Sample records for type constant volume

  1. Constant Volume During Combustion | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-Up fromDepartmentTieCelebrate Earth Codestheatfor Optimized91 *09ofNameConstant Volume

  2. Thermodynamics and dynamics of a monoatomic glass former. Constant pressure and constant volume behavior

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Matyushov, Dmitry

    Thermodynamics and dynamics of a monoatomic glass former. Constant pressure and constant volume-pressure simulations of the thermodynamic and dynamic properties of the low-temperature liquid and crystalline phases the thermodynamics of the configurational manifold as an ensemble of excitations, each carrying an excitation entropy

  3. Chemistry of tributyl phosphate and nitric acid at constant volume

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Agnew, S.F.; Eisenhawer, S.W.; Morris, J.S. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper addresses the reaction of tributyl phosphate (TBP) with nitric acid (HNO{sub 3}). The reaction pressure of TBP/HNO{sub 3} mixtures as a function of time was measured under constant volume. A simplified model, which parametrically includes autocatalysis, was used to plot the total gas production of the reaction as a function of time. Comparison of the functions shows a rough equivalence in the induction time, reaction time, and total gas production. Predictions of the amounts of reaction products as a function of time were made based on assumptions regarding autocatalysis and using rate constants from experimental data. The derived reaction mechanisms and experimental results have several implications. Tests with a large amount of venting and high surface to volume ratio will show very different behavior than tests with increasing confinement and low surface to volume ratios. The amount alkyl nitrate, carbon monoxide, or hydrogen that reacts within the organic phase is limited by their solubilities and volatilities. The overall yield of both heat and gas per mol of nitric acid or TBP will vary significantly depending on the amount of solution, free volume, and vessel vent capacity.

  4. Variable Speed Drive (VSD) Applications in Dual-Duct Constant Volume Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Joo, I.; Liu, M.; Conger, K.; Wang, G.

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Models have been developed for static pressure and potential supply fan energy savings by using variable speed drive (VSD) in dual-duct constant volume systems. Experiments have been performed using a full size dual-duct constant volume system...

  5. STATE OF CALIFORNIA CONSTANT VOLUME SINGLE ZONE UNITARY AIR CONDITIONER AND HEAT PUMP SYSTEMS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    STATE OF CALIFORNIA CONSTANT VOLUME SINGLE ZONE UNITARY AIR CONDITIONER AND HEAT PUMP SYSTEMS CEC Volume Single Zone Unitary Air Conditioner and Heat Pump Systems (Page 1 of 4) Project Name CONSTANT VOLUME SINGLE ZONE UNITARY AIR CONDITIONER AND HEAT PUMP SYSTEMS CEC-MECH-3A (Revised 08

  6. The type Ia supernovae and the Hubble's constant

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ari Brynjolfsson

    2004-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The Hubble's constant is usually surmised to be a constant; but the experiments show a large spread and conflicting estimates. According to the plasma-redshift theory, the Hubble's constant varies with the plasma densities along the line of sight. It varies then slightly with the direction and the distance to a supernova and a galaxy. The relation between the magnitudes of type Ia supernovae and their observed redshifts results in an Hubble's constant with an average value in intergalactic space of 59.44 km per s per Mpc. The standard deviation from this average value is only 0.6 km per s per Mpc, but the standard deviation in a single measurement is about 8.2 km per s per Mpc. These deviations do not include possible absolute calibration errors. The experiments show that the Hubble's constant varies with the intrinsic redshifts of the Milky Way galaxy and the host galaxies for type Ia supernovae, and that it varies with the galactic latitude. These findings support the plasma-redshift theory and contradict the contemporary big-bang theory. Together with the previously reported absence of time dilation in type Ia supernovae measurements, these findings have profound consequences for the standard cosmological theory.

  7. Hydraulic conductivity testing of geosynthetic clay liners (GCLs) using the constant volume method

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, X.; Benson, C.H.

    1999-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Hydraulic conductivity tests were conducted using open and constant-volume permeation systems on specimens from a geosynthetic clay liner (GCL). Two constant volume (CV) systems were employed: the falling-head constant-volume (FHCV) system and the constant-head constant-volume (CHCV) system. A conventional burette system using pressurized air was employed for the open system (OS) tests. The test results show that hydraulic conductivity tests can be conducted 30 or more times faster with the FHCV and CHCV systems than with an open system. Typically the permeation portion of the FHCV and CHCV tests can be conducted in one-half day. Slightly lower hydraulic conductivities are measured with the CV systems due to the slightly higher effective stress applied during testing with these systems. The CHCV system has several advantages over the FHCV system, including minimizing initial transient behavior, constant applied effective stress during testing, and simpler calculations.

  8. Research on Fuzzy Regulation Strategies in the Constant Air Volume Air Conditioning System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bai, T.; Zhang, J.; Ning, N.; Tong, K.; Wu, Y.; Wang, H.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The energy consumption of the constant air volume (CAV) system largely depends on the regulation strategies. Although some air conditioning systems are equipped with automatic regulation devices, others lack effective regulation strategies. To avoid...

  9. Control Humidity With Single-Duct, Single-Zone, Constant Air Volume System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, H.; Deng, S.; Bruner, H. L.; Claridge, D. E.

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The lecture hall of the Richardson Petroleum Building at Texas A&M University is a large lecture hall, with a total floor area of approximately 2500 ft^2. The lecture hall was served by a constant air volume (CAV) air handling unit (AHU) which had...

  10. Reducing Building Energy Costs Using Optimized Operation Strategies for Constant Volume Air Handling Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, M.; Athar, A.; Reddy, A.; Claridge, D. E.; Haberl, J. S.; White, E.

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    SDCVP 67.380 $153.200 $41.800 $195.000 $2.89 measured energy consumption for each building. The horizontal axis is the ambient temperature. The venical axis is the average daily energy consumption in MMBtulhr. Figure 5 compares the predicted...REDUCING BUILDING ENERGY COSTS USING OPTIMIZED OPERATION STRATEGIES FOR CONSTANT VOLUME AIR HANDLING SYSTEMS Mingsheng Liu, her Atha, Agarni Reddy Ed White David Claridge and Jeff Haberl Department of Physical Plant Texas A&M University...

  11. Table 43. Refiner Motor Gasoline Volumes by Grade, Sales Type...

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    220 Energy Information AdministrationPetroleum Marketing Annual 1998 Table 43. Refiner Motor Gasoline Volumes by Grade, Sales Type, PAD District, and State (Thousand Gallons per...

  12. Table 43. Refiner Motor Gasoline Volumes by Grade, Sales Type...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    220 Energy Information AdministrationPetroleum Marketing Annual 1999 Table 43. Refiner Motor Gasoline Volumes by Grade, Sales Type, PAD District, and State (Thousand Gallons per...

  13. Table 43. Refiner Motor Gasoline Volumes by Grade, Sales Type...

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Energy Information Administration Petroleum Marketing Annual 1995 Table 43. Refiner Motor Gasoline Volumes by Grade, Sales Type, PAD District, and State (Thousand Gallons per...

  14. Analysis of error in using fractured gas well type curves for constant pressure production

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schkade, David Wayne

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of normalized time and normalized cumulative production is a large improvement over using a constant evaluation pressure. 0 imens ion less cumulative production type curves are particularly useful in modeling production for economic projections, such as re... of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 1987 Major Subject: Petroleum Engineering ANALYSIS OF ERROR IN USING FRACTURED GAS WELL TYPE CURVES FOR CONSTANT PRESSURE PRDDUCTION A Thesis by DAVID WAYNE SCHKADE Approved as to style and content by: S. A. Ho lditch...

  15. Single-Duct Constant Air Volume System Supply Air Temperature Reset: Using Return Air Temperature or Outside Air Temperature?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wei, G.; Turner, W. D.; Claridge, D.; Liu, M.

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The supply air temperature set point for a singleduct constant air volume air handling unit (AHU) system is often reset based on either return air temperature or outside air temperature in order to reduce simultaneous cooling and heating energy...

  16. Table 43. Refiner Motor Gasoline Volumes by Grade, Sales Type...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    150.0 2,026.7 W W 234.5 161.7 - 396.3 See footnotes at end of table. 43. Refiner Motor Gasoline Volumes by Grade, Sales Type, PAD District, and State 262 Energy Information...

  17. Table 43. Refiner Motor Gasoline Volumes by Grade, Sales Type...

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    253.2 2,222.4 W W 206.4 134.3 - 340.7 See footnotes at end of table. 43. Refiner Motor Gasoline Volumes by Grade, Sales Type, PAD District, and State 262 Energy Information...

  18. Bianchi Type III Anisotropic Dark Energy Models with Constant Deceleration Parameter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anil Kumar Yadav; Lallan Yadav

    2010-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

    The Bianchi type III dark energy models with constant deceleration parameter are investigated. The equation of state parameter $\\omega$ is found to be time dependent and its existing range for this model is consistent with the recent observations of SN Ia data, SN Ia data (with CMBR anisotropy) and galaxy clustering statistics. The physical aspect of the dark energy models are discussed.

  19. Stability study of a constant-volume thin film flow J. M. Gomba,* J. Diez,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kondic, Lou

    , there is an increas- ing interest in understanding flows in microscopic devices designed to propel and mix small volumes of liquids. Micro- metric ducts, pumps, turbines, and valves are all examples of such small

  20. Feasibility of Measuring the Cosmological Constant [LAMBDA] and Mass Density [Omega] using Type Ia Supernovae

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goobar, A.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    at z = 1. uncertainty for supernovae at z = 1. mR Adding theMass Density .Q Using Type Ia Supernovae A. Goobar and S.Density Q Using Type Ia Supernovae Ariel Goobar l and Saul

  1. Direct numerical simulation of ignition front propagation in a constant volume with temperature inhomogeneities. I. Fundamental analysis and diagnostics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Jacqueline H.; Hawkes, Evatt R.; Sankaran, Ramanan [Reacting Flow Research Department, Combustion Research Facility, Sandia National Laboratories, P.O. Box 969 MS 9051, Livermore, CA 94551-0969 (United States); Mason, Scott D. [Lockheed Martin Corporation, Sunnyvale, CA 94089 (United States); Im, Hong G. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-2125 (United States)

    2006-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The influence of thermal stratification on autoignition at constant volume and high pressure is studied by direct numerical simulation (DNS) with detailed hydrogen/air chemistry with a view to providing better understanding and modeling of combustion processes in homogeneous charge compression-ignition engines. Numerical diagnostics are developed to analyze the mode of combustion and the dependence of overall ignition progress on initial mixture conditions. The roles of dissipation of heat and mass are divided conceptually into transport within ignition fronts and passive scalar dissipation, which modifies the statistics of the preignition temperature field. Transport within ignition fronts is analyzed by monitoring the propagation speed of ignition fronts using the displacement speed of a scalar that tracks the location of maximum heat release rate. The prevalence of deflagrative versus spontaneous ignition front propagation is found to depend on the local temperature gradient, and may be identified by the ratio of the instantaneous front speed to the laminar deflagration speed. The significance of passive scalar mixing is examined using a mixing timescale based on enthalpy fluctuations. Finally, the predictions of the multizone modeling strategy are compared with the DNS, and the results are explained using the diagnostics developed. (author)

  2. Gravitational waves in vacuum spacetimes with cosmological constant. I. Classification and geometrical properties of non-twisting type N solutions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Bicak; J. Podolsky

    1999-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

    All non-twisting Petrov-type N solutions of vacuum Einstein field equations with cosmological constant Lambda are summarized. They are shown to belong either to the non-expanding Kundt class or to the expanding Robinson-Trautman class. Invariant subclasses of each class are defined and the corresponding metrics are given explicitly in suitable canonical coordinates. Relations between the subclasses and their geometrical properties are analyzed. In the subsequent paper these solutions are interpreted as exact gravitational waves propagating in de Sitter or anti-de Sitter spacetimes.

  3. Compositional modeling in porous media using constant volume flash and flux computation without the need for phase identification

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Polívka, Ond?ej, E-mail: ondrej.polivka@fjfi.cvut.cz; Mikyška, Ji?í, E-mail: jiri.mikyska@fjfi.cvut.cz

    2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The paper deals with the numerical solution of a compositional model describing compressible two-phase flow of a mixture composed of several components in porous media with species transfer between the phases. The mathematical model is formulated by means of the extended Darcy's laws for all phases, components continuity equations, constitutive relations, and appropriate initial and boundary conditions. The splitting of components among the phases is described using a new formulation of the local thermodynamic equilibrium which uses volume, temperature, and moles as specification variables. The problem is solved numerically using a combination of the mixed-hybrid finite element method for the total flux discretization and the finite volume method for the discretization of transport equations. A new approach to numerical flux approximation is proposed, which does not require the phase identification and determination of correspondence between the phases on adjacent elements. The time discretization is carried out by the backward Euler method. The resulting large system of nonlinear algebraic equations is solved by the Newton–Raphson iterative method. We provide eight examples of different complexity to show reliability and robustness of our approach.

  4. Air-Side Energy Use Calculations for Four HVAC Systems: Dual Duct Constant Volume (DDCAV), Dual Duct Variable Volume (DDVAV), Constant Volume with Reheat (CAVRH), Variable Volume with Reheat (VAVRH), Four Pipe Fan Coil Unit (FC), Four Pipe Induction Unit (FI), and Single Zone (SZ) Systems, Revised June 2002

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haberl, J. S.; Bou-Saada, T. E.; Saman, N. F.

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    (CAVRH), and variable volume with reheat (VAVRH), four pipe fan coil unit (FC), four pipe induction unit (FI), and a single zone air conditioning system (SZ). These calculations are presented in spreadsheets that include a running commentary so...

  5. ISQ derivation ("derivation in SI units") of a Landau and Lifschitz type formula for field ionization rate-constant

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richard G. Forbes

    2015-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

    In the 1940s/50s, Landau and Lifschitz (LL) published in their Quantum Mechanics textbook what is now a well known formula for the rate-constant for the electrostatic field ionization (ESFI) of a hydrogen atom in its ground electronic state. This formula is widely regarded as correct in the low field limit, and has played a significant role in development of ESFI theory. The formula was originally derived and presented in the atomic units system, with the hydrogen ionization energy I_H set equal to (1/2), making it impossible to determine by inspection to what power I_H is raised in its pre-exponential. Knowledge of this power would be useful in the context of near-surface ESFI, where significant image-force-induced shifts in effective ionization energy can occur. Also, large numbers of applied scientists and engineers work with ESFI as a process of technological importance, but cannot nowadays be expected to have familiarity with the Gaussian or atomic units equation systems. In the 1970s, what is now called the International System of Quantities (ISQ), which includes the equation system behind SI units, was internationally adopted as the primary system for university teaching and for communication of scientific equations between theoreticians and applied scientists and engineers. However, 40 years on, no transparent derivation of an ISQ equivalent of the LL formula is easily found in the literature. This tutorial paper presents a detailed ISQ derivation, finds that ionization energy appears in the pre-exponential as I_H to the power (7/2) (not 5/2, as sometimes stated) and defines a universal "tunnelling ionization constant" that appears in the ISQ formula pre-exponential. It is shown how this formula relates to the "attempt frequency" form often used to describe rate-constants for tunnelling processes, and an ISQ expression is given for the motive energy in the related JWKB integral.

  6. Gravitational waves in vacuum spacetimes with cosmological constant. II. Deviation of geodesics and interpretation of non-twisting type N solutions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Bicak; J. Podolsky

    1999-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

    In a suitably chosen essentially unique frame tied to a given observer in a general spacetime, the equation of geodesic deviation can be decomposed into a sum of terms describing specific effects: isotropic (background) motions associated with the cosmological constant, transverse motions corresponding to the effects of gravitational waves, longitudinal motions, and Coulomb-type effects. Conditions under which the frame is parallelly transported along a geodesic are discussed. Suitable coordinates are introduced and an explicit coordinate form of the frame is determined for spacetimes admitting a non-twisting null congruence. Specific properties of all non-twisting type N vacuum solutions with cosmological constant Lambda (non-expanding Kundt class and expanding Robinson-Trautman class) are then analyzed. It is demonstrated that these spacetimes can be understood as exact transverse gravitational waves of two polarization modes "+" and "x", shifted by pi/4, which propagate "on" Minkowski, de Sitter, or anti-de Sitter backgrounds. It is also shown that the solutions with Lambda>0 may serve as exact demonstrations of the cosmic "no-hair" conjecture in radiative spacetimes with no symmetry.

  7. Volumes

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative FuelsTotal" (Percent) Type: Sulfur ContentMwH)","RES_CONS4,369,090 4,367,318 4,367,470

  8. Varying constants quantum cosmology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Katarzyna Leszczynska; Adam Balcerzak; Mariusz P. Dabrowski

    2015-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

    We discuss minisuperspace models within the framework of varying physical constants theories including $\\Lambda$-term. In particular, we consider the varying speed of light (VSL) theory and varying gravitational constant theory (VG) using the specific ans\\"atze for the variability of constants: $c(a) = c_0 a^n$ and $G(a)=G_0 a^q$. We find that most of the varying $c$ and $G$ minisuperspace potentials are of the tunneling type which allows to use WKB approximation of quantum mechanics. Using this method we show that the probability of tunneling of the universe "from nothing" ($a=0)$ to a Friedmann geometry with the scale factor $a_t$ is large for growing $c$ models and is strongly suppressed for diminishing $c$ models. As for $G$ varying, the probability of tunneling is large for $G$ diminishing, while it is small for $G$ increasing. In general, both varying $c$ and $G$ change the probability of tunneling in comparison to the standard matter content (cosmological term, dust, radiation) universe models.

  9. 1. Physical constants 101 1. PHYSICAL CONSTANTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    with the Fermi coupling constant) comes from the Particle Data Group. The figures in parentheses after the values of 1 eV/c particle hc/(1 eV) 1.239 841 875(31)Ã?10-6 m 25 Rydberg energy hcR = mee4/2(4 0)2 2 = mec22 accel. gN 9.806 65 m s-2 exact Avogadro constant NA 6.022 141 79(30)Ã?1023 mol-1 50 Boltzmann constant k

  10. 1. Physical constants 1 1. PHYSICAL CONSTANTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of constants (beginning with the Fermi coupling constant) comes from the Particle Data Group. The figures of 1 eV/c particle hc/(1 eV) 1.239 841 930(27)Ã?10-6 m 22 Rydberg energy hcR = mee4/2(40)2 2 = mec22 gravitational accel. gN 9.806 65 m s-2 exact Avogadro constant NA 6.022 141 29(27)Ã?1023 mol-1 44 Boltzmann

  11. 1. A tank of volume V is to be filled with an ideal gas. Initially the tank is at P1and T1.the port is regulated with a valve, and the port properties are constant at Tin.The tank is well

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Haimei

    1. A tank of volume V is to be filled with an ideal gas. Initially the tank is at P1and T1.the port is regulated with a valve, and the port properties are constant at Tin.The tank is well insulated so the process is adiabatic. If the final pressure of the tank is Pz,determine the finaltemperature of the tank T

  12. An Environmental Variation of Constants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Philippe Brax

    2014-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Models of modified gravity, whereby local tests of gravity are evaded thanks to a screening mechanism of the chameleon or Damour-Polyakov types, lead to a spatial variation of the particle masses and the fine structure constant. This is triggered by the environmental dependence of the value of the scalar field whose presence modifies gravity. In dense media, the field settles at a density dependent value while in sparse environments it takes the background cosmological value. We estimate that the maximal deviation of constants from their present values is constrained by local tests of gravity, and must be less than $10^{-6}$.

  13. constant.inc

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ... with 1(read) completion } { 2 for status, and 3 for DMA control } { constants below for IBM DTC51C interface board } hddata = 0; { data port, bidirectional } hdcon ...

  14. Topology-controlled volume rendering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weber, Gunther H; Dillard, Scott E; Carr, Hamish; Pascucci, Valerio; Hamann, Bernd

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    type. Even when volume render- ing is applied to nonmedicalin graphics hardware. We render tubes between saddles and

  15. Unitaxial constant velocity microactuator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McIntyre, T.J.

    1994-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

    A uniaxial drive system or microactuator capable of operating in an ultra-high vacuum environment is disclosed. The mechanism includes a flexible coupling having a bore therethrough, and two clamp/pusher assemblies mounted in axial ends of the coupling. The clamp/pusher assemblies are energized by voltage-operated piezoelectrics therewithin to operatively engage the shaft and coupling causing the shaft to move along its rotational axis through the bore. The microactuator is capable of repeatably positioning to sub-nanometer accuracy while affording a scan range in excess of 5 centimeters. Moreover, the microactuator generates smooth, constant velocity motion profiles while producing a drive thrust of greater than 10 pounds. The system is remotely controlled and piezoelectrically driven, hence minimal thermal loading, vibrational excitation, or outgassing is introduced to the operating environment. 10 figs.

  16. Irrationality of the Zeta Constants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    N. A. Carella

    2014-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

    A general technique for proving the irrationality of the zeta constants z(s) for odd s = 2n + 1 => 3 from the known irrationality of the beta constants L(2n+1) is developed in this note. The results on the irrationality of the zeta constants z(2n), n => 1, and z(3) are well known, but the results on the irrationality for the zeta constants z(2n+1), n => 2, are new, and these results seem to confirm that these constants are irrational numbers. In addition, a result on the irrationality measures indicates that mu(L(2n+1)) <= mu(z(2n+1)).

  17. Reliability concerns with logical constants in Xilinx FPGA designs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Quinn, Heather M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Graham, Paul [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Morgan, Keith [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Ostler, Patrick [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Allen, Greg [JPL; Swift, Gary [XILINX; Tseng, Chen W [XILINX

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In Xilinx Field Programmable Gate Arrays logical constants, which ground unused inputs and provide constants for designs, are implemented in SEU-susceptible logic. In the past, these logical constants have been shown to cause the user circuit to output bad data and were not resetable through off-line rcconfiguration. In the more recent devices, logical constants are less problematic, though mitigation should still be considered for high reliability applications. In conclusion, we have presented a number of reliability concerns with logical constants in the Xilinx Virtex family. There are two main categories of logical constants: implicit and explicit logical constants. In all of the Virtex devices, the implicit logical constants are implemented using half latches, which in the most recent devices are several orders of magnitudes smaller than configuration bit cells. Explicit logical constants are implemented exclusively using constant LUTs in the Virtex-I and Virtex-II, and use a combination of constant LUTs and architectural posts to the ground plane in the Virtex-4. We have also presented mitigation methods and options for these devices. While SEUs in implicit and some types of explicit logical constants can cause data corrupt, the chance of failure from these components is now much smaller than it was in the Virtex-I device. Therefore, for many cases, mitigation might not be necessary, except under extremely high reliability situations.

  18. On the relationship of gravitational constants in KK reduction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lu, J X

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this short note, we try to clarify a seemly trivial but often confusing question in relating a higher-dimensional physical gravitational constant to its lower-dimensional correspondence in Kaluza-Klein reduction. In particular, we re-derive the low-energy M-theory gravitational constant in terms of type IIA string coupling $g_s$ and constant $\\alpha'$ through the metric relation between the two theories.

  19. Supply Fan Control for Constant Air Volume Air Handling Units

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cho, Y.; Wang, G.; Liu, M.

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    there is fixed VFD speed, as shown in Table 1 and Figure 11. On the other hand, the energy consumption is 3,896,493 Btu/hr when there is dynamic VFD speed. The thermal energy consumption of dynamic VFD speed is less than that of the fixed VFD speed by 44... %. Therefore, when the supply fan speed control is optimized, thermal energy can be reduced. Table 1. Comparison data of thermal energy consumption Floor Fixed VFD speed (Btu/hr) Dynamic VFD speed (Btu/hr) Energy saving (%) PLF 784,891 502,611 36...

  20. The Hubble constant and dark energy from cosmological distance measures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kazuhide Ichikawa; Tomo Takahashi

    2008-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

    We study how the determination of the Hubble constant from cosmological distance measures is affected by models of dark energy and vice versa. For this purpose, constraints on the Hubble constant and dark energy are investigated using the cosmological observations of cosmic microwave background, baryon acoustic oscillations and type Ia suprenovae. When one investigates dark energy, the Hubble constant is often a nuisance parameter, thus it is usually marginalized over. On the other hand, when one focuses on the Hubble constant, simple dark energy models such as a cosmological constant and a constant equation of state are usually assumed. Since we do not know the nature of dark energy yet, it is interesting to investigate the Hubble constant assuming some types of dark energy and see to what extent the constraint on the Hubble constant is affected by the assumption concerning dark energy. We show that the constraint on the Hubble constant is not affected much by the assumption for dark energy. We furthermore show that this holds true even if we remove the assumption that the universe is flat. We also discuss how the prior on the Hubble constant affects the constraints on dark energy and/or the curvature of the universe.

  1. Significant Increase in Hydrogen Photoproduction Rates and Yields by Wild-Type Algae is Detected at High Photobioreactor Gas Phase Volume (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This NREL Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Technical Highlight describes how hydrogen photoproduction activity in algal cultures can be improved dramatically by increasing the gas-phase to liquid-phase volume ratio of the photobioreactor. NREL, in partnership with subcontractors from the Institute of Basic Biological Problems in Pushchino, Russia, demonstrated that the hydrogen photoproduction rate in algal cultures always decreases exponentially with increasing hydrogen partial pressure above the culture. The inhibitory effect of high hydrogen concentrations in the photobioreactor gas phase on hydrogen photoproduction by algae is significant and comparable to the effect observed with some anaerobic bacteria.

  2. Structure constants of diagonal reduction algebras of gl type

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Khoroshkin; O. Ogievetsky

    2011-07-12T23:59:59.000Z

    We describe, in terms of generators and relations, the reduction algebra, related to the diagonal embedding of the Lie algebra $\\gl_n$ into $\\gl_n\\oplus\\gl_n$. Its representation theory is related to the theory of decompositions of tensor products of $\\gl_n$-modules.

  3. Volume Project

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    rroames

    2010-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Math 13900. Volume Project. For the following project, you may use any materials. This must be your own original creation. Construct a right pyramid with a base ...

  4. Mesonic low-energy constants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johan Bijnens; Gerhard Ecker

    2014-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

    We review the status of the coupling constants of chiral Lagrangians in the meson sector, the so-called low-energy constants (LECs). Special emphasis is put on the chiral $SU(2)$ and $SU(3)$ Lagrangians for the strong interactions of light mesons. The theoretical and experimental input for determining the corresponding LECs is discussed. In the two-flavour sector, we review the knowledge of the $O(p^4)$ LECs from both continuum fits and lattice QCD analyses. For chiral $SU(3)$, NNLO effects play a much bigger role. Our main new results are fits of the LECs $L_i$ both at NLO and NNLO, making extensive use of the available knowledge of NNLO LECs. We compare our results with available lattice determinations. Resonance saturation of LECs and the convergence of chiral $SU(3)$ to NNLO are discussed. We also review the status of predictions for the LECs of chiral Lagrangians with dynamical photons and leptons.

  5. Petroleum Products Table 43. Refiner Motor Gasoline Volumes...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    by Grade, Sales Type, PAD District, and State 262 Energy Information Administration Petroleum Marketing Annual 1996 Table 43. Refiner Motor Gasoline Volumes by Grade, Sales Type,...

  6. Petroleum Products Table 43. Refiner Motor Gasoline Volumes...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    by Grade, Sales Type, PAD District, and State 262 Energy Information Administration Petroleum Marketing Annual 1997 Table 43. Refiner Motor Gasoline Volumes by Grade, Sales Type,...

  7. CALCULATING OPTICAL CONSTANTS OF GLAZING MATERIALS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rubin, Michael

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Solar Energy CALCULATING OPTICAL CONSTANTS OF GLAZING MATERIALS Michael Rub August 1981 TWO-WEEK LOAN

  8. Relaxing a large cosmological constant

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Florian Bauer; Joan Sola; Hrvoje Stefancic

    2009-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The cosmological constant (CC) problem is the biggest enigma of theoretical physics ever. In recent times, it has been rephrased as the dark energy problem in order to encompass a wider spectrum of possibilities. It is, in any case, a polyhedric puzzle with many faces, including the cosmic coincidence problem, i.e. why the density of matter is presently so close to the CC density. However, the oldest, toughest and most intriguing face of this polyhedron is the big CC problem, namely why the measured value of the CC at present is so small as compared to any typical density scale existing in high energy physics, especially taking into account the many phase transitions that our Universe has undergone since the early times, including inflation. In this letter, we propose to extend the field equations of General Relativity by including a class of invariant terms that automatically relax the value of the CC irrespective of the initial size of the vacuum energy in the early epochs. We show that, at late times, the Universe enters an eternal de Sitter stage mimicking a tiny positive cosmological constant. Thus, these models could solve the big CC problem and have also a bearing on the cosmic coincidence problem. Remarkably, they mimic the LCDM model to a large extent, but they still leave some characteristic imprints that should be testable in the next generation of experiments.

