Sample records for type constant volume

  1. Constant Volume During Combustion | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny: Theof"Wave theJuly 30, 2013 Sanyo: Notice ofConstant Volume During Combustion

  2. Thermodynamics and dynamics of a monoatomic glass former. Constant pressure and constant volume behavior

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Matyushov, Dmitry

    Thermodynamics and dynamics of a monoatomic glass former. Constant pressure and constant volume-pressure simulations of the thermodynamic and dynamic properties of the low-temperature liquid and crystalline phases the thermodynamics of the configurational manifold as an ensemble of excitations, each carrying an excitation entropy

  3. Air-Side Energy Use Calculations for Four HVAC Systems: Dual Duct Constant Volume (DDCAV), Dual Duct Variable Volume (DDVAV), Constant Volume with Reheat (CAVRH0), Variable Volume with Reheat (VAVRH)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haberl, J. S.

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report contains engineering calculations for four (4) air-side, heating, ventilating and air-conditioning systems (HVAC) systems, including: dual duct constant volume (DDCAV), dual duct variable volume (DDVAV), constant volume with reheat...

  4. Variable Speed Drive (VSD) Applications in Dual-Duct Constant Volume Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Joo, I.; Liu, M.; Conger, K.; Wang, G.

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Models have been developed for static pressure and potential supply fan energy savings by using variable speed drive (VSD) in dual-duct constant volume systems. Experiments have been performed using a full size dual-duct constant volume system...

  5. STATE OF CALIFORNIA CONSTANT VOLUME SINGLE ZONE UNITARY AIR CONDITIONER AND HEAT PUMP SYSTEMS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    STATE OF CALIFORNIA CONSTANT VOLUME SINGLE ZONE UNITARY AIR CONDITIONER AND HEAT PUMP SYSTEMS CEC Volume Single Zone Unitary Air Conditioner and Heat Pump Systems (Page 1 of 4) Project Name CONSTANT VOLUME SINGLE ZONE UNITARY AIR CONDITIONER AND HEAT PUMP SYSTEMS CEC-MECH-3A (Revised 08

  6. The type Ia supernovae and the Hubble's constant

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ari Brynjolfsson

    2004-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The Hubble's constant is usually surmised to be a constant; but the experiments show a large spread and conflicting estimates. According to the plasma-redshift theory, the Hubble's constant varies with the plasma densities along the line of sight. It varies then slightly with the direction and the distance to a supernova and a galaxy. The relation between the magnitudes of type Ia supernovae and their observed redshifts results in an Hubble's constant with an average value in intergalactic space of 59.44 km per s per Mpc. The standard deviation from this average value is only 0.6 km per s per Mpc, but the standard deviation in a single measurement is about 8.2 km per s per Mpc. These deviations do not include possible absolute calibration errors. The experiments show that the Hubble's constant varies with the intrinsic redshifts of the Milky Way galaxy and the host galaxies for type Ia supernovae, and that it varies with the galactic latitude. These findings support the plasma-redshift theory and contradict the contemporary big-bang theory. Together with the previously reported absence of time dilation in type Ia supernovae measurements, these findings have profound consequences for the standard cosmological theory.

  7. Hydraulic conductivity testing of geosynthetic clay liners (GCLs) using the constant volume method

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, X.; Benson, C.H.

    1999-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Hydraulic conductivity tests were conducted using open and constant-volume permeation systems on specimens from a geosynthetic clay liner (GCL). Two constant volume (CV) systems were employed: the falling-head constant-volume (FHCV) system and the constant-head constant-volume (CHCV) system. A conventional burette system using pressurized air was employed for the open system (OS) tests. The test results show that hydraulic conductivity tests can be conducted 30 or more times faster with the FHCV and CHCV systems than with an open system. Typically the permeation portion of the FHCV and CHCV tests can be conducted in one-half day. Slightly lower hydraulic conductivities are measured with the CV systems due to the slightly higher effective stress applied during testing with these systems. The CHCV system has several advantages over the FHCV system, including minimizing initial transient behavior, constant applied effective stress during testing, and simpler calculations.

  8. High Temperature, Large Sample Volume, Constant Flow Magic Angle...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    sample spinning rate of 3.5 kHz, 1 H and 13 C 90-degree pulse width of 8 s, constant flow control at 1.0 atmospheric pressure, and temperature control up to 250 C. This...

  9. Air-Side Energy Use Calculations for Four HVAC Systems: Dual Duct Constant Volume (DDCAV), Dual Duct Variable Volume (DDVAV), Constant Volume with Reheat (CAVRH), Variable Volume with Reheat (VAVRH), Four Pipe Fan Coil Unit (FC), Four Pipe Induction Unit (FI), and Single Zone (SZ) Systems, Revised June 2002

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haberl, J. S.; Bou-Saada, T. E.; Saman, N. F.

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report contains engineering calculations for seven (7) air-side, heating, ventilating and air conditioning systems (HVAC) systems, including: dual duct constant volume (DDCAV), dual duct variable volume (DDVAV), constant volume with reheat...

  10. Research on Fuzzy Regulation Strategies in the Constant Air Volume Air Conditioning System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bai, T.; Zhang, J.; Ning, N.; Tong, K.; Wu, Y.; Wang, H.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The energy consumption of the constant air volume (CAV) system largely depends on the regulation strategies. Although some air conditioning systems are equipped with automatic regulation devices, others lack effective regulation strategies. To avoid...

  11. Research on Fuzzy Regulation Strategies in the Constant Air Volume Air Conditioning System 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bai, T.; Zhang, J.; Ning, N.; Tong, K.; Wu, Y.; Wang, H.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The energy consumption of the constant air volume (CAV) system largely depends on the regulation strategies. Although some air conditioning systems are equipped with automatic regulation devices, others lack effective ...

  12. Control Humidity With Single-Duct, Single-Zone, Constant Air Volume System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, H.; Deng, S.; Bruner, H. L.; Claridge, D. E.

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ), which turned this inefficient, humid lecture hall into a comfortable learning environment. This case study also explores other possibilities to solve the humidity control problem with single-duct, single-zone constant air volume systems....

  13. The Hubble Constant from Type Ia Supernovae in Early-Type Galaxies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tom Richtler; Georg Drenkhahn

    1999-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Type Ia supernovae (SNe) are the best standard candles available today in spite of an appreciable intrinsic variation of their luminosities at maximum phase, and of probably non-uniform progenitors. For an unbiased use of type Ia SNe as distance indicators it is important to know accurately how the decline rate and colour at maximum phase correlate with the peak brightness. In order to calibrate the Hubble diagram of type Ia SNe, i.e. to derive the Hubble constant, one needs to determine the absolute brightness of nearby type Ia SNe. Globular cluster systems of early type Ia host galaxies provide suitable distance indicators. We discuss how Ia SNe can be calibrated and explain the method of Globular Cluster Luminosity Functions (GCLFs). At present, the distance to the Fornax galaxy cluster is most important for deriving the Hubble constant. Our present data indicate a Hubble constant of H_0=72+-4 km/s/Mpc. As an appendix, we summarise what is known about absolute magnitudes of Ia's in late-type galaxies.

  14. Hardy–Sobolev Type Inequalities with Sharp Constants in Carnot ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2010-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

    nonlinear case p = 2. We also obtain a sharp inequality of Hardy–Sobolev type. Keywords Hardy type inequalities·Carnot groups·Carnot–Carathéodory spaces·.

  15. Fine-structure constant constraints on Bekenstein-type models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. M. M. Leal; C. J. A. P. Martins; L. B. Ventura

    2014-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Astrophysical tests of the stability of dimensionless fundamental couplings, such as the fine-structure constant $\\alpha$, are an area of much increased recent activity, following some indications of possible spacetime variations at the few parts per million level. Here we obtain updated constraints on the Bekenstein-Sandvik-Barrow-Magueijo model, which is arguably the simplest model allowing for $\\alpha$ variations. Recent accurate spectroscopic measurements allow us to improve previous constraints by about an order of magnitude. We briefly comment on the dependence of the results on the data sample, as well as on the improvements expected from future facilities.

  16. Table 43. Refiner Motor Gasoline Volumes by Grade, Sales Type...

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    220 Energy Information AdministrationPetroleum Marketing Annual 1998 Table 43. Refiner Motor Gasoline Volumes by Grade, Sales Type, PAD District, and State (Thousand Gallons per...

  17. Table 43. Refiner Motor Gasoline Volumes by Grade, Sales Type...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    220 Energy Information AdministrationPetroleum Marketing Annual 1999 Table 43. Refiner Motor Gasoline Volumes by Grade, Sales Type, PAD District, and State (Thousand Gallons per...

  18. Table 43. Refiner Motor Gasoline Volumes by Grade, Sales Type...

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Energy Information Administration Petroleum Marketing Annual 1995 Table 43. Refiner Motor Gasoline Volumes by Grade, Sales Type, PAD District, and State (Thousand Gallons per...

  19. Analysis of error in using fractured gas well type curves for constant pressure production

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schkade, David Wayne

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of normalized time and normalized cumulative production is a large improvement over using a constant evaluation pressure. 0 imens ion less cumulative production type curves are particularly useful in modeling production for economic projections, such as re... of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 1987 Major Subject: Petroleum Engineering ANALYSIS OF ERROR IN USING FRACTURED GAS WELL TYPE CURVES FOR CONSTANT PRESSURE PRDDUCTION A Thesis by DAVID WAYNE SCHKADE Approved as to style and content by: S. A. Ho lditch...

  20. Table 43. Refiner Motor Gasoline Volumes by Grade, Sales Type...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    150.0 2,026.7 W W 234.5 161.7 - 396.3 See footnotes at end of table. 43. Refiner Motor Gasoline Volumes by Grade, Sales Type, PAD District, and State 262 Energy Information...

  1. Table 43. Refiner Motor Gasoline Volumes by Grade, Sales Type...

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    253.2 2,222.4 W W 206.4 134.3 - 340.7 See footnotes at end of table. 43. Refiner Motor Gasoline Volumes by Grade, Sales Type, PAD District, and State 262 Energy Information...

  2. Using a Constant Volume Displacement Ventilation System to Create a Micro Climate in a Large Airport Terminal in Bangkok

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Simmonds, P.; Gaw, W.

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Using a Constant Volume Displacement Ventilation System to Create a Micro Climate in a Large Airport Terminal in Bangkok Peter Simmonds Flack + Kurtz New York Abstract In order to conserve energy and create a comfortable climate for both.... CF'D analysis was used to investigate the effectiveness of a displacement ventilation system. A displacement ventilation system pours ventilation air into a space across the floor. The temperature difference between the supply air and the room...

  3. Feasibility of Measuring the Cosmological Constant [LAMBDA] and Mass Density [Omega] using Type Ia Supernovae

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goobar, A.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    at z = 1. uncertainty for supernovae at z = 1. mR Adding theMass Density .Q Using Type Ia Supernovae A. Goobar and S.Density Q Using Type Ia Supernovae Ariel Goobar l and Saul

  4. Influence of type 2 diabetes on brain volumes and changes in brain volumes: Results from the Women's Health Initiative Magnetic Resonance Imaging Studies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    L E In?uence of Type 2 Diabetes on Brain Volumes and ChangesOBJECTIVEdTo study how type 2 diabetes adversely affectsAlzheimer disease and type 2 diabetes: a review. Brain Res

  5. Elastic constants determined by nanoindentation for p-type thermoelectric half-Heusler

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gahlawat, S.; Wheeler, L.; White, K. W., E-mail: zren@uh.edu, E-mail: kwwhite@uh.edu [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Houston, Houston, Texas 77204 (United States); He, R.; Chen, S.; Ren, Z. F., E-mail: zren@uh.edu, E-mail: kwwhite@uh.edu [Department of Physics and TcSUH, University of Houston, Houston, Texas 77204 (United States)

    2014-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents a study of the elastic properties of the p-type thermoelectric half-Heusler material, Hf{sub 0.44}Zr{sub 0.44}Ti{sub 0.12}CoSb{sub 0.8}Sn{sub 0.2}, using nanoindentation. Large grain-sized polycrystalline specimens were fabricated for these measurements, providing sufficient indentation targets within single grains. Electron Backscatter Diffraction methods indexed the target grains for the correlation needed for our elastic analysis of individual single crystals for this cubic thermoelectric material. Elastic properties, including the Zener ratio and the Poisson ratio, obtained from the elasticity tensor are also reported.

  6. Compositional modeling in porous media using constant volume flash and flux computation without the need for phase identification

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Polívka, Ond?ej, E-mail: ondrej.polivka@fjfi.cvut.cz; Mikyška, Ji?í, E-mail: jiri.mikyska@fjfi.cvut.cz

    2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The paper deals with the numerical solution of a compositional model describing compressible two-phase flow of a mixture composed of several components in porous media with species transfer between the phases. The mathematical model is formulated by means of the extended Darcy's laws for all phases, components continuity equations, constitutive relations, and appropriate initial and boundary conditions. The splitting of components among the phases is described using a new formulation of the local thermodynamic equilibrium which uses volume, temperature, and moles as specification variables. The problem is solved numerically using a combination of the mixed-hybrid finite element method for the total flux discretization and the finite volume method for the discretization of transport equations. A new approach to numerical flux approximation is proposed, which does not require the phase identification and determination of correspondence between the phases on adjacent elements. The time discretization is carried out by the backward Euler method. The resulting large system of nonlinear algebraic equations is solved by the Newton–Raphson iterative method. We provide eight examples of different complexity to show reliability and robustness of our approach.

  7. Single-Duct Constant Air Volume System Supply Air Temperature Reset: Using Return Air Temperature or Outside Air Temperature? 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wei, G.; Turner, W. D.; Claridge, D.; Liu, M.

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    space area. Room temperatures are controlled by pneumatic thermostats. The AHU has a minimum outside air damper and a maximum outside air damper. The minimum outside air damper is fully open when the AHU is in operation. The maximum outside air... of thermostat, and the relationship between room temperature set point and return air temperature. The Role Of Thermostat Traditional pneumatic thermostat is a proportional (P) type controller. It senses the space temperature changes and produces...

  8. Single-Duct Constant Air Volume System Supply Air Temperature Reset: Using Return Air Temperature or Outside Air Temperature?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wei, G.; Turner, W. D.; Claridge, D.; Liu, M.

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    space area. Room temperatures are controlled by pneumatic thermostats. The AHU has a minimum outside air damper and a maximum outside air damper. The minimum outside air damper is fully open when the AHU is in operation. The maximum outside air... understand how this reset scheme responds to building load change, thus resulting in supply air temperature reset, it is helpful to explain the role of thermostat. In the following section, we explain the way how the thermostat works, the type...

  9. ISQ derivation ("derivation in SI units") of a Landau and Lifschitz type formula for field ionization rate-constant

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richard G. Forbes

    2015-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

    In the 1940s/50s, Landau and Lifschitz (LL) published in their Quantum Mechanics textbook what is now a well known formula for the rate-constant for the electrostatic field ionization (ESFI) of a hydrogen atom in its ground electronic state. This formula is widely regarded as correct in the low field limit, and has played a significant role in development of ESFI theory. The formula was originally derived and presented in the atomic units system, with the hydrogen ionization energy I_H set equal to (1/2), making it impossible to determine by inspection to what power I_H is raised in its pre-exponential. Knowledge of this power would be useful in the context of near-surface ESFI, where significant image-force-induced shifts in effective ionization energy can occur. Also, large numbers of applied scientists and engineers work with ESFI as a process of technological importance, but cannot nowadays be expected to have familiarity with the Gaussian or atomic units equation systems. In the 1970s, what is now called the International System of Quantities (ISQ), which includes the equation system behind SI units, was internationally adopted as the primary system for university teaching and for communication of scientific equations between theoreticians and applied scientists and engineers. However, 40 years on, no transparent derivation of an ISQ equivalent of the LL formula is easily found in the literature. This tutorial paper presents a detailed ISQ derivation, finds that ionization energy appears in the pre-exponential as I_H to the power (7/2) (not 5/2, as sometimes stated) and defines a universal "tunnelling ionization constant" that appears in the ISQ formula pre-exponential. It is shown how this formula relates to the "attempt frequency" form often used to describe rate-constants for tunnelling processes, and an ISQ expression is given for the motive energy in the related JWKB integral.

  10. Motion Constants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Frank Znidarsic

    2000-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

    A Bose condensate of electrons may exist in nickel hydrogen and palladium hydrogen systems. The motion constants associated with the gravitational and nuclear forces motion tend toward the electromagnetic in these systems. The change in the motion constants produces unexpected gravitomagnetic and nuclear affects.

  11. The HST Key Project on the Extragalactic Distance Scale XXV. A Recalibration of Cepheid Distances to Type Ia Supernovae and the Value of the Hubble Constant

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brad K. Gibson; Peter B. Stetson; Wendy L. Freedman; Jeremy R. Mould; Robert C. Kennicutt, Jr.; John P. Huchra; Shoko Sakai; John A. Graham; Caleb I. Fassett; Daniel D. Kelson; Laura Ferrarese; Shaun M. G. Hughes; Garth D. Illingworth; Lucas M. Macri; Barry F. Madore; Kim M. Sebo; Nancy A. Silbermann

    1999-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Cepheid-based distances to seven Type Ia supernovae (SNe)-host galaxies have been derived using the standard HST Key Project on the Extragalactic Distance Scale pipeline. For the first time, this allows for a transparent comparison of data accumulated as part of three different HST projects, the Key Project, the Sandage et al. Type Ia SNe program, and the Tanvir et al. Leo I Group study. Re-analyzing the Tanvir et al. galaxy and six Sandage et al. galaxies we find a mean (weighted) offset in true distance moduli of 0.12+/-0.07 mag -- i.e., 6% in linear distance -- in the sense of reducing the distance scale, or increasing H0. Adopting the reddening-corrected Hubble relations of Suntzeff et al. (1999), tied to a zero point based upon SNe~1990N, 1981B, 1998bu, 1989B, 1972E and 1960F and the photometric calibration of Hill et al. (1998), leads to a Hubble constant of H0=68+/-2(random)+/-5(systematic) km/s/Mpc. Adopting the Kennicutt et al. (1998) Cepheid period-luminosity-metallicity dependency decreases the inferred H0 by 4%. The H0 result from Type Ia SNe is now in good agreement, to within their respective uncertainties, with that from the Tully-Fisher and surface brightness fluctuation relations.

  12. ,"Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Sales to End Users Refiner Sales Volumes"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghurajiConventional Gasoline Sales to End Users, Total Refiner Sales Volumes"for

  13. Varying constants quantum cosmology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Katarzyna Leszczynska; Adam Balcerzak; Mariusz P. Dabrowski

    2015-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

    We discuss minisuperspace models within the framework of varying physical constants theories including $\\Lambda$-term. In particular, we consider the varying speed of light (VSL) theory and varying gravitational constant theory (VG) using the specific ans\\"atze for the variability of constants: $c(a) = c_0 a^n$ and $G(a)=G_0 a^q$. We find that most of the varying $c$ and $G$ minisuperspace potentials are of the tunneling type which allows to use WKB approximation of quantum mechanics. Using this method we show that the probability of tunneling of the universe "from nothing" ($a=0)$ to a Friedmann geometry with the scale factor $a_t$ is large for growing $c$ models and is strongly suppressed for diminishing $c$ models. As for $G$ varying, the probability of tunneling is large for $G$ diminishing, while it is small for $G$ increasing. In general, both varying $c$ and $G$ change the probability of tunneling in comparison to the standard matter content (cosmological term, dust, radiation) universe models.

  14. 1. Physical constants 101 1. PHYSICAL CONSTANTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    with the Fermi coupling constant) comes from the Particle Data Group. The figures in parentheses after the values of 1 eV/c particle hc/(1 eV) 1.239 841 875(31)Ã?10-6 m 25 Rydberg energy hcR = mee4/2(4 0)2 2 = mec22 accel. gN 9.806 65 m s-2 exact Avogadro constant NA 6.022 141 79(30)Ã?1023 mol-1 50 Boltzmann constant k

  15. 1. Physical constants 1 1. PHYSICAL CONSTANTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of constants (beginning with the Fermi coupling constant) comes from the Particle Data Group. The figures of 1 eV/c particle hc/(1 eV) 1.239 841 930(27)Ã?10-6 m 22 Rydberg energy hcR = mee4/2(40)2 2 = mec22 gravitational accel. gN 9.806 65 m s-2 exact Avogadro constant NA 6.022 141 29(27)Ã?1023 mol-1 44 Boltzmann

  16. An Environmental Variation of Constants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Philippe Brax

    2014-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Models of modified gravity, whereby local tests of gravity are evaded thanks to a screening mechanism of the chameleon or Damour-Polyakov types, lead to a spatial variation of the particle masses and the fine structure constant. This is triggered by the environmental dependence of the value of the scalar field whose presence modifies gravity. In dense media, the field settles at a density dependent value while in sparse environments it takes the background cosmological value. We estimate that the maximal deviation of constants from their present values is constrained by local tests of gravity, and must be less than $10^{-6}$.

  17. Topology-controlled volume rendering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weber, Gunther H; Dillard, Scott E; Carr, Hamish; Pascucci, Valerio; Hamann, Bernd

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    type. Even when volume render- ing is applied to nonmedicalin graphics hardware. We render tubes between saddles and

  18. Cosmology with Varying Constants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. J. A. P. Martins

    2000-08-18T23:59:59.000Z

    I motivate and discuss some recent work on theories with varying constants, and consider some possible observational consequences and tests. Particular emphasis is given to models which can (almost) exactly mimic the predictions of standard inflationary models.

  19. constant | The Ames Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over OurThe Iron4 Self-Scrubbing:,, , ., ..., ,+ . :,2013constant Ames Laboratory Profile

  20. Unitaxial constant velocity microactuator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McIntyre, T.J.

    1994-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

    A uniaxial drive system or microactuator capable of operating in an ultra-high vacuum environment is disclosed. The mechanism includes a flexible coupling having a bore therethrough, and two clamp/pusher assemblies mounted in axial ends of the coupling. The clamp/pusher assemblies are energized by voltage-operated piezoelectrics therewithin to operatively engage the shaft and coupling causing the shaft to move along its rotational axis through the bore. The microactuator is capable of repeatably positioning to sub-nanometer accuracy while affording a scan range in excess of 5 centimeters. Moreover, the microactuator generates smooth, constant velocity motion profiles while producing a drive thrust of greater than 10 pounds. The system is remotely controlled and piezoelectrically driven, hence minimal thermal loading, vibrational excitation, or outgassing is introduced to the operating environment. 10 figs.

  1. Unitaxial constant velocity microactuator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McIntyre, Timothy J. (Knoxville, TN)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A uniaxial drive system or microactuator capable of operating in an ultra-high vacuum environment. The mechanism includes a flexible coupling having a bore therethrough, and two clamp/pusher assemblies mounted in axial ends of the coupling. The clamp/pusher assemblies are energized by voltage-operated piezoelectrics therewithin to operatively engage the shaft and coupling causing the shaft to move along its rotational axis through the bore. The microactuator is capable of repeatably positioning to sub-manometer accuracy while affording a scan range in excess of 5 centimeters. Moreover, the microactuator generates smooth, constant velocity motion profiles while producing a drive thrust of greater than 10 pounds. The system is remotely controlled and piezoelectrically driven, hence minimal thermal loading, vibrational excitation, or outgassing is introduced to the operating environment.

  2. On the relationship of gravitational constants in KK reduction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lu, J X

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this short note, we try to clarify a seemly trivial but often confusing question in relating a higher-dimensional physical gravitational constant to its lower-dimensional correspondence in Kaluza-Klein reduction. In particular, we re-derive the low-energy M-theory gravitational constant in terms of type IIA string coupling $g_s$ and constant $\\alpha'$ through the metric relation between the two theories.

  3. Supply Fan Control for Constant Air Volume Air Handling Units

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cho, Y.; Wang, G.; Liu, M.

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    there is fixed VFD speed, as shown in Table 1 and Figure 11. On the other hand, the energy consumption is 3,896,493 Btu/hr when there is dynamic VFD speed. The thermal energy consumption of dynamic VFD speed is less than that of the fixed VFD speed by 44... %. Therefore, when the supply fan speed control is optimized, thermal energy can be reduced. Table 1. Comparison data of thermal energy consumption Floor Fixed VFD speed (Btu/hr) Dynamic VFD speed (Btu/hr) Energy saving (%) PLF 784,891 502,611 36...

  4. The development of an automatic constant volume respirometer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Luckett, Larry Wayne

    1973-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Characteristics Gas exchange rates in s gaseous evolution reaction were measured concurrently by the two respirometer systems, in order' to compare the operational response of each. The reaction chosen was the decomposition of hydrogen peroxide into its... in the closed arm is adjusted to the reference mark& and the Pluid height in the open srm is noted ~ In this manner diPferent gaseous pressures may be selected Por the system. At sech of the several gaseous pressures selected, five Pivs-minute counting...

  5. Time-Varying Fine-Structure Constant Requires Cosmological Constant

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. W. Kuhne

    1999-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Webb et al. presented preliminary evidence for a time-varying fine-structure constant. We show Teller's formula for this variation to be ruled out within the Einstein-de Sitter universe, however, it is compatible with cosmologies which require a large cosmological constant.

  6. Dimensionality and the Cosmological Constant

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Z. C. Wu

    2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the Kaluza-Klein model with a cosmological constant and a flux, the external spacetime and its dimension of the created universe from a $S^s \\times S^{n-s}$ seed instanton can be identified in quantum cosmology. One can also show that in the internal space the effective cosmological constant is most probably zero.

  7. Significant Increase in Hydrogen Photoproduction Rates and Yields by Wild-Type Algae is Detected at High Photobioreactor Gas Phase Volume (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This NREL Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Technical Highlight describes how hydrogen photoproduction activity in algal cultures can be improved dramatically by increasing the gas-phase to liquid-phase volume ratio of the photobioreactor. NREL, in partnership with subcontractors from the Institute of Basic Biological Problems in Pushchino, Russia, demonstrated that the hydrogen photoproduction rate in algal cultures always decreases exponentially with increasing hydrogen partial pressure above the culture. The inhibitory effect of high hydrogen concentrations in the photobioreactor gas phase on hydrogen photoproduction by algae is significant and comparable to the effect observed with some anaerobic bacteria.

  8. Varying constants, Gravitation and Cosmology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jean-Philippe Uzan

    2010-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Fundamental constants are a cornerstone of our physical laws. Any constant varying in space and/or time would reflect the existence of an almost massless field that couples to matter. This will induce a violation of the universality of free fall. It is thus of utmost importance for our understanding of gravity and of the domain of validity of general relativity to test for their constancy. We thus detail the relations between the constants, the tests of the local position invariance and of the universality of free fall. We then review the main experimental and observational constraints that have been obtained from atomic clocks, the Oklo phenomenon, Solar system observations, meteorites dating, quasar absorption spectra, stellar physics, pulsar timing, the cosmic microwave background and big bang nucleosynthesis. At each step we describe the basics of each system, its dependence with respect to the constants, the known systematic effects and the most recent constraints that have been obtained. We then describe the main theoretical frameworks in which the low-energy constants may actually be varying and we focus on the unification mechanisms and the relations between the variation of different constants. To finish, we discuss the more speculative possibility of understanding their numerical values and the apparent fine-tuning that they confront us with.

  9. The Effects of Quantum Entropy on the Bag Constant

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miller, D E; Miller, David E.; Tawfik, Abdel-Nasser

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The effects of quantum entropy on the bag constant are studied at low temperatures and small chemical potentials. The inclusion of the quantum entropy of the quarks in the equation of state provides the hadronic bag with an additional heat which causes a decrease in the effective latent heat inside the bag. We have considered two types of baryonic bags, $\\Delta$ and $\\Omega^-$. In both cases we have found that the bag constant without the quantum entropy almost does not change with the temperature and the quark chemical potential. The contribution from the quantum entropy to the equation of state clearly decreases the value of the bag constant.

  10. Distinct Cyclin D Genes Show Mitotic Accumulation or Constant Levels of Transcripts in Tobacco

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Murray, J.A.H.

    Distinct Cyclin D Genes Show Mitotic Accumulation or Constant Levels of Transcripts in Tobacco-type cyclins accumulate peri- odically during the S, G2, and early M phases (A types) or G2 and early M phases

  11. Typed Self-Optimization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown, Matt

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    type T y[O]. The operator IsIs is self-applicative, in thatargument t is any of Is[O] or IsIs, and otherwise behavesproof constant introduced by IsIs proves that the type of t

  12. Uranium in US surface, ground, and domestic waters. Volume 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Drury, J.S.; Reynolds, S.; Owen, P.T.; Ross, R.H.; Ensminger, J.T.

    1981-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The report Uranium in US Surface, Ground, and Domestic Waters comprises four volumes. Volumes 2, 3, and 4 contain data characterizing the location, sampling date, type, use, and uranium conentrations of 89,994 individual samples presented in tabular form. The tabular data in volumes 2, 3, and 4 are summarized in volume 1 in narrative form and with maps and histograms.

  13. Asymptotically Flat Wormhole Solutions in a Generic Cosmological Constant Background

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Y. Heydarzade; N. Riazi; H. Moradpour

    2015-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

    There are a number of reasons to study wormholes with generic cosmological constant $\\Lambda$. Recent observations indicate that present accelerating expansion of the universe demands $\\Lambda>0$. On the other hand, some extended theories of gravitation such as supergravity and superstring theories posses vacuum states with $\\Lambdaenergy density and pressure profiles which support such a geometry are obtained. It is shown that for having such a geometry, the wormhole throat $r_0$, the cosmological constant $\\Lambda$ and the equation of state parameter $\\omega$ should satisfy two specific conditions. The possibility of setting different values for the parameters of the model helps us to find exact solutions for the metric functions, mass functions and energy-momentum profiles. At last, the volume integral quantifier, which provides useful information about the total amount of energy condition violating matter is discussed briefly.

  14. Towards the cosmological constant problem

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eun Kyung Park; Pyung Seong Kwon

    2014-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We apply a new self-tuning mechanism to the well-known Kachru-Kallosh-Linde-Trivedi (KKLT) model to address the cosmological constant problem. In this mechanism the cosmological constant $\\lambda$ contains a supersymmetry breaking term ${\\mathcal E}_{\\rm SB}$ besides the usual scalar potential ${\\mathcal V}_{\\rm scalar}$ of the $N=1$ supergravity, which is distinguished from the usual theories where $\\lambda$ is directly identified with ${\\mathcal V}_{\\rm scalar}$ alone. Also in this mechanism, whether $\\lambda$ vanishes or not is basically determined by the tensor structure of the scalar potential density, not by the zero or nonzero values of the scalar potential itself. As a result of this application we find that the natural scenario for the vanishing $\\lambda$ of the present universe is to take one of the AdS (rather than dS) vacua of KKLT as the background vacuum of our present universe. This AdS vacuum scenario does not suffer from the problematics of the dS vacua of KKLT. The background vacuum is stable both classically and quantum mechanically (no tunneling instabilities), and the value $\\lambda =0$ is also stable against quantum corrections because in this scenario the perturbative corrections of ${\\mathcal V}_{\\rm scalar}$ and quantum fluctuations $\\delta_Q {\\hat I}_{\\rm brane}^{(NS)} + \\delta_Q {\\hat I}_{\\rm brane}^{(R)}$ on the branes are all gauged away by an automatic cancelation between ${\\mathcal V}_{\\rm scalar} + \\delta_Q {\\hat I}_{\\rm brane}^{(NS)} + \\delta_Q {\\hat I}_{\\rm brane}^{(R)}$ and ${\\mathcal E}_{\\rm SB}$.

  15. MINIMAL SURFACES, SURFACES OF CONSTANT MEAN ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2003-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

    constant Ciso(G) > 0 of Theorem 12.1, for any go ? G, R > 0, one has for every ... constant Ciso = Ciso(G) > 0 as in Theorem 12.4, for every X-Caccioppoli set E ...

  16. Constant time algorithms in sparse graph model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nguyen, Huy Ngoc, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We focus on constant-time algorithms for graph problems in bounded degree model. We introduce several techniques to design constant-time approximation algorithms for problems such as Vertex Cover, Maximum Matching, Maximum ...

  17. Rate constants for charge transfer across semiconductor-liquid interfaces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fajardo, A.M.; Lewis, N.S. [California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA (United States)

    1996-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Interfacial charge-transfer rate constants have been measured for n-type Si electrodes in contact with a series of viologen-based redox couples in methanol through analyses of the behavior of these junctions with respect to their current density versus potential and differential capacitance versus potential properties. The data allow evaluation of the maximum rate constant (and therefore the electronic coupling) for majority carriers in the solid as well as of the dependence of the rate constant on the driving force for transfer of delocalized electrons from the n-Si semiconducting electrode into the localized molecular redox species in the solution phase. The data are in good agreement with existing models of this interfacial electron transfer process and provide insight into the fundamental kinetic events underlying the use of semiconducting photoelectrodes in applications such as solar energy conversion. 23 refs., 3 figs.

  18. Table A1 Molar mass, gas constant, and critical-point properties

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kostic, Milivoje M.

    of carbon dioxide, CO2 Table A­21 Ideal-gas properties of carbon monoxide, CO Table A­22 Ideal Properties of the atmosphere at high altitude Table A­17 Ideal-gas properties of air Table A­18 Ideal-point properties Molar mass, constant, Temperature, Pressure, Volume, Substance Formula M kg/kmol R kJ/kg·K* K MPa

  19. The Constant Voltage Transformer (CVT) for Mitigating Effects of Voltage Sags on Industrial Equipment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ferraro, R. J.; Osborne, R.; Stephens, R.

    ) an increase in loads that use power electronics in some type of power conversion configuration [1][2]. This paper presents applications of the constant-voltage transformer (CVT) for mitigating the effects of electric service voltage sags on industrial...

  20. Inverse problem in anisotropic poroelasticity: Drained constants from undrained ultrasound measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berryman, J.G.; Nakagawa, S.

