importance to dust production is limited by observationally poor constraints on the nature and amount of dust particles produced by individual SNe. In this paper, we present a spectrum covering optical through near-Infrared (NIR) light of the luminous Type IIn supernova 2010jl around one and a half years after the explosion. This unique data set reveals multiple signatures of newly formed dust particles. The NIR portion of the spectrum provides a rare example where thermal emission from newly formed hot dust grains is clearly detected. We determine the main population of the dust species to be carbon grains at a temperature of ?1350-1450 K at this epoch. The mass of the dust grains is derived to be ?(7.5-8.5) × 10{sup –4} M{sub ?}. Hydrogen emission lines show wavelength-dependent absorption, which provides a good estimate of the typical size of the newly formed dust grains (?< 0.1 ?m, and most likely ?< 0.01 ?m). We believe the dust grains were formed in a dense cooling shell as a result of a strong SN-circumstellar media (CSM) interaction. The dust grains occupy ?10% of the emitting volume, suggesting an inhomogeneous, clumpy structure. The average CSM density must be ?> 3 × 10{sup 7} cm{sup –3}, corresponding to a mass loss rate of ?> 0.02 M{sub ?} yr{sup –1} (for a mass loss wind velocity of ?100 km s{sup –1}). This strongly supports a scenario in which SN 2010jl and probably other luminous SNe IIn are powered by strong interactions within very dense CSM, perhaps created by Luminous-Blue-Variable-like eruptions within the last century before the explosion.

  15. CfA3: 185 TYPE Ia SUPERNOVA LIGHT CURVES FROM THE CfA (Journal Article) |

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfate Reducing Bacteria (TechnicalTransmission,Textit ChandraSciTech Connect Conference:SciTech

  16. Probing thermonuclear supernova explosions with neutrinos

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Odrzywolek; T. Plewa

    2011-03-27

    Aims: We present neutrino light curves and energy spectra for two representative type Ia supernova explosion models: a pure deflagration and a delayed detonation. Methods: We calculate the neutrino flux from $\\beta$ processes using nuclear statistical equilibrium abundances convoluted with approximate neutrino spectra of the individual nuclei and the thermal neutrino spectrum (pair+plasma). Results: Although the two considered thermonuclear supernova explosion scenarios are expected to produce almost identical electromagnetic output, their neutrino signatures appear vastly different, which allow an unambiguous identification of the explosion mechanism: a pure deflagration produces a single peak in the neutrino light curve, while the addition of the second maximum characterizes a delayed-detonation. We identified the following main contributors to the neutrino signal: (1) weak electron neutrino emission from electron captures (in particular on the protons Co55 and Ni56) and numerous beta-active nuclei produced by the thermonuclear flame and/or detonation front, (2) electron antineutrinos from positron captures on neutrons, and (3) the thermal emission from pair annihilation. We estimate that a pure deflagration supernova explosion at a distance of 1 kpc would trigger about 14 events in the future 50 kt liquid scintillator detector and some 19 events in a 0.5 Mt water Cherenkov-type detector. Conclusions: While in contrast to core-collapse supernovae neutrinos carry only a very small fraction of the energy produced in the thermonuclear supernova explosion, the SN Ia neutrino signal provides information that allows us to unambiguously distinguish between different possible explosion scenarios. These studies will become feasible with the next generation of proposed neutrino observatories.

  17. Exploring Dark Energy with SNAP

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aldering, G.

    2009-01-01

    experiment to use Type Ia supernovae and weak gravitationalon the use of Type Ia supernovae as a means of measuring thenewer data from Type Ia supernovae (including constraints

  18. Large Scale Computing and Storage Requirements for High Energy Physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gerber, Richard A.

    2011-01-01

    number modeling of type ia supernovae. I. Hydrodynamics.number modeling of type ia supernovae. II. Energy evolution.Mach number modeling of type ia supernovae. III. Reactions.

  19. Type I Superluminous Supernovae as Explosions inside Non-Hydrogen Circumstellar Envelopes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sorokina, Elena; Nomoto, Ken'ichi; Quimby, Robert; Tolstov, Alexey

    2015-01-01

    A number of Type I (hydrogenless) superluminous supernova (SLSN) events have been discovered recently. However, their nature remains debatable. One of the most promising ideas is the shock-interaction mechanism, but only simplified semi-analytical models have been applied so far. We simulate light curves for several Type~I SLSN (SLSN-I) models enshrouded by dense, non-hydrogen circumstellar envelopes, using a multi-group radiation hydrodynamics code that predicts not only bolometric, but also multicolor light curves. We demonstrate that the bulk of SLSNe-I including those with relatively narrow light curves like SN~2010gx or broad ones like PTF09cnd can be explained by the interaction of the SN ejecta with circumstellar matter (CSM), though the range of parameters for these models is rather wide. Moderate explosion energy ($\\sim (2 - 4)\\cdot 10^{51}$~ergs) is sufficient to explain both narrow and broad SLSN-I light curves, but ejected mass and envelope mass differ for those two cases. Only 5 to 10 $M_\\odot$ o...

  20. Photometric and polarimetric observations of fast declining Type II supernovae 2013hj and 2014G

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bose, Subhash; Misra, Kuntal; Matsumoto, Katsura; Kumar, Brajesh; Singh, Mridweeka; Fukushima, Daiki; Kawabata, Miho

    2015-01-01

    We present broadband photometric and polarimetric observations of two type II supernovae (SNe) 2013hj and 2014G. SN 2014G is a spectroscopically classified type IIL event, which we also confirm photometrically as its light curve show characteristic features (plateau slope of 2.55 mag (100 d)$ ^{-1} $ in V-band and duration of $ \\sim77 $d) of a generic IIL SN. On the other hand SN 2013hj also shows high plateau decline rate of $ 1.5 $ mag (100 d)$ ^{-1} $ in V-band, similar to SNe IIL, but marginally lower than SNe IIL template light curves. Our high cadence photometric observations of SNe 2013hj and 2014G enables us to cover all characteristic phases up to radioactive tail of optical light curves. Broadband polarimetric observations reveal some polarization in SN 2013hj with subtle enhancement as SN evolves towards plateau end, however the polarization angle remains constant throughout the evolution. This characteristic is consistent with the idea that the evolving SN with recombining hydrogen envelope is slo...

  1. SN 2011fu: A type IIb Supernova with a luminous double-peaked light curve

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Morales-Garoffolo, A; Bersten, M; Jerkstrand, A; Taubenberger, S; Benetti, S; Cappellaro, E; Kotak, R; Pastorello, A; Bufano, F; Domínguez, R M; Ergon, M; Fraser, M; Gao, X; García, E; Howell, D A; Isern, J; Smartt, S J; Tomasella, L; Valenti, S

    2015-01-01

    We present optical and near infrared observations of the type IIb supernova (SN) 2011fu from a few days to $\\sim300$ d after explosion. The SN presents a double-peaked light curve (LC) similar to that of SN 1993J, although more luminous and with a longer cooling phase after the primary peak. The spectral evolution is also similar to SN 1993J's, with hydrogen dominating the spectra to $\\sim40$ d, then helium gaining strength, and nebular emission lines appearing from $\\sim60$ d post-explosion. The velocities derived from the P-Cygni absorptions are overall similar to those of other type IIb SNe. We have found a strong similarity between the oxygen and magnesium line profiles at late times, which suggests that these lines are forming at the same location within the ejecta. The hydrodynamical modelling of the pseudo-bolometric LC and the observed photospheric velocities suggest that SN 2011fu was the explosion of an extended star ($\\rm R\\sim450$ R$_\\odot$), in which 1.3 $\\times 10^{51}$ erg of kinetic energy wer...

  2. UNITY: Confronting Supernova Cosmology's Statistical and Systematic Uncertainties in a Unified Bayesian Framework

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rubin, David; Barbary, Kyle; Boone, Kyle; Chappell, Greta; Currie, Miles; Deustua, Susana; Fagrelius, Parker; Fruchter, Andrew; Hayden, Brian; Lidman, Chris; Nordin, Jakob; Perlmutter, Saul; Saunders, Clare; Sofiatti, Caroline

    2015-01-01

    While recent supernova cosmology research has benefited from improved measurements, current analysis approaches are not statistically optimal and will prove insufficient for future surveys. This paper discusses the limitations of current supernova cosmological analyses in treating outliers, selection effects, shape- and color-standardization relations, intrinsic dispersion, and heterogeneous observations. We present a new Bayesian framework, called UNITY (Unified Nonlinear Inference for Type-Ia cosmologY), that incorporates significant improvements in our ability to confront these effects. We apply the framework to real supernova observations and demonstrate smaller statistical and systematic uncertainties. We verify earlier results that SNe Ia require nonlinear shape and color standardizations, but we now include these nonlinear relations in a statistically well-justified way. This analysis was blinded, in that the method was first validated on simulated data, and no analysis changes were made after transiti...

  3. Faint Thermonuclear Supernovae from AM Canum Venaticorum Binaries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lars Bildsten; Ken J. Shen; Nevin N. Weinberg; Gijs Nelemans

    2007-05-06

    Helium that accretes onto a Carbon/Oxygen white dwarf in the double white dwarf AM Canum Venaticorum (AM CVn) binaries undergoes unstable thermonuclear flashes when the orbital period is in the 3.5-25 minute range. At the shortest orbital periods (and highest accretion rates, Mdot > 10^-7 Msol/yr), the flashes are weak and likely lead to the Helium equivalent of classical nova outbursts. However, as the orbit widens and Mdot drops, the mass required for the unstable ignition increases, leading to progressively more violent flashes up to a final flash with Helium shell mass ~ 0.02-0.1 Msol. The high pressures of these last flashes allow the burning to produce the radioactive elements 48Cr, 52Fe, and 56Ni that power a faint (M_V in the range of -15 to -18) and rapidly rising (few days) thermonuclear supernova. Current galactic AM CVn space densities imply one such explosion every 5,000-15,000 years in 10^11 Msol of old stars (~ 2-6% of the Type Ia rate in E/SO galaxies). These ".Ia" supernovae (one-tenth as bright for one-tenth the time as a Type Ia supernovae) are excellent targets for deep (e.g. V=24) searches with nightly cadences, potentially yielding an all-sky rate of 1,000 per year.

  4. CoreCollapseSupernovasVSGalaxyColor WayneStateUniversity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cinabro, David

    ,IbeganfilteringdatausingtheprogramlanguagePerl.Ifirststarted filteringallthesupernovaedatafilesintoTypeIIsupernovae.Thisincludedall supernovaeexceptforTypeIa.Thefilteringprocessismadepossiblebyeachsupernova

  5. Observational Properties of Type Ib/c Supernova Progenitors in Binary Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Hyun-Jeong; Koo, Bon-Chul

    2015-01-01

    In several recent observational studies on Type Ib/c supernovae (SNe Ib/c), the inferred ejecta masses have a peak value of 2.0 -- 4.0 $M_\\odot$, in favor of the binary scenario for their progenitors rather than the Wolf-Rayet star scenario. To investigate the observational properties of relatively low-mass helium stars in binary systems as SN Ib/c progenitors, we constructed atmospheric models with the non-LTE radiative transfer code CMFGEN, using binary star evolution models. We find that these helium stars can be characterized by relatively narrow helium emission lines if the mass-loss rate during the final evolutionary phase is significantly enhanced as implied by many SN Ib/c observations. The optical brightness of helium star progenitors can be meaningfully enhanced with a strong wind for $M \\gtrsim 4.4 M_\\odot$, but hardly affected or slightly weakened for relatively low-mass of $\\sim 3.0 M_\\odot$, compared to the simple estimate using blackbody approximation. We further confirm the previous suggestion...

  6. Optical observations of the luminous Type IIn Supernova 2010jl for over 900 days

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jencson, J E; Kochanek, C S; Shappee, B J; Stanek, K Z; Pogge, R W

    2015-01-01

    The luminous Type IIn Supernova (SN) 2010jl shows strong evidence for the interaction of the SN ejecta with dense circumstellar material (CSM). We present observations of SN 2010jl for $t \\sim 900$ d after its earliest detection, including a sequence of optical spectra ranging from $t = 55$ to $909$ d. We also supplement our late time spectra and the photometric measurements in the literature with an additional epoch of new, late time $BVRI$ photometry. Combining available photometric and spectroscopic data, we derive a semi-bolometric optical light curve and calculate a total radiated energy in the optical for SN 2010jl of $\\sim 3.5\\times10^{50}$ erg. We also examine the evolution of the H$\\alpha$ emission line profile in detail and find evidence for asymmetry in the profile for $t \\gtrsim 775$ d that is not easily explained by any of the proposed scenarios for this fascinating event. Finally, we discuss the interpretations from the literature of the optical and near-infrared light curves, and propose that t...

  7. The type IIb supernova 2013df and its cool supergiant progenitor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Van Dyk, Schuyler D. [Spitzer Science Center/Caltech, Mail Code 220-6, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Zheng, WeiKang; Fox, Ori D.; Clubb, Kelsey I.; Filippenko, Alexei V.; Kelly, Patrick L. [Department of Astronomy, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720-3411 (United States); Cenko, S. Bradley [Astrophysics Science Division, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Mail Code 661, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Foley, Ryan J. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Miller, Adam A. [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, MS 169-506, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States); Smith, Nathan [Steward Observatory, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85720 (United States); Lee, William H. [Instituto de Astronomía, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Apdo. Postal 70-264, Cd. Universitaria, México DF 04510 (Mexico); Ben-Ami, Sagi; Gal-Yam, Avishay, E-mail: vandyk@ipac.caltech.edu [Benoziyo Center for Astrophysics, The Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovot 76100 (Israel)

    2014-02-01

    We have obtained early-time photometry and spectroscopy of supernova (SN) 2013df in NGC 4414. The SN is clearly of Type IIb, with notable similarities to SN 1993J. From its luminosity at secondary maximum light, it appears that less {sup 56}Ni (? 0.06 M {sub ?}) was synthesized in the SN 2013df explosion than was the case for the SNe IIb 1993J, 2008ax, and 2011dh. Based on a comparison of the light curves, the SN 2013df progenitor must have been more extended in radius prior to explosion than the progenitor of SN 1993J. The total extinction for SN 2013df is estimated to be A{sub V} = 0.30 mag. The metallicity at the SN location is likely to be solar. We have conducted Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Target of Opportunity observations of the SN with the Wide Field Camera 3, and from a precise comparison of these new observations to archival HST observations of the host galaxy obtained 14 yr prior to explosion, we have identified the progenitor of SN 2013df to be a yellow supergiant, somewhat hotter than a red supergiant progenitor for a normal Type II-Plateau SN. From its observed spectral energy distribution, assuming that the light is dominated by one star, the progenitor had effective temperature T {sub eff} = 4250 ± 100 K and a bolometric luminosity L {sub bol} = 10{sup 4.94±0.06} L {sub ?}. This leads to an effective radius R {sub eff} = 545 ± 65 R {sub ?}. The star likely had an initial mass in the range of 13-17 M {sub ?}; however, if it was a member of an interacting binary system, detailed modeling of the system is required to estimate this mass more accurately. The progenitor star of SN 2013df appears to have been relatively similar to the progenitor of SN 1993J.

  8. Precursors prior to type IIn supernova explosions are common: Precursor rates, properties, and correlations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ofek, Eran O.; Steinbok, Aviram; Arcavi, Iair; Gal-Yam, Avishay; Tal, David; Ben-Ami, Sagi; Yaron, Ofer [Benoziyo Center for Astrophysics, Weizmann Institute of Science, 76100 Rehovot (Israel); Sullivan, Mark [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Southampton, Southampton SO17 1BJ (United Kingdom); Shaviv, Nir J. [Racah Institute of Physics, The Hebrew University, 91904 Jerusalem (Israel); Kulkarni, Shrinivas R. [Cahill Center for Astronomy and Astrophysics, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Nugent, Peter E. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Kasliwal, Mansi M. [Observatories of the Carnegie Institution for Science, 813 Santa Barbara Street, Pasadena, CA 91101 (United States); Cenko, S. Bradley [Astrophysics Science Division, NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center, Mail Code 661, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Laher, Russ; Surace, Jason [Spitzer Science Center, California Institute of Technology, M/S 314-6, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Bloom, Joshua S.; Filippenko, Alexei V. [Department of Astronomy, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720-3411 (United States); Silverman, Jeffrey M. [Department of Astronomy, University of Texas, Austin, TX 78712 (United States)

    2014-07-10

    There is a growing number of Type IIn supernovae (SNe) which present an outburst prior to their presumably final explosion. These precursors may affect the SN display, and are likely related to poorly charted phenomena in the final stages of stellar evolution. By coadding Palomar Transient Factory (PTF) images taken prior to the explosion, here we present a search for precursors in a sample of 16 Type IIn SNe. We find five SNe IIn that likely have at least one possible precursor event (PTF 10bjb, SN 2010mc, PTF 10weh, SN 2011ht, and PTF 12cxj), three of which are reported here for the first time. For each SN we calculate the control time. We find that precursor events among SNe IIn are common: at the one-sided 99% confidence level, >50% of SNe IIn have at least one pre-explosion outburst that is brighter than 3 × 10{sup 7} L{sub ?} taking place up to 1/3 yr prior to the SN explosion. The average rate of such precursor events during the year prior to the SN explosion is likely ? 1 yr{sup –1}, and fainter precursors are possibly even more common. Ignoring the two weakest precursors in our sample, the precursors rate we find is still on the order of one per year. We also find possible correlations between the integrated luminosity of the precursor and the SN total radiated energy, peak luminosity, and rise time. These correlations are expected if the precursors are mass-ejection events, and the early-time light curve of these SNe is powered by interaction of the SN shock and ejecta with optically thick circumstellar material.