  9. Typed Self-Optimization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown, Matt

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    type T y[O]. The operator IsIs is self-applicative, in thatargument t is any of Is[O] or IsIs, and otherwise behavesproof constant introduced by IsIs proves that the type of t

  10. Asymptotically Flat Wormhole Solutions in a Generic Cosmological Constant Background

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Y. Heydarzade; N. Riazi; H. Moradpour

    2015-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

    There are a number of reasons to study wormholes with generic cosmological constant $\\Lambda$. Recent observations indicate that present accelerating expansion of the universe demands $\\Lambda>0$. On the other hand, some extended theories of gravitation such as supergravity and superstring theories posses vacuum states with $\\Lambdaenergy density and pressure profiles which support such a geometry are obtained. It is shown that for having such a geometry, the wormhole throat $r_0$, the cosmological constant $\\Lambda$ and the equation of state parameter $\\omega$ should satisfy two specific conditions. The possibility of setting different values for the parameters of the model helps us to find exact solutions for the metric functions, mass functions and energy-momentum profiles. At last, the volume integral quantifier, which provides useful information about the total amount of energy condition violating matter is discussed briefly.

  11. Uranium in US surface, ground, and domestic waters. Volume 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Drury, J.S.; Reynolds, S.; Owen, P.T.; Ross, R.H.; Ensminger, J.T.

    1981-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The report Uranium in US Surface, Ground, and Domestic Waters comprises four volumes. Volumes 2, 3, and 4 contain data characterizing the location, sampling date, type, use, and uranium conentrations of 89,994 individual samples presented in tabular form. The tabular data in volumes 2, 3, and 4 are summarized in volume 1 in narrative form and with maps and histograms.

  12. Rate constants for charge transfer across semiconductor-liquid interfaces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fajardo, A.M.; Lewis, N.S. [California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA (United States)

    1996-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Interfacial charge-transfer rate constants have been measured for n-type Si electrodes in contact with a series of viologen-based redox couples in methanol through analyses of the behavior of these junctions with respect to their current density versus potential and differential capacitance versus potential properties. The data allow evaluation of the maximum rate constant (and therefore the electronic coupling) for majority carriers in the solid as well as of the dependence of the rate constant on the driving force for transfer of delocalized electrons from the n-Si semiconducting electrode into the localized molecular redox species in the solution phase. The data are in good agreement with existing models of this interfacial electron transfer process and provide insight into the fundamental kinetic events underlying the use of semiconducting photoelectrodes in applications such as solar energy conversion. 23 refs., 3 figs.

  13. Emergent cosmological constant from colliding electromagnetic waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Halilsoy; S. Habib Mazharimousavi; O. Gurtug

    2014-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In this study we advocate the view that the cosmological constant is of electromagnetic (em) origin, which can be generated from the collision of em shock waves coupled with gravitational shock waves. The wave profiles that participate in the collision have different amplitudes. It is shown that, circular polarization with equal amplitude waves does not generate cosmological constant. We also prove that the generation of the cosmological constant is related to the linear polarization. The addition of cross polarization generates no cosmological constant. Depending on the value of the wave amplitudes, the generated cosmological constant can be positive or negative. We show additionally that, the collision of nonlinear em waves in a particular class of Born-Infeld theory also yields a cosmological constant.

  14. Kepler Problem in the Constant Curvature Space

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. Pronko

    2007-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

    We present algebraic derivation of the result of Schr\\"{o}dinger [1] for the spectrum of hydrogen atom in the space with constant curvature.

  15. Biophysical Journal, Volume 97 Supporting Material

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heller, Eric

    leaflet area was then calculated assuming a radius of 51.5 nm, while initial volume was calculated, and Jack W. Szostak #12;Supplementary Information I. Calculation of membrane outer leaflet area change that minimizes the area change. In the deflated state, membrane area was taken to be constant at the mid

  16. The Constant Voltage Transformer (CVT) for Mitigating Effects of Voltage Sags on Industrial Equipment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ferraro, R. J.; Osborne, R.; Stephens, R.

    ) an increase in loads that use power electronics in some type of power conversion configuration [1][2]. This paper presents applications of the constant-voltage transformer (CVT) for mitigating the effects of electric service voltage sags on industrial...

  17. Inverse problem in anisotropic poroelasticity: Drained constants from undrained ultrasound measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berryman, J.G.; Nakagawa, S.

    2009-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Poroelastic analysis has traditionally focused on the relationship between dry or drained constants which are assumed known and the saturated or undrained constants which are assumed unknown. However, there are many applications in this field of study for which the main measurements can only be made on the saturated/undrained system, and then it is uncertain what the eects of the uids were on the system, since the drained constants remain a mystery. The work presented here shows how to deduce drained constants from undrained constants for anisotropic systems having symmetries ranging from isotropic to orthotropic. Laboratory ultrasound data are then inverted for the drained constants in three granular packings: one of glass beads, and two others for distinct types of more or less angular sand grain packings. Experiments were performed under uniaxial stress, which resulted in hexagonal (transversely isotropic) symmetry of the poroelastic response. One important conclusion from the general analysis is that the drained constants are uniquely related to the undrained constants, assuming that porosity, grain bulk modulus, and pore uid bulk modulus are already known. Since the resulting system of equations for all the drained constants is linear, measurement error in undrained constants also propagates linearly into the computed drained constants.

  18. Volume Comparison

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear SecurityTensile Strain Switched Ferromagnetism inS-4500IIVasudhaSurface. | EMSLVisualizingwith SalicylamideVolume

  19. The Constant Radiance Term Lszl Neumann 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    is zero. The self- 1 Email: neumann@hungary.net #12; L. Neumann: The Constant Radiance Term - 2 information, nor the calculation of form factors. A constant radiance is extracted from the solution in every of the residuum problem is zero. The self-emitting term of the residuum problem can either be positive or negative

  20. Newtonian Constant of Gravitation International Consortium

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Newtonian Constant of Gravitation International Consortium I. BACKGROUND Recent measurements of the Newtonian constant of gravitation G are in disagreement, with discrepancies that are roughly ten times forces on a laboratory scale. It also raises the question of whether the Newtonian force law

  1. Table 44. Refiner Motor Gasoline Volumes by Formulation, Sales...

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    250 Energy Information AdministrationPetroleum Marketing Annual 1999 Table 44. Refiner Motor Gasoline Volumes by Formulation, Sales Type, PAD District, and State (Thousand Gallons...

  2. Table 44. Refiner Motor Gasoline Volumes by Formulation, Sales...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    - - - - W W - - - - - - See footnotes at end of table. 44. Refiner Motor Gasoline Volumes by Formulation, Sales Type, PAD District, and State 292 Energy...

  3. Table 44. Refiner Motor Gasoline Volumes by Formulation, Sales...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    250 Energy Information AdministrationPetroleum Marketing Annual 1998 Table 44. Refiner Motor Gasoline Volumes by Formulation, Sales Type, PAD District, and State (Thousand Gallons...

  4. Table 44. Refiner Motor Gasoline Volumes by Formulation, Sales...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Energy Information Administration Petroleum Marketing Annual 1995 Table 44. Refiner Motor Gasoline Volumes by Formulation, Sales Type, PAD District, and State (Thousand Gallons...

  5. Constants and Pseudo-Constants of Coupled Beam Motion in the PEP-II Rings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Decker, F.J.; Colocho, W.S.; Wang, M.H.; Yan, Y.T.; Yocky, G.; /SLAC

    2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Constants of beam motion help as cross checks to analyze beam diagnostics and the modeling procedure. Pseudo-constants, like the betatron mismatch parameter or the coupling parameter det C, are constant till certain elements in the beam line change them. This can be used to visually find the non-desired changes, pinpointing errors compared with the model.

  6. A beta-type fully implicit reservoir simulator with variable bubble point and dew point

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boe, Jarle

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the following equation. V P 5. 617 m g 2 QT 1000 (56) And the R curve can be obtained from the same constant volume Sg depletion by summing up the GPM content of the propane through hep- tanes plus fractions. The B and the R can then be calculated 0 so...A BETA-TYPE FULLY IMPLICIT RESERVOIR SIMULATOR WITH VARIABLE BUBBLE POINT AND DEW POINT A Thesis by JARLE BOE Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER...

  7. Asymptotic safety and the cosmological constant

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kevin Falls

    2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the non-perturbative renormalisation of quantum gravity in four dimensions. Taking care to disentangle physical degrees of freedom, we observe the topological nature of conformal fluctuations arising from the functional measure. The resulting beta functions possess an asymptotically safe fixed point with a global phase structure leading to classical general relativity for positive, negative or vanishing cosmological constant. If only the conformal fluctuations are quantised we find an asymptotically safe fixed point predicting a vanishing cosmological constant on all scales. At this fixed point we reproduce the critical exponent, $\

  8. Electromagnetic corrections to pseudoscalar decay constants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Benjamin Glaessle; Gunnar S. Bali

    2011-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The effects of electromagnetic interactions on pseudoscalar decay constants are investigated. Using a compact QED and QCD action we are able to resolve differences of about 0.1 MeV. We obtain the preliminary results f_pi^0-f_pi^+/- =0.09(3) MeV and f_D^0-f_D^+/- =0.79(11) MeV for light and charmed pseudoscalar decay constants on a N_f=2 nonperturbatively improved Sheikholeslami-Wohlert ensemble.

  9. Optical Constants ofOptical Constants of Uranium Nitride Thin FilmsUranium Nitride Thin Films

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hart, Gus

    Optical Constants ofOptical Constants of Uranium Nitride Thin FilmsUranium Nitride Thin FilmsDelta--Beta Scatter Plot at 220 eVBeta Scatter Plot at 220 eV #12;Why Uranium Nitride?Why Uranium Nitride? UraniumUranium, uranium,Bombard target, uranium, with argon ionswith argon ions Uranium atoms leaveUranium atoms leave

  10. Surface Tension and the Cosmological Constant

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Joseph Samuel; Supurna Sinha

    2006-04-18T23:59:59.000Z

    The astronomically observed value of the cosmological constant is small but non-zero. This raises two questions together known as the cosmological constant problem a) why is lambda so nearly zero? b) why is lambda not EXACTLY zero? Sorkin has proposed that b) can be naturally explained as a one by square root N fluctuation by invoking discreteness of spacetime at the Planck scale due to quantum gravity. In this paper we shed light on these questions by developing an analogy between the cosmological constant and the surface tension of membranes. The ``cosmological constant problem'' has a natural analogue in the membrane context: the vanishingly small surface tension of fluid membranes provides an example where question a) above arises and is answered. We go on to find a direct analogue of Sorkin's proposal for answering question b) in the membrane context, where the discreteness of spacetime translates into the molecular structure of matter. We propose analogue experiments to probe a small and fluctuating surface tension in fluid membranes. A counterpart of dimensional reduction a la Kaluza-Klein and large extra dimensions also appears in the physics of fluid membranes.

  11. Adaptation in constant utility nonstationary environments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Littman, Michael L.

    Adaptation in constant utility non­stationary environments Michael L. Littman & David H. Ackley Abstract Environments that vary over time present a fundamental problem to adaptive systems. Although adaptive opportunities. We consider a broad class of non­stationary environments, those which combine

  12. Density Perturbations for Running Cosmological Constant

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Julio C. Fabris; Ilya L. Shapiro; Joan Sola

    2007-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The dynamics of density and metric perturbations is investigated for the previously developed model where the decay of the vacuum energy into matter (or vice versa) is due to the renormalization group (RG) running of the cosmological constant (CC) term. The evolution of the CC depends on the single parameter \

  13. A Time-dependent Cosmological Constant Phenomenology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Salvatore Capozziello; Ruggiero de Ritis; Alma Angela Marino

    1996-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

    We construct a cosmological toy model in which a step-function ``cosmological constant'' is taken into consideration beside ordinary matter. We assume that $\\Lambda$ takes two values depending on the epoch, and matter goes from a radiation dominated era to a dust dominated era. The model is exactly solvable and it can be compared with recent observations.

  14. The Cosmological Constant and the String Landscape

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Joseph Polchinski

    2006-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Theories of the cosmological constant fall into two classes, those in which the vacuum energy is fixed by the fundamental theory and those in which it is adjustable in some way. For each class we discuss key challenges. The string theory landscape is an example of an adjustment mechanism. We discuss the status of this idea, and future directions.

  15. Constant-Pressure Measurement of Steam-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    SGP-TR-169 Constant-Pressure Measurement of Steam- Water Relative Permeability Peter A. O by measuring in-situ steam saturation more directly. Mobile steam mass fraction was established by separate steam and water inlets or by correlating with previous results. The measured steam-water relative

  16. Polynomial Constants are Decidable Markus Muller-Olm1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Müller-Olm, Markus

    Polynomial Constants are Decidable Markus M¨uller-Olm1 and Helmut Seidl2 1 University of Dortmund variable, are interpreted. Another decidable class of constants are finite constants [19]. This motivated M¨uller-Olm

  17. acid dissociation constants: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of Constants . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20 3.1.1 Flow Graphs Mller-Olm, Markus 333 Cosmological constant, supersymmetry, nonassociativity, and Big Numbers...

  18. approx constant applicable: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of Constants . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20 3.1.1 Flow Graphs Mller-Olm, Markus 280 Cosmological constant, supersymmetry, nonassociativity, and Big Numbers...

  19. acid dissociation constant: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of Constants . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20 3.1.1 Flow Graphs Mller-Olm, Markus 333 Cosmological constant, supersymmetry, nonassociativity, and Big Numbers...

  20. afectan las constantes: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of Constants . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20 3.1.1 Flow Graphs Mller-Olm, Markus 144 Cosmological constant, supersymmetry, nonassociativity, and Big Numbers...

  1. Infrared Spectroscopy and Optical Constants of Porous Amorphous...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Spectroscopy and Optical Constants of Porous Amorphous Solid Water. Infrared Spectroscopy and Optical Constants of Porous Amorphous Solid Water. Abstract: Reflection-absorption...

  2. Variable energy constant current accelerator structure

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Anderson, O.A.

    1988-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

    A variable energy, constant current ion beam accelerator structure is disclosed comprising an ion source capable of providing the desired ions, a pre-accelerator for establishing an initial energy level, a matching/pumping module having means for focusing means for maintaining the beam current, and at least one main accelerator module for continuing beam focus, with means capable of variably imparting acceleration to the beam so that a constant beam output current is maintained independent of the variable output energy. In a preferred embodiment, quadrupole electrodes are provided in both the matching/pumping module and the one or more accelerator modules, and are formed using four opposing cylinder electrodes which extend parallel to the beam axis and are spaced around the beam at 90/degree/ intervals with opposing electrodes maintained at the same potential. 12 figs., 3 tabs.

  3. Quantum Exclusion of Positive Cosmological Constant?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gia Dvali; Cesar Gomez

    2014-12-27T23:59:59.000Z

    We show that a positive cosmological constant is incompatible with the quantum-corpuscular resolution of de Sitter metric in form of a coherent state. The reason is very general and is due to the quantum self-destruction of the coherent state because of the scattering of constituent graviton quanta. This process creates an irreversible quantum clock, which precludes eternal de Sitter. It also eliminates the possibility of Boltzmann brains and Poincare recurrences. This effect is expected to be part of any microscopic theory that takes into account the quantum corpuscular structure of the cosmological background. This observation puts the cosmological constant problem in a very different light, promoting it, from a naturalness problem, into a question of quantum consistency. We are learning that quantum gravity cannot tolerate exceedingly-classical sources.

  4. Cosmological Constant Problems and Renormalization Group

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ilya L. Shapiro; Joan Sola

    2007-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

    The Cosmological Constant Problem emerges when Quantum Field Theory is applied to the gravitational theory, due to the enormous magnitude of the induced energy of the vacuum. The unique known solution of this problem involves an extremely precise fine-tuning of the vacuum counterpart. We review a few of the existing approaches to this problem based on the account of the quantum (loop) effects and pay special attention to the ones involving the renormalization group.

  5. Computer News, Volume 3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    [mandelbrot set] MATH DEPT Computer News, Volume 3. How to take advantage of the newer, faster machines on our network ...

  6. Computer News, Volume 2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    [mandelbrot set] MATH DEPT Computer News, Volume 2. How to handle .pdf files on the web: acroread, distill, and Netscape ...

  7. A comparison of various calculational methods for constant volatility ratio, constant reflux multicomponent distillation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hurst, James William

    1952-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    for Figures 17, 18, nd 19. . . 83 XIV. Tabulation of Empirical Correlation (Equation 48). 85 ZIQUR S Page l. Operating Data for the Depropanization of a Light Naphtha. 26 2. Composition of Vapor Rising from Plates in a Column Containi. ng an Infinite... for lg constant- doublet separation systems in which the molal liquid and vapor flows remain constant within each section of the column. An empirical correlation (Equation 48) relating the error of the "apcroximate" method to process variables...

  8. Current and future industrial energy service characterizations. Volume II. Energy data on the US manufacturing subsector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krawiec, F.; Thomas, T.; Jackson, F.; Limaye, D.R.; Isser, S.; Karnofsky, K.; Davis, T.D.

    1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In order to characterize industrial energy service, current energy demand, its end uses, and cost of typical energy applications and resultant services in the industrial sector were examined and a projection of state industrial energy demands and prices to 1990 was developed. Volume II presents in Section 2 data on the US manufacturing subsector energy demand, intensity, growth rates, and cost for 1971, 1974, and 1976. These energy data are disaggregated not only by fuel type but also by user classifications, including the 2-digit SIC industry groups, 3-digit subgroups, and 4-digit SIC individual industries. These data characterize typical energy applications and the resultant services in this subsector. The quantities of fuel and electric energy purchased by the US manufacturing subsector were converted to British thermal units and reported in billions of Btu. The conversion factors are presented in Table 4-1 of Volume I. To facilitate the descriptive analysis, all energy cost and intensity data were expressed in constant 1976 dollars. The specific US industrial energy service characteristics developed and used in the descriptive analysis are presented in Volume I. Section 3 presents the computer program used to produce the tabulated data.

  9. High Temperature, Large Sample Volume, Constant Flow Magic Angle Spinning NMR Probe for a 11

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-SeriesFlickr FlickrGuidedCH2M HILLAdministrationHigh SchoolHigh SchoolHigh

  10. Regular Type III and Type N Approximate Solutions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Philip Downes; Paul MacAllevey; Bogdan Nita; Ivor Robinson

    2001-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

    New type III and type N approximate solutions which are regular in the linear approximation are shown to exist. For that, we use complex transformations on self-dual Robinson-Trautman metrics rather then the classical approach. The regularity criterion is the boundedness and vanishing at infinity of a scalar obtained by saturating the Bel-Robinson tensor of the first approximation by a time-like vector which is constant with respect to the zeroth approximation.

  11. TASI Lectures on the cosmological constant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bousso, Raphael; Bousso, Raphael

    2007-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The energy density of the vacuum, Lambda, is at least 60 orders of magnitude smaller than several known contributions to it. Approaches to this problem are tightly constrained by data ranging from elementary observations to precision experiments. Absent overwhelming evidence to the contrary, dark energy can only be interpreted as vacuum energy, so the venerable assumption that Lambda=0 conflicts with observation. The possibility remains that Lambda is fundamentally variable, though constant over large spacetime regions. This can explain the observed value, but only in a theory satisfying a number of restrictive kinematic and dynamical conditions. String theory offers a concrete realization through its landscape of metastable vacua.

  12. Scalar field collapse with negative cosmological constant

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. Baier; Hiromichi Nishimura; S. A. Stricker

    2014-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

    The formation of black holes or naked singularities is studied in a model in which a homogeneous time-dependent scalar field with an exponential potential couples to four dimensional gravity with negative cosmological constant. An analytic solution is derived and its consequences are discussed. The model depends only on one free parameter, which determines the equation of state and decides the fate of the spacetime. Without fine tuning the value of this parameter the collapse ends in a generic formation of a black hole or a naked singularity. The latter case violates the cosmic censorship conjecture.

  13. Scalar field collapse with negative cosmological constant

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baier, R; Stricker, S A

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The formation of black holes or naked singularities is studied in a model in which a homogeneous time-dependent scalar field with an exponential potential couples to four dimensional gravity with negative cosmological constant. An analytic solution is derived and its consequences are discussed. The model depends only on one free parameter which determines the equation of state and decides the fate of the spacetime. Depending on the value of this parameter the collapse ends in a black hole or a naked singularity. The latter case violates the cosmic censorship conjecture.

  14. $f(T)$ Theories and Varying Fine Structure Constant

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wei, Hao; Qi, Hao-Yu

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In analogy to $f(R)$ theory, recently $f(T)$ theory has been proposed to drive the current accelerated expansion without invoking dark energy. In the literature, the observational constraints on $f(T)$ theories were obtained mainly by using the cosmological data, such as type Ia supernovae (SNIa), baryon acoustic oscillation (BAO), and cosmic microwave background radiation (CMB). In this work, we instead try to constrain $f(T)$ theories with the varying fine structure "constant", $\\alpha\\equiv e^2/\\hbar c$. We find that the constraints on $f(T)$ theories from the observational $\\Delta\\alpha/\\alpha$ data are very severe. In fact, they make $f(T)$ theories almost indistinguishable from $\\Lambda$CDM model.

  15. Seismic pulse propagation with constant Q and stable probability distributions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Francesco Mainardi; Massimo Tomirotti

    2010-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The one-dimensional propagation of seismic waves with constant Q is shown to be governed by an evolution equation of fractional order in time, which interpolates the heat equation and the wave equation. The fundamental solutions for the Cauchy and Signalling problems are expressed in terms of entire functions (of Wright type) in the similarity variable and their behaviours turn out to be intermediate between those for the limiting cases of a perfectly viscous fluid and a perfectly elastic solid. In view of the small dissipation exhibited by the seismic pulses, the nearly elastic limit is considered. Furthermore, the fundamental solutions for the Cauchy and Signalling problems are shown to be related to stable probability distributions with index of stability determined by the order of the fractional time derivative in the evolution equation.

  16. From constant to non-degenerately vanishing magnetic fields in superconductivity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bernard Helffer; Ayman Kachmar

    2015-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

    We explore the relationship between two reference functions arising in the analysis of the Ginzburg-Landau functional. The first function describes the distribution of superconductivity in a type II superconductor subjected to a constant magnetic field. The second function describes the distribution of superconductivity in a type II superconductor submitted to a variable magnetic field that vanishes non-degenerately along a smooth curve.

  17. American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics Comparison of Tensile Fatigue Resistance and Constant

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and Constant Life Diagrams for Several Potential Wind Turbine Blade Laminates Daniel D. Samborsky, Timothy J laminates of current and potential interest for wind turbine blades, representing three types of fibers: E loading relative to an earlier material. Comparisons of the materials show significant improvements under

  18. The Problem of the Cosmological Constant

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ostoma, T; Ostoma, Tom; Trushyk, Mike

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ElectroMagnetic Quantum Gravity (EMQG) is applied to the problem of the Cosmological Constant. EMQG is a quantum gravity theory (ref. 1) in which the virtual particles of the quantum vacuum play a very important role in all gravitational interactions, and also in accelerated motion. According to EMQG theory (and quantum field theory in general), empty space is populated by vast numbers of virtual particles, consisting of virtual fermion and virtual anti-fermion particles, which posses mass, and also virtual boson particles of all the various force particle species. Therefore the problem of the cosmological constant is essentially equivalent to a determination of the mass contributed by all the virtual particles of the vacuum to the overall curvature and dynamics of the entire universe. Our original analysis was based on the assumption of perfect symmetry in the creation and destruction of virtual fermion and virtual anti-fermion particle pairs in the quantum vacuum, which is in accordance with the existing la...

  19. Is Cosmological Constant Needed in Higgs Inflation?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feng, Chao-Jun

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The detection of B-mode shows a very powerful constraint to theoretical inflation models through the measurement of the tensor-to-scalar ratio $r$. Higgs boson is the most likely candidate of the inflaton field. But usually, Higgs inflation models predict a small value of $r$, which is not quite consistent with the recent results from BICEP2. In this paper, we explored whether a cosmological constant energy component is needed to improve the situation. And we found the answer is yes. For the so-called Higgs chaotic inflation model with a quadratic potential, it predicts $r\\approx 0.2$, $n_s\\approx0.96$ with e-folds number $N\\approx 56$, which is large enough to overcome the problems such as the horizon problem in the Big Bang cosmology. The required energy scale of the cosmological constant is roughly $\\Lambda \\sim (10^{14} \\text{GeV})^2 $, which means a mechanism is still needed to solve the fine-tuning problem in the later time evolution of the universe, e.g. by introducing some dark energy component.

  20. Is Cosmological Constant Needed in Higgs Inflation?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chao-Jun Feng; Xin-Zhou Li

    2014-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The detection of B-mode shows a very powerful constraint to theoretical inflation models through the measurement of the tensor-to-scalar ratio $r$. Higgs boson is the most likely candidate of the inflaton field. But usually, Higgs inflation models predict a small value of $r$, which is not quite consistent with the recent results from BICEP2. In this paper, we explored whether a cosmological constant energy component is needed to improve the situation. And we found the answer is yes. For the so-called Higgs chaotic inflation model with a quadratic potential, it predicts $r\\approx 0.2$, $n_s\\approx0.96$ with e-folds number $N\\approx 56$, which is large enough to overcome the problems such as the horizon problem in the Big Bang cosmology. The required energy scale of the cosmological constant is roughly $\\Lambda \\sim (10^{14} \\text{GeV})^2 $, which means a mechanism is still needed to solve the fine-tuning problem in the later time evolution of the universe, e.g. by introducing some dark energy component.

  1. Superintegrable systems on spaces of constant curvature

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gonera, Cezary, E-mail: cgonera@uni.lodz.pl; Kaszubska, Magdalena

    2014-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Construction and classification of two-dimensional (2D) superintegrable systems (i.e. systems admitting, in addition to two global integrals of motion guaranteeing the Liouville integrability, the third global and independent one) defined on 2D spaces of constant curvature and separable in the so-called geodesic polar coordinates are presented. The method proposed is applicable to any value of curvature including the case of Euclidean plane, sphere and hyperbolic plane. The main result is a generalization of Bertrand’s theorem on 2D spaces of constant curvature and covers most of the known separable and superintegrable models on such spaces (in particular, the so-called Tremblay–Turbiner–Winternitz (TTW) and Post–Winternitz (PW) models which have recently attracted some interest). -- Highlights: •Classifying 2D superintegrable, separable (polar coordinates) systems on S{sup 2}, R{sup 2}, H{sup 2}. •Construction of radial, angular potentials leading to superintegrability. •Generalization of Bertrand’s theorem covering known models, e.g. Higgs, TTW, PW, and Coulomb.

  2. Automatic detection of sweep-meshable volumes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tautges; Timothy J. (Madison, WI), White; David R. (Pittsburgh, PA)

    2006-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of and software for automatically determining whether a mesh can be generated by sweeping for a representation of a geometric solid comprising: classifying surface mesh schemes for surfaces of the representation locally using surface vertex types; grouping mappable and submappable surfaces of the representation into chains; computing volume edge types for the representation; recursively traversing surfaces of the representation and grouping the surfaces into source, target, and linking surface lists; and checking traversal direction when traversing onto linking surfaces.

  3. Constant field gradient planar coupled cavity structure

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kang, Y.W.; Kustom, R.L.

    1999-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

    A cavity structure is disclosed having at least two opposing planar housing members spaced apart to accommodate the passage of a particle beam through the structure between the members. Each of the housing members have a plurality of serially aligned hollows defined therein, and also passages, formed in the members, which interconnect serially adjacent hollows to provide communication between the hollows. The opposing planar housing members are spaced and aligned such that the hollows in one member cooperate with corresponding hollows in the other member to form a plurality of resonant cavities aligned along the particle beam within the cavity structure. To facilitate the obtaining of a constant field gradient within the cavity structure, the passages are configured so as to be incrementally narrower in the direction of travel of the particle beam. In addition, the spacing distance between the opposing housing members is configured to be incrementally smaller in the direction of travel of the beam. 16 figs.