    2009-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Poroelastic analysis has traditionally focused on the relationship between dry or drained constants which are assumed known and the saturated or undrained constants which are assumed unknown. However, there are many applications in this field of study for which the main measurements can only be made on the saturated/undrained system, and then it is uncertain what the eects of the uids were on the system, since the drained constants remain a mystery. The work presented here shows how to deduce drained constants from undrained constants for anisotropic systems having symmetries ranging from isotropic to orthotropic. Laboratory ultrasound data are then inverted for the drained constants in three granular packings: one of glass beads, and two others for distinct types of more or less angular sand grain packings. Experiments were performed under uniaxial stress, which resulted in hexagonal (transversely isotropic) symmetry of the poroelastic response. One important conclusion from the general analysis is that the drained constants are uniquely related to the undrained constants, assuming that porosity, grain bulk modulus, and pore uid bulk modulus are already known. Since the resulting system of equations for all the drained constants is linear, measurement error in undrained constants also propagates linearly into the computed drained constants.

  1. Constant voltage electro-slag remelting control

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schlienger, M.E.

    1996-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

    A system for controlling electrode gap in an electro-slag remelt furnace has a constant regulated voltage and an electrode which is fed into the slag pool at a constant rate. The impedance of the circuit through the slag pool is directly proportional to the gap distance. Because of the constant voltage, the system current changes are inversely proportional to changes in gap. This negative feedback causes the gap to remain stable. 1 fig.

  2. Cosmological Constant and Axions in String Theory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Svrcek, Peter; /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SLAC

    2006-08-18T23:59:59.000Z

    String theory axions appear to be promising candidates for explaining cosmological constant via quintessence. In this paper, we study conditions on the string compactifications under which axion quintessence can happen. For sufficiently large number of axions, cosmological constant can be accounted for as the potential energy of axions that have not yet relaxed to their minima. In compactifications that incorporate unified models of particle physics, the height of the axion potential can naturally fall close to the observed value of cosmological constant.

  3. Vacuum Energy and the Cosmological Constant

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. C. Melissinos

    2001-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

    We discuss a numerical relation between the cosmological constant and the vacuum energy arising from the Casimir effect in extra dimensions

  4. Kepler Problem in the Constant Curvature Space

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. Pronko

    2007-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

    We present algebraic derivation of the result of Schr\\"{o}dinger [1] for the spectrum of hydrogen atom in the space with constant curvature.

  5. A natural cosmological constant from chameleons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Horatiu Nastase; Amanda Weltman

    2015-04-06T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a simple model where the effective cosmological constant appears from chameleon scalar fields. For a Kachru-Kallosh-Linde-Trivedi (KKLT)-inspired form of the potential and a particular chameleon coupling to the local density, patches of approximately constant scalar field potential cluster around regions of matter with density above a certain value, generating the effect of a cosmological constant on large scales. This construction addresses both the cosmological constant problem (why $\\Lambda$ is so small, yet nonzero) and the coincidence problem (why $\\Lambda$ is comparable to the matter density now).

  6. Table 44. Refiner Motor Gasoline Volumes by Formulation, Sales...

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    250 Energy Information AdministrationPetroleum Marketing Annual 1999 Table 44. Refiner Motor Gasoline Volumes by Formulation, Sales Type, PAD District, and State (Thousand Gallons...

  7. Table 44. Refiner Motor Gasoline Volumes by Formulation, Sales...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    - - - - W W - - - - - - See footnotes at end of table. 44. Refiner Motor Gasoline Volumes by Formulation, Sales Type, PAD District, and State 292 Energy...

  8. Petroleum Products Table 43. Refiner Motor Gasoline Volumes...

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    220 Energy Information AdministrationPetroleum Marketing Annual 2000 Table 43. Refiner Motor Gasoline Volumes by Grade, Sales Type, PAD District, and State (Thousand Gallons per...

  9. Petroleum Products Table 43. Refiner Motor Gasoline Volumes...

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Energy Information Administration Petroleum Marketing Annual 1995 Table 43. Refiner Motor Gasoline Volumes by Grade, Sales Type, PAD District, and State (Thousand Gallons per...

  10. Table 44. Refiner Motor Gasoline Volumes by Formulation, Sales...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    250 Energy Information AdministrationPetroleum Marketing Annual 1998 Table 44. Refiner Motor Gasoline Volumes by Formulation, Sales Type, PAD District, and State (Thousand Gallons...

  11. Table 44. Refiner Motor Gasoline Volumes by Formulation, Sales...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Energy Information Administration Petroleum Marketing Annual 1995 Table 44. Refiner Motor Gasoline Volumes by Formulation, Sales Type, PAD District, and State (Thousand Gallons...

  12. Water Quality Program, Volume 2 (Alabama) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    13, 2013. EZFeed Policy Place Alabama Applies to States or Provinces Alabama Name Water Quality Program, Volume 2 (Alabama) Policy Category Other Policy Policy Type...

  13. Volume Comparison

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal Stocks at Commercial and InstitutionalArea:Mnt(N)3.1.Liquids ReserveVolume

  14. Sequential Constant Size Compressors for Reinforcement Learning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schmidhuber, Juergen

    Sequential Constant Size Compressors for Reinforcement Learning Linus Gissl´en, Matt Luciw, Vincent with this problem: standard RL techniques using as input the hidden layer output of a Sequential Constant-Size Compressor (SCSC). The SCSC takes the form of a sequential Recurrent Auto-Associative Mem- ory, trained

  15. Vacuum Fluctuations and the Cosmological Constant

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shi Qi

    2006-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The hypothesis is proposed that under the approximation that the quantum equations of motion reduce to the classical ones, the quantum vacuum also reduces to the classical vacuum--the empty space. The vacuum energy of QED is studied under this hypothesis. A possible solution to the cosmological constant problem is provided and a kind of parameterization of the cosmological "constant" is derived.

  16. Newtonian Constant of Gravitation International Consortium

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Newtonian Constant of Gravitation International Consortium I. BACKGROUND Recent measurements of the Newtonian constant of gravitation G are in disagreement, with discrepancies that are roughly ten times forces on a laboratory scale. It also raises the question of whether the Newtonian force law

  17. A beta-type fully implicit reservoir simulator with variable bubble point and dew point

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boe, Jarle

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the following equation. V P 5. 617 m g 2 QT 1000 (56) And the R curve can be obtained from the same constant volume Sg depletion by summing up the GPM content of the propane through hep- tanes plus fractions. The B and the R can then be calculated 0 so...A BETA-TYPE FULLY IMPLICIT RESERVOIR SIMULATOR WITH VARIABLE BUBBLE POINT AND DEW POINT A Thesis by JARLE BOE Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER...

  18. Constants and Pseudo-Constants of Coupled Beam Motion in the PEP-II Rings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Decker, F.J.; Colocho, W.S.; Wang, M.H.; Yan, Y.T.; Yocky, G.; /SLAC

    2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Constants of beam motion help as cross checks to analyze beam diagnostics and the modeling procedure. Pseudo-constants, like the betatron mismatch parameter or the coupling parameter det C, are constant till certain elements in the beam line change them. This can be used to visually find the non-desired changes, pinpointing errors compared with the model.

  19. Vacuum Structure and Gravitational Bags Produced by Metric-Independent Spacetime Volume-Form Dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eduardo Guendelman; Emil Nissimov; Svetlana Pacheva

    2015-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

    We propose a new class of gravity-matter-gauge theories in terms of two different non-Riemannian volume-forms independent of the Riemannian metric. The nonlinear gauge field system contains a square-root $\\sqrt{-F^2}$ of the standard Maxwell Lagrangian which is known to describe charge confinement in flat spacetime. In the physical Einstein frame we obtain an effective Lagrangian of "k-essence" type with quadratic dependence on the scalar "dilaton" kinetic term X, with a remarkable effective potential possessing two infinitely large flat regions as well as with nontrivial effective gauge coupling constants running with the "dilaton" $\\varphi$. Corresponding to the each of the two flat regions we find "vacuum" configurations of the following types: (i) $\\varphi = const$ and a non-zero gauge field vacuum $\\sqrt{-F^2}\

  20. Asymptotically Vanishing Cosmological Constant in the Multiverse

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hikaru Kawai; Takashi Okada

    2011-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the problem of the cosmological constant in the context of the multiverse in Lorentzian spacetime, and show that the cosmological constant will vanish in the future. This sort of argument was started from Coleman in 1989, and he argued that the Euclidean wormholes make the multiverse partition a superposition of various values of the cosmological constant $\\Lambda$, which has a sharp peak at $\\Lambda=0$. However, the implication of the Euclidean analysis to our Lorentzian spacetime is unclear. With this motivation, we analyze the quantum state of the multiverse in Lorentzian spacetime by the WKB method, and calculate the density matrix of our universe by tracing out the other universes. Our result predicts vanishing cosmological constant. While Coleman obtained the enhancement at $\\Lambda=0$ through the action itself, in our Lorentzian analysis the similar enhancement arises from the front factor of $e^{iS}$ in the universe wave function, which is in the next leading order in the WKB approximation.

  1. p=constant compression on loose Hostun sand: The case of an anisotropic response

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. Evesque

    2005-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Experimental data from axially symmetric compression test at constant mean pressure p on Hostun sand from Flavigny experiments on loose sands are used to study the validity of an "isotropic" modelling at different densities . It is found that the material response is not isotropic even at small deviatoric stress. As an "isotropic" behaviour is found for compression test at constant volume on the same sand, this new result questions the unicity of the trajectory in the classical phase space of soil mechanics (q,p,v), with q being thed deviatoric stress, v the specific volume. This asks whether the space shall be taken larger than 3d or not. Pacs # : 5.40 ; 45.70 ; 62.20 ; 83.70.Fn

  2. Advances in Lung Volume

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jones, Michelle

    Advances in Lung Volume Reduction Surgery The Ohio University Medical Center Lung Volume Reduction LungVolumeReductionSurgery Spring 2010 © 2010 The Ohio State University Medical Center ­ 04 Consult Ohio State's #12;The Ohio State University Medical Center Lung Volume Reduction Surgery Patient

  3. The Vacuum and the Cosmological Constant Problem

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gerald E. Marsh

    2008-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

    It will be argued here that the cosmological constant problem exists because of the way the vacuum is defined in quantum field theory. It has been known for some time that for QFT to be gauge invariant certain terms--such as part of the vacuum polarization tensor--must be eliminated either explicitly or by some form of regularization followed by renormalization. It has recently been shown that lack of gauge invariance is a result of the way the vacuum is defined, and redefining the vacuum so that the theory is gauge invariant may also offer a solution to the cosmological constant problem.

  4. Cosmological constant in scale-invariant theories

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Foot, Robert; Kobakhidze, Archil; Volkas, Raymond R. [School of Physics, University of Melbourne, Victoria 3010 (Australia)

    2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The incorporation of a small cosmological constant within radiatively broken scale-invariant models is discussed. We show that phenomenologically consistent scale-invariant models can be constructed which allow a small positive cosmological constant, providing certain relation between the particle masses is satisfied. As a result, the mass of the dilaton is generated at two-loop level. Another interesting consequence is that the electroweak symmetry-breaking vacuum in such models is necessarily a metastable ''false'' vacuum which, fortunately, is not expected to decay on cosmological time scales.

  5. Optical Constants ofOptical Constants of Uranium Nitride Thin FilmsUranium Nitride Thin Films

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hart, Gus

    Optical Constants ofOptical Constants of Uranium Nitride Thin FilmsUranium Nitride Thin FilmsDelta--Beta Scatter Plot at 220 eVBeta Scatter Plot at 220 eV #12;Why Uranium Nitride?Why Uranium Nitride? UraniumUranium, uranium,Bombard target, uranium, with argon ionswith argon ions Uranium atoms leaveUranium atoms leave

  6. Vacuum Fluctuations Cannot Mimic a Cosmological Constant

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robert D. Klauber

    2007-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

    When the vacuum fluctuation pressure is calculated directly from fundamental principles of quantum field theory, in the same manner as vacuum fluctuation energy density is commonly calculated, one finds it is not equal to the negative of the vacuum fluctuation energy density. Thus, vacuum fluctuations cannot manifest as a cosmological constant of any order.

  7. Surface Tension and the Cosmological Constant

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Joseph Samuel; Supurna Sinha

    2006-04-18T23:59:59.000Z

    The astronomically observed value of the cosmological constant is small but non-zero. This raises two questions together known as the cosmological constant problem a) why is lambda so nearly zero? b) why is lambda not EXACTLY zero? Sorkin has proposed that b) can be naturally explained as a one by square root N fluctuation by invoking discreteness of spacetime at the Planck scale due to quantum gravity. In this paper we shed light on these questions by developing an analogy between the cosmological constant and the surface tension of membranes. The ``cosmological constant problem'' has a natural analogue in the membrane context: the vanishingly small surface tension of fluid membranes provides an example where question a) above arises and is answered. We go on to find a direct analogue of Sorkin's proposal for answering question b) in the membrane context, where the discreteness of spacetime translates into the molecular structure of matter. We propose analogue experiments to probe a small and fluctuating surface tension in fluid membranes. A counterpart of dimensional reduction a la Kaluza-Klein and large extra dimensions also appears in the physics of fluid membranes.

  8. Constant-Pressure Measurement of Steam-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    SGP-TR-169 Constant-Pressure Measurement of Steam- Water Relative Permeability Peter A. O by measuring in-situ steam saturation more directly. Mobile steam mass fraction was established by separate steam and water inlets or by correlating with previous results. The measured steam-water relative

  9. Sandia Software Guidelines, Volume 2. Documentation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This volume is one in a series of Sandia Software Guidelines intended for use in producing quality software within Sandia National Laboratories. In consonance with the IEEE Standards for software documentation, this volume provides guidance in the selection of an adequate document set for a software project and example formats for many types of software documentation. A tutorial on life cycle documentation is also provided. Extended document thematic outlines and working examples of software documents are available on electronic media as an extension of this volume.

  10. Polynomial Constants are Decidable Markus Muller-Olm1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Müller-Olm, Markus

    Polynomial Constants are Decidable Markus M¨uller-Olm1 and Helmut Seidl2 1 University of Dortmund variable, are interpreted. Another decidable class of constants are finite constants [19]. This motivated M¨uller-Olm

  11. Infrared Spectroscopy and Optical Constants of Porous Amorphous...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Spectroscopy and Optical Constants of Porous Amorphous Solid Water. Infrared Spectroscopy and Optical Constants of Porous Amorphous Solid Water. Abstract: Reflection-absorption...

  12. acid dissociation constants: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of Constants . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20 3.1.1 Flow Graphs Mller-Olm, Markus 333 Cosmological constant, supersymmetry, nonassociativity, and Big Numbers...

  13. air group constant: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of Constants . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20 3.1.1 Flow Graphs Mller-Olm, Markus 257 Cosmological constant, supersymmetry, nonassociativity, and Big Numbers...

  14. approximation multigroup constant: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of Constants . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20 3.1.1 Flow Graphs Mller-Olm, Markus 482 Cosmological constant, supersymmetry, nonassociativity, and Big Numbers...

  15. approx constant applicable: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of Constants . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20 3.1.1 Flow Graphs Mller-Olm, Markus 280 Cosmological constant, supersymmetry, nonassociativity, and Big Numbers...

  16. acid dissociation constant: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of Constants . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20 3.1.1 Flow Graphs Mller-Olm, Markus 333 Cosmological constant, supersymmetry, nonassociativity, and Big Numbers...

  17. abbn-90 constant system: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of Constants . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20 3.1.1 Flow Graphs Mller-Olm, Markus 332 Cosmological constant, supersymmetry, nonassociativity, and Big Numbers...

  18. afectan las constantes: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of Constants . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20 3.1.1 Flow Graphs Mller-Olm, Markus 144 Cosmological constant, supersymmetry, nonassociativity, and Big Numbers...

  19. averaging thermal constants: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of Constants . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20 3.1.1 Flow Graphs Mller-Olm, Markus 431 Cosmological constant, supersymmetry, nonassociativity, and Big Numbers...

  20. High Dielectric Constant Capacitors for Power Electronic Systems...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Dielectric Constant Capacitors for Power Electronic Systems High Dielectric Constant Capacitors for Power Electronic Systems 2009 DOE Hydrogen Program and Vehicle Technologies...

  1. High Dialectric Constant Capacitors for Power Electronic Systems...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    High Dialectric Constant Capacitors for Power Electronic Systems High Dialectric Constant Capacitors for Power Electronic Systems 2012 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and...

  2. High-Dialectric-Constant Capacitors for Power Electronic Systems...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    High-Dialectric-Constant Capacitors for Power Electronic Systems High-Dialectric-Constant Capacitors for Power Electronic Systems 2011 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program, and...

  3. High Dialectric Constant Capacitors for Power Electronic Systems...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Dialectric Constant Capacitors for Power Electronic Systems High Dialectric Constant Capacitors for Power Electronic Systems 2010 DOE Vehicle Technologies and Hydrogen Programs...

  4. Regular Type III and Type N Approximate Solutions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Philip Downes; Paul MacAllevey; Bogdan Nita; Ivor Robinson

    2001-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

    New type III and type N approximate solutions which are regular in the linear approximation are shown to exist. For that, we use complex transformations on self-dual Robinson-Trautman metrics rather then the classical approach. The regularity criterion is the boundedness and vanishing at infinity of a scalar obtained by saturating the Bel-Robinson tensor of the first approximation by a time-like vector which is constant with respect to the zeroth approximation.

  5. Current and future industrial energy service characterizations. Volume II. Energy data on the US manufacturing subsector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krawiec, F.; Thomas, T.; Jackson, F.; Limaye, D.R.; Isser, S.; Karnofsky, K.; Davis, T.D.

    1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In order to characterize industrial energy service, current energy demand, its end uses, and cost of typical energy applications and resultant services in the industrial sector were examined and a projection of state industrial energy demands and prices to 1990 was developed. Volume II presents in Section 2 data on the US manufacturing subsector energy demand, intensity, growth rates, and cost for 1971, 1974, and 1976. These energy data are disaggregated not only by fuel type but also by user classifications, including the 2-digit SIC industry groups, 3-digit subgroups, and 4-digit SIC individual industries. These data characterize typical energy applications and the resultant services in this subsector. The quantities of fuel and electric energy purchased by the US manufacturing subsector were converted to British thermal units and reported in billions of Btu. The conversion factors are presented in Table 4-1 of Volume I. To facilitate the descriptive analysis, all energy cost and intensity data were expressed in constant 1976 dollars. The specific US industrial energy service characteristics developed and used in the descriptive analysis are presented in Volume I. Section 3 presents the computer program used to produce the tabulated data.

  6. Cosmological constant and quantum gravitational corrections to the running fine structure constant

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    David J. Toms

    2008-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The quantum gravitational contribution to the renormalization group behavior of the electric charge in Einstein-Maxwell theory with a cosmological constant is considered. Quantum gravity is shown to lead to a contribution to the running charge not present when the cosmological constant vanishes. This re-opens the possibility, suggested by Robinson and Wilczek, of altering the scaling behaviour of gauge theories at high energies although our result differs. We show the possibility of an ultraviolet fixed point that is linked directly to the cosmological constant.

  7. The Cosmological Constant in the Quantum Multiverse

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grant Larsen; Yasunori Nomura; H. L. L. Roberts

    2011-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Recently, a new framework for describing the multiverse has been proposed which is based on the principles of quantum mechanics. The framework allows for well-defined predictions, both regarding global properties of the universe and outcomes of particular experiments, according to a single probability formula. This provides complete unification of the eternally inflating multiverse and many worlds in quantum mechanics. In this paper we elucidate how cosmological parameters can be calculated in this framework, and study the probability distribution for the value of the cosmological constant. We consider both positive and negative values, and find that the observed value is consistent with the calculated distribution at an order of magnitude level. In particular, in contrast to the case of earlier measure proposals, our framework prefers a positive cosmological constant over a negative one. These results depend only moderately on how we model galaxy formation and life evolution therein.

  8. Variable energy constant current accelerator structure

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Anderson, O.A.

    1988-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

    A variable energy, constant current ion beam accelerator structure is disclosed comprising an ion source capable of providing the desired ions, a pre-accelerator for establishing an initial energy level, a matching/pumping module having means for focusing means for maintaining the beam current, and at least one main accelerator module for continuing beam focus, with means capable of variably imparting acceleration to the beam so that a constant beam output current is maintained independent of the variable output energy. In a preferred embodiment, quadrupole electrodes are provided in both the matching/pumping module and the one or more accelerator modules, and are formed using four opposing cylinder electrodes which extend parallel to the beam axis and are spaced around the beam at 90/degree/ intervals with opposing electrodes maintained at the same potential. 12 figs., 3 tabs.

  9. Comment on "Black holes constrain varying constants"

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. V. Flambaum

    2002-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

    A recent paper [DDL] claims that the increase of the proton electric charge e leads to a (forbidden) decrease of black hole entropy, therefore, possible evidence for variation of $\\alpha=e^2/\\hbar c$ [alpha] must be interpreted as a decrease of the speed of light. We argue that purely theoretical consideration of black holes possibly cannot give any model-independent limitations on variation of fundamental constants.

  10. Light Dragging, the Origin of Hubble's Constant

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walter J. Christensen Jr

    2008-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Recently E. Harrison has argued the Red Shift distance law proposed by Hubble and velocity-distance law developed later on theoretical grounds has no general proof demonstrating the two laws are actually equivalent. It is the purpose of this paper to account for the nebular redshift law of Hubble based on two principles: 1) Spacetime motion and light dragging. 2) An overall spacetime index of refraction based on Hubble's Constant.

  11. Computer News, Volume 3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    [mandelbrot set] MATH DEPT Computer News, Volume 3. How to take advantage of the newer, faster machines on our network ...

  12. Computer News, Volume 2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    [mandelbrot set] MATH DEPT Computer News, Volume 2. How to handle .pdf files on the web: acroread, distill, and Netscape ...

  13. Which Fundamental Constants for CMB and BAO?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rich, James

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the Cosmic Microwave Background using the three-scale framework of Hu et al. to derive the dependence of the CMB temperature anisotropy spectrum on the fundamental constants. We show that, as expected, the observed spectrum depends only on \\emph{dimensionless} combinations of the constants, and we emphasize the points that make this generally true for cosmological observations. Our analysis suggests that the CMB spectrum shape is mostly determined by $\\alpha^2m_e/m_p$ and the proton-CDM-particle mass ratio, $m_p/\\mchi$, with a sub-dominant dependence on $(G\\mchi m_e/\\hbar c)\\alpha^\\beta$ with $\\beta\\sim -7$. The distance to the last-scattering surface depends on $Gm_p\\mchi/\\hbar c$, so published CMB observational limits on time variations of the constants, besides making assumptions about the form of the dark-energy, implicitly assume the time-independence of this quantity. On the other hand, low-redshift $H_0$, BAO and large-scale structure data can be combined with the \\emph{shape} of the CMB spect...

  14. JOURNAL DE PHYSIQUE IV Colloque C4, supplkmentau Journal de Physique 11, Volume 3,septembre 1993

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    K for polycarbonate and polyoxy- methylene samples. The values of 73 and 13 are a constant below measurements have also been performed to deduce the free-volume hole distributions in the polycarbonate using the particle in a spherical box theory. The free-volume hole radii of polycarbonate at 293 K

  15. From constant to non-degenerately vanishing magnetic fields in superconductivity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bernard Helffer; Ayman Kachmar

    2015-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

    We explore the relationship between two reference functions arising in the analysis of the Ginzburg-Landau functional. The first function describes the distribution of superconductivity in a type II superconductor subjected to a constant magnetic field. The second function describes the distribution of superconductivity in a type II superconductor submitted to a variable magnetic field that vanishes non-degenerately along a smooth curve.

  16. Self-gravitating scalar breathers with negative cosmological constant

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gyula Fodor; Péter Forgács; Philippe Grandclément

    2015-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Breather-type (time-periodic and spatially localized) solutions with spherical symmetry are investigated in a massless scalar field theory coupled to Einstein's gravity with cosmological constant in $d$ spatial dimensions imposing anti de Sitter (AdS) asymptotics on space-time. Using a code constructed with the Kadath library that enables the use of spectral methods, the phase space of breather solutions is explored in detail for $d=3$ and $d=4$. It is found that there are discrete families of solutions indexed by an integer and by their frequency. Using a time evolution code these AdS breathers are found to be stable for up to a critical central density, in analogy to boson stars. Using an analytical perturbative expansion small amplitude breathers are worked out for arbitrary dimensions $d$.

  17. Fine-structure constant constraints on dark energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martins, C J A P

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We use astrophysical and atomic clock tests of the stability of the fine-structure constant $\\alpha$, together with Type Ia supernova and Hubble parameter data, to constrain the simplest class of dynamical dark energy models where the same degree of freedom is assumed to provide both the dark energy and (through a dimensionless coupling, $\\zeta$, to the electromagnetic sector) the $\\alpha$ variation. We show how current data tightly constrains a combination of $\\zeta$ and the dark energy equation of state $w_0$. At the $95\\%$ confidence level and marginalizing over $w_0$ we find $|\\zeta|<5\\times10^{-6}$, with the atomic clock tests dominating the constraints. The forthcoming generation of high-resolution ultra-stable spectrographs will enable significantly tighter constraints.

  18. $f(T)$ Theories and Varying Fine Structure Constant

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wei, Hao; Qi, Hao-Yu

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In analogy to $f(R)$ theory, recently $f(T)$ theory has been proposed to drive the current accelerated expansion without invoking dark energy. In the literature, the observational constraints on $f(T)$ theories were obtained mainly by using the cosmological data, such as type Ia supernovae (SNIa), baryon acoustic oscillation (BAO), and cosmic microwave background radiation (CMB). In this work, we instead try to constrain $f(T)$ theories with the varying fine structure "constant", $\\alpha\\equiv e^2/\\hbar c$. We find that the constraints on $f(T)$ theories from the observational $\\Delta\\alpha/\\alpha$ data are very severe. In fact, they make $f(T)$ theories almost indistinguishable from $\\Lambda$CDM model.

  19. Seismic pulse propagation with constant Q and stable probability distributions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Francesco Mainardi; Massimo Tomirotti

    2010-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The one-dimensional propagation of seismic waves with constant Q is shown to be governed by an evolution equation of fractional order in time, which interpolates the heat equation and the wave equation. The fundamental solutions for the Cauchy and Signalling problems are expressed in terms of entire functions (of Wright type) in the similarity variable and their behaviours turn out to be intermediate between those for the limiting cases of a perfectly viscous fluid and a perfectly elastic solid. In view of the small dissipation exhibited by the seismic pulses, the nearly elastic limit is considered. Furthermore, the fundamental solutions for the Cauchy and Signalling problems are shown to be related to stable probability distributions with index of stability determined by the order of the fractional time derivative in the evolution equation.

  20. American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics Comparison of Tensile Fatigue Resistance and Constant

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and Constant Life Diagrams for Several Potential Wind Turbine Blade Laminates Daniel D. Samborsky, Timothy J laminates of current and potential interest for wind turbine blades, representing three types of fibers: E loading relative to an earlier material. Comparisons of the materials show significant improvements under

  1. Low Energy Constants from the zero mode contribution to the pseudo-scalar correlator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Shcheredin; W. Bietenholz

    2005-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    We apply different types of overlap operators in quenched QCD simulations to compute the zero mode contribution to the pseudo-scalar correlator. In particular we use the conventional Neuberger Dirac operator and the overlap hypercube Dirac operator. Confronting our data with the analytical predictions by Chiral Perturbation Theory we evaluate the pion decay constant and the parameter \\alpha of the quenched chiral Lagrangian.

  2. Reducing Building Energy Costs Using Optimized Operation Strategies for Constant Volume Air Handling Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, M.; Athar, A.; Reddy, A.; Claridge, D. E.; Haberl, J. S.; White, E.

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    , building energy consumption can be further reduced even after these traditional O&M measures are applied. This involves optimal adjusting of cold deck and hot deck settings according to the ambient temperature and organizing cold deck settings properly... where more than one cold deck is present (Extended O&M Measures). The cold deck and hot deck settings can be adjusted continuously by the Energy Management and Control Systems without additional investment. The optimized cold deck settings can...

  3. Performance Analysis of Dual-Fan, Dual-Duct Constant Volume Air-Handling Units

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Joo, I. S.; Liu, M.

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Dual-fan, dual-duct air-handling units introduce outside air directly into the cooling duct and use two variable speed devices to independently maintain the static pressure of the hot and the cold air ducts. Analytical models have been developed...

  4. Self-similarity in particle-laden flows at constant volume

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grunewald, Natalie; Levy, Rachel; Mata, Matthew; Ward, Thomas; Bertozzi, Andrea L.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Acrivos A (1986) Viscous resuspension. Chem Eng Sci 41(6):sedimentation and viscous resuspension. Int J Numer Methods

  5. TASI Lectures on the cosmological constant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bousso, Raphael; Bousso, Raphael

    2007-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The energy density of the vacuum, Lambda, is at least 60 orders of magnitude smaller than several known contributions to it. Approaches to this problem are tightly constrained by data ranging from elementary observations to precision experiments. Absent overwhelming evidence to the contrary, dark energy can only be interpreted as vacuum energy, so the venerable assumption that Lambda=0 conflicts with observation. The possibility remains that Lambda is fundamentally variable, though constant over large spacetime regions. This can explain the observed value, but only in a theory satisfying a number of restrictive kinematic and dynamical conditions. String theory offers a concrete realization through its landscape of metastable vacua.

  6. A Measurement of Newton's Gravitational Constant

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    St. Schlamminger; E. Holzschuh; W. Kündig; F. Nolting; R. E. Pixley; J. Schurr; U. Straumann

    2006-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

    A precision measurement of the gravitational constant $G$ has been made using a beam balance. Special attention has been given to determining the calibration, the effect of a possible nonlinearity of the balance and the zero-point variation of the balance. The equipment, the measurements and the analysis are described in detail. The value obtained for G is 6.674252(109)(54) 10^{-11} m3 kg-1 s-2. The relative statistical and systematic uncertainties of this result are 16.3 10^{-6} and 8.1 10^{-6}, respectively.

  7. Is Cosmological Constant Needed in Higgs Inflation?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feng, Chao-Jun

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The detection of B-mode shows a very powerful constraint to theoretical inflation models through the measurement of the tensor-to-scalar ratio $r$. Higgs boson is the most likely candidate of the inflaton field. But usually, Higgs inflation models predict a small value of $r$, which is not quite consistent with the recent results from BICEP2. In this paper, we explored whether a cosmological constant energy component is needed to improve the situation. And we found the answer is yes. For the so-called Higgs chaotic inflation model with a quadratic potential, it predicts $r\\approx 0.2$, $n_s\\approx0.96$ with e-folds number $N\\approx 56$, which is large enough to overcome the problems such as the horizon problem in the Big Bang cosmology. The required energy scale of the cosmological constant is roughly $\\Lambda \\sim (10^{14} \\text{GeV})^2 $, which means a mechanism is still needed to solve the fine-tuning problem in the later time evolution of the universe, e.g. by introducing some dark energy component.

  8. Is Cosmological Constant Needed in Higgs Inflation?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chao-Jun Feng; Xin-Zhou Li

    2014-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The detection of B-mode shows a very powerful constraint to theoretical inflation models through the measurement of the tensor-to-scalar ratio $r$. Higgs boson is the most likely candidate of the inflaton field. But usually, Higgs inflation models predict a small value of $r$, which is not quite consistent with the recent results from BICEP2. In this paper, we explored whether a cosmological constant energy component is needed to improve the situation. And we found the answer is yes. For the so-called Higgs chaotic inflation model with a quadratic potential, it predicts $r\\approx 0.2$, $n_s\\approx0.96$ with e-folds number $N\\approx 56$, which is large enough to overcome the problems such as the horizon problem in the Big Bang cosmology. The required energy scale of the cosmological constant is roughly $\\Lambda \\sim (10^{14} \\text{GeV})^2 $, which means a mechanism is still needed to solve the fine-tuning problem in the later time evolution of the universe, e.g. by introducing some dark energy component.

  9. Superintegrable systems on spaces of constant curvature

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gonera, Cezary, E-mail: cgonera@uni.lodz.pl; Kaszubska, Magdalena

    2014-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Construction and classification of two-dimensional (2D) superintegrable systems (i.e. systems admitting, in addition to two global integrals of motion guaranteeing the Liouville integrability, the third global and independent one) defined on 2D spaces of constant curvature and separable in the so-called geodesic polar coordinates are presented. The method proposed is applicable to any value of curvature including the case of Euclidean plane, sphere and hyperbolic plane. The main result is a generalization of Bertrand’s theorem on 2D spaces of constant curvature and covers most of the known separable and superintegrable models on such spaces (in particular, the so-called Tremblay–Turbiner–Winternitz (TTW) and Post–Winternitz (PW) models which have recently attracted some interest). -- Highlights: •Classifying 2D superintegrable, separable (polar coordinates) systems on S{sup 2}, R{sup 2}, H{sup 2}. •Construction of radial, angular potentials leading to superintegrability. •Generalization of Bertrand’s theorem covering known models, e.g. Higgs, TTW, PW, and Coulomb.

  10. The Problem of the Cosmological Constant

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ostoma, T; Ostoma, Tom; Trushyk, Mike

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ElectroMagnetic Quantum Gravity (EMQG) is applied to the problem of the Cosmological Constant. EMQG is a quantum gravity theory (ref. 1) in which the virtual particles of the quantum vacuum play a very important role in all gravitational interactions, and also in accelerated motion. According to EMQG theory (and quantum field theory in general), empty space is populated by vast numbers of virtual particles, consisting of virtual fermion and virtual anti-fermion particles, which posses mass, and also virtual boson particles of all the various force particle species. Therefore the problem of the cosmological constant is essentially equivalent to a determination of the mass contributed by all the virtual particles of the vacuum to the overall curvature and dynamics of the entire universe. Our original analysis was based on the assumption of perfect symmetry in the creation and destruction of virtual fermion and virtual anti-fermion particle pairs in the quantum vacuum, which is in accordance with the existing la...