  9. Optical observations of the type Ic supernova 2007gr in NGC 1058

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Juncheng; Wang, Xiaofeng; Li, Junzheng [Physics Department and Tsinghua Center for Astrophysics (THCA), Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Ganeshalingam, Mohan; Silverman, Jeffrey M.; Filippenko, Alexei V.; Li, Weidong; Chornock, Ryan; Steele, Thea, E-mail: cjc09@mails.tsinghua.edu.cn, E-mail: wang_xf@mail.tsinghua.edu.cn [Department of Astronomy, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720-3411 (United States)

    2014-08-01

    We present extensive optical observations of the normal Type Ic supernova (SN) 2007gr, spanning from about one week before maximum light to more than one year thereafter. The optical light and color curves of SN 2007gr are very similar to those of the broad-lined Type Ic SN 2002ap, but the spectra show remarkable differences. The optical spectra of SN 2007gr are characterized by unusually narrow lines, prominent carbon lines, and slow evolution of the line velocity after maximum light. The earliest spectrum (taken at t = –8 days) shows a possible signature of helium (He I ?5876 at a velocity of ?19,000 km s{sup –1}). Moreover, the larger intensity ratio of the [O I] ?6300 and ?6364 lines inferred from the early nebular spectra implies a lower opacity of the ejecta shortly after the explosion. These results indicate that SN 2007gr perhaps underwent a less energetic explosion of a smaller-mass Wolf-Rayet star (?8-9 M{sub ?}) in a binary system, as favored by an analysis of the progenitor environment through pre-explosion and post-explosion Hubble Space Telescope images. In the nebular spectra, asymmetric double-peaked profiles can be seen in the [O I] ?6300 and Mg I] ?4571 lines. We suggest that the two peaks are contributed by the blueshifted and rest-frame components. The similarity in velocity structure and the different evolution of the strength of the two components favor an aspherical explosion with the ejecta distributed in a torus or disk-like geometry, but inside the ejecta the O and Mg have different distributions.

  10. Absolute-magnitude distributions of supernovae

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Richardson, Dean; Wright, John [Department of Physics, Xavier University of Louisiana, New Orleans, LA 70125 (United States); Jenkins III, Robert L. [Applied Physics Department, Richard Stockton College, Galloway, NJ 08205 (United States); Maddox, Larry, E-mail: drichar7@xula.edu [Department of Chemistry and Physics, Southeastern Louisiana University, Hammond, LA 70402 (United States)

    2014-05-01

    The absolute-magnitude distributions of seven supernova (SN) types are presented. The data used here were primarily taken from the Asiago Supernova Catalogue, but were supplemented with additional data. We accounted for both foreground and host-galaxy extinction. A bootstrap method is used to correct the samples for Malmquist bias. Separately, we generate volume-limited samples, restricted to events within 100 Mpc. We find that the superluminous events (M{sub B} < –21) make up only about 0.1% of all SNe in the bias-corrected sample. The subluminous events (M{sub B} > –15) make up about 3%. The normal Ia distribution was the brightest with a mean absolute blue magnitude of –19.25. The IIP distribution was the dimmest at –16.75.

  11. The supernova cosmology cookbook: Bayesian numerical recipes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Karpenka, N V

    2015-01-01

    Theoretical and observational cosmology have enjoyed a number of significant successes over the last two decades. Cosmic microwave background measurements from the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe and Planck, together with large-scale structure and supernova (SN) searches, have put very tight constraints on cosmological parameters. Type Ia supernovae (SNIa) played a central role in the discovery of the accelerated expansion of the Universe, recognised by the Nobel Prize in Physics in 2011. The last decade has seen an enormous increase in the amount of high quality SN observations, with SN catalogues now containing hundreds of objects. This number is expected to increase to thousands in the next few years, as data from next-generation missions, such as the Dark Energy Survey and Large Synoptic Survey Telescope become available. In order to exploit the vast amount of forthcoming high quality data, it is extremely important to develop robust and efficient statistical analysis methods to answer cosmological q...

  12. Constraints on Off-Axis GRB Jets in Type Ibc Supernovae From Late-Time Radio Observations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. M. Soderberg; D. A. Frail; M. H. Wieringa

    2005-12-06

    It has been suggested that the peculiar properties of the luminous Type Ic supernova SN 1998bw and its low-energy gamma-ray burst GRB 980425 may be understood if they originated in a standard gamma-ray burst explosion viewed far from the axis of the relativistic jet. In this scenario, strong radio emission is predicted from the jet on a timescale 1 to 10 years after the explosion as it decelerates and spreads into our line of sight. To test this hypothesis we have carried out late-time radio observations of SN 1998bw at $t=5.6$ years, yielding upper limits which are consistent with the continued fading of the supernova. We find these limits to be consistent with an off-axis jet only if the progenitor mass loss rate is $\\dot{M}\\lesssim 4 \\times 10^{-7}$ M$_\\odot$ yr$^{-1}$ (for a wind velocity $v_w=1000$ km s$^{-1}$) or the fraction of the shock energy in magnetic fields is $\\epsilon_B \\lesssim 10^{-3}$. These values are low relative to those inferred for cosmological GRBs. We combine the SN 1998bw measurements with existing observations for a sample of 15 local Type Ibc supernovae to estimate that at most 6% produce collimated, relativistic outflows.

  13. Tracked Flame Simulation for Type Ia Yongmin Zhang 1 , James Glimm 1;2 , Srabasti Dutta 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New York at Stoney Brook, State University of

    thermonuclear combustion. Keywords: front tracking, supernova, combustion 1 #12; 1 Introduction We study of energy and chemical elements deposited into the interstellar medium, and they are important distance of the ejecta, and the strength and brightness of the burning are all determined by the speed of thermonuclear

  14. A Parameter Study of Type II Supernova Light Curves Using 6 M_odot He Cores

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Timothy R. Young

    2004-09-13

    Results of numerical calculations of Type II supernova light curves are presented. The model progenitor stars have 6 $M{_\\odot}$ cores and various envelopes, originating from a numerically evolved 20 $M{_\\odot}$ star. Five parameters that affect the light curves are examined: the ejected mass, the progenitor radius, the explosion energy, the $^{56}$Ni mass, and the extent of $^{56}$Ni mixing. The following affects have been found: 1) the larger the progenitor radius the brighter the early--time light curve, with little affect on the late--time light curve, 2) the larger the envelope mass the fainter the early light curve and the flatter the slope of the late light curve, 3) the larger the explosion energy the brighter the early light curve and the steeper the slope of the late light curve, 4) the larger the $^{56}$Ni mass the brighter the overall light curve after 20 to 50 days, with no affect on the early light curve, 5) the more extensive the $^{56}$Ni mixing the brighter the early light curve and the steeper the late light curve. The primary parameters affecting the light curve shape are the progenitor radius and the ejected mass. The secondary parameters are the explosion energy, $^{56}$Ni mass and $^{56}$Ni mixing. I find that while in principle the general shape and absolute magnitude of a light curve indicate a unique set of parameters, in practice it is difficult to avoid some ambiguity in the parameters. I find that the nickel--powered diffusion wave and the recombination of helium produce a prominent secondary peak in all our calculations. The feature is less prominent when compositional mixing, both $^{56}$Ni mixing and mixing between the hydrogen and helium layers, occurs. The model photospheric temperatures and velocities are presented, for comparison to observation.

  15. THE CHEMICALLY CONTROLLED SYNTHESIS OF DUST IN TYPE II-P SUPERNOVAE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sarangi, Arkaprabha; Cherchneff, Isabelle, E-mail: arkaprabha.sarangi@unibas.ch, E-mail: isabelle.cherchneff@unibas.ch [Departement Physik, Universität Basel, CH-4056 Basel (Switzerland)

    2013-10-20

    We study the formation of molecules and dust clusters in the ejecta of solar metallicity, Type II-P supernovae (SNe) using a chemical kinetic approach. We follow the evolution of molecules and small dust cluster masses from day 100 to day 1500 after explosion. We consider stellar progenitors with initial masses of 12, 15, 19, and 25 M{sub ?} that explode as SNe with stratified ejecta. The molecular precursors to dust grains comprise molecular chains, rings and small clusters of silica, silicates, metal oxides, sulfides and carbides, pure metals, and carbon, where the nucleation of silicate clusters is described by a two-step process of metal and oxygen addition. We study the impact of the {sup 56}Ni mass on the type and amount of synthesized dust. We predict that large masses of molecules including CO, SiO, SiS, O{sub 2}, and SO form in the ejecta. We show that the discrepancy between the small dust masses detected at infrared wavelengths some 500 days post-explosion and the larger amounts of dust recently detected with Herschel in SN remnants can be explained by the non-equilibrium chemistry linked to the formation of molecules and dust clusters in the ejected material. Dust gradually builds up from small (?10{sup –5} M{sub ?}) to large masses (?5 × 10{sup –2} M{sub ?}) over a 5 yr period after explosion. Subsequent dust formation and/or growth is hampered by the shortage of chemical agents participating in the dust nucleation and the long timescale for accretion. The results highlight the dependence of the dust chemical composition and mass on the amount of {sup 56}Ni synthesized during the explosion. This dependence may partly explain the diversity of epochs at which dust forms in SNe. More generally, our results indicate that Type II-P SNe are efficient but moderate dust producers with an upper limit on the mass of synthesized dust ranging from ?0.03 to 0.09 M{sub ?}. Other dust sources must then operate at high redshift to explain the large quantities of dust present in young galaxies in the early universe.

  16. Supernova Remnants in the Magellanic Clouds. VI. The DEML316 Supernova Remnants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. M. Williams; Y. -H. Chu

    2005-09-22

    The DEML316 system contains two shells, both with the characteristic signatures of supernova remnants (SNRs). We analyze Chandra and XMM-Newton data for DEML316, investigating its spatial and spectral X-ray features. Our Chandra observations resolve the structure of the northeastern SNR (Shell A) as a bright inner ring and a set of "arcs" surrounded by fainter diffuse emission. The spectrum is well fit by a thermal plasma model with temperature ~1.4 keV; we do not find significant spectral differences for different regions of this SNR. The southwestern SNR (Shell B) exhibits an irregular X-ray outline, with a brighter interior ring of emission including a bright knot of emission. Overall the emission of the SNR is well described by a thermal plasma of temperature ~0.6 keV. The Bright Knot, however, is spectrally distinct from the rest of the SNR, requiring the addition of a high-energy spectral component consistent with a power-law spectrum of photon index 1.6--1.8. We confirm the findings of Nishiuchi et al. (2001) that the spectra of these shells are notably different, with Shell A requiring a high iron abundance for a good spectral fit, implying a Type Ia origin. We further explicitly compare abundance ratios to model predictions for Type Ia and Type II supernovae. The low ratios for Shell A (O/Fe of 1.5 and Ne/Fe of 0.2) and the high ratios for Shell B (O/Fe of 30--130 and Ne/Fe of 8--16) are consistent with Type Ia and Type II origins, respectively. The difference between the SNR progenitor types casts some doubt on the suggestion that these SNRs are interacting with one another.

  17. Observing the next galactic supernova

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adams, Scott M.; Kochanek, C. S.; Beacom, John F.; Stanek, K. Z. [Department of Astronomy, The Ohio State University, 140 West 18th Avenue, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Vagins, Mark R. [Kavli Institute for the Physics and Mathematics of the Universe (WPI), Todai Institutes for Advanced Study, University of Tokyo, 5-1-5 Kashiwanoha, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8583 (Japan)

    2013-12-01

    No supernova (SN) in the Milky Way has been observed since the invention of the optical telescope, instruments for other wavelengths, neutrino detectors, or gravitational wave observatories. It would be a tragedy to miss the opportunity to fully characterize the next one. To aid preparations for its observations, we model the distance, extinction, and magnitude probability distributions of a successful Galactic core-collapse supernova (ccSN), its shock breakout radiation, and its massive star progenitor. We find, at very high probability (? 100%), that the next Galactic SN will easily be detectable in the near-IR and that near-IR photometry of the progenitor star very likely (? 92%) already exists in the Two Micron All Sky Survey. Most ccSNe (98%) will be easily observed in the optical, but a significant fraction (43%) will lack observations of the progenitor due to a combination of survey sensitivity and confusion. If neutrino detection experiments can quickly disseminate a likely position (?3°), we show that a modestly priced IR camera system can probably detect the shock breakout radiation pulse even in daytime (64% for the cheapest design). Neutrino experiments should seriously consider adding such systems, both for their scientific return and as an added and internal layer of protection against false triggers. We find that shock breakouts from failed ccSNe of red supergiants may be more observable than those of successful SNe due to their lower radiation temperatures. We review the process by which neutrinos from a Galactic ccSN would be detected and announced. We provide new information on the EGADS system and its potential for providing instant neutrino alerts. We also discuss the distance, extinction, and magnitude probability distributions for the next Galactic Type Ia supernova (SN Ia). Based on our modeled observability, we find a Galactic ccSN rate of 3.2{sub ?2.6}{sup +7.3} per century and a Galactic SN Ia rate of 1.4{sub ?0.8}{sup +1.4} per century for a total Galactic SN rate of 4.6{sub ?2.7}{sup +7.4} per century is needed to account for the SNe observed over the last millennium, which implies a Galactic star formation rate of 3.6{sub ?3.0}{sup +8.3} M {sub ?} yr{sup –1}.

  18. Tachyon cosmology, supernovae data and the Big Brake singularity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Z. Keresztes; L. Á. Gergely; V. Gorini; U. Moschella; A. Yu. Kamenshchik

    2009-04-21

    We compare the existing observational data on type Ia Supernovae with the evolutions of the universe predicted by a one-parameter family of tachyon models which we have introduced recently in paper \\cite{we-tach}. Among the set of the trajectories of the model which are compatible with the data there is a consistent subset for which the universe ends up in a new type of soft cosmological singularity dubbed Big Brake. This opens up yet another scenario for the future history of the universe besides the one predicted by the standard $\\Lambda$CDM model.

  19. Analytical solutions for energy spectra of electrons accelerated by nonrelativistic shock-waves in shell type supernova remnants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. N. Zirakashvili; F. Aharonian

    2007-10-26

    %context {Recent observations of hard X-rays and very high energy gamma-rays from a number of young shell type supernova remnants indicate the importance of detailed quantitative studies of energy spectra of relativistic electrons formed via diffusive shock acceleration accompanied by intense nonthermal emission through synchrotron radiation and inverse Compton scattering.} %aim {The aim of this work was derivation of exact asymptotic solutions of the kinetic equation which describes the energy distribution of shock-accelerated electrons for an arbitrary energy-dependence of the diffusion coefficient.} %method {The asymptotic solutions at low and very high energy domains coupled with numerical calculations in the intermediate energy range allow analytical presentations of energy spectra of electrons for the entire energy region.} %results {Under the assumption that the energy losses of electrons are dominated by synchrotron cooling, we derived the exact asymptotic spectra of electrons without any restriction on the diffusion coefficient. We also obtained simple analytical approximations which describe, with accuracy better than ten percent, the energy spectra of nonthermal emission of shock-accelerated electrons due to the synchrotron radiation and inverse Compton scattering.} %conclusions {The results can be applied for interpretation of X-ray and gamma-ray observations of shell type supernova remnants, as well as other nonthermal high energy source populations like microquasars and large scale synchrotron jets of active galactic nuclei.