  4. Casimir energy for surfaces with constant conductivity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nail Khusnutdinov; D. Drosdoff; Lilia M. Woods

    2014-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider the vacuum energy of the electromagnetic field in systems characterized by a constant conductivity using the zeta-regularization approach. The interaction in two cases is investigated: two infinitely thin parallel sheets and an infinitely thin spherical shell. We found that the Casimir energy for the planar system is always attractive and it has the same characteristic distance dependence as the interaction for two perfect semi-infinite metals. The Casimir energy for the spherical shell depends on the inverse radius of the sphere, but it maybe negative or positive depending on the value of the conductivity. If the conductivity is less than a certain critical value, the interaction is attractive, otherwise the Casimir force is repulsive regardless of the spherical shell radius.

  5. Eternal Higgs inflation and cosmological constant problem

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hamada, Yuta; Oda, Kin-ya

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate the Higgs potential beyond the Planck scale in the superstring theory, under the assumption that the supersymmetry is broken at the string scale. We identify the Higgs field as a massless state of the string, which is indicated by the fact that the bare Higgs mass can be zero around the string scale. We find that, in the large field region, the Higgs potential is connected to a runaway vacuum with vanishing energy, which corresponds to opening up an extra dimension. We verify that such universal behavior indeed follows from the toroidal compactification of the non-supersymmetric $SO(16)\\times SO(16)$ heterotic string theory. We show that this behavior fits in the picture that the Higgs field is the source of the eternal inflation. The observed small value of the cosmological constant of our universe may be understood as the degeneracy with this runaway vacuum, which has vanishing energy, as is suggested by the multiple point criticality principle.

  6. Universal equations and constants of turbulent motion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baumert, Helmut Z

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents a parameter-free theory of shear-generated turbulence at asymptotically high Reynolds numbers in incompressible fluids. It is based on a two-fluids concept. Both components are materially identical and inviscid. The first component is an ensemble of quasi-rigid dipole-vortex tubes as quasi-particles in chaotic motion. The second is a superfluid performing evasive motions between the tubes. The local dipole motions follow Helmholtz' law. The vortex radii scale with the energy-containing length scale. Collisions between quasi-particles lead either to annihilation (likewise rotation, turbulent dissipation) or to scattering (counterrotation, turbulent diffusion). There are analogies with birth and death processes of population dynamics and their master equations. For free homogeneous decay the theory predicts the TKE to follow 1/t. With an adiabatic condition at the wall it predicts the logarithmic law with von Karman's constant as 1/\\sqrt{2 pi} = 0.399. Likewise rotating couples form dissipat...

  7. World Volume Action for Fractional Branes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Merlatti, P

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the world volume action of fractional Dp-branes of type IIA string theory compactified on the orbifold T^4/Z_2. The geometric relation between these branes and wrapped branes is investigated using conformal techniques. In particular we examine in detail various scattering amplitudes and find that the leading low-energy interactions are consistent with the boundary action derived geometrically.

  8. World Volume Action for Fractional Branes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. Merlatti; G. Sabella

    2001-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the world volume action of fractional Dp-branes of type IIA string theory compactified on the orbifold T^4/Z_2. The geometric relation between these branes and wrapped branes is investigated using conformal techniques. In particular we examine in detail various scattering amplitudes and find that the leading low-energy interactions are consistent with the boundary action derived geometrically.

  9. LANL Volume 2_Final

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    42 LANL * Consider developing programmatic evaluation criteria based on the October 1999 draft of Volume VI, Emergency Management Evaluations, of the DOE emergency...

  10. Finite Volume Element Method

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2003-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

    FVE is closely related to the control volume finite element method ... simple stencils, to apply to a fairly wide range of fluid flow equations, to effectively treat.

  11. Computer News, Volume 25

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MATH DEPT Computer News, Volume 25. TeX for Mac OS X. plus ssh and security issues for Macs. by Rodrigo Bañuelos. NOTE: These instructions are now ...

  12. Computer News, Volume 21

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MATH DEPT Computer News, Volume 21. I came, I saw, ical. There's a great new calendar and appointment book program on our system called ical at.

  13. Computer News, Volume 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MATH DEPT Computer News, Volume 1. You and your .cshrc file. Click on RELOAD now. This page is frequently updated and you might be looking at an old ...

  14. Computer News, Volume 36

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MATH DEPT Computer News, Volume 36. Click on RELOAD now. This page is frequently updated and you might be looking at an old version saved by your ...

  15. Computer News, Volume 19

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MATH DEPT Computer News, Volume 19. Those damned attachments! I explain here how to extract and decode e-mail attachments of various kinds. Click on ...

  16. Computer News, Volume 8

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    [mandelbrot set] MATH DEPT Computer News, Volume 8. A convenient way to do e-mail from home. by guest columnist, Donu Arapura ...

  17. Computer News, Volume 20

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MATH DEPT Computer News, Volume 20. You and your .forward file. Let's say your name is Steven Bellisandagorapahockey and your login id on math is sbellis ...

  18. Computer News, Volume 37

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MATH DEPT Computer News, Volume 37. Click on RELOAD now. This page is frequently updated and you might be looking at an old version saved by your ...

  19. Computer News, Volume 13

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MATH DEPT Computer News, Volume 13. How to dork your official classlist. Click on RELOAD now. This page is frequently updated and you might be looking at ...

  20. Computer News, Volume 15

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MATH DEPT Computer News, Volume 15. How to gain access to Mathematica on a math dept SUN. Click on RELOAD now. This page is frequently updated and ...

  1. Computer News, Volume 34

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    [mandelbrot set] MATH DEPT Computer News, Volume 34. Click on RELOAD now. This page is frequently updated and you might be looking at an old version

  2. Computer News, Volume 33

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MATH DEPT Computer News, Volume 33. How I teach big calculus lectures with a tablet PC. Click on RELOAD now. This page is frequently updated and you ...

  3. Computer News, Volume 12

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MATH DEPT Computer News, Volume 12. Quick and dirty math on the internet. Click on RELOAD now. This page is frequently updated and you might be ...

  4. Computer News, Volume 38

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MATH DEPT Computer News, Volume 38. Click on RELOAD now. This page is frequently updated and you might be looking at an old version saved by your ...

  5. Computer News, Volume 27

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MATH DEPT Computer News, Volume 27. How to approve Plans of Study on the web. First, make sure you know your Purdue Career Account Login and ...

  6. Computer News, Volume 4

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MATH DEPT Computer News, Volume 4. Xess, the spreadsheet. Click on RELOAD now. This page is frequently updated and you might be looking at an old ...

  7. Computer News, Volume 2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MATH DEPT Computer News, Volume 2. How to add acroread and distill to your path. Click on RELOAD now. This page is frequently updated and you might be ...

  8. Computer News, Volume 35

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MATH DEPT Computer News, Volume 34. Click on RELOAD now. This page is frequently updated and you might be looking at an old version saved by your ...

  9. Computer News, Volume 32

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MATH DEPT Computer News, Volume 32. The new TeX and how to create the new PU Math letterhead stationery. with help from Brad Lucier, Rodrigo Bañuelos

  10. Computer News, Volume 39

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MATH DEPT Computer News, Volume 39. Click on RELOAD now. This page is frequently updated and you might be looking at an old version saved by your ...

  11. Computer News, Volume 23

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MATH DEPT Computer News, Volume 23. How to view e-mail formatted in HTML originating from the web. Click on RELOAD now. This page is frequently ...

  12. Prime Supplier Sales Volumes

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Sales Volumes of Motor Gasoline by Grade, Formulation, PAD District, and State 356 Energy Information Administration Petroleum Marketing Annual 1996 Table 48. Prime...

  13. Prime Supplier Sales Volumes

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Sales Volumes of Motor Gasoline by Grade, Formulation, PAD District, and State 356 Energy Information Administration Petroleum Marketing Annual 1997 Table 48. Prime...

  14. achievements review volume: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    LETTERS VOLUME 84 3 JANUARY 2000 NUMBER 1 Delayed "Choice" Quantum Eraser Yoon January 1999) We report a delayed "choice" quantum eraser experiment of the type proposed by Scully...

  15. Article No. ectj?????? Econometrics Journal (2008), volume 04, pp. 132.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wolfe, Patrick J.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Article No. ectj?????? Econometrics Journal (2008), volume 04, pp. 1­32. Realised Kernels is a Brownian motion, all adapted to some filtration F. For reviews of the econometrics of processes of the type

  16. Petroleum Products Table 43. Refiner Motor Gasoline Volumes...

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    133.6 - 276.4 See footnotes at end of table. 220 Energy Information AdministrationPetroleum Marketing Annual 2000 Table 43. Refiner Motor Gasoline Volumes by Grade, Sales Type,...

  17. Petroleum Products Table 43. Refiner Motor Gasoline Volumes...

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    201.3 - 453.3 See footnotes at end of table. 262 Energy Information Administration Petroleum Marketing Annual 1995 Table 43. Refiner Motor Gasoline Volumes by Grade, Sales Type,...

  18. Table 7. U.S. Refiner Motor Gasoline Volumes by Grade and Sales...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Information Administration Petroleum Marketing Annual 1995 Table 7. U.S. Refiner Motor Gasoline Volumes by Grade and Sales Type (Million Gallons per Day) - Continued Year...

  19. Table 7. U.S. Refiner Motor Gasoline Volumes by Grade and Sales...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Energy Information AdministrationPetroleum Marketing Annual 1998 Table 7. U.S. Refiner Motor Gasoline Volumes by Grade and Sales Type (Million Gallons per Day) - Continued Year...

  20. Holographic Dark Energy with Cosmological Constant

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hu, Yazhou; Li, Nan; Zhang, Zhenhui

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Inspired by the multiverse scenario, we study a heterotic dark energy model in which there are two parts, the first being the cosmological constant and the second being the holographic dark energy, thus this model is named the $\\Lambda$HDE model. By studying the $\\Lambda$HDE model theoretically, we find that the parameters $c$ and $\\Omega_{hde}$ are divided into a few domains in which the fate of the universe is quite different. We investigate dynamical behaviors of this model, and especially the future evolution of the universe. We perform fitting analysis on the cosmological parameters in the $\\Lambda$HDE model by using the recent observational data. We find the model yields $\\chi^2_{\\rm min}=426.27$ when constrained by Planck+SNLS3+BAO+HST, comparable to the results of the HDE model (428.20) and the concordant $\\Lambda$CDM model (431.35). At 68.3\\% CL, we obtain $-0.07<\\Omega_{\\Lambda0}<0.68$ and correspondingly $0.04<\\Omega_{hde0}<0.79$, implying at present there is considerable degeneracy bet...

  1. Universal equations and constants of turbulent motion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Helmut Z. Baumert

    2012-03-22T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents a parameter-free theory of shear-generated turbulence at asymptotically high Reynolds numbers in incompressible fluids. It is based on a two-fluids concept. Both components are materially identical and inviscid. The first component is an ensemble of quasi-rigid dipole-vortex tubes as quasi-particles in chaotic motion. The second is a superfluid performing evasive motions between the tubes. The local dipole motions follow Helmholtz' law. The vortex radii scale with the energy-containing length scale. Collisions between quasi-particles lead either to annihilation (likewise rotation, turbulent dissipation) or to scattering (counterrotation, turbulent diffusion). There are analogies with birth and death processes of population dynamics and their master equations. For free homogeneous decay the theory predicts the TKE to follow 1/t. With an adiabatic condition at the wall it predicts the logarithmic law with von Karman's constant as 1/\\sqrt{2 pi} = 0.399. Likewise rotating couples form dissipative patches almost at rest ($\\rightarrow$ intermittency) wherein the spectrum evolves like an "Apollonian gear" as discussed first by Herrmann, 1990. On this basis the prefactor of the 3D-wavenumber spectrum is predicted as (1/3)(4 pi)^{2/3}=1.8; in the Lagrangian frequency spectrum it is simply 2. The results are situated well within the scatter range of observational, experimental and DNS results.

  2. Universal constants and equations of turbulent motion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baumert, Helmut Z

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the spirit of Prandtl [1926], for turbulence at high Reynolds number we present an analogy with the kinetic theory of gases, with dipoles made of Thorpe's [1977] quasi-solid vortex tubes as frictionless, incompressible but deformable quasi-particles. Their movements are governed by Helmholtz' elementary vortex rules applied locally. A contact interaction or 'collision' leads either to random scatter of a trajectory or to the formation of two likewise rotating, fundamentally unstable whirls forming a dissipative patch slowly rotating around its center of mass which is almost at rest. This approach predicts von Karman's constant as 1/sqrt(2 pi) = 0.399 and the spatio-temporal dynamics of energy-containing time and length scales controlling turbulent mixing Baumert [2009]. A link to turbulence spectra was missing so far. In the present paper it is shown that the above image of random vortex-dipole movements is compatible with Kolmogorov's turbulence spectra if dissipative patches, beginning as two likewise ro...

  3. Variation of stability constants of thorium citrate complexes and of thorium hydrolysis constants with ionic strength

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Choppin, G.R.; Erten, H.N.; Xia, Y.X. [Florida State Univ., Tallahassee, FL (United States)

    1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Citrate is among the organic anions that are expected to be present in the wastes planned for deposition in the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant repository. In this study, a solvent extraction method has been used to measure the stability constants of Thorium(IV)[Th(IV)] with citrate anions in aqueous solutions with (a) NaClO{sub 4} and (b) NaCl as the background electrolytes. The ionic strengths were varied up to 5 m (NaCl) and 14 m (NaClO{sub 4}). The data from the NaClO{sub 4} solutions at varying pH values were used to calculate the hydrolysis constants for formation of Th(OH){sup 3+} at the different ionic strengths.

  4. The variation of the fine structure constant: testing the dipole model with thermonuclear supernovae

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kraiselburd, Lucila; Negrelli, Carolina; Berro, Enrique García

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The large-number hypothesis conjectures that fundamental constants may vary. Accordingly, the spacetime variation of fundamental constants has been an active subject of research for decades. Recently, using data obtained with large telescopes a phenomenological model in which the fine structure constant might vary spatially has been proposed. We test whether this hypothetical spatial variation of {\\alpha}, which follows a dipole law, is compatible with the data of distant thermonuclear supernovae. Unlike previous works, in our calculations we consider not only the variation of the luminosity distance when a varying {\\alpha} is adopted, but we also take into account the variation of the peak luminosity of Type Ia supernovae resulting from a variation of {\\alpha}. This is done using an empirical relation for the peak bolometric magnitude of thermonuclear supernovae that correctly reproduces the results of detailed numerical simulations. We find that there is no significant difference between the several phenome...

  5. Elastic constants of single crystal Hastelloy X at elevated temperatures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Canistraro, H.A. [Univ. of Hartford, CT (United States). Dept. of Mechanical and Audio Engineering Technology; Jordan, E.H.; Shi Shixiang [Univ. of Connecticut, Storrs, CT (United States); Favrow, L.H.; Reed, F.A. [United Technologies Research Center, East Hartford, CT (United States)

    1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An acoustic time of flight technique is described in detail for measuring the elastic constants of cubic single crystals that allows for the constants to be determined at elevated temperature. Although the overall technique is not new, various aspects of the present work may prove extremely useful to others interested in finding these values, especially for aerospace materials applications. Elastic constants were determined for the nickel based alloy, Hastelloy X from room temperature to 1,000 C. Accurate elastic constants were needed as part of an effort to predict both polycrystal mechanical properties and the nature of grain induced heterogeneous mechanical response. The increased accuracy of the acoustically determined constants resulted in up to a 15% change in the predicted stresses in individual grains. These results indicate that the use of elastic single crystal constants of pure nickel as an approximation for the constants of gas turbine single crystal alloys, which is often done today, is inaccurate.

  6. Universal constants and equations of turbulent motion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Helmut Z. Baumert

    2011-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

    In the spirit of Prandtl's conjecture of 1926, for turbulence at high Reynolds number we present an analogy with the kinetic theory of gases, with dipoles made of quasi-rigid and 'dressed' vortex tubes as frictionless, incompressible but deformable quasi-particles. Their movements are governed by Helmholtz' elementary vortex rules applied locally. A contact interaction or 'collision' leads either to random scatter of a trajectory or to the formation of two likewise rotating, fundamentally unstable whirls forming a dissipative patch slowly rotating around its center of mass which is almost at rest. This approach predicts von Karman's constant as 1/sqrt(2 pi) = 0.399 and the spatio-temporal dynamics of energy-containing time and length scales controlling turbulent mixing [Baumert 2009]. A link to turbulence spectra was missing so far. In the present paper it is shown that the above image of random vortex-dipole movements is compatible with Kolmogorov's turbulence spectra if dissipative patches, beginning as two likewise rotating eddies, evolve locally into a space-filling bearing in the sense of Herrmann [1990], i.e. into an "Apollonian gear". Its parts and pieces are incompressible and flexibly deformable vortex tubes which are frictionless, excepting the dissipative scale of size zero. For steady and locally homogeneous conditions our approach predicts the dimensionless pre-factor in the 3D Eulerian wavenumber spectrum as [(4 pi)^2/3]/3 = 1.8, and in the Lagrangian frequency spectrum as 2. Our derivations rest on geometry, methods from many-particle physics, and on elementary conservation laws.

  7. Economic evaluation of volume reduction for Defense transuranic waste

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, C.M.

    1981-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This study evaluates the economics of volume reduction of retrievably stored and newly generated DOE transuranic waste by comparing the costs of reduction of the waste with the savings possible in transportation and disposal of the waste. The report develops a general approach to the comparison of TRU waste volume reduction costs and cost savings, establishes an initial set of cost data, and develops conclusions to support selecting technologies and facilities for the disposal of DOE transuranic waste. Section I outlines the analysis which considers seven types of volume reduction from incineration and compaction of combustibles to compaction, size reduction, shredding, melting, and decontamination of metals. The study considers the volume reduction of contact-handled newly generated, and retrievably stored DOE transuranic waste. Section II of this report describes the analytical approach, assumptions, and flow of waste material through sites. Section III presents the waste inventories, disposal, and transportation savings with volume reduction and the volume reduction techniques and savings.

  8. Observational constraints on holographic dark energy with varying gravitational constant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lu, Jianbo; Xu, Lixin [Institute of Theoretical Physics, School of Physics and Optoelectronic Technology, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian, 116024 (China); Saridakis, Emmanuel N. [College of Mathematics and Physics, Chongqing University of Posts and Telecommunications, Chongqing, 400065 (China); Setare, M.R., E-mail: lvjianbo819@163.com, E-mail: msaridak@phys.uoa.gr, E-mail: rezakord@ipm.ir, E-mail: lxxu@dlut.edu.cn [Department of Science of Bijar, University of Kurdistan, Bijar (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We use observational data from Type Ia Supernovae (SN), Baryon Acoustic Oscillations (BAO), Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) and observational Hubble data (OHD), and the Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) method, to constrain the cosmological scenario of holographic dark energy with varying gravitational constant. We consider both flat and non-flat background geometry, and we present the corresponding constraints and contour-plots of the model parameters. We conclude that the scenario is compatible with observations. In 1? we find ?{sub ?0} = 0.72{sup +0.03}{sub ?0.03}, ?{sub k0} = ?0.0013{sup +0.0130}{sub ?0.0040}, c = 0.80{sup +0.19}{sub ?0.14} and ?{sub G}?G'/G = ?0.0025{sup +0.0080}{sub ?0.0050}, while for the present value of the dark energy equation-of-state parameter we obtain w{sub 0} = ?1.04{sup +0.15}{sub ?0.20}.

  9. Cooking the volumes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sparavigna, Amelia Carolina

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Cooking possesses a system of units of measurement, that includes measures of volumes based on pre-metric units. This paper discusses the cooking measures and compares their features with those of the ancient Roman measures of capacity.

  10. Computer News, Volume 29

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MATH DEPT Computer News, Volume 29. How to update your login shell from csh to tcsh. If you, like me, have had an account on the Math network of SUNs ...

  11. Computer News, Volume 30

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MATH DEPT Computer News, Volume 30. How to create an ASCII version of the Purdue Logo and other matters of e-mail etiquette. The Purdue logo... ... ah, yes ...

  12. Computer News, Volume 26

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MATH DEPT Computer News, Volume 26. How to trim an e-mail alias. The faculty e-mail alias has a lot more people on it than you might imagine. (To find out ...

  13. Computer News, Volume 7

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MATH DEPT Computer News, Volume 7. How to put figures in TeX. (I assume that you are using X windows on or from a math dept SUN.) To make a figure, I use ...

  14. Computer News, Volume 31

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MATH DEPT Computer News, Volume 31. How to create .pdf files from TeX. by Donu Arapura. Click on RELOAD now. This page is frequently updated and you ...

  15. Imaging using volume holograms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sinha, Arnab, 1978-

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Volume holograms can be thought of as self-aligned 3D stacks of diffractive elements that operate coherently on incident fields as they propagate through the structure. In this thesis, we propose, design and implement ...

  16. Development of a floating piston expander control algorithm for a Collins-type cryocooler

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hogan, Jake (Jake R.)

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The multi-stage Collins-type cryocooler uses a floating piston design for the working fluid expansion in each stage. The piston floats between a cold volume, where the working fluid is expanded, and a warm volume. The ...

  17. A Magnification Lens for Interactive Volume Visualization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LaMar, E; Hamann, B; Joy, K I

    2001-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Volume visualization of large data sets suffers from the same problem that many other visualization modalities suffer from: either one can visualize the entire data set and lose small details or visualize a small region and lose the context. In this paper, they present a magnification lens technique for volume visualization. While the notion of a magnification-lens is not new, and other techniques attempt to simulate the physical properties of a magnifying lens, their contribution is in developing a magnification lens that is fast, can be implemented using a fairly small software overhead, and has a natural, intuitive appearance. The issue with magnification lens is the border, or transition, region. The lens center and exterior have a constant zoom factor, and are simple to render. It is the border region that blends between the external and interior magnification, and has a non-constant magnification. They use the perspective-correct textures capability, available in most current graphics systems, to produce a lens with a tessellated border region that approximates linear compression with respect to the radius of the magnification lens. They discuss how a cubic border can mitigate the discontinuities resulting from the use of a linear function, without significant performance loss. They discuss various issues concerning development of a three-dimensional magnification lens.

  18. Experimental determination of the effective strong coupling constant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alexandre Deur; Volker Burkert; Jian-Ping Chen; Wolfgang Korsch

    2005-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We extract an effective strong coupling constant from low Q2 data on the Bjorken sum. Using sum rules, we establish its Q2-behavior over the complete Q2-range. The result is compared to effective coupling constants extracted from different processes and to calculations based on Schwinger-Dyson equations, hadron spectroscopy or lattice QCD. Although the connection between the experimentally extracted effective coupling constant and the calculations is not clear, the results agree surprisingly well.

  19. Computing the Grothendieck constant of some graph classes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2011-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Jun 10, 2011 ... However this is not the case for the clique-web inequalities, ... Keywords: Grothendieck constant, elliptope, cut polytope, clique-web inequality.

  20. The Constant Rank Condition and Second Order Constraint ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2009-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Nov 13, 2009 ... The Constant Rank condition for feasible points of nonlinear ... stant Rank condition is, in addition, a second order constraint qualification.

  1. Forecast Technical Document Volume Increment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Forecast Technical Document Volume Increment Forecasts A document describing how volume increment is handled in the 2011 Production Forecast. Tom Jenkins Robert Matthews Ewan Mackie Lesley Halsall #12;PF2011 ­ Volume increment forecasts Background A volume increment forecast is a fundamental output of the forecast

  2. The Duffing Oscillator And Linearization Techniques For Its Motion Constants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rashdan, Mouath

    2014-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

    constant is known, solving the system is no longer needed to analyze the characteristics of the system. Motion constants are time independent integrals that are hard to find for nonlinear dynamic systems. We chose the Duffing Oscillator as a higher order...

  3. Maximum Constant Boost Control of the Z-Source Inverter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tolbert, Leon M.

    Maximum Constant Boost Control of the Z-Source Inverter Miaosen Shen1 , Jin Wang1 , Alan Joseph1 Laboratory Abstract: This paper proposes two maximum constant boost control methods for the Z-source inverter to modulation index is analyzed in detail and verified by simulation and experiment. Keywords- Z-source inverter

  4. Codes of constant Lee or Euclidean weight Jay A. Wood

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wood, Jay

    Codes of constant Lee or Euclidean weight Jay A. Wood Department of Mathematics, Computer Science & Statistics Purdue University Calumet Hammond, Indiana 46323 2094 USA wood@calumet.purdue.edu http: www.calumet.purdue.edu public math wood Abstract. Carlet 2 has determined the linear codes over Z=4 of constant Lee weight

  5. Initial data sets with ends of cylindrical type: I. The Lichnerowicz equation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Piotr T. Chru?ciel; Rafe Mazzeo

    2014-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

    We construct large classes of vacuum general relativistic initial data sets, possibly with a cosmological constant Lambda, containing ends of cylindrical type.

  6. Evolving Lorentzian wormholes supported by phantom matter and cosmological constant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cataldo, Mauricio; Campo, Sergio del; Minning, Paul; Salgado, Patricio [Departamento de Fisica, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad del Bio-Bio, Avenida Collao 1202, Casilla 5-C, Concepcion (Chile); Instituto de Fisica, Facultad de Ciencias, Pontificia Universidad Catolica de Valparaiso, Avenida Brasil 2950, Valparaiso (Chile); Departamento de Fisica, Facultad de Ciencias Fisicas y Matematicas, Universidad de Concepcion, Casilla 160-C, Concepcion (Chile)

    2009-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper we study the possibility of sustaining an evolving wormhole via exotic matter made of phantom energy in the presence of a cosmological constant. We derive analytical evolving wormhole geometries by supposing that the radial tension of the phantom matter, which is negative to the radial pressure, and the pressure measured in the tangential directions have barotropic equations of state with constant state parameters. In this case the presence of a cosmological constant ensures accelerated expansion of the wormhole configurations. More specifically, for positive cosmological constant we have wormholes which expand forever and, for negative cosmological constant we have wormholes which expand to a maximum value and then recollapse. At spatial infinity the energy density and the pressures of the anisotropic phantom matter threading the wormholes vanish; thus these evolving wormholes are asymptotically vacuum {lambda}-Friedmann models with either open or closed or flat topologies.

  7. Prime Supplier Sales Volumes of Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas ConchasPassive Solar Home DesignPresentations Presentations926 2.804 2.705

  8. Table 44. Refiner Motor Gasoline Volumes by Formulation, Sales Type,

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelinesProved ReservesFeet)per Thousand Cubic Feet)5.2572,177.8 33,696.78,415.8

  9. Table 44. Refiner Motor Gasoline Volumes by Formulation, Sales Type,

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelinesProved ReservesFeet)per Thousand Cubic Feet)5.2572,177.8 33,696.78,415.8161.3

  10. Table 44. Refiner Motor Gasoline Volumes by Formulation, Sales Type,

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelinesProved ReservesFeet)per Thousand Cubic Feet)5.2572,177.8 33,696.78,415.8161.3220.9

  11. Table 44. Refiner Motor Gasoline Volumes by Formulation, Sales Type,

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelinesProved ReservesFeet)per Thousand Cubic Feet)5.2572,177.8

  12. Table 44. Refiner Motor Gasoline Volumes by Formulation, Sales Type,

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelinesProved ReservesFeet)per Thousand Cubic Feet)5.2572,177.84,707.0 35,821.0 18,450.2

  13. Prime Supplier Sales Volumes of Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia,(Million Barrels) Crude Oil Reserves in NonproducingAdditions to Capacity on theThousand7.End Users55,453.9 54,959.2

  14. Viability Assessment Volume 4

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DOE

    1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Volume 4 provides the DOE plan and cost estimate for the remaining work necessary to proceed from completing this VA to submitting an LA to NRC. This work includes preparing an EIS and evaluating the suitability of the site. Both items are necessary components of the documentation required to support a decision in 2001 by the Secretary of Energy on whether or not to recommend that the President approve the site for development as a repository. If the President recommends the site to Congress and the site designation becomes effective, then DOE will submit the LA to NRC in 2002 for authorization to construct the repository. The work described in Volume 4 constitutes the last step in the characterization of the Yucca Mountain site and the design and evaluation of the performance of a repository system in the geologic setting of this site. The plans in this volume for the next 4 years' work are based on the results of the previous 15 years' work, as reported in Volumes 1, 2, and 3 of this VA. Volume 1 summarizes what DOE has learned to date about the Yucca Mountain site. Volume 2 describes the current, reference repository design, several design options that might enhance the performance of the reference design, and several alternative designs that represent substantial departures from the reference design. Volume 2 also summarizes the results of tests of candidate materials for waste packages and for support of the tunnels into which waste would be emplaced. Volume 3 provides the results of the latest performance assessments undertaken to evaluate the performance of the design in the geologic setting of Yucca Mountain. The results described in Volumes 1, 2, and 3 provide the basis for identifying and prioritizing the work described in this volume. DOE believes that the planned work, together with the results of previous work, will be sufficient to support a site suitability evaluation for site recommendation and, if the site is recommended and designated, a defensible LA. Volume 4 is divided into seven sections. Section 2 presents a rationale and summary for the technical work to be done to develop the preclosure and postclosure safety cases that will support the compliance evaluations required for the evaluation of site suitability and for licensing. Section 2 also describes other necessary technical work, including that needed to support design decisions and development of the necessary design information. Section 3 presents a more detailed description of the technical work required to address the issues identified in Section 2. Section 3 also describes activities that will continue after submittal of the site recommendation and the LA. Examples include the drift scale heater test in the Exploratory Studies Facility (Section 3.1.4.3) and long-term waste package corrosion testing (Section 3.2.2.9). Section 4 discusses the statutory and regulatory framework for site recommendation and submittal of an LA, and describes the activities and documentation that must be completed to achieve these milestones, including the development of an EIS. Section 5 describes the numerous activities required to support program milestones, including support for completing the testing program, continuing tests as part of the performance confirmation program, and managing information and records to support regulatory and legal review. Sections 6 and 7 provide cost and schedule information for the activities planned.