  11. Variable energy constant current accelerator structure

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Anderson, Oscar A. (Berkeley, CA)

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A variable energy, constant current ion beam accelerator structure is disclosed comprising an ion source capable of providing the desired ions, a pre-accelerator for establishing an initial energy level, a matching/pumping module having means for focusing means for maintaining the beam current, and at least one main accelerator module for continuing beam focus, with means capable of variably imparting acceleration to the beam so that a constant beam output current is maintained independent of the variable output energy. In a preferred embodiment, quadrupole electrodes are provided in both the matching/pumping module and the one or more accelerator modules, and are formed using four opposing cylinder electrodes which extend parallel to the beam axis and are spaced around the beam at 90.degree. intervals with opposing electrodes maintained at the same potential. Adjacent cylinder electrodes of the quadrupole structure are maintained at different potentials to thereby reshape the cross section of the charged particle beam to an ellipse in cross section at the mid point along each quadrupole electrode unit in the accelerator modules. The beam is maintained in focus by alternating the major axis of the ellipse along the x and y axis respectively at adjacent quadrupoles. In another embodiment, electrostatic ring electrodes may be utilized instead of the quadrupole electrodes.

  12. Constant-mesh, multiple-shaft transmission

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rea, J.E.; Mills, D.D.; Sewell, J.S.

    1992-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

    This patent describes a multiple-shaft, constant-mesh transmission adapted to establish selectively a reverse torque delivery path and a forward drive torque delivery path and having a torque input means including a torque input shaft, a mainshaft aligned with the input shaft, a countershaft geared to the input shaft in spaced, parallel relationship with respect to the mainshaft, a torque output shaft joined to the mainshaft; multiple mainshaft gear elements journalled on the main airshaft, multiple cluster gear elements carried by the countershaft in meshing engagement with the mainshaft gear elements, one of the cluster gear elements being rotatably journalled on the countershaft; a reverse idle gear, a reverse gear journalled on the countershaft, the reverse idler gear being in constant mesh with the reverse gear and one of the mainshaft gear elements; first clutch means for connecting selectively the reverse gear and the countershaft; second synchronizer clutch means for connecting selectively the one of the mainshaft gear elements to the mainshaft; and third synchronizer clutch means for selectively connecting another of the mainshaft gear elements to the mainshaft; the first clutch means being a double-acting clutch with a first common axially movable clutch element adapted upon movement in one axial direction to drivably connected the reverse gear to the countershaft and adapted upon movement in the opposite axial direction to connect the one cluster gear element to the countershaft.

  13. World Volume Action for Fractional Branes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Merlatti, P

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the world volume action of fractional Dp-branes of type IIA string theory compactified on the orbifold T^4/Z_2. The geometric relation between these branes and wrapped branes is investigated using conformal techniques. In particular we examine in detail various scattering amplitudes and find that the leading low-energy interactions are consistent with the boundary action derived geometrically.

  14. World Volume Action for Fractional Branes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. Merlatti; G. Sabella

    2001-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the world volume action of fractional Dp-branes of type IIA string theory compactified on the orbifold T^4/Z_2. The geometric relation between these branes and wrapped branes is investigated using conformal techniques. In particular we examine in detail various scattering amplitudes and find that the leading low-energy interactions are consistent with the boundary action derived geometrically.

  15. Petroleum Products Table 43. Refiner Motor Gasoline Volumes...

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    150.0 2,026.7 W W 234.5 161.7 - 396.3 See footnotes at end of table. 43. Refiner Motor Gasoline Volumes by Grade, Sales Type, PAD District, and State 262 Energy Information...

  16. Petroleum Products Table 43. Refiner Motor Gasoline Volumes...

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    253.2 2,222.4 W W 206.4 134.3 - 340.7 See footnotes at end of table. 43. Refiner Motor Gasoline Volumes by Grade, Sales Type, PAD District, and State 262 Energy Information...

  17. achievements review volume: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    LETTERS VOLUME 84 3 JANUARY 2000 NUMBER 1 Delayed "Choice" Quantum Eraser Yoon January 1999) We report a delayed "choice" quantum eraser experiment of the type proposed by Scully...

  18. Article No. ectj?????? Econometrics Journal (2008), volume 04, pp. 132.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wolfe, Patrick J.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Article No. ectj?????? Econometrics Journal (2008), volume 04, pp. 1­32. Realised Kernels is a Brownian motion, all adapted to some filtration F. For reviews of the econometrics of processes of the type

  19. Table 7. U.S. Refiner Motor Gasoline Volumes by Grade and Sales...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Information Administration Petroleum Marketing Annual 1995 Table 7. U.S. Refiner Motor Gasoline Volumes by Grade and Sales Type (Million Gallons per Day) - Continued Year...

  20. Table 7. U.S. Refiner Motor Gasoline Volumes by Grade and Sales...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Energy Information AdministrationPetroleum Marketing Annual 1998 Table 7. U.S. Refiner Motor Gasoline Volumes by Grade and Sales Type (Million Gallons per Day) - Continued Year...

  1. Remedial investigation for the chemical plant area of the Weldon Spring Site. Volume 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This volume contains figures such as charts and maps identifying areas of contamination, and tables of compiled data on the types and amount of contamination.

  2. Table 11. U.S. Refiner Oxygenated Motor Gasoline Volumes by...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Administration Petroleum Marketing Annual 1995 Table 11. U.S. Refiner Oxygenated Motor Gasoline Volumes by Grade and Sales Type (Million Gallons per Day) - Continued Year...

  3. Constant field gradient planar coupled cavity structure

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kang, Y.W.; Kustom, R.L.

    1999-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

    A cavity structure is disclosed having at least two opposing planar housing members spaced apart to accommodate the passage of a particle beam through the structure between the members. Each of the housing members have a plurality of serially aligned hollows defined therein, and also passages, formed in the members, which interconnect serially adjacent hollows to provide communication between the hollows. The opposing planar housing members are spaced and aligned such that the hollows in one member cooperate with corresponding hollows in the other member to form a plurality of resonant cavities aligned along the particle beam within the cavity structure. To facilitate the obtaining of a constant field gradient within the cavity structure, the passages are configured so as to be incrementally narrower in the direction of travel of the particle beam. In addition, the spacing distance between the opposing housing members is configured to be incrementally smaller in the direction of travel of the beam. 16 figs.

  4. Computer News, Volume 21

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MATH DEPT Computer News, Volume 21. I came, I saw, ical. There's a great new calendar and appointment book program on our system called ical at.

  5. Computer News, Volume 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MATH DEPT Computer News, Volume 1. You and your .cshrc file. Click on RELOAD now. This page is frequently updated and you might be looking at an old ...

  6. Computer News, Volume 36

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MATH DEPT Computer News, Volume 36. Click on RELOAD now. This page is frequently updated and you might be looking at an old version saved by your ...

  7. Computer News, Volume 19

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MATH DEPT Computer News, Volume 19. Those damned attachments! I explain here how to extract and decode e-mail attachments of various kinds. Click on ...

  8. Computer News, Volume 8

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    [mandelbrot set] MATH DEPT Computer News, Volume 8. A convenient way to do e-mail from home. by guest columnist, Donu Arapura ...

  9. Computer News, Volume 20

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MATH DEPT Computer News, Volume 20. You and your .forward file. Let's say your name is Steven Bellisandagorapahockey and your login id on math is sbellis ...

  10. Computer News, Volume 37

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MATH DEPT Computer News, Volume 37. Click on RELOAD now. This page is frequently updated and you might be looking at an old version saved by your ...

  11. Computer News, Volume 13

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MATH DEPT Computer News, Volume 13. How to dork your official classlist. Click on RELOAD now. This page is frequently updated and you might be looking at ...

  12. Computer News, Volume 15

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MATH DEPT Computer News, Volume 15. How to gain access to Mathematica on a math dept SUN. Click on RELOAD now. This page is frequently updated and ...

  13. Computer News, Volume 34

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    [mandelbrot set] MATH DEPT Computer News, Volume 34. Click on RELOAD now. This page is frequently updated and you might be looking at an old version

  14. Computer News, Volume 33

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MATH DEPT Computer News, Volume 33. How I teach big calculus lectures with a tablet PC. Click on RELOAD now. This page is frequently updated and you ...

  15. Computer News, Volume 12

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MATH DEPT Computer News, Volume 12. Quick and dirty math on the internet. Click on RELOAD now. This page is frequently updated and you might be ...

  16. Computer News, Volume 38

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MATH DEPT Computer News, Volume 38. Click on RELOAD now. This page is frequently updated and you might be looking at an old version saved by your ...

  17. Computer News, Volume 27

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MATH DEPT Computer News, Volume 27. How to approve Plans of Study on the web. First, make sure you know your Purdue Career Account Login and ...

  18. Computer News, Volume 4

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MATH DEPT Computer News, Volume 4. Xess, the spreadsheet. Click on RELOAD now. This page is frequently updated and you might be looking at an old ...

  19. Computer News, Volume 2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MATH DEPT Computer News, Volume 2. How to add acroread and distill to your path. Click on RELOAD now. This page is frequently updated and you might be ...

  20. Computer News, Volume 35

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MATH DEPT Computer News, Volume 34. Click on RELOAD now. This page is frequently updated and you might be looking at an old version saved by your ...

  1. Computer News, Volume 32

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MATH DEPT Computer News, Volume 32. The new TeX and how to create the new PU Math letterhead stationery. with help from Brad Lucier, Rodrigo Bañuelos

  2. Computer News, Volume 39

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MATH DEPT Computer News, Volume 39. Click on RELOAD now. This page is frequently updated and you might be looking at an old version saved by your ...

  3. Computer News, Volume 23

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MATH DEPT Computer News, Volume 23. How to view e-mail formatted in HTML originating from the web. Click on RELOAD now. This page is frequently ...

  4. Prime Supplier Sales Volumes

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Sales Volumes of Motor Gasoline by Grade, Formulation, PAD District, and State 356 Energy Information Administration Petroleum Marketing Annual 1996 Table 48. Prime...

  5. Prime Supplier Sales Volumes

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Sales Volumes of Motor Gasoline by Grade, Formulation, PAD District, and State 356 Energy Information Administration Petroleum Marketing Annual 1997 Table 48. Prime...

  6. LANL Volume 2_Final

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    42 LANL * Consider developing programmatic evaluation criteria based on the October 1999 draft of Volume VI, Emergency Management Evaluations, of the DOE emergency...

  7. Finite Volume Element Method

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2003-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

    FVE is closely related to the control volume finite element method ... simple stencils, to apply to a fairly wide range of fluid flow equations, to effectively treat.

  8. WASTE DESCRIPTION TYPE OF PROJECT POUNDS REDUCED,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minimization/ Volume Reduction 0 Solid Radioactive Waste $2,168 $0 $2,168 Vial Crusher for glass vialsWASTE DESCRIPTION TYPE OF PROJECT POUNDS REDUCED, REUSED, RECYCLED OR CONSERVED IN 2004 WASTE TYPE DESCRIPTION DETAILS * Automotive Waste Substitution 510 Hazardous Waste $1,020 $1,000 $1,000 Aqueous Solvent

  9. WASTE DESCRIPTION TYPE OF PROJECT POUNDS REDUCED,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    labeled chemicals Waste Minimization/ Volume Reduction 0 Solid Radioactive Waste $2,168 $3,795 $2,168 VialWASTE DESCRIPTION TYPE OF PROJECT POUNDS REDUCED, REUSED, RECYCLED OR CONSERVED IN 2003 WASTE TYPE DESCRIPTION DETAILS * Radioactive Waste Source Reduction 1,500 Radioactive Waste $6,000 $2,500 $6,000 Waste

  10. Economic evaluation of volume reduction for Defense transuranic waste

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, C.M.

    1981-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This study evaluates the economics of volume reduction of retrievably stored and newly generated DOE transuranic waste by comparing the costs of reduction of the waste with the savings possible in transportation and disposal of the waste. The report develops a general approach to the comparison of TRU waste volume reduction costs and cost savings, establishes an initial set of cost data, and develops conclusions to support selecting technologies and facilities for the disposal of DOE transuranic waste. Section I outlines the analysis which considers seven types of volume reduction from incineration and compaction of combustibles to compaction, size reduction, shredding, melting, and decontamination of metals. The study considers the volume reduction of contact-handled newly generated, and retrievably stored DOE transuranic waste. Section II of this report describes the analytical approach, assumptions, and flow of waste material through sites. Section III presents the waste inventories, disposal, and transportation savings with volume reduction and the volume reduction techniques and savings.

  11. Curvature invariants in type-III spacetimes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. Pravda

    1999-08-17T23:59:59.000Z

    The results of paper [1] are generalized for vacuum type-III solutions with, in general, a non-vanishing cosmological constant Lambda. It is shown that all curvature invariants containing derivatives of the Weyl tensor vanish if a type-III spacetime admits a non-expanding and non-twisting null geodesic congruence. A non-vanishing curvature invariant containing first derivatives of the Weyl tensor is found in the case of type-III spacetime with expansion or twist.

  12. The variation of the fine structure constant: testing the dipole model with thermonuclear supernovae

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kraiselburd, Lucila; Negrelli, Carolina; Berro, Enrique García

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The large-number hypothesis conjectures that fundamental constants may vary. Accordingly, the spacetime variation of fundamental constants has been an active subject of research for decades. Recently, using data obtained with large telescopes a phenomenological model in which the fine structure constant might vary spatially has been proposed. We test whether this hypothetical spatial variation of {\\alpha}, which follows a dipole law, is compatible with the data of distant thermonuclear supernovae. Unlike previous works, in our calculations we consider not only the variation of the luminosity distance when a varying {\\alpha} is adopted, but we also take into account the variation of the peak luminosity of Type Ia supernovae resulting from a variation of {\\alpha}. This is done using an empirical relation for the peak bolometric magnitude of thermonuclear supernovae that correctly reproduces the results of detailed numerical simulations. We find that there is no significant difference between the several phenome...

  13. Predicting the cosmological constant with the scale-factor cutoff measure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    De Simone, Andrea; Guth, Alan H. [Center for Theoretical Physics, Laboratory for Nuclear Science, and Department of Physics, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States); Salem, Michael P.; Vilenkin, Alexander [Institute of Cosmology, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Tufts University, Medford, Massachusetts 02155 (United States)

    2008-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    It is well known that anthropic selection from a landscape with a flat prior distribution of cosmological constant {lambda} gives a reasonable fit to observation. However, a realistic model of the multiverse has a physical volume that diverges with time, and the predicted distribution of {lambda} depends on how the spacetime volume is regulated. A very promising method of regulation uses a scale-factor cutoff, which avoids a number of serious problems that arise in other approaches. In particular, the scale-factor cutoff avoids the 'youngness problem' (high probability of living in a much younger universe) and the 'Q and G catastrophes' (high probability for the primordial density contrast Q and gravitational constant G to have extremely large or small values). We apply the scale-factor cutoff measure to the probability distribution of {lambda}, considering both positive and negative values. The results are in good agreement with observation. In particular, the scale-factor cutoff strongly suppresses the probability for values of {lambda} that are more than about 10 times the observed value. We also discuss qualitatively the prediction for the density parameter {omega}, indicating that with this measure there is a possibility of detectable negative curvature.

  14. 316 J. RULLA AND R.E. SHOWALTER constant on each of u 0. Thus, the heat flux in the fissures is given by Fourier's

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ~ eand ~ is a measure of the degree of fissuring. Conservation of heat energy computed respectively with the volume exchange rate. In (Lb) occurs the dual situation in which the storage of heat in the fissure#12;316 J. RULLA AND R.E. SHOWALTER constant on each of u 0. Thus, the heat flux

  15. Award Types

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office511041cloth DocumentationProductsAlternativeOperationalAugust AugustInstruments on theAward Types Types of

  16. A Magnification Lens for Interactive Volume Visualization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LaMar, E; Hamann, B; Joy, K I

    2001-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Volume visualization of large data sets suffers from the same problem that many other visualization modalities suffer from: either one can visualize the entire data set and lose small details or visualize a small region and lose the context. In this paper, they present a magnification lens technique for volume visualization. While the notion of a magnification-lens is not new, and other techniques attempt to simulate the physical properties of a magnifying lens, their contribution is in developing a magnification lens that is fast, can be implemented using a fairly small software overhead, and has a natural, intuitive appearance. The issue with magnification lens is the border, or transition, region. The lens center and exterior have a constant zoom factor, and are simple to render. It is the border region that blends between the external and interior magnification, and has a non-constant magnification. They use the perspective-correct textures capability, available in most current graphics systems, to produce a lens with a tessellated border region that approximates linear compression with respect to the radius of the magnification lens. They discuss how a cubic border can mitigate the discontinuities resulting from the use of a linear function, without significant performance loss. They discuss various issues concerning development of a three-dimensional magnification lens.

  17. Observational constraints on holographic dark energy with varying gravitational constant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lu, Jianbo; Xu, Lixin [Institute of Theoretical Physics, School of Physics and Optoelectronic Technology, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian, 116024 (China); Saridakis, Emmanuel N. [College of Mathematics and Physics, Chongqing University of Posts and Telecommunications, Chongqing, 400065 (China); Setare, M.R., E-mail: lvjianbo819@163.com, E-mail: msaridak@phys.uoa.gr, E-mail: rezakord@ipm.ir, E-mail: lxxu@dlut.edu.cn [Department of Science of Bijar, University of Kurdistan, Bijar (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We use observational data from Type Ia Supernovae (SN), Baryon Acoustic Oscillations (BAO), Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) and observational Hubble data (OHD), and the Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) method, to constrain the cosmological scenario of holographic dark energy with varying gravitational constant. We consider both flat and non-flat background geometry, and we present the corresponding constraints and contour-plots of the model parameters. We conclude that the scenario is compatible with observations. In 1? we find ?{sub ?0} = 0.72{sup +0.03}{sub ?0.03}, ?{sub k0} = ?0.0013{sup +0.0130}{sub ?0.0040}, c = 0.80{sup +0.19}{sub ?0.14} and ?{sub G}?G'/G = ?0.0025{sup +0.0080}{sub ?0.0050}, while for the present value of the dark energy equation-of-state parameter we obtain w{sub 0} = ?1.04{sup +0.15}{sub ?0.20}.

  18. Initial data sets with ends of cylindrical type: I. The Lichnerowicz equation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Piotr T. Chru?ciel; Rafe Mazzeo

    2014-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

    We construct large classes of vacuum general relativistic initial data sets, possibly with a cosmological constant Lambda, containing ends of cylindrical type.

  19. Computer News, Volume 29

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MATH DEPT Computer News, Volume 29. How to update your login shell from csh to tcsh. If you, like me, have had an account on the Math network of SUNs ...

  20. Computer News, Volume 30

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MATH DEPT Computer News, Volume 30. How to create an ASCII version of the Purdue Logo and other matters of e-mail etiquette. The Purdue logo... ... ah, yes ...

  1. Computer News, Volume 26

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MATH DEPT Computer News, Volume 26. How to trim an e-mail alias. The faculty e-mail alias has a lot more people on it than you might imagine. (To find out ...

  2. Computer News, Volume 7

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MATH DEPT Computer News, Volume 7. How to put figures in TeX. (I assume that you are using X windows on or from a math dept SUN.) To make a figure, I use ...

  3. Computer News, Volume 31

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MATH DEPT Computer News, Volume 31. How to create .pdf files from TeX. by Donu Arapura. Click on RELOAD now. This page is frequently updated and you ...

  4. Imaging using volume holograms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sinha, Arnab, 1978-

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Volume holograms can be thought of as self-aligned 3D stacks of diffractive elements that operate coherently on incident fields as they propagate through the structure. In this thesis, we propose, design and implement ...

  5. Dark Radiation in Anisotropic LARGE Volume Compactifications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stephen Angus

    2014-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Dark radiation is a compelling extension to $\\Lambda$CDM: current experimental results hint at $\\Delta N_{\\rm eff} \\gtrsim 0.5$, which is increased to $\\Delta N_{\\rm eff} \\simeq 1$ if the recent BICEP2 results are included. In recent years dark radiation has been considered in the context of string theory models such as the LARGE Volume Scenario of type IIB string theory, forging a link between present-day cosmological observations and models of physics at the Planck scale. In this paper I consider an extension of the LARGE Volume Scenario in which the bulk volume is stabilised by two moduli instead of one. Consequently, the lightest modulus no longer corresponds to the compactification volume but instead to a transverse direction in the bulk geometry. I focus on scenarios in which sequestering of soft masses is achieved by localising the Standard Model on D3 branes at a singularity. The fraction of dark radiation produced in such models vastly exceeds experimental bounds, ruling out the sequestered LARGE Volume Scenario with two bulk moduli as a model of the early Universe.

  6. Experimental determination of the effective strong coupling constant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alexandre Deur; Volker Burkert; Jian-Ping Chen; Wolfgang Korsch

    2005-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We extract an effective strong coupling constant from low Q2 data on the Bjorken sum. Using sum rules, we establish its Q2-behavior over the complete Q2-range. The result is compared to effective coupling constants extracted from different processes and to calculations based on Schwinger-Dyson equations, hadron spectroscopy or lattice QCD. Although the connection between the experimentally extracted effective coupling constant and the calculations is not clear, the results agree surprisingly well.

  7. Optical properties of fly ash. Volume 2, Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Self, S.A.

    1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Research performed under this contract was divided into four tasks under the following headings: Task 1, Characterization of fly ash; Task 2, Measurements of the optical constants of slags; Task 3, Calculations of the radiant properties of fly ash dispersions; and Task 4, Measurements of the radiant properties of fly ash dispersions. Tasks 1 and 4 constituted the Ph.D. research topic of Sarbajit Ghosal, while Tasks 2 and 3 constituted the Ph.D. research topic of Jon Ebert. Together their doctoral dissertations give a complete account of the work performed. This final report, issued in two volumes consists of an executive summary of the whole program followed by the dissertation of Ghosal and Ebert. Volume 2 contains the dissertation of Ebert which covers the measurements of the optical constants of slags, and calculations of the radiant properties of fly ash dispersions. A list of publications and conference presentations resulting from the work is also included.

  8. Volume modulus inflation and the gravitino mass problem

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Conlon, J P [Cavendish Laboratory, J J Thomson Avenue, Cambridge CB3 0HE (United Kingdom)] [Cavendish Laboratory, J J Thomson Avenue, Cambridge CB3 0HE (United Kingdom); Kallosh, R; Linde, A [Department of Physics, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States)] [Department of Physics, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States); Quevedo, F, E-mail: jpc41@cam.ac.uk, E-mail: kallosh@stanford.edu, E-mail: alinde@stanford.edu, E-mail: f.quevedo@damtp.cam.ac.uk [DAMTP, Centre for Mathematical Sciences, Wilberforce Road, Cambridge CB3 0WA (United Kingdom)] [DAMTP, Centre for Mathematical Sciences, Wilberforce Road, Cambridge CB3 0WA (United Kingdom)

    2008-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The Hubble constant during the last stages of inflation in a broad class of models based on the Kachru-Kallosh-Linde-Trivedi mechanism should be smaller than the gravitino mass, H{approx}volume of compactification the corresponding constraint typically is even stronger, H{approx}volume of compactification where inflation may occur exponentially far away from the present vacuum state. In these models, the Hubble constant during inflation can be many orders of magnitude greater than the gravitino mass. We introduce a toy model describing this scenario, and discuss its strengths and weaknesses.

  9. Table 44. Refiner Motor Gasoline Volumes by Formulation, Sales Type,

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122Commercial ConsumersThousandCubic Feet) DecadeV49 155 18157.39,369.58,502.8

  10. Table 44. Refiner Motor Gasoline Volumes by Formulation, Sales Type,

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122Commercial ConsumersThousandCubic Feet) DecadeV49 155 18157.39,369.58,502.8161.3

  11. Table 44. Refiner Motor Gasoline Volumes by Formulation, Sales Type,

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122Commercial ConsumersThousandCubic Feet) DecadeV49 155

  12. Table 44. Refiner Motor Gasoline Volumes by Formulation, Sales Type,

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122Commercial ConsumersThousandCubic Feet) DecadeV49 1553,177.2 34,690.6 19,370.8

  13. Table 44. Refiner Motor Gasoline Volumes by Formulation, Sales Type,

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122Commercial ConsumersThousandCubic Feet) DecadeV49 1553,177.2 34,690.6

  14. Prime Supplier Sales Volumes of Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghurajiConventionalMississippi"site. IfProved(MillionPrice8.PDFThousand7. ConsumptionNov-14

  15. Prime Supplier Sales Volumes of Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTownDells,1Stocks Nov-14 Dec-14Table 4. U.S.Feet)

  16. Enhancement of Compton Scattering by an Effective Coupling Constant

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bernardo Barbiellini; Piero Nicolini

    2011-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

    A robust thermodynamic argument shows that a small reduction of the effective coupling constant $\\alpha$ of QED greatly enhances the Compton scattering cross section and that the Thomson scattering length is connected to a fundamental scale $\\lambda$. A discussion provides a possible quantum interpretation of this enormous sensitivity to changes in the effective coupling constant $\\alpha$.

  17. The Duffing Oscillator And Linearization Techniques For Its Motion Constants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rashdan, Mouath

    2014-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

    constant is known, solving the system is no longer needed to analyze the characteristics of the system. Motion constants are time independent integrals that are hard to find for nonlinear dynamic systems. We chose the Duffing Oscillator as a higher order...

  18. Cosmological model with $?_M$-dependent cosmological constant

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. Majernik

    2003-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

    The idea here is to set the cosmical constant $\\lambda$ proportional to the scalar of the stress-energy tensor of the ordinary matter. We investigate the evolution of the scale factor in a cosmological model in which the cosmological constant is proportional to the scalar of the stress-energy tensor.

  19. The Duffing Oscillator And Linearization Techniques For Its Motion Constants 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rashdan, Mouath

    2014-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

    constant is known, solving the system is no longer needed to analyze the characteristics of the system. Motion constants are time independent integrals that are hard to find for nonlinear dynamic systems. We chose the Duffing Oscillator as a higher order...

  20. Effect of Lumpectomy Cavity Volume Change on the Clinical Target Volume for Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation: A Deformable Registration Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, Leonard H., E-mail: lkim@beaumonthospitals.co [Department of Radiation Oncology, William Beaumont Hospital, Royal Oak, MI (United States); DeCesare, Sam; Vicini, Frank; Yan Di [Department of Radiation Oncology, William Beaumont Hospital, Royal Oak, MI (United States)

    2010-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: Previous studies have shown that lumpectomy cavity volumes can change significantly in the weeks following surgery. The effect of this volume change on the surrounding tissue that constitutes the clinical target volume (CTV) for accelerated partial breast irradiation and boost treatment after whole breast irradiation has not been previously studied. In the present study, we used deformable registration to estimate the effect of lumpectomy cavity volume changes on the CTV for accelerated partial breast irradiation and discuss the implications for target construction. Methods and Materials: The data from 13 accelerated partial breast irradiation patients were retrospectively analyzed. Deformable registration was used to propagate contours from the initial planning computed tomography scan to a later computed tomography scan acquired at the start of treatment. The changes in cavity volume and CTV, distance between cavity and CTV contours (i.e., CTV margin), and CTV localization error after cavity registration were determined. Results: The mean {+-} standard deviation change in cavity volume and CTV between the two computed tomography scans was -35% {+-} 23% and -14% {+-} 12%, respectively. An increase in the cavity-to-CTV margin of 2 {+-} 2 mm was required to encompass the CTV, and this increase correlated with the cavity volume change. Because changes in the cavity and CTV were not identical, a localization error of 2-3 mm in the CTV center of mass occurred when the cavity was used as the reference for image guidance. Conclusion: Deformable registration suggested that CTV margins do not remain constant as the cavity volume changes. This finding has implications for planning target volume and CTV construction.

  1. Evolving Lorentzian wormholes supported by phantom matter and cosmological constant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cataldo, Mauricio; Campo, Sergio del; Minning, Paul; Salgado, Patricio [Departamento de Fisica, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad del Bio-Bio, Avenida Collao 1202, Casilla 5-C, Concepcion (Chile); Instituto de Fisica, Facultad de Ciencias, Pontificia Universidad Catolica de Valparaiso, Avenida Brasil 2950, Valparaiso (Chile); Departamento de Fisica, Facultad de Ciencias Fisicas y Matematicas, Universidad de Concepcion, Casilla 160-C, Concepcion (Chile)

    2009-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper we study the possibility of sustaining an evolving wormhole via exotic matter made of phantom energy in the presence of a cosmological constant. We derive analytical evolving wormhole geometries by supposing that the radial tension of the phantom matter, which is negative to the radial pressure, and the pressure measured in the tangential directions have barotropic equations of state with constant state parameters. In this case the presence of a cosmological constant ensures accelerated expansion of the wormhole configurations. More specifically, for positive cosmological constant we have wormholes which expand forever and, for negative cosmological constant we have wormholes which expand to a maximum value and then recollapse. At spatial infinity the energy density and the pressures of the anisotropic phantom matter threading the wormholes vanish; thus these evolving wormholes are asymptotically vacuum {lambda}-Friedmann models with either open or closed or flat topologies.

  2. Viability Assessment Volume 5

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DOE,

    1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This volume presents a management summary of the cost estimate to complete the design, and to license, construct, operate, monitor, close, and decommission a Monitored Geologic Repository at Yucca Mountain in Nevada. This volume summarizes the scope, estimating methodologies, and assumptions used in development of the Monitored Geologic Repository-VA cost estimate. It identifies the key features necessary to understand the summary costs presented herein. This cost summary derives from a larger body of documented cost analysis. Volume 5 is organized to reflect this structured approach to cost estimation and contains the following sections: Section 1, Cost Elements. This section briefly defines the components of each major repository cost element. Section 2, Project Phases. This section presents the definition, as used in the estimate, of five project phases (Licensing, Pre-emplacement Construction, Emplacement Operations, Monitoring, and Closure and Decommissioning) and the schedule dates for each phase. It also contains major milestone dates and a bar chart schedule. Section 3, Major Assumptions. This section identifies key high-level assumptions for the cost estimate basis. Additional detailed assumptions are included in the appendices. Section 4, Integrated Cost Summary. This section presents a high-level roll-up of the VA costs resulting from the estimating work. The tables and figures contained in this section were compiled from the more detailed cost estimates in the appendices. Section 5, References. This section identifies the references that support this cost volume. Appendices. For each major repository cost element, Appendices B-F [B, C, D, E, F] presents additional information on the scope of cost elements, identifies methodologies used to develop the cost estimates, lists underlying cost assumptions, and tabulates summary results. Appendix A contains a glossary to assist the reader in understanding the terminology in Volume 5. Appendix G presents costs associated with three VA design options, as described in Volume 2. These costs are provided for information and are not compiled into the integrated cost summary.

  3. 1994 Solid waste forecast container volume summary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Templeton, K.J.; Clary, J.L.

    1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes a 30-year forecast of the solid waste volumes by container type. The volumes described are low-level mixed waste (LLMW) and transuranic/transuranic mixed (TRU/TRUM) waste. These volumes and their associated container types will be generated or received at the US Department of Energy Hanford Site for storage, treatment, and disposal at Westinghouse Hanford Company`s Solid Waste Operations Complex (SWOC) during a 30-year period from FY 1994 through FY 2023. The forecast data for the 30-year period indicates that approximately 307,150 m{sup 3} of LLMW and TRU/TRUM waste will be managed by the SWOC. The main container type for this waste is 55-gallon drums, which will be used to ship 36% of the LLMW and TRU/TRUM waste. The main waste generator forecasting the use of 55-gallon drums is Past Practice Remediation. This waste will be generated by the Environmental Restoration Program during remediation of Hanford`s past practice sites. Although Past Practice Remediation is the primary generator of 55-gallon drums, most waste generators are planning to ship some percentage of their waste in 55-gallon drums. Long-length equipment containers (LECs) are forecasted to contain 32% of the LLMW and TRU/TRUM waste. The main waste generator forecasting the use of LECs is the Long-Length Equipment waste generator, which is responsible for retrieving contaminated long-length equipment from the tank farms. Boxes are forecasted to contain 21% of the waste. These containers are primarily forecasted for use by the Environmental Restoration Operations--D&D of Surplus Facilities waste generator. This waste generator is responsible for the solid waste generated during decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) of the facilities currently on the Surplus Facilities Program Plan. The remaining LLMW and TRU/TRUM waste volume is planned to be shipped in casks and other miscellaneous containers.

  4. Viability Assessment Volume 4

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DOE

    1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Volume 4 provides the DOE plan and cost estimate for the remaining work necessary to proceed from completing this VA to submitting an LA to NRC. This work includes preparing an EIS and evaluating the suitability of the site. Both items are necessary components of the documentation required to support a decision in 2001 by the Secretary of Energy on whether or not to recommend that the President approve the site for development as a repository. If the President recommends the site to Congress and the site designation becomes effective, then DOE will submit the LA to NRC in 2002 for authorization to construct the repository. The work described in Volume 4 constitutes the last step in the characterization of the Yucca Mountain site and the design and evaluation of the performance of a repository system in the geologic setting of this site. The plans in this volume for the next 4 years' work are based on the results of the previous 15 years' work, as reported in Volumes 1, 2, and 3 of this VA. Volume 1 summarizes what DOE has learned to date about the Yucca Mountain site. Volume 2 describes the current, reference repository design, several design options that might enhance the performance of the reference design, and several alternative designs that represent substantial departures from the reference design. Volume 2 also summarizes the results of tests of candidate materials for waste packages and for support of the tunnels into which waste would be emplaced. Volume 3 provides the results of the latest performance assessments undertaken to evaluate the performance of the design in the geologic setting of Yucca Mountain. The results described in Volumes 1, 2, and 3 provide the basis for identifying and prioritizing the work described in this volume. DOE believes that the planned work, together with the results of previous work, will be sufficient to support a site suitability evaluation for site recommendation and, if the site is recommended and designated, a defensible LA. Volume 4 is divided into seven sections. Section 2 presents a rationale and summary for the technical work to be done to develop the preclosure and postclosure safety cases that will support the compliance evaluations required for the evaluation of site suitability and for licensing. Section 2 also describes other necessary technical work, including that needed to support design decisions and development of the necessary design information. Section 3 presents a more detailed description of the technical work required to address the issues identified in Section 2. Section 3 also describes activities that will continue after submittal of the site recommendation and the LA. Examples include the drift scale heater test in the Exploratory Studies Facility (Section 3.1.4.3) and long-term waste package corrosion testing (Section 3.2.2.9). Section 4 discusses the statutory and regulatory framework for site recommendation and submittal of an LA, and describes the activities and documentation that must be completed to achieve these milestones, including the development of an EIS. Section 5 describes the numerous activities required to support program milestones, including support for completing the testing program, continuing tests as part of the performance confirmation program, and managing information and records to support regulatory and legal review. Sections 6 and 7 provide cost and schedule information for the activities planned.