  20. White dwarf mergers,White dwarf mergers, thermonuclear supernovae,thermonuclear supernovae,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hinton, Jim

    White dwarf mergers,White dwarf mergers, thermonuclear supernovae,thermonuclear supernovae fusion is ignited. Degenerate, hence runaway. #12;CO white dwarf accretes, either from companion, or from disk after merger. As it approaches maximum mass, C fusion is ignited. Degenerate, hence runaway. SN Ia

  1. The effect of weak lensing on distance estimates from supernovae

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, Mathew; Maartens, Roy [Department of Physics, University of the Western Cape, Cape Town 7535 (South Africa); Bacon, David J.; Nichol, Robert C.; Campbell, Heather; D'Andrea, Chris B. [Institute of Cosmology and Gravitation, University of Portsmouth, Portsmouth, PO1 3FX (United Kingdom); Clarkson, Chris [Astrophysics, Cosmology and Gravity Centre (ACGC), Department of Mathematics and Applied Mathematics, University of Cape Town, Rondebosch 7701 (South Africa); Bassett, Bruce A. [South African Astronomical Observatory, P.O. Box 9, Observatory 7935 (South Africa); Cinabro, David [Wayne State University, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Detroit, MI 48202 (United States); Finley, David A.; Frieman, Joshua A. [Center for Particle Astrophysics, Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, P.O. Box 500, Batavia, IL 60510 (United States); Galbany, Lluis [CENTRA Centro Multidisciplinar de Astrofísica, Instituto Superior Técnico, Av. Rovisco Pais 1, 1049-001 Lisbon (Portugal); Garnavich, Peter M. [Department of Physics, University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, IN 46556 (United States); Olmstead, Matthew D. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT 84112 (United States); Schneider, Donald P. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Shapiro, Charles [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, 4800 Oak Grove Drive, La Canada Flintridge, CA 91109 (United States); Sollerman, Jesper, E-mail: matsmith2@gmail.com [The Oskar Klein Centre, Department of Astronomy, AlbaNova, SE-106 91 Stockholm (Sweden)

    2014-01-01

    Using a sample of 608 Type Ia supernovae from the SDSS-II and BOSS surveys, combined with a sample of foreground galaxies from SDSS-II, we estimate the weak lensing convergence for each supernova line of sight. We find that the correlation between this measurement and the Hubble residuals is consistent with the prediction from lensing (at a significance of 1.7?). Strong correlations are also found between the residuals and supernova nuisance parameters after a linear correction is applied. When these other correlations are taken into account, the lensing signal is detected at 1.4?. We show, for the first time, that distance estimates from supernovae can be improved when lensing is incorporated, by including a new parameter in the SALT2 methodology for determining distance moduli. The recovered value of the new parameter is consistent with the lensing prediction. Using cosmic microwave background data from WMAP7, H {sub 0} data from Hubble Space Telescope and Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Baryon acoustic oscillations measurements, we find the best-fit value of the new lensing parameter and show that the central values and uncertainties on ? {sub m} and w are unaffected. The lensing of supernovae, while only seen at marginal significance in this low-redshift sample, will be of vital importance for the next generation of surveys, such as DES and LSST, which will be systematics-dominated.

  2. The First Second of a Type-II Supernova: Convection, Accretion, and Shock Propagation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    H. -Thomas Janka; Ewald Mueller

    1995-03-03

    One- and two-dimensional hydrodynamical simulations of neutrino-driven supernova explosions are discussed. The simulations cover the phase between the stagnation of the prompt shock and about one second after core bounce. Systematic variation of the neutrino fluxes from the neutrino sphere shows that the explosion energy, explosion time scale, initial mass of the protoneutron star, and explosive nucleosynthesis of iron-group elements depend sensitively on the strength of the neutrino heating during the first few 100 ms after shock formation. Convective overturn in the neutrino-heated region behind the shock is a crucial help for the explosion only in a narrow window of neutrino luminosities. Here powerful explosions can be obtained only in the multi-dimensional case. For higher core-neutrino fluxes also spherically symmetrical models yield energetic explosions, while for lower luminosities even with convection no strong explosions occur.

  3. SNe Ia tests of quintessence tracker cosmology in an anisotropic background

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miranda, W. [Instituto Federal da Bahia, Paulo Afonso, Bahia (Brazil); Carneiro, S.; Pigozzo, C., E-mail: welber.miranda@ifba.edu.br, E-mail: saulo.carneiro@pq.cnpq.br, E-mail: cpigozzo@ufba.br [Instituto de Física, Universidade Federal da Bahia, Salvador, Bahia (Brazil)

    2014-07-01

    We investigate the observational effects of a quintessence model in an anisotropic spacetime. The anisotropic metric is a non-rotating particular case of a generalized Gödel's metric and is classified as Bianchi III. This metric is an exact solution of the Einstein-Klein-Gordon field equations with an anisotropic scalar field ?, which is responsible for the anisotropy of the spacetime geometry. We test the model against observations of type Ia supernovae, analyzing the SDSS dataset calibrated with the MLCS2k2 fitter, and the results are compared to standard quintessence models with Ratra-Peebles potentials. We obtain a good agreement with observations, with best values for the matter and curvature density parameters ?{sub M} = 0.29 and ?{sub k}= 0.01 respectively. We conclude that present SNe Ia observations cannot, alone, distinguish a possible anisotropic axis in the cosmos.

  4. A Novel Supernova Detector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    David B. Cline

    2000-01-13

    We discuss the prospects for detecting nu_{mu,tau} and nu_{tau}neutrinos from Type II supernovas using the novel detector at the Supernova Burst Observatory (SNBO) or OMNIS that is being designed for an underground laboratory in the USA. This detector would collect ~2000 flavor selected events from a Galactic supernova and could probe neutrino mass down to a few eV, as well as the dynamics of the supernova process. We believe this is essential to further our understanding of the neutrino section of elementary particle physics.

  5. RADIO EMISSION FROM SN 1994I IN NGC 5194 (M 51): THE BEST-STUDIED TYPE Ib/c RADIO SUPERNOVA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weiler, Kurt W.

    We present the results of detailed monitoring of the radio emission from the Type Ic supernova SN 1994I from three days after optical discovery on 1994 March 31 until eight years later at age 2927 days on 2002 April 5. The ...

  6. Supernova constraints on alternative models to dark energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yungui Gong; Chang-Kui Duan

    2004-05-04

    The recent observations of type Ia supernovae suggest that the universe is accelerating now and decelerated in the recent past. This may be the evidence of the breakdown of the standard Friedmann equation. The Friedmann equation $H^2\\sim \\rho$ is modified to be a general form $H^2=g(\\rho)$. Three models with particular form of $g(\\rho)$ are considered in detail. The supernova data published by \\citet{tonry}, \\citet{ddsg} and \\citet{raknop03} are used to analyze the models. After the best fit parameters are obtained, we then find out the transition redshift $z_{\\rm T}$ when the universe switched from the deceleration phase to the acceleration phase.

  7. Supernova constraints on alternative models to dark energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gong, Y; Gong, Yungui; Duan, Chang-Kui

    2004-01-01

    The recent observations of type Ia supernovae suggest that the universe is accelerating now and decelerated in the recent past. This may be the evidence of the breakdown of the standard Friedmann equation. The Friedmann equation $H^2\\sim \\rho$ is modified to be a general form $H^2=g(\\rho)$. Three models with particular form of $g(\\rho)$ are considered in detail. The supernova data published by \\citet{tonry}, \\citet{ddsg} and \\citet{raknop03} are used to analyze the models. After the best fit parameters are obtained, we then find out the transition redshift $z_{\\rm T}$ when the universe switched from the deceleration phase to the acceleration phase.

  8. iPTF13bvn: The first evidence of a binary progenitor for a type Ib supernova

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bersten, Melina C.; Folatelli, Gastón; Nomoto, Ken'ichi; Quimby, Robert; Benvenuto, Omar G.; Srivastav, Shubham; Anupama, G. C.; Sahu, Devendra K.

    2014-10-01

    The recent detection in archival Hubble Space Telescope images of an object at the location of supernova (SN) iPTF13bvn may represent the first direct evidence of the progenitor of a Type Ib SN. The object's photometry was found to be compatible with a Wolf-Rayet pre-SN star mass of ?11 M {sub ?}. However, based on hydrodynamical models, we show that the progenitor had a pre-SN mass of ?3.5 M {sub ?} and that it could not be larger than ?8 M {sub ?}. We propose an interacting binary system as the SN progenitor and perform evolutionary calculations that are able to self-consistently explain the light curve shape, the absence of hydrogen, and the pre-SN photometry. We further discuss the range of allowed binary systems and predict that the remaining companion is a luminous O-type star of significantly lower flux in the optical than the pre-SN object. A future detection of such a star may be possible and would provide the first robust identification of a progenitor system for a Type Ib SN.

  9. Neutrino-driven explosions of ultra-stripped type Ic supernovae generating binary neutron stars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Suwa, Yudai; Shibata, Masaru; Umeda, Hideyuki; Takahashi, Koh

    2015-01-01

    We study explosion characteristics of ultra-stripped supernovae (SNe), which are candidates of SNe generating binary neutron stars (NSs). As a first step, we perform stellar evolutionary simulations of bare carbon-oxygen cores of mass from 1.45 to 2.0 $M_\\odot$ until the iron cores become unstable and start collapsing. We then perform axisymmetric hydrodynamics simulations with spectral neutrino transport using these stellar evolution outcomes as initial conditions. All models exhibit successful explosions driven by neutrino heating. The diagnostic explosion energy, ejecta mass, Ni mass, and NS mass are typically $\\sim 10^{50}$ erg, $\\sim 0.1 M_\\odot$, $\\sim 0.01M_\\odot$, and $\\approx 1.3 M_\\odot$, which are compatible with observations of rapidly-evolving and luminous transient such as SN 2005ek. We also find that the ultra-stripped SN is a candidate for producing the secondary low-mass NS in the observed compact binary NSs like PSR J0737-3039.

  10. The variation of the fine structure constant: testing the dipole model with thermonuclear supernovae

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kraiselburd, Lucila; Negrelli, Carolina; Berro, Enrique García

    2014-01-01

    The large-number hypothesis conjectures that fundamental constants may vary. Accordingly, the spacetime variation of fundamental constants has been an active subject of research for decades. Recently, using data obtained with large telescopes a phenomenological model in which the fine structure constant might vary spatially has been proposed. We test whether this hypothetical spatial variation of {\\alpha}, which follows a dipole law, is compatible with the data of distant thermonuclear supernovae. Unlike previous works, in our calculations we consider not only the variation of the luminosity distance when a varying {\\alpha} is adopted, but we also take into account the variation of the peak luminosity of Type Ia supernovae resulting from a variation of {\\alpha}. This is done using an empirical relation for the peak bolometric magnitude of thermonuclear supernovae that correctly reproduces the results of detailed numerical simulations. We find that there is no significant difference between the several phenome...

  11. Supernova progenitors and iron density evolution from SN rate evolution measurements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guillaume Blanc; Laura Greggio

    2008-03-28

    Using an extensive compilation of literature supernova rate data we study to which extent its evolution constrains the star formation history, the distribution of the type Ia supernova (SNIa) progenitor's lifetime, the mass range of core-collapse supernova (CCSN) progenitors, and the evolution of the iron density in the field. We find that the diagnostic power of the cosmic SNIa rate on their progenitor model is relatively weak. More promising is the use of the evolution of the SNIa rate in galaxy clusters. We find that the CCSN rate is compatible with a Salpeter IMF, with a minimum mass for their progenitors > 10 Msun. We estimate the evolution in the field of the iron density released by SNe and find that in the local universe the iron abundance should be ~ 0.1 solar. We discuss the difference between this value and the iron abundance in clusters.

  12. Publications by Bruno Leibundgut Leibundgut, B.: Light Curves of Supernovae Type I, Ph.D. Thesis, Basel: University of Basel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leibundgut, Bruno

    .: Supernovae a Few Years Past Maximum, in SN 1987A and other Supernovae, eds. I.J. Danziger and K. Kj., Phillips, M.M., Smith, R.C., Win- kler, P.F., Winge, C., Roth, K.C., Blades, J.C., Branch, D., Chevalier, R

  13. Extragalactic distance scales: H0 from Hubble (Edwin) to Hubble (Hubble telescope)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Trimble, V; Trimble, V

    1997-01-01

    1939) both noted that supernovae, being very bright andassuming that all type Ia supernovae VIRGINIA TRIMBLE flashthe luminosity of type Ia supernovae ( assuming them to be

  14. Deflagrations in hybrid CONe white dwarfs: a route to explain the faint Type Iax supernova 2008ha

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kromer, M; Pakmor, R; Ruiter, A J; Hillebrandt, W; Marquardt, K S; Roepke, F K; Seitenzahl, I R; Sim, S A; Taubenberger, S

    2015-01-01

    Stellar evolution models predict the existence of hybrid white dwarfs (WDs) with a carbon-oxygen core surrounded by an oxygen-neon mantle. Being born with masses ~1.1 Msun, hybrid WDs in a binary system may easily approach the Chandrasekhar mass (MCh) by accretion and give rise to a thermonuclear explosion. Here, we investigate an off-centre deflagration in a near-MCh hybrid WD under the assumption that nuclear burning only occurs in carbon-rich material. Performing hydrodynamics simulations of the explosion and detailed nucleosynthesis post-processing calculations, we find that only 0.014 Msun of material is ejected while the remainder of the mass stays bound. The ejecta consist predominantly of iron-group elements, O, C, Si and S. We also calculate synthetic observables for our model and find reasonable agreement with the faint Type Iax SN 2008ha. This shows for the first time that deflagrations in near-MCh WDs can in principle explain the observed diversity of Type Iax supernovae. Leaving behind a near-MCh...

  15. The type IIP supernova 2012aw in M95: Hydrodynamical modeling of the photospheric phase from accurate spectrophotometric monitoring

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dall'Ora, M.; Botticella, M. T.; Della Valle, M. [INAF, Osservatorio Astronomico di Capodimonte, Napoli (Italy); Pumo, M. L.; Zampieri, L.; Tomasella, L.; Cappellaro, E.; Benetti, S. [INAF, Osservatorio Astronomico di Padova, I-35122 Padova (Italy); Pignata, G.; Bufano, F. [Departamento de Ciencias Fisicas, Universidad Andres Bello, Avda. Republica 252, Santiago (Chile); Bayless, A. J. [Southwest Research Institute, Department of Space Science, 6220 Culebra Road, San Antonio, TX 78238 (United States); Pritchard, T. A. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Penn State University, 525 Davey Lab, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Taubenberger, S.; Benitez, S. [Max-Planck-Institut für Astrophysik, Karl-Schwarzschild-Str. 1, D-85741 Garching (Germany); Kotak, R.; Inserra, C.; Fraser, M. [Astrophysics Research Centre, School of Mathematics and Physics, Queen's University Belfast, Belfast, BT7 1NN (United Kingdom); Elias-Rosa, N. [Institut de Ciències de l'Espai (CSIC-IEEC) Campus UAB, Torre C5, Za plata, E-08193 Bellaterra, Barcelona (Spain); Haislip, J. B. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, 120 E. Cameron Ave., Chapel Hill, NC 27599 (United States); Harutyunyan, A. [Fundación Galileo Galilei - Telescopio Nazionale Galileo, Rambla José Ana Fernández Pérez 7, E-38712 Breña Baja, TF - Spain (Spain); and others

    2014-06-01

    We present an extensive optical and near-infrared photometric and spectroscopic campaign of the Type IIP supernova SN 2012aw. The data set densely covers the evolution of SN 2012aw shortly after the explosion through the end of the photospheric phase, with two additional photometric observations collected during the nebular phase, to fit the radioactive tail and estimate the {sup 56}Ni mass. Also included in our analysis is the previously published Swift UV data, therefore providing a complete view of the ultraviolet-optical-infrared evolution of the photospheric phase. On the basis of our data set, we estimate all the relevant physical parameters of SN 2012aw with our radiation-hydrodynamics code: envelope mass M {sub env} ? 20 M {sub ?}, progenitor radius R ? 3 × 10{sup 13} cm (?430 R {sub ?}), explosion energy E ? 1.5 foe, and initial {sup 56}Ni mass ?0.06 M {sub ?}. These mass and radius values are reasonably well supported by independent evolutionary models of the progenitor, and may suggest a progenitor mass higher than the observational limit of 16.5 ± 1.5 M {sub ?} of the Type IIP events.

  16. Reducing Zero-point Systematics in Dark Energy Supernova Experiments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Faccioli, Lorenzo

    2011-01-01

    Schmidt, B . P. 2003, i n Supernovae a n d G a m m a - R a ynumber of observed supernovae, m a x i m u m surveyObservations of type l a Supernovae (SNe la) have allowed

  17. Spectropolarimetry of SN 2011dh in M51: geometric insights on a Type IIb supernova progenitor and explosion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mauerhan, Jon C; Leonard, Douglas C; Smith, Paul S; Filippenko, Alexei V; Smith, Nathan; Hoffman, Jennifer L; Huk, Leah; Clubb, Kelsey I; Silverman, Jeffrey M; Cenko, S Bradley; Milne, Peter; Gal-Yam, Avishay; Ben-Ami, Sagi

    2015-01-01

    We present seven epochs of spectropolarimetry of the Type IIb supernova (SN) 2011dh in M51, spanning 86 days of its evolution. The first epoch was obtained 9 days after the explosion, when the photosphere was still in the depleted hydrogen layer of the stripped-envelope progenitor. Continuum polarization is securely detected at the level of P~0.5% through day 14 and appears to diminish by day 30, which is different from the prevailing trends suggested by studies of other core-collapse SNe. Time-variable modulations in P and position angle are detected across P-Cygni line features. H-alpha and HeI polarization peak after 30 days and exhibit position angles roughly aligned with the earlier continuum, while OI and CaII appear to be geometrically distinct. We discuss several possibilities to explain the evolution of the continuum and line polarization, including the potential effects of a tidally deformed progenitor star, aspherical radioactive heating by fast-rising plumes of Ni-56 from the core, oblique shock b...