  15. Effect of Lumpectomy Cavity Volume Change on the Clinical Target Volume for Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation: A Deformable Registration Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, Leonard H., E-mail: lkim@beaumonthospitals.co [Department of Radiation Oncology, William Beaumont Hospital, Royal Oak, MI (United States); DeCesare, Sam; Vicini, Frank; Yan Di [Department of Radiation Oncology, William Beaumont Hospital, Royal Oak, MI (United States)

    2010-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: Previous studies have shown that lumpectomy cavity volumes can change significantly in the weeks following surgery. The effect of this volume change on the surrounding tissue that constitutes the clinical target volume (CTV) for accelerated partial breast irradiation and boost treatment after whole breast irradiation has not been previously studied. In the present study, we used deformable registration to estimate the effect of lumpectomy cavity volume changes on the CTV for accelerated partial breast irradiation and discuss the implications for target construction. Methods and Materials: The data from 13 accelerated partial breast irradiation patients were retrospectively analyzed. Deformable registration was used to propagate contours from the initial planning computed tomography scan to a later computed tomography scan acquired at the start of treatment. The changes in cavity volume and CTV, distance between cavity and CTV contours (i.e., CTV margin), and CTV localization error after cavity registration were determined. Results: The mean {+-} standard deviation change in cavity volume and CTV between the two computed tomography scans was -35% {+-} 23% and -14% {+-} 12%, respectively. An increase in the cavity-to-CTV margin of 2 {+-} 2 mm was required to encompass the CTV, and this increase correlated with the cavity volume change. Because changes in the cavity and CTV were not identical, a localization error of 2-3 mm in the CTV center of mass occurred when the cavity was used as the reference for image guidance. Conclusion: Deformable registration suggested that CTV margins do not remain constant as the cavity volume changes. This finding has implications for planning target volume and CTV construction.

  16. Methodology for extracting local constants from petroleum cracking flows

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chang, Shen-Lin (Woodridge, IL); Lottes, Steven A. (Naperville, IL); Zhou, Chenn Q. (Munster, IN)

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A methodology provides for the extraction of local chemical kinetic model constants for use in a reacting flow computational fluid dynamics (CFD) computer code with chemical kinetic computations to optimize the operating conditions or design of the system, including retrofit design improvements to existing systems. The coupled CFD and kinetic computer code are used in combination with data obtained from a matrix of experimental tests to extract the kinetic constants. Local fluid dynamic effects are implicitly included in the extracted local kinetic constants for each particular application system to which the methodology is applied. The extracted local kinetic model constants work well over a fairly broad range of operating conditions for specific and complex reaction sets in specific and complex reactor systems. While disclosed in terms of use in a Fluid Catalytic Cracking (FCC) riser, the inventive methodology has application in virtually any reaction set to extract constants for any particular application and reaction set formulation. The methodology includes the step of: (1) selecting the test data sets for various conditions; (2) establishing the general trend of the parametric effect on the measured product yields; (3) calculating product yields for the selected test conditions using coupled computational fluid dynamics and chemical kinetics; (4) adjusting the local kinetic constants to match calculated product yields with experimental data; and (5) validating the determined set of local kinetic constants by comparing the calculated results with experimental data from additional test runs at different operating conditions.

  17. Publications Edited Volume

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MacIver, Malcolm A.

    of Robots with Passive Environments: Application to Force Feedback Control Ed Colgate and Neville Hogan, J. Edward Colgate Industrial Robot, 26 (5), 1999, pp 335-341 Toward Robot-Assisted VascularPublications Edited Volume Advances in Robotics, Mechatronics, and Haptic Interfaces 1993 Edited

  18. Hamiltonian and Volume Operators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Pierri

    2002-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

    2+1 gravity coupled to a massless scalar field has an initial singularity when the spatial slices are compact. The quantized model is used here to investigate several issues of quantum gravity. The spectrum of the volume operator is studied at the initial singularity. The energy spectrum is obtained. Dynamics of the universe is also investigated.

  19. Van't Hoff law for temperature dependent Langmuir constants in clathrate hydrate nanocavities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lakhlifi, Azzedine

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This work gives a van't Hoff law expression of Langmuir constants of different species for determining their occupancy in the nanocavities of clathrate hydrates. The van't Hoff law's parameters are derived from a fit with Langmuir constants calculated using a pairwise site-site interaction potential to model the anisotropic potential environment in the cavities, as a function of temperature. The parameters can be used for calculating clathrates compositions. Results are given for nineteen gas species trapped in the small and large cavities of structure types I and II [1]. The accuracy of this approach is based on a comparison with available experimental data for ethane and cyclo- propane clathrate hydrates. The numerical method applied in this work, was recently validated from a comparison with the spherical cell method based on analytical considerations [1

  20. Fundamental constants and cosmic vacuum: the micro and macro connection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fritzsch, Harald

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The idea that the vacuum energy density $\\rho_{\\Lambda}$ could be time dependent is a most reasonable one in the expanding Universe; in fact, much more reasonable than just a rigid cosmological constant for the entire cosmic history. Being $\\rho_{\\Lambda}=\\rho_{\\Lambda}(t)$ dynamical, it offers a possibility to tackle the cosmological constant problem in its various facets. Furthermore, for a long time (most prominently since Dirac's first proposal on a time variable gravitational coupling) the possibility that the fundamental "constants" of Nature are slowly drifting with the cosmic expansion has been continuously investigated. In the last two decades, and specially in recent times, mounting experimental evidence attests that this could be the case. In this paper, we consider the possibility that these two groups of facts might be intimately connected, namely that the observed acceleration of the Universe and the possible time variation of the fundamental constants are two manifestations of the same underlyi...

  1. Estimation of the base flow recession constant under human interference

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas, Brian F; Vogel, Richard M; Kroll, Charles N; Famiglietti, James S

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    J. Sci. , 248, 673–696. Szilagyi, J. (1999), On the use ofWater, 37(5), 660–662. Szilagyi, J. , Z. Bribovszki, and P.ow recession constant while Szilagyi et al. [2007], Wang and

  2. Colliding Impulsive Gravitational Waves and a Cosmological Constant

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barrabès, C

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a space--time model of the collision of two homogeneous, plane impulsive gravitational waves (each having a delta function profile) propagating in a vacuum before collision and for which the post collision space--time has constant curvature. The profiles of the incoming waves are $k\\,\\delta(u)$ and $l\\,\\delta(v)$ where $k, l$ are real constants and $u=0, v=0$ are intersecting null hypersurfaces. The cosmological constant $\\Lambda$ in the post collision region of the space--time is given by $\\Lambda=-6\\,k\\,l$. In this sense this model collision provides a mechanism for generating a cosmological constant and therefore may be relevant to the theoretical description of dark energy.

  3. arthritis remains constant: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    We show that the only value of n for which the late-time matter energy density to dark energy density ratio (rmrhomrhoLambda) is constant (which could...

  4. Determining coal permeabilities through constant pressure production interference testing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schubarth, Stephen Kurt

    2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

    DETERMINING COAL PERMEABILITIES THROUGH CONSTANT PRESSURE PRODUCTION INTERFERENCE TESTING A Thesis by STEPHEN KURT SCHUBARTH Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas ASM University fn Partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree... of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1983 Major Subject: Petroleum Engineering DETERMINING COAL PERMEABILITIES THROUGH CONSTANT PRESSURE PRODUCTION INTERFERENCE TESTING A Thesis by STEPHEN KURT SCHUBARTH Approved as to style and content by: tephen A. Hold...

  5. Phenomenology of infrared finite gluon propagator and coupling constant

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. A. Natale

    2006-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

    We report on some recent solutions of the Dyson-Schwinger equations for the infrared behavior of the gluon propagator and coupling constant, discussing their differences and proposing that these different behaviors can be tested through hadronic phenomenology. We discuss which kind of phenomenological tests can be applied to the gluon propagator and coupling constant, how sensitive they are to the infrared region of momenta and what specific solution is preferred by the experimental data.

  6. The eta decay constant in `resummed' chiral perturbation theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Kolesar; J. Novotny

    2008-02-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The recently developed 'Resummed' ChPT is illustrated on the case of pseudoscalar meson decay constants. We try to get an estimate of the eta decay constant, which is not well known from experiments, while using several ways including the Generalized ChPT Lagrangian to gather information beyond Standard next-to-leading order. We compare the results to published ChPT predictions, our own Standard ChPT calculations and available phenomenological estimates.

  7. Statistical Ensembles with Volume Fluctuations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mark I. Gorenstein

    2008-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

    The volume fluctuations in statistical mechanics are discussed. First, the volume fluctuations in ensembles with a fixed external pressure, the so called pressure ensembles, are considered. Second, a generalization of the pressure ensembles is suggested. Namely, the statistical ensembles with the volume fluctuating according to externally given distributions are considered. Several examples and possible applications in statistical models of hadron production are discussed.

  8. Relative Evaluation of the Independent Volume Measures of Caverns

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    MUNSON,DARRELL E.

    2000-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Throughout the construction and operation of the caverns of the Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR), three types of cavern volume measurements have been maintained. These are: (1) the calculated solution volume determined during initial construction by solution mining and any subsequent solutioning during oil transfers, (2) the calculated sonar volume determined through sonar surveys of the cavern dimensions, and (3) the direct metering of oil to determine the volume of the cavern occupied by the oil. The objective of this study is to compare these measurements to each other and determine, if possible, the uncertainties associated with a given type of measurement. Over time, each type of measurement has acquired a customary, or an industry accepted, stated uncertainty. This uncertainty is not necessarily the result of a technical analysis. Ultimately there is one definitive quantity, the oil volume measure by the oil custody transfer meters, taken by all parties to the transfer as the correct ledger amount and for which the SPR Project is accountable. However, subsequent transfers within a site may not be with meters of the same accuracy. In this study, a very simple theory of the perfect relationship is used to evaluate the correlation (deviation) of the various measures. This theory permits separation of uncertainty and bias. Each of the four SPR sites are examined, first with comparisons between the calculated solution volumes and the sonar volumes determined during construction, then with comparisons of the oil inventories and the sonar volumes obtained either by surveying through brine prior to oil filling or through the oil directly.

  9. Viability Assessment Volume 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DOE

    1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This volume describes the major design features of the Monitored Geologic Repository. This document is not intended to provide an exhaustive, detailed description of the repository design. Rather, this document summarizes the major systems and primary elements of the design that are radiologically significant, and references the specific technical documents and design analyses wherein the details can be found. Not all portions of the design are at the same level of completeness. Highest priority has been given to assigning resources to advance the design of the Monitored Geologic Repository features that are important to radiological safety and/or waste isolation and for which there is no NRC licensing precedent. Those features that are important to radiological safety and/or waste isolation, but for which there is an NRC precedent, receive second priority. Systems and features that have no impact on radiological safety or waste isolation receive the lowest priority. This prioritization process, referred to as binning, is discussed in more detail in Section 2.3. Not every subject discussed in this volume is given equal treatment with regard to the level of detail provided. For example, less detail is provided for the surface facility design than for the subsurface and waste package designs. This different level of detail is intentional. Greater detail is provided for those functions, structures, systems, and components that play key roles with regard to protecting radiological health and safety and that are not common to existing nuclear facilities already licensed by NRC. A number of radiological subjects are not addressed in the VA, (e.g., environmental qualification of equipment). Environmental qualification of equipment and other radiological safety considerations will be addressed in the LA. Non-radiological safety considerations such as silica dust control and other occupational safety considerations are considered equally important but are not addressed in th is volume of the VA (see Volume 1, Section 2.2.1.2, subsection on Health Related Mineral Issues).

  10. High Volume Test Automation 1 High Volume Test AutomationHigh Volume Test Automation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    High Volume Test Automation 1 High Volume Test AutomationHigh Volume Test Automation Keynote Automation 2 AcknowledgementsAcknowledgements · Many of the ideas in this presentation were initially jointly developed with Doug Hoffman,as we developed a course on test automation architecture, and in the Los Altos

  11. Non-Perturbative Gluon pair production from a Constant Chromo-Electric Field via the Schwinger Mechanism in Arbitrary Gauge

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fred Cooper; Gouranga C. Nayak

    2006-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the non-perturbative production of gluon pairs from a constant SU(3) chromo-electric background field via the Schwinger mechanism. We fix the covariant background gauge with an arbitrary gauge parameter \\alpha. We determine the transverse momentum distribution of the gluons, as well as the total probability of creating pairs per unit space time volume. We find that the result is independent of the covariant gauge parameter \\alpha used to define arbitrary covariant background gauges. We find that our non-perturbative result is both gauge invariant and gauge parameter \\alpha independent.

  12. Global structure of Robinson-Trautman radiative space-times with cosmological constant

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Bicak; J. Podolsky

    1999-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Robinson-Trautman radiative space-times of Petrov type II with a non-vanishing cosmological constant Lambda and mass parameter m>0 are studied using analytical methods. They are shown to approach the corresponding spherically symmetric Schwarzschild-de Sitter or Schwarzschild-anti-de Sitter solution at large retarded times. Their global structure is analyzed, and it is demonstrated that the smoothness of the extension of the metrics across the horizon, as compared with the case Lambda=0, is increased for Lambda>0 and decreased for Lambda0 exhibit explicitly the cosmic no-hair conjecture under the presence of gravitational waves.

  13. Gravitation, the 'Dark Matter' Effect and the Fine Structure Constant

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reginald T. Cahill

    2005-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Gravitational anomalies such as the mine/borehole g anomaly, the near-flatness of the spiral galaxy rotation-velocity curves, currently interpreted as a `dark matter' effect, the absence of that effect in ordinary elliptical galaxies, and the ongoing problems in accurately determining Newton's gravitational constant G_N are explained by a generalisation of the Newtonian theory of gravity to a fluid-flow formalism with one new dimensionless constant. By analysing the borehole data this constant is shown to be the fine structure constant alpha=1/137. The spiral galaxy `dark matter' effect and the globular cluster `black hole' masses are then correctly predicted. This formalism also explains the cause of the long-standing uncertainties in G_N and leads to the introduction of a fundamental gravitational constant G not = G_N with value G=(6.6526 +/- 0.013)x 10^-11 m^3s^{-2}kg^{-1}. The occurrence of alpha implies that space has a quantum structure, and we have the first evidence of quantum gravity effects.

  14. Regular Black Hole Metric with Three Constants of Motion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johannsen, Tim

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    According to the no-hair theorem, astrophysical black holes are uniquely characterized by their masses and spins and are described by the Kerr metric. Several parametric spacetimes which deviate from the Kerr metric have been proposed in order to test this theorem with observations of black holes in both the electromagnetic and gravitational-wave spectra. Such metrics often contain naked singularities or closed timelike curves in the vicinity of the compact objects that can limit the applicability of the metrics to compact objects that do not spin rapidly, and generally admit only two constants of motion. The existence of a third constant, however, can facilitate the calculation of observables, because the equations of motion can be written in first-order form. In this paper, I design a Kerr-like black hole metric which is regular everywhere outside of the event horizon, possesses three independent constants of motion, and depends nonlinearly on four free functions that parameterize potential deviations from ...

  15. Statistical theory of elastic constants of cholesteric liquid crystals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Kapanowski

    2009-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

    A statistical theory of cholesteric liquid crystals composed of short rigid biaxial molecules is presented. It is derived in the thermodynamic limit at a small density and a small twist. The uniaxial (biaxial) cholesteric phase is regarded as a distorted form of the uniaxial (biaxial) nematic phase. The chirality of the interactions and the implementation of the inversion to the rotation matrix elements are discussed in detail. General microscopic expressions for the elastic constants are derived. The expressions involve the one-particle distribution function and the potential energy of two-body short-range interactions. It is shown that the elastic constants determine the twist of the phase. The stability condition for the cholesteric and nematic phases is presented. The theory is used to study unary and binary systems. The temperature and concentration dependence of the order parameters, the elastic constants and the twist of the phase are obtained. The possibility of phase separation is not investigated.

  16. 1995 solid waste 30-year container volume summary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Templeton, K.J.; DeForest, T.J.; Patridge, M.D. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

    1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes a 30-year forecast of the solid waste volumes by container category. The volumes described are low-level mixed waste (LLMW) and transuranic/transuranic mixed (TRU-TRUM) waste. These volumes and their associated container categories will be generated or received at the US Department of Energy Hanford Site for storage, treatment, and disposal at Westinghouse Hanford Company`s Solid Waste Operations Complex (SWOC) during a 30-year period from FY 1995 through FY 2024. The data presented in this report establish a baseline for solid waste management both in the present and future. With knowledge of the volumes by container type, decisions on the facility handling and storage requirements can be adequately made. It is recognized that the forecast estimates will vary as facility planning and missions continue to change and become better defined; however, the data presented in this report still provide useful insight into Hanford`s future solid waste management requirements.

  17. Lokaratna, Volume 4

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mishra, Mahendra Kumar

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Muthukumarswamy and his colleagues of NFSC, Chennai to support this volume to be published in their web site for a global readership. On behalf of Folklore Foundation, Odisha Bhubaneswar , I wish a Happy and prosperous new Year 2012... not create the tiger to prey upon man, but to hunt, to provide food for him […]. Magicians are, however, believed to have acquired the power to take away life at pleasure, without reference to the will of the gods, by dark and impious arts which are purely...

  18. Lokaratna, Volume 3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mishra, Mahendra Kumar

    Support Center, and Chennai for his support to get this volume published in NFSC web site for the wider readership. I am also thankful to Prof. Mark Turin of Cambridge University who has been kinds enough to link the web journal of Folklore... of Nature such as cloud, sky, Tam?la trees, night and Yamun? river have been illustrated. Moreover, all these aspects are blackish by nature and very similar to the dark-bodied Krishna. It may be undoubtedly stated that the poet has consciously used...

  19. FY 2005 Volume 5

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of EnergyEnergyENERGYWomentheATLANTA, GA5 &of Energy memoCityTheDepartmentKey9Statistical6 Volume 5

  20. FY 2005 Volume 6

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of EnergyEnergyENERGYWomentheATLANTA, GA5 &of Energy memoCityTheDepartmentKey9Statistical6 Volume 57

  1. FY 2005 Volume 7

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of EnergyEnergyENERGYWomentheATLANTA, GA5 &of Energy memoCityTheDepartmentKey9Statistical6 Volume

  2. Topological Quantization in Units of the Fine Structure Constant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maciejko, Joseph; /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /Stanford U., Materials Sci. Dept. /SLAC; Qi, Xiao-Liang; /Station Q, UCSB /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /Stanford U., Materials Sci. Dept. /SLAC; Drew, H.Dennis; /Maryland U.; Zhang, Shou-Cheng; /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /Stanford U., Materials Sci. Dept. /SLAC

    2011-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Fundamental topological phenomena in condensed matter physics are associated with a quantized electromagnetic response in units of fundamental constants. Recently, it has been predicted theoretically that the time-reversal invariant topological insulator in three dimensions exhibits a topological magnetoelectric effect quantized in units of the fine structure constant {alpha} = e{sup 2}/{h_bar}c. In this Letter, we propose an optical experiment to directly measure this topological quantization phenomenon, independent of material details. Our proposal also provides a way to measure the half-quantized Hall conductances on the two surfaces of the topological insulator independently of each other.

  3. Cosmological Evolution of Fundamental Constants: From Theory to Experiment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xavier Calmet; Matthias Keller

    2014-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper we discuss a possible cosmological time evolution of fundamental constants from the theoretical and experimental point of views. On the theoretical side, we explain that such a cosmological time evolution is actually something very natural which can be described by mechanisms similar to those used to explain cosmic inflation. We then discuss implications for grand unified theories, showing that the unification condition of the gauge coupling could evolve with cosmological time. Measurements of the electron-to-proton mass ratio can test grand unified theories using low energy data. Following the theoretical discussion, we review the current status of precision measurements of fundamental constants and their potential cosmological time dependence.

  4. Early universe constraints on time variation of fundamental constants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Landau, Susana J.; Mosquera, Mercedes E.; Scoccola, Claudia G.; Vucetich, Hector [Departamento de Fisica, FCEyN, Universidad de Buenos Aires, Ciudad Universitaria-Pabellon 1, 1428 Buenos Aires (Argentina); Facultad de Ciencias Astronomicas y Geofisicas. Universidad Nacional de La Plata, Paseo del Bosque S/N 1900 La Plata (Argentina); Facultad de Ciencias Astronomicas y Geofisicas. Universidad Nacional de La Plata, Paseo del Bosque S/N 1900 La Plata (Argentina); and Instituto de Astrofisica, Paseo del Bosque S/N 1900 La Plata (Argentina); Facultad de Ciencias Astronomicas y Geofisicas. Universidad Nacional de La Plata, Paseo del Bosque S/N 1900 La Plata (Argentina)

    2008-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the time variation of fundamental constants in the early Universe. Using data from primordial light nuclei abundances, cosmic microwave background, and the 2dFGRS power spectrum, we put constraints on the time variation of the fine structure constant {alpha} and the Higgs vacuum expectation value without assuming any theoretical framework. A variation in leads to a variation in the electron mass, among other effects. Along the same line, we study the variation of {alpha} and the electron mass m{sub e}. In a purely phenomenological fashion, we derive a relationship between both variations.

  5. Discrete canonical analysis of three dimensional gravity with cosmological constant

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Berra-Montiel; J. E. Rosales-Quintero

    2014-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

    We discuss the interplay between standard canonical analysis and canonical discretization in three-dimensional gravity with cosmological constant. By using the Hamiltonian analysis, we find that the continuum local symmetries of the theory are given by the on-shell space-time diffeomorphisms, which at the action level, corresponds to the Kalb-Ramond transformations. At the time of discretization, although this symmetry is explicitly broken, we prove that the theory still preserves certain gauge freedom generated by a constant curvature relation in terms of holonomies and the Gauss's law in the lattice approach.

  6. The Quantum Vacuum and the Cosmological Constant Problem

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Svend Erik Rugh; Henrik Zinkernagel

    2000-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The cosmological constant problem arises at the intersection between general relativity and quantum field theory, and is regarded as a fundamental problem in modern physics. In this paper we describe the historical and conceptual origin of the cosmological constant problem which is intimately connected to the vacuum concept in quantum field theory. We critically discuss how the problem rests on the notion of physical real vacuum energy, and which relations between general relativity and quantum field theory are assumed in order to make the problem well-defined.

  7. The Quantum Vacuum and the Cosmological Constant Problem

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rugh, S E; Rugh, Svend Erik; Zinkernagel, Henrik

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The cosmological constant problem arises at the intersection between general relativity and quantum field theory, and is regarded as a fundamental problem in modern physics. In this paper we describe the historical and conceptual origin of the cosmological constant problem which is intimately connected to the vacuum concept in quantum field theory. We critically discuss how the problem rests on the notion of physical real vacuum energy, and which relations between general relativity and quantum field theory are assumed in order to make the problem well-defined.

  8. Period doubling, information entropy, and estimates for Feigenbaum's constants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reginald D. Smith

    2013-08-03T23:59:59.000Z

    The relationship between period doubling bifurcations and Feigenbaum's constants has been studied for nearly 40 years and this relationship has helped uncover many fundamental aspects of universal scaling across multiple nonlinear dynamical systems. This paper will combine information entropy with symbolic dynamics to demonstrate how period doubling can be defined using these tools alone. In addition, the technique allows us to uncover some unexpected, simple estimates for Feigenbaum's constants which relate them to log 2 and the golden ratio, phi, as well as to each other.

  9. Electromagnetic low-energy constants in ChPT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Christoph Haefeli; Mikhail A. Ivanov; Martin Schmid

    2007-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate three-flavour chiral perturbation theory including virtual photons in a limit where the strange quark mass is much larger than the external momenta and the up and down quark masses, and where the external fields are those of two-flavour chiral perturbation theory. In particular we work out the strange quark mass dependence of the electromagnetic two-flavour low-energy constants C and k_i. We expect that these relations will be useful for a more precise determination of the electromagnetic low-energy constants.

  10. Assessment of inspectability of LMFBR designs. Volume 2. Appendixes. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1981-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This volume contains appendices on: LMFBR primary heat transport system, support systems for a pool-type reactor and guard tank, pool-type reactor and guard tank, NaK-cooled DDHRS and pool-type reactor deck structure and bimetallic weld of reactor tank.

  11. Toroidal constant-tension superconducting magnetic energy storage units

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Herring, J.S.

    1992-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

    A superconducting magnetic energy storage unit is provided in which the magnet is wound in a toroidal fashion such that the magnetic field produced is contained only within the bore of the magnet, and thus producing a very low external field. The superconducting magnet includes a coolant channel disposed through the wire. The bore of the magnet comprises a storage volume in which cryogenic coolant is stored, and this volume supplies the coolant to be delivered to the coolant channel in the magnet. 6 figs.

  12. RELATIONSHIPS BETWEEN ZOOPLANKTON DISPLACEMENT VOLUME, WET WEIGHT, DRY WEIGHT, AND CARBONI

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of the regression line for log transformed values for carbon vs. dry weight and wet weight vs. displacement volumeRELATIONSHIPS BETWEEN ZOOPLANKTON DISPLACEMENT VOLUME, WET WEIGHT, DRY WEIGHT, AND CARBONI PETER H are identical. We have employed this type of analysis in determinations on samples from diverse sea areas

  13. Calculation of the Dimer Equilibrium Constant of Heavy Water Saturated Vapor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bulavin, L A; Makhlaichuk, V N

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Water is the most common substance on Earth.The discovery of heavy water and its further study have shown that the change of hydrogen for deuterium leads to the significant differences in their properties.The triple point temperature of heavy water is higher,at the same time the critical temperature is lower.Experimental values of the second virial coefficient of the EOS for the vapor of normal and heavy water differ at all temperatures.This fact can influence the values of the dimerization constant for the heavy water vapor.The equilibrium properties of the dimerization process are described with the methods of chemical thermodynamics.The chemical potentials for monomers (m) and dimers (d)are the functions of their concentrations.The interactions of monomer-dimer and dimer-dimer types are taken into account within the solution of equation for chemical potentials.The obtained expression for the dimerization constant contains the contributions of these types.The averaged potentials are modeled by the Sutherlan...

  14. Determination of rate constants by the frequency response method

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Y.E.; Willcox, D.; Gonzalez, R.D.

    1989-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A technique based upon transmission FTIR to obtain rate constants for adsorption and desorption over supported metal catalysts has been developed and tested. The technique requires the use of a sinusoidal perturbation function imposed on steady state linearized adsorption-desorption kinetics. The measurement of a phase lag between the sinusoidal inlet gas phase forcing concentration and the response of surface coverage, together with a measurement of the maximum amplitudes of the forcing function and surface response enable the calculation of the relevant adsorption and desorption rate constants. The technique has been successfully applied to the measurement of both adsorption and desorption rate constants for CO adsorbed on a 1% Pt/SiO/sub 2/ catalyst. The values obtained for these rate constants at 343 K were: K/sub a/ = 0.147 s/sup -1/ and K/sub d/ = 7.28 x 10/sup -3/ s/sup -1/. A sticking coefficient corresponding to the adsorption of weakly bonded CO on Pt under conditions of high CO surface coverage was obtained.