  5. Methodology for extracting local constants from petroleum cracking flows

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chang, Shen-Lin (Woodridge, IL); Lottes, Steven A. (Naperville, IL); Zhou, Chenn Q. (Munster, IN)

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A methodology provides for the extraction of local chemical kinetic model constants for use in a reacting flow computational fluid dynamics (CFD) computer code with chemical kinetic computations to optimize the operating conditions or design of the system, including retrofit design improvements to existing systems. The coupled CFD and kinetic computer code are used in combination with data obtained from a matrix of experimental tests to extract the kinetic constants. Local fluid dynamic effects are implicitly included in the extracted local kinetic constants for each particular application system to which the methodology is applied. The extracted local kinetic model constants work well over a fairly broad range of operating conditions for specific and complex reaction sets in specific and complex reactor systems. While disclosed in terms of use in a Fluid Catalytic Cracking (FCC) riser, the inventive methodology has application in virtually any reaction set to extract constants for any particular application and reaction set formulation. The methodology includes the step of: (1) selecting the test data sets for various conditions; (2) establishing the general trend of the parametric effect on the measured product yields; (3) calculating product yields for the selected test conditions using coupled computational fluid dynamics and chemical kinetics; (4) adjusting the local kinetic constants to match calculated product yields with experimental data; and (5) validating the determined set of local kinetic constants by comparing the calculated results with experimental data from additional test runs at different operating conditions.

  6. Publications Edited Volume

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MacIver, Malcolm A.

    of Robots with Passive Environments: Application to Force Feedback Control Ed Colgate and Neville Hogan, J. Edward Colgate Industrial Robot, 26 (5), 1999, pp 335-341 Toward Robot-Assisted VascularPublications Edited Volume Advances in Robotics, Mechatronics, and Haptic Interfaces 1993 Edited

  7. EVALUATION OF CONSTANT CURRENT WELD CONTROL FOR PINCH WELDING

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Korinko, P; STANLEY, S; HOWARD, H

    2005-10-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Modern weld controllers typically use current to control the weld process. SRS uses a legacy voltage control method. This task was undertaken to determine if the improvements in the weld control equipment could be implemented to provide improvements to the process control. The constant current mode of operation will reduce weld variability by about a factor of 4. The constant voltage welds were slightly hotter than the constant current welds of the same nominal current. The control mode did not appear to adversely affect the weld quality, but appropriate current ranges need to be established and a qualification methodology for both welding and shunt calibrations needs to be developed and documented.

  8. Experimental determination of the effective strong coupling constant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alexandre Deur; Volker Burkert; Jian-Ping Chen; Wolfgang Korsch

    2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We extract an effective strong coupling constant from low Q{sup 2} data on the Bjorken sum. Using sum rules, we establish its Q{sup 2}-behavior over the complete Q{sup 2}-range. The result is compared to effective coupling constants extracted from different processes and to calculations based on Schwinger-Dyson equations, hadron spectroscopy or lattice QCD. Although the connection between the experimentally extracted effective coupling constant and the calculations is not clear, the results agree surprisingly well.

  9. Van't Hoff law for temperature dependent Langmuir constants in clathrate hydrate nanocavities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lakhlifi, Azzedine

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This work gives a van't Hoff law expression of Langmuir constants of different species for determining their occupancy in the nanocavities of clathrate hydrates. The van't Hoff law's parameters are derived from a fit with Langmuir constants calculated using a pairwise site-site interaction potential to model the anisotropic potential environment in the cavities, as a function of temperature. The parameters can be used for calculating clathrates compositions. Results are given for nineteen gas species trapped in the small and large cavities of structure types I and II [1]. The accuracy of this approach is based on a comparison with available experimental data for ethane and cyclo- propane clathrate hydrates. The numerical method applied in this work, was recently validated from a comparison with the spherical cell method based on analytical considerations [1

  10. Constraints on axion-nucleon coupling constants from measuring the Casimir force between corrugated surfaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. B. Bezerra; G. L. Klimchitskaya; V. M. Mostepanenko; C. Romero

    2014-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    We obtain stronger laboratory constraints on the coupling constants of axion-like particles to nucleons from measurements of the normal and lateral Casimir forces between sinusoidally corrugated surfaces of a sphere and a plate. For this purpose, the normal and lateral additional force arising in the experimental configurations due to two-axion exchange between protons and neutrons are calculated. Our constraints following from measurements of the normal and lateral Casimir forces are stronger than the laboratory constraints reported so far for masses of axion-like particles larger than 11eV and 8eV, respectively. A comparison between various laboratory constraints on the coupling constants of axion-like particles to nucleons obtained from the magnetometer measurements, Eotvos- and Cavendish-type experiments, and from the Casimir effect is performed over the wide range of masses of axion-like particles from 10^{-10}eV to 20eV.

  11. Scale-invariance in gravity and implications for the cosmological constant

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bryan Kelleher

    2004-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Recently a scale invariant theory of gravity was constructed by imposing a conformal symmetry on general relativity. The imposition of this symmetry changed the configuration space from superspace - the space of all Riemannian 3-metrics modulo diffeomorphisms - to conformal superspace - the space of all Riemannian 3-metrics modulo diffeomorphisms and conformal transformations. However, despite numerous attractive features, the theory suffers from at least one major problem: the volume of the universe is no longer a dynamical variable. In attempting to resolve this problem a new theory is found which has several surprising and atractive features from both quantisation and cosmological perspectives. Furthermore, it is an extremely restrictive theory and thus may provide testable predictions quickly and easily. One particularly interesting feature of the theory is the resolution of the cosmological constant problem.

  12. Relative Evaluation of the Independent Volume Measures of Caverns

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    MUNSON,DARRELL E.

    2000-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Throughout the construction and operation of the caverns of the Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR), three types of cavern volume measurements have been maintained. These are: (1) the calculated solution volume determined during initial construction by solution mining and any subsequent solutioning during oil transfers, (2) the calculated sonar volume determined through sonar surveys of the cavern dimensions, and (3) the direct metering of oil to determine the volume of the cavern occupied by the oil. The objective of this study is to compare these measurements to each other and determine, if possible, the uncertainties associated with a given type of measurement. Over time, each type of measurement has acquired a customary, or an industry accepted, stated uncertainty. This uncertainty is not necessarily the result of a technical analysis. Ultimately there is one definitive quantity, the oil volume measure by the oil custody transfer meters, taken by all parties to the transfer as the correct ledger amount and for which the SPR Project is accountable. However, subsequent transfers within a site may not be with meters of the same accuracy. In this study, a very simple theory of the perfect relationship is used to evaluate the correlation (deviation) of the various measures. This theory permits separation of uncertainty and bias. Each of the four SPR sites are examined, first with comparisons between the calculated solution volumes and the sonar volumes determined during construction, then with comparisons of the oil inventories and the sonar volumes obtained either by surveying through brine prior to oil filling or through the oil directly.

  13. Calculation of the Dimer Equilibrium Constant of Heavy Water Saturated Vapor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    L. A. Bulavin; S. V. Khrapatiy; V. N. Makhlaichuk

    2015-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Water is the most common substance on Earth.The discovery of heavy water and its further study have shown that the change of hydrogen for deuterium leads to the significant differences in their properties.The triple point temperature of heavy water is higher,at the same time the critical temperature is lower.Experimental values of the second virial coefficient of the EOS for the vapor of normal and heavy water differ at all temperatures.This fact can influence the values of the dimerization constant for the heavy water vapor.The equilibrium properties of the dimerization process are described with the methods of chemical thermodynamics.The chemical potentials for monomers (m) and dimers (d)are the functions of their concentrations.The interactions of monomer-dimer and dimer-dimer types are taken into account within the solution of equation for chemical potentials.The obtained expression for the dimerization constant contains the contributions of these types.The averaged potentials are modeled by the Sutherland potential.Theoretical values of the dimerization constant for the heavy water vapor at different temperatures are compared to those for normal water.We see the exceeding of the values for the heavy water at all temperatures.This fact is in good agreement with all experimental data that is available.The excess is related to the differences in the character of the heat excitations of the dimers of normal and heavy water,their rotational constants and energy of their vibrational excitations.Significant role is also played by the monomer-dimer and dimer-dimer interactions.

  14. Volume scaling of Dirac eigenvalues in SU(3) lattice gauge theory with color sextet fermions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas DeGrand

    2009-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

    I observe a rough volume-dependent scaling of the low eigenvalues of a chiral Dirac operator in lattice studies of SU(3) lattice gauge theory with two flavors of color sextet fermions, in its weak-coupling phase. The mean value of the ith eigenvalue scales with the simulation volume V=L^4 as L^p ~zeta_i, where zeta_i is a volume-independent constant. The exponent p is about 1.4. A possible explanation for this phenomenon is that p is the leading relevant exponent associated with the fermion mass dependence of correlation functions in a theory whose zero-mass limit is conformal.

  15. Cosmology models with ?_M-dependent cosmological constant

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. Majernik

    2002-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate the evolution of the scale factor in a cosmological model in which the cosmological constant is given by the scalar arisen by the contraction of the stress-energy tensor.

  16. CODATA Recommended Values of the Fundamental Physical Constants: 1998*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of recommended values is available on the World Wide Web at physics.nist.gov/ constants. © 1999 American Institute of Physics and American Chemical Society. S0047-2689 00 00301-9 Key words: CODATA, conversion

  17. Estimation of the base flow recession constant under human interference

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas, Brian F; Vogel, Richard M; Kroll, Charles N; Famiglietti, James S

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    J. Sci. , 248, 673–696. Szilagyi, J. (1999), On the use ofWater, 37(5), 660–662. Szilagyi, J. , Z. Bribovszki, and P.ow recession constant while Szilagyi et al. [2007], Wang and

  18. arthritis remains constant: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    We show that the only value of n for which the late-time matter energy density to dark energy density ratio (rmrhomrhoLambda) is constant (which could...

  19. Non-Perturbative Gluon pair production from a Constant Chromo-Electric Field via the Schwinger Mechanism in Arbitrary Gauge

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fred Cooper; Gouranga C. Nayak

    2006-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the non-perturbative production of gluon pairs from a constant SU(3) chromo-electric background field via the Schwinger mechanism. We fix the covariant background gauge with an arbitrary gauge parameter \\alpha. We determine the transverse momentum distribution of the gluons, as well as the total probability of creating pairs per unit space time volume. We find that the result is independent of the covariant gauge parameter \\alpha used to define arbitrary covariant background gauges. We find that our non-perturbative result is both gauge invariant and gauge parameter \\alpha independent.

  20. A comparison of various calculational methods for constant volatility ratio, constant reflux multicomponent distillation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hurst, James William

    1952-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    in equilibrium with the liquid leaving the plate. The reverse may be tru e, but this is much rarer. In dealing with an actual column of the plate type, consideration must therefore be given to the average plate efficiency. The number of theoretical plates... Thesis J'ames William Hurst January l952 CONT%ITS Sur mary Page I. Introduction. II. Literature Survey 1 e 9 III. Calculational Procedures. . . . . . . . . . . 24 A. Bases of L. ethods. e 24 B. Detailed methods of Calculation IV. Illustrative...

  1. High Volume Test Automation 1 High Volume Test AutomationHigh Volume Test Automation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    High Volume Test Automation 1 High Volume Test AutomationHigh Volume Test Automation Keynote Automation 2 AcknowledgementsAcknowledgements · Many of the ideas in this presentation were initially jointly developed with Doug Hoffman,as we developed a course on test automation architecture, and in the Los Altos

  2. Viability Assessment Volume 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DOE

    1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This volume describes the major design features of the Monitored Geologic Repository. This document is not intended to provide an exhaustive, detailed description of the repository design. Rather, this document summarizes the major systems and primary elements of the design that are radiologically significant, and references the specific technical documents and design analyses wherein the details can be found. Not all portions of the design are at the same level of completeness. Highest priority has been given to assigning resources to advance the design of the Monitored Geologic Repository features that are important to radiological safety and/or waste isolation and for which there is no NRC licensing precedent. Those features that are important to radiological safety and/or waste isolation, but for which there is an NRC precedent, receive second priority. Systems and features that have no impact on radiological safety or waste isolation receive the lowest priority. This prioritization process, referred to as binning, is discussed in more detail in Section 2.3. Not every subject discussed in this volume is given equal treatment with regard to the level of detail provided. For example, less detail is provided for the surface facility design than for the subsurface and waste package designs. This different level of detail is intentional. Greater detail is provided for those functions, structures, systems, and components that play key roles with regard to protecting radiological health and safety and that are not common to existing nuclear facilities already licensed by NRC. A number of radiological subjects are not addressed in the VA, (e.g., environmental qualification of equipment). Environmental qualification of equipment and other radiological safety considerations will be addressed in the LA. Non-radiological safety considerations such as silica dust control and other occupational safety considerations are considered equally important but are not addressed in th is volume of the VA (see Volume 1, Section 2.2.1.2, subsection on Health Related Mineral Issues).

  3. 1995 solid waste 30-year container volume summary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Templeton, K.J.; DeForest, T.J.; Patridge, M.D. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

    1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes a 30-year forecast of the solid waste volumes by container category. The volumes described are low-level mixed waste (LLMW) and transuranic/transuranic mixed (TRU-TRUM) waste. These volumes and their associated container categories will be generated or received at the US Department of Energy Hanford Site for storage, treatment, and disposal at Westinghouse Hanford Company`s Solid Waste Operations Complex (SWOC) during a 30-year period from FY 1995 through FY 2024. The data presented in this report establish a baseline for solid waste management both in the present and future. With knowledge of the volumes by container type, decisions on the facility handling and storage requirements can be adequately made. It is recognized that the forecast estimates will vary as facility planning and missions continue to change and become better defined; however, the data presented in this report still provide useful insight into Hanford`s future solid waste management requirements.

  4. Nearby Supernova Factory Observations of SN 2006D: On Sporadic Carbon Signatures in Early Type Ia Supernova Spectra

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    with low volume-?lling factor. Subject headings: supernovae:general — supernovae: individual (SN 2006D)Introduction Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) make valuable

  5. CODATA recommended values of the fundamental physical constants: 2002

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mohr, Peter J.; Taylor, Barry N. [National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, Maryland 20899-8401 (United States)

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper gives the 2002 self-consistent set of values of the basic constants and conversion factors of physics and chemistry recommended by the Committee on Data for Science and Technology (CODATA) for international use. Further, it describes in detail the adjustment of the values of the subset of constants on which the complete 2002 set of recommended values is based. Two noteworthy additions in the 2002 adjustment are recommended values for the bound-state rms charge radii of the proton and deuteron and tests of the exactness of the Josephson and quantum-Hall-effect relations K{sub J}=2e/h and R{sub K}=h/e{sup 2}, where K{sub J} and R{sub K} are the Josephson and von Klitzing constants, respectively, e is the elementary charge, and h is the Planck constant. The 2002 set replaces the previously recommended 1998 CODATA set. The 2002 adjustment takes into account the data considered in the 1998 adjustment as well as the data that became available between 31 December 1998, the closing date of that adjustment, and 31 December 2002, the closing date of the new adjustment. The differences between the 2002 and 1998 recommended values compared to the uncertainties of the latter are generally not unreasonable. The new CODATA set of recommended values may also be found on the World Wide Web at physics.nist.gov/constants.

  6. Table 9. U.S. Refiner Conventional Motor Gasoline Volumes by...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    5.7 5.9 4.4 12.9 NA 17.3 See footnotes at end of table. 9. U.S. Refiner Conventional Motor Gasoline Volumes by Grade and Sales Type 18 Energy Information Administration ...

  7. Table 13. U.S. Refiner Reformulated Motor Gasoline Volumes by...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    3.3 3.4 7.9 3.3 W 11.3 See footnotes at end of table. 13. U.S. Refiner Reformulated Motor Gasoline Volumes by Grade and Sales Type 26 Energy Information Administration ...

  8. Table 13. U.S. Refiner Reformulated Motor Gasoline Volumes by...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    3.6 3.7 7.9 3.1 W 11.0 See footnotes at end of table. 13. U.S. Refiner Reformulated Motor Gasoline Volumes by Grade and Sales Type 26 Energy Information Administration ...

  9. Table 9. U.S. Refiner Conventional Motor Gasoline Volumes by...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    5.7 5.9 3.9 12.7 W 16.6 See footnotes at end of table. 9. U.S. Refiner Conventional Motor Gasoline Volumes by Grade and Sales Type 18 Energy Information Administration ...

  10. Lokaratna, Volume 4

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mishra, Mahendra Kumar

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Muthukumarswamy and his colleagues of NFSC, Chennai to support this volume to be published in their web site for a global readership. On behalf of Folklore Foundation, Odisha Bhubaneswar , I wish a Happy and prosperous new Year 2012... (b)ali-B?eli,5 mythical Great Ancestress of the Kondhs and, at one time, a human manifestation of the earth goddess ? originally choose to manifest herself to man in her tiger form; after she had assumed such form, she killed a large quantity of game animals...

  11. FY 2005 Volume 4

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011 Strategic Plan| Department of.pdf6-OPAMDepartment of EnergyME-0035 Volume 4 Science

  12. FY 2005 Volume 5

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011 Strategic Plan| Department of.pdf6-OPAMDepartment of EnergyME-0035 Volume 4 Science6

  13. FY 2005 Volume 6

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011 Strategic Plan| Department of.pdf6-OPAMDepartment of EnergyME-0035 Volume 4 Science67

  14. FY 2005 Volume 7

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011 Strategic Plan| Department of.pdf6-OPAMDepartment of EnergyME-0035 Volume 4

  15. Volume One Disc Two

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over OurThe Iron SpinPrincetonUsing Maps1 -Visualizing Brain Metals inVolume-One-Disc-Two

  16. Period doubling, information entropy, and estimates for Feigenbaum's constants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reginald D. Smith

    2013-08-03T23:59:59.000Z

    The relationship between period doubling bifurcations and Feigenbaum's constants has been studied for nearly 40 years and this relationship has helped uncover many fundamental aspects of universal scaling across multiple nonlinear dynamical systems. This paper will combine information entropy with symbolic dynamics to demonstrate how period doubling can be defined using these tools alone. In addition, the technique allows us to uncover some unexpected, simple estimates for Feigenbaum's constants which relate them to log 2 and the golden ratio, phi, as well as to each other.

  17. The Equivalence Principle and the Constants of Nature

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thibault Damour

    2009-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

    We briefly review the various contexts within which one might address the issue of ``why'' the dimensionless constants of Nature have the particular values that they are observed to have. Both the general historical trend, in physics, of replacing a-priori-given, absolute structures by dynamical entities, and anthropic considerations, suggest that coupling ``constants'' have a dynamical nature. This hints at the existence of observable violations of the Equivalence Principle at some level, and motivates the need for improved tests of the Equivalence Principle.

  18. Topological Quantization in Units of the Fine Structure Constant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maciejko, Joseph; /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /Stanford U., Materials Sci. Dept. /SLAC; Qi, Xiao-Liang; /Station Q, UCSB /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /Stanford U., Materials Sci. Dept. /SLAC; Drew, H.Dennis; /Maryland U.; Zhang, Shou-Cheng; /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /Stanford U., Materials Sci. Dept. /SLAC

    2011-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Fundamental topological phenomena in condensed matter physics are associated with a quantized electromagnetic response in units of fundamental constants. Recently, it has been predicted theoretically that the time-reversal invariant topological insulator in three dimensions exhibits a topological magnetoelectric effect quantized in units of the fine structure constant {alpha} = e{sup 2}/{h_bar}c. In this Letter, we propose an optical experiment to directly measure this topological quantization phenomenon, independent of material details. Our proposal also provides a way to measure the half-quantized Hall conductances on the two surfaces of the topological insulator independently of each other.

  19. Discrete canonical analysis of three dimensional gravity with cosmological constant

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Berra-Montiel; J. E. Rosales-Quintero

    2014-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

    We discuss the interplay between standard canonical analysis and canonical discretization in three-dimensional gravity with cosmological constant. By using the Hamiltonian analysis, we find that the continuum local symmetries of the theory are given by the on-shell space-time diffeomorphisms, which at the action level, corresponds to the Kalb-Ramond transformations. At the time of discretization, although this symmetry is explicitly broken, we prove that the theory still preserves certain gauge freedom generated by a constant curvature relation in terms of holonomies and the Gauss's law in the lattice approach.

  20. 1995 Solid Waste 30-year volume summary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Valero, O.J. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States); DeForest, T.J.; Templeton, K.J. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

    1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document, prepared by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) under the direction of Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC), provides a description of the annual low-level mixed waste (LLMW) and transuranic/transuranic mixed solid waste (TRU-TRUM) volumes expected to be managed by Hanford`s Solid Waste Central Waste Complex (CWC) over the next 30 years. The waste generation sources and waste categories are also described. This document is intended to be used as a reference for short- and long-term planning of the Hanford treatment, storage, and disposal (TSD) activities over the next several decades. By estimating the waste volumes that will be generated in the future, facility planners can determine the timing of key waste management activities, evaluate alternative treatment strategies, and plan storage and disposal capacities. In addition, this document can be used by other waste sites and the general public to gain a better understanding of the types and volumes of waste that will be managed at Hanford.

  1. Calculation of the Dimer Equilibrium Constant of Heavy Water Saturated Vapor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bulavin, L A; Makhlaichuk, V N

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Water is the most common substance on Earth.The discovery of heavy water and its further study have shown that the change of hydrogen for deuterium leads to the significant differences in their properties.The triple point temperature of heavy water is higher,at the same time the critical temperature is lower.Experimental values of the second virial coefficient of the EOS for the vapor of normal and heavy water differ at all temperatures.This fact can influence the values of the dimerization constant for the heavy water vapor.The equilibrium properties of the dimerization process are described with the methods of chemical thermodynamics.The chemical potentials for monomers (m) and dimers (d)are the functions of their concentrations.The interactions of monomer-dimer and dimer-dimer types are taken into account within the solution of equation for chemical potentials.The obtained expression for the dimerization constant contains the contributions of these types.The averaged potentials are modeled by the Sutherlan...

  2. Toroidal constant-tension superconducting magnetic energy storage units

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Herring, J.S.

    1992-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

    A superconducting magnetic energy storage unit is provided in which the magnet is wound in a toroidal fashion such that the magnetic field produced is contained only within the bore of the magnet, and thus producing a very low external field. The superconducting magnet includes a coolant channel disposed through the wire. The bore of the magnet comprises a storage volume in which cryogenic coolant is stored, and this volume supplies the coolant to be delivered to the coolant channel in the magnet. 6 figs.

  3. Assignment Types UTS LIBRARY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    University of Technology, Sydney

    Assignment Types UTS LIBRARY February 2013 Academic Writing Guide Part 2 ­ Assignment Types: This section outlines the basic types of written assignments, providing structural elements and examples. #12;2 II. Assignment Types 1. Essay Writing

  4. Fundamental constants and cosmic vacuum: the micro and macro connection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harald Fritzsch; Joan Sola

    2015-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The idea that the vacuum energy density $\\rho_{\\Lambda}$ could be time dependent is a most reasonable one in the expanding Universe; in fact, much more reasonable than just a rigid cosmological constant for the entire cosmic history. Being $\\rho_{\\Lambda}=\\rho_{\\Lambda}(t)$ dynamical, it offers a possibility to tackle the cosmological constant problem in its various facets. Furthermore, for a long time (most prominently since Dirac's first proposal on a time variable gravitational coupling) the possibility that the fundamental "constants" of Nature are slowly drifting with the cosmic expansion has been continuously investigated. In the last two decades, and specially in recent times, mounting experimental evidence attests that this could be the case. In this paper, we consider the possibility that these two groups of facts might be intimately connected, namely that the observed acceleration of the Universe and the possible time variation of the fundamental constants are two manifestations of the same underlying dynamics. We call it: the "micro and macro connection", and on its basis we expect that the cosmological term in Einstein's equations, Newton's coupling and the masses of all the particles in the Universe, both the dark matter particles and the ordinary baryons and leptons, should all drift with the cosmic expansion. Here we discuss specific cosmological models realizing such possibility in a way that preserves the principle of covariance of General Relativity.

  5. A Constant Gain Kalman Filter Approach to track Maneuvering Targets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Naik, Naren

    1 A Constant Gain Kalman Filter Approach to track Maneuvering Targets Ashwin Yadav1 , Peeyush domains. One of the most fundamental and widely used approaches to target tracking is the Kalman filter. In presence of unknown noise statistics there are difficulties in the Kalman filter yielding acceptable

  6. Global Representation of the Fine Structure Constant and its Variation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michael Edmund Tobar

    2005-02-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The fine structure constant, alpha, is shown to be proportional to the ratio of the quanta of electric and magnetic flux of force of the electron, and provides a new representation, which is global across all unit systems. Consequently, a variation in alpha was shown to manifest due to a differential change in the fraction of the quanta of electric and magnetic flux of force, while a variation in hcross.c was shown to manifest due to the common mode change. The representation is discussed with respect to the running of the fine structure constant at high energies (small distances), and a putative temporal drift. It is shown that the running of the fine structure constant is due to equal components of electric screening (polarization of vacuum) and magnetic anti-screening (magnetization of vacuum), which cause the perceived quanta of electric charge to increase at small distances, while the magnetic flux quanta decreases. This introduces the concept of the bare magnetic flux quanta as well as the bare electric charge. With regards to temporal drift, it is confirmed that it is impossible to determine which fundamental constant is varying if alpha varies.

  7. Quartz resonators thermal modelization using located constants networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    of quartz resonator. The designed model is tested by comparison of the experimental frequency versus235 Quartz resonators thermal modelization using located constants networks S. Galliou and J. P modelization of quartz resonators is first presented ; next, the method consisting on establishing a located

  8. USEFUL EQUATIONS AND CONSTANTS k = 8.99 X 109

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kioussis, Nicholas

    E E Vector Sum electU W Potential Difference: elect 0 0 WU V q q Definition Potential Energy Capacitance: Q C V Definition 0 A C d Parallel Plate, Dielectric: 0C C Dielectric Constant Energy Stored Field: qF E Definition Electric Field: 2 q E k r Magnitude (for point charge) Superposition: 1 2 3 E E

  9. CODATA recommended values of the fundamental physical constants: 2010*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    constants and conversion factors of physics and chemistry recommended by the Committee on Data for Science. Theory of hydrogen and deuterium energy levels 1534 a. Dirac eigenvalue 1534 b. Relativistic recoil 1534 c. Nuclear polarizability 1535 d. Self energy 1535 e. Vacuum polarization 1536 f. Two

  10. Constant Sustainable Consumption Rate in Optimal Growth with Exhaustible Resources*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wan, Frederic Yui-Ming

    's criterion of maximum sustainable consumption rate, previously formulated as a minimum-resource-extraction or not the constant unit resource extraction cost vanishes. The related problem of maximizing the terminal capital appetite for the earth's finite stock of nonrenew- able resources, such as fossil fuel and minerals, have

  11. CAPUT DARK ENERGY TOPICS, 2013 1. The Cosmological Constant

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weijgaert, Rien van de

    CAPUT DARK ENERGY TOPICS, 2013 1 #12;1. The Cosmological Constant - The acceleration as curvature term in the Einstein field equation and not a form of dark energy. Provide a critical discussion., Rovelli C., 2010 Is dark energy really a mystery ? Nature, 466, 321 (July 2010) - Padmanabhan T., 2003

  12. Temperature and moisture dependence of dielectric constant for silica aerogels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hrubesh, L.H., LLNL

    1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The dielectric constants of silica aerogels are among the lowest measured for any solid material. The silica aerogels also exhibit low thermal expansion and are thermally stable to temperatures exceeding 500{degrees}C. However, due to the open porosity and large surface areas for aerogels, their dielectric constants are strongly affected by moisture and temperature. This paper presents data for the dielectric constants of silica aerogels as a function of moisture content at 25{degrees}C, and as a function of temperature, for temperatures in the range from 25{degrees}C to 450{degrees}C. Dielectric constant data are also given for silica aerogels that are heat treated in dry nitrogen at 500{degrees}C, then cooled to 25{degrees}C for measurements in dry air. All measurements are made on bulk aerogel spheres at 22GHz microwave frequency, using a cavity perturbation method. The results of the dependence found here for bulk materials can be inferred to apply also to thin films of silica aerogels having similar nano-structures and densities.

  13. Dynamical constants of structured photons with parabolic-cylindrical symmetry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. M. Rodriguez-Lara; R. Jauregui

    2009-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Electromagnetic modes with parabolic-cylindrical symmetry and their dynamical variables are studied both in the classical and quantum realm. As a result, a new dynamical constant for the electromagnetic field is identified and linked to the symmetry operator which supports it.

  14. G.-L. THOMAS and SYDNEY YOUNG. -The vapour pressures, specific volumes, and critical constants of normal hexane (Tensions de vapeur, volumes spci-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    propyle, puis purifié et distillé onze fois. Toutes les fractions étudiées avaient des propriétés retiré par distillation fractionnée - par MM. Young et Thomas - d'un produit qualifié « pentane » prove- nant de la distillation du pétrole d'Amérique. Le point d'ébullition ramené à 760 millimètres est 36

  15. Types of Costs Types of Cost Estimates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boisvert, Jeff

    · Types of Costs · Types of Cost Estimates · Methods to estimate capital costs MIN E 408: Mining% accuracy. ­ 2-5% of pre-production capital Types of Cost Estimates #12;3. Definitive ­ Based on definitive-even $ Production Level Fixed Cost Break-even $ Production Level Cost-Revenue Relationships · Capital Costs (or

  16. Interactive Volume Rendering of Diffusion Tensor Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hlawitschka, Mario

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ller. Volumeshop: o Interactive direct volume illustration.Kin04] [KKW05] [KTW06] Interactive Volume Rendering of Di?magic volume lens: An interactive focus+context technique

  17. Constant-Optimized Quantum Circuits for Modular Multiplication and Exponentiation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Igor L. Markov; Mehdi Saeedi

    2015-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Reversible circuits for modular multiplication $Cx$%$M$ with $xconstant-factor improvements, as well as an improvement by a constant additive term that is significant for few-qubit circuits arising in ongoing laboratory experiments with Shor's algorithm.

  18. Thermodynamics of de Sitter Black Holes: Thermal Cosmological Constant

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yuichi Sekiwa

    2006-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the thermodynamic properties associated with the black hole event horizon and the cosmological horizon for black hole solutions in asymptotically de Sitter spacetimes. We examine thermodynamics of these horizons on the basis of the conserved charges according to Teitelboim's method. In particular, we have succeeded in deriving the generalized Smarr formula among thermodynamical quantities in a simple and natural way. We then show that cosmological constant must decrease when one takes into account the quantum effect. These observations have been obtained if and only if cosmological constant plays the role of a thermodynamical state variable. We also touch upon the relation between inflation of our universe and a phase transition of black holes.

  19. Mega-masers, Dark Energy and the Hubble Constant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lo, Fred K. Y.

    2007-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Powerful water maser emission (water mega-masers) can be found in accretion disks in the nuclei of some galaxies. Besides providing a measure of the mass at the nucleus, such mega-masers can be used to determine the distance to the host galaxy, based on a kinematic model. We will explain the importance of determining the Hubble Constant to high accuracy for constraining the equation of state of Dark Energy and describe the Mega-maser Cosmology Project that has the goal of determining the Hubble Constant to better than 3%. Time permitting, we will also present the scientific capabilities of the current and future NRAO facilities: ALMA, EVLA, VLBA and GBT, for addressing key astrophysical problems

  20. Photon-Axion-Like Particle Coupling Constant and Cosmological Observations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Yu. Piotrovich; Yu. N. Gnedin; T. M. Natsvlishvili

    2008-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

    We estimated the photon-pseudoscalar particle mixing constant from the effect of cosmological alignment and cosmological rotation of polarization plane of distant QSOs. This effect is explained in terms of birefringent phenomenon due to photon-pseudoscalar (axion-like) particle mixing in a cosmic magnetic field. On the contrary, one can estimate the strength of the cosmic magnetic field using the constraints on the photon-axion-like particle coupling constant from the CAST experiment and from SNe Ia dimming effect. In a result, the lower limit on the intergalactic ($z\\approx 1\\div 2$) magnetic field appears at the level of about $4\\times 10^{-10}\\div 10^{-11}$ G.

  1. New process to avoid emissions: Constant pressure in coke ovens

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Giertz, J.; Huhn, F. [DMT-Gesellschaft fuer Forschung und Pruefung mbH, Essen (Germany). Inst. for Cokemaking and Fuel Technology; Hofherr, K. [Thyssen Stahl AG, Duisburg (Germany)

    1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A chamber pressure regulation (PROven), especially effective in regard to emission control problems of coke ovens is introduced for the first time. Because of the partial vacuum in the collecting main system, it is possible to keep the oven`s raw gas pressure constant on a low level over the full coking time. The individual pressure control for each chamber is assured directly as a function of the oven pressure by an immersion system controlling the flow resistance of the collecting main valve. The latter is a fixed-position design (system name ``FixCup``). By doing away with the interdependence of collecting main pressure and chamber pressure, a parameter seen as a coking constant could not be made variable. This opens a new way to reduce coke oven emissions and simultaneously to prevent the ovens from damage caused by air ingress into the oven.

  2. Sound damping constant for generalized theories of gravity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brustein, Ram [Department of Physics, Ben-Gurion University, Beer-Sheva, 84105 (Israel); Medved, A. J. M. [Physics Department, University of Seoul, Seoul 130-743 (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The near-horizon metric for a black brane in anti-de Sitter space and the metric near the AdS boundary both exhibit hydrodynamic behavior. We demonstrate the equivalence of this pair of hydrodynamic systems for the sound mode of a conformal theory. This is first established for Einstein's gravity, but we then show how the sound damping constant will be modified from its Einstein form for a generalized theory. The modified damping constant is expressible as the ratio of a pair of gravitational couplings that are indicative of the sound-channel class of gravitons. This ratio of couplings differs from both that of the shear diffusion coefficient and the shear viscosity to entropy ratio. Our analysis is mostly limited to conformal theories, but suggestions are made as to how this restriction might eventually be lifted.