  18. Nucleosynthesis simulations for the production of the p-nuclei $^{\\text{92}}$Mo and $^{\\text{94}}$Mo in a Supernova type II model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Göbel, Kathrin; Koloczek, Alexander; Pignatari, Marco; Reifarth, René; Schach, René; Sonnabend, Kerstin

    2015-01-01

    We present a nucleosynthesis sensitivity study for the $\\gamma$-process in a Supernova type II model within the NuGrid research platform. The simulations aimed at identifying the relevant local production and destruction rates for the p-nuclei of molybdenum and at determining the sensitivity of the final abundances to these rates. We show that local destruction rates strongly determine the abundance of $^{92}$Mo and $^{94}$Mo, and quantify the impact.

  19. A Deep Search for Prompt Radio Emission from Thermonuclear Supernovae with the Very Large Array

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chomiuk, Laura; Chevalier, Roger A; Bruzewski, Seth; Foley, Ryan J; Parrent, Jerod; Strader, Jay; Badenes, Carles; Fransson, Claes; Kamble, Atish; Margutti, Raffaella; Rupen, Michael P; Simon, Joshua D

    2015-01-01

    Searches for circumstellar material around Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) are one of the most powerful tests of the nature of SN Ia progenitors, and radio observations provide a particularly sensitive probe of this material. Here we report radio observations for SNe Ia and their lower-luminosity thermonuclear cousins. We present the largest, most sensitive, and spectroscopically diverse study of prompt (delta t thermonuclear SNe, including 25 obtained by our team with the unprecedented depth of the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array. With these observations, SN 2012cg joins SN 2011fe and SN 2014J as a SN Ia with remarkably deep radio limits and excellent temporal coverage (six epochs, spanning 5--216 days after explosion, yielding Mdot/v_w <~ 5 x 10^-9 M_sun/yr / (100 km/s), assuming epsilon_B = 0.1 and epsilon_e = 0.1). All observations yield non-detections, placing strong constraints on the presence of circumstellar material. We present analytical models for the temporal an...

  20. Low-mass helium star models for type Ib supernovae - Light curves, mixing, and nucleosynthesis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shigeyama, Toshikazu; Nomoto, Kenichi; Tsujimoto, Takuji; Hashimoto, Masaki (Tokyo Univ. (Japan) Kyushu Univ., Fukuoka (Japan))

    1990-09-01

    The applicability of theoretical models of He-star explosions to type Ib SN explosions is explored. Particular attention is given to light curves and mixing, Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities and mixing, and nucleosynthesis and the mass of Ni-56. Typical numerical results are presented in graphs, and it is concluded that the explosions of SN 1983N and SN 1983I can be accurately represented in terms of explosions of He stars with M(alpha) of 3-4 solar mass. A strong M(alpha) dependence of light-curve shape, photospheric velocity, and Ni-56 mass is found. 44 refs.

  1. A Unified Energy-Reservoir Model Containing Contributions from $^{56}$Ni and Neutron Stars and Its Implication to Luminous Type Ic Supernovae

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, S Q; Dai, Z G; Wu, X F

    2015-01-01

    Most type-Ic core-collapse supernovae (CCSNe) produce $^{56}$Ni and neutron stars (NSs) or black holes (BHs). The dipole radiation of nascent NSs has usually been neglected in explaining supernovae (SNe) with peak absolute magnitude $M_{\\rm peak}$ in any band are $\\gtrsim -19.5$~mag, while the $^{56}$Ni can be neglected in fitting most type-Ic superluminous supernovae (SLSNe Ic) whose $M_{\\rm peak}$ in any band are $\\lesssim -21$~mag, since the luminosity from a magnetar (highly magnetized NS) can outshine that from a moderate amount of $^{56}$Ni. For luminous SNe Ic with $-21 \\lesssim M_{\\rm peak}\\lesssim -19.5$~mag, however, both contributions from $^{56}$Ni and NSs cannot be neglected without serious modeling, since they are not SLSNe and the $^{56}$Ni mass could be up to $\\sim 0.5 M_{\\odot}$. In this paper we propose a unified model that contain contributions from both $^{56}$Ni and a nascent NS. We select three luminous SNe Ic-BL, SN~2010ay, SN~2006nx, and SN~14475, and show that, if these SNe are powere...

  2. The Environments of Supernovae in Post-Refurbishment Hubble Space Telescope Images

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. D. Van Dyk; C. Y. Peng; A. J. Barth; A. V. Filippenko

    1999-07-19

    The locations of supernovae in the local stellar and gaseous environment in galaxies contain important clues to their progenitor stars. Access to this information, however, has been hampered by the limited resolution achieved by ground-based observations. High spatial resolution Hubble Space Telescope (HST) images of galaxy fields in which supernovae had been observed can improve the situation considerably. We have examined the immediate environments of a few dozen supernovae using archival post-refurbishment HST images. Although our analysis is limited due to signal-to-noise ratio and filter bandpass considerations, the images allow us for the first time to resolve individual stars in, and to derive detailed color-magnitude diagrams for, several environments. We are able to place more rigorous constraints on the masses of these supernovae. A search was made for late-time emission from supernovae in the archival images, and for the progenitor stars in presupernova images of the host galaxies. We have detected SN 1986J in NGC 891 and, possibly, SN 1981K in NGC 4258. We have also identified the progenitor of the Type IIn SN 1997bs in NGC 3627. By removing younger resolved stars in the environments of SNe Ia, we can measure the colors of the unresolved stellar background and attribute these colors generally to an older, redder population. HST images ``accidentally'' caught the Type Ia SN 1994D in NGC 4526 shortly after its outburst; we measure its brightness. Finally, we add to the statistical inferences that can be made from studying the association of SNe with recent star-forming regions.

  3. Optical and ultraviolet observations of a low-velocity type II plateau supernova 2013am in M65

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Jujia; Bai, Jinming; Fan, Yufeng; Wang, Jianguo; Yi, Weimin; Wang, Chuanjun; Xin, Yuxin; Liangchang; Zhang, Xiliang; Lun, Baoli; Wang, Xueli; He, Shousheng [Yunnan Observatories (YNAO), Chinese Academy of Sciences, Kunming 650216 (China); Wang, Xiaofeng; Huang, Fang; Mo, Jun [Physics Department and Tsinghua Center for Astrophysics (THCA), Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Mazzali, Paolo A.; Bersier, David [Astrophysics Research Institute, Liverpool John Moores University, Liverpool Science Park, 146 Brownlow Hill, Liverpool L3 5RF (United Kingdom); Zhang, Tianmeng [National Astronomical Observatories of China (NAOC), Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100012 (China); Walker, Emma S., E-mail: jujia@ynao.ac.cn, E-mail: baijinming@ynao.ac.cn, E-mail: wang_xf@mail.tsinghua.edu.cn [Department of Physics, Yale University, New Haven, CT 06520-8121 (United States)

    2014-12-10

    Optical and ultraviolet observations for the nearby type II plateau supernova (SN IIP) 2013am in the nearby spiral galaxy M65 are presented in this paper. The early spectra are characterized by relatively narrow P-Cygni features, with ejecta velocities much lower than observed in normal SNe IIP (i.e., ?2000 km s{sup –1} versus ?5000 km {sup –1} in the middle of the plateau phase). Moreover, prominent Ca II absorptions are also detected in SN 2013am at relatively early phases. These spectral features are reminiscent of those seen in the low-velocity and low-luminosity SN IIP 2005cs. However, SN 2013am exhibits different photometric properties, having shorter plateau phases and brighter light curve tails if compared to SN 2005cs. Adopting R{sub V} = 3.1 and a mean value of total reddening derived from the photometric and spectroscopic methods (i.e., E(B – V) = 0.55 ± 0.19 mag), we find that SN 2013am may have reached an absolute V-band peak magnitude of –15.83 ± 0.71 mag and produced an {sup 56}Ni mass of 0.016{sub ?0.006}{sup +0.010} M {sub ?} in the explosion. These parameters are close to those derived for SN 2008in and SN 2009N, which have been regarded as 'gap-filler' objects linking the faint SNe IIP to the normal ones. This indicates that some low-velocity SNe IIP may not necessarily result from the low-energetic explosions. The low expansion velocities could be due to a lower metallicity of the progenitor stars, a larger envelope mass ejected in the explosion, or the effect of viewing angle where these SNe were observed at an angle away from the polar direction.

  4. A HIGH-RESOLUTION SPECTROSCOPIC SEARCH FOR THE REMAINING DONOR FOR TYCHO'S SUPERNOVA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kerzendorf, Wolfgang E.; Yong, David; Schmidt, Brian P.; Murphy, Simon J.; Bessell, Michael S. [Research School of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Mount Stromlo Observatory, Cotter Road, Weston Creek, ACT 2611 (Australia); Simon, Joshua D. [Observatories of the Carnegie Institution for Science, 813 Santa Barbara Street, Pasadena, CA 91101 (United States); Jeffery, C. Simon [Armagh Observatory, College Hill, Armagh BT61 9DG (United Kingdom); Anderson, Jay [Space Telescope Science Institute, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Podsiadlowski, Philipp [Department of Astrophysics, University of Oxford, Oxford, OX1 3RH (United Kingdom); Gal-Yam, Avishay [Benoziyo Center for Astrophysics, Faculty of Physics, Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovot 76100 (Israel); Silverman, Jeffrey M.; Filippenko, Alexei V. [Department of Astronomy, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720-3411 (United States); Nomoto, Ken'ichi [Kavli Institute for the Physics and Mathematics of the Universe, University of Tokyo, 5-1-5 Kashiwanoha, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8583 (Japan); Venn, Kim A. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Victoria, Elliott Building, 3800 Finnerty Road, Victoria, BC V8P 5C2 (Canada); Foley, Ryan J., E-mail: wkerzend@mso.anu.edu.au [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States)

    2013-09-10

    In this paper, we report on our analysis using Hubble Space Telescope astrometry and Keck-I HIRES spectroscopy of the central six stars of Tycho's supernova remnant (SN 1572). With these data, we measured the proper motions, radial velocities, rotational velocities, and chemical abundances of these objects. Regarding the chemical abundances, we do not confirm the unusually high [Ni/Fe] ratio previously reported for Tycho-G. Rather, we find that for all metrics in all stars, none exhibit the characteristics expected from traditional Type Ia supernova single-degenerate-scenario calculations. The only possible exception is Tycho-B, a rare, metal-poor A-type star; however, we are unable to find a suitable scenario for it. Thus, we suggest that SN 1572 cannot be explained by the standard single-degenerate model.

  5. Measurement of Omega_m, Omega_Lambda from a blind analysis of Type Ia supernovae with CMAGIC: Using color information to verify the acceleration of the Universe

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2006-01-01

    verify the acceleration of the Universe A. Conley 1,2,8 , G.with the picture of an accelerating Universe, and agreewith a ?at Universe within 1.7?, including systematics. We

  6. A Grey Radiative Transfer Procedure For Gamma-ray Transfer in Supernovae

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    David J. Jeffery

    1998-11-23

    The gamma-ray transfer in supernovae for the purposes of energy deposition in the ejecta can be approximated fairly accurately as frequency-integrated (grey) radiative transfer using a mean opacity as shown by Swartz, Sutherland, & Harkness (SSH). In SSH's grey radiative transfer procedure (unoptimized) the mean opacity is a pure absorption opacity and it is a constant aside from a usually weak composition dependence. In this paper, we present a variation on the SSH procedure which uses multiple mean opacities which have both absorption and scattering components. There is a mean opacity for each order of Compton scattering. A local-state (LS) approximation permits an analytic solution for the gamma-ray transfer of scattered gamma-ray fields. The LS approximation is admittedly crude, but the scattered fields are always of lesser importance to the energy deposition. We call our procedure the LS grey radiative transfer procedure or LS procedure for short. For a standard Type Ia supernova (SN Ia) model the uncertainty in gamma-ray energy deposition is estimated to be of order 10 % or less. The LS procedure code used for this paper can be obtained by request from the author. For completeness and easy reference, we include in this paper a review of the gamma-ray opacities important in supernovae, a discussion of the appropriate mean opacity prescription, and a discussion of the errors arising from neglecting time-dependent and non-static radiative transfer effects.

  7. GRB 020410: A Gamma-ray burst afterglow discovered by its supernova light

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2004-01-01

    high-velocity Type Ib/c supernovae such as SN 1998bw. Otherwith the luminous Type Ic supernovae 1998bw (Galama et al.a link between GRBs and supernovae. However GRB 980425 was a

  8. Discovery of a Supernova Explosion at Half the Age of the Universe and its Cosmological Implications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Perlmutter, S.

    2010-01-01

    ULDA Access Guide No.6: Supernovae (eds Cappellaro, E. ,of light curves of supernovae type 1. Astra. Astrophys.magnitudes of Type la supernovae. Astrophys. J. 413, LI05-

  9. Optimal Extraction of Cosmological Information from Supernova Data in the Presence of Calibration Uncertainties

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Alex G.; Miquel, Ramon

    2005-01-01

    The study of type-la supernovae provided the firstResults from more recent supernovae surveys [5, 6] further8] techniques to turn type-la supernovae into standardized

  10. Supernova rates from the SUDARE VST-Omegacam search. I

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cappellaro, E; Pignata, G; Grado, L; Greggio, L; Limatola, L; Vaccari, M; Baruffolo, A; Benetti, S; Bufano, F; Capaccioli, M; Cascone, E; Covone, G; De Cicco, D; Falocco, S; Della Valle, M; Jarvis, M; Marchetti, L; Napolitano, N R; Paolillo, M; Pastorello, A; Radovich, M; Schipani, P; Spiro, S; Tomasella, L; Turatto, M

    2015-01-01

    We describe the observing strategy, data reduction tools and early results of a supernova (SN) search project, named SUDARE, conducted with the ESO VST telescope aimed at measuring the rate of the different types of SNe in the redshift range 0.2type II, 22% type IIn and 34% type Ib/c. In order to link the transients, we built a catalog of ~1.3x10^5 galaxies in the redshift range 0Ia and core collapse SNe in different bin of redshifts. The values are consistent with other measurements from the literature. The dispersion of the rate measurements for SNe Ia is comparable with the scatter of the t...

  11. The Very Early Light Curve of SN 2015F in NGC 2442: A Possible Detection of Shock-Heated Cooling Emission and Constraints on SN Ia Progenitor System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Im, Myungshin; Yoon, Sung-Chul; Kim, Jae-Woo; Ehgamberdiev, Shuhrat A; Monard, Libert A G; Sung, Hyun-Il

    2015-01-01

    The main progenitor candidate of Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) is white dwarfs in binary systems where the companion star is another white dwarf (double degenerate system) or a less evolved non-degenerate star with R* >~ 0.1 Rsun (single degenerate system), but no direct observational evidence exists that tells which progenitor system is more common. Recent studies suggest that the light curve of a supernova shortly after its explosion can be used to set a limit on the progenitor size, R*. Here, we report a high cadence monitoring observation of SN 2015F, a normal SN Ia, in the galaxy NGC 2442 starting about 84 days before the first light time. With our daily cadence data, we catch the emergence of the radioactively powered light curve, but more importantly detect with a > 97.4% confidence a possible dim precursor emission that appears at roughly 1.5 days before the rise of the radioactively powered emission. The signal is consistent with theoretical expectations for a progenitor system involving a companion st...

  12. Physical Dust Models for the Extinction toward Supernova 2014J in M82

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gao, Jian; Li, Aigen; Li, Jun; Wang, Xiaofeng

    2015-01-01

    Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) are powerful cosmological "standardizable candles" and the most precise distance indicators. However, a limiting factor in their use for precision cosmology rests on our ability to correct for the dust extinction toward them. SN 2014J in the starburst galaxy M82, the closest detected SN~Ia in three decades, provides unparalleled opportunities to study the dust extinction toward an SN Ia. In order to derive the extinction as a function of wavelength, we model the color excesses toward SN 2014J, which are observationally derived over a wide wavelength range in terms of dust models consisting of a mixture of silicate and graphite. The resulting extinction laws steeply rise toward the far ultraviolet, even steeper than that of the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC). We infer a visual extinction of $A_V \\approx 1.9~\\rm mag$, a reddening of $E(B-V)\\approx1.1~ \\rm mag$, and a total-to-selective extinction ratio of $R_V \\approx 1.7$, consistent with that previously derived from photometric, spec...