  15. Codes of constant Lee or Euclidean weight Jay A. Wood

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wood, Jay

    Codes of constant Lee or Euclidean weight Jay A. Wood Department of Mathematics, Computer Science & Statistics Purdue University Calumet Hammond, Indiana 46323--2094 USA wood@calumet.purdue.edu http://www.calumet.purdue.edu/public/math/wood Scholarly Research Awards. #12; JAY A. WOOD 1. Linear codes as modules Throughout this extended abstract

  16. MINIMAL CURVES OF CONSTANT TORSION THOMAS A. IVEY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ivey, Thomas A.

    moving along , the functions p, r, y may be visualized as pitch, roll, and yaw, respectively. Suppose two of some given distribution of rank two, or equivalently, of a Pfaffian system I of rank four. We may ask by Chow's theorem [7], which says that if a smooth constant rank Pfaffian system I on manifold M contains

  17. Temperature and moisture dependence of dielectric constant for silica aerogels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hrubesh, L.H., LLNL

    1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The dielectric constants of silica aerogels are among the lowest measured for any solid material. The silica aerogels also exhibit low thermal expansion and are thermally stable to temperatures exceeding 500{degrees}C. However, due to the open porosity and large surface areas for aerogels, their dielectric constants are strongly affected by moisture and temperature. This paper presents data for the dielectric constants of silica aerogels as a function of moisture content at 25{degrees}C, and as a function of temperature, for temperatures in the range from 25{degrees}C to 450{degrees}C. Dielectric constant data are also given for silica aerogels that are heat treated in dry nitrogen at 500{degrees}C, then cooled to 25{degrees}C for measurements in dry air. All measurements are made on bulk aerogel spheres at 22GHz microwave frequency, using a cavity perturbation method. The results of the dependence found here for bulk materials can be inferred to apply also to thin films of silica aerogels having similar nano-structures and densities.

  18. CAPUT DARK ENERGY TOPICS, 2013 1. The Cosmological Constant

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weijgaert, Rien van de

    CAPUT DARK ENERGY TOPICS, 2013 1 #12;1. The Cosmological Constant - The acceleration as curvature term in the Einstein field equation and not a form of dark energy. Provide a critical discussion., Rovelli C., 2010 Is dark energy really a mystery ? Nature, 466, 321 (July 2010) - Padmanabhan T., 2003

  19. Studying variation of fundamental constants with molecules V. V. Flambaum

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Titov, Anatoly

    directly linked to experimentally measured atomic and molecular observables. Below we will show that huge, and Oklo natural nuclear reactor give us the space-time variation of constants on the Universe lifetime scale, i.e. on times from few bil- lion to more than ten billion years. Comparison of the frequencies

  20. Fundamental constants and cosmic vacuum: the micro and macro connection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harald Fritzsch; Joan Sola

    2015-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The idea that the vacuum energy density $\\rho_{\\Lambda}$ could be time dependent is a most reasonable one in the expanding Universe; in fact, much more reasonable than just a rigid cosmological constant for the entire cosmic history. Being $\\rho_{\\Lambda}=\\rho_{\\Lambda}(t)$ dynamical, it offers a possibility to tackle the cosmological constant problem in its various facets. Furthermore, for a long time (most prominently since Dirac's first proposal on a time variable gravitational coupling) the possibility that the fundamental "constants" of Nature are slowly drifting with the cosmic expansion has been continuously investigated. In the last two decades, and specially in recent times, mounting experimental evidence attests that this could be the case. In this paper, we consider the possibility that these two groups of facts might be intimately connected, namely that the observed acceleration of the Universe and the possible time variation of the fundamental constants are two manifestations of the same underlying dynamics. We call it: the "micro and macro connection", and on its basis we expect that the cosmological term in Einstein's equations, Newton's coupling and the masses of all the particles in the Universe, both the dark matter particles and the ordinary baryons and leptons, should all drift with the cosmic expansion. Here we discuss specific cosmological models realizing such possibility in a way that preserves the principle of covariance of General Relativity.

  1. Measurement of the cosmological constant P. Antilogus a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    . The usage of SN Ia to probe the vacuum energy and more generally to study the dark energy seems quite, let us expect a break through in the understanding of the dark energy, energy at the source of the observed acceleration of the universe expansion. 2. From the cosmological constant to the dark energy

  2. CODATA Recommended Values of the Fundamental Physical Constants: 1998*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and conversion factors of physics and chemistry recommended by the Committee on Data for Science and Technology Institute of Physics and American Chemical Society. S0047-2689 00 00301-9 Key words: CODATA, conversion factors, data analysis, electrical units, fundamental constants, Josephson effect, least

  3. Dynamical constants of structured photons with parabolic-cylindrical symmetry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. M. Rodriguez-Lara; R. Jauregui

    2009-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Electromagnetic modes with parabolic-cylindrical symmetry and their dynamical variables are studied both in the classical and quantum realm. As a result, a new dynamical constant for the electromagnetic field is identified and linked to the symmetry operator which supports it.

  4. WRIGHT'S CONSTANTS IN GRAPH ENUMERATION AND BROWNIAN EXCURSION AREA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Janson, Svante

    WRIGHT'S CONSTANTS IN GRAPH ENUMERATION AND BROWNIAN EXCURSION AREA SVANTE JANSON Abstract - 1) = n n-2 for every n # 1. Wright [19] proved that for any fixed k # -1, we have the analoguous) Note the equivalent recursion formula # k+1 = 3k + 2 2 # k + k # j=0 # j # k-j , k # -1. (4) Wright

  5. WRIGHT'S CONSTANTS IN GRAPH ENUMERATION AND BROWNIAN EXCURSION AREA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Janson, Svante

    WRIGHT'S CONSTANTS IN GRAPH ENUMERATION AND BROWNIAN EXCURSION AREA SVANTE JANSON Abstract n 1. Wright [19] proved that for any fixed k -1, we have the analoguous asymptotic formula C(n, n-j, k -1. (4) Wright gives in the later paper [20] the same result in the form k = 2(1-5k)/23k1/2(k - 1

  6. Mobile applications constantly demand additional memory, and traditional

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Hsien-Hsin "Sean"

    . This remote access could reduce local storage space, thereby reducing energy demands on the mobile plat- form60 Mobile applications constantly demand additional memory, and traditional designs increase- port connected ubiquitous environments. Engineers attempt to minimize network use because of its

  7. RisR1320(EN) Distance Constant of the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    is released from a locked position of the rotor and the increasing rotation rate recorded. It is concluded­550­3003­3; ISBN 87­550­3004­1 (Internet) ISSN 0106­2840 Print: Pitney Bowes Management Services Denmark 2002 #12 second. Wind-tunnel calibrations show that for con- stant wind speed U the constant rotor angular

  8. USEFUL EQUATIONS AND CONSTANTS k = 8.99 X 109

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kioussis, Nicholas

    E E Vector Sum electU W Potential Difference: elect 0 0 WU V q q Definition Potential Energy Capacitance: Q C V Definition 0 A C d Parallel Plate, Dielectric: 0C C Dielectric Constant Energy Stored Field: qF E Definition Electric Field: 2 q E k r Magnitude (for point charge) Superposition: 1 2 3 E E

  9. Global Representation of the Fine Structure Constant and its Variation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michael Edmund Tobar

    2005-02-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The fine structure constant, alpha, is shown to be proportional to the ratio of the quanta of electric and magnetic flux of force of the electron, and provides a new representation, which is global across all unit systems. Consequently, a variation in alpha was shown to manifest due to a differential change in the fraction of the quanta of electric and magnetic flux of force, while a variation in hcross.c was shown to manifest due to the common mode change. The representation is discussed with respect to the running of the fine structure constant at high energies (small distances), and a putative temporal drift. It is shown that the running of the fine structure constant is due to equal components of electric screening (polarization of vacuum) and magnetic anti-screening (magnetization of vacuum), which cause the perceived quanta of electric charge to increase at small distances, while the magnetic flux quanta decreases. This introduces the concept of the bare magnetic flux quanta as well as the bare electric charge. With regards to temporal drift, it is confirmed that it is impossible to determine which fundamental constant is varying if alpha varies.

  10. Money Smart Many families face the constant challenge of managing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Money Smart Relevance Many families face the constant challenge of managing limited resources correctly. Response Money Smart is a financial management program developed by the Federal Deposit Insurance knowledge, develop financial confidence, and use banking services effectively. For almost 10 years, Money

  11. Table 9. U.S. Refiner Conventional Motor Gasoline Volumes by...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    5.7 5.9 4.4 12.9 NA 17.3 See footnotes at end of table. 9. U.S. Refiner Conventional Motor Gasoline Volumes by Grade and Sales Type 18 Energy Information Administration ...

  12. Table 13. U.S. Refiner Reformulated Motor Gasoline Volumes by...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    3.3 3.4 7.9 3.3 W 11.3 See footnotes at end of table. 13. U.S. Refiner Reformulated Motor Gasoline Volumes by Grade and Sales Type 26 Energy Information Administration ...

  13. Table 13. U.S. Refiner Reformulated Motor Gasoline Volumes by...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    3.6 3.7 7.9 3.1 W 11.0 See footnotes at end of table. 13. U.S. Refiner Reformulated Motor Gasoline Volumes by Grade and Sales Type 26 Energy Information Administration ...

  14. Table 9. U.S. Refiner Conventional Motor Gasoline Volumes by...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    5.7 5.9 3.9 12.7 W 16.6 See footnotes at end of table. 9. U.S. Refiner Conventional Motor Gasoline Volumes by Grade and Sales Type 18 Energy Information Administration ...

  15. Using a Constant Volume Displacement Ventilation System to Create a Micro Climate in a Large Airport Terminal in Bangkok

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Simmonds, P.; Gaw, W.

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In order to conserve energy and create a comfortable climate for both passengers and workers at a new large international airport in Thailand, a design concept was created where only the first 2m above the occupied zone is conditioned...

  16. Nearby Supernova Factory Observations of SN 2006D: On Sporadic Carbon Signatures in Early Type Ia Supernova Spectra

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    with low volume-?lling factor. Subject headings: supernovae:general — supernovae: individual (SN 2006D)Introduction Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) make valuable

  17. G.-L. THOMAS and SYDNEY YOUNG. -The vapour pressures, specific volumes, and critical constants of normal hexane (Tensions de vapeur, volumes spci-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    propyle, puis purifié et distillé onze fois. Toutes les fractions étudiées avaient des propriétés retiré par distillation fractionnée - par MM. Young et Thomas - d'un produit qualifié « pentane » prove- nant de la distillation du pétrole d'Amérique. Le point d'ébullition ramené à 760 millimètres est 36

  18. Mega-masers, Dark Energy and the Hubble Constant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lo, Fred K. Y.

    2007-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Powerful water maser emission (water mega-masers) can be found in accretion disks in the nuclei of some galaxies. Besides providing a measure of the mass at the nucleus, such mega-masers can be used to determine the distance to the host galaxy, based on a kinematic model. We will explain the importance of determining the Hubble Constant to high accuracy for constraining the equation of state of Dark Energy and describe the Mega-maser Cosmology Project that has the goal of determining the Hubble Constant to better than 3%. Time permitting, we will also present the scientific capabilities of the current and future NRAO facilities: ALMA, EVLA, VLBA and GBT, for addressing key astrophysical problems

  19. Thermodynamics of de Sitter Black Holes: Thermal Cosmological Constant

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yuichi Sekiwa

    2006-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the thermodynamic properties associated with the black hole event horizon and the cosmological horizon for black hole solutions in asymptotically de Sitter spacetimes. We examine thermodynamics of these horizons on the basis of the conserved charges according to Teitelboim's method. In particular, we have succeeded in deriving the generalized Smarr formula among thermodynamical quantities in a simple and natural way. We then show that cosmological constant must decrease when one takes into account the quantum effect. These observations have been obtained if and only if cosmological constant plays the role of a thermodynamical state variable. We also touch upon the relation between inflation of our universe and a phase transition of black holes.

  20. New process to avoid emissions: Constant pressure in coke ovens

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Giertz, J.; Huhn, F. [DMT-Gesellschaft fuer Forschung und Pruefung mbH, Essen (Germany). Inst. for Cokemaking and Fuel Technology; Hofherr, K. [Thyssen Stahl AG, Duisburg (Germany)

    1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A chamber pressure regulation (PROven), especially effective in regard to emission control problems of coke ovens is introduced for the first time. Because of the partial vacuum in the collecting main system, it is possible to keep the oven`s raw gas pressure constant on a low level over the full coking time. The individual pressure control for each chamber is assured directly as a function of the oven pressure by an immersion system controlling the flow resistance of the collecting main valve. The latter is a fixed-position design (system name ``FixCup``). By doing away with the interdependence of collecting main pressure and chamber pressure, a parameter seen as a coking constant could not be made variable. This opens a new way to reduce coke oven emissions and simultaneously to prevent the ovens from damage caused by air ingress into the oven.

  1. Sound damping constant for generalized theories of gravity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brustein, Ram [Department of Physics, Ben-Gurion University, Beer-Sheva, 84105 (Israel); Medved, A. J. M. [Physics Department, University of Seoul, Seoul 130-743 (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The near-horizon metric for a black brane in anti-de Sitter space and the metric near the AdS boundary both exhibit hydrodynamic behavior. We demonstrate the equivalence of this pair of hydrodynamic systems for the sound mode of a conformal theory. This is first established for Einstein's gravity, but we then show how the sound damping constant will be modified from its Einstein form for a generalized theory. The modified damping constant is expressible as the ratio of a pair of gravitational couplings that are indicative of the sound-channel class of gravitons. This ratio of couplings differs from both that of the shear diffusion coefficient and the shear viscosity to entropy ratio. Our analysis is mostly limited to conformal theories, but suggestions are made as to how this restriction might eventually be lifted.

  2. Apparatus producing constant cable tension for intermittent demand

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lauritzen, T.

    1984-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

    This invention relates to apparatus for producing constant tension in cable or the like when it is unreeled and reeled from a drum or spool under conditions of intermittent demand. The invention is particularly applicable to the handling of superconductive cable, but the invention is also applicable to the unreeling and reeling of other strands, such as electrical cable, wire, cord, other cables, fish line, wrapping paper and numerous other materials.

  3. Turbine blade having a constant thickness airfoil skin

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Marra, John J

    2012-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

    A turbine blade is provided for a gas turbine comprising: a support structure comprising a base defining a root of the blade and a framework extending radially outwardly from the base, and an outer skin coupled to the support structure framework. The skin has a generally constant thickness along substantially the entire radial extent thereof. The framework and the skin define an airfoil of the blade.

  4. Apparatus producing constant cable tension for intermittent demand

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lauritzen, Ted (Lafayette, CA)

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The disclosed apparatus produces constant tension in superconducting electrical cable, or some other strand, under conditions of intermittent demand, as the cable is unreeled from a reel or reeled thereon. The apparatus comprises a pivotally supported swing frame on which the reel is rotatably supported, a rotary motor, a drive train connected between the motor and the reel and including an electrically controllable variable torque slip clutch, a servo transducer connected to the swing frame for producing servo input signals corresponding to the position thereof, a servo control system connected between the transducer and the clutch for regulating the torque transmitted by the clutch to maintain the swing frame in a predetermined position, at least one air cylinder connected to the swing frame for counteracting the tension in the cable, and pressure regulating means for supplying a constant air pressure to the cylinder to establish the constant tension in the cable, the servo system and the clutch being effective to produce torque on the reel in an amount sufficient to provide tension in the cable corresponding to the constant force exerted by the air cylinder. The drive train also preferably includes a fail-safe brake operable to its released position by electrical power in common with the servo system, for preventing rotation of the reel if there is a power failure. A shock absorber and biasing springs may also be connected to the swing frame, such springs biasing the frame toward its predetermined position. The tension in the cable may be measured by force measuring devices engageable with the bearings for the reel shaft, such bearings being supported for slight lateral movement. The reel shaft is driven by a Shmidt coupler which accommodates such movement.

  5. Hydrogen Atom and Time Variation of Fine-Structure Constant

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mu-Lin Yan

    2009-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper, we have solved the de Sitter special relativistic ($\\mathcal{SR}_{cR}$-) Dirac equation of hydrogen in the earth-QSO(quasar) framework reference by means of the adiabatic approach. The aspects of geometry effects of de Sitter space-time described by Beltrami metric are explored and taken into account. It is found that the $\\mathcal{SR}_{cR}$-Dirac equation of hydrogen is a time dependent quantum Hamiltonian system. We provide an explicit calculation to justify the adiabatic approach in dealing with this time-dependent system. Since the radius of de Sitter sphere $R$ is cosmologically large, the evolution of the system is very slow so that the adiabatic approximation legitimately works with high accuracy. We conclude that the electromagnetic fine-structure constant, the electron mass and the Planck constant are time variations. This prediction of fine-structure constant is consistent with the presently available observation data. For confirming it further, experiments/observations are required.

  6. Laboratory evaluation of the constant rate of strain and constant head techniques for measurement of the hydraulic conductivity of fine grained soils

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adams, Amy Lynn

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis evaluates the constant rate of strain and constant head techniques for measurement of the hydraulic conductivity of fine grained soils. A laboratory program compares hydraulic conductivity measurements made ...

  7. Reheating-volume measure in the landscape

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sergei Winitzki

    2008-10-09T23:59:59.000Z

    I recently proposed the "reheating-volume" (RV) prescription as a possible solution to the measure problem in "multiverse" cosmology. The goal of this work is to extend the RV measure to scenarios involving bubble nucleation, such as the string theory landscape. In the spirit of the RV prescription, I propose to calculate the distribution of observable quantities in a landscape that is conditioned in probability to nucleate a finite total number of bubbles to the future of an initial bubble. A general formula for the relative number of bubbles of different types can be derived. I show that the RV measure is well-defined and independent of the choice of the initial bubble type, as long as that type supports further bubble nucleation. Applying the RV measure to a generic landscape, I find that the abundance of Boltzmann brains is always negligibly small compared with the abundance of ordinary observers in the bubbles of the same type. As an illustration, I present explicit results for a toy landscape containing four vacuum states and for landscapes with a single high-energy vacuum and a large number of low-energy vacua.

  8. Site Environmental Report for 2008, Volume II

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lackner, Regina

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Volume I: Collection Stack Air Ambient Air Rainwater Creekscollection activities Volume II section Stormwater Ambient Air; RainwaterRainwater Radiological Activity Analyte Gross alpha Location* ENV-44 Collection

  9. Types of Costs Types of Cost Estimates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boisvert, Jeff

    · Types of Costs · Types of Cost Estimates · Methods to estimate capital costs MIN E 408: Mining% accuracy. ­ 2-5% of pre-production capital Types of Cost Estimates #12;3. Definitive ­ Based on definitive-even $ Production Level Fixed Cost Break-even $ Production Level Cost-Revenue Relationships · Capital Costs (or

  10. REORIENTAO Ensino Mdio -Volume I

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, I-Shih

    REORIENTAÇÃO CURRICULAR PORTUGUÊS Ensino Médio - Volume I Materiais Didáticos #12;#12;GOVERNO DO SUBSECRETARIA ADJUNTA DE PLANEJAMENTO PEDAGÓGICO Alba Rodrigues Cruz #12;#12;GOVERNO DO ESTADO DO RIO DE JANEIRO

  11. Coupling constant constraints in a nonminimally coupled phantom cosmology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Szydlowski, Marek; Hrycyna, Orest; Kurek, Aleksandra [Astronomical Observatory, Jagiellonian University, Orla 171, 30-244 Cracow (Poland) and Mark Kac Complex Systems Research Centre, Jagiellonian University, Reymonta 4, 30-059 Cracow (Poland); Department of Theoretical Physics, Faculty of Philosophy, John Paul II Catholic University of Lublin, Al. Raclawickie 14, 20-950 Lublin (Poland); Astronomical Observatory, Jagiellonian University, Orla 171, 30-244 Cracow (Poland)

    2008-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In the paper we investigate observational constraints on coupling to gravity constant parameter {xi} using distant supernovae SNIa data, baryon oscillation peak (BOP), the cosmic microwave background radiation (CMBR) shift parameter, and the H(z) data set. We estimate the value of this parameter to constrain the extended quintessence models with nonminimally coupled to gravity phantom scalar field. The combined analysis of observational data favors a value of {xi} which lies in close neighborhood of the conformal coupling. While our estimations are model dependent they give rise to an indirect bound on the equivalence principle.

  12. Compatibility of neutron star masses and hyperon coupling constants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    H. Huber; M. K. Weigel; F. Weber

    1998-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

    It is shown that the modern equations of state for neutron star matter based on microscopic calculations of symmetric and asymmetric nuclear matter are compatible with the lower bound on the maximum neutron-star mass for a certain range of hyperon coupling constants, which are constrained by the binding energies of hyperons in symmetric nuclear matter. The hyperons are included by means of the relativistic Hartree-- or Hartree--Fock approximation. The obtained couplings are also in satisfactory agreement with hypernuclei data in the relativistic Hartree scheme. Within the relativistic Hartree--Fock approximation hypernuclei have not been investigated so far.

  13. Silica aerogel: An intrinsically low dielectric constant material

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hrubesh, L.W.

    1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Silica aerogels are highly porous solids having unique morphologies in wavelength of visible which both the pores and particles have sizes less than the wavelength of visible light. This fine nanostructure modifies the normal transport mechanisms within aerogels and endows them with a variety of exceptional physical properties. For example, aerogels have the lowest measured thermal conductivity and dielectric constant for any solid material. The intrinsically low dielectric properties of silica aerogels are the direct result of the extremely high achievable porosities, which are controllable over a range from 75% to more than 99.8 %, and which result in measured dielectric constants from 2.0 to less than 1.01. This paper discusses the synthesis of silica aerogels, processing them as thin films, and characterizing their dielectric properties. Existing data and other physical characteristics of bulk aerogels (e.g., thermal stablity, thermal expansion, moisture adsorption, modulus, dielectric strength, etc.), which are useful for evaluating them as potential dielectrics for microelectronics, are also given.

  14. Some Implications of the Cosmological Constant to Fundamental Physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. Aldrovandi; J. P. Beltran Almeida; J. G. Pereira

    2007-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

    In the presence of a cosmological constant, ordinary Poincare' special relativity is no longer valid and must be replaced by a de Sitter special relativity, in which Minkowski space is replaced by a de Sitter spacetime. In consequence, the ordinary notions of energy and momentum change, and will satisfy a different kinematic relation. Such a theory is a different kind of a doubly special relativity. Since the only difference between the Poincare' and the de Sitter groups is the replacement of translations by certain linear combinations of translations and proper conformal transformations, the net result of this change is ultimately the breakdown of ordinary translational invariance. From the experimental point of view, therefore, a de Sitter special relativity might be probed by looking for possible violations of translational invariance. If we assume the existence of a connection between the energy scale of an experiment and the local value of the cosmological constant, there would be changes in the kinematics of massive particles which could hopefully be detected in high-energy experiments. Furthermore, due to the presence of a horizon, the usual causal structure of spacetime would be significantly modified at the Planck scale.

  15. Energy Levels Of Hydrogen-Like Atomsand Fundamental Constants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Valeri V. Dvoeglazov; Rudolf N. Faustov; Yuri N. Tyukhtyaev

    1994-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The present review includes the description of theoretical methods for the investigations of the spectra of hydrogen-like systems. Various versions of the quasipotential approach and the method of the effective Dirac equation are considered. The new methods, which have been developed in the eighties, are described. These are the method for the investigation of the spectra by means of the quasipotential equation with the relativistic reduced mass and the method for a selection of the logarithmic corrections by means of the renormalization group equation. The special attention is given to the construction of a perturbation theory and the selection of graphs, whereof the contributions of different orders of $\\alpha$, the fine structure constant, to the energy of the fine and hyperfine splitting in a positronium, a muonium and a hydrogen atom could be calculated. In the second part of this article the comparison of the experimental results and the theoretical results concerning the wide range of topics is produced. They are the fine and hyperfine splitting in the hydrogenic systems, the Lamb shift and the anomalous magnetic moments of an electron and a muon. Also, the problem of the precision determination of a numerical value of the fine structure constant, connected with the above topics, is discussed.

  16. Forecast Technical Document Growing Stock Volume

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Forecast Technical Document Growing Stock Volume Forecasts A document describing how growing stock (`standing') volume is handled in the 2011 Production Forecast. Tom Jenkins Robert Matthews Ewan Mackie Lesley Halsall #12;PF2011 ­ Growing stock volume forecasts Background A forecast of standing volume (or

  17. Journal of Applied Polymer Science Volume 102, Issue 2, pages 12541261, 15 October, 2006 1254

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gupta, Nikhil

    On the Tensile Properties of Glass Microballoon-Epoxy Resin Syntactic Foams Nikhil Gupta1 and Ruslan Nagorny in the present research. Sixteen types of syntactic foams have been fabricated and tested. Four types of glass-3532 E-mail: ngupta@poly.edu ABSTRACT The effect of hollow glass particle (microballoon) volume fraction

  18. International Linear Collider Technical Design Report (Volumes 1 through 4)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harrison M.

    2013-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The design report consists of four volumes: Volume 1, Executive Summary; Volume 2, Physics; Volume 3, Accelerator (Part I, R and D in the Technical Design Phase, and Part II, Baseline Design); and Volume 4, Detectors.

  19. Constant power speed range extension of surface mounted PM motors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lawler, Jack Steward (Knoxville, TN); Bailey, John Milton (Knoxville, TN)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A circuit and method for controlling a rotating machine (11) in the constant horsepower range above base speed uses an inverter (15) having SCR's (T1-T6) connected in series with the primary commutation switches (Q1-Q6) to control turn off of the primary commutation switches and to protect the primary commutation switches from faults. The primary commutation switches (Q1-Q6) are controlled by a controller (14), to fire in advance or after a time when the back emf equals the applied voltage, and then to turn off after a precise dwell time, such that suitable power is developed at speeds up to at least six times base speed.

  20. Determination of the electron–phonon coupling constant in tungsten

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Daraszewicz, Szymon L.; Duffy, Dorothy M.; Shluger, Alexander L. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, London Centre for Nanotechnology, University College London, Gower Street, WC1E 6BT London (United Kingdom); Giret, Yvelin [Department of Physics and Astronomy, London Centre for Nanotechnology, University College London, Gower Street, WC1E 6BT London (United Kingdom); The Institute of Scientific and Industrial Research (ISIR), Osaka University, Mihogaoka 8-1, Ibaraki, Osaka 567-0047 (Japan); Tanimura, Hiroshi; Tanimura, Katsumi [The Institute of Scientific and Industrial Research (ISIR), Osaka University, Mihogaoka 8-1, Ibaraki, Osaka 567-0047 (Japan)

    2014-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

    We used two methods to determine the effective electron-phonon coupling constant (G{sub 0}) in tungsten. Our first principles calculations predict G{sub 0}?=?1.65?×?10{sup 17?}W m{sup ?3} K{sup ?1}. The temporal decay of the femtosecond-resolution optical reflectivity for a (100) surface of bulk W was measured using a pump-probe scheme and analysed using ab initio parameterised two temperature model, which includes both the effects of the electron-phonon coupling and thermal conduction into bulk. This analysis gives G{sub 0}?=?1.4(3)?×?10{sup 17?}W m{sup ?3} K{sup ?1}, in good agreement with the theoretical prediction. The described effective method of calculating and measuring G{sub 0} in bulk materials can be easily extended to other metals.

  1. Temperature relationship of the elastic constants of vanadium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Belousov, O.K.