  3. Laboratory evaluation of the constant rate of strain and constant head techniques for measurement of the hydraulic conductivity of fine grained soils

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adams, Amy Lynn

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis evaluates the constant rate of strain and constant head techniques for measurement of the hydraulic conductivity of fine grained soils. A laboratory program compares hydraulic conductivity measurements made ...

  4. Scaling behavior of discretization errors in renormalization and improvement constants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bhattacharya, T; Lee, W; Sharpe, S R; Bhattacharya, Tanmoy; Gupta, Rajan; Lee, Weonjong; Sharpe, Stephen R.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Non-perturbative results for improvement and renormalization constants needed for on-shell and off-shell O(a) improvement of bilinear operators composed of Wilson fermions are presented. The calculations have been done in the quenched approximation at beta=6.0, 6.2 and 6.4. To quantify residual discretization errors we compare our data with results from other non-perturbative calculations and with one-loop perturbation theory.

  5. Apparatus producing constant cable tension for intermittent demand

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lauritzen, T.

    1984-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

    This invention relates to apparatus for producing constant tension in cable or the like when it is unreeled and reeled from a drum or spool under conditions of intermittent demand. The invention is particularly applicable to the handling of superconductive cable, but the invention is also applicable to the unreeling and reeling of other strands, such as electrical cable, wire, cord, other cables, fish line, wrapping paper and numerous other materials.

  6. The Stückelberg Holographic Superconductors in Constant External Magnetic Field

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jian-Pin Wu

    2010-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate the St\\"{u}ckelberg holographic superconductor in present of the constant external magnetic field. We observe that a critical value of magnetic field exists as the cases in usual holographic superconductor. Furthermore, we find that the applied magnetic field strongly influence the phase transition of this model and have a jump in the condensate at the critical temperature even for $c_{4}=1$.

  7. Noncommutative field with constant background fields and neutral fermion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cui-bai Luo; Feng-yao Hou; Zhu-fang Cui; Xiao-jun Liu; Hong-shi Zong

    2015-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Introducing constant background fields into the noncommutative gauge theory, we first obtain a Hermitian fermion Lagrangian which involves a Lorentz violation term, then we generalize it to a new deformed canonical noncommutation relations for fermion field. Massless neutrino oscillation in the deformed canonical noncommutation relations is analyzed. The restriction of the noncommutative coefficients is also discussed. By comparing with the existing experimental data of conventional neutrino oscillations, the order of noncommutative deformed coefficients is given from different ways.

  8. Turbine blade having a constant thickness airfoil skin

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Marra, John J

    2012-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

    A turbine blade is provided for a gas turbine comprising: a support structure comprising a base defining a root of the blade and a framework extending radially outwardly from the base, and an outer skin coupled to the support structure framework. The skin has a generally constant thickness along substantially the entire radial extent thereof. The framework and the skin define an airfoil of the blade.

  9. Hydrogen Atom and Time Variation of Fine-Structure Constant

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mu-Lin Yan

    2009-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper, we have solved the de Sitter special relativistic ($\\mathcal{SR}_{cR}$-) Dirac equation of hydrogen in the earth-QSO(quasar) framework reference by means of the adiabatic approach. The aspects of geometry effects of de Sitter space-time described by Beltrami metric are explored and taken into account. It is found that the $\\mathcal{SR}_{cR}$-Dirac equation of hydrogen is a time dependent quantum Hamiltonian system. We provide an explicit calculation to justify the adiabatic approach in dealing with this time-dependent system. Since the radius of de Sitter sphere $R$ is cosmologically large, the evolution of the system is very slow so that the adiabatic approximation legitimately works with high accuracy. We conclude that the electromagnetic fine-structure constant, the electron mass and the Planck constant are time variations. This prediction of fine-structure constant is consistent with the presently available observation data. For confirming it further, experiments/observations are required.

  10. On the possibility of variation of the fundamental constants of physics in the static universe

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. Jonauskas

    1999-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

    A variation of fundamental constants of physics is proposed in a frame of static universe. It is shown when the velocity of light increases (decreases) the Planck's constant increases (decreases) and mass of bodies decreases (increases). This variation of constants leads to the variation of dimensions of bodies and the energy levels of atoms, but a fine structure constant remains unaltered.

  11. Types of Commissioning

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Several commissioning types exist to address the specific needs of equipment and systems across both new and existing buildings. The following commissioning types provide a good overview.

  12. Journal of Applied Polymer Science Volume 102, Issue 2, pages 12541261, 15 October, 2006 1254

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gupta, Nikhil

    On the Tensile Properties of Glass Microballoon-Epoxy Resin Syntactic Foams Nikhil Gupta1 and Ruslan Nagorny in the present research. Sixteen types of syntactic foams have been fabricated and tested. Four types of glass-3532 E-mail: ngupta@poly.edu ABSTRACT The effect of hollow glass particle (microballoon) volume fraction

  13. REORIENTAO Ensino Mdio -Volume I

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, I-Shih

    REORIENTAÇÃO CURRICULAR PORTUGUÊS Ensino Médio - Volume I Materiais Didáticos #12;#12;GOVERNO DO SUBSECRETARIA ADJUNTA DE PLANEJAMENTO PEDAGÓGICO Alba Rodrigues Cruz #12;#12;GOVERNO DO ESTADO DO RIO DE JANEIRO

  14. Degravitation, inflation and the cosmological constant as an afterglow

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Patil, Subodh P., E-mail: subodh@physik.hu-berlin.de [Humboldt Universitaet zu Berlin, Institut fuer Physik, Newtonstrasse 15, D-12489 Berlin (Germany)

    2009-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In this report, we adopt the phenomenological approach of taking the degravitation paradigm seriously as a consistent modification of gravity in the IR, and investigate its consequences for various cosmological situations. We motivate degravitation - where Netwon's constant is promoted to a scale dependent filter function - as arising from either a small (resonant) mass for the graviton, or as an effect in semi-classical gravity. After addressing how the Bianchi identities are to be satisfied in such a set up, we turn our attention towards the cosmological consequences of degravitation. By considering the example filter function corresponding to a resonantly massive graviton (with a filter scale larger than the present horizon scale), we show that slow roll inflation, hybrid inflation and old inflation remain quantitatively unchanged. We also find that the degravitation mechanism inherits a memory of past energy densities in the present epoch in such a way that is likely significant for present cosmological evolution. For example, if the universe underwent inflation in the past due to it having tunneled out of some false vacuum, we find that degravitation implies a remnant 'afterglow' cosmological constant, whose scale immediately afterwards is parametrically suppressed by the filter scale (L) in Planck units {Lambda} {approx} l{sup 2}{sub pl}/L{sup 2}. We discuss circumstances through which this scenario reasonably yields the presently observed value for {Lambda} {approx} O(10{sup -120}). We also find that in a universe still currently trapped in some false vacuum state, resonance graviton models of degravitation only degravitate initially Planck or GUT scale energy densities down to the presently observed value over timescales comparable to the filter scale. We argue that different functional forms for the filter function will yield similar conclusions. In this way, we argue that although the degravitation models we study have the potential to explain why the cosmological constant is not large in addition to why it is not zero, it does not satisfactorily address the co-incidence problem without additional tuning.

  15. Determining coal permeabilities through constant pressure production interference testing 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schubarth, Stephen Kurt

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Kurt Schubarth, B. S. , Texas A&M Un1versity Chairman of Advisory Committee: Dr. Stephen A. Holditch The determination of format1on propert1es 1s important to the success of any underground coal gasification (UCG) project. There are many ways... method of analysis for a mult1ple well test w1th a constant pressure source. The method is then verified by analyzing data generated from a numer1cal reservoir simulator. An analys1s of a hydrology test performed during the 1980 Texas ASM UCG project...

  16. Compatibility of neutron star masses and hyperon coupling constants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    H. Huber; M. K. Weigel; F. Weber

    1998-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

    It is shown that the modern equations of state for neutron star matter based on microscopic calculations of symmetric and asymmetric nuclear matter are compatible with the lower bound on the maximum neutron-star mass for a certain range of hyperon coupling constants, which are constrained by the binding energies of hyperons in symmetric nuclear matter. The hyperons are included by means of the relativistic Hartree-- or Hartree--Fock approximation. The obtained couplings are also in satisfactory agreement with hypernuclei data in the relativistic Hartree scheme. Within the relativistic Hartree--Fock approximation hypernuclei have not been investigated so far.

  17. Confined System with Rashba Coupling in Constant Magnetic Field

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohammed El Bouziani; Rachid Houca; Ahmed Jellal

    2012-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

    We study a two dimensional system of electrons with Rashba coupling in the constant magnetic field $B$ and confining potential. We algebraically diagonalize the corresponding Hamiltonian to end up with the solutions of the energy spectrum. In terms of two kinds of operator we construct two symmetries and discuss the filling of the shells with electrons for strong and weak $B$. Subsequently, we show that our system is sharing some common features with quantum optics where the exact operator solutions for the basics Jaynes-Cummings variables are derived from our results. An interesting limit is studied and the corresponding quantum dynamics is recovered.

  18. Photon propagation in noncommutative QED with constant external field

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. Fresneda; D. M. Gitman; A. E. Shabad

    2015-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We find dispersion laws for the photon propagating in the presence of mutually orthogonal constant external electric and magnetic fields in the context of the $\\theta $-expanded noncommutative QED. We show that there is no birefringence to the first order in the noncommutativity parameter $% \\theta .$ By analyzing the group velocities of the photon eigenmodes we show that there occurs superluminal propagation for any direction. This phenomenon depends on the mutual orientation of the external electromagnetic fields and the noncommutativity vector. We argue that the propagation of signals with superluminal group velocity violates causality in spite of the fact that the noncommutative theory is not Lorentz-invariant and speculate about possible workarounds.

  19. Photon propagation in noncommutative QED with constant external field

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fresneda, R; Shabad, A E

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We find dispersion laws for the photon propagating in the presence of mutually orthogonal constant external electric and magnetic fields in the context of the $\\theta $-expanded noncommutative QED. We show that there is no birefringence to the first order in the noncommutativity parameter $% \\theta .$ By analyzing the group velocities of the photon eigenmodes we show that there occurs superluminal propagation for any direction. This phenomenon depends on the mutual orientation of the external electromagnetic fields and the noncommutativity vector. We argue that the propagation of signals with superluminal group velocity violates causality in spite of the fact that the noncommutative theory is not Lorentz-invariant and speculate about possible workarounds.

  20. Types of Costs Types of Cost Estimates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boisvert, Jeff

    05-1 · Types of Costs · Types of Cost Estimates · Methods to estimate capital costs MIN E 408-Revenue Relationships · Capital Costs (or first cost or capital investment): ­ Expenditures made to acquire or develop capital assets ­ Three main classes of capital costs: 1. Depreciable Investment: · Investment allocated

  1. International Linear Collider Technical Design Report (Volumes 1 through 4)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harrison M.

    2013-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The design report consists of four volumes: Volume 1, Executive Summary; Volume 2, Physics; Volume 3, Accelerator (Part I, R and D in the Technical Design Phase, and Part II, Baseline Design); and Volume 4, Detectors.

  2. Volume-Duration-Frequencies for Ungaged Catchments in Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Devulapalli, Ravi S.; Valdes, Juan B.

    of individual phases, consists of two volumes. Volume I (titled Volume-Duration-Frequencies for Ungaged Catchments in Texas: Calculation of Regional Regression Equations) presents the regional regression equations developed, while Volume II (titled Volume...

  3. Silica aerogel: An intrinsically low dielectric constant material

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hrubesh, L.W.

    1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Silica aerogels are highly porous solids having unique morphologies in wavelength of visible which both the pores and particles have sizes less than the wavelength of visible light. This fine nanostructure modifies the normal transport mechanisms within aerogels and endows them with a variety of exceptional physical properties. For example, aerogels have the lowest measured thermal conductivity and dielectric constant for any solid material. The intrinsically low dielectric properties of silica aerogels are the direct result of the extremely high achievable porosities, which are controllable over a range from 75% to more than 99.8 %, and which result in measured dielectric constants from 2.0 to less than 1.01. This paper discusses the synthesis of silica aerogels, processing them as thin films, and characterizing their dielectric properties. Existing data and other physical characteristics of bulk aerogels (e.g., thermal stablity, thermal expansion, moisture adsorption, modulus, dielectric strength, etc.), which are useful for evaluating them as potential dielectrics for microelectronics, are also given.

  4. Energy Levels Of Hydrogen-Like Atomsand Fundamental Constants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Valeri V. Dvoeglazov; Rudolf N. Faustov; Yuri N. Tyukhtyaev

    1994-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The present review includes the description of theoretical methods for the investigations of the spectra of hydrogen-like systems. Various versions of the quasipotential approach and the method of the effective Dirac equation are considered. The new methods, which have been developed in the eighties, are described. These are the method for the investigation of the spectra by means of the quasipotential equation with the relativistic reduced mass and the method for a selection of the logarithmic corrections by means of the renormalization group equation. The special attention is given to the construction of a perturbation theory and the selection of graphs, whereof the contributions of different orders of $\\alpha$, the fine structure constant, to the energy of the fine and hyperfine splitting in a positronium, a muonium and a hydrogen atom could be calculated. In the second part of this article the comparison of the experimental results and the theoretical results concerning the wide range of topics is produced. They are the fine and hyperfine splitting in the hydrogenic systems, the Lamb shift and the anomalous magnetic moments of an electron and a muon. Also, the problem of the precision determination of a numerical value of the fine structure constant, connected with the above topics, is discussed.

  5. Determining the Hubble constant using HII regions and HII galaxies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chavez, Ricardo; Terlevich, Roberto; Plionis, Manolis; Bresolin, Fabio; Basilakos, Spyros; Melnick, Jorge

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We report the first results of a long term program aiming to provide accurate independent estimates of the Hubble constant (H0) and the Dark Energy equation of state parameter (w) using the L(Hbeta)-velocity dispersion (sigma) distance estimator for Giant HII regions and HII galaxies. We have used VLT and Subaru high dispersion spectroscopic observations of a local sample of HII galaxies, identified in the SDSS DR7 catalogue in order to re-define and improve the L(Hbeta) - sigma distance indicator and to determine the Hubble constant. To this end we used as local calibration or 'anchor' of this correlation, giant HII regions in nearby galaxies which have accurate distance measurements determined via primary indicators. Using our best sample of 89 nearby HII galaxies and 23 Giant HII regions in 9 galaxies we obtain H0 = 73.9+- 2.7 (statistical)+- 2.9 (systematic) km s-1 Mpc-1, in excellent agreement with, and independently confirming, the most recent SNe Ia based results.

  6. Axial-vector coupling constants and chiral-symmetry restoration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Henley, E.M. (Department of Physics FM-15 and Institute for Nuclear Theory HN-12, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98195 (United States)); Hwang, W.P. (Department of Physics, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan 10764 (Taiwan, Province of China)); Kisslinger, L.S. (Department of Physics, Carnegie-Mellon University, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15213 (United States))

    1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The isovector axial-vector coupling constant {ital g}{sub {ital A}} is determined by using the method of QCD sum rules. A sum rule for ({ital g}{sub {ital A}}{minus}1) is obtained, and it is shown that, with standard values of the quark condensates, {ital g}{sub {ital A}}=1.26{plus minus}0.08. It is also shown that the isovector axial-vector coupling ({ital g}{sub {ital A}}{minus}1)=0 in the limit in which chiral symmetry is restored, and the quark condensate vanishes. A sum rule is also obtained for the isoscalar'' axial-vector coupling constant {ital g}{sub {ital A}}{sup {ital S}}, which is found to be 0.13 if the isovector values of susceptibilities are used. On the other hand, {ital g}{sub {ital A}}{sup {ital S}}={minus}0.68 if the quark condensate is set to zero while {ital g}{sub {ital A}}{sup {ital S}}={minus}1.00 if both the quark and gluon condensates vanish in the event of chiral-symmetry restoration. The values of {ital g}{sub {ital A}} and {ital g}{sub {ital A}}{sup {ital S}} allow us to deduce {Delta}{ital u} and {Delta}{ital d} in the proton.

  7. Zero-Branes, Quantum Mechanics and the Cosmological Constant

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andrew Chamblin; Neil D. Lambert

    2001-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

    We analyse some dynamical issues in a modified type IIA supergravity, recently proposed as an extension of M-theory that admits de Sitter space. In particular we find that this theory has multiple zero-brane solutions. This suggests a microscopic quantum mechanical matrix description which yields a massive deformation of the usual M(atrix) formulation of M-theory and type IIA string theory.

  8. Structure–performance relationships for cantilever-type piezoelectric energy harvesters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cho, Kyung-Hoon, E-mail: kh97.cho@samsung.com, E-mail: spriya@vt.edu; Park, Hwi-Yeol; Heo, Jin S. [Samsung Advanced Institute of Technology, Samsung Electronics, Yongin 446-712 (Korea, Republic of); Priya, Shashank, E-mail: kh97.cho@samsung.com, E-mail: spriya@vt.edu [Center for Energy Harvesting Materials and Systems (CEHMS), Virginia Tech, Virginia 24061 (United States)

    2014-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

    This study provides comprehensive analysis of the structure–performance relationships in cantilever-type piezoelectric energy harvesters. It provides full understanding of the effect of all the practical global control variables on the harvester performance. The control variables considered for the analysis were material parameters, areal and volumetric dimensions, and configuration of the inactive and active layers. Experimentally, the output power density of the harvester was maximum when the shape of the beam was close to a square for a constant bending stiffness and a fixed beam area. Through analytical modeling of the effective stiffness for the piezoelectric bimorph, the conditions for enhancing the bending stiffness within the same beam volume as that of a conventional bimorph were identified. The harvester configuration with beam aspect ratio of 0.86 utilizing distributed inactive layers exhibited an giant output power of 52.5?mW and power density of 28.5?mW?cm{sup ?3} at 30?Hz under 6.9?m?s{sup ?2} excitation. The analysis further indicates that the trend in the output power with varying damping ratio is dissimilar to that of the efficiency. In order to realize best performance, the harvester should be designed with respect to maximizing the magnitude of output power.

  9. State of the art review of radioactive waste volume reduction techniques for commercial nuclear power plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A review is made of the state of the art of volume reduction techniques for low level liquid and solid radioactive wastes produced as a result of: (1) operation of commercial nuclear power plants, (2) storage of spent fuel in away-from-reactor facilities, and (3) decontamination/decommissioning of commercial nuclear power plants. The types of wastes and their chemical, physical, and radiological characteristics are identified. Methods used by industry for processing radioactive wastes are reviewed and compared to the new techniques for processing and reducing the volume of radioactive wastes. A detailed system description and report on operating experiences follow for each of the new volume reduction techniques. In addition, descriptions of volume reduction methods presently under development are provided. The Appendix records data collected during site surveys of vendor facilities and operating power plants. A Bibliography is provided for each of the various volume reduction techniques discussed in the report.

  10. Abstract--There are two types of drivers in production machine systems: constant velocity (CV) motor and servo-motor.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, WJ "Chris"

    ) motor and servo-motor. If a system contains two drivers or more, among which some are of the CV motor while the other are the servo-motor, the system has the so-called hybrid driver architecture is stable. A simulation is performed to show verify the proposed controller. The CV motor has the velocity

  11. Lieb-Liniger gas in a constant-force potential

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jukic, D.; Galic, S.; Buljan, H. [Department of Physics, University of Zagreb, Bijenicka c. 32, 10000 Zagreb (Croatia); Pezer, R. [Faculty of Metallurgy, University of Zagreb, Aleja narodnih heroja 3, 44103 Sisak (Croatia)

    2010-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We use Gaudin's Fermi-Bose mapping operator to calculate exact solutions for the Lieb-Liniger model in a linear (constant-force) potential (the constructed exact stationary solutions are referred to as the Lieb-Liniger-Airy wave functions). The ground-state properties of the gas in the wedgelike trapping potential are calculated in the strongly interacting regime by using Girardeau's Fermi-Bose mapping and the pseudopotential approach in the 1/c approximation (c denotes the strength of the interaction). We point out that quantum dynamics of Lieb-Liniger wave packets in the linear potential can be calculated by employing an N-dimensional Fourier transform as in the case of free expansion.

  12. Span Programs for Functions with Constant-Sized 1-certificates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aleksandrs Belovs

    2011-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Besides the Hidden Subgroup Problem, the second large class of quantum speed-ups is for functions with constant-sized 1-certificates. This includes the OR function, solvable by the Grover algorithm, the distinctness, the triangle and other problems. The usual way to solve them is by quantum walk on the Johnson graph. We propose a solution for the same problems using span programs. The span program is a computational model equivalent to the quantum query algorithm in its strength, and yet very different in its outfit. We prove the power of our approach by designing a quantum algorithm for the triangle problem with query complexity $O(n^{35/27})$ that is better than $O(n^{13/10})$ of the best previously known algorithm by Magniez et al.

  13. Path Integral Confined Dirac Fermions in a Constant Magnetic Field

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abdeldjalil Merdaci; Ahmed Jellal; Lyazid Chetouani

    2014-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider Dirac fermion confined in harmonic potential and submitted to a constant magnetic field. The corresponding solutions of the energy spectrum are obtained by using the path integral techniques. For this, we begin by establishing a symmetric global projection, which provides a symmetric form for the Green function. Based on this, we show that it is possible to end up with the propagator of the harmonic oscillator for one charged particle. After some transformations, we derive the normalized wave functions and the eigenvalues in terms of different physical parameters and quantum numbers. By interchanging quantum numbers, we show that our solutions possed interesting properties. The density of current and the non-relativistic limit are analyzed where different conclusions are obtained.

  14. Statistical Inference for Models with Intractable Normalizing Constants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jin, Ick Hoon

    2011-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

    be calculated by S1(y) = X 1?iconstant ratio R(?t, ?) = ?(?)/?(?t) by bRm(?t,yt, ?) = 1 m mX i=1 g(y(t)i , ?) g(y(t)i , ?t) . 4. Calculate the Monte Carlo MH ratio r...

  15. Constant power speed range extension of surface mounted PM motors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lawler, Jack Steward (Knoxville, TN); Bailey, John Milton (Knoxville, TN)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A circuit and method for controlling a rotating machine (11) in the constant horsepower range above base speed uses an inverter (15) having SCR's (T1-T6) connected in series with the primary commutation switches (Q1-Q6) to control turn off of the primary commutation switches and to protect the primary commutation switches from faults. The primary commutation switches (Q1-Q6) are controlled by a controller (14), to fire in advance or after a time when the back emf equals the applied voltage, and then to turn off after a precise dwell time, such that suitable power is developed at speeds up to at least six times base speed.

  16. Temperature relationship of the elastic constants of vanadium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Belousov, O.K.

    1987-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Information on the elastic constants of vanadium and their temperature relationship is limited and ambiguous. This article gives the values of these characteristics for VEL-2 electron beam remelted vanadium with a purity of about 99.8%. The elastic properties were measured in heating from 20 to 1600/sup 0/C in a vacuum. The relationship of the modulus of elasticity to temperature has two almost linear portions in the 20-300 and 300-1350/sup 0/C ranges and then a more intense reduction in it is observed. The shear modulus drops sharply starting with 800/sup 0/C and decreases to G = 36 kN/mm/sup 2/ at 1600/sup 0/C. Poisson's ratio has values close to 0.3. Its most significant increase starts with 1400/sup 0/C.e

  17. Determination of the electron–phonon coupling constant in tungsten

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Daraszewicz, Szymon L.; Duffy, Dorothy M.; Shluger, Alexander L. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, London Centre for Nanotechnology, University College London, Gower Street, WC1E 6BT London (United Kingdom); Giret, Yvelin [Department of Physics and Astronomy, London Centre for Nanotechnology, University College London, Gower Street, WC1E 6BT London (United Kingdom); The Institute of Scientific and Industrial Research (ISIR), Osaka University, Mihogaoka 8-1, Ibaraki, Osaka 567-0047 (Japan); Tanimura, Hiroshi; Tanimura, Katsumi [The Institute of Scientific and Industrial Research (ISIR), Osaka University, Mihogaoka 8-1, Ibaraki, Osaka 567-0047 (Japan)

    2014-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

    We used two methods to determine the effective electron-phonon coupling constant (G{sub 0}) in tungsten. Our first principles calculations predict G{sub 0}?=?1.65?×?10{sup 17?}W m{sup ?3} K{sup ?1}. The temporal decay of the femtosecond-resolution optical reflectivity for a (100) surface of bulk W was measured using a pump-probe scheme and analysed using ab initio parameterised two temperature model, which includes both the effects of the electron-phonon coupling and thermal conduction into bulk. This analysis gives G{sub 0}?=?1.4(3)?×?10{sup 17?}W m{sup ?3} K{sup ?1}, in good agreement with the theoretical prediction. The described effective method of calculating and measuring G{sub 0} in bulk materials can be easily extended to other metals.

  18. Predicting the Cosmological Constant from the Causal Entropic Principle

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bousso, Raphael; Bousso, Raphael; Harnik, Roni; Kribs, Graham D.; Perez, Gilad

    2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We compute the expected value of the cosmological constant in our universe from the Causal Entropic Principle. Since observers must obey the laws of thermodynamics and causality, the principle asserts that physical parameters are most likely to be found in the range of values for which the total entropy production within a causally connected region is maximized. Despite the absence of more explicit anthropic criteria, the resulting probability distribution turns out to be in excellent agreement with observation. In particular, we find that dust heated by stars dominates the entropy production, demonstrating the remarkable power of this thermodynamic selection criterion. The alternative approach-weighting by the number of"observers per baryon" -- is less well-defined, requires problematic assumptions about the nature of observers, and yet prefers values larger than present experimental bounds.

  19. Predicting the Cosmological Constant from the CausalEntropic Principle

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bousso, Raphael; Harnik, Roni; Kribs, Graham D.; Perez, Gilad

    2007-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We compute the expected value of the cosmological constant in our universe from the Causal Entropic Principle. Since observers must obey the laws of thermodynamics and causality, it asserts that physical parameters are most likely to be found in the range of values for which the total entropy production within a causally connected region is maximized. Despite the absence of more explicit anthropic criteria, the resulting probability distribution turns out to be in excellent agreement with observation. In particular, we find that dust heated by stars dominates the entropy production, demonstrating the remarkable power of this thermodynamic selection criterion. The alternative approach--weighting by the number of ''observers per baryon''--is less well-defined, requires problematic assumptions about the nature of observers, and yet prefers values larger than present experimental bounds.

  20. Scale of gravity and the cosmological constant within a landscape

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Graesser, Michael L. [California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California 91125 (United States); Department of Physics, Rutgers University, Piscataway, New Jersey 08540 (United States); Salem, Michael P. [California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California 91125 (United States)

    2007-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    It is possible that the scale of gravity, parametrized by the apparent Planck mass, may obtain different values within different universes in an encompassing multiverse. We investigate the range over which the Planck mass may scan while still satisfying anthropic constraints. The window for anthropically allowed values of the Planck mass may have important consequences for landscape predictions. For example, if the likelihood to observe some value of the Planck mass is weighted by the inflationary expansion factors of the universes that contain that value, then it appears extremely unlikely to observe the value of the Planck mass that is measured within our universe. This is another example of the runaway inflation problem discussed in recent literature. We also show that the window for the Planck mass significantly weakens the anthropic constraint on the cosmological constant when both are allowed to vary over a landscape.

  1. Testing the cosmological constant as a candidate for dark energy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kratochvil, Jan; Linde, Andrei; Linder, Eric V.; Shmakova, Marina

    2003-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

    It may be difficult to single out the best model of dark energy on the basis of the existing and planned cosmological observations, because many different models can lead to similar observational consequences. However, each particular model can be studied and either found consistent with observations or ruled out. In this paper, we concentrate on the possibility to test and rule out the simplest and by far the most popular of the models of dark energy, the theory described by general relativity with positive vacuum energy (the cosmological constant). We evaluate the conditions under which this model could be ruled out by the future observations made by the Supernova/Acceleration Probe SNAP (both for supernovae and weak lensing) and by the Planck Surveyor cosmic microwave background satellite.

  2. Second Law Analysis of Constant Temperature Diesel Combustion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Druecke, Dr. Ben [University of Wisconsin; Foster, Prof. Dave [University of Wisconsin; Klein, Prof. Sandy [University of Wisconsin; Daw, C Stuart [ORNL; Chakravarthy, Veerathu K [ORNL; Graves, Ronald L [ORNL

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The results from a second law analysis of a constant temperature diesel combustion process are presented and show that this process is not significantly more reversible than conventional combustion. In addition to quantifying the total availability destruction in combustion, the magnitudes of the combustion irreversibilities attributable to each irreversible subprocess (mixing, oxidation and internal heat transfer) were determined. The primary contributor to combustion irreversibilities is the thermal interaction of reacting and non-reacting species during the oxidation and internal thermal energy transfer subprocesses. Increasing combustion temperature significantly decreases availability destruction by making the oxidation and internal thermal energy transfer processes more reversible. While increasing combustion temperature decreases combustion irreversibility, it also results in an increase in exhaust temperature. A tradeoff exists between large availability destruction at low combustion temperatures and large amounts of availability discarded in the exhaust at high combustion temperatures. The optimum amount of work was found to occur for a combustion temperature of approximately 1600 K.

  3. When did vacuum energy of the Universe become cosmological constant?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. Burdyuzha

    2007-12-29T23:59:59.000Z

    A quark-gluon phase transition in the Universe is researched after which vacuum (dark) energy has hardened and become cosmological constant. Before this a vacuum component of the Universe was changing by jumps during phase transitions since vacuum condensates of quantum fields carried a negative contribution in its positive density energy. This quintessence period of the Universe life took place during the first parts of a second when our Universe was losing high symmetry. Using Zel'dovich's formula the modern value of vacuum energy is also calculated. It is shown that a quantum chromodynamical vacuum which is characterized by pseudogoldstone bosons existed definitely when temperature of the Universe was T~150 MeV. Therefore there is a large probability that dark energy is vacuum energy.

  4. Precision Measurement of the Newtonian Gravitational Constant Using Cold Atoms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. Rosi; F. Sorrentino; L. Cacciapuoti; M. Prevedelli; G. M. Tino

    2014-12-26T23:59:59.000Z

    About 300 experiments have tried to determine the value of the Newtonian gravitational constant, G, so far, but large discrepancies in the results have made it impossible to know its value precisely. The weakness of the gravitational interaction and the impossibility of shielding the effects of gravity make it very difficult to measure G while keeping systematic effects under control. Most previous experiments performed were based on the torsion pendulum or torsion balance scheme as in the experiment by Cavendish in 1798, and in all cases macroscopic masses were used. Here we report the precise determination of G using laser-cooled atoms and quantum interferometry. We obtain the value G=6.67191(99) x 10^(-11) m^3 kg^(-1) s^(-2) with a relative uncertainty of 150 parts per million (the combined standard uncertainty is given in parentheses). Our value differs by 1.5 combined standard deviations from the current recommended value of the Committee on Data for Science and Technology. A conceptually different experiment such as ours helps to identify the systematic errors that have proved elusive in previous experiments, thus improving the confidence in the value of G. There is no definitive relationship between G and the other fundamental constants, and there is no theoretical prediction for its value, against which to test experimental results. Improving the precision with which we know G has not only a pure metrological interest, but is also important because of the key role that G has in theories of gravitation, cosmology, particle physics and astrophysics and in geophysical models.

  5. Types of Reuse

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The following provides greater detail regarding the types of reuse pursued for LM sites. It should be noted that many actual reuses combine several types of the uses listed below.

  6. Simulations Data Simulation Type

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Xiaorui "Ray"

    to request different simulations data. The flow chart above demonstrates the different steps and options@ornl.gov) Autotune Drupal 7 CMS Current building energy models (BEMs), using EnergyPlus or other simulations, are unreliable because they have to constantly be calibrated to match actual energy usage data. Currently

  7. Which BPS baryons minimize volume?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Evslin, Jarah; Kuperstein, Stanislav [Scuola Internazionale Superiore di Studi Avanzati (SISSA), Strada Costiera, Via Beirut n.2-4, 34013 Trieste (Italy); Theoretische Natuurkunde, Vrije Universiteit Brussel and The International Solvay Institutes, Pleinlaan 2, B-1050 Brussels (Belgium)

    2009-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A Bogomol'nyi-Prasad-Sommerfield (BPS) 3-cycle in a Sasaki-Einstein 5-manifold in general does not minimize volume in its homology class, as we illustrate with several examples of nonminimal volume BPS cycles on the 5-manifolds Y{sup p,q}. Instead they minimize the energy of a wrapping D-brane, extremizing a generalized calibration. We present this generalized calibration and demonstrate that it reproduces both the Born-Infeld and the Wess-Zumino parts of the D3-brane energy.

  8. Annealing properties of open volumes in strained SiN films studied by monoenergetic positron beams

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Uedono, A.; Ito, K.; Narumi, T.; Sometani, M.; Yamabe, K.; Miyagawa, Y.; Murata, T.; Honda, K.; Hattori, N.; Matsuura, M.; Asai, K.; Ohdaira, T.; Suzuki, R. [Institute of Applied Physics, University of Tsukuba, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8573 (Japan); Process Technology Development Division, Renesas Technology Corp., 4-1 Mizuhara, Itami, Hyogo 664-0005 (Japan); National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, 1-1-1 Umezono, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8568 (Japan)

    2007-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The effect of annealing on open volumes in strained SiN films deposited on Si by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition was studied using monoenergetic positron beams. For compressive SiN, the stress was reduced by postdeposition annealing; this effect was attributed to the relaxation of matrix structures accompanied by an expansion of small open spaces intrinsically existing in the matrix and the introduction of large open volumes. For tensile SiN, although annealing tends to decrease the concentration of large open volumes, the size of the small open spaces and the film stress were almost constant up to 1000 deg. C annealing. This was attributed to the network structure related to the open spaces remaining stable even at 1000 deg. C annealing, and this mainly determines the stress in the tensile film.