  13. Snacktime for Hungry Black Holes: Theoretical Studies of the Tidal Disruption of Stars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Strubbe, Linda Elisabeth

    2011-01-01

    law tail . . . . . . . 3.5 Rates of supernovae close to thein color to be Type Ia supernovae, gamma-ray bursts, or AGN.Type II supernovae (bluer than Type Ia’s) are not expected

  14. Type IIb supernova SN 2011dh: Spectra and photometry from the ultraviolet to the near-infrared

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marion, G. H.; Kirshner, Robert P.; Foley, Ryan J.; Berlind, Perry; Bieryla, Allyson; Calkins, Michael L.; Challis, Peter; Chornock, Ryan; Esquerdo, Gilbert A.; Falco, Emilio E.; Friedman, Andrew S. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden St., Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Vinko, Jozsef [University of Texas at Austin, 1 University Station C1400, Austin, TX 78712-0259 (United States); Bloom, Joshua S. [Department of Astronomy, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720-3411 (United States); Chevalier, Roger A. [Astronomy Department, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA 22904 (United States); Culliton, Chris; Curtis, Jason L. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Pennsylvania State University, 525 Davey Laboratory, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Everett, Mark E. [National Optical Astronomy Observatory, Tucson, AZ 85719 (United States); France, Kevin [Center for Astrophysics and Space Astronomy, University of Colorado, 389 UCB, Boulder, CO 80309 (United States); Fransson, Claes [Department of Astronomy, The Oskar Klein Centre, Stockholm University, S-106 91 Stockholm (Sweden); Garnavich, Peter, E-mail: gmarion@cfa.harvard.edu [Department of Physics, University of Notre Dame, 225 Nieuwland Science Hall, Notre Dame, IN 46556 (United States); and others

    2014-02-01

    We report spectroscopic and photometric observations of the Type IIb SN 2011dh obtained between 4 and 34 days after the estimated date of explosion (May 31.5 UT). The data cover a wide wavelength range from 2000 Å in the ultraviolet (UV) to 2.4 ?m in the near-infrared (NIR). Optical spectra provide line profiles and velocity measurements of H I, He I, Ca II, and Fe II that trace the composition and kinematics of the supernova (SN). NIR spectra show that helium is present in the atmosphere as early as 11 days after the explosion. A UV spectrum obtained with the Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph reveals that the UV flux for SN 2011dh is low compared to other SN IIb. Modeling the spectrum with SYNOW suggests that the UV deficit is due to line blanketing from Ti II and Co II. The H I and He I velocities in SN 2011dh are separated by about 4000 km s{sup –1} at all phases. A velocity gap is consistent with models for a preexplosion structure in which a hydrogen-rich shell surrounds the progenitor. We estimate that the H shell of SN 2011dh is ?8 times less massive than the shell of SN 1993J and ?3 times more massive than the shell of SN 2008ax. Light curves (LCs) for 12 passbands are presented: UVW2, UVM2, UVW1, U, u', B, V, r', i', J, H, and K{sub s} . In the B band, SN 2011dh reached peak brightness of 13.17 mag at 20.0 ± 0.5 after the explosion. The maximum bolometric luminosity of 1.8 ± 0.2 × 10{sup 42} erg s{sup –1} occurred ?22 days after the explosion. NIR emission provides more than 30% of the total bolometric flux at the beginning of our observations, and the NIR contribution increases to nearly 50% of the total by day 34. The UV produces 16% of the total flux on day 4, 5% on day 9, and 1% on day 34. We compare the bolometric LCs of SN 2011dh, SN 2008ax, and SN 1993J. The LC are very different for the first 12 days after the explosions, but all three SN IIb display similar peak luminosities, times of peak, decline rates, and colors after maximum. This suggests that the progenitors of these SN IIb may have had similar compositions and masses, but they exploded inside hydrogen shells that have a wide range of masses. SN 2011dh was well observed, and a likely progenitor star has been identified in preexplosion images. The detailed observations presented here will help evaluate theoretical models for this SN and lead to a better understanding of SN IIb.

  15. PROBING THE LOW-REDSHIFT STAR FORMATION RATE AS A FUNCTION OF METALLICITY THROUGH THE LOCAL ENVIRONMENTS OF TYPE II SUPERNOVAE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stoll, R.; Stanek, K. Z.; Pogge, R. W. [Department of Astronomy, Ohio State University, 140 West 18th Avenue, Columbus, OH 43210-1173 (United States); Prieto, J. L. [Department of Astrophysical Sciences, Princeton University, 4 Ivy Lane, Peyton Hall, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States)

    2013-08-10

    Type II supernovae (SNe) can be used as a star formation tracer to probe the metallicity distribution of global low-redshift star formation. We present oxygen and iron abundance distributions of Type II SN progenitor regions that avoid many previous sources of bias. Because iron abundance, rather than oxygen abundance, is of key importance for the late stage evolution of the massive stars that are the progenitors of core-collapse supernovae, and because iron enrichment lags oxygen enrichment, we find a general conversion from oxygen abundance to iron abundance. The distributions we present here are the best yet observational standard of comparison for evaluating how different classes of supernovae depend on progenitor metallicity. We spectroscopically measure the gas-phase oxygen abundance near a representative subsample of the hosts of Type II SNe from the first-year Palomar Transient Factory (PTF) SN search, using a combination of Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) spectra near the SN location (9 hosts) and new longslit spectroscopy (25 hosts). The median metallicity of these 34 hosts at or near the SN location is 12+log(O/H) = 8.65, with a median error of 0.09. The median host galaxy stellar mass from fits to SDSS photometry is 10{sup 9.9} M{sub Sun }. They do not show a systematic offset in metallicity or mass from a redshift-matched sample of the MPA/JHU value-added catalog. In contrast to previous SN host metallicity studies, this sample is drawn from a single survey. It is also drawn from an areal rather than a targeted survey, so SNe in the lowest-mass galaxies are not systematically excluded. Indeed, the PTF SN search has a slight bias toward following up transients in low mass galaxies. The progenitor region metallicity distribution we find is statistically indistinguishable from the metallicity distribution of Type II SN hosts found by targeted surveys and by samples from multiple surveys with different selection functions. Using the relationship between iron and oxygen abundances found for Milky Way disk, bulge, and halo stars, we translate our distribution of Type II SN environments as a function of oxygen abundance into an estimate of the iron abundance, since iron varies more steeply than oxygen. We find that though this sample spans only 0.65 dex in oxygen abundance, the gap between the iron and oxygen abundance is 50% wider at the low-metallicity end of our sample than at the high-metallicity end.

  16. Neutrinos and Nucleosynthesis in Supernova

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    U. Solis; J. C. D'Olivo; L. G. Cabral-Rosetti

    2005-11-12

    The type II supernova is considered as a candidate site for the production of heavy elements. The nucleosynthesis occurs in an intense neutrino flux, we calculate the electron fraction in this environment.

  17. Power-law cosmology, SN Ia, and BAO

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dolgov, Aleksander; Halenka, Vitali; Tkachev, Igor E-mail: vithal@umich.edu

    2014-10-01

    We revise observational constraints on the class of models of modified gravity which at low redshifts lead to a power-law cosmology. To this end we use available public data on Supernova Ia and on baryon acoustic oscillations. We show that the expansion regime a(t) ? t{sup ?} with ? close to 3/2 in a spatially flat universe is a good fit to these data.

  18. What We Know About Dark Energy From Supernovae

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Filippenko, Alex [University of California, Berkeley, California, United States

    2010-01-08

    The measured distances of type Ia (white dwarf) supernovae as a function of redshift (z) have shown that the expansion of the Universe is currently accelerating, probably due to the presence of dark energy (X) having a negative pressure. Combining all of the data with existing results from large-scale structure surveys, we find a best fit for Omega M and Omega X of 0.28 and 0.72 (respectively), in excellent agreement with the values derived independently from WMAP measurements of the cosmic microwave background radiation. Thus far, the best-fit value for the dark energy equation-of-state parameter is -1, and its first derivative is consistent with zero, suggesting that the dark energy may indeed be Einstein's cosmological constant.

  19. Discovery of gamma-ray emission from the shell-type supernova remnant RCW 86 with H.E.S.S

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    HESS Collaboration; F. Aharonian

    2008-10-15

    The shell-type supernova remnant (SNR) RCW 86, possibly associated with the historical supernova SN 185, with its relatively large size (about 40' in diameter) and the presence of non-thermal X-rays is a promising target for gamma-ray observations. The high sensitivity, good angular resolution of a few arc minutes and the large field of view of the High Energy Stereoscopic System (H.E.S.S.) make it ideally suited for the study of the gamma-ray morphology of such extended sources. H.E.S.S. observations have indeed led to the discovery of the SNR RCW 86 in very high energy (VHE; E > 100 GeV) gamma-rays. With 31 hours of observation time, the source is detected with a statistical significance of 8.5 sigma and is significantly more extended than the H.E.S.S. point spread function. Morphological studies have been performed and show that the gamma-ray flux does not correlate perfectly with the X-ray emission. The flux from the remnant is ~10% of the flux from the Crab nebula, with a similar photon index of about 2.5. Possible origins of the very high energy gamma-ray emission, via either Inverse Compton scattering by electrons or the decay of neutral pions produced by proton interactions, are discussed on the basis of spectral features obtained both in the X-ray and gamma-ray regimes.

  20. Core-Collapse Supernovae from 9 to 120 Solar Masses Based on Neutrino-powered Explosions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sukhbold, Tuguldur; Woosley, S E; Brown, Justin M; Janka, H -T

    2015-01-01

    Nucleosynthesis, light curves, explosion energies, and remnant masses are calculated for a grid of supernovae resulting from massive stars with solar metallicity and masses from 9.0 to 120 solar masses. The full evolution is followed using an adaptive reaction network of up to 2000 nuclei. A novel aspect of the survey is the use of a one-dimensional neutrino transport model for the explosion. This explosion model has been calibrated to give the observed energy for SN 1987A, using several standard progenitors, and for the Crab supernova using a 9.6 solar mass progenitor. As a result of using a calibrated central engine, the final kinetic energy of the supernova is variable and sensitive to the structure of the presupernova star. Many progenitors with extended core structures do not explode, but become black holes, and the masses of exploding stars do not form a simply connected set. The resulting nucleosynthesis agrees reasonably well with the sun provided that a reasonable contribution from Type Ia supernovae...

  1. Hubble's variable parameter: The long and short of it

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Trimble, V; Trimble, V

    1996-01-01

    supernovae Key project Type Ia supernovae Globular clustersType I supernovae Gravitational lensing Surface brightnessratio” method) Type Ia supernovae method 75 f 8 47 f 7 87.3

  2. Supernova constraints on Multi-coupled Dark Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arpine Piloyan; Valerio Marra; Marco Baldi; Luca Amendola

    2013-07-09

    The persisting consistency of ever more accurate observational data with the predictions of the standard LCDM cosmological model puts severe constraints on possible alternative scenarios, but still does not shed any light on the fundamental nature of the cosmic dark sector.As large deviations from a LCDM cosmology are ruled out by data, the path to detect possible features of alternative models goes necessarily through the definition of cosmological scenarios that leave almost unaffected the background and -- to a lesser extent -- the linear perturbations evolution of the universe. In this context,the Multi-coupled DE (McDE) model was proposed by Baldi 2012 as a particular realization of an interacting Dark Energy field characterized by an effective screening mechanism capable of suppressing the effects of the coupling at the background and linear perturbation level. In the present paper, for the first time, we challenge the McDE scenario through a direct comparison with real data, in particular with the luminosity distance of Type Ia supernovae. By studying the existence and stability conditions of the critical points of the associated background dynamical system, we select only the cosmologically consistent solutions, and confront their background expansion history with data. Confirming previous qualitative results, the McDE scenario appears to be fully consistent with the adopted sample of Type Ia supernovae, even for coupling values corresponding to an associated scalar fifth-force about four orders of magnitude stronger than standard gravity. Our analysis demonstrates the effectiveness of the McDE background screening, and shows some new non-trivial asymptotic solutions for the future evolution of the universe. Our results show how the background expansion history might be highly insensitive to the fundamental nature and to the internal complexity of the dark sector. [Abridged

  3. TITLE AUTHORS SUBJECT SUBJECT RELATED DESCRIPTION PUBLISHER AVAILABILI...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Univ of Oklahoma Univ of Oklahoma ASTRONOMY AND ASTROPHYSICS Dark Energy Type Ia supernovae radiative transfer Dark Energy Type Ia supernovae radiative transfer The progress...

  4. Properties of optically selected supernova remnant candidates in M33

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, Jong Hwan; Lee, Myung Gyoon, E-mail: leejh@astro.snu.ac.kr, E-mail: mglee@astro.snu.ac.kr [Astronomy Program, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-747 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-10-01

    Narrowband images covering strong emission lines are efficient for surveying supernova remnants (SNRs) in nearby galaxies. Using the narrowband images provided by the Local Group Galaxy Survey, we searched for SNRs in M33. Culling the objects with enhanced [S II]/H? and round morphology in the continuum-subtracted H? and [S II] images, we produced a list of 199 sources. Among them, 79 are previously unknown. Their progenitor and morphology types were classified. A majority of the sample (170 objects) are likely remnants of core-collapse supernovae (SNe), and 29 are remnants of Type Ia SNe. The cumulative size distribution of these objects is found to be similar to that of the M31 remnants derived in a similar way. We obtain a power-law slope, ? = 2.38 ± 0.05. Thus, a majority of the sources are considered to be in the Sedov-Taylor phase, consistent with previous findings. The histogram of the emission-line ratio ([S II]/H?) of the remnants has two concentrations at [S II]/H? ? 0.55 and ?0.8, as in M31. Interestingly, L {sub X} (and L {sub 20cm}) of the compact center-bright objects are correlated with their optical luminosity. The remnants with X-ray emission have brighter optical surface brightnesses and smaller diameters than those without X-ray emission.

  5. Supernovae. Part II: The aftermath

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Trimble, V; Trimble, V

    1983-01-01

    R. Viswanathan, 1980, As- Supernovae. Part II ExperimentalSmith, 1982, Astrophys. Supernovae. Chevalier, R. A. , andC. B. , 1974, Ed. , Supernovae and Supernova Rem- nants,

  6. Search for Relic Neutrinos and Supernova Bursts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    David B. Cline

    2000-01-14

    We describe the current situation concerning methods to search for relic neutrinos from the Big Bang and from all past supernovae (SNs). The most promising method for Big Bang neutrinos is by the interaction of ultra-high- energy (UHE) neutrinos. For supernova neutrinos, both Super Kamiokande- and ICARUS-type detectors will be important to study both nubar_{e} and nu_{e} fluxes. We also discuss a dedicated supernova burst observatory (OMNIS) being planned for three sites in the world. We also describe the possible analysis of the supernova type-II (SNII) neutrinos, including flavor mixing, that might be carried out in the future.

  7. LSQ14bdq: A Type Ic super-luminous supernova with a double-peaked light curve

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nicholl, M; Jerkstrand, A; Sim, S A; Inserra, C; Anderson, J P; Baltay, C; Benetti, S; Chambers, K; Chen, T -W; Elias-Rosa, N; Feindt, U; Flewelling, H A; Fraser, M; Gal-Yam, A; Galbany, L; Huber, M E; Kangas, T; Kankare, E; Kotak, R; Krühler, T; Maguire, K; McKinnon, R; Rabinowitz, D; Rostami, S; Schulze, S; Smith, K W; Sullivan, M; Tonry, J L; Valenti, S; Young, D R

    2015-01-01

    We present data for LSQ14bdq, a hydrogen-poor super-luminous supernova (SLSN) discovered by the La Silla QUEST survey and classified by the Public ESO Spectroscopic Survey of Transient Objects. The spectrum and light curve are very similar to slow-declining SLSNe such as PTF12dam. However, detections within $\\sim1$ day after explosion show a bright and relatively fast initial peak, lasting for $\\sim15$ days, prior to the usual slow rise to maximum light. The broader, main peak can be fit with either central engine or circumstellar interaction models. We discuss the implications of the precursor peak in the context of these models. It is too bright and narrow to be explained as a normal \\Ni-powered SN, and we suggest that interaction models may struggle to fit the precursor and main peak simultaneously. We propose that the initial peak is from the post-shock cooling of an extended stellar envelope, and reheating by a central engine drives the second peak. In this picture, we show that an explosion energy of $\\...

  8. Types of Directives - DOE Directives, Delegations, and Requirements

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home RoomPreservationBio-Inspired SolarAbout /Two Electron Holes in HematiteType Ia Supernovae Type

  9. Types of Nuclear Industry Jobs Commercial and Government Sectors

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home RoomPreservationBio-Inspired SolarAbout /Two Electron Holes in HematiteType Ia SupernovaeTypes of

  10. ELECTRON-CAPTURE SUPERNOVAE AS ORIGIN OF {sup 48}Ca

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wanajo, Shinya [National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, 2-21-1 Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan); Janka, Hans-Thomas; Mueller, Bernhard, E-mail: shinya.wanajo@nao.ac.jp [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Astrophysik, Karl-Schwarzschild-Str. 1, D-85748 Garching (Germany)

    2013-04-20

    We report that electron-capture supernovae (ECSNe), arising from collapsing oxygen-neon-magnesium cores, are a possible source of {sup 48}Ca, whose origin has remained a longstanding puzzle. Our two-dimensional, self-consistent explosion model of an ECSN predicts ejection of neutron-rich matter with electron fractions Y{sub e} Almost-Equal-To 0.40-0.42 and relatively low entropies, s Almost-Equal-To 13-15 k{sub B} per nucleon (k{sub B} is the Boltzmann constant). Post-processing nucleosynthesis calculations result in appreciable production of {sup 48}Ca in such neutron-rich and low-entropy matter during the quasi-nuclear equilibrium and subsequent freezeout phases. The amount of ejected {sup 48}Ca can account for that in the solar inventory when we consider possible uncertainties in the entropies. ECSNe could thus be a site of {sup 48}Ca production in addition to a hypothetical, rare class of high-density Type Ia supernovae.