    1987-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Information on the elastic constants of vanadium and their temperature relationship is limited and ambiguous. This article gives the values of these characteristics for VEL-2 electron beam remelted vanadium with a purity of about 99.8%. The elastic properties were measured in heating from 20 to 1600/sup 0/C in a vacuum. The relationship of the modulus of elasticity to temperature has two almost linear portions in the 20-300 and 300-1350/sup 0/C ranges and then a more intense reduction in it is observed. The shear modulus drops sharply starting with 800/sup 0/C and decreases to G = 36 kN/mm/sup 2/ at 1600/sup 0/C. Poisson's ratio has values close to 0.3. Its most significant increase starts with 1400/sup 0/C.e

  2. Nonzero cosmological constant and the many vacua world

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. A. Grib

    2003-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The idea of the quantum state of the Universe described by some density matrix, i.e mixture of at least two vacua, the trivial symmetric and the nontrivial one with spontaneously broken symmetry is discussed. Nonzero cosmological constant necessarily arises for such a state and has the observable value if one takes the axion mass for the vacuum expectation value. The Higgs model, Nambu's model and discrete symmetry breaking are considered. Human observers can observe only the world on the nonsymmetric vacuum, the world on the other vacuum is some dark matter. Gravity is due to action of two worlds. Tachyons nonobservable for visible matter can be present in the dark matter, leading to some effects of nonlocality in the space of the Universe.

  3. Span Programs for Functions with Constant-Sized 1-certificates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aleksandrs Belovs

    2011-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Besides the Hidden Subgroup Problem, the second large class of quantum speed-ups is for functions with constant-sized 1-certificates. This includes the OR function, solvable by the Grover algorithm, the distinctness, the triangle and other problems. The usual way to solve them is by quantum walk on the Johnson graph. We propose a solution for the same problems using span programs. The span program is a computational model equivalent to the quantum query algorithm in its strength, and yet very different in its outfit. We prove the power of our approach by designing a quantum algorithm for the triangle problem with query complexity $O(n^{35/27})$ that is better than $O(n^{13/10})$ of the best previously known algorithm by Magniez et al.

  4. Path Integral Confined Dirac Fermions in a Constant Magnetic Field

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abdeldjalil Merdaci; Ahmed Jellal; Lyazid Chetouani

    2014-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider Dirac fermion confined in harmonic potential and submitted to a constant magnetic field. The corresponding solutions of the energy spectrum are obtained by using the path integral techniques. For this, we begin by establishing a symmetric global projection, which provides a symmetric form for the Green function. Based on this, we show that it is possible to end up with the propagator of the harmonic oscillator for one charged particle. After some transformations, we derive the normalized wave functions and the eigenvalues in terms of different physical parameters and quantum numbers. By interchanging quantum numbers, we show that our solutions possed interesting properties. The density of current and the non-relativistic limit are analyzed where different conclusions are obtained.

  5. Lieb-Liniger gas in a constant-force potential

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jukic, D.; Galic, S.; Buljan, H. [Department of Physics, University of Zagreb, Bijenicka c. 32, 10000 Zagreb (Croatia); Pezer, R. [Faculty of Metallurgy, University of Zagreb, Aleja narodnih heroja 3, 44103 Sisak (Croatia)

    2010-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We use Gaudin's Fermi-Bose mapping operator to calculate exact solutions for the Lieb-Liniger model in a linear (constant-force) potential (the constructed exact stationary solutions are referred to as the Lieb-Liniger-Airy wave functions). The ground-state properties of the gas in the wedgelike trapping potential are calculated in the strongly interacting regime by using Girardeau's Fermi-Bose mapping and the pseudopotential approach in the 1/c approximation (c denotes the strength of the interaction). We point out that quantum dynamics of Lieb-Liniger wave packets in the linear potential can be calculated by employing an N-dimensional Fourier transform as in the case of free expansion.

  6. Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Solutions at Constant Chemical Potential

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Perego, Claudio; Parrinello, Michele

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Molecular Dynamics studies of chemical processes in solution are of great value in a wide spectrum of applications, that range from nano-technology to pharmaceutical chemistry. However, these calculations are affected by severe finite-size effects, such as the solution being depleted as the chemical process proceeds, that influence the outcome of the simulations. To overcome these limitations, one must allow the system to exchange molecules with a macroscopic reservoir, thus sampling a Grand-Canonical ensemble. Despite the fact that different remedies have been proposed, this still represents a key challenge in molecular simulations. In the present work we propose the C$\\mu$MD method, which introduces an external force that controls the environment of the chemical process of interest. This external force, drawing molecules from a finite reservoir, maintains the chemical potential constant in the region where the process takes place. We have applied the C$\\mu$MD method to the paradigmatic case of urea crystall...

  7. Determination of the Boltzmann Constant Using the Differential - Cylindrical Procedure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feng, X J; Lin, H; Gillis, K A; Moldover, M R

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We report in this paper the progresses on the determination of the Boltzmann constant using the acoustic gas thermometer (AGT) of fixed-length cylindrical cavities. First, we present the comparison of the molar masses of pure argon gases through comparing speeds of sound of gases. The procedure is independent from the methodology by Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry (GC-MS). The experimental results show good agreement between both methods. The comparison offers an independent inspection of the analytical results by GC-MS. Second, we present the principle of the novel differential-cylindrical procedure based on the AGT of two fixed-length cavities. The deletion mechanism for some major perturbations is analyzed for the new procedure. The experimental results of the differential-cylindrical procedure demonstrate some major improvements on the first, second acoustic and third virial coefficients, and the excess half-widths. The three acoustic virial coefficients agree well with the stated-of-the-art experime...

  8. Types of Costs Types of Cost Estimates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boisvert, Jeff

    05-1 · Types of Costs · Types of Cost Estimates · Methods to estimate capital costs MIN E 408-Revenue Relationships · Capital Costs (or first cost or capital investment): ­ Expenditures made to acquire or develop capital assets ­ Three main classes of capital costs: 1. Depreciable Investment: · Investment allocated

  9. Abstract--There are two types of drivers in production machine systems: constant velocity (CV) motor and servo-motor.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, WJ "Chris"

    the dynamic model of the five-bar hybrid mechanism including its electric motors. Section 3 presents) motor and servo-motor. If a system contains two drivers or more, among which some are of the CV motor while the other are the servo-motor, the system has the so-called hybrid driver architecture

  10. FESD Proposal, Type I VOICE: Volcano, Ocean, Ice, and Carbon Experiments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huybers, Peter

    in continental ice volume and sea level produce changes in pressure and stress within the crust and mantleFESD Proposal, Type I VOICE: Volcano, Ocean, Ice, and Carbon Experiments Project Manager: Charles during Pleistocene ice ages. We posit that changes in sea level and ice volume drive changes in volcanism

  11. Third Report of the California Hospital Outcomes Project (1997): Report on Heart Attack, 1991-1993 Volume 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Romano, Patrick S; Luft, Harold S; Rainwater, Julie A

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    age, sex, type of heart attack, and chronic diseases wereand location of the heart attack, and the specific chronicP S , Luft HS. Report on Heart Attack 1991-1993, Volume 1:

  12. Third Report of the California Hospital Outcomes Project (1997): Report on Heart Attack, 1991-1993 Volume 2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Romano, Patrick S; Luft, Harold S; Rainwater, Julie A

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    age, sex, type of heart attack, and chronic diseases wereJA, Zach AP. Report on Heart Attack 1991-1993, Volume 2:California, Santa Barbara Heart Attack Clinical Panel Melvin

  13. Which BPS baryons minimize volume?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Evslin, Jarah; Kuperstein, Stanislav [Scuola Internazionale Superiore di Studi Avanzati (SISSA), Strada Costiera, Via Beirut n.2-4, 34013 Trieste (Italy); Theoretische Natuurkunde, Vrije Universiteit Brussel and The International Solvay Institutes, Pleinlaan 2, B-1050 Brussels (Belgium)

    2009-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A Bogomol'nyi-Prasad-Sommerfield (BPS) 3-cycle in a Sasaki-Einstein 5-manifold in general does not minimize volume in its homology class, as we illustrate with several examples of nonminimal volume BPS cycles on the 5-manifolds Y{sup p,q}. Instead they minimize the energy of a wrapping D-brane, extremizing a generalized calibration. We present this generalized calibration and demonstrate that it reproduces both the Born-Infeld and the Wess-Zumino parts of the D3-brane energy.

  14. State of the art review of radioactive waste volume reduction techniques for commercial nuclear power plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A review is made of the state of the art of volume reduction techniques for low level liquid and solid radioactive wastes produced as a result of: (1) operation of commercial nuclear power plants, (2) storage of spent fuel in away-from-reactor facilities, and (3) decontamination/decommissioning of commercial nuclear power plants. The types of wastes and their chemical, physical, and radiological characteristics are identified. Methods used by industry for processing radioactive wastes are reviewed and compared to the new techniques for processing and reducing the volume of radioactive wastes. A detailed system description and report on operating experiences follow for each of the new volume reduction techniques. In addition, descriptions of volume reduction methods presently under development are provided. The Appendix records data collected during site surveys of vendor facilities and operating power plants. A Bibliography is provided for each of the various volume reduction techniques discussed in the report.

  15. Polynomial Constants are Decidable ? Markus Muller-Olm 1 and Helmut Seidl 2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seidl, Helmut

    Polynomial Constants are Decidable ? Markus Muller-Olm 1 and Helmut Seidl 2 1 University are #12;nite constants [19]. This motivated Muller-Olm and Ruthing [16] to study the complexity

  16. Polynomial Constants are Decidable # Markus MullerOlm 1 and Helmut Seidl 2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Müller-Olm, Markus

    Polynomial Constants are Decidable # Markus MË?uller­Olm 1 and Helmut Seidl 2 1 University]. This motivated MË?uller­Olm and RË?uthing [16] to study the complexity of constant propagation for classes

  17. OPTICAL CONSTANTS OF THIN FILMS FROM THE CHARACTERISTIC ELECTRON ENERGY LOSSES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    114. OPTICAL CONSTANTS OF THIN FILMS FROM THE CHARACTERISTIC ELECTRON ENERGY LOSSES By R. E in the photon energy range from 5 to 30 eV. The optical constants of aluminum from 2 500 A to 6 500 A have been à une étude de l'oscillateur optique. Abstract. 2014 A method for obtaining the optical constants

  18. A CONSTANT-INVENTORY TACTICAL PLANNING MODEL FOR A JOB SHOP

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Graves, Stephen C.

    A CONSTANT-INVENTORY TACTICAL PLANNING MODEL FOR A JOB SHOP Stephen C. Graves Massachusetts a constant-inventory tactical planning model for a generic manufacturing system, such as a job shop assume that we can regulate the release of work to the shop to maintain the constant-inventory constraint

  19. PATRAM '80. Proceedings. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huebner, H.W. (ed.)

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Volume 1 contains papers from the following sessions: Plenary Session; Regulations, Licensing and Standards; LMFBR Systems Concepts; Risk/Safety Assessment I; Systems and Package Design; US Institutional Issues; Risk/Safety Assessment II; Leakage, Leak Rate and Seals; Poster Session A; Operations and Systems Experience I; Manufacturing Processes and Materials; and Quality Assurance and Maintenance. Individual papers were processed. (LM)

  20. PATRAM '80. Proceedings. Volume 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huebner, H.W. (ed.)

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Volume 2 contains papers from the following sessions: Safeguards-Related Problems; Neutronics and Criticality; Operations and Systems Experience II; Plutonium Systems; Intermediate Storage in Casks; Operations and Systems Planning; Institutional Issues; Structural and Thermal Evaluation I; Poster Session B; Extended Testing I; Structural and Thermal Evaluation II; Extended Testing II; and Emergency Preparedness and Response. Individual papers were processed. (LM)

  1. De Sitter brane-world, localization of gravity, and the cosmological constant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Neupane, Ishwaree P. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Canterbury, Private Bag 4800, Christchurch 8041 (New Zealand)

    2011-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Cosmological models with a de Sitter 3-brane embedded in a 5-dimensional de Sitter spacetime (dS{sub 5}) give rise to a finite 4D Planck mass similar to that in Randall-Sundrum (RS) brane-world models in anti-de Sitter 5-dimensional spacetime(AdS{sub 5}). Yet, there arise a few important differences as compared to the results with a flat 3-brane or 4D Minkowski spacetime. For example, the mass reduction formula (MRF) M{sub Pl}{sup 2}=M{sub (5)}{sup 3}l{sub AdS} as well as the relationship M{sub Pl}{sup 2}=M{sub Pl(4+n)}{sup n+2}L{sup n} (with L being the average size or the radius of the n extra dimensions) expected in models of product-space (or Kaluza-Klein) compactifications get modified in cosmological backgrounds. In an expanding universe, a physically relevant MRF encodes information upon the 4-dimensional Hubble expansion parameter, in addition to the length and mass parameters L, M{sub Pl}, and M{sub Pl(4+n)}. If a bulk cosmological constant is present in the solution, then the reduction formula is further modified. With these new insights, we show that the localization of a massless 4D graviton as well as the mass hierarchy between M{sub Pl} and M{sub Pl(4+n)} can be explained in cosmological brane-world models. A notable advantage of having a 5D de Sitter bulk is that in this case the zero-mass wave function is normalizable, which is not necessarily the case if the bulk spacetime is anti-de Sitter. In spacetime dimensions D{>=}7, however, the bulk cosmological constant {Lambda}{sub b} can take either sign ({Lambda}{sub b}<0, =0, or >0). The D=6 case is rather inconclusive, in which case {Lambda}{sub b} may be introduced together with 2-form gauge field (or flux). We obtain some interesting classical gravity solutions that compactify higher-dimensional spacetime to produce a Robertson-Walker universe with de Sitter-type expansion plus one extra noncompact direction. We also show that such models can admit both an effective 4-dimensional Newton constant that remains finite and a normalizable zero-mode graviton wave function.

  2. Characteristics of potential repository wastes. Volume 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The LWR spent fuels discussed in Volume 1 of this report comprise about 99% of all domestic non-reprocessed spent fuel. In this report we discuss other types of spent fuels which, although small in relative quantity, consist of a number of diverse types, sizes, and compositions. Many of these fuels are candidates for repository disposal. Some non-LWR spent fuels are currently reprocessed or are scheduled for reprocessing in DOE facilities at the Savannah River Site, Hanford Site, and the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. It appears likely that the reprocessing of fuels that have been reprocessed in the past will continue and that the resulting high-level wastes will become part of defense HLW. However, it is not entirely clear in some cases whether a given fuel will be reprocessed, especially in cases where pretreatment may be needed before reprocessing, or where the enrichment is not high enough to make reprocessing attractive. Some fuels may be canistered, while others may require special means of disposal. The major categories covered in this chapter include HTGR spent fuel from the Fort St. Vrain and Peach Bottom-1 reactors, research and test reactor fuels, and miscellaneous fuels, and wastes generated from the decommissioning of facilities.

  3. On the possible running of the cosmological "constant"

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ilya L. Shapiro; Joan Sola

    2009-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Despite the many outstanding cosmological observations leading to a strong evidence for a nonvanishing cosmological constant (CC) term in the gravitational field equations, the theoretical status of this quantity seems to be lagging well behind the observational successes. It thus seems timely to revisit some fundamental aspects of the CC term in Quantum Field Theory (QFT). We emphasize that, in curved space-time, nothing a priori prevents this term from potentially having a mild running behavior associated to quantum effects. Remarkably, this could be the very origin of the dynamical nature of the Dark Energy, in contrast to many other popular options considered in the literature. In discussing this possibility, we also address some recent criticisms concerning the possibility of such running. Our conclusion is that, while there is no comprehensive proof of the CC running, there is no proof of the non-running either. The problem can be solved only through a deeper understanding of the vacuum contributions of massive quantum fields on a curved spacetime background. We suggest that such investigations are at the heart of one of the most important endeavors of fundamental theoretical cosmology in the years to come.

  4. Can the cosmological "constant" run? - It may run

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ilya L. Shapiro; Joan Sola

    2008-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Using standard quantum field theory, we discuss several theoretical aspects of the possible running of the cosmological constant (CC) term in Einstein's equations. The basic motivation for the present work is to emphasize that this possibility should also be taken into account when considering dynamical models for the dark energy (DE), which are nowadays mainly focused on identifying the DE with the energy density associated to one or more ad hoc scalar fields. At the same time, we address some recent criticisms that have been published (or privately communicated to us) attempting to cast doubts on the fundamental possibility of such running. In this work, we argue that while there is no comprehensive proof of the CC running, there is no rigorous proof of the non-running either. In particular, some purported "non-running theorem" recently adduced in the literature is, in our opinion, completely insubstantial and formally incorrect. The way to the CC running is, therefore, still open and we take here the opportunity to present a pedagogical review of the present state of the art in this field, including a a brief historical account.

  5. Petroleum Supply Annual 2005, Volume 1

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Supply Annual 2005, Volume 1 Released: October 23, 2006 Petroleum Supply Annual 2005, Volume 1 --- All Tables in PDF (1.0 MB) CSV XLS --- All CSV and XLS files contained in a...

  6. Statistically Equivalent Representative Volume Elements for Unidirectional

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ghosh, Somnath

    Statistically Equivalent Representative Volume Elements for Unidirectional Composite the statistically equivalent representative volume element (SERVE) are proposed for fiber-reinforced microstructures using a bilinear cohesive zone law. As introduced in the first article, a combination of statistical

  7. Types of Reuse

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The following provides greater detail regarding the types of reuse pursued for LM sites. It should be noted that many actual reuses combine several types of the uses listed below.

  8. Site Environmental Report for 2005 Volume I and Volume II

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ruggieri, Michael

    2006-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Each year, Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory prepares an integrated report on its environmental programs to satisfy the requirements of United States Department of Energy Order 231.1A, ''Environment, Safety, and Health Reporting''. The ''Site Environmental Report for 2005'' summarizes Berkeley Lab's environmental management performance, presents environmental monitoring results, and describes significant programs for calendar year 2005. (Throughout this report, Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory is referred to as ''Berkeley Lab'', ''the Laboratory'', ''Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory'', and ''LBNL''.) The report is separated into two volumes. Volume I contains an overview of the Laboratory, the status of environmental programs, and summarized results from surveillance and monitoring activities. This year's Volume I text body is organized into an executive summary followed by six chapters. The report's structure has been reorganized this year, and it now includes a chapter devoted to environmental management system topics. Volume II contains individual data results from surveillance and monitoring activities. The ''Site Environmental Report'' is distributed by releasing it on the Web from the Berkeley Lab Environmental Services Group (ESG) home page, which is located at http://www.lbl.gov/ehs/esg/. Many of the documents cited in this report also are accessible from the ESG Web page. CD and printed copies of this Site Environmental Report are available upon request. The report follows the Laboratory's policy of using the International System of Units (SI), also known as the metric system of measurements. Whenever possible, results are also reported using the more conventional (non-SI) system of measurements, because the non-SI system is referenced by several current regulatory standards and is more familiar to some readers. Two tables are provided at the end of the Glossary to help readers: the first defines the prefixes used with SI units of measurement, and the second provides conversions to non-SI units.

  9. Fort Irwin Integrated Resource Assessment. Volume 2, Baseline detail

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Richman, E.E.; Keller, J.M.; Dittmer, A.L.; Hadley, D.L.

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report documents the assessment of baseline energy use at Fort Irwin, a US Army Forces Command facility near Barstow, California. It is a companion report to Volume 1, Executive Summary, and Volume 3, Integrated Resource Assessment. The US Army Forces Command (FORSCOM) has tasked the US Department of Energy (DOE) Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP), supported by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL), to identify, evaluate, and assist in acquiring all cost-effective energy projects at Fort Irwin. This is part of a model program that PNL has designed to support energy-use decisions in the federal sector. This program (1) identifies and evaluates all cost-effective energy projects; (2) develops a schedule at each installation for project acquisition considering project type, size, timing, and capital requirements, as well as energy and dollar savings; and (3) targets 100% of the financing required to implement energy efficiency projects. PNL applied this model program to Fort Irwin. This analysis examines the characteristics of electric, propane gas, and vehicle fuel use for a typical operating year. It records energy-use intensities for the facilities at Fort Irwin by building type and energy end use. It also breaks down building energy consumption by fuel type, energy end use, and building type. A complete energy consumption reconciliation is presented that accounts for all energy use among buildings, utilities, and applicable losses.

  10. Verifying Volume Rendering Using Discretization Error Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kirby, Mike

    Verifying Volume Rendering Using Discretization Error Analysis Tiago Etiene, Daniel Jo¨nsson, Timo--We propose an approach for verification of volume rendering correctness based on an analysis of the volume rendering integral, the basis of most DVR algorithms. With respect to the most common discretization

  11. Waste minimization handbook, Volume 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boing, L.E.; Coffey, M.J.

    1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This technical guide presents various methods used by industry to minimize low-level radioactive waste (LLW) generated during decommissioning and decontamination (D and D) activities. Such activities generate significant amounts of LLW during their operations. Waste minimization refers to any measure, procedure, or technique that reduces the amount of waste generated during a specific operation or project. Preventive waste minimization techniques implemented when a project is initiated can significantly reduce waste. Techniques implemented during decontamination activities reduce the cost of decommissioning. The application of waste minimization techniques is not limited to D and D activities; it is also useful during any phase of a facility`s life cycle. This compendium will be supplemented with a second volume of abstracts of hundreds of papers related to minimizing low-level nuclear waste. This second volume is expected to be released in late 1996.

  12. MACHINE CONTEST MACHINE VOLUME WORKSHEET

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yener, Aylin

    MACHINE CONTEST® MACHINE VOLUME WORKSHEET Note: Each square is 1' x 1' (0.3 m x 0.3 m) (Official the footprint of your machine NOTE: If any part of the machine falls within a square, you must count the entire: _______________ (choose one: ft2 or m2 ) STEP 3: Measure the height of your machine. NOTE: The maximum height is 8' (2.4 m

  13. Petroleum supply annual 1994. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

    The Petroleum Supply Annual (PSA) contains information on the supply and disposition of crude oil and petroleum products. The publication reflects data that were collected from the petroleum industry during 1994 through annual and monthly surveys. The PSA is divided into two volumes. This first volume contains four sections: Summary Statistics, Detailed Statistics, Refinery Capacity, and Oxygenate Capacity each with final annual data. The second volume contains final statistics for each month of 1994, and replaces data previously published in the Petroleum Supply Monthly (PSM). The tables in Volumes 1 and 2 are similarly numbered to facilitate comparison between them. Below is a description of each section in Volume 1 of the PSA.

  14. Petroleum supply annual 1993. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Petroleum Supply Annual (PSA) contains information on the supply and disposition of crude oil and petroleum products. The publication reflects data that were collected from the petroleum industry during 1993 through annual and monthly surveys. The PSA is divided into two volumes. This first volume contains four sections: Summary Statistics, Detailed Statistics, Refinery Capacity, and Oxygenate Capacity each with final annual data. The second volume contains final statistics for each month of 1993, and replaces data previously published in the Petroleum Supply Monthly (PSM). The tables in Volumes 1 and 2 are similarly numbered to facilitate comparison between them. Below is a description of each section in Volume 1 of the PSA.

  15. Solidification of low-volume power plant sludges. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bell, N.E.; Halverson, M.A.; Mercer, B.M.

    1981-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A literature review was conducted to obtain information on the status of hazardous waste solidification technology and application of this technology to low-volume power plant waste sludges. Because of scarcity of sludge composition data, anticipated major components were identified primarily by chemical reactions that are known to occur during treatment of specific wastewaters. Chemical and physical properties of these sludges were critically analyzed for compatibility with several types of commercially available solidification processes. The study pointed out the need for additional information on the nature of these sludges, especially leaching characteristics and the presence of substances that will interfere with solidification processes. Laboratory studies were recommended for evaluation of solidification process which have the greatest potential for converting hazardous low-volume sludges to non-hazardous waste forms.

  16. Shared Communications: Volume 2. In-Depth Systems Research

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Truett, LF

    2004-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

    This report is the second of two documents that examine the literature for actual examples of organizations and agencies that share communications resources. While the primary emphasis is on rural, intelligent transportation system (ITS) communications involving transit, examples will not be limited to rural activities, nor to ITS implementation, nor even to transit. In addition, the term ''communication'' will be broadly applied to include all information resources. The first document of this series, ''Shared Communications: Volume I. A Summary and Literature Review'', defines the meaning of the term ''shared communication resources'' and provides many examples of agencies that share resources. This document, ''Shared Communications: Volume II. In-Depth Systems Research'', reviews attributes that contributed to successful applications of the sharing communication resources concept. A few examples of each type of communication sharing are provided. Based on the issues and best practice realworld examples, recommendations for potential usage and recommended approaches for field operational tests are provided.

  17. Atom interferometric techniques for measuring gravitational acceleration and constant magnetic field gradients

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barrett, B

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We discuss two techniques for probing the effects of a homogeneous force acting on cold atoms, such as that due to gravity or a constant magnetic field gradient, using grating echo-type atom interferometers. A comprehensive theoretical description of signals generated by both two-pulse and three-pulse interferometers, accounting for magnetic sub-levels in the atomic ground state, is shown to agree with experimental results. Laser-cooled samples of $^{85}$Rb with temperatures as low as 2.4 $\\mu$K have been achieved in a relatively large glass cell with well-suppressed magnetic fields. Using transit time limited interferometer signals, we demonstrate sensitivity to externally applied magnetic gradients as small as $\\sim 4$ mG/cm. With these timescales we estimate that precision measurements of the gravitational acceleration, $g$, are possible with both the two-pulse and three-pulse echo interferometers. Whereas the two-pulse signal is a position-sensitive technique to measure the absolute value of $g$, the thre...

  18. Structure disorder degree of polysilicon thin films grown by different processing: Constant C from Raman spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Quan, E-mail: wangq@mail.ujs.edu.cn [School of mechanical engineering, Jiangsu University, Zhenjiang 212013 (China); State Key Laboratory of Solid Lubrication, Lanzhou Institute of Chemical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Zhang, Yanmin; Hu, Ran; Ren, Naifei [School of mechanical engineering, Jiangsu University, Zhenjiang 212013 (China); Ge, Daohan [School of mechanical engineering, Jiangsu University, Zhenjiang 212013 (China); State Key Laboratory of Transducer Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 200050 (China)

    2013-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Flat, low-stress, boron-doped polysilicon thin films were prepared on single crystalline silicon substrates by low pressure chemical vapor deposition. It was found that the polysilicon films with different deposition processing have different microstructure properties. The confinement effect, tensile stresses, defects, and the Fano effect all have a great influence on the line shape of Raman scattering peak. But the effect results are different. The microstructure and the surface layer are two important mechanisms dominating the internal stress in three types of polysilicon thin films. For low-stress polysilicon thin film, the tensile stresses are mainly due to the change of microstructure after thermal annealing. But the tensile stresses in flat polysilicon thin film are induced by the silicon carbide layer at surface. After the thin film doped with boron atoms, the phenomenon of the tensile stresses increasing can be explained by the change of microstructure and the increase in the content of silicon carbide. We also investigated the disorder degree states for three polysilicon thin films by analyzing a constant C. It was found that the disorder degree of low-stress polysilicon thin film larger than that of flat and boron-doped polysilicon thin films due to the phase transformation after annealing. After the flat polysilicon thin film doped with boron atoms, there is no obvious change in the disorder degree and the disorder degree in some regions even decreases.

  19. Confronting the relaxation mechanism for a large cosmological constant with observations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Spyros Basilakos; Florian Bauer; Joan Sola

    2012-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

    In order to deal with a large cosmological constant a relaxation mechanism based on modified gravity has been proposed recently. By virtue of this mechanism the effect of the vacuum energy density of a given quantum field/string theory (no matter how big is its initial value in the early universe) can be neutralized dynamically, i.e. without fine tuning, and hence a Big Bang-like evolution of the cosmos becomes possible. Remarkably, a large class F^n_m of models of this kind, namely capable of dynamically adjusting the vacuum energy irrespective of its value and size, has been identified. In this paper, we carefully put them to the experimental test. By performing a joint likelihood analysis we confront these models with the most recent observational data on type Ia supernovae (SNIa), the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB), the Baryonic Acoustic Oscillations (BAO) and the high redshift data on the expansion rate, so as to determine which ones are the most favored by observations. We compare the optimal relaxation models F^n_m found by this method with the standard or concordance LambdaCDM model, and find that some of these models may appear as almost indistinguishable from it. Interestingly enough, this shows that it is possible to construct viable solutions to the tough cosmological fine tuning problem with models that display the same basic phenomenological features as the concordance model.

  20. Volumes

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    W 803.9 1,360.3 214.2 2,378.3 W W 172.8 133.2 - 305.9 See footnotes at end of table. 220 Energy Information AdministrationPetroleum Marketing Annual 1999 Table 43. Refiner Motor...