  9. Polynomial Constants are Decidable ? Markus Muller-Olm 1 and Helmut Seidl 2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seidl, Helmut

    Polynomial Constants are Decidable ? Markus Muller-Olm 1 and Helmut Seidl 2 1 University are #12;nite constants [19]. This motivated Muller-Olm and Ruthing [16] to study the complexity

  10. Polynomial Constants are Decidable # Markus MullerOlm 1 and Helmut Seidl 2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Müller-Olm, Markus

    Polynomial Constants are Decidable # Markus MË?uller­Olm 1 and Helmut Seidl 2 1 University]. This motivated MË?uller­Olm and RË?uthing [16] to study the complexity of constant propagation for classes

  11. High air volume to low liquid volume aerosol collector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Masquelier, Donald A. (Tracy, CA); Milanovich, Fred P. (Lafayette, CA); Willeke, Klaus (Cincinnati, OH)

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A high air volume to low liquid volume aerosol collector. A high volume flow of aerosol particles is drawn into an annular, centripetal slot in a collector which directs the aerosol flow into a small volume of liquid pool contained is a lower center section of the collector. The annular jet of air impinges into the liquid, imbedding initially airborne particles in the liquid. The liquid in the pool continuously circulates in the lower section of the collector by moving to the center line, then upwardly, and through assistance by a rotating deflector plate passes back into the liquid at the outer area adjacent the impinging air jet which passes upwardly through the liquid pool and through a hollow center of the collector, and is discharged via a side outlet opening. Any liquid droplets escaping with the effluent air are captured by a rotating mist eliminator and moved back toward the liquid pool. The collector includes a sensor assembly for determining, controlling, and maintaining the level of the liquid pool, and includes a lower centrally located valve assembly connected to a liquid reservoir and to an analyzer for analyzing the particles which are impinged into the liquid pool.

  12. Improved constraints on the coupling constants of axion-like particles to nucleons from recent Casimir-less experiment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. L. Klimchitskaya; V. M. Mostepanenko

    2015-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

    We obtain improved constraints on the coupling constants of axion-like particles to nucleons from a recently performed Casimir-less experiment. For this purpose, the differential force between a Au-coated sphere and either Au or Si sectors of a rotating disc, arising due to two-axion exchange, is calculated. Over a wide region of axion masses from 1.7 meV to 0.9 eV the obtained constraints are stronger up to a factor of 60 than the previously known ones following from the Cavendish-type experiment and measurements of the effective Casimir pressure.

  13. Stronger constraints on the coupling constants of axion-like particles to nucleons from recent Casimir-less experiment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Klimchitskaya, G L

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We obtain stronger constraints on the coupling constants of axion-like particles to nucleons from a recently performed Casimir-less experiment. For this purpose, the differential force between a Au-coated sphe\\-re and either Au or Si sectors of a rotating disc, arising due to two-axion exchange, is calculated. Over a wide region of axion masses from 1.7 meV to 0.9 eV the obtained constraints are stronger up to a factor of 60 than the previously known ones following from the Cavendish-type experiment and measurements of the effective Casimir pressure.

  14. Characteristics of potential repository wastes. Volume 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The LWR spent fuels discussed in Volume 1 of this report comprise about 99% of all domestic non-reprocessed spent fuel. In this report we discuss other types of spent fuels which, although small in relative quantity, consist of a number of diverse types, sizes, and compositions. Many of these fuels are candidates for repository disposal. Some non-LWR spent fuels are currently reprocessed or are scheduled for reprocessing in DOE facilities at the Savannah River Site, Hanford Site, and the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. It appears likely that the reprocessing of fuels that have been reprocessed in the past will continue and that the resulting high-level wastes will become part of defense HLW. However, it is not entirely clear in some cases whether a given fuel will be reprocessed, especially in cases where pretreatment may be needed before reprocessing, or where the enrichment is not high enough to make reprocessing attractive. Some fuels may be canistered, while others may require special means of disposal. The major categories covered in this chapter include HTGR spent fuel from the Fort St. Vrain and Peach Bottom-1 reactors, research and test reactor fuels, and miscellaneous fuels, and wastes generated from the decommissioning of facilities.

  15. New Variation of Constants Formula for Some Partial Functional Differential Equations with Infinite Delay 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    New Variation of Constants Formula for Some Partial Functional Differential Equations with Infinite, Morocco ezzinbi@ucam.ac.ma Abstract In this work, we give a new variation of constants formula for some words and phrases: Hille-Yosida operator, integral solutions, variation of constants formula, uniform

  16. A CONSTANT-INVENTORY TACTICAL PLANNING MODEL FOR A JOB SHOP

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Graves, Stephen C.

    A CONSTANT-INVENTORY TACTICAL PLANNING MODEL FOR A JOB SHOP Stephen C. Graves Massachusetts a constant-inventory tactical planning model for a generic manufacturing system, such as a job shop assume that we can regulate the release of work to the shop to maintain the constant-inventory constraint

  17. De Sitter brane-world, localization of gravity, and the cosmological constant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Neupane, Ishwaree P. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Canterbury, Private Bag 4800, Christchurch 8041 (New Zealand)

    2011-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Cosmological models with a de Sitter 3-brane embedded in a 5-dimensional de Sitter spacetime (dS{sub 5}) give rise to a finite 4D Planck mass similar to that in Randall-Sundrum (RS) brane-world models in anti-de Sitter 5-dimensional spacetime(AdS{sub 5}). Yet, there arise a few important differences as compared to the results with a flat 3-brane or 4D Minkowski spacetime. For example, the mass reduction formula (MRF) M{sub Pl}{sup 2}=M{sub (5)}{sup 3}l{sub AdS} as well as the relationship M{sub Pl}{sup 2}=M{sub Pl(4+n)}{sup n+2}L{sup n} (with L being the average size or the radius of the n extra dimensions) expected in models of product-space (or Kaluza-Klein) compactifications get modified in cosmological backgrounds. In an expanding universe, a physically relevant MRF encodes information upon the 4-dimensional Hubble expansion parameter, in addition to the length and mass parameters L, M{sub Pl}, and M{sub Pl(4+n)}. If a bulk cosmological constant is present in the solution, then the reduction formula is further modified. With these new insights, we show that the localization of a massless 4D graviton as well as the mass hierarchy between M{sub Pl} and M{sub Pl(4+n)} can be explained in cosmological brane-world models. A notable advantage of having a 5D de Sitter bulk is that in this case the zero-mass wave function is normalizable, which is not necessarily the case if the bulk spacetime is anti-de Sitter. In spacetime dimensions D{>=}7, however, the bulk cosmological constant {Lambda}{sub b} can take either sign ({Lambda}{sub b}<0, =0, or >0). The D=6 case is rather inconclusive, in which case {Lambda}{sub b} may be introduced together with 2-form gauge field (or flux). We obtain some interesting classical gravity solutions that compactify higher-dimensional spacetime to produce a Robertson-Walker universe with de Sitter-type expansion plus one extra noncompact direction. We also show that such models can admit both an effective 4-dimensional Newton constant that remains finite and a normalizable zero-mode graviton wave function.

  18. High-Temperature-High-Volume Lifting for Enhanced Geothermal...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    High-Temperature-High-Volume Lifting for Enhanced Geothermal Systems High-Temperature-High-Volume Lifting for Enhanced Geothermal Systems High-Temperature-High-Volume Lifting for...

  19. PATRAM '80. Proceedings. Volume 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huebner, H.W. (ed.)

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Volume 2 contains papers from the following sessions: Safeguards-Related Problems; Neutronics and Criticality; Operations and Systems Experience II; Plutonium Systems; Intermediate Storage in Casks; Operations and Systems Planning; Institutional Issues; Structural and Thermal Evaluation I; Poster Session B; Extended Testing I; Structural and Thermal Evaluation II; Extended Testing II; and Emergency Preparedness and Response. Individual papers were processed. (LM)

  20. PATRAM '80. Proceedings. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huebner, H.W. (ed.)

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Volume 1 contains papers from the following sessions: Plenary Session; Regulations, Licensing and Standards; LMFBR Systems Concepts; Risk/Safety Assessment I; Systems and Package Design; US Institutional Issues; Risk/Safety Assessment II; Leakage, Leak Rate and Seals; Poster Session A; Operations and Systems Experience I; Manufacturing Processes and Materials; and Quality Assurance and Maintenance. Individual papers were processed. (LM)

  1. Neuron, Volume 78 Supplemental Information

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gentner, Timothy

    Neuron, Volume 78 Supplemental Information Associative Learning Enhances Population Coding colored dot denotes the mean response for two neurons to each of four stimuli. Each colored ellipse) For a positive relationship, neuron pairs with positive signal correlation and large noise correlation have

  2. Fort Irwin Integrated Resource Assessment. Volume 2, Baseline detail

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Richman, E.E.; Keller, J.M.; Dittmer, A.L.; Hadley, D.L.

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report documents the assessment of baseline energy use at Fort Irwin, a US Army Forces Command facility near Barstow, California. It is a companion report to Volume 1, Executive Summary, and Volume 3, Integrated Resource Assessment. The US Army Forces Command (FORSCOM) has tasked the US Department of Energy (DOE) Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP), supported by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL), to identify, evaluate, and assist in acquiring all cost-effective energy projects at Fort Irwin. This is part of a model program that PNL has designed to support energy-use decisions in the federal sector. This program (1) identifies and evaluates all cost-effective energy projects; (2) develops a schedule at each installation for project acquisition considering project type, size, timing, and capital requirements, as well as energy and dollar savings; and (3) targets 100% of the financing required to implement energy efficiency projects. PNL applied this model program to Fort Irwin. This analysis examines the characteristics of electric, propane gas, and vehicle fuel use for a typical operating year. It records energy-use intensities for the facilities at Fort Irwin by building type and energy end use. It also breaks down building energy consumption by fuel type, energy end use, and building type. A complete energy consumption reconciliation is presented that accounts for all energy use among buildings, utilities, and applicable losses.

  3. Arnold Schwarzenegger HIGH-VOLUME MANUFACTURING FOR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arnold Schwarzenegger Governor HIGH-VOLUME MANUFACTURING FOR LOW-COST, FLEXIBLE SOLAR CELL Prepared-VOLUME MANUFACTURING FOR LOW-COST, FLEXIBLE SOLAR CELL EISG AWARDEE InterPhases Research 166 N. Moorpark Rd. Suite 204

  4. MINIMAL VOLUME Laurent BESSI`ERES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Remy, Bertrand

    MINIMAL VOLUME by Laurent BESSI`ERES Abstract. -- The aim of this text is to explain some rigidity manifold, simplicial volume, global topological meth- ods (`a la Gromov). #12;2 LAURENT BESSI`ERES 1

  5. Types of contracts and agreements guide. Part 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1981-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this volume is to be helpful in providing a comprehensive introduction to a wide variety of contract types and agreements, including a consideration of small purchase procedures and multiyear procurement. In both format and content, it is designed to help those persons who influence the determination of the types of contracts and agreements to be employed in acquiring goods and services for the Department of Energy. Information is presented on selecting and negotiating types of contract compensation arrangements; fixed-price type contract compensation arrangements, including small purchases and multiyear procurement; cost-reimbursement type contract compensation arrangements; other types of contract compensation agreements; and basic agreements and basic ordering agreements. (LCL)

  6. NIHAO III: The constant disc gas mass conspiracy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stinson, G S; Wang, L; Macciò, A V; Herpich, J; Bradford, J D; Quinn, T R; Wadsley, J; Keller, B

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We show that the cool gas masses of galactic discs reach a steady state that lasts many Gyr after their last major merger in cosmological hydrodynamic simulations. The mass of disc gas, M$_{\\rm gas}$, depends upon a galaxy halo's spin and virial mass, but not upon stellar feedback. Halos with low spin have high star formation efficiency and lower disc gas mass. Similarly, lower stellar feedback leads to more star formation so the gas mass ends up nearly the same irregardless of stellar feedback strength. Even considering spin, the M$_{\\rm gas}$ relation with halo mass, M$_{200}$ only shows a factor of 3 scatter. The M$_{\\rm gas}$--M$_{200}$ relation show a break at M$_{200}$=$2\\times10^{11}$ M$_\\odot$ that corresponds to an observed break in the M$_{\\rm gas}$--M$_\\star$ relation. The constant disc mass stems from a shared halo gas density profile in all the simulated galaxies. In their outer regions, the profiles are isothermal. Where the profile rises above $n=10^{-3}$ cm$^{-3}$, the gas readily cools and th...

  7. Distribution Function of Dark Matter with Constant Anisotropy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ding Ma; Ping He

    2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    N-body simulations of dark matter halos show that the density is cusped near the center of the halo. The density profile behaves as $r^{-\\gamma}$ in the inner parts, where $\\gamma \\simeq 1$ for the NFW model and $\\gamma \\simeq 1.5$ for the Moore's model, but in the outer parts, both models agree with each other in the asymptotic behavior of the density profile. The simulations also show the information about anisotropy parameter $\\beta(r)$ of velocity distribution. $\\beta\\approx 0$ in the inner part and $\\beta\\approx 0.5$ (radially anisotropic) in the outer part of the halo. We provide some distribution functions $F(E,L)$ with the constant anisotropy parameter $\\beta$ for the two spherical models of dark matter halos: a new generalized NFW model and a generalized Moore model. There are two parameters $\\alpha$ and $\\epsilon$ for those two generalized models to determine the asymptotic behavior of the density profile. In this paper, we concentrate on the situation of $\\beta(r)=1/2$ from the viewpoint of the simulation.

  8. Spectroscopic constants and potential energy curves of tungsten carbide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Balasubramanian, K. [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Arizona State University, Tempe, Arizona 85287-1604 (United States)] [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Arizona State University, Tempe, Arizona 85287-1604 (United States)

    2000-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Spectroscopic constants (R{sub e},{omega}{sub e},T{sub e},{mu}{sub e}) and potential energy curves for 40 low-lying electronic states of the diatomic tungsten carbide (WC) were obtained using the complete active space multiconfiguration self-consistent field followed by the multireference singles+doubles configuration interaction and full first- and second-order configuration interaction calculations that included up to 6.4 mil configurations. Spin-orbit effects were included through the enhanced relativistic configuration interaction method described here for 28 electronic states of WC lying below {approx}20 000 cm-1. The spin-orbit splitting of the ground state of WC was found to be very large (4394 cm-1). The ground and excited electronic states of the W atom were also computed and were found to be in good agreement with the experimental data. The nature of bonding was analyzed through the composition of orbitals, leading configurations, Mulliken populations, and dipole moments. The dissociation energy of WC was computed including spin-orbit and electron correlation effects. The recent photoelectron spectra of WC{sup -} were assigned on the basis of our computed results. (c) 2000 American Institute of Physics.

  9. Constant pressure and temperature discrete-time Langevin molecular dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Niels Grønbech-Jensen; Oded Farago

    2014-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a new and improved method for simultaneous control of temperature and pressure in molecular dynamics simulations with periodic boundary conditions. The thermostat-barostat equations are build on our previously developed stochastic thermostat, which has been shown to provide correct statistical configurational sampling for any time step that yields stable trajectories. Here, we extend the method and develop a set of discrete-time equations of motion for both particle dynamics and system volume in order to seek pressure control that is insensitive to the choice of the numerical time step. The resulting method is simple, practical, and efficient. The method is demonstrated through direct numerical simulations of two characteristic model systems - a one dimensional particle chain for which exact statistical results can be obtained and used as benchmarks, and a three dimensional system of Lennard-Jones interacting particles simulated in both solid and liquid phases. The results, which are compared against the method of Kolb & Dunweg, show that the new method behaves according to the objective, namely that acquired statistical averages and fluctuations of configurational measures are accurate and robust against the chosen time step applied to the simulation.

  10. Verifying Volume Rendering Using Discretization Error Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kirby, Mike

    Verifying Volume Rendering Using Discretization Error Analysis Tiago Etiene, Daniel Jo¨nsson, Timo--We propose an approach for verification of volume rendering correctness based on an analysis of the volume rendering integral, the basis of most DVR algorithms. With respect to the most common discretization

  11. Site Environmental Report for 2005 Volume I and Volume II

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ruggieri, Michael

    2006-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Each year, Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory prepares an integrated report on its environmental programs to satisfy the requirements of United States Department of Energy Order 231.1A, ''Environment, Safety, and Health Reporting''. The ''Site Environmental Report for 2005'' summarizes Berkeley Lab's environmental management performance, presents environmental monitoring results, and describes significant programs for calendar year 2005. (Throughout this report, Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory is referred to as ''Berkeley Lab'', ''the Laboratory'', ''Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory'', and ''LBNL''.) The report is separated into two volumes. Volume I contains an overview of the Laboratory, the status of environmental programs, and summarized results from surveillance and monitoring activities. This year's Volume I text body is organized into an executive summary followed by six chapters. The report's structure has been reorganized this year, and it now includes a chapter devoted to environmental management system topics. Volume II contains individual data results from surveillance and monitoring activities. The ''Site Environmental Report'' is distributed by releasing it on the Web from the Berkeley Lab Environmental Services Group (ESG) home page, which is located at http://www.lbl.gov/ehs/esg/. Many of the documents cited in this report also are accessible from the ESG Web page. CD and printed copies of this Site Environmental Report are available upon request. The report follows the Laboratory's policy of using the International System of Units (SI), also known as the metric system of measurements. Whenever possible, results are also reported using the more conventional (non-SI) system of measurements, because the non-SI system is referenced by several current regulatory standards and is more familiar to some readers. Two tables are provided at the end of the Glossary to help readers: the first defines the prefixes used with SI units of measurement, and the second provides conversions to non-SI units.

  12. Solidification of low-volume power plant sludges. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bell, N.E.; Halverson, M.A.; Mercer, B.M.

    1981-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A literature review was conducted to obtain information on the status of hazardous waste solidification technology and application of this technology to low-volume power plant waste sludges. Because of scarcity of sludge composition data, anticipated major components were identified primarily by chemical reactions that are known to occur during treatment of specific wastewaters. Chemical and physical properties of these sludges were critically analyzed for compatibility with several types of commercially available solidification processes. The study pointed out the need for additional information on the nature of these sludges, especially leaching characteristics and the presence of substances that will interfere with solidification processes. Laboratory studies were recommended for evaluation of solidification process which have the greatest potential for converting hazardous low-volume sludges to non-hazardous waste forms.

  13. Testable solution of the cosmological constant and coincidence problems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shaw, Douglas J.; Barrow, John D. [DAMTP, Centre for Mathematical Sciences, Cambridge CB3 0WA (United Kingdom)

    2011-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a new solution to the cosmological constant (CC) and coincidence problems in which the observed value of the CC, {Lambda}, is linked to other observable properties of the Universe. This is achieved by promoting the CC from a parameter that must be specified, to a field that can take many possible values. The observed value of {Lambda}{approx_equal}(9.3 Gyrs){sup -2}[{approx_equal}10{sup -120} in Planck units] is determined by a new constraint equation which follows from the application of a causally restricted variation principle. When applied to our visible Universe, the model makes a testable prediction for the dimensionless spatial curvature of {Omega}{sub k0}=-0.0056({zeta}{sub b}/0.5), where {zeta}{sub b}{approx}1/2 is a QCD parameter. Requiring that a classical history exist, our model determines the probability of observing a given {Lambda}. The observed CC value, which we successfully predict, is typical within our model even before the effects of anthropic selection are included. When anthropic selection effects are accounted for, we find that the observed coincidence between t{sub {Lambda}={Lambda}}{sup -1/2} and the age of the Universe, t{sub U}, is a typical occurrence in our model. In contrast to multiverse explanations of the CC problems, our solution is independent of the choice of a prior weighting of different {Lambda} values and does not rely on anthropic selection effects. Our model includes no unnatural small parameters and does not require the introduction of new dynamical scalar fields or modifications to general relativity, and it can be tested by astronomical observations in the near future.

  14. Waste minimization handbook, Volume 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boing, L.E.; Coffey, M.J.

    1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This technical guide presents various methods used by industry to minimize low-level radioactive waste (LLW) generated during decommissioning and decontamination (D and D) activities. Such activities generate significant amounts of LLW during their operations. Waste minimization refers to any measure, procedure, or technique that reduces the amount of waste generated during a specific operation or project. Preventive waste minimization techniques implemented when a project is initiated can significantly reduce waste. Techniques implemented during decontamination activities reduce the cost of decommissioning. The application of waste minimization techniques is not limited to D and D activities; it is also useful during any phase of a facility`s life cycle. This compendium will be supplemented with a second volume of abstracts of hundreds of papers related to minimizing low-level nuclear waste. This second volume is expected to be released in late 1996.

  15. John von Neumann Institute for Computing Different Types of Protein Folding Identified with

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Janke, Wolfhard

    John von Neumann Institute for Computing Different Types of Protein Folding Identified://www.fz-juelich.de/nic-series/volume40 #12;Different Types of Protein Folding Identified with a Coarse-Grained Heteropolymer Model Stefan The identification of folding channels is one of the key tasks of protein folding studies. While secondary structures

  16. Petroleum supply annual 1993. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Petroleum Supply Annual (PSA) contains information on the supply and disposition of crude oil and petroleum products. The publication reflects data that were collected from the petroleum industry during 1993 through annual and monthly surveys. The PSA is divided into two volumes. This first volume contains four sections: Summary Statistics, Detailed Statistics, Refinery Capacity, and Oxygenate Capacity each with final annual data. The second volume contains final statistics for each month of 1993, and replaces data previously published in the Petroleum Supply Monthly (PSM). The tables in Volumes 1 and 2 are similarly numbered to facilitate comparison between them. Below is a description of each section in Volume 1 of the PSA.

  17. Petroleum supply annual 1994. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

    The Petroleum Supply Annual (PSA) contains information on the supply and disposition of crude oil and petroleum products. The publication reflects data that were collected from the petroleum industry during 1994 through annual and monthly surveys. The PSA is divided into two volumes. This first volume contains four sections: Summary Statistics, Detailed Statistics, Refinery Capacity, and Oxygenate Capacity each with final annual data. The second volume contains final statistics for each month of 1994, and replaces data previously published in the Petroleum Supply Monthly (PSM). The tables in Volumes 1 and 2 are similarly numbered to facilitate comparison between them. Below is a description of each section in Volume 1 of the PSA.

  18. Moving from Status to Trends: Forest Inventory and Analysis Symposium 2012 396GTR-NRS-P-105 FIA'S VOLUME-TO-BIOMASS CONVERSION METHOD (CRM)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    developed from published equations. These 35 equations, which predict aboveground biomass of individual volume estimates to biomass using constant specific gravity values and auxiliary information for branches sector (Heath et al. 2011) of the Inventory of U.S. Greenhouse Gas Emissions and Sinks (EPA 2012). A meta

  19. Wightman function and the Casimir effect for a Robin sphere in a constant curvature space

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Bellucci; A. A. Saharian; N. A. Saharyan

    2014-07-03T23:59:59.000Z

    We evaluate the Wightman function, the mean field squared and the vacuum expectation value (VEV) of the energy-momentum tensor for a scalar field with Robin boundary condition on a spherical shell in the background of a constant negative curvature space. For the coefficient in the boundary condition there is a critical value above which the scalar vacuum becomes unstable. In both interior and exterior regions, the VEVs are decomposed into the boundary-free and sphere-induced contributions. For the latter, rapidly convergent integral representations are provided. In the region inside the sphere, the eigenvalues are expressed in terms of the zeros of the combination of the associated Legendre function and its derivative and the decomposition is achieved by making use of the Abel-Plana type summation formula for the series over these zeros. The sphere-induced contribution to the VEV of the field squared is negative for Dirichlet boundary condition and positive for Neumann one. At distances from the sphere larger than the curvature scale of the background space the suppression of the vacuum fluctuations in the gravitational field corresponding to the negative curvature space is stronger compared with the case of the Minkowskian bulk. In particular, the decay of the VEVs with the distance is exponential for both massive and massless fields. The corresponding results are generalized for spaces with spherical bubbles and for cosmological models with negative curvature spaces.

  20. Your Guide to Diabetes: Type 1 and Type 2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rau, Don C.

    Your Guide to Diabetes: Type 1 and Type 2 National Diabetes Information Clearinghouse #12;#12;Your Guide to Diabetes: Type 1 and Type 2 #12;#12;Contents Learn about Diabetes ............................................................ 1 What is diabetes? .............................................................. 2 What

  1. Fort Stewart integrated resource assessment. Volume 2, Baseline detail

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Keller, J.M.; Sullivan, G.P.; Wahlstrom, R.R.; Larson, L.L.

    1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report documents the assessment of baseline energy use at Fort Stewart, a US Army Forces Command facility located near Savannah, Georgia. This is a companion report to Volume 1, Executive Summary, and Volume 3, Integrated Resource Assessment. The US Army Forces Command (FORSCOM) tasked Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) to identify, evaluate, and assist in acquiring all cost-effective energy projects at Fort Stewart. PNL, in support of the US Department of Energy (DOE) Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP), has designed a model program applicable to the federal sector for this purpose. The model program (1) identifies and evaluates all cost-effective energy projects; (2) develops a schedule at each installation for project acquisition considering project type, size, timing, and capital requirements, as well as energy and dollar savings; and (3) targets 100% of the financing required to implement energy efficiency projects. PNL applied this model program to Fort Stewart. The analysis examines the characteristics of electric, natural gas, oil, propane, and wood chip use for fiscal year (FY) 1990. The results include energy-use intensities for the facilities at Fort Stewart by building type, fuel type, and energy end use. A complete energy consumption reconciliation is presented that accounts for the distribution of all major energy uses and losses among buildings, utilities, and central systems.

  2. Black Hole Enthalpy and an Entropy Inequality for the Thermodynamic Volume

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Cvetic; G. W. Gibbons; D. Kubiznak; C. N. Pope

    2011-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

    In a theory where the cosmological constant $\\Lambda$ or the gauge coupling constant $g$ arises as the vacuum expectation value, its variation should be included in the first law of thermodynamics for black holes. This becomes $dE= TdS + \\Omega_i dJ_i + \\Phi_\\alpha d Q_\\alpha + \\Theta d \\Lambda$, where $E$ is now the enthalpy of the spacetime, and $\\Theta$, the thermodynamic conjugate of $\\Lambda$, is proportional to an effective volume $V = -\\frac{16 \\pi \\Theta}{D-2}$ "inside the event horizon." Here we calculate $\\Theta$ and $V$ for a wide variety of $D$-dimensional charged rotating asymptotically AdS black hole spacetimes, using the first law or the Smarr relation. We compare our expressions with those obtained by implementing a suggestion of Kastor, Ray and Traschen, involving Komar integrals and Killing potentials, which we construct from conformal Killing-Yano tensors. We conjecture that the volume $V$ and the horizon area $A$ satisfy the inequality $R\\equiv ((D-1)V/{\\cal A}_{D-2})^{1/(D-1)}\\, ({\\cal A}_{D-2}/A)^{1/(D-2)}\\ge1$, where ${\\cal A}_{D-2}$ is the volume of the unit $(D-2)$-sphere, and we show that this is obeyed for a wide variety of black holes, and saturated for Schwarzschild-AdS. Intriguingly, this inequality is the "inverse" of the isoperimetric inequality for a volume $V$ in Euclidean $(D-1)$ space bounded by a surface of area $A$, for which $R\\le 1$. Our conjectured {\\it Reverse Isoperimetric Inequality} can be interpreted as the statement that the entropy inside a horizon of a given "volume" $V$ is maximised for Schwarzschild-AdS. The thermodynamic definition of $V$ requires a cosmological constant (or gauge coupling constant). However, except in 7 dimensions, a smooth limit exists where $\\Lambda$ or $g$ goes to zero, providing a definition of $V$ even for asymptotically-flat black holes.

  3. Precursor systems analyses of automated highway systems: Commercial vehicle and transit ahs analysis. Volume 6. Final report, September 1993-February 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bottiger, F.; Chemnitz, H.D.; Doorman, J.; Franke, U.; Zimmerman, T.

    1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document is the final report of the Automated Highway System (AHS). The activities of Commercial Vehicle and Transit AHS Analysis are reported on in this document. This document type is resource materials. This volume is the six in a series. There are nine other volumes in the series.

  4. DTERMINATION DES CONSTANTES SCALAIRES DE L'TAT DE BASE DE SF6

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    L-373 DÉTERMINATION DES CONSTANTES SCALAIRES DE L'ÉTAT DE BASE DE SF6 H. BERGER, A. ABOUMAJD et R'analyse de la bande Raman 03BD2 de SF6, les constantes scalaires de l'état de base ont pu être déterminéesBD2 Raman band the molecular constants of the ground state of SF6 have been determined : B0 = 0

  5. Does the measured value of the Planck constant depend on the energy of measurements?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massa, Enrico; Jentschel, Michael

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The measurement of the Avogadro constant opened the way to a comparison of the watt-balance measurements of the Planck constant with the values calculated from the quotients of the Planck constant and the mass of a particle or an atom. Since the energy scales of these measurements span nine energy decades, these data provide insight into the consistency of our understanding of physics.

  6. Volumes

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    W 872.9 1,737.8 282.7 2,893.4 W W 132.1 117.6 - 249.7 See footnotes at end of table. 220 Energy Information AdministrationPetroleum Marketing Annual 2002 Table 43. Refiner Motor...

  7. Volumes

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    W NA W 1,666.1 W 2,880.1 NA W 134.2 125.5 - 259.7 See footnotes at end of table. 220 Energy Information AdministrationPetroleum Marketing Annual 2001 Table 43. Refiner Motor...

  8. Volumes

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    8,415.8 39,569.3 40,215.9 122,708.5 26,876.5 189,800.8 10,466.7 10,604.8 10,129.5 14,302.8 - 24,432.4 February ... 40,637.5 41,953.1 43,328.9 133,687.6...

  9. Volumes

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    9,369.5 40,816.0 42,057.4 126,970.8 38,559.5 207,587.7 9,892.3 10,063.7 W 15,155.9 W 25,989.9 February ... 41,671.7 43,092.9 43,590.9 131,633.0 37,204.6...

  10. VOLUME

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of the particle with external electromagnetic fields (i.e., wiggler, undulator) or media (i.e., transition radiation, Cerenkov, Smith-Purcell, etc.). The Fourier component,...

  11. Volumes

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office ofthroughYear JanYearFuel Consumption0 0 0 1996-2013 Lease1,706.6

  12. Volumes

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40 Buildingto17 34 44Year JanDecade Year-0 Year-11,113,016 1,124,7170 09,369.5

  13. Volumes

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40 Buildingto17 34 44Year JanDecade Year-0 Year-11,113,016 1,124,7170

  14. Volumes

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40 Buildingto17 34 44Year JanDecade Year-0 Year-11,113,016 1,124,717041,706.6

  15. VOLUME

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over OurThe Iron SpinPrincetonUsing Maps to Predict4 VARIATIONS IN7VOGTLE VOGTLE VOGTLE18

  16. VOLUME

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over OurThe Iron SpinPrincetonUsing Maps to Predict4 VARIATIONS IN7VOGTLE VOGTLE

  17. VOLUME

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over OurThe Iron SpinPrincetonUsing Maps to Predict4 VARIATIONS IN7VOGTLE VOGTLE0, NUMBER

  18. VOLUME

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over OurThe Iron SpinPrincetonUsing Maps to Predict4 VARIATIONS IN7VOGTLE VOGTLE0,

  19. VOLUME

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over OurThe Iron SpinPrincetonUsing Maps to Predict4 VARIATIONS IN7VOGTLE VOGTLE0,3 P H Y

  20. VOLUME

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over OurThe Iron SpinPrincetonUsing Maps to Predict4 VARIATIONS IN7VOGTLE VOGTLE0,3 P H

  1. VOLUME

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over OurThe Iron SpinPrincetonUsing Maps to Predict4 VARIATIONS IN7VOGTLE VOGTLE0,3 P H0

  2. VOLUME

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over OurThe Iron SpinPrincetonUsing Maps to Predict4 VARIATIONS IN7VOGTLE VOGTLE0,3 P

  3. VOLUME

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over OurThe Iron SpinPrincetonUsing Maps to Predict4 VARIATIONS IN7VOGTLE VOGTLE0,3

  4. VOLUME

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over OurThe Iron SpinPrincetonUsing Maps to Predict4 VARIATIONS IN7VOGTLE VOGTLE0,318 P H

  5. Programmatic methods for addressing contaminated volume uncertainties.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DURHAM, L.A.; JOHNSON, R.L.; RIEMAN, C.R.; SPECTOR, H.L.; Environmental Science Division; U.S. ARMY CORPS OF ENGINEERS BUFFALO DISTRICT

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Accurate estimates of the volumes of contaminated soils or sediments are critical to effective program planning and to successfully designing and implementing remedial actions. Unfortunately, data available to support the preremedial design are often sparse and insufficient for accurately estimating contaminated soil volumes, resulting in significant uncertainty associated with these volume estimates. The uncertainty in the soil volume estimates significantly contributes to the uncertainty in the overall project cost estimates, especially since excavation and off-site disposal are the primary cost items in soil remedial action projects. The Army Corps of Engineers Buffalo District's experience has been that historical contaminated soil volume estimates developed under the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP) often underestimated the actual volume of subsurface contaminated soils requiring excavation during the course of a remedial activity. In response, the Buffalo District has adopted a variety of programmatic methods for addressing contaminated volume uncertainties. These include developing final status survey protocols prior to remedial design, explicitly estimating the uncertainty associated with volume estimates, investing in predesign data collection to reduce volume uncertainties, and incorporating dynamic work strategies and real-time analytics in predesign characterization and remediation activities. This paper describes some of these experiences in greater detail, drawing from the knowledge gained at Ashland1, Ashland2, Linde, and Rattlesnake Creek. In the case of Rattlesnake Creek, these approaches provided the Buffalo District with an accurate predesign contaminated volume estimate and resulted in one of the first successful FUSRAP fixed-price remediation contracts for the Buffalo District.

  6. Elastic Constants of Ni-Mn-Ga Magnetic Shape Memory Alloys

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stipcich, M. [Universitat de Barcelona; Manosa, L. [Universitat de Barcelona; Planes, A. [Universitat de Barcelona; Morin, M. [INSA de Lyon; Zarestky, Jerel L [ORNL; Lograsso, Tom [Ames Laboratory; Stassis, C. [Ames Laboratory

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We have measured the adiabatic second order elastic constants of two Ni-Mn-Ga magnetic shape memory crystals with different martensitic transition temperatures, using ultrasonic methods. The temperature dependence of the elastic constants has been followed across the ferromagnetic transition and down to the martensitic transition temperature. Within experimental errors no noticeable change in any of the elastic constants has been observed at the Curie point. The temperature dependence of the shear elastic constant C' has been found to be very different for the two alloys. Such a different behavior is in agreement with recent theoretical predictions for systems undergoing multi-stage structural transitions.