  11. "Title","Creator/Author","Publication Date","OSTI Identifier...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    PHYSICS; ACCURACY; COLOR; COSMOLOGICAL CONSTANT; LUMINOSITY; PHOTOMETRY; SHAPE; SUPERNOVAE Astrophysics,ASTRO",,"We combine the CfA3 supernovae Type Ia (SN Ia) sample with...

  12. Bolometric light curves of supernovae and post-explosion magnetic fields

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. Ruiz-Lapuente; H. Spruit

    1997-11-20

    The various effects leading to diversity in the bolometric light curves of supernovae are examined: nucleosynthesis, kinematic differences, ejected mass, degree of mixing, and configuration and intensity of the magnetic field are discussed. In Type Ia supernovae, a departure in the bolometric light curve from the full-trapping decline of $^{56}$Co can occur within the two and a half years after the explosion, depending on the evolutionary path followed by the WD during the accretion phase. If convection has developed in the WD core during the presupernova evolution, starting several thousand years before the explosion, a tangled magnetic field close to the equipartition value should have grown in the WD. Such an intense magnetic field would confine positrons where they originate from the $^{56}$Co decays, and preclude a strong departure from the full-trapping decline, as the supernova expands. This situation is expected to occur in C+O Chandrasekhar WDs as opposed to edge-lit detonated sub-Chandrasekhar WDs. If the pre-explosion magnetic field of the WD is less intense than 10$^{5-8}$G, a lack of confinement of the positrons emitted in the $^{56}$Co decay and a departure from full-trapping decline would occur. The time at which it takes place can provide estimates of the original magnetic field of the WD, its configuration, and also of the mass of the supernova ejecta. In SN 1991bg, the bolometric light curve suggests absence of a significant tangled magnetic field (intensity lower than $10^{3}$ G). Chandrasekhar-mass models do not reproduce the bolometric light curve of this supernova. For SN 1972E, on the contrary, there is evidence for a tangled configuration of the magnetic field and its light curve is well reproduced by a Chandrasekhar WD explosion.

  13. Detonating Failed Deflagration Model of Thermonuclear Supernovae I. Explosion Dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tomasz Plewa

    2006-11-24

    We present a detonating failed deflagration model of Type Ia supernovae. In this model, the thermonuclear explosion of a massive white dwarf follows an off-center deflagration. We conduct a survey of asymmetric ignition configurations initiated at various distances from the stellar center. In all cases studied, we find that only a small amount of stellar fuel is consumed during deflagration phase, no explosion is obtained, and the released energy is mostly wasted on expanding the progenitor. Products of the failed deflagration quickly reach the stellar surface, polluting and strongly disturbing it. These disturbances eventually evolve into small and isolated shock-dominated regions which are rich in fuel. We consider these regions as seeds capable of forming self-sustained detonations that, ultimately, result in the thermonuclear supernova explosion. Preliminary nucleosynthesis results indicate the model supernova ejecta are typically composed of about 0.1-0.25 Msun of silicon group elements, 0.9-1.2 Msun of iron group elements, and are essentially carbon-free. The ejecta have a composite morphology, are chemically stratified, and display a modest amount of intrinsic asymmetry. The innermost layers are slightly egg-shaped with the axis ratio ~1.2-1.3 and dominated by the products of silicon burning. This central region is surrounded by a shell of silicon-group elements. The outermost layers of ejecta are highly inhomogeneous and contain products of incomplete oxygen burning with only small admixture of unburned stellar material. The explosion energies are ~1.3-1.5 10^51 erg.

  14. A reconnaissance of the possible donor stars to the Kepler supernova

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kerzendorf, Wolfgang E.; Childress, Michael; Schmidt, Brian P. [Research School of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Mount Stromlo Observatory, Cotter Road, Weston Creek, ACT 2611 (Australia); Scharwächter, Julia [Observatoire de Paris, LERMA (CNRS: UMR 8112), 61 Av. de l'Observatoire, 75014 Paris (France); Do, Tuan, E-mail: wkerzend@mso.anu.edu.au [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of Toronto, 50 Saint George Street, Toronto, ON M5S 3H4 (Canada)

    2014-02-10

    The identity of Type Ia supernova progenitors remains a mystery, with various lines of evidence pointing toward either accretion from a nondegenerate companion or the rapid merger of two degenerate stars leading to the thermonuclear destruction of a white dwarf. In this paper, we spectroscopically scrutinize 24 of the brightest stars residing in the central 38'' × 38'' of the SN 1604 (Kepler) supernova remnant to search for a possible surviving companion star. We can rule out, with high certainty, a red giant companion star—a progenitor indicated by some models of the supernova remnant. Furthermore, we find no star that exhibits properties uniquely consistent with those expected of a donor star down to L > 10 L {sub ?}. While the distribution of star properties toward the remnant are consistent with unrelated stars, we identify the most promising candidates for further astrometric and spectroscopic follow up. Such a program would either discover the donor star or place strong limits on progenitor systems to luminosities with L << L {sub ?}.

  15. Accelerated Cosmological Models in Modified Gravity tested by distant Supernovae SNIa data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andrzej Borowiec; Wlodzimierz Godlowski; Marek Szydlowski

    2006-08-03

    Recent supernovae of type Ia measurements and other astronomical observations suggest that our universe is in accelerating phase of evolution at the present epoch. While a dark energy of unknown form is usually proposed as the most feasible mechanism for the acceleration, there are appears some alternative conception that some effects arising from generalization of Einstein equation can mimic dark energy through a modified Friedmann equation. In this work we investigate some observational constraints on modified Friedmann equation obtained from generalized Lagrangian ${\\cal L} \\propto R^n$ in minimal coupling with matter in Palatini formalism. We mainly concentrate on the constraints of model parameters from distant supernovae but other constraint from baryon oscillation prior is also considered. We obtain the confidence levels on two additional model parameter ($n$,$\\Omega_{m,0}$). We conclude that the FRW model of First-Order Non-linear gravity survives several observational test like SNIa observation and baryon oscillation peaks. We find preferred value of $\\Omega_{m,0} \\simeq 0.3$ from combined analysis of supernovae data and baryon oscillation peak. For deeper statistical analysis we apply Akaike and Bayesian information criteria of model selection for comparison prediction of the model with prediction of concordance $\\Lambda$CDM model.

  16. IA News Archive

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergy A plug-inPPLforLDRD Report11,SecurityHome . Form D-4-A Government of the66 IA News

  17. Hot Coal for Christmas: Dust Formation in the Swept-Up Shell Around The Peculiar Type Ib Supernova 2006jc

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, Nathan; Filippenko, Alexei V

    2007-01-01

    We present evidence for the formation of dust grains in an unusual Type Ib SN based on late-time spectra of SN 2006jc. The progenitor suffered a giant outburst qualitatively similar to those seen in LBVs just 2 years prior to the SN, and we speculate that the dust formation we observe is an indirect consequence of that event. The key evidence for dust formation seen in our optical spectra is (1) the appearance of a strong continuum emission source at red wavelengths, and (2) fading of the redshifted sides of narrow HeI emission lines. These two observed characteristics provide the strongest case yet for dust formation in any Type Ib/c SN. Both developments occurred simultaneously between 51 and 75 days after peak brightness, which is quick compared to other dusty SNe. The high temperature of the dust implies carbon and not silicates, and we describe how infrared photometry may test this conjecture. Geometric considerations indicate dust formation occurring in the dense gas swept-up by the forward shock, and n...

  18. Massive stars exploding in a He-rich circumstellar medium - VII. The metamorphosis of ASASSN-15ed from a narrow line Type Ibn to a normal Type Ib Supernova

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pastorello, A; Elias-Rosa, N; Bersier, D; Hosseinzadeh, G; Morales-Garoffolo, A; Noebauer, U M; Taubenberger, S; Tomasella, L; Kochanek, C S; Falco, E; Basu, U; Beacom, J F; Benetti, S; Brimacombe, J; Cappellaro, E; Danilet, A B; Dong, Subo; Fernandez, J M; Goss, N; Granata, V; Harutyunyan, A; Holoien, T W -S; Ishida, E E O; Kiyota, S; Krannich, G; Nicholls, B; Ochner, P; Pojmanski, G; Shappee, B J; Simonian, G V; Stanek, K Z; Starrfield, S; Szczygiel, D; Tartaglia, L; Terreran, G; Thompson, T A; Turatto, M; Wagner, R M; Wiethoff, W S; Wilber, A; Wozniak, P R

    2015-01-01

    We present the results of the spectroscopic and photometric monitoring campaign of ASASSN-15ed. The transient was discovered quite young by the All Sky Automated Survey for SuperNovae (ASAS-SN). Amateur astronomers allowed us to sample the photometric SN evolution around maximum light, which we estimate to have occurred on JD = 2457087.4 +- 0.6 in the r-band. Its apparent r-band magnitude at maximum was r = 16.91 +- 0.10, providing an absolute magnitude M(r) ~ -20.04 +- 0.20, which is slightly more luminous than the typical magnitudes estimated for Type Ibn SNe. The post-peak evolution was well monitored, and the decline rate (being in most bands around 0.1 mag/d during the first 25 d after maximum) is marginally slower than the average decline rates of SNe Ibn during the same time interval. The object was initially classified as a Type Ibn SN because early-time spectra were characterized by a blue continuum with superimposed narrow P-Cygni lines of He I, suggesting the presence of a slowly moving (1200-1500 ...

  19. Long-lasting X-ray emission from type IIb supernova 2011dh and mass-loss history of the yellow supergiant progenitor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maeda, Keiichi [Department of Astronomy, Kyoto University, Kitashirakawa-Oiwake-cho, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan); Katsuda, Satoru [RIKEN (The Institute of Physical and Chemical Research) Nishina Center, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Bamba, Aya [Department of Physics and Mathematics, Aoyama Gakuin University, 5-10-1 Fuchinobe, Chuo-ku, Sagamihara, Kanagawa 252-5258 (Japan); Terada, Yukikatsu [Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Saitama University, Shimo-Okubo 255, Sakura, Saitama 338-8570 (Japan); Fukazawa, Yasushi, E-mail: keiichi.maeda@kusastro.kyoto-u.ac.jp [Department of Physical Science, Hiroshima University, 1-3-1 Kagamiyama, Higashi-Hiroshima, Hiroshima 739-8526 (Japan)

    2014-04-20

    Type IIb supernova (SN) 2011dh, with conclusive detection of an unprecedented yellow supergiant (YSG) progenitor, provides an excellent opportunity to deepen our understanding on the massive star evolution in the final centuries toward the SN explosion. In this paper, we report on detection and analyses of thermal X-ray emission from SN IIb 2011dh at ?500 days after the explosion on Chandra archival data, providing a solidly derived mass-loss rate of a YSG progenitor for the first time. We find that the circumstellar media should be dense, more than that expected from a Wolf-Rayet (W-R) star by one order of magnitude. The emission is powered by a reverse shock penetrating into an outer envelope, fully consistent with the YSG progenitor but not with a W-R progenitor. The density distribution at the outermost ejecta is much steeper than that expected from a compact W-R star, and this finding must be taken into account in modeling the early UV/optical emission from SNe IIb. The derived mass-loss rate is ?3 × 10{sup –6} M {sub ?} yr{sup –1} for the mass-loss velocity of ?20 km s{sup –1} in the final ?1300 yr before the explosion. The derived mass-loss properties are largely consistent with the standard wind mass-loss expected for a giant star. This is not sufficient to be a main driver to expel nearly all the hydrogen envelope. Therefore, the binary interaction, with a huge mass transfer having taken place at ? 1300 yr before the explosion, is a likely scenario to produce the YSG progenitor.

  20. Sunfall: a collaborative visual analytics system for astrophysics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aragon, Cecilia R.

    2008-01-01

    from 42 High-Redshift Supernovae Astrophys. J. 519 565-Observational Evidence from Supernovae for an AcceleratingProgenitors of Type Ia Supernovae (Ph.D. dissertation, Univ.

  1. Astrophysics in 2006

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Trimble, V; Trimble, V; Aschwanden, MJ; Hansen, CJ

    2007-01-01

    · Active galaxies · Supernovae 1 Introduction Astrophysicsproduction by Type Ia supernovae, and so large values of [?/from local events like supernovae and pulsars (Goldreich and

  2. NONUNIFORM EXPANSION OF THE YOUNGEST GALACTIC SUPERNOVA REMNANT G1.9+0.3

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Borkowski, Kazimierz J.; Reynolds, Stephen P. [Department of Physics, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27695-8202 (United States); Green, David A. [Cavendish Laboratory, 19 J.J. Thomson Avenue, Cambridge CB3 0HE (United Kingdom); Hwang, Una [Department of Astronomy, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 (United States); Petre, Robert [NASA/GSFC, Code 660, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Krishnamurthy, Kalyani [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Duke University, Durham, NC 27708 (United States); Willett, Rebecca, E-mail: kborkow@unity.ncsu.edu [Department of Electrical and Computing Engineering, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI 53706 (United States)

    2014-08-01

    We report measurements of the X-ray expansion of the youngest Galactic supernova remnant, G1.9+0.3, using Chandra observations in 2007, 2009, and 2011. The measured rates strongly deviate from uniform expansion, decreasing radially by about 60% along the X-ray bright SE-NW axis from 0.84% ± 0.06% yr{sup –1} to 0.52% ± 0.03% yr{sup –1}. This corresponds to undecelerated ages of 120-190 yr, confirming the young age of G1.9+0.3 and implying a significant deceleration of the blast wave. The synchrotron-dominated X-ray emission brightens at a rate of 1.9% ± 0.4% yr{sup –1}. We identify bright outer and inner rims with the blast wave and reverse shock, respectively. Sharp density gradients in either the ejecta or ambient medium are required to produce the sudden deceleration of the reverse shock or the blast wave implied by the large spread in expansion ages. The blast wave could have been decelerated recently by an encounter with a modest density discontinuity in the ambient medium, such as may be found at a wind termination shock, requiring strong mass loss in the progenitor. Alternatively, the reverse shock might have encountered an order-of-magnitude density discontinuity within the ejecta, such as may be found in pulsating delayed-detonation Type Ia models. We demonstrate that the blast wave is much more decelerated than the reverse shock in these models for remnants at ages similar to G1.9+0.3. Similar effects may also be produced by dense shells possibly associated with high-velocity features in Type Ia spectra. Accounting for the asymmetry of G1.9+0.3 will require more realistic three-dimensional Type Ia models.

  3. SN 2005ip: A luminous type IIn supernova emerging from a dense circumstellar medium as revealed by X-ray observations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Katsuda, Satoru [RIKEN (The Institute of Physical and Chemical Research) Nishina Center, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Maeda, Keiichi [Department of Astronomy, Kyoto University, Kitashirakawa-Oiwake-cho, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan); Nozawa, Takaya [Kavli Institute for the Physics and Mathematics of the Universe (WPI), University of Tokyo, 5-1-5 Kashiwanoha, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8583 (Japan); Pooley, David [Department of Physics, Sam Houston State University, Huntsville, TX 77341-2267 (United States); Immler, Stefan [Astrophysics Science Division, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 2077 (United States)

    2014-01-10

    We report on the X-ray spectral evolution of the nearby Type IIn supernova (SN) 2005ip based on Chandra and Swift observations covering ?1-6 yr after explosion. X-ray spectra in all epochs are well fitted by a thermal emission model with kT ? 7 keV. The somewhat high temperature suggests that the X-ray emission mainly arises from the circumstellar medium (CSM) heated by the forward shock. We find that the spectra taken two to three years after the explosion are heavily absorbed (N {sub H} ? 5 × 10{sup 22} cm{sup –2}), but the absorption gradually decreases to the level of the Galactic absorption (N {sub H} ? 4 × 10{sup 20} cm{sup –2}) at the final epoch. This indicates that the SN went off in a dense CSM and that the forward shock has overtaken it. The intrinsic X-ray luminosity stays constant until the final epoch, when it drops by a factor of ?2. The intrinsic 0.2-10 keV luminosity during the plateau phase is measured to be ?1.5 × 10{sup 41} erg s{sup –1}, ranking SN 2005ip as one of the brightest X-ray SNe. Based on the column density, we derive a lower limit of a mass-loss rate to be M-dot ?1.5×10{sup ?2} (V{sub w} /100 km s{sup –1}) M {sub ?} yr{sup –1}, which roughly agrees with that inferred from the X-ray luminosity, M-dot ?2×10{sup ?2} (V{sub w} /100 km s{sup –1}) M {sub ?} yr{sup –1}, where V{sub w} is the circumstellar wind speed. Such a high mass-loss rate suggests that the progenitor star had eruptive mass ejections similar to a luminous blue variable star. The total mass ejected in the eruptive period is estimated to be ?15 M {sub ?}, indicating that the progenitor mass is ? 25 M {sub ?}.