  1. Volumes

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    W W 830.4 W W 2,295.3 W W 190.9 133.6 - 324.5 See footnotes at end of table. 220 Energy Information AdministrationPetroleum Marketing Annual 1998 Table 43. Refiner Motor...

  2. Volumes

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    W 872.9 1,737.8 282.7 2,893.4 W W 132.1 117.6 - 249.7 See footnotes at end of table. 220 Energy Information AdministrationPetroleum Marketing Annual 2002 Table 43. Refiner Motor...

  3. Volumes

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    W NA W 1,666.1 W 2,880.1 NA W 134.2 125.5 - 259.7 See footnotes at end of table. 220 Energy Information AdministrationPetroleum Marketing Annual 2001 Table 43. Refiner Motor...

  4. VOLUME

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear SecurityTensile Strain Switched Ferromagnetism inS-4500II Field EmissionFunctionalPortalV1 - March8, NUMBER 18 P

  5. VOLUME

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear SecurityTensile Strain Switched Ferromagnetism inS-4500II Field EmissionFunctionalPortalV1 - March8, NUMBER 18

  6. VOLUME

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear SecurityTensile Strain Switched Ferromagnetism inS-4500II Field EmissionFunctionalPortalV1 - March8, NUMBER 180,

  7. VOLUME

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear SecurityTensile Strain Switched Ferromagnetism inS-4500II Field EmissionFunctionalPortalV1 - March8, NUMBER

  8. VOLUME

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear SecurityTensile Strain Switched Ferromagnetism inS-4500II Field EmissionFunctionalPortalV1 - March8, NUMBER3 P H

  9. VOLUME

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear SecurityTensile Strain Switched Ferromagnetism inS-4500II Field EmissionFunctionalPortalV1 - March8, NUMBER3 P H6

  10. VOLUME

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear SecurityTensile Strain Switched Ferromagnetism inS-4500II Field EmissionFunctionalPortalV1 - March8, NUMBER3 P

  11. VOLUME

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear SecurityTensile Strain Switched Ferromagnetism inS-4500II Field EmissionFunctionalPortalV1 - March8, NUMBER3 P8,

  12. VOLUME

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear SecurityTensile Strain Switched Ferromagnetism inS-4500II Field EmissionFunctionalPortalV1 - March8, NUMBER3

  13. VOLUME

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear SecurityTensile Strain Switched Ferromagnetism inS-4500II Field EmissionFunctionalPortalV1 - March8, NUMBER318 P

  14. VOLUME

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear SecurityTensile Strain Switched Ferromagnetism inS-4500II Field EmissionFunctionalPortalV1 - March8, NUMBER318

  15. Volumes

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelinesProved ReservesFeet)per Thousand28Decreases (BillionSeparation 2,37809,369.5

  16. Volumes

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelinesProved ReservesFeet)per Thousand28Decreases (BillionSeparation

  17. Volumes

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelinesProved ReservesFeet)per Thousand28Decreases (BillionSeparation41,706.6 42,867.4

  18. Spatial homogenization for plate-type critical assemblies. [LMFBR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rempe, K.R.; Smith, K.S.

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Standard calculational models of plate-type LMFBR critical assemblies do not explicitly represent individual plates. Instead, detailed plate-by-plate calculations are performed only for each representative cell type, and homogenized cross sections are defined by flux-volume weighting of individual plate cross sections. Subsequent reactor calculations are performed by modeling each cell type with homogenized cross sections. The homogenized cross sections are sensitive to the manner in which the cell leakage is modeled. The intent of this paper is to present a method of representing the cell leakage which results in more accurate homogenized cross sections than the methods presently in use.

  19. Does the measured value of the Planck constant depend on the energy of measurements?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massa, Enrico; Jentschel, Michael

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The measurement of the Avogadro constant opened the way to a comparison of the watt-balance measurements of the Planck constant with the values calculated from the quotients of the Planck constant and the mass of a particle or an atom. Since the energy scales of these measurements span nine energy decades, these data provide insight into the consistency of our understanding of physics.

  20. The Structure of a Tunicate C-type Lectin from Polyandrocarpa misakiensis Complexed with

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Williams, Roger L.

    , Hills Road, Cambridge CB2 2QH, UK C-type lectins are calcium-dependent carbohydrate-recognising proteins misakiensis revealed the presence of a single calcium atom per monomer with a dissociation constant of 2.6 m in structure from other C-type lectins mainly in the diverse loop regions and in the second a-helix, which

  1. Fort Stewart integrated resource assessment. Volume 2, Baseline detail

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Keller, J.M.; Sullivan, G.P.; Wahlstrom, R.R.; Larson, L.L.

    1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report documents the assessment of baseline energy use at Fort Stewart, a US Army Forces Command facility located near Savannah, Georgia. This is a companion report to Volume 1, Executive Summary, and Volume 3, Integrated Resource Assessment. The US Army Forces Command (FORSCOM) tasked Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) to identify, evaluate, and assist in acquiring all cost-effective energy projects at Fort Stewart. PNL, in support of the US Department of Energy (DOE) Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP), has designed a model program applicable to the federal sector for this purpose. The model program (1) identifies and evaluates all cost-effective energy projects; (2) develops a schedule at each installation for project acquisition considering project type, size, timing, and capital requirements, as well as energy and dollar savings; and (3) targets 100% of the financing required to implement energy efficiency projects. PNL applied this model program to Fort Stewart. The analysis examines the characteristics of electric, natural gas, oil, propane, and wood chip use for fiscal year (FY) 1990. The results include energy-use intensities for the facilities at Fort Stewart by building type, fuel type, and energy end use. A complete energy consumption reconciliation is presented that accounts for the distribution of all major energy uses and losses among buildings, utilities, and central systems.

  2. Rock types, pore types, and hydrocarbon exploration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coalson, E.B.; Hartmann, D.J.; Thomas, J.B.

    1985-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A proposed exploration-oriented method of classifying porosity in sedimentary rocks is based on microscopic examination cores or cuttings. Factors include geometry, size, abundance, and connectivity of the pores. The porosity classification is predictive of key petrophysical characteristics: porosity-permeability relationships, capillary pressures, and (less certainly) relative permeabilities. For instance, intercrystalline macroporosity typically is associated with high permeability for a given porosity, low capillarity, and favorable relative permeabilities. This is found to be true whether this porosity type occurs in a sucrosic dolomite or in a sandstone with pervasive quartz overgrowths. This predictive method was applied in three Rocky Mountain oil plays. Subtle pore throat traps could be recognized in the J sandstone (Cretaceous) in the Denver basin of Colorado by means of porosity permeability plotting. Variations in hydrocarbon productivity from a Teapot Formation (Cretaceous) field in the Powder River basin of Wyoming were related to porosity types and microfacies; the relationships were applied to exploration. Rock and porosity typing in the Red River Formation (Ordovician) reconciled apparent inconsistencies between drill-stem test, log, and mud-log data from a Williston basin wildcat. The well was reevaluated and completed successfully, resulting in a new field discovery. In each of these three examples, petrophysics was fundamental for proper evaluation of wildcat wells and exploration plays.

  3. Froissart Bound on Inelastic Cross Section Without Unknown Constants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martin, André

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Assuming that axiomatic local field theory results hold for hadron scattering, Andr\\'e Martin and S. M. Roy recently obtained absolute bounds on the D-wave below threshold for pion-pion scattering and thereby determined the scale of the logarithm in the Froissart bound on total cross sections in terms of pion mass only. Previously, Martin proved a rigorous upper bound on the inelastic cross-section $\\sigma_{inel}$ which is one-fourth of the corresponding upper bound on $\\sigma_{tot}$, and Wu, Martin,Roy and Singh improved the bound by adding the constraint of a given $\\sigma_{tot}$. Here we use unitarity and analyticity to determine, without any high energy approximation, upper bounds on energy averaged inelastic cross sections in terms of low energy data in the crossed channel. These are Froissart-type bounds without any unknown coefficient or unknown scale factors and can be tested experimentally. Alternatively, their asymptotic forms,together with the Martin-Roy absolute bounds on pion-pion D-waves below t...

  4. Scuttlebutt Volume 2, No. 4

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ?s Sunshine Award & Crewmember of the Year Award. Polls close on Friday, July 18. Crewmembers may vote in the official site, http://groups.yahoo.com/group/uss-southerncrossawards/. The results Will be announced at the Summit. Summit Event Venues... of our good friends in Adelaide, reacquaint myself with my ?old? mates and make friends with new ones. See you in SA. COL Bruce O?Brien Commanding Officer Newsletter Publisher http://www.uss-southerncross.com/ July / August 2008 Volume 2, Issue 4...

  5. Scuttlebutt Volume 2, No. 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    , of the USS Genesis. To CPT Kieran Bock and his crew, the officers and crew of the Southern Cross send their very best wishes and congratulations, and we wish them fair seas and LOTS of stars to follow. The ScuttleButt Volume 2, Issue 1 5 USS Atlantis... will be forwarded separately to each individual member. Please forward any enquiries to the Intel Officer - ENS Ashley Walker on alwalk78@optusnet.com.au. ENS Ashley Walker Operations Intelligence Officer Welcoming New Crewmembers Savannah Clark Daniel...

  6. Volume 4 | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-Up from theDepartment of Dept.| Department ofEducationVirgin4, 2009InsightsVolume 4

  7. Scuttlebutt Volume 1, No. 8

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    http://www.uss-southerncross.com/news.htm http://www.uss-southerncross.com/ ARMAGEDDON AND NEW WORLDS 5 November/December 2007 Volume 1, Issue 8 2 Vol.1 Issue 8 ScuttleButt ScuttleButt is the official bimonthly publication of the USS Southern... 5. Club 360, BioShock Operations 6. Ship?s Muster Tactical/Security 8. Armageddon by Matt Tuting 9. Region 11 Convention Listing Communications 10. The Klingon Language Institute 11. The USS Southern Cross' writing group - The Writer...

  8. Scuttlebutt Volume 2, No. 3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . From The Bridge 4. The Editor's Corner 5. The X/O's Desk 6. Club 360 7. In Memoriam ? Lauretta Gal 28. The Southern Cross Press Operations 5. Ship's Muster Medical 8. The Psyche Report Communications 9. Followup: Spiderwick... and Pieces 5The ScuttleButt Volume 2, Issue 3 The X/O?s Desk Attention all Stations: Hello and welcome to my little area for voicing my ideas or opinions. Well not much to talk about this time things have been quite I know Bruce has booked his airfare...

  9. multimaterial topology optimization by volume constrained allen ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2014-04-04T23:59:59.000Z

    where q ? 3 is the SIMP penalization power and Ci is the constant stiffness ..... of (39) is equivalent to the solution of p ? 1 decoupled linear heat equations.

  10. Volume reduction and vitrification of nuclear waste with thermal plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hoffelner, W. [Moser-Glaser and Co., Muttenz (Switzerland); Chrubasik, A. [NUKEM GmbH, Alzenau (Germany); Eschenbach, R.C. [RETECH Inc., Ukiah, CA (United States)

    1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    A process for efficient and safe destruction of organics and vitrification of low/medium level radioactive waste is presented. A transferred arc plasma torch is employed as the heat source. The process handles several types of feed: combustibles, inorganic materials and metals. A non-leaching glassy solid which can be stored without further treatment is obtained as the final product. High volume-reduction factors can be achieved with this process. A wet gas cleaning system leads to extremely clean off-gas.

  11. John von Neumann Institute for Computing Different Types of Protein Folding Identified with

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Janke, Wolfhard

    John von Neumann Institute for Computing Different Types of Protein Folding Identified://www.fz-juelich.de/nic-series/volume40 #12;Different Types of Protein Folding Identified with a Coarse-Grained Heteropolymer Model Stefan The identification of folding channels is one of the key tasks of protein folding studies. While secondary structures

  12. Precursor systems analyses of automated highway systems: Commercial vehicle and transit ahs analysis. Volume 6. Final report, September 1993-February 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bottiger, F.; Chemnitz, H.D.; Doorman, J.; Franke, U.; Zimmerman, T.

    1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document is the final report of the Automated Highway System (AHS). The activities of Commercial Vehicle and Transit AHS Analysis are reported on in this document. This document type is resource materials. This volume is the six in a series. There are nine other volumes in the series.

  13. Petroleum supply annual 1995: Volume 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The {ital Petroleum Supply Annual} contains information on supply and disposition of crude oil and petroleum products. It reflects data collected from the petroleum industry during 1995 through monthly surveys, and it is divided into 2 volumes. This volume contains three sections: summary statistics, detailed statistics, and selected refinery statistics, each with final annual data. (The other volume contains final statistics for each month and replaces data previously published in the {ital Petroleum Supply Monthly}).

  14. National Low-Level Waste Management Program radionuclide report series. Volume 13, Curium-242

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adams, J.P.

    1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report, Volume 13 of the National Low-Level Waste Management Program Radionuclide Report Series, discusses the radiological and chemical characteristics of curium-242 ({sup 242}Cm). This report also includes discussions about waste types and forms in which {sup 242}Cm can be found and {sup 242}Cm behavior in the environment and in the human body.

  15. Properties of concrete incorporating high volumes of ASTM Class F fly ash

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Wei Tung

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis presents the results of research performed in developing high-volume fly ash (HVFA) concrete incorporating ASTM Type I cement and ASTM Class F fly ash from Big Brown Power Plant of TU Electric, Texas. In HVFA concrete, the proportion...

  16. National Low-Level Waste Management Program Radionuclide Report Series, Volume 17: Plutonium-239

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. P. Adams; M. L. Carboneau

    1999-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report, Volume 17 of the National Low-Level Waste Management Program Radionuclide Report Series, discusses the radiological and chemical characteristics of plutonium-239 (Pu-239). This report also discusses waste types and forms in which Pu-239 can be found, waste and disposal information on Pu-239, and Pu-239 behavior in the environment and in the human body.

  17. Table 7. U.S. Refiner Motor Gasoline Volumes by Grade and Sales...

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    35.2 213.6 9.5 9.8 12.9 16.6 NA 29.5 See footnotes at end of table. 7. U.S. Refiner Motor Gasoline Volumes by Grade and Sales Type 14 Energy Information Administration ...

  18. Table 11. U.S. Refiner Oxygenated Motor Gasoline Volumes by...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    - 4.9 0.4 0.4 0.3 0.4 - 0.7 See footnotes at end of table. 11. U.S. Refiner Oxygenated Motor Gasoline Volumes by Grade and Sales Type 22 Energy Information Administration ...

  19. Table 7. U.S. Refiner Motor Gasoline Volumes by Grade and Sales...

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    33.9 215.8 9.7 10.0 12.1 16.3 0.0 28.4 See footnotes at end of table. 7. U.S. Refiner Motor Gasoline Volumes by Grade and Sales Type 14 Energy Information Administration ...

  20. Table 11. U.S. Refiner Oxygenated Motor Gasoline Volumes by...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    W 5.6 0.5 0.5 0.5 0.4 - 0.9 See footnotes at end of table. 11. U.S. Refiner Oxygenated Motor Gasoline Volumes by Grade and Sales Type 22 Energy Information Administration ...

  1. Some Optimizations of Hardware Multiplication by Constant Matrices Nicolas Boullis, Arnaud Tisserand

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Davis, University of

    are achieved. 1 Introduction Important optimizations of the speed, area and power consumption of circuits can of this operation frequency. The problem of the optimization of multiplication by constant has been studiedSome Optimizations of Hardware Multiplication by Constant Matrices Nicolas Boullis, Arnaud

  2. Universal Gravitational Constant EX-9908 Page 1 of 13 Re-Written by Geoffrey R. Clarion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dai, Pengcheng

    Newton was able to deduce his law of universal gravitation. Newton's law of universal gravitation: 2 21 rUniversal Gravitational Constant EX-9908 Page 1 of 13 Re-Written by Geoffrey R. Clarion Universal Gravitational Constant EQUIPMENT 1 Gravitational Torsion Balance AP-8215 1 X-Y Adjustable Diode Laser OS-8526A 1

  3. Macdonald's Constant Term Conjectures For Exceptional Root Systems* Frank G. Garvan and Gaston Gonnet

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Garvan, Frank

    Macdonald's Constant Term Conjectures For Exceptional Root Systems* A Frank G. Garvan and Gaston Gonnet bstract: We announce proofs of Macdonald's constant term conjectures for the affine root systems result mply that Macdonald's conjectures are true in form for any root system, and the complete truth

  4. Dynamics of kinematically constrained bimolecular reactions having constant product recoil energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zare, Richard N.

    Dynamics of kinematically constrained bimolecular reactions having constant product recoil energy reactions in which the product recoil energy is assumed constant (CPR approximation). It is further assumed-shaped, peaking at the vibrational level with an energy equal to the reaction exoergicity minus the product recoil

  5. MODIFICATION DE LA CHAMBRE DE COMPENSATION D'UN RESPIROMTRE A PRESSION CONSTANTE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    MODIFICATION OF THE COMPENSATION CHAMBER OF A CONSTANT PRESSURE RESPIROMETER A change was madeNOTE MODIFICATION DE LA CHAMBRE DE COMPENSATION D'UN RESPIROM�TRE A PRESSION CONSTANTE Andrée PIHET compensation (appelée aussi fiole de référence) qui élimine les effets des changements barométriques et

  6. Weak Interactions in Atoms Nuclear Anapole Moment Weak Coupling Constants Nuclear Anapole Moment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pines, Alexander

    Weak Interactions in Atoms Nuclear Anapole Moment Weak Coupling Constants Nuclear Anapole Moment;Weak Interactions in Atoms Nuclear Anapole Moment Weak Coupling Constants Plan of the talk Weak Interactions in Atoms Charged and Neutral Currents. Effective P-odd Hamiltonian Nuclear Anapole Moment

  7. AN EXTENDED NICHOLS CHART WITH CONSTANT MAGNITUDE LOCI OF SENSITIVITY AND

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Regruto, Diego

    AN EXTENDED NICHOLS CHART WITH CONSTANT MAGNITUDE LOCI OF SENSITIVITY AND COMPLEMENTARY SENSITIVITY chart) and constant magnitude loci MS of |S(j)|. While the for- mer are part of standard methodologies the complementary sensitivity and sensitivity functions. In order to handle such resonance peak specifications

  8. DETERMINING OPTICAL CONSTANTS OF URANIUM NITRIDE THIN FILMS IN THE EXTREME

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hart, Gus

    DETERMINING OPTICAL CONSTANTS OF URANIUM NITRIDE THIN FILMS IN THE EXTREME ULTRAVIOLET (1.6-35 NM deposition and characterization of reactively-sputtered uranium nitride thin films. I also report optical.1 Application 1 1.2 Optical Constants 2 1.3 Project Focus 7 2 Uranium Nitride Thin Films 8 2.1 Sputtering 8 2

  9. Numerical Analysis of Non-constant Discounting with an Application to Renewable Resource Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Karp, Larry S.

    Numerical Analysis of Non-constant Discounting with an Application to Renewable Resource Management illustrate the approach by studying welfare and observational equivalence for a particular renewable resource man- agement problem. Keywords: Non-constant discounting, numerical methods, non-renewable resources

  10. Expression des constantes de distorsion centrifuge des hexafluorures en fonction des frquences harmoniques.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    'application est faite aux molécules SF6 et UF6. 4 constantes cubiques de SF6 ont été déterminées à partir des for the centrifugal distortion constants as a function of harmonic frequencies ; application is made to SF6 and UF6. 4

  11. Evolution of the coupling constant in SU(2) lattice gauge theory with two adjoint fermions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ari J. Hietanen; Kari Rummukainen; Kimmo Tuominen

    2009-11-24T23:59:59.000Z

    We measure the evolution of the coupling constant using the Schroedinger functional method in the lattice formulation of SU(2) gauge theory with two massless Dirac fermions in the adjoint representation. We observe strong evidence for an infrared fixed point, where the theory becomes conformal. We measure the continuum beta-function and the coupling constant as a function of the energy scale.

  12. ANALYSIS OF ANISOTROPY IN ELASTIC CONSTANTS OF SiCp/2124 Al METAL MATRIX COMPOSITES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hong, Soon Hyung

    ANALYSIS OF ANISOTROPY IN ELASTIC CONSTANTS OF SiCp/2124 Al METAL MATRIX COMPOSITES H.K. Jung* , Y; Metal matrix composite; Elastic constants; Aspect ratio; Anisotropy 1. Introduction Metal matrix composites (MMCs) are becoming attractive materials for advanced aerospace structures because

  13. Video Description Length Guided Constant Quality Video Coding with Bitrate Constraint

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tomkins, Andrew

    Video Description Length Guided Constant Quality Video Coding with Bitrate Constraint Lei Yang propose a new video encoding strategy -- Video description length guided Constant Quality video coding with Bitrate Constraint (V-CQBC), for large scale video transcoding systems of video charing websites

  14. Indeterminacy with Constant Money Growth Rules and Income-Based Liquidity Constraints

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Indeterminacy with Constant Money Growth Rules and Income-Based Liquidity Constraints Stefano Bosi Abstract We study the implications of constant money growth rules on the sta- bility properties. In this context, the steady state value of the velocity of money becomes a cru- cial parameter for gauging whether

  15. Water Quality Program, Volume 1 (Alabama)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This volume of the water quality program mainly deals with the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System. National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System" or "(NPDES)" means the national...

  16. Petroleum supply annual 1998: Volume 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1999-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The ``Petroleum Supply Annual`` (PSA) contains information on the supply and disposition of crude oil and petroleum products. The publication reflects data that were collected from the petroleum industry during 1998 through annual and monthly surveys. The PSA is divided into two volumes. This first volume contains three sections: Summary Statistics, Detailed Statistics, and Refinery Statistics; each with final annual data. The second volume contains final statistics for each month of 1998, and replaces data previously published in the PSA. The tables in Volumes 1 and 2 are similarly numbered to facilitate comparison between them. 16 figs., 59 tabs.

  17. Petroleum supply annual, 1997. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Petroleum Supply Annual (PSA) contains information on the supply and disposition of crude oil and petroleum products. The publication reflects data that were collected from the petroleum industry during 1997 through annual and monthly surveys. The PSA is divided into two volumes. This first volume contains three sections: Summary Statistics, Detailed Statistics, and Refinery Statistics; each with final annual data. The second volume contains final statistics for each month of 1997, and replaces data previously published in the Petroleum Supply Monthly (PSM). The tables in Volumes 1 and 2 are similarly numbered to facilitate comparison between them. 16 figs., 48 tabs.

  18. Volume, Number of Shipments Surpass Goals

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Laboratory," said Pete Maggiore, assistant manager for environmental operations at the NNSA Los Alamos Site Office. "We exceeded our goals and are on track to double both volume...

  19. Water Quality Program, Volume 2 (Alabama)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This volume of the water quality program mainly deals with Technical Standards, Corrective Action Requirements and Financial Responsibility for Owners and Operators of Underground Storage Tanks....

  20. Volume reduction of hot cell plastic wastes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dykes, F W; Henscheid, J P; Lewis, L C; Lundholm, C W; Nicklas, J H

    1989-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

    The disposal of radioactively-contaminated solid wastes has become a national crisis. In such circumstances, it is imperative that this waste be reduced to minimum volume and be packaged to prevent pollution of the environment. The majority of the solid waste generated at the hot cell under consideration is plastic lab ware. Cutting this waste into small pieces with a hot wire technique reduced the volume 66%. Melting the waste, although more time consuming, reduced the volume 90%. The hot wire technique can also be used to cut up damaged master slave manipulator boots, greatly reducing their disposal volume.

  1. ARE Update Volume 13, Number 4

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Use of U.S. Croplands for Biofuels In- creases Greenhousea mini- mum volume of biofuels and requires a nationalper unit of various biofuels. For example, corn ethanol

  2. Cosmic constraint on unified model of dark sectors in flat and non-flat varying gravitational constant theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lu, Jianbo; Wu, Yabo; Xu, Lixin

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Observations indicate that most universal matter are invisible and gravitational constant $G(t)$ maybe depends on the time. The theory of variation of $G$ (VG) is explored in this paper, with naturally resulting to the invisible components in universe. We utilize the observational data: lookback time data, model-independent gamma ray bursts data, growth function of matter linear perturbations, type Ia supernovae data with systematic errors, cosmic microwave background, and baryon acoustic oscillation data from the radial scale measurement and the peak-positions measurement, to restrict the unified model (UM) of dark components in VG theory. Using the best-fit values of parameters with the covariance matrix, constraints on the variation of $G$ are $(\\frac{G}{G_{0}})_{z=3.5}\\simeq 1.0003^{+0.0014}_{-0.0016}$ and $(\\frac{\\dot{G}}{G})_{today}\\simeq 0.7977^{+2.3566}_{-2.3566}\\times 10^{-13} yr^{-1}$ in a flat geometry, the small uncertainties around constants. Limit on equation of state of dark matter is $w_{0dm}=...

  3. Bounds and self-consistent estimates for elastic constants of granular polycrystals composed of orthorhombics or crystal with higher symmetries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berryman, J. G.

    2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Methods for computing Hashin-Shtrikman bounds and related self-consistent estimates of elastic constants for polycrystals composed of crystals having orthorhombic symmetry have been known for about three decades. However, these methods are underutilized, perhaps because of some perceived difficulties with implementing the necessary computational procedures. Several simplifications of these techniques are introduced, thereby reducing the overall computational burden, as well as the complications inherent in mapping out the Hashin-Shtrikman bounding curves. The self-consistent estimates of the effective elastic constants are very robust, involving a quickly converging iteration procedure. Once these self-consistent values are known, they may then be used to speed up the computations of the Hashin-Shtrikman bounds themselves. It is shown furthermore that the resulting orthorhombic polycrystal code can be used as well to compute both bounds and self-consistent estimates for polycrystals of higher-symmetry tetragonal, hexagonal, and cubic (but not trigonal) materials. The self-consistent results found this way are shown to be the same as those obtained using the earlier methods, specifically those methods designed specially for each individual symmetry type. But the Hashin-Shtrikman bounds found using the orthorhombic code are either the same or (more typically) tighter than those found previously for these special cases (i.e., tetragonal, hexagonal, and cubic). The improvement in the Hashin-Shtrikman bounds is presumably due to the additional degrees of freedom introduced into the available search space.

  4. Document Type: Subject Terms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Major, Arkady

    Title: Authors: Source: Document Type: Subject Terms: Abstract: Full Text Word Count: ISSN at creating team results. In fact, it's priceless. Managers in Western corporations have received a lifetime

  5. Ironmaking conference proceedings. Volume 54

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The technical presentations at this conference displayed a renewed sense of viability of the coke and ironmaking community. In addition, many of the papers show that the environmental aspects of ironmaking are being integrated into day-to-day operations rather than being thought of as separate responsibilities. This volume contains 68 papers divided into the following sections: Blast furnace injection; Blast furnace fundamental studies; Blast furnace general; Blast furnace repairs/rebuilds/modernization; Process control techniques for blast furnaces; Cokemaking general; Cokemaking environmental; Coke--by-products--plant operations; Coal and coke research; Battery operations; Pelletizing; Direct reduction and smelting; and Sintering. Most of the papers have been processed separately for inclusion on the data base.

  6. Information architecture. Volume 3: Guidance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this document, as presented in Volume 1, The Foundations, is to assist the Department of Energy (DOE) in developing and promulgating information architecture guidance. This guidance is aimed at increasing the development of information architecture as a Departmentwide management best practice. This document describes departmental information architecture principles and minimum design characteristics for systems and infrastructures within the DOE Information Architecture Conceptual Model, and establishes a Departmentwide standards-based architecture program. The publication of this document fulfills the commitment to address guiding principles, promote standard architectural practices, and provide technical guidance. This document guides the transition from the baseline or defacto Departmental architecture through approved information management program plans and budgets to the future vision architecture. This document also represents another major step toward establishing a well-organized, logical foundation for the DOE information architecture.

  7. Fort Drum integrated resource assessment. Volume 2, Baseline detail

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dixon, D.R.; Armstrong, P.R.; Brodrick, J.R.; Daellenbach, K.K.; Di Massa, F.V.; Keller, J.M.; Richman, E.E.; Sullivan, G.P.; Wahlstrom, R.R.