  7. On the Running of the Cosmological Constant in Quantum General Relativity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. F. L. Ward

    2009-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

    We present arguments that show what the running of the cosmological constant means when quantum general relativity is formulated following the prescription developed by Feynman.

  8. Cosmological Constant as Vacuum Energy Density of Quantum Field Theories on Noncommutative Spacetime

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xiao-Jun Wang

    2004-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We propose a new approach to understand hierarchy problem for cosmological constant in terms of considering noncommutative nature of space-time. We calculate that vacuum energy density of the noncommutative quantum field theories in nontrivial background, which admits a smaller cosmological constant by introducing an higher noncommutative scale $\\mu_{NC}\\sim M_p$. The result $\\rho_\\Lambda\\sim 10^{-6}\\Lambda_{SUSY}^8M_p^4/\\mu_{NC}^8$ yields cosmological constant at the order of current observed value for supersymmetry breaking scale at 10TeV. It is the same as Banks' phenomenological formula for cosmological constant.

  9. Volume reduction and vitrification of nuclear waste with thermal plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hoffelner, W. [Moser-Glaser and Co., Muttenz (Switzerland); Chrubasik, A. [NUKEM GmbH, Alzenau (Germany); Eschenbach, R.C. [RETECH Inc., Ukiah, CA (United States)

    1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    A process for efficient and safe destruction of organics and vitrification of low/medium level radioactive waste is presented. A transferred arc plasma torch is employed as the heat source. The process handles several types of feed: combustibles, inorganic materials and metals. A non-leaching glassy solid which can be stored without further treatment is obtained as the final product. High volume-reduction factors can be achieved with this process. A wet gas cleaning system leads to extremely clean off-gas.

  10. Table 7. U.S. Refiner Motor Gasoline Volumes by Grade and Sales...

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    35.2 213.6 9.5 9.8 12.9 16.6 NA 29.5 See footnotes at end of table. 7. U.S. Refiner Motor Gasoline Volumes by Grade and Sales Type 14 Energy Information Administration ...

  11. Table 11. U.S. Refiner Oxygenated Motor Gasoline Volumes by...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    - 4.9 0.4 0.4 0.3 0.4 - 0.7 See footnotes at end of table. 11. U.S. Refiner Oxygenated Motor Gasoline Volumes by Grade and Sales Type 22 Energy Information Administration ...

  12. Table 7. U.S. Refiner Motor Gasoline Volumes by Grade and Sales...

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    33.9 215.8 9.7 10.0 12.1 16.3 0.0 28.4 See footnotes at end of table. 7. U.S. Refiner Motor Gasoline Volumes by Grade and Sales Type 14 Energy Information Administration ...

  13. Table 11. U.S. Refiner Oxygenated Motor Gasoline Volumes by...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    W 5.6 0.5 0.5 0.5 0.4 - 0.9 See footnotes at end of table. 11. U.S. Refiner Oxygenated Motor Gasoline Volumes by Grade and Sales Type 22 Energy Information Administration ...

  14. National Low-Level Waste Management Program radionuclide report series. Volume 13, Curium-242

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adams, J.P.

    1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report, Volume 13 of the National Low-Level Waste Management Program Radionuclide Report Series, discusses the radiological and chemical characteristics of curium-242 ({sup 242}Cm). This report also includes discussions about waste types and forms in which {sup 242}Cm can be found and {sup 242}Cm behavior in the environment and in the human body.

  15. Solutions of TEAM problems 13 and 20 using a volume integral formulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kettunen, L.; Forsman, K. [Tampere Univ. of Technology (Finland); Levine, D.; Gropp, W. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)

    1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Solutions for TEAM benchmark problems 13 and 20, obtained with an h-type volume integral formulation, are presented. Results computed with an increasing number of unknowns are shown in order to study the convergence of the numerical calculations. Some theoretical questions and aspects of parallelism are also highlighted.

  16. Fejer-type inequalities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mitroi, F C

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The aim of this paper is to present some new Fejer-type results for convex functions. Improvements of Young's inequality (the arithmetic-geometric mean inequality) and other applications to special means are pointed as well.

  17. Document Type: Subject Terms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Major, Arkady

    Title: Authors: Source: Document Type: Subject Terms: Abstract: Full Text Word Count: ISSN at creating team results. In fact, it's priceless. Managers in Western corporations have received a lifetime

  18. Greater-than-Class C low-level waste characterization. Appendix I: Impact of concentration averaging low-level radioactive waste volume projections

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tuite, P.; Tuite, K.; O`Kelley, M.; Ely, P.

    1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This study provides a quantitative framework for bounding unpackaged greater-than-Class C low-level radioactive waste types as a function of concentration averaging. The study defines the three concentration averaging scenarios that lead to base, high, and low volumetric projections; identifies those waste types that could be greater-than-Class C under the high volume, or worst case, concentration averaging scenario; and quantifies the impact of these scenarios on identified waste types relative to the base case scenario. The base volume scenario was assumed to reflect current requirements at the disposal sites as well as the regulatory views. The high volume scenario was assumed to reflect the most conservative criteria as incorporated in some compact host state requirements. The low volume scenario was assumed to reflect the 10 CFR Part 61 criteria as applicable to both shallow land burial facilities and to practices that could be employed to reduce the generation of Class C waste types.

  19. Scuttlebutt Volume 2, No. 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    , of the USS Genesis. To CPT Kieran Bock and his crew, the officers and crew of the Southern Cross send their very best wishes and congratulations, and we wish them fair seas and LOTS of stars to follow. The ScuttleButt Volume 2, Issue 1 5 USS Atlantis... will be forwarded separately to each individual member. Please forward any enquiries to the Intel Officer - ENS Ashley Walker on alwalk78@optusnet.com.au. ENS Ashley Walker Operations Intelligence Officer Welcoming New Crewmembers Savannah Clark Daniel...

  20. Scuttlebutt Volume 2, No. 4

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ?s Sunshine Award & Crewmember of the Year Award. Polls close on Friday, July 18. Crewmembers may vote in the official site, http://groups.yahoo.com/group/uss-southerncrossawards/. The results Will be announced at the Summit. Summit Event Venues... of our good friends in Adelaide, reacquaint myself with my ?old? mates and make friends with new ones. See you in SA. COL Bruce O?Brien Commanding Officer Newsletter Publisher http://www.uss-southerncross.com/ July / August 2008 Volume 2, Issue 4...

  1. Environmental Report 1995. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harrach, R.J.; Failor, R.A.; Gallegos, G.M. [and others

    1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report contains the results of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory`s (LLNL) environmental monitoring and compliance effort and an assessment of the impact of LLNL operations on the environment and the public. This first volume describes LLNL`s environmental impact and compliance activities and features descriptive and explanatory text, summary data tables, and plots showing data trends. The summary data include measures of the center of data, their spread or variability, and their extreme values. Chapters on monitoring air, sewage, surface water, ground water, soil and sediment, vegetation and foodstuff, and environmental radiation are present.

  2. Froissart Bound on Inelastic Cross Section Without Unknown Constants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martin, André

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Assuming that axiomatic local field theory results hold for hadron scattering, Andr\\'e Martin and S. M. Roy recently obtained absolute bounds on the D-wave below threshold for pion-pion scattering and thereby determined the scale of the logarithm in the Froissart bound on total cross sections in terms of pion mass only. Previously, Martin proved a rigorous upper bound on the inelastic cross-section $\\sigma_{inel}$ which is one-fourth of the corresponding upper bound on $\\sigma_{tot}$, and Wu, Martin,Roy and Singh improved the bound by adding the constraint of a given $\\sigma_{tot}$. Here we use unitarity and analyticity to determine, without any high energy approximation, upper bounds on energy averaged inelastic cross sections in terms of low energy data in the crossed channel. These are Froissart-type bounds without any unknown coefficient or unknown scale factors and can be tested experimentally. Alternatively, their asymptotic forms,together with the Martin-Roy absolute bounds on pion-pion D-waves below t...

  3. Verification and validation guidelines for high integrity systems. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hecht, H.; Hecht, M.; Dinsmore, G.; Hecht, S.; Tang, D. [SoHaR, Inc., Beverly Hills, CA (United States)

    1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    High integrity systems include all protective (safety and mitigation) systems for nuclear power plants, and also systems for which comparable reliability requirements exist in other fields, such as in the process industries, in air traffic control, and in patient monitoring and other medical systems. Verification aims at determining that each stage in the software development completely and correctly implements requirements that were established in a preceding phase, while validation determines that the overall performance of a computer system completely and correctly meets system requirements. Volume I of the report reviews existing classifications for high integrity systems and for the types of errors that may be encountered, and makes recommendations for verification and validation procedures, based on assumptions about the environment in which these procedures will be conducted. The final chapter of Volume I deals with a framework for standards in this field. Volume II contains appendices dealing with specific methodologies for system classification, for dependability evaluation, and for two software tools that can automate otherwise very labor intensive verification and validation activities.

  4. A distributed computing environment for volume visualization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barua, Sandip Pannalal

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    in computer-aided instruction, and can be expected to be widely used in medical classrooms in the near future. Figure Remot W kststloos High Bandwidth I Li& I I I I I High Performance Computer Fig. 2. A real-time multi-user environment 2 could... Page Volume Rendering Time 48 Normalized and Processor Performance Compensated Volume Ren- dering Time 49 III Computation Overhead - Ray Trace Phase 51 IV Computation Overhead - Volume Build Phase . 51 CHAPTER I INTRODUCTION I. A Scientific...

  5. Petroleum supply annual 1995: Volume 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The {ital Petroleum Supply Annual} contains information on supply and disposition of crude oil and petroleum products. It reflects data collected from the petroleum industry during 1995 through monthly surveys, and it is divided into 2 volumes. This volume contains three sections: summary statistics, detailed statistics, and selected refinery statistics, each with final annual data. (The other volume contains final statistics for each month and replaces data previously published in the {ital Petroleum Supply Monthly}).

  6. A distributed computing environment for volume visualization 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barua, Sandip Pannalal

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    in computer-aided instruction, and can be expected to be widely used in medical classrooms in the near future. Figure Remot W kststloos High Bandwidth I Li& I I I I I High Performance Computer Fig. 2. A real-time multi-user environment 2 could... Page Volume Rendering Time 48 Normalized and Processor Performance Compensated Volume Ren- dering Time 49 III Computation Overhead - Ray Trace Phase 51 IV Computation Overhead - Volume Build Phase . 51 CHAPTER I INTRODUCTION I. A Scientific...

  7. Behavior of type 304 and type 316 austenitic stainless in 55% lithium bromide heavy brine environments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Itzhak, D.; Elias, O. (Ben-Gurion Univ., Beer-Sheva (Israel). Dept. of Materials Engineering)

    1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Cylindrical tensile specimens of AISI type 304 (UNS S30400) and type 316 (UNS S31600) stainless steels (SS) were tested under constant-load conditions in 55% lithium bromide (LiBr) heavy brines at temperatures of 120 C and 140 C. Elongation and open-circuit potential (OCP) were recorded during the tensile test. Potentiodynamic polarization measurements were conducted, and the failed surface fractures were examined by scanning electron microscopy. The tested SS were subjected to stress corrosion under the test environments. Sensitivity was affected strongly by pH values. In LiBr brine of pH = 11.6, the passivation processes were more effective than in brine of pH = 6 [approximately] 8. Because of effective passivation behavior in brine of pH = 11.6, lower values of [delta]l[sub 0] were measured, indicating lower dislocation relaxation processes and high resistance to stress corrosion cracking.

  8. Photoexcitation of a Volume Plasmon in Buckyballs

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Photoexcitation of a Volume Plasmon in Buckyballs Print For molecules made from a single element, buckyballs (carbon-60) are very large. They mark the transition from atoms to...

  9. Clay Mathematics Proceedings Volume 12, 2009

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sart, Remi

    Clay Mathematics Proceedings Volume 12, 2009 Renormalization in connected graded Hopf cO2008 Clay Mathemat* *ics Institute 1 #12

  10. Petroleum supply annual, 1997. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Petroleum Supply Annual (PSA) contains information on the supply and disposition of crude oil and petroleum products. The publication reflects data that were collected from the petroleum industry during 1997 through annual and monthly surveys. The PSA is divided into two volumes. This first volume contains three sections: Summary Statistics, Detailed Statistics, and Refinery Statistics; each with final annual data. The second volume contains final statistics for each month of 1997, and replaces data previously published in the Petroleum Supply Monthly (PSM). The tables in Volumes 1 and 2 are similarly numbered to facilitate comparison between them. 16 figs., 48 tabs.

  11. Petroleum supply annual 1998: Volume 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1999-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The ``Petroleum Supply Annual`` (PSA) contains information on the supply and disposition of crude oil and petroleum products. The publication reflects data that were collected from the petroleum industry during 1998 through annual and monthly surveys. The PSA is divided into two volumes. This first volume contains three sections: Summary Statistics, Detailed Statistics, and Refinery Statistics; each with final annual data. The second volume contains final statistics for each month of 1998, and replaces data previously published in the PSA. The tables in Volumes 1 and 2 are similarly numbered to facilitate comparison between them. 16 figs., 59 tabs.

  12. Water Quality Program, Volume 1 (Alabama)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This volume of the water quality program mainly deals with the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System. National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System" or "(NPDES)" means the national...

  13. Volume, Number of Shipments Surpass Goals

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Laboratory," said Pete Maggiore, assistant manager for environmental operations at the NNSA Los Alamos Site Office. "We exceeded our goals and are on track to double both volume...

  14. Water Quality Program, Volume 2 (Alabama)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This volume of the water quality program mainly deals with Technical Standards, Corrective Action Requirements and Financial Responsibility for Owners and Operators of Underground Storage Tanks....

  15. ARE Update Volume 13, Number 4

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Use of U.S. Croplands for Biofuels In- creases Greenhousea mini- mum volume of biofuels and requires a nationalper unit of various biofuels. For example, corn ethanol

  16. Volume 7, No.4Volume 7, No.4 2012 Year in Review

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    Volume 7, No.4Volume 7, No.4 2012 Year in Review Special Focus: Taking Care of our Wounded Warriors Focus: Year in Review onthecover The Southwestern Division takes a look back at the year 2012 through

  17. ANALYSIS OF ANISOTROPY IN ELASTIC CONSTANTS OF SiCp/2124 Al METAL MATRIX COMPOSITES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hong, Soon Hyung

    ANALYSIS OF ANISOTROPY IN ELASTIC CONSTANTS OF SiCp/2124 Al METAL MATRIX COMPOSITES H.K. Jung* , Y; Metal matrix composite; Elastic constants; Aspect ratio; Anisotropy 1. Introduction Metal matrix composites (MMCs) are becoming attractive materials for advanced aerospace structures because

  18. THE PURIFICATION OF SF6 IN A CONSTANT TEMPERATURE ADSORPTION PROCESS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    1423 THE PURIFICATION OF SF6 IN A CONSTANT TEMPERATURE ADSORPTION PROCESS C. BRASSARD Laboratoire propagation du SF6 dû à son adsorption dans une colonne de charbon actif à une tempéra- ture constante de 2014 20 °C. Abstract. 2014 The Dynamitron and the Tandem SF6 gas, initially contained 11 % and 35 % non

  19. A fast multipole boundary element method for modeling 2-D multiple crack problems with constant elements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Yijun

    A fast multipole boundary element method for modeling 2-D multiple crack problems with constant 3 April 2014 Accepted 20 May 2014 Keywords: Fast multipole BEM 2-D multi-crack problems Constant elements Crack opening displacements Stress intensity factors a b s t r a c t A fast multipole boundary

  20. Numerical Analysis of Non-constant Discounting with an Application to Renewable Resource Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Karp, Larry S.

    Numerical Analysis of Non-constant Discounting with an Application to Renewable Resource Management illustrate the approach by studying welfare and observational equivalence for a particular renewable resource man- agement problem. Keywords: Non-constant discounting, numerical methods, non-renewable resources

  1. Expression des constantes de distorsion centrifuge des hexafluorures en fonction des frquences harmoniques.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    'application est faite aux molécules SF6 et UF6. 4 constantes cubiques de SF6 ont été déterminées à partir des for the centrifugal distortion constants as a function of harmonic frequencies ; application is made to SF6 and UF6. 4

  2. Some Optimizations of Hardware Multiplication by Constant Matrices Nicolas Boullis, Arnaud Tisserand

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Davis, University of

    are achieved. 1 Introduction Important optimizations of the speed, area and power consumption of circuits can of this operation frequency. The problem of the optimization of multiplication by constant has been studiedSome Optimizations of Hardware Multiplication by Constant Matrices Nicolas Boullis, Arnaud

  3. A direct ab inifio dynamics approach for calculating thermal rate constants using variational transition state theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Truong, Thanh N.

    of a focusing technique to minimize the number of electronic structure calculations, while still preservingA direct ab inifio dynamics approach for calculating thermal rate constants using variational dynamics, " for calculations of thermal rate constants and related properties from first principles

  4. Direct Test of the Time-Independence of Fundamental Nuclear Constants Using the Oklo

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shlyakhter, Ilya

    Direct Test of the Time-Independence of Fundamental Nuclear Constants Using the Oklo Natural Reactor #3; Alexander I. Shlyakhter November 18, 1982 1 Introduction The following eight quantities enter the important natural constants of cosmology and atomic theory are connected by simple mathematical relations

  5. Universal Gravitational Constant EX-9908 Page 1 of 13 Re-Written by Geoffrey R. Clarion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dai, Pengcheng

    Newton was able to deduce his law of universal gravitation. Newton's law of universal gravitation: 2 21 rUniversal Gravitational Constant EX-9908 Page 1 of 13 Re-Written by Geoffrey R. Clarion Universal Gravitational Constant EQUIPMENT 1 Gravitational Torsion Balance AP-8215 1 X-Y Adjustable Diode Laser OS-8526A 1

  6. The Asymptotic Minimax Constant for Sup-Norm Loss in Nonparametric Density Estimation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nussbaum, Michael

    The Asymptotic Minimax Constant for Sup-Norm Loss in Nonparametric Density Estimation ALEXANDER, uniform nor- m risk, white noise RUNNING TITLE: Asymptotic minimax density estimation To whom) an asymptotically minimax exact constant has been found for loss in the uniform norm, for Gaussian nonparametric

  7. THE LIND-LEHMER CONSTANT FOR Zn DILUM DESILVA AND CHRISTOPHER PINNER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pinner, Christopher

    THE LIND-LEHMER CONSTANT FOR Zn p DILUM DESILVA AND CHRISTOPHER PINNER Abstract. We determine the Lind Lehmer constant for groups of the form Zn p . 1. Introduction Let G be a compact abelian group of integral combinations of characters, Lind [6] defines a logarithmic Mahler measure of f over G m(f) = m

  8. DETERMINING OPTICAL CONSTANTS OF URANIUM NITRIDE THIN FILMS IN THE EXTREME

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hart, Gus

    DETERMINING OPTICAL CONSTANTS OF URANIUM NITRIDE THIN FILMS IN THE EXTREME ULTRAVIOLET (1.6-35 NM deposition and characterization of reactively-sputtered uranium nitride thin films. I also report optical.1 Application 1 1.2 Optical Constants 2 1.3 Project Focus 7 2 Uranium Nitride Thin Films 8 2.1 Sputtering 8 2

  9. Evolution of the coupling constant in SU(2) lattice gauge theory with two adjoint fermions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ari J. Hietanen; Kari Rummukainen; Kimmo Tuominen

    2009-11-24T23:59:59.000Z

    We measure the evolution of the coupling constant using the Schroedinger functional method in the lattice formulation of SU(2) gauge theory with two massless Dirac fermions in the adjoint representation. We observe strong evidence for an infrared fixed point, where the theory becomes conformal. We measure the continuum beta-function and the coupling constant as a function of the energy scale.

  10. Video Description Length Guided Constant Quality Video Coding with Bitrate Constraint

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tomkins, Andrew

    Video Description Length Guided Constant Quality Video Coding with Bitrate Constraint Lei Yang propose a new video encoding strategy -- Video description length guided Constant Quality video coding with Bitrate Constraint (V-CQBC), for large scale video transcoding systems of video charing websites

  11. Reheating-volume measure for random-walk inflation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Winitzki, Sergei [Department of Physics, Ludwig-Maximilians University, Munich (Germany); Yukawa Institute of Theoretical Physics, Kyoto University, Kyoto (Japan)

    2008-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The recently proposed 'reheating-volume' (RV) measure promises to solve the long-standing problem of extracting probabilistic predictions from cosmological multiverse scenarios involving eternal inflation. I give a detailed description of the new measure and its applications to generic models of eternal inflation of random-walk type. For those models I derive a general formula for RV-regulated probability distributions that is suitable for numerical computations. I show that the results of the RV cutoff in random-walk type models are always gauge invariant and independent of the initial conditions at the beginning of inflation. In a toy model where equal-time cutoffs lead to the 'youngness paradox', the RV cutoff yields unbiased results that are distinct from previously proposed measures.

  12. Controllable giant dielectric constant in AlO{sub x}/TiO{sub y} nanolaminates.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, W.; Chen, Z.; Premnath, R. N.; Kabius, B.; Auciello, O. (Center for Nanoscale Materials); ( MSD); (Univ. of Puerto Rico)

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Dielectric materials exhibiting high dielectric constants play critical roles in a wide range of applications from microchip energy storage embedded capacitors for implantable biomedical devices to energy storage capacitors for a new generation of renewable energy generation/storage systems. Instead of searching for new materials, we demonstrate that giant dielectric constants can be achieved by integrating two simple oxides with low dielectric constants into nanolaminate structures. In addition, the obtained dielectric constant values are highly tunable by manipulating the sub-layer thicknesses of the component oxides to control the number of interfaces and oxygen redistribution. The work reported here opens a new pathway for the design and development of high dielectric constant materials based on the nanolaminate concept.

  13. Bounds and self-consistent estimates for elastic constants of granular polycrystals composed of orthorhombics or crystal with higher symmetries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berryman, J. G.

    2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Methods for computing Hashin-Shtrikman bounds and related self-consistent estimates of elastic constants for polycrystals composed of crystals having orthorhombic symmetry have been known for about three decades. However, these methods are underutilized, perhaps because of some perceived difficulties with implementing the necessary computational procedures. Several simplifications of these techniques are introduced, thereby reducing the overall computational burden, as well as the complications inherent in mapping out the Hashin-Shtrikman bounding curves. The self-consistent estimates of the effective elastic constants are very robust, involving a quickly converging iteration procedure. Once these self-consistent values are known, they may then be used to speed up the computations of the Hashin-Shtrikman bounds themselves. It is shown furthermore that the resulting orthorhombic polycrystal code can be used as well to compute both bounds and self-consistent estimates for polycrystals of higher-symmetry tetragonal, hexagonal, and cubic (but not trigonal) materials. The self-consistent results found this way are shown to be the same as those obtained using the earlier methods, specifically those methods designed specially for each individual symmetry type. But the Hashin-Shtrikman bounds found using the orthorhombic code are either the same or (more typically) tighter than those found previously for these special cases (i.e., tetragonal, hexagonal, and cubic). The improvement in the Hashin-Shtrikman bounds is presumably due to the additional degrees of freedom introduced into the available search space.

  14. Cosmic constraint on unified model of dark sectors in flat and non-flat varying gravitational constant theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lu, Jianbo; Wu, Yabo; Xu, Lixin

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Observations indicate that most universal matter are invisible and gravitational constant $G(t)$ maybe depends on the time. The theory of variation of $G$ (VG) is explored in this paper, with naturally resulting to the invisible components in universe. We utilize the observational data: lookback time data, model-independent gamma ray bursts data, growth function of matter linear perturbations, type Ia supernovae data with systematic errors, cosmic microwave background, and baryon acoustic oscillation data from the radial scale measurement and the peak-positions measurement, to restrict the unified model (UM) of dark components in VG theory. Using the best-fit values of parameters with the covariance matrix, constraints on the variation of $G$ are $(\\frac{G}{G_{0}})_{z=3.5}\\simeq 1.0003^{+0.0014}_{-0.0016}$ and $(\\frac{\\dot{G}}{G})_{today}\\simeq 0.7977^{+2.3566}_{-2.3566}\\times 10^{-13} yr^{-1}$ in a flat geometry, the small uncertainties around constants. Limit on equation of state of dark matter is $w_{0dm}=...

  15. Dynamics of electrical double layer formation in room-temperature ionic liquids under constant-current charging conditions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jiang, Xikai [ORNL] [ORNL; Huang, Jingsong [ORNL] [ORNL; Zhao, Hui [University of Nevada, Las Vegas] [University of Nevada, Las Vegas; Sumpter, Bobby G [ORNL] [ORNL; Qiao, Rui [Clemson University] [Clemson University

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We report detailed simulation results on the formation dynamics of an electrical double layer (EDL) inside an electrochemical cell featuring room-temperature ionic liquids (RTILs) enclosed between two planar electrodes. Under relatively small charging currents, the evolution of cell potential during charging can be suitably predicted by the Landau-Ginzburg-type continuum model proposed recently (M. Z. Bazant, B. D. Storey, and A. A. Kornyshev, Phys. Rev. Lett., 106, 046102, 2011). Under very large charging currents, the cell potential shows pronounced oscillation during the initial stage of charging, a feature not captured by the continuum model. Such oscillation originates from the sequential growth of the ionic space charge layers near the electrode surface, allowing the evolution of EDLs in RTILs with time, an atomistic process difficult to visualize experimentally, to be studied by analyzing the cell potential under constant current charging conditions. While the continuum model cannot predict the potential oscillation under such far-from-equilibrium charging conditions, it can nevertheless qualitatively capture the growth of cell potential during the later stage of charging. Improving the continuum model by introducing frequency-dependent dielectric constant and density-dependent ion diffusion coefficients may help to further extend the applicability of the model. Keywords: ionic

  16. Fort Drum integrated resource assessment. Volume 2, Baseline detail

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dixon, D.R.; Armstrong, P.R.; Brodrick, J.R.; Daellenbach, K.K.; Di Massa, F.V.; Keller, J.M.; Richman, E.E.; Sullivan, G.P.; Wahlstrom, R.R.

    1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The US Army Forces Command (FORSCOM) has tasked the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) as the lead laboratory supporting the US Department of Energy (DOE) Federal Energy Management Program`s mission to identify, evaluate, and assist in acquiring all cost-effective energy projects at Fort Drum. This is a model program PNL is designing for federal customers served by the Niagara Mohawk Power Company. It will identify and evaluate all electric and fossil fuel cost-effective energy projects; develop a schedule at each installation for project acquisition considering project type, size, timing, and capital requirements, as well as energy and dollar savings; and secure 100% of the financing required to implement electric energy efficiency projects from Niagara Mohawk and have Niagara Mohawk procure the necessary contractors to perform detailed audits and install the technologies. This report documents the assessment of baseline energy use at one of Niagara Mohawk`s primary federal facilities, the FORSCOM Fort Drum facility located near Watertown, New York. It is a companion report to Volume 1, the Executive Summary, and Volume 3, the Resource Assessment. This analysis examines the characteristics of electric, gas, oil, propane, coal, and purchased thermal capacity use for fiscal year (FY) 1990. It records energy-use intensities for the facilities at Fort Drum by building type and energy end use. It also breaks down building energy consumption by fuel type, energy end use, and building type. A complete energy consumption reconciliation is presented that includes the accounting of all energy use among buildings, utilities, central systems, and applicable losses.

  17. A coarse entropy-rigidity theorem and discrete length-volume inequalities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kinneberg, Kyle Edward

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A discrete length-volume inequality . . . . . . . .v 3 Length-volume inequalities revisitedlength-volume inequality for cubes . . . . . . . . . . . .

  18. Direct Rendering of Deformable Volume Data Shiaofen Fang

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fang, Shiaofen

    Direct Rendering of Deformable Volume Data Shiaofen Fang Department of Computer and Information In this paper, we present a new deformable volume rendering algorithm. The volume deformation is modeled to directly render the deformed volume without going through the expensive volume construction process

  19. Information architecture. Volume 3: Guidance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this document, as presented in Volume 1, The Foundations, is to assist the Department of Energy (DOE) in developing and promulgating information architecture guidance. This guidance is aimed at increasing the development of information architecture as a Departmentwide management best practice. This document describes departmental information architecture principles and minimum design characteristics for systems and infrastructures within the DOE Information Architecture Conceptual Model, and establishes a Departmentwide standards-based architecture program. The publication of this document fulfills the commitment to address guiding principles, promote standard architectural practices, and provide technical guidance. This document guides the transition from the baseline or defacto Departmental architecture through approved information management program plans and budgets to the future vision architecture. This document also represents another major step toward establishing a well-organized, logical foundation for the DOE information architecture.

  20. Ironmaking conference proceedings. Volume 54

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The technical presentations at this conference displayed a renewed sense of viability of the coke and ironmaking community. In addition, many of the papers show that the environmental aspects of ironmaking are being integrated into day-to-day operations rather than being thought of as separate responsibilities. This volume contains 68 papers divided into the following sections: Blast furnace injection; Blast furnace fundamental studies; Blast furnace general; Blast furnace repairs/rebuilds/modernization; Process control techniques for blast furnaces; Cokemaking general; Cokemaking environmental; Coke--by-products--plant operations; Coal and coke research; Battery operations; Pelletizing; Direct reduction and smelting; and Sintering. Most of the papers have been processed separately for inclusion on the data base.

  1. Dimensional SPC for low-volume production

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chin, Chang-Ho

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . To make up for the weaknesses of SPC in low-volume production, a new method to test data independence, a new plot to describe the similarity between two charts, and two modified graphical tools are proposed. In low-volume production, it is frequently hard...

  2. Environment-Dependent Fundamental Physical Constants in the Theory of General Inconstancy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hidezumi Terazawa

    2014-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

    A theory of special inconstancy, in which some fundamental physical constants such as the fine-structure and gravitational constants may vary, is proposed in pregeometry. In the special theory of inconstancy, the \\alpha-G relation of \\alpha=3\\pi/[16ln(4\\pi/5GM_W^2)] between the varying fine-structure and gravitaional constants (where M_W is the charged weak boson mass) is derived from the hypothesis that both of these constants are related to the same fundamental length scale in nature. Furthermore, it leads to the prediction of dot{{\\alpha}}/\\alpha=(-0.8\\pm2.5)\\times10^{-14}yr^{-1} from the most precise limit of dot{G}/G=(-0.6\\pm2.0)\\times10^{-12}yr^{-1} by Thorsett, which is not only consistent with the recent observation of dot{{\\alpha}}/\\alpha=(0.5\\pm0.5)\\times10^{-14}yr^{-1} by Webb et al. but also feasible for future experimental tests. Also a theory of general inconstancy, in which any fundamental physical constants may vary, is proposed in "more general relativity", by assuming that the space-time is "environment-dependent". In the general theory of inconstancy, the G-\\Lambda\\ relation between the varying gravitational and cosmological constants is derived from the hypothesis that the space-time metric is a function of \\tau, the "environment-coodinate", in addition to x^{\\mu}, the ordinary space-time coodinates. Furthermore, it leads to the prediction of the varying cosmological constant, which is consistent with the present observations. In addition, the latest observation of spatial variation in the fine-structure constant from VLT/UVES of (1.1\\pm 0.2)\\times 10^{-6}GLyr^{-1} by King et al. is suggested to be taken as a clear evidence for environment-dependent fundamental physical constants

  3. Programmatic methods for addressing contaminated volume uncertainties

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rieman, C.R.; Spector, H.L. [U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Buffalo District, Buffalo, NY (United States); Durham, L.A.; Johnson, R.L. [Argonne National Laboratory, Environmental Science Div., IL (United States)

    2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Accurate estimates of the volumes of contaminated soils or sediments are critical to effective program planning and to successfully designing and implementing remedial actions. Unfortunately, data available to support the pre-remedial design are often sparse and insufficient for accurately estimating contaminated soil volumes, resulting in significant uncertainty associated with these volume estimates. The uncertainty in the soil volume estimates significantly contributes to the uncertainty in the overall project cost estimates, especially since excavation and off-site disposal are the primary cost items in soil remedial action projects. The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Buffalo District's experience has been that historical contaminated soil volume estimates developed under the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP) often underestimated the actual volume of subsurface contaminated soils requiring excavation during the course of a remedial activity. In response, the Buffalo District has adopted a variety of programmatic methods for addressing contaminated volume uncertainties. These include developing final status survey protocols prior to remedial design, explicitly estimating the uncertainty associated with volume estimates, investing in pre-design data collection to reduce volume uncertainties, and incorporating dynamic work strategies and real-time analytics in pre-design characterization and remediation activities. This paper describes some of these experiences in greater detail, drawing from the knowledge gained at Ashland 1, Ashland 2, Linde, and Rattlesnake Creek. In the case of Rattlesnake Creek, these approaches provided the Buffalo District with an accurate pre-design contaminated volume estimate and resulted in one of the first successful FUSRAP fixed-price remediation contracts for the Buffalo District. (authors)

  4. Fundamental Kinetics Database Utilizing Shock Tube Measurements (Volumes 1, 2, 3, 4, and Volume 6)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Davidson, D. F.; Hanson, R. K

    The data from shock tube experiments generally takes three forms: ignition delay times, species concentration time-histories and reaction rate measurements. Volume 1 focuses on ignition delay time data measured and published by the Shock Tube Group in the Mechanical Engineering Department of Stanford University. The cut-off date for inclusion into this volume was January 2005. Volume 2 focuses on species concentration time-histories and was cut off December 2005. The two volumes are in PDF format and are accompanied by a zipped file of supporting data. Volume 3 was issued in 2009. Volume 4, Ignition delay times measurements came out in May, 2014, along with Reaction Rates Measurements, Vol 6. Volume 5 is not available at this time.

  5. Decay constants of the pion and its excitations on the lattice.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mastropas, Ekaterina V. [William and Mary College, JLAB; Richards, David G. [JLAB

    2014-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a calculation using lattice QCD of the ratios of decay constants of the excited states of the pion, to that of the pion ground state, at three values of the pion mass between 400 and 700 MeV, using an anisotropic clover fermion action with three flavors of quarks. We find that the decay constant of the first excitation, and more notably of the second, is suppressed with respect to that of the ground-state pion, but that the suppression shows little dependence on the quark mass. The strong suppression of the decay constant of the second excited state is consistent with its interpretation as a predominantly hybrid state.