  4. Superluminous supernovae as standardizable candles and high-redshift distance probes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Inserra, C.; Smartt, S. J., E-mail: c.inserra@qub.ac.uk [Astrophysics Research Centre, School of Mathematics and Physics, Queens University Belfast, Belfast BT7 1NN (United Kingdom)

    2014-12-01

    We investigate the use of type Ic superluminous supernovae (SLSN Ic) as standardizable candles and distance indicators. Their appeal as cosmological probes stems from their remarkable peak luminosities, hot blackbody temperatures, and bright rest-frame ultraviolet emission. We present a sample of 16 published SLSN, from redshifts 0.1 to 1.2, and calculate accurate K corrections to determine uniform magnitudes in 2 synthetic rest-frame filter bandpasses with central wavelengths at 400 nm and 520 nm. At 400 nm, we find an encouragingly low scatter in their uncorrected, raw mean magnitudes with M(400) = –21.86 ± 0.35 mag for the full sample of 16 objects. We investigate the correlation between their decline rates and peak magnitude and find that the brighter events appear to decline more slowly. In a manner similar to the Phillips relation for type Ia SNe (SNe Ia), we define a ?M {sub 20} decline relation. This correlates peak magnitude and decline over 20 days and can reduce the scatter in standardized peak magnitudes to ±0.22 mag. We further show that M(400) appears to have a strong color dependence. Redder objects are fainter and also become redder faster. Using this peak magnitudecolor evolution relation, a surprisingly low scatter of between ±0.08 mag and ±0.13 mag can be found in peak magnitudes, depending on sample selection. However, we caution that only 8 to 10 objects currently have enough data to test this peak magnitudecolor evolution relation. We conclude that SLSN Ic are promising distance indicators in the high-redshift universe in regimes beyond those possible with SNe Ia. Although the empirical relationships are encouraging, the unknown progenitor systems, how they may evolve with redshift, and the uncertain explosion physics are of some concern. The two major measurement uncertainties are the limited numbers of low-redshift, well-studied objects available to test these relationships and internal dust extinction in the host galaxies.

  5. The Nuclear Equation of State and Supernovae James M. Lattimer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lattimer, James M.

    type of supernova is powered by thermonuclear energy. This type of event involves the end product elements. Iron­peak elements, lying at the maximum of the nuclear binding energy curve, are the final will be devoted to them. We will point out, however, that because thermonuclear supernovae occur from a quite

  6. Accelerating universe from gravitational leakage into extra dimensions: confrontation with SNeIa

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zong-Hong Zhu; Jailson S. Alcaniz

    2004-11-01

    There is mounting observational evidence that the expansion of our universe is undergoing an acceleration. A dark energy component has usually been invoked as the most feasible mechanism for the acceleration. However, it is desirable to explore alternative possibilities motivated by particle physics before adopting such an untested entity. In this work, we focus our attention on an acceleration mechanism: one arising from gravitational leakage into extra dimensions. We confront this scenario with high-$z$ type Ia supernovae compiled by Tonry et al. (2003) and recent measurements of the X-ray gas mass fractions in clusters of galaxies published by Allen et al. (2002,2003). A combination of the two databases gives at a 99% confidence level that $\\Omega_m=0.29^{+0.04}_{-0.02}$, $\\Omega_{rc}=0.21^{+0.08}_{-0.08}$, and $\\Omega_k=-0.36^{+0.31}_{-0.35}$, indicating a closed universe. We then constrain the model using the test of the turnaround redshift, $z_{q=0}$, at which the universe switches from deceleration to acceleration. We show that, in order to explain that acceleration happened earlier than $z_{q=0} = 0.6$ within the framework of gravitational leakage into extra dimensions, a low matter density, $\\Omega_m < 0.27$, or a closed universe is necessary.

  7. The general relativistic instability supernova of a supermassive population III star

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Ke-Jung; Woosley, Stan [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Heger, Alexander [Monash Centre for Astrophysics, Monash University, Victoria 3800 (Australia); Almgren, Ann [Center for Computational Sciences and Engineering, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Whalen, Daniel J. [T-2, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Johnson, Jarrett L., E-mail: kchen@ucolick.org [XTD-PRI, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States)

    2014-08-01

    The formation of supermassive Population III stars with masses ?10,000 M{sub ?} in primeval galaxies in strong ultraviolet backgrounds at z ? 15 may be the most viable pathway to the formation of supermassive black holes by z ? 7. Most of these stars are expected to live for short times and then directly collapse to black holes, with little or no mass loss over their lives. However, we have now discovered that non-rotating primordial stars with masses close to 55,000 M{sub ?} can instead die as highly energetic thermonuclear supernovae powered by explosive helium burning, releasing up to 10{sup 55} erg, or about 10,000 times the energy of a Type Ia supernova. The explosion is triggered by the general relativistic contribution of thermal photons to gravity in the core of the star, which causes the core to contract and explosively burn. The energy release completely unbinds the star, leaving no compact remnant, and about half of the mass of the star is ejected into the early cosmos in the form of heavy elements. The explosion would be visible in the near infrared at z ? 20 to Euclid and the Wide-Field Infrared Survey Telescope, perhaps signaling the birth of supermassive black hole seeds and the first quasars.

  8. Three-dimensional simulations of pure deflagration models for thermonuclear supernovae

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Long, Min; Jordan, George C. IV; Van Rossum, Daniel R.; Diemer, Benedikt; Graziani, Carlo; Kessler, Richard; Rich, Paul; Lamb, Don Q. [Flash Center for Computational Science, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States); Meyer, Bradley, E-mail: long@flash.uchicago.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Clemson University, Clemson, SC 29634 (United States)

    2014-07-10

    We present a systematic study of the pure deflagration model of Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) using three-dimensional, high-resolution, full-star hydrodynamical simulations, nucleosynthetic yields calculated using Lagrangian tracer particles, and light curves calculated using radiation transport. We evaluate the simulations by comparing their predicted light curves with many observed SNe Ia using the SALT2 data-driven model and find that the simulations may correspond to under-luminous SNe Iax. We explore the effects of the initial conditions on our results by varying the number of randomly selected ignition points from 63 to 3500, and the radius of the centered sphere they are confined in from 128 to 384 km. We find that the rate of nuclear burning depends on the number of ignition points at early times, the density of ignition points at intermediate times, and the radius of the confining sphere at late times. The results depend primarily on the number of ignition points, but we do not expect this to be the case in general. The simulations with few ignition points release more nuclear energy E{sub nuc}, have larger kinetic energies E{sub K}, and produce more {sup 56}Ni than those with many ignition points, and differ in the distribution of {sup 56}Ni, Si, and C/O in the ejecta. For these reasons, the simulations with few ignition points exhibit higher peak B-band absolute magnitudes M{sub B} and light curves that rise and decline more quickly; their M{sub B} and light curves resemble those of under-luminous SNe Iax, while those for simulations with many ignition points are not.

  9. Radio Emission from a Young Supernova Remnant Interacting with an Interstellar Cloud Magnetohydrodynamic Simulation with Relativistic Electrons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jun, B I; Jun, Byung-Il

    1999-01-01

    We present two-dimensional MHD simulations of the evolution of a young Type Ia supernova remnant during its interaction with an interstellar cloud of comparable size at impact. We include for the first time in such simulations explicit relativistic electron transport, including spectral information using a simple but effective scheme that follows their acceleration at shocks and subsequent transport. From this information we also model radio synchrotron emission, including spectra. The principal conclusions from these experiments are: 1) Independent of the cloud interaction, the SNR reverse shock can be an efficient site for particle acceleration in a young SNR. 2) At these early times the synchrotron spectral index due to electrons accelerated at the primary shocks should be close to 0.5 unless those shocks are modified by cosmic-ray pressures. However, interaction with the cloud generates regions of distinctly steeper spectra, which may complicate interpretation in terms of global dynamical models for SNR e...

  10. From SupernovaeFrom Supernovae to Inflationto Inflation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yamamoto, Hirosuke

    From SupernovaeFrom Supernovae to Inflationto Inflation Katsuhiko SatoKatsuhiko Sato 1)Department.4. NucleosynthesisNucleosynthesis in supernovaein supernovae II.II. ParticleParticle cosmologycosmology andand Early

  11. Neutrino flavor transformation in core-collapse supernovae

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cherry, John F.; Cherry, John F.

    2012-01-01

    in Supernovae . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Collapse Supernovae . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Mechanisms of Core-Collapse Supernovae: Simulation Results

  12. REVIEW ARTICLE The physics of core-collapse supernovae

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Loss, Daniel

    : type Ia, thought to be the thermonuclear explosions of accreting white dwarf stars1 ; and all the rest stages of hydrogen, helium, carbon, neon, oxygen and silicon fusion in its centre (Table 1

  13. SUPERNOVAE - FEWER AND FURTHER BETWEEN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    TRIMBLE, V

    1988-01-01

    1987). 2. Tammann. G.A. in Supernovae: A Survey of CurremCalifornia 94720, USA. Supernovae Fewer and further betweenmatic searches for supernovae in bright southern galaxies by

  14. Supernovae. Part I: The events

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Trimble, V; Trimble, V

    1982-01-01

    Barkat, Z. , 1977, in Supernovae, edited by D. N. Schramm {Sci. Rev. 27, Canal, Supernovae. R. A. , 1981f, in NATO81.C. B. , Ed. , 1974, Supernovae and Their Remnants,

  15. Earth Matter Effects in Detection of Supernova Neutrinos

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    X. -H. Guo; Bing-Lin Young

    2006-05-11

    We calculated the matter effect, including both the Earth and supernova, on the detection of neutrinos from type II supernovae at the proposed Daya Bay reactor neutrino experiment. It is found that apart from the dependence on the flip probability P_H inside the supernova and the mass hierarchy of neutrinos, the amount of the Earth matter effect depends on the direction of the incoming supernova neutrinos, and reaches the biggest value when the incident angle of neutrinos is around 93^\\circ. In the reaction channel \\bar{\

  16. Nucleosynthesis Supernova Explosions Final Stages of Stellar Evolution For Take Away Final Stages of Stellar Evolution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hörandel, Jörg R.

    Nucleosynthesis Supernova Explosions Final Stages of Stellar Evolution For Take Away Final Stages.XII.2006 Seminar on Astroparticle Physics - Cosmic Rays #12;Nucleosynthesis Supernova Explosions Final are supernova explosions and which different types exist? Where do heavy elements come from? #12;Nucleosynthesis

  17. The Nuclear Physics of Solar and Supernova Neutrino Detection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    W. C. Haxton

    1999-01-15

    This talk provides a basic introduction for students interested in the responses of detectors to solar, supernova, and other low-energy neutrino sources. Some of the nuclear physics is then applied in a discussion of nucleosynthesis within a Type II supernova, including the r-process and the neutrino process.

  18. Nonparametric study of the evolution of the cosmological equation of state with SNeIa, BAO, and high-redshift GRBs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Postnikov, S. [Nuclear Theory Center, Indiana University, Bloomington, IN (United States); Dainotti, M. G. [Physics Department, Stanford University, Via Pueblo Mall 382, Stanford, CA (United States); Hernandez, X. [Instituto de Astronomía, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, México D.F. 04510 (Mexico); Capozziello, S., E-mail: spostnik@indiana.edu, E-mail: mdainott@stanford.edu, E-mail: dainotti@oa.uj.edu.pl, E-mail: xavier@astros.unam.mx, E-mail: capozziello@na.infn.it [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universitá di Napoli "Federico II," Compl. Univ. di Monte S. Angelo, Edificio G, Via Cinthia, I-80126 Napoli (Italy)

    2014-03-10

    We study the dark energy equation of state as a function of redshift in a nonparametric way, without imposing any a priori w(z) (ratio of pressure over energy density) functional form. As a check of the method, we test our scheme through the use of synthetic data sets produced from different input cosmological models that have the same relative errors and redshift distribution as the real data. Using the luminosity-time L{sub X} -T{sub a} correlation for gamma-ray burst (GRB) X-ray afterglows (the Dainotti et al. correlation), we are able to utilize GRB samples from the Swift satellite as probes of the expansion history of the universe out to z ? 10. Within the assumption of a flat Friedmann-Lemaître-Robertson-Walker universe and combining supernovae type Ia (SNeIa) data with baryonic acoustic oscillation constraints, the resulting maximum likelihood solutions are close to a constant w = –1. If one imposes the restriction of a constant w, we obtain w = –0.99 ± 0.06 (consistent with a cosmological constant) with the present-day Hubble constant as H {sub 0} = 70.0 ± 0.6km s{sup –1} Mpc{sup –1} and density parameter as ?{sub ?0} = 0.723 ± 0.025, while nonparametric w(z) solutions give us a probability map that is centered at H {sub 0} = 70.04 ± 1km s{sup –1} Mpc{sup –1} and ?{sub ?0} = 0.724 ± 0.03. Our chosen GRB data sample with a full correlation matrix allows us to estimate the amount, as well as quality (errors), of data needed to constrain w(z) in the redshift range extending an order of magnitude beyond the farthest SNeIa measured.

  19. Fermilab Today

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    4 percent. The key is a special type of Type Ia supernovae. Type Ia supernovae are thermonuclear explosions of white dwarfs - the very dense remnants of stars that have burned all...

  20. Nucleosynthesis in Supernovae

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. J. Horowitz; Gang Li

    1999-05-19

    Core collapse supernovae are dominated by energy transport from neutrinos. Therefore, some supernova properties could depend on symetries and features of the standard model weak interactions. The cross section for neutrino capture is larger than that for antineutrino capture by one term of order the neutrino energy over the nucleon mass. This reduces the ratio of neutrons to protons in the $\

  1. Hydrodynamical evolution of merging carbon-oxygen white dwarfs: their pre-supernova structure and observational counterparts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tanikawa, Ataru; Sato, Yushi; Nomoto, Ken'ichi; Maeda, Keiichi; Hachisu, Izumi

    2015-01-01

    We perform smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) simulations for merging binary carbon-oxygen (CO) white dwarfs (WDs) with masses of $1.1$ and $1.0$ $M_\\odot$, until the merger remnant reaches a dynamically steady state. Using these results, we assess whether the binary could induce a thermonuclear explosion, and whether the explosion could be observed as a type Ia supernova (SN Ia). We investigate three explosion mechanisms: a helium-ignition following the dynamical merger (`helium-ignited violent merger model'), a carbon-ignition (`carbon-ignited violent merger model'), and an explosion following the formation of the Chandrasekhar mass WD (`Chandrasekhar mass model'). An explosion of the helium-ignited violent merger model is possible, while we predict that the resulting SN ejecta are highly asymmetric since its companion star is fully intact at the time of the explosion. The carbon-ignited violent merger model can also lead to an explosion. However, the envelope of the exploding WD spreads out to $\\sim 0.1...

  2. Optical Observations of Gamma-Ray Bursts, the Discovery of Supernovae 2005bv, 2005ee, and 2006ak, and Searches for Transients Using the "MASTER" Robotic Telescope

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. M. Lipunov; V. G. Kornilov; A. V. Krylov; N. V. Tyurina; A. A. Belinski; E. S. Gorbovskoy; D. A. Kuvshinov; P. A. Gritsyk; G. A. Antipov; G. V. Borisov; A. V. Sankovich; V. V. Vladimirov; V. I. Vybornov; A. S. Kuznetsov

    2007-11-02

    We present the results of observations obtained using the MASTER robotic telescope in 2005 - 2006, including the earliest observations of the optical emission of the gamma-ray bursts GRB 050824 and GRB 060926. Together with later observations, these data yield the brightness-variation law t^{-0.55+-0.05} for GRB 050824. An optical flare was detected in GRB 060926 - a brightness enhancement that repeated the behavior observed in the X-ray variations. The spectrum of GRB 060926 is found to be F_E ~ E^-\\beta, where \\beta = 1.0+-0.2. Limits on the optical brightnesses of 26 gamma-ray bursts have been derived, 9 of these for the first time. Data for more than 90% of the accessible sky down to $19^m$ were taken and reduced in real time during the survey. A database has been composed based on these data. Limits have been placed on the rate of optical flares that are not associated with detected gamma-ray bursts, and on the opening angle for the beams of gamma-ray bursts. Three new supernovae have been discovered: SN 2005bv (type Ia) - the first to be discovered on Russian territory, SN 2005ee - one of the most powerful type II supernovae known, and SN 2006ak (type Ia). We have obtained an image of SN 2006X during the growth stage and a light curve that fully describes the brightness maximum and exponential decay. A new method for searching for optical transients of gamma-ray bursts detected using triangulation from various spacecraft is proposed and tested.

  3. Neutrinos from Supernovas and Supernova Remnants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Francesco Vissani; Maria Laura Costantini

    2005-08-05

    Supernovae (SN) and supernova remnants (SNR) have key roles in galaxies, but their physical descriptions is still incomplete. Thus, it is of interest to study neutrino radiation to understand SN and SNR better. We will discuss: (1) The ~10 MeV thermal neutrinos that arise from core collapse SN, that were observed for SN1987A, and can be seen with several existing or planned experiments. (2) The 10-100 TeV neutrinos expected from galactic SNR (in particular from RX J1713.7-3946) targets of future underwater neutrino telescopes.

  4. An HST Search for Supernovae Accompanying X-ray Flashes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. M. Soderberg; S. R. Kulkarni; D. B. Fox; E. Berger; P. A. Price; S. B. Cenko; D. A. Howell; A. Gal-Yam; D. C. Leonard; D. A. Frail; D. Moon; R. A. Chevalier; M. Hamuy; K. C. Hurley; D. Kelson; K. Koviak; W. Krzeminski; P. Kumar; A. MacFadyen; P. J. McCarthy; H. S. Park; B. A. Peterson; M. M. Phillips; M. Rauch; M. Roth; B. P. Schmidt; S. Shectman

    2005-02-25

    We present the results from an Hubble Space Telescope/ACS search for supernovae associated with X-ray flashes 020903, 040701, 040812 and 040916. We find strong evidence that XRF 020903 (z=0.25) was associated with a SN 1998bw-like supernova and confirm this using optical spectroscopy at t ~ 25 days. We find no evidence, however, for SN 1998bw-like supernovae associated with the other three events. In the case of XRF 040701 (z=0.21), we rule out even a faint supernova similar to SN 2002ap, using template light-curves for several local Type Ic supernovae. For the two cases in which the redshift is not known, XRFs 040812 and 040916, we derive robust redshift limits assuming they were accompanied by supernovae similar to SN 1998bw and compare these limits with photometric redshift constraints provided by their host galaxies. We supplement this analysis with results for three additional events (XRFs 011030, 020427 and 030723) and discuss the observed diversity of supernovae associated with X-ray flashes and gamma-ray bursts. We conclude that XRF-SNe exist, but can be significantly fainter than SN 1998bw, possibly consistent with the observed spread in local Type Ibc supernovae.

  5. Supernova Recognition using Support Vector Machines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Romano, Raquel A.; Aragon, Cecilia R.; Ding, Chris

    2006-01-01

    pected to contain real supernovae. Astrophysicists who inObservational Evi- dence from Supernovae for an Acceleratingi.e. to ?nd all potential supernovae, while reducing the

  6. Four Papers by the Supernova Cosmology Project

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Perlmutter, S.; Deustua, S.; Gabi, S.; Goldhaber, G.

    2008-01-01

    Study Institute Thermonuclear Supernovae Conference,STUDY INSTITUTE THERMONUCLEAR SUPERNOVAE Aiguablava, SPAIN20-30, 1995 To appear-in Thermonuclear Supernovae (NATO ASI)

  7. Clocking the Rise and Fall of Core-Collapse Supernovae

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    For several weeks, the brightness of that single event can rival that of an entire galaxy. As a result, supernovae of various types are often used as "standard candles" in...

  8. Correlated Fluctuations in Luminosity Distance and the (Surprising) Importance of Peculiar Motion in Supernova Surveys

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lam Hui; Patrick B. Greene

    2006-05-12

    Large scale structure introduces two different kinds of errors in the luminosity distance estimates from standardizable candles such as supernovae Ia (SNe) - a Poissonian scatter for each SN and a coherent component due to correlated fluctuations between different SNe. Increasing the number of SNe helps reduce the first type of error but not the second. The coherent component has been largely ignored in forecasts of dark energy parameter estimation from upcoming SN surveys. For instance it is commonly thought, based on Poissonian considerations, that peculiar motion is unimportant, even for a low redshift SN survey such as the Nearby Supernova Factory (SNfactory; z = 0.03 - 0.08), which provides a useful anchor for future high redshift surveys by determining the SN zero-point. We show that ignoring coherent peculiar motion leads to an underestimate of the zero-point error by about a factor of 2, despite the fact that SNfactory covers almost half of the sky. More generally, there are four types of fluctuations: peculiar motion, gravitational lensing, gravitational redshift and what is akin to the integrated Sachs-Wolfe effect. Peculiar motion and lensing dominates at low and high redshifts respectively. Taking into account all significant luminosity distance fluctuations due to large scale structure leads to a degradation of up to 60% in the determination of the dark energy equation of state from upcoming high redshift SN surveys, when used in conjunction with a low redshift anchor such as the SNfactory. The most relevant fluctuations are the coherent ones due to peculiar motion and the Poissonian ones due to lensing, with peculiar motion playing the dominant role. We also discuss to what extent the noise here can be viewed as a useful signal, and whether corrections can be made to reduce the degradation.

  9. Hydrogen issue in Core Collapse Supernovae

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Elmhamdi; I. J. Danziger; D. Branch; B. Leibundgut

    2006-11-06

    We discuss results of analyzing a time series of selected photospheric-optical spectra of core collapse supernovae (CCSNe). This is accomplished by means of the parameterized supernovae synthetic spectrum (SSp) code ``SYNOW''. Special attention is addressed to traces of hydrogen at early phases, especially for the stripped-envelope SNe (i.e. SNe Ib-c). A thin low mass hydrogen layer extending to very high ejection velocities above the helium shell, is found to be the most likely scenario for Type Ib SNe.

  10. Automated search for supernovae

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kare, J.T.

    1984-11-15

    This thesis describes the design, development, and testing of a search system for supernovae, based on the use of current computer and detector technology. This search uses a computer-controlled telescope and charge coupled device (CCD) detector to collect images of hundreds of galaxies per night of observation, and a dedicated minicomputer to process these images in real time. The system is now collecting test images of up to several hundred fields per night, with a sensitivity corresponding to a limiting magnitude (visual) of 17. At full speed and sensitivity, the search will examine some 6000 galaxies every three nights, with a limiting magnitude of 18 or fainter, yielding roughly two supernovae per week (assuming one supernova per galaxy per 50 years) at 5 to 50 percent of maximum light. An additional 500 nearby galaxies will be searched every night, to locate about 10 supernovae per year at one or two percent of maximum light, within hours of the initial explosion.

  11. Nucleosynthesis in Thermonuclear Supernovae

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Claudia, Travaglio [Istituto Nazionale di Astrofisica, Osservatorio Astronomico di Torino; Hix, William Raphael [ORNL

    2013-01-01

    We review our understanding of the nucleosynthesis that occurs in thermonuclear supernovae and their contribution to Galactic Chemical evolution. We discuss the prospects to improve the modeling of the nucleosynthesis within simulations of these events.

  12. IA-32 Intel Architecture Software Developer's

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bernstein, Daniel

    IA-32 Intel® Architecture Software Developer's Manual Volume 1: Basic Architecture NOTE: The IA-32 Intel Architecture Software Developer's Manual consists of four volumes: Basic Architecture, Order RIGHT. INTEL PRODUCTS ARE NOT INTENDED FOR USE IN MEDICAL, LIFE SAVING, OR LIFE SUSTAINING APPLICATIONS

  13. IA-32 Intel Architecture Software Developer's

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    IA-32 Intel® Architecture Software Developer's Manual Volume 3: System Programming Guide NOTE: The IA-32 Intel Architecture Developer's Manual consists of three books: Basic Architecture, Order Number SAVING, OR LIFE SUSTAINING APPLICATIONS. Intel may make changes to specifications and product

  14. Final Technical Report: Discovering the Nature of Dark Energy...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Report: Discovering the Nature of Dark Energy: Towards Better Distances from Type Ia Supernovae Saurabh W. Jha 79 ASTRONOMY AND ASTROPHYSICS dark energy; supernovae; cosmology dark...

  15. TITLE AUTHORS SUBJECT SUBJECT RELATED DESCRIPTION PUBLISHER AVAILABILI...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Report Discovering the Nature of Dark Energy Towards Better Distances from Type Ia Supernovae Saurabh W Jha ASTRONOMY AND ASTROPHYSICS dark energy supernovae cosmology dark...

  16. On the population of X-ray supernova remnants in the Large Magellanic Cloud

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maggi, P; Kavanagh, P J; Sasaki, M; Bozzetto, L M; Filipovi?, M D; Vasilopoulos, G; Pietsch, W; Points, S D; Chu, Y -H; Dickel, J; Ehle, M; Williams, R; Greiner, J

    2015-01-01

    We present a comprehensive X-ray study of the population of supernova remnants (SNRs) in the LMC. Using primarily XMM-Newton, we conduct a systematic spectral analysis of LMC SNRs to gain new insights on their evolution and the interplay with their host galaxy. We combine all the archival XMM observations of the LMC with those of our Very Large Programme survey. We produce X-ray images and spectra of 51 SNRs, out of a list of 59. Using a careful modeling of the background, we consistently analyse all the X-ray spectra and measure temperatures, luminosities, and chemical compositions. We investigate the spatial distribution of SNRs in the LMC and the connection with their environment, characterised by various SFHs. We tentatively type all LMC SNRs to constrain the ratio of core-collapse to type Ia SN rates in the LMC. We compare the X-ray-derived column densities to HI maps to probing the 3D structure of the LMC. This work provides the first homogeneous catalogue of X-ray spectral properties of LMC SNRs. It of...

  17. DES13S2cmm: The first superluminous supernova from the dark energy survey

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Papadopoulos, A.; D'Andrea, C. B.; Sullivan, M.; Nichol, R. C.; Barbary, K.; Biswas, R.; Brown, P. J.; Covarrubias, R. A.; Finley, D. A.; Fischer, J. A.; et al

    2015-03-23

    We present DES13S2cmm, the first spectroscopically-confirmed superluminous supernova (SLSN) from the Dark Energy Survey (DES). We briefly discuss the data and search algorithm used to find this event in the first year of DES operations, and outline the spectroscopic data obtained from the European Southern Observatory (ESO) Very Large Telescope to confirm its redshift (z = 0.663 ± 0.001 based on the host-galaxy emission lines) and likely spectral type (type I). Using this redshift, we find MUpeak = -21.05???¹?-0.09 for the peak, rest-frame U-band absolute magnitude, and find DES13S2cmm to be located in a faint, low metallicity (sub-solar), low stellar-massmore »host galaxy (log(M/M_sun) = 9.3 ± 0.3); consistent with what is seen for other SLSNe-I. We compare the bolometric light curve of DES13S2cmm to fourteen similarly well-observed SLSNe-I in the literature and find it possesses one of the slowest declining tails (beyond +30 days rest frame past peak), and is the faintest at peak. Moreover, we find the bolometric light curves of all SLSNe-I studied herein possess a dispersion of only 0.2-0.3 magnitudes between +25 and +30 days after peak (rest frame) depending on redshift range studied; this could be important for 'standardising' such supernovae, as is done with the more common type Ia. We fit the bolometric light curve of DES13S2cmm with two competing models for SLSNe-I - the radioactive decay of ??Ni, and a magnetar - and find that while the magnetar is formally a better fit, neither model provides a compelling match to the data. Although we are unable to conclusively differentiate between these two physical models for this particular SLSN-I, further DES observations of more SLSNe-I should break this degeneracy, especially if the light curves of SLSNe-I can be observed beyond 100 days in the rest frame of the supernova.« less

  18. DES13S2cmm: The first superluminous supernova from the dark energy survey

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Papadopoulos, A. [Institute of Cosmology and Gravitation (ICG), Portsmouth (United Kingdom); D'Andrea, C. B.; Sullivan, M.; Nichol, R. C.; Barbary, K.; Biswas, R.; Brown, P. J.; Covarrubias, R. A.; Finley, D. A.; Fischer, J. A.; Foley, R. J.; Goldstein, D.; Gupta, R. R.; Kessler, R.; Kovacs, E.; Kuhlmann, S. E.; Lidman, C.; March, M.; Nugent, P. E.; Sako, M.; Smith, R. C.; Spinka, H.; Wester, W.; Abbott, T. M. C.; Abdalla, F.; Allam, S. S.; Banerji, M.; Bernstein, J. P.; Bernstein, R. A.; Carnero, A.; da Costa, L. N.; DePoy, D. L.; Desai, S.; Diehl, H. T.; Eifler, T.; Evrard, A. E.; Flaugher, B.; Frieman, J. A.; Gerdes, D.; Gruen, D.; Honscheid, K.; James, D.; Kuehn, K.; Kuropatkin, N.; Lahav, O.; Maia, M. A. G.; Makler, M.; Marshall, J. L.; Merritt, K. W.; Miller, C. J.; Miquel, R.; Ogando, R.; Plazas, A. A.; Roe, N. A.; Romer, A. K.; Rykoff, E.; Sanchez, E.; Santiago, B. X.; Scarpine, V.; Schubnell, M.; Sevilla, I.; Soares-Santos, M.; Suchyta, E.; Swanson, M.; Tarle, G.; Thaler, J.; Tucker, L. D.; Wechsler, R. H.; Zuntz, J.

    2015-03-20

    We present DES13S2cmm, the first spectroscopically-confirmed superluminous supernova (SLSN) from the Dark Energy Survey (DES). We briefly discuss the data and search algorithm used to find this event in the first year of DES operations, and outline the spectroscopic data obtained from the European Southern Observatory (ESO) Very Large Telescope to confirm its redshift (z = 0.663 ± 0.001 based on the host-galaxy emission lines) and likely spectral type (type I). Using this redshift, we find MUpeak = -21.05???¹?-0.09 for the peak, rest-frame U-band absolute magnitude, and find DES13S2cmm to be located in a faint, low metallicity (sub-solar), low stellar-mass host galaxy (log(M/M_sun) = 9.3 ± 0.3); consistent with what is seen for other SLSNe-I. We compare the bolometric light curve of DES13S2cmm to fourteen similarly well-observed SLSNe-I in the literature and find it possesses one of the slowest declining tails (beyond +30 days rest frame past peak), and is the faintest at peak. Moreover, we find the bolometric light curves of all SLSNe-I studied herein possess a dispersion of only 0.2-0.3 magnitudes between +25 and +30 days after peak (rest frame) depending on redshift range studied; this could be important for 'standardising' such supernovae, as is done with the more common type Ia. We fit the bolometric light curve of DES13S2cmm with two competing models for SLSNe-I - the radioactive decay of ??Ni, and a magnetar - and find that while the magnetar is formally a better fit, neither model provides a compelling match to the data. Although we are unable to conclusively differentiate between these two physical models for this particular SLSN-I, further DES observations of more SLSNe-I should break this degeneracy, especially if the light curves of SLSNe-I can be observed beyond 100 days in the rest frame of the supernova.

  19. DES13S2cmm: The first superluminous supernova from the Dark Energy Survey

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Papadopoulos, A.; Plazas, A. A.; D"Andrea, C. B.; Sullivan, M.; Nichol, R. C.; Barbary, K.; Biswas, R.; Brown, P. J.; Covarrubias, R. A.; Finley, D. A.; et al

    2015-03-20

    We present DES13S2cmm, the first spectroscopically-confirmed superluminous supernova (SLSN) from the Dark Energy Survey (DES). We briefly discuss the data and search algorithm used to find this event in the first year of DES operations, and outline the spectroscopic data obtained from the European Southern Observatory (ESO) Very Large Telescope to confirm its redshift (z = 0.663 ± 0.001 based on the host-galaxy emission lines) and likely spectral type (type I). Using this redshift, we find MpeakU = ?21.05+0.10?0.09 for the peak, rest-frame U-band absolute magnitude, and find DES13S2cmm to be located in a faint, low-metallicity (sub-solar), low stellar-mass hostmore »galaxy (log?(M/M?) = 9.3 ± 0.3), consistent with what is seen for other SLSNe-I. We compare the bolometric light curve of DES13S2cmm to fourteen similarly well-observed SLSNe-I in the literature and find it possesses one of the slowest declining tails (beyond +30 days rest frame past peak), and is the faintest at peak. Moreover, we find the bolometric light curves of all SLSNe-I studied herein possess a dispersion of only 0.2–0.3 magnitudes between +25 and +30 days after peak (rest frame) depending on redshift range studied; this could be important for ‘standardising’ such supernovae, as is done with the more common type Ia. We fit the bolometric light curve of DES13S2cmm with two competing models for SLSNe-I – the radioactive decay of ??Ni, and a magnetar – and find that while the magnetar is formally a better fit, neither model provides a compelling match to the data. Although we are unable to conclusively differentiate between these two physical models for this particular SLSN-I, further DES observations of more SLSNe-I should break this degeneracy, especially if the light curves of SLSNe-I can be observed beyond 100 d in the rest frame of the supernova.« less

  20. The Laminar Flame Speedup by Neon-22 Enrichment in White Dwarf Supernovae

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    David A. Chamulak; Edward F. Brown; Francis X. Timmes

    2006-12-18

    Carbon-oxygen white dwarfs contain neon-22 formed from alpha-captures onto nitrogen during core He burning in the progenitor star. In a white dwarf (type Ia) supernova, the neon-22 abundance determines, in part, the neutron-to-proton ratio and hence the abundance of radioactive nickel-56 that powers the lightcurve. The neon-22 abundance also changes the burning rate and hence the laminar flame speed. We tabulate the flame speedup for different initial carbon and neon-22 abundances and for a range of densities. This increase in the laminar flame speed--about 30% for a neon-22 mass fraction of 6%--affects the deflagration just after ignition near the center of the white dwarf, where the laminar speed of the flame dominates over the buoyant rise, and in regions of lower density ~ 10^7 g/cm3 where a transition to distributed burning is conjectured to occur. The increase in flame speed will decrease the density of any transition to distributed burning.