    1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The US Army Forces Command (FORSCOM) has tasked the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) as the lead laboratory supporting the US Department of Energy (DOE) Federal Energy Management Program`s mission to identify, evaluate, and assist in acquiring all cost-effective energy projects at Fort Drum. This is a model program PNL is designing for federal customers served by the Niagara Mohawk Power Company. It will identify and evaluate all electric and fossil fuel cost-effective energy projects; develop a schedule at each installation for project acquisition considering project type, size, timing, and capital requirements, as well as energy and dollar savings; and secure 100% of the financing required to implement electric energy efficiency projects from Niagara Mohawk and have Niagara Mohawk procure the necessary contractors to perform detailed audits and install the technologies. This report documents the assessment of baseline energy use at one of Niagara Mohawk`s primary federal facilities, the FORSCOM Fort Drum facility located near Watertown, New York. It is a companion report to Volume 1, the Executive Summary, and Volume 3, the Resource Assessment. This analysis examines the characteristics of electric, gas, oil, propane, coal, and purchased thermal capacity use for fiscal year (FY) 1990. It records energy-use intensities for the facilities at Fort Drum by building type and energy end use. It also breaks down building energy consumption by fuel type, energy end use, and building type. A complete energy consumption reconciliation is presented that includes the accounting of all energy use among buildings, utilities, central systems, and applicable losses.

  8. Thermodynamic Volumes for AdS-Taub-NUT and AdS-Taub-Bolt

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clifford V. Johnson

    2014-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

    In theories of semi-classical quantum gravity where the cosmological constant is considered a thermodynamic variable, the gravitational mass of a black hole has been shown to correspond to the enthalpy of the thermodynamic system, rather than the energy. We propose that this should be extended to all spacetime solutions, and consider the meaning of this extension of gravitational thermodynamics for the Taub-NUT and Taub-Bolt geometries in four dimensional locally anti-de Sitter spacetime. We present formulae for their thermodynamic volumes. Surprisingly, Taub-NUT has negative volume, for which there is a natural dynamical explanation in terms of the process of formation of the spacetime. A special case corresponds to pure AdS_4 with an S^3 slicing. The same dynamical setting can explain the negative entropy known to exist for these solutions for a range of parameters.

  9. Direct Rendering of Deformable Volume Data Shiaofen Fang

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fang, Shiaofen

    Direct Rendering of Deformable Volume Data Shiaofen Fang Department of Computer and Information In this paper, we present a new deformable volume rendering algorithm. The volume deformation is modeled to directly render the deformed volume without going through the expensive volume construction process

  10. Dimensional SPC for low-volume production

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chin, Chang-Ho

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . To make up for the weaknesses of SPC in low-volume production, a new method to test data independence, a new plot to describe the similarity between two charts, and two modified graphical tools are proposed. In low-volume production, it is frequently hard...

  11. Tourisme & Territoires / Tourism & Territories Volume 3 (2013)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Tourisme & Territoires / Tourism & Territories Volume 3 (2013) Achin & George-Marcelpoil Tourter de Grenoble, Unité de recherche Développement des territoires montagnards. #12;Tourisme & Territoires / Tourism & Territories Volume 3 (2013) Achin & George-Marcelpoil Tourter.com 68 ongtemps structurés autour

  12. Environment-Dependent Fundamental Physical Constants in the Theory of General Inconstancy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hidezumi Terazawa

    2014-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

    A theory of special inconstancy, in which some fundamental physical constants such as the fine-structure and gravitational constants may vary, is proposed in pregeometry. In the special theory of inconstancy, the \\alpha-G relation of \\alpha=3\\pi/[16ln(4\\pi/5GM_W^2)] between the varying fine-structure and gravitaional constants (where M_W is the charged weak boson mass) is derived from the hypothesis that both of these constants are related to the same fundamental length scale in nature. Furthermore, it leads to the prediction of dot{{\\alpha}}/\\alpha=(-0.8\\pm2.5)\\times10^{-14}yr^{-1} from the most precise limit of dot{G}/G=(-0.6\\pm2.0)\\times10^{-12}yr^{-1} by Thorsett, which is not only consistent with the recent observation of dot{{\\alpha}}/\\alpha=(0.5\\pm0.5)\\times10^{-14}yr^{-1} by Webb et al. but also feasible for future experimental tests. Also a theory of general inconstancy, in which any fundamental physical constants may vary, is proposed in "more general relativity", by assuming that the space-time is "environment-dependent". In the general theory of inconstancy, the G-\\Lambda\\ relation between the varying gravitational and cosmological constants is derived from the hypothesis that the space-time metric is a function of \\tau, the "environment-coodinate", in addition to x^{\\mu}, the ordinary space-time coodinates. Furthermore, it leads to the prediction of the varying cosmological constant, which is consistent with the present observations. In addition, the latest observation of spatial variation in the fine-structure constant from VLT/UVES of (1.1\\pm 0.2)\\times 10^{-6}GLyr^{-1} by King et al. is suggested to be taken as a clear evidence for environment-dependent fundamental physical constants

  13. Contemporary Mathematics Volume 00, 0000

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Blass, Andreas R.

    'aŸs's theory of generalized Galois­Tukey connections. The second aspect is to analyze a sequential structure, higher­type object in the category of generalized Galois­Tukey connections. It turns out to occur also these pairs of functions generalized Galois­Tukey connections, but for brevity we shall call them morphisms

  14. Structure, Volume 20 Supplemental Information

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McIntosh, Lawrence P.

    is related to Figure 1 and Figure 2. This figure shows the E. coli outer membrane extraction and planar lipid HSQC of the secretion mutant K64+V66+T92 and MALDI-TOF to confirm processing by the sec-system. Figure deletion strain made from a BW25113 parent and YebF secretion monitored by western blot. The Wild- type

  15. Behavior of type 304 and type 316 austenitic stainless in 55% lithium bromide heavy brine environments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Itzhak, D.; Elias, O. (Ben-Gurion Univ., Beer-Sheva (Israel). Dept. of Materials Engineering)

    1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Cylindrical tensile specimens of AISI type 304 (UNS S30400) and type 316 (UNS S31600) stainless steels (SS) were tested under constant-load conditions in 55% lithium bromide (LiBr) heavy brines at temperatures of 120 C and 140 C. Elongation and open-circuit potential (OCP) were recorded during the tensile test. Potentiodynamic polarization measurements were conducted, and the failed surface fractures were examined by scanning electron microscopy. The tested SS were subjected to stress corrosion under the test environments. Sensitivity was affected strongly by pH values. In LiBr brine of pH = 11.6, the passivation processes were more effective than in brine of pH = 6 [approximately] 8. Because of effective passivation behavior in brine of pH = 11.6, lower values of [delta]l[sub 0] were measured, indicating lower dislocation relaxation processes and high resistance to stress corrosion cracking.

  16. Wave functions and decay constants of $B$ and $D$ mesons in the relativistic potential model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mao-Zhi Yang

    2012-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

    With the decay constants of $D$ and $D_s$ mesons measured in experiment recently, we revisit the study of the bound states of quark and antiquark in $B$ and $D$ mesons in the relativistic potential model. The relativistic bound state wave equation is solved numerically. The masses, decay constants and wave functions of $B$ and $D$ mesons are obtained. Both the masses and decay constants obtained here can be consistent with the experimental data. The wave functions can be used in the study of $B$ and $D$ meson decays.

  17. Decay constants of the pion and its excitations on the lattice.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mastropas, Ekaterina V. [William and Mary College, JLAB; Richards, David G. [JLAB

    2014-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a calculation using lattice QCD of the ratios of decay constants of the excited states of the pion, to that of the pion ground state, at three values of the pion mass between 400 and 700 MeV, using an anisotropic clover fermion action with three flavors of quarks. We find that the decay constant of the first excitation, and more notably of the second, is suppressed with respect to that of the ground-state pion, but that the suppression shows little dependence on the quark mass. The strong suppression of the decay constant of the second excited state is consistent with its interpretation as a predominantly hybrid state.

  18. Leptonic B- and D-meson decay constants with 2+1 flavors of asqtad fermions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kronfeld, Andreas S; Simone, James N; Van de Water, Ruth S

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the status of our updated D- and B-meson decay-constant analysis, based on the MILC $N_f = 2+1$ asqtad gauge ensembles. Heavy quarks are incorporated using the Wilson clover action with the Fermilab interpretation. This analysis includes ensembles at five lattice spacings from a $\\approx$ 0.045 to 0.15 fm, and light sea-quark masses down to 1/20th of the strange-quark mass. Projected error budgets for ratios of decay constants, in particular between bottom- and charm-meson decay constants, are presented.

  19. Leptonic B- and D-meson decay constants with 2+1 flavors of asqtad fermions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andreas S. Kronfeld; Ethan T. Neil; James N. Simone; Ruth S. Van de Water; for the Fermilab Lattice Collaboration; for the MILC Collaboration

    2015-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the status of our updated D- and B-meson decay-constant analysis, based on the MILC $N_f = 2+1$ asqtad gauge ensembles. Heavy quarks are incorporated using the Wilson clover action with the Fermilab interpretation. This analysis includes ensembles at five lattice spacings from a $\\approx$ 0.045 to 0.15 fm, and light sea-quark masses down to 1/20th of the strange-quark mass. Projected error budgets for ratios of decay constants, in particular between bottom- and charm-meson decay constants, are presented.

  20. Programmatic methods for addressing contaminated volume uncertainties

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rieman, C.R.; Spector, H.L. [U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Buffalo District, Buffalo, NY (United States); Durham, L.A.; Johnson, R.L. [Argonne National Laboratory, Environmental Science Div., IL (United States)

    2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Accurate estimates of the volumes of contaminated soils or sediments are critical to effective program planning and to successfully designing and implementing remedial actions. Unfortunately, data available to support the pre-remedial design are often sparse and insufficient for accurately estimating contaminated soil volumes, resulting in significant uncertainty associated with these volume estimates. The uncertainty in the soil volume estimates significantly contributes to the uncertainty in the overall project cost estimates, especially since excavation and off-site disposal are the primary cost items in soil remedial action projects. The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Buffalo District's experience has been that historical contaminated soil volume estimates developed under the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP) often underestimated the actual volume of subsurface contaminated soils requiring excavation during the course of a remedial activity. In response, the Buffalo District has adopted a variety of programmatic methods for addressing contaminated volume uncertainties. These include developing final status survey protocols prior to remedial design, explicitly estimating the uncertainty associated with volume estimates, investing in pre-design data collection to reduce volume uncertainties, and incorporating dynamic work strategies and real-time analytics in pre-design characterization and remediation activities. This paper describes some of these experiences in greater detail, drawing from the knowledge gained at Ashland 1, Ashland 2, Linde, and Rattlesnake Creek. In the case of Rattlesnake Creek, these approaches provided the Buffalo District with an accurate pre-design contaminated volume estimate and resulted in one of the first successful FUSRAP fixed-price remediation contracts for the Buffalo District. (authors)

  1. Fundamental Kinetics Database Utilizing Shock Tube Measurements (Volumes 1, 2, 3, 4, and Volume 6)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Davidson, D.F.; Hanson, R.K

    The data from shock tube experiments generally takes three forms: ignition delay times, species concentration time-histories and reaction rate measurements. Volume 1 focuses on ignition delay time data measured and published by the Shock Tube Group in the Mechanical Engineering Department of Stanford University. The cut-off date for inclusion into this volume was January 2005. Volume 2 focuses on species concentration time-histories and was cut off December 2005. The two volumes are in PDF format and are accompanied by a zipped file of supporting data. Volume 3 was issued in 2009. Volume 4, Ignition delay times measurements came out in May, 2014, along with Reaction Rates Measurements, Vol 6. Volume 5 is not available at this time.

  2. Mid-Infrared Plasmonic Platform based on Heavily Doped Epitaxial Ge-on-Si: Retrieving the Optical Constants of Thin Ge Epilayers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baldassarre, Leonetta; Samarelli, Antonio; Gallacher, Kevin; Paul, Douglas J; Frigerio, Jacopo; Isella, Giovanni; Sakat, Emilie; Finazzi, Marco; Biagioni, Paolo; Ortolani, Michele

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The n-type Ge-on-Si epitaxial material platform enables a novel paradigm for plasmonics in the mid-infrared, prompting the future development of lab-on-a-chip and subwavelength vibrational spectroscopic sensors. In order to exploit this material, through proper electrodynamic design, it is mandatory to retrieve the dielectric constants of the thin Ge epilayers with high precision due to the difference from bulk Ge crystals. Here we discuss the procedure we have employed to extract the real and imaginary part of the dielectric constants from normal incidence reflectance measurements, by combining the standard multilayer fitting procedure based on the Drude model with Kramers-Kronig transformations of absolute reflectance data in the zero-transmission range of the thin film.

  3. Generation of plasma inhomogeneities and their total suppression in a volume self-sustained discharge

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khomich, V. Yu.; Yamschikov, V. A., E-mail: yamschikov52@mail.ru [Russian Academy of Sciences, Institute for Electrophysics and Electroenergetics (Russian Federation)

    2011-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The principle types of inhomogeneities formed in a volume self-sustained discharge are analyzed. Possible mechanisms and conditions for suppression of their development are considered. An ultimately homogeneous volume self-sustained discharge in CO{sub 2}: N{sub 2}: He mixtures where local plasma inhomogeneities are absent is obtained. At the energy contribution of 170 J/l, the duration of steady discharge burning in the CO{sub 2}: N{sub 2}: He = 1: 2: 3 mixtures at atmospheric pressure is 10 {mu}s.

  4. ISpace: Interactive Volume Data Classification Techniques Using Independent Component Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ma, Kwan-Liu

    , multivariate data analysis, multimodality data, scientific visualization, seg- mentation, volume rendering 1ISpace: Interactive Volume Data Classification Techniques Using Independent Component Analysis, which uses Independent Component Analysis (ICA) and a multi- dimensional histogram of the volume data

  5. A constant-mass fuel delivery system for use in underwater autonomous vehicles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saxton-Fox, Theresa Ann

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis describes the design and assembly of two constant-mass fuel tanks to be used in autonomous underwater vehicles (AUVs). The fuel tanks are part of a power supply designed to increase AUV endurance without limiting ...

  6. Study of Thermal Properties of Graphene-Based Structures Using the Force Constant Method

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Study of Thermal Properties of Graphene-Based Structures Using the Force Constant Method Hossein, 2012) Abstract The thermal properties of graphene-based materials are theoretically investigated transport is investigated for different structures including graphene, graphene antidot lat- tices

  7. Determination of Henry's law constants of organics in dilute aqueous solutions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hansen, K.C.; Zhou, Zhou; Yaws, C.L.; Aminabhavi, T.M. (Lamar Univ., Beaumont, TX (United States). Dept. of Chemistry)

    1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Accurate knowledge of Henry's law constants, H, or air/water partitioning coefficients are required to predict the behavior of organic compounds in the environment. In particular, when the compounds are relatively volatile and exhibit low solubility in water, air stripping may be a viable method for above-ground treatment. Henry's law constants of 15 volatile organic compounds in dilute aqueous solutions were measured by the procedure of equilibrium partitioning in a closed system. The method is based upon the measurement of the headspace concentration by gas chromatography. The compounds investigated included six halogenated hydrocarbons, four aromatic hydrocarbons, and five alkanes. The measurements were made at three temperatures between 25 and 45 C. The measured Henry's law constants compared well with the literature data of some liquids. The temperature dependence of Henry's law constant was also studied from the van't Hoff relation.

  8. Fractal properties in fundamental force coupling constants, in atomic energies, and in elementary particle masses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boris Tatischeff

    2011-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Using the discrete-scale invariance theory, we show that the coupling constants of fundamental forces, the atomic masses and energies, and the elementary particle masses, obey to the fractal properties.

  9. AbstractStock-rebuilding time iso pleths relate constant levels of fishing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    519 Abstract­Stock-rebuilding time iso pleths relate constant levels of fishing mortality (F. Iso pleths calculated in previous studies by deterministic models approximate median, rather than mean

  10. Analysis of three-phase rectifiers with constant-voltage loads

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Caliskan, Vahe

    This work presents a quantitative analysis of the operating characteristics of three-phase diode bridge rectifiers with AC-side reactance and constant-voltage loads. We focus on the case where the AC-side currents vary ...

  11. Improved Measurement of the Muon Lifetime and Determination of the Fermi Constant

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. T. Debevec

    2011-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

    The MuLan collaboration has measured the lifetime of the positve muon to a precision of 1.0 parts per million. The Fermi constant is determined to a precision of 0.6 parts per million.

  12. The creation of fiberglass tanks and parts for autonomous underwater vehicle constant buoyancy power supply

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sack, Jean H. (Jean Hope)

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this thesis was to construct and seal air and containment tanks and other parts for a constant buoyancy power supply for an Autonomous Underwater Vehicle, or AUV. While multiple materials and techniques were ...

  13. The export responsiveness of the Argentine grain export marketing system: a constant market share analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Millimet, Scott Alan

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    THE EXPORT RESPONSIVENESS OF THE ARGENTINE GRAIN EXPORT MARKET NG SYSTEM: A CONSTANT MARKET SHARE ANALYSIS A Thesis by SCOTT ALAN MILLIMET Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement... for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 1982 Ma) or Subject: Agricultural Economics THE EXPORT RESPONSIVENESS OF THE ARGENTINE GRAIN EXPORT MARKETING SYSTEM: A CONSTANT MARKET SHARE ANALYSIS A Thesis by SCOTT ALAN MILLIMET Approved as to style...

  14. Small sample size power for some tests of constant hazard function

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fercho, Wayne Ward

    2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

    1970 ABSTRACT Small Sample Size Power for Some Tests of Constant Hazard Function (December 1970) Wayne Ward Fercho, B. A. , North Dakota State University N. S. , Texas A&M University Directed by: Dr. Larry Ringer Four different tests of constant.... Moran [1951] showed that Bartlett's M test was an asymptotically most powerful test agai. nst the alternative of a gamma distribution with parameters beta and theta. Hartley [1950] stated that the loss in power of his test was negligible...

  15. On the distribution of estimators of diffusion constants for Brownian motion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Denis Boyer; David S. Dean

    2011-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

    We discuss the distribution of various estimators for extracting the diffusion constant of single Brownian trajectories obtained by fitting the squared displacement of the trajectory. The analysis of the problem can be framed in terms of quadratic functionals of Brownian motion that correspond to the Euclidean path integral for simple Harmonic oscillators with time dependent frequencies. Explicit analytical results are given for the distribution of the diffusion constant estimator in a number of cases and our results are confirmed by numerical simulations.

  16. Information architecture. Volume 4: Vision

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Vision document marks the transition from definition to implementation of the Department of Energy (DOE) Information Architecture Program. A description of the possibilities for the future, supported by actual experience with a process model and tool set, points toward implementation options. The directions for future information technology investments are discussed. Practical examples of how technology answers the business and information needs of the organization through coordinated and meshed data, applications, and technology architectures are related. This document is the fourth and final volume in the planned series for defining and exhibiting the DOE information architecture. The targeted scope of this document includes DOE Program Offices, field sites, contractor-operated facilities, and laboratories. This document paints a picture of how, over the next 7 years, technology may be implemented, dramatically improving the ways business is conducted at DOE. While technology is mentioned throughout this document, the vision is not about technology. The vision concerns the transition afforded by technology and the process steps to be completed to ensure alignment with business needs. This goal can be met if those directing the changing business and mission-support processes understand the capabilities afforded by architectural processes.

  17. Independent Oversight Inspection, Nevada Test Site, Volume 2...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Volume 2 - September 2004 Independent Oversight Inspection, Nevada Test Site, Volume 2 - September 2004 September 2004 Inspection of Emergency Management at the Nevada Test Site...

  18. Advanced Materials and Processing of Composites for High Volume...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    -- Washington D.C. lm021zaluzec2010o.pdf More Documents & Publications Advanced Materials and Processing of Composites for High Volume Applications ACC115 High Volume...

  19. Advanced Materials and Processing of Composites for High Volume...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Advanced Materials and Processing of Composites for High Volume Applications Advanced Materials and Processing of Composites for High Volume Applications 2011 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel...

  20. Energy Department Authorizes Additional Volume at Proposed Freeport...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Additional Volume at Proposed Freeport LNG Facility to Export Liquefied Natural Gas Energy Department Authorizes Additional Volume at Proposed Freeport LNG Facility to Export...

  1. Building America Best Practices Series: Volume 12. EnergyRenovations...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Building America Best Practices Series: Volume 12. Energy Renovations-Insulation: A Guide for Contractors to Share With Homeowners Building America Best Practices Series: Volume...

  2. Hybrid Parallelism for Volume Rendering at Large Scale at NERSC

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Volume Rendering at Large Scale Hybrid Parallelism for Volume Rendering at Large Scale volrend-swes.png We studied the performance and scalability characteristics of hybrid''...

  3. Volume 72, Numbers 3 & 4 (Complete)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dickson, Donald R.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ................................................................................ 281 190 seventeenth-century news Tom Cain and Ruth Connolly, eds. The Complete Poetry of Robert Herrick. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2013. Vol. 1: lxxv + 504 pp. + 20 illus. $135. Vol. 2: xix + 805 pp. + 22 illus. $135. Review by james mardock... on the print poems in Volume 1 appear at the end of Volume 2, otherwise dedicated to the manuscript poems, but both the Hesperides colla- tions and the fine thirty-two-page essay on Hesperides’s printing and publishing history are tucked at the back of Volume...

  4. High-loop perturbative renormalization constants for Lattice QCD (III): three-loop quark currents for Iwasaki gauge action and n_f=4 Wilson fermions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Brambilla; F. Di Renzo; M. Hasegawa

    2014-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

    This is the third of a series of papers on three-loop computation of renormalization constants for Lattice QCD. Our main point of interest are results for the regularization defined by Iwasaki gauge action and n_f=4 Wilson fermions. Our results for quark bilinears renormalized according to the RI'-MOM scheme can be compared to non-perturbative results. The latter are available for Twisted Mass QCD: being defined in the chiral limit, renormalization constants must be the same. We also address more general problems. In particular, we discuss a few methodological issues connected to summing the perturbative series such as the effectiveness of Boosted Perturbation Theory and the disentanglement of irrelevant and finite volume contributions. Discussing these issues we consider ont only the new results of this paper, but also those for the regularization defined by tree-level Symanzik improved gauge action and n_f=2 Wilson fermions, which we presented in a recent paper of ours. We finally comment to which extent the techniques we put at work in the NSPT context can provide a fresher look into the lattice version of the RI'-MOM scheme.

  5. DNS of the effects of thermal stratification and turbulent mixing on H2/air ignition in a constant volume, and comparison with the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Im, Hong G.

    and explained using the diagnostics developed. Introduction Homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI, the combustion mode in HCCI engines is not well understood, as both volumetric and front-like combustion modes of control strategies for HCCI engines. Specific Objectives The overall goals of the present study are to un

  6. Dust around Type Ia supernovae

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Lifan

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Dust around Type Ia supernovae Lifan Wang 1,2 LawrenceIa. Subject headings: Supernovae: General, Dust, Extinctionline) bands for Type Ia supernovae. (a), upper panel, shows

  7. Wolter type i LAMAR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Catura, R.C.; Joki, E.G.

    1981-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Observational objectives for the LAMAR and their influence on the instrument design are discussed. It is concluded that the most important design parameter is the angular resolution of the LAMAR modules since it so strongly influences sensitivity, optical identifications, source confusion, spectral resolution for objective gratings and the ability to resolve small extended sources. A high resolution Wolter Type I LAMAR module is described, its hardware status discussed, and the performance of a LAMAR observatory presented. A promising technique for enhancing the reflectivity of Wolter Type I X-ray optics in a selected bandpass at high energy has been investigated and the performance of the LAMAR module, utilizing this method, has been calculated.

  8. Variable volume architecture : expanding the boundary

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saheba, Asheshh (Asheshh Mohit), 1972-

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Research into the creation of a Variable Volume Architecture is explored through a series of proposals and projects. An argument is established to develop the means and methods of achieving an architecture of transformation. ...

  9. Petroleum supply annual, 1997. Volume 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Petroleum Supply Annual (PSA) contains information on the supply and disposition of crude oil and petroleum products. The publication reflects data that were collected from the petroleum industry during 1997 through monthly surveys. The PSA is divided into two volumes. The first volume contains three sections: Summary Statistics, Detailed Statistics, and Refinery Statistics; each with final annual data. The second volume contains final statistics for each month of 1997, and replaces data previously published in the Petroleum Supply Monthly (PSM). The tables in Volumes 1 and 2 are similarly numbered to facilitate comparison between them. Explanatory Notes, located at the end of this publication, present information describing data collection, sources, estimation methodology, data quality control procedures, modifications to reporting requirements and interpretation of tables. Industry terminology and product definitions are listed alphabetically in the Glossary. 35 tabs.

  10. Petroleum supply annual 1995: Volume 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Petroleum Supply Annual (PSA) contains information on the supply and disposition of crude oil and petroleum products. The publication reflects data that were collected from the petroleum industry during 1995 through monthly surveys. The PSA is divided into two volumes. This first volume contains three sections: Summary Statistics, Detailed Statistics, and selected Refinery Statistics each with final annual data. The second volume contains final statistics for each month of 1995, and replaces data previously published in the Petroleum Supply Monthly (PSM). The tables in Volumes 1 and 2 are similarly numbered to facilitate comparison between them. Explanatory Notes, located at the end of this publication, present information describing data collection, sources, estimation methodology, data quality control procedures, modifications to reporting requirements and interpretation of tables. Industry terminology and product definitions are listed alphabetically in the Glossary.

  11. Petroleum supply annual 1996: Volume 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Petroleum Supply Annual (PSA) contains information on the supply and disposition of crude oil and petroleum products. The publication reflects data that were collected from the petroleum industry during 1996 through monthly surveys. The PSA is divided into two volumes. The first volume contains three sections: Summary Statistics, Detailed Statistics, and Refinery Capacity; each with final annual data. The second volume contains final statistics for each month of 1996, and replaces data previously published in the Petroleum Supply Monthly (PSM). The tables in Volumes 1 and 2 are similarly numbered to facilitate comparison between them. Explanatory Notes, located at the end of this publication, present information describing data collection, sources, estimation methodology, data quality control procedures, modifications to reporting requirements and interpretation of tables. Industry terminology and product definitions are listed alphabetically in the Glossary. 35 tabs.

  12. Petroleum supply annual 1998: Volume 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1999-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Petroleum Supply Annual (PSA) contains information on the supply and disposition of crude oil and petroleum products. The publication reflects data that were collected from the petroleum industry during 1998 through monthly surveys. The PSA is divided into two volumes. The first volume contains three sections: Summary Statistics, Detailed Statistics, and Refinery Statistics; each with final annual data. This second volume contains final statistics for each month of 1998, and replaces data previously published in the Petroleum Supply Monthly (PSM). The tables in Volumes 1 and 2 are similarly numbered to facilitate comparison between them. Explanatory Notes, located at the end of this publication, present information describing data collection, sources, estimation methodology, data quality control procedures, modifications to reporting requirements and interpretation of tables. Industry terminology and product definitions are listed alphabetically in the Glossary. 35 tabs.

  13. Petroleum supply annual 1994, Volume 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Petroleum Supply Annual (PSA) contains information on the supply and disposition of crude oil and petroleum products. The publication reflects data that were collected from the petroleum industry during 1994 through annual and monthly surveys. The PSA is divided into two volumes. This first volume contains four sections: Summary Statistics, Detailed Statistics, Refinery Capacity, and Oxygenate Capacity each with final annual data. The second volume contains final statistics for each month of 1994, and replaces data previously published in the Petroleum Supply Monthly (PSM). The tables in Volumes 1 and 2 are similarly numbered to facilitate comparison between them. Explanatory Notes, located at the end of this publication, present information describing data collection, sources, estimation methodology, data quality control procedures, modifications to reporting requirements and interpretation of tables. Industry terminology and product definitions are listed alphabetically in the Glossary.

  14. Site Environmental Report for 1999 - Volume 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ruggieri, M.

    2000-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Each year, Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory prepares an integrated report on its environmental programs to satisfy the requirements of United States Department of Energy Order 231.1. The Site Environmental Report for 1999 is intended to summarize Berkeley Lab's compliance with environmental standards and requirements, characterize environmental management efforts through surveillance and monitoring activities, and highlight significant programs and efforts for calendar year 1999. The report is separated into two volumes. Volume I contains a general overview of the Laboratory, the status of environmental programs, and summary results from surveillance and monitoring activities. Each chapter in Volume I begins with an outline of the sections that follow, including any tables or figures found in the chapter. Readers should use section numbers (e.g., {section}1.5) as navigational tools to find topics of interest in either the printed or the electronic version of the report. Volume II