  6. Wave functions and decay constants of $B$ and $D$ mesons in the relativistic potential model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mao-Zhi Yang

    2012-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

    With the decay constants of $D$ and $D_s$ mesons measured in experiment recently, we revisit the study of the bound states of quark and antiquark in $B$ and $D$ mesons in the relativistic potential model. The relativistic bound state wave equation is solved numerically. The masses, decay constants and wave functions of $B$ and $D$ mesons are obtained. Both the masses and decay constants obtained here can be consistent with the experimental data. The wave functions can be used in the study of $B$ and $D$ meson decays.

  7. Mid-Infrared Plasmonic Platform based on Heavily Doped Epitaxial Ge-on-Si: Retrieving the Optical Constants of Thin Ge Epilayers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baldassarre, Leonetta; Samarelli, Antonio; Gallacher, Kevin; Paul, Douglas J; Frigerio, Jacopo; Isella, Giovanni; Sakat, Emilie; Finazzi, Marco; Biagioni, Paolo; Ortolani, Michele

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The n-type Ge-on-Si epitaxial material platform enables a novel paradigm for plasmonics in the mid-infrared, prompting the future development of lab-on-a-chip and subwavelength vibrational spectroscopic sensors. In order to exploit this material, through proper electrodynamic design, it is mandatory to retrieve the dielectric constants of the thin Ge epilayers with high precision due to the difference from bulk Ge crystals. Here we discuss the procedure we have employed to extract the real and imaginary part of the dielectric constants from normal incidence reflectance measurements, by combining the standard multilayer fitting procedure based on the Drude model with Kramers-Kronig transformations of absolute reflectance data in the zero-transmission range of the thin film.

  8. Dust around Type Ia supernovae

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Lifan

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Dust around Type Ia supernovae Lifan Wang 1,2 LawrenceIa. Subject headings: Supernovae: General, Dust, Extinctionline) bands for Type Ia supernovae. (a), upper panel, shows

  9. ISpace: Interactive Volume Data Classification Techniques Using Independent Component Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ma, Kwan-Liu

    , multivariate data analysis, multimodality data, scientific visualization, seg- mentation, volume rendering 1ISpace: Interactive Volume Data Classification Techniques Using Independent Component Analysis, which uses Independent Component Analysis (ICA) and a multi- dimensional histogram of the volume data

  10. Reheating-volume measure in the string theory landscape

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Winitzki, Sergei [Department of Physics, Ludwig-Maximilians University, Munich (Germany)

    2008-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    I recently proposed the ''reheating-volume'' (RV) prescription as a possible solution to the measure problem in ''multiverse'' cosmology. The goal of this work is to extend the RV measure to scenarios involving bubble nucleation, such as the string theory landscape. In the spirit of the RV prescription, I propose to calculate the distribution of observable quantities in a landscape that is conditioned in probability to nucleate a finite total number of bubbles to the future of an initial bubble. A general formula for the relative number of bubbles of different types can be derived. I show that the RV measure is well defined and independent of the choice of the initial bubble type, as long as that type supports further bubble nucleation. Applying the RV measure to a generic landscape, I find that the abundance of Boltzmann brains is always negligibly small compared with the abundance of ordinary observers in the bubbles of the same type. As an illustration, I present explicit results for a toy landscape containing four vacuum states, and for landscapes with a single high-energy vacuum and a large number of low-energy vacua.

  11. Wolter type i LAMAR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Catura, R.C.; Joki, E.G.

    1981-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Observational objectives for the LAMAR and their influence on the instrument design are discussed. It is concluded that the most important design parameter is the angular resolution of the LAMAR modules since it so strongly influences sensitivity, optical identifications, source confusion, spectral resolution for objective gratings and the ability to resolve small extended sources. A high resolution Wolter Type I LAMAR module is described, its hardware status discussed, and the performance of a LAMAR observatory presented. A promising technique for enhancing the reflectivity of Wolter Type I X-ray optics in a selected bandpass at high energy has been investigated and the performance of the LAMAR module, utilizing this method, has been calculated.

  12. Rappels: 4) Piles Types abstraits de donnes (Abstract Data Type)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hamel, Sylvie

    Rappels: 4) Piles #12;Types abstraits de données (Abstract Data Type) IFT2015, A2009, Sylvie Hamel Université de Montréal 1Piles Type de données Un ensemble de valeurs Un ensemble d'opérations Structure de Université de Montréal 2Piles #12;Type abstrait de données PILE (§4.2) Garde en mémoire des objets

  13. Building America Best Practices Series: Volume 12. EnergyRenovations...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Building America Best Practices Series: Volume 12. Energy Renovations-Insulation: A Guide for Contractors to Share With Homeowners Building America Best Practices Series: Volume...

  14. Independent Oversight Inspection, Nevada Test Site, Volume 2...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Volume 2 - September 2004 Independent Oversight Inspection, Nevada Test Site, Volume 2 - September 2004 September 2004 Inspection of Emergency Management at the Nevada Test Site...

  15. Advanced Materials and Processing of Composites for High Volume...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    -- Washington D.C. lm021zaluzec2010o.pdf More Documents & Publications Advanced Materials and Processing of Composites for High Volume Applications ACC115 High Volume...

  16. Advanced Materials and Processing of Composites for High Volume...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Advanced Materials and Processing of Composites for High Volume Applications Advanced Materials and Processing of Composites for High Volume Applications 2011 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel...

  17. A constant-mass fuel delivery system for use in underwater autonomous vehicles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saxton-Fox, Theresa Ann

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis describes the design and assembly of two constant-mass fuel tanks to be used in autonomous underwater vehicles (AUVs). The fuel tanks are part of a power supply designed to increase AUV endurance without limiting ...

  18. Fractal properties in fundamental force coupling constants, in atomic energies, and in elementary particle masses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boris Tatischeff

    2011-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Using the discrete-scale invariance theory, we show that the coupling constants of fundamental forces, the atomic masses and energies, and the elementary particle masses, obey to the fractal properties.

  19. Determination of Henry's law constants of organics in dilute aqueous solutions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hansen, K.C.; Zhou, Zhou; Yaws, C.L.; Aminabhavi, T.M. (Lamar Univ., Beaumont, TX (United States). Dept. of Chemistry)

    1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Accurate knowledge of Henry's law constants, H, or air/water partitioning coefficients are required to predict the behavior of organic compounds in the environment. In particular, when the compounds are relatively volatile and exhibit low solubility in water, air stripping may be a viable method for above-ground treatment. Henry's law constants of 15 volatile organic compounds in dilute aqueous solutions were measured by the procedure of equilibrium partitioning in a closed system. The method is based upon the measurement of the headspace concentration by gas chromatography. The compounds investigated included six halogenated hydrocarbons, four aromatic hydrocarbons, and five alkanes. The measurements were made at three temperatures between 25 and 45 C. The measured Henry's law constants compared well with the literature data of some liquids. The temperature dependence of Henry's law constant was also studied from the van't Hoff relation.

  20. ForPeerReview A Validation Study of Lithium-ion Cell Constant C-Rate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michalek, Jeremy J.

    ForPeerReview A Validation Study of Lithium-ion Cell Constant C-Rate Discharge Simulation and Engineering, Engineering and Public Policy Keywords: Battery Design Studio®, Lithium-ion, Battery Performance

  1. Microprocessors are becoming increasingly complex and difficult to debug. Researchers are constantly looking

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Al-Asaad, Hussain

    1 ABSTRACT Microprocessors are becoming increasingly complex and difficult to debug. Researchers are constantly looking for new methods to increase the observability and control- lability of microprocessors to important internal signals without inter- rupting the microprocessor execution. The output

  2. Study of Thermal Properties of Graphene-Based Structures Using the Force Constant Method

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Study of Thermal Properties of Graphene-Based Structures Using the Force Constant Method Hossein, 2012) Abstract The thermal properties of graphene-based materials are theoretically investigated transport is investigated for different structures including graphene, graphene antidot lat- tices

  3. EPR determination of the rate constants of detachment of hydrogen from triethylsilane by metal carbonyl radicals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gasanov, R.G.; Dotdaev, S.Kh.

    1987-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The rate constants of detachment of hydrogen triethylsilane by radicals of rhenium and manganese pentacarbonyls, tungsten cyclopentadienyltricarbonyl, and iron cyclopentadienyldicarbonyl were determined, and the order of the reactivity of the metal carbonyls was hypothesized.

  4. An alternative to constant rate link padding for the prevention of traffic analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Graham, Bryan Wayne

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    approach to prevent traffic analysis has always been constant rate link padding. However, the effectiveness of this method when an adversary has access to advanced monitoring equipment and knowledge of statistical analysis has not been addressed...

  5. Optimality gap of constant-order policies decays exponentially in the ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2014-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

    demand, we further compute all expressions appearing in our bound in closed .... positive lead times, sometimes the best constant-order policy outperforms the ..... bounds tight enough to be useful in practice. ...... and consumer responses.

  6. The Gravitational Instability of the Vacuum: Insight into the Cosmological Constant Problem

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alexander, S

    2004-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

    A mechanism for suppressing the cosmological constant is developed, based on an analogy with a superconducting phaseshift in which free fermions coupled perturbatively to a weak gravitational field are in an unstable false vacuum state. The coupling of the fermions to the gravitational field generates fermion condensates with zero momentum and a phase transition induces a nonperturbative transition to a true vacuum state by producing a positive energy gap {Delta} in the vacuum energy, identified with {radical}{Lambda}, where {Lambda} is the cosmological constant. In the strong coupling limit a large cosmological constant induces a period of inflation in the early universe, followed by a weak coupling limit in which {radical}{Lambda} vanishes exponentially fast as the universe expands due to the dependence of the energy gap on the density of Fermi surface fermions, D({epsilon}), predicting a small cosmological constant in the present universe.

  7. A new scheme for the running coupling constant in gauge theories using Wilson loops

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Erek Bilgici; Antonino Flachi; Etsuko Itou; Masafumi Kurachi; C. -J David Lin; Hideo Matsufuru; Hiroshi Ohki; Tetsuya Onogi; Takeshi Yamazaki

    2010-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

    We propose a new renormalization scheme of the running coupling constant in general gauge theories using the Wilson loops. The renormalized coupling constant is obtained from the Creutz ratio in lattice simulations and the corresponding perturbative coefficient at the leading order. The latter can be calculated by adopting the zeta-function resummation techniques. We perform a benchmark test of our scheme in quenched QCD with the plaquette gauge action. The running of the coupling constant is determined by applying the step-scaling procedure. Using several methods to improve the statistical accuracy, we show that the running coupling constant can be determined in a wide range of energy scales with relatively small number of gauge configurations.

  8. The creation of fiberglass tanks and parts for autonomous underwater vehicle constant buoyancy power supply

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sack, Jean H. (Jean Hope)

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this thesis was to construct and seal air and containment tanks and other parts for a constant buoyancy power supply for an Autonomous Underwater Vehicle, or AUV. While multiple materials and techniques were ...

  9. CODATA recommended values of the fundamental physical constants: Peter J. Mohr

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , People's Republic of China Electronic address: mohr@nist.gov Electronic address: barry.taylor@nist.gov be found on the World Wide Web at physics.nist.gov/constants. CONTENTS Glossary 3 I. Introduction 5 A

  10. AbstractStock-rebuilding time iso pleths relate constant levels of fishing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    519 Abstract­Stock-rebuilding time iso pleths relate constant levels of fishing mortality (F. Iso pleths calculated in previous studies by deterministic models approximate median, rather than mean

  11. Limits on the integration constant of the dark radiation term in Brane Cosmology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. S. Al-Rawaf

    2005-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider the constraints from primordial Helium abundances on the constant of integration of the dark radiation term of the brane-world generalized Friedmann equation derived from the Randall-Sundrum Single brane model. We found that -- using simple, approximate and semianalytical Method -- that the constant of integration is limited to be between -8.9 and 2.2 which limits the possible contribution from dark radiation term to be approximately between -27% to 7% of the background photon energy density.

  12. On the distribution of estimators of diffusion constants for Brownian motion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Denis Boyer; David S. Dean

    2011-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

    We discuss the distribution of various estimators for extracting the diffusion constant of single Brownian trajectories obtained by fitting the squared displacement of the trajectory. The analysis of the problem can be framed in terms of quadratic functionals of Brownian motion that correspond to the Euclidean path integral for simple Harmonic oscillators with time dependent frequencies. Explicit analytical results are given for the distribution of the diffusion constant estimator in a number of cases and our results are confirmed by numerical simulations.

  13. Variation of calibration constant of alpha track detectors with respect to altitude

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vasudevan, Latha

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and earthquake prediction (Fleischer et al. 1980). A number of methods for monitoring radon gas concentrations in air have been developed in recent years. They encompass a variety of experimental techniques with a wide range of sensitivities and time... of the calibration constant is essential for the reliable determination of indoor air concentration and other applications of the Alpha Track Detector (ATD) measurements. The calibration constant was derived from the observed track densities (tracks/cm') for each...

  14. THE LIND-LEHMER CONSTANT FOR CYCLIC GROUPS OF ORDER LESS THAN 892, 371, 480.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pinner, Christopher

    THE LIND-LEHMER CONSTANT FOR CYCLIC GROUPS OF ORDER LESS THAN 892, 371, 480. VINCENT PIGNO AND CHRISTOPHER PINNER Abstract. We determine the Lind Lehmer constant for the cyclic group Zn when n is not a multiple of 892, 371, 480 = 23 · 3 · 5 · 7 · 11 · 13 · 17 · 19 · 23. 1. Introduction In [4] Lind introduced

  15. Variation of jet quenching from RHIC to LHC and thermal suppression of QCD coupling constant

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. G. Zakharov

    2011-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We perform a joint jet tomographic analysis of the data on the nuclear modification factor $R_{AA}$ from PHENIX at RHIC and ALICE at LHC. The computations are performed accounting for radiative and collisional parton energy loss with running coupling constant. Our results show that the observed slow variation of $R_{AA}$ from RHIC to LHC indicates that the QCD coupling constant is suppressed in the quark-gluon plasma produced at LHC.

  16. The export responsiveness of the Argentine grain export marketing system: a constant market share analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Millimet, Scott Alan

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    THE EXPORT RESPONSIVENESS OF THE ARGENTINE GRAIN EXPORT MARKET NG SYSTEM: A CONSTANT MARKET SHARE ANALYSIS A Thesis by SCOTT ALAN MILLIMET Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement... for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 1982 Ma) or Subject: Agricultural Economics THE EXPORT RESPONSIVENESS OF THE ARGENTINE GRAIN EXPORT MARKETING SYSTEM: A CONSTANT MARKET SHARE ANALYSIS A Thesis by SCOTT ALAN MILLIMET Approved as to style...

  17. Null-plane phenomenology for the pion decay constant and radius

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Frederico, T.; Miller, G.A. (Department of Physics, FM-15, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98195 (United States))

    1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The pion decay constant and the electromagnetic form factor are computed by using quark diagrams and projecting the bound-state wave function on the null plane. We show that the resulting formulas are the same as those of the Hamiltonian front-form scheme. The connection between the radius ({ital r}{sub {pi}}) and the pion decay constant ({ital f}{sub {pi}}) is studied using different models of confinement.

  18. Information architecture. Volume 4: Vision

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Vision document marks the transition from definition to implementation of the Department of Energy (DOE) Information Architecture Program. A description of the possibilities for the future, supported by actual experience with a process model and tool set, points toward implementation options. The directions for future information technology investments are discussed. Practical examples of how technology answers the business and information needs of the organization through coordinated and meshed data, applications, and technology architectures are related. This document is the fourth and final volume in the planned series for defining and exhibiting the DOE information architecture. The targeted scope of this document includes DOE Program Offices, field sites, contractor-operated facilities, and laboratories. This document paints a picture of how, over the next 7 years, technology may be implemented, dramatically improving the ways business is conducted at DOE. While technology is mentioned throughout this document, the vision is not about technology. The vision concerns the transition afforded by technology and the process steps to be completed to ensure alignment with business needs. This goal can be met if those directing the changing business and mission-support processes understand the capabilities afforded by architectural processes.

  19. High-loop perturbative renormalization constants for Lattice QCD (III): three-loop quark currents for Iwasaki gauge action and n_f=4 Wilson fermions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Brambilla; F. Di Renzo; M. Hasegawa

    2014-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

    This is the third of a series of papers on three-loop computation of renormalization constants for Lattice QCD. Our main point of interest are results for the regularization defined by Iwasaki gauge action and n_f=4 Wilson fermions. Our results for quark bilinears renormalized according to the RI'-MOM scheme can be compared to non-perturbative results. The latter are available for Twisted Mass QCD: being defined in the chiral limit, renormalization constants must be the same. We also address more general problems. In particular, we discuss a few methodological issues connected to summing the perturbative series such as the effectiveness of Boosted Perturbation Theory and the disentanglement of irrelevant and finite volume contributions. Discussing these issues we consider ont only the new results of this paper, but also those for the regularization defined by tree-level Symanzik improved gauge action and n_f=2 Wilson fermions, which we presented in a recent paper of ours. We finally comment to which extent the techniques we put at work in the NSPT context can provide a fresher look into the lattice version of the RI'-MOM scheme.

  20. Postdoc Appointment Types

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible forPortsmouth/Paducah Project Office Press ReleasesPost-Closure BenefitsAppointment Types

  1. Black Hole Enthalpy and an Entropy Inequality for the Thermodynamic Volume

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cvetic, M; Kubiznak, D; Pope, C N

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In a theory where the cosmological constant \\Lambda or the gauge coupling constant g arises as the vacuum expectation value, its variation should be included in the first law of thermodynamics for black holes. This becomes dE= TdS + \\Omega_i dJ_i + \\Phi_\\alpha d Q_\\alpha + \\Theta d \\Lambda, where E is now the enthalpy of the spacetime, and \\Theta, the thermodynamic conjugate of \\Lambda, is proportional to an effective volume V = -\\frac{16 \\pi \\Theta}{D-2} "inside the event horizon." Here we calculate \\Theta and V for a wide variety of D-dimensional charged rotating asymptotically AdS black hole spacetimes, using the first law or the Smarr relation. We compare our expressions with those obtained by implementing a suggestion of Kastor, Ray and Traschen, involving Komar integrals and Killing potentials, which we construct from conformal Killing-Yano tensors. We conjecture that the volume V and the horizon area A satisfy the inequality R\\equiv ((D-1)V/{\\cal A}_{D-2})^{1/(D-1)}\\, ({\\cal A}_{D-2}/A)^{1/(D-2)}\\ge1, ...

  2. Infinite volume limit for the dipole gas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Dimock

    2009-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider a classical dipole gas in with low activity and show that the pressure has a limit as the volume goes to infinity. The result is obtained by a renormalization group analysis of the model.

  3. Petroleum supply annual, 1997. Volume 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Petroleum Supply Annual (PSA) contains information on the supply and disposition of crude oil and petroleum products. The publication reflects data that were collected from the petroleum industry during 1997 through monthly surveys. The PSA is divided into two volumes. The first volume contains three sections: Summary Statistics, Detailed Statistics, and Refinery Statistics; each with final annual data. The second volume contains final statistics for each month of 1997, and replaces data previously published in the Petroleum Supply Monthly (PSM). The tables in Volumes 1 and 2 are similarly numbered to facilitate comparison between them. Explanatory Notes, located at the end of this publication, present information describing data collection, sources, estimation methodology, data quality control procedures, modifications to reporting requirements and interpretation of tables. Industry terminology and product definitions are listed alphabetically in the Glossary. 35 tabs.

  4. Petroleum supply annual 1998: Volume 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1999-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Petroleum Supply Annual (PSA) contains information on the supply and disposition of crude oil and petroleum products. The publication reflects data that were collected from the petroleum industry during 1998 through monthly surveys. The PSA is divided into two volumes. The first volume contains three sections: Summary Statistics, Detailed Statistics, and Refinery Statistics; each with final annual data. This second volume contains final statistics for each month of 1998, and replaces data previously published in the Petroleum Supply Monthly (PSM). The tables in Volumes 1 and 2 are similarly numbered to facilitate comparison between them. Explanatory Notes, located at the end of this publication, present information describing data collection, sources, estimation methodology, data quality control procedures, modifications to reporting requirements and interpretation of tables. Industry terminology and product definitions are listed alphabetically in the Glossary. 35 tabs.

  5. Petroleum supply annual 1994, Volume 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Petroleum Supply Annual (PSA) contains information on the supply and disposition of crude oil and petroleum products. The publication reflects data that were collected from the petroleum industry during 1994 through annual and monthly surveys. The PSA is divided into two volumes. This first volume contains four sections: Summary Statistics, Detailed Statistics, Refinery Capacity, and Oxygenate Capacity each with final annual data. The second volume contains final statistics for each month of 1994, and replaces data previously published in the Petroleum Supply Monthly (PSM). The tables in Volumes 1 and 2 are similarly numbered to facilitate comparison between them. Explanatory Notes, located at the end of this publication, present information describing data collection, sources, estimation methodology, data quality control procedures, modifications to reporting requirements and interpretation of tables. Industry terminology and product definitions are listed alphabetically in the Glossary.

  6. Petroleum supply annual 1996: Volume 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Petroleum Supply Annual (PSA) contains information on the supply and disposition of crude oil and petroleum products. The publication reflects data that were collected from the petroleum industry during 1996 through monthly surveys. The PSA is divided into two volumes. The first volume contains three sections: Summary Statistics, Detailed Statistics, and Refinery Capacity; each with final annual data. The second volume contains final statistics for each month of 1996, and replaces data previously published in the Petroleum Supply Monthly (PSM). The tables in Volumes 1 and 2 are similarly numbered to facilitate comparison between them. Explanatory Notes, located at the end of this publication, present information describing data collection, sources, estimation methodology, data quality control procedures, modifications to reporting requirements and interpretation of tables. Industry terminology and product definitions are listed alphabetically in the Glossary. 35 tabs.

  7. Petroleum supply annual 1995: Volume 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Petroleum Supply Annual (PSA) contains information on the supply and disposition of crude oil and petroleum products. The publication reflects data that were collected from the petroleum industry during 1995 through monthly surveys. The PSA is divided into two volumes. This first volume contains three sections: Summary Statistics, Detailed Statistics, and selected Refinery Statistics each with final annual data. The second volume contains final statistics for each month of 1995, and replaces data previously published in the Petroleum Supply Monthly (PSM). The tables in Volumes 1 and 2 are similarly numbered to facilitate comparison between them. Explanatory Notes, located at the end of this publication, present information describing data collection, sources, estimation methodology, data quality control procedures, modifications to reporting requirements and interpretation of tables. Industry terminology and product definitions are listed alphabetically in the Glossary.

  8. Petroleum Supply Annual 1997, Volume 1

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    7, Volume 1 Entire . The entire report as a single file. PDF 1.0MB . . Front Matter . Cover Page, Contacts, Preface, and Table of Contents Page PDF . . Summary Statistics . Summary...

  9. Petroleum Supply Annual 1998, Volume 2

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    8, Volume 2 Entire . The entire report as a single file. PDF 3.8MB . . Front Matter . Cover Page, Contacts, Preface, and Table of Contents Page PDF . . Monthly Statistics Tables ....

  10. Variable volume architecture : expanding the boundary

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saheba, Asheshh (Asheshh Mohit), 1972-

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Research into the creation of a Variable Volume Architecture is explored through a series of proposals and projects. An argument is established to develop the means and methods of achieving an architecture of transformation. ...

  11. Detonation Diffraction into a Confined Volume

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Polley, Nolan Lee

    2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    little attention. Experimental work needs to be conducted on detonation diffraction into a confined volume to better understand how the interaction of the diffracted shock wave with a confining wall impacts the detonation diffraction process. Therefore, a...

  12. Volume 68, Numbers 1&2 (Complete)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dickson, Donald

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    EVENTEENTH- ENTURY EWS SPRING - SUMMER 2010 Vol. 68 Nos. 1&2 Including THE NEO-LATIN NEWS Vol. 58, Nos. 1&2 Seventeenth-Century newS VOLUME 68, Nos. 1&2 SPRING-SUMMER, 2010 SCN... of the Lake University E. Joe Johnson, Clayton State University EDITORIAL ASSISTANTS Jacob Schornick, Texas A&M University contents volume 68, nos. 1&2 ............................... spring-summer, 2010 John Considine, Dictionaries in Early Modern Europe...

  13. Volume 60, Numbers 1&2 (Complete)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dickson, Donald

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    EVENTEENTH- ENTURY EWS SPRING - SUMMER 2002 Vol. 60 Nos. 1&2 budleafswbudleafse Including THE NEO-LATIN NEWS Vol. 50, Nos. 1&2 SEVENTEENTH-CENTURY NEWS VOLUME 60, Nos. 1&2 SPRING-SUMMER, 2002 SCN, an official organ of the Milton Society... Meter, Texas A&M University CONTENTS VOLUME 60, Nos. 1&2 SPRING-SUMMER, 2002 REVIEWS ?Vocation Homily, George Herbert, and the Cultural Criticism: A Review Essay? by JONATHAN NAUMAN...

  14. ASEAN--USAID Buildings Energy Conservation Project final report. Volume 2, Technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Levine, M.D.; Busch, J.F. [eds.

    1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This volume reports on research in the area of energy conservation technology applied to commercial buildings in the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN) region. Unlike Volume I of this series, this volume is a compilation of original technical papers prepared by different authors in the project. In this regard, this volume is much like a technical journal. The papers that follow report on research conducted by both US and ASEAN researchers. The authors representing Indonesia, Malaysia, Philippines, and Thailand, come from a range of positions in the energy arena, including government energy agencies, electric utilities, and universities. As such, they account for a wide range of perspectives on energy problems and the role that technology can play in solving them. This volume is about using energy more intelligently. In some cases, the effort is towards the use of more advanced technologies, such as low-emittance coatings on window glass, thermal energy storage, or cogeneration. In others, the emphasis is towards reclaiming traditional techniques for rendering energy services, but in new contexts such as lighting office buildings with natural light, or cooling buildings of all types with natural ventilation. Used in its broadest sense, the term ``technology`` encompasses all of the topics addressed in this volume. Along with the more customary associations of technology, such as advanced materials and equipment and the analysis of their performance, this volume treats design concepts and techniques, analysis of ``secondary`` impacts from applying technologies (i.e., unintended impacts, or impacts on parties not directly involved in the purchase and use of the technology), and the collection of primary data used for conducting technical analyses.

  15. Determination of the semi-leptonic weak interaction pseudoscalar coupling constant , g$_{P}$, using the reaction $\\mu^{-}$p --> $\

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hasinoff, M D; Azuelos, Georges; Bertl, W; Blecher, M; Chen, C Q; Depommier, P; Doyle, B; Von Egidy, T; Gorringe, T P; Gumplinger, P; Henderson, R; Jonkmans, G; Larabee, A J; MacDonald, J A; McDonald, S C; Munro, M H; Poutissou, J M; Poutissou, R; Robertson, B C; Sample, D G; Schott, W; Taylor, G N; Veillette, S; Wright, D H

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Determination of the semi-leptonic weak interaction pseudoscalar coupling constant , g$_{P}$, using the reaction $\\mu^{-}$p --> $\

  16. Alternative fuels for vehicles fleet demonstration program. Final report, volume 2: Appendices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Alternative Fuels for Vehicles Fleet Demonstration Program (AFV-FDP) was a multiyear effort to collect technical data for use in determining the costs and benefits of alternative-fuel vehicles (AFVs) in typical applications in New York State. This report, Volume 2, includes 13 appendices to Volume 1 that expand upon issues raised therein. Volume 1 provides: (1) Information about the purpose and scope of the AFV-FDP; (2) A summary of AFV-FDP findings organized on the basis of vehicle type and fuel type; (3) A short review of the status of AFV technology development, including examples of companies in the State that are active in developing AFVs and AFV components; and (4) A brief overview of the status of AFV deployment in the State. Volume 3 provides expanded reporting of AFV-FDP technical details, including the complete texts of the brochure Garage Guidelines for Alternative Fuels and the technical report Fleet Experience Survey Report, plus an extensive glossary of AFV terminology. The appendices cover a wide range of issues including: emissions regulations in New York State; production and health effects of ozone; vehicle emissions and control systems; emissions from heavy-duty engines; reformulated gasoline; greenhouse gases; production and characteristics of alternative fuels; the Energy Policy Act of 1992; the Clean Fuel Fleet Program; garage design guidelines for alternative fuels; surveys of fleet managers using alternative fuels; taxes on conventional and alternative fuels; and zero-emission vehicle technology.

  17. DNS of the effects of thermal stratification and turbulent mixing on H2/air ignition in a constant volume, and comparison with the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Im, Hong G.

    and explained using the diagnostics developed. Introduction Homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI, the combustion mode in HCCI engines is not well understood, as both volumetric and front-like combustion modes of control strategies for HCCI engines. Specific Objectives The overall goals of the present study are to un

  18. Finite element and nite volume discretizations of Drift-Di usion type uid models for semiconductors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brezzi, Franco

    Milano Via Bonardi 9, 20133 Milano, Italy z University of Western Australia Department of Mathematics and Statistics Nedlands, Western Australia 6907, Australia This paper is to appear as a Chapter of Numerical the initial/boundary conditions which complete the model. We also consider in more detail the Energy

  19. Microbial Indicators in Restaurant Salads: Correlation Between Salad Type, Restaurant Ownership Format, and Customer Business Volumes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prince, David Warren

    2013-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

    ). This outbreak was the largest outbreak to occur of listeriosis involving fatalities in the United States (93). In 2006, one of the most publicized outbreaks occurred involving E. coli O157:H7 contaminated spinach that caused 204 cases of foodborne illness.... Molecular methods have the ability to subtype and compare pathogen strains in food, water, and in clinical cases, and can aid principle investigators with identifying sources of contamination (13, 53, 58, 60, 108, 137, 156). Although there have been...

  20. Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Sales to End Users Refiner Sales Volumes

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40 Buildingto China (Million Cubic Feet) 3 0 0 0 1 1996-2013 Lease20 5537,954.6

  1. Table 7. U.S. Refiner Motor Gasoline Volumes by Grade and Sales Type

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122Commercial ConsumersThousandCubic Feet) DecadeV49 155 181 177 1959,5488 25031996

  2. Table 7. U.S. Refiner Motor Gasoline Volumes by Grade and Sales Type

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122Commercial ConsumersThousandCubic Feet) DecadeV49 155 181 177 1959,5488 25031996

  3. Table 7. U.S. Refiner Motor Gasoline Volumes by Grade and Sales Type

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122Commercial ConsumersThousandCubic Feet) DecadeV49 155 181 177 1959,5488 25031996

  4. Table 7. U.S. Refiner Motor Gasoline Volumes by Grade and Sales Type

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122Commercial ConsumersThousandCubic Feet) DecadeV49 155 181 177 1959,5488 25031996

  5. Table 7. U.S. Refiner Motor Gasoline Volumes by Grade and Sales Type

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122Commercial ConsumersThousandCubic Feet) DecadeV49 155 181 177 1959,5488 25031996

  6. Table 9. U.S. Refiner Conventional Motor Gasoline Volumes by Grade and Sales Type

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122Commercial ConsumersThousandCubic Feet) DecadeV49 155 181 177 1959,54883 January

  7. Table 9. U.S. Refiner Conventional Motor Gasoline Volumes by Grade and Sales Type

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122Commercial ConsumersThousandCubic Feet) DecadeV49 155 181 177 1959,54883

  8. Table 9. U.S. Refiner Conventional Motor Gasoline Volumes by Grade and Sales Type

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122Commercial ConsumersThousandCubic Feet) DecadeV49 155 181 177 1959,54883

  9. Table 9. U.S. Refiner Conventional Motor Gasoline Volumes by Grade and Sales Type

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122Commercial ConsumersThousandCubic Feet) DecadeV49 155 181 177 1959,54883 1996

  10. Table 9. U.S. Refiner Conventional Motor Gasoline Volumes by Grade and Sales Type

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122Commercial ConsumersThousandCubic Feet) DecadeV49 155 181 177 1959,54883

  11. Table 11. U.S. Refiner Oxygenated Motor Gasoline Volumes by Grade and Sales Type

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122Commercial ConsumersThousandCubic Feet) DecadeV49 155 181 177 1959,548833

  12. Table 11. U.S. Refiner Oxygenated Motor Gasoline Volumes by Grade and Sales Type

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122Commercial ConsumersThousandCubic Feet) DecadeV49 155 181 177 1959,548833

  13. Table 11. U.S. Refiner Oxygenated Motor Gasoline Volumes by Grade and Sales Type

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122Commercial ConsumersThousandCubic Feet) DecadeV49 155 181 177 1959,548833

  14. Table 11. U.S. Refiner Oxygenated Motor Gasoline Volumes by Grade and Sales Type

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122Commercial ConsumersThousandCubic Feet) DecadeV49 155 181 177 1959,548833 1996

  15. Table 11. U.S. Refiner Oxygenated Motor Gasoline Volumes by Grade and Sales Type

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122Commercial ConsumersThousandCubic Feet) DecadeV49 155 181 177 1959,548833

  16. Table 13. U.S. Refiner Reformulated Motor Gasoline Volumes by Grade and Sales Type

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122Commercial ConsumersThousandCubic Feet) DecadeV49 155 181 177 1959,5488333

  17. Table 13. U.S. Refiner Reformulated Motor Gasoline Volumes by Grade and Sales Type

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122Commercial ConsumersThousandCubic Feet) DecadeV49 155 181 177 1959,5488333

  18. Table 13. U.S. Refiner Reformulated Motor Gasoline Volumes by Grade and Sales Type

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122Commercial ConsumersThousandCubic Feet) DecadeV49 155 181 177 1959,5488333

  19. Table 13. U.S. Refiner Reformulated Motor Gasoline Volumes by Grade and Sales Type

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122Commercial ConsumersThousandCubic Feet) DecadeV49 155 181 177 1959,5488333 1996

  20. Table 13. U.S. Refiner Reformulated Motor Gasoline Volumes by Grade and Sales Type

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122Commercial ConsumersThousandCubic Feet) DecadeV49 155 181 177 1959,5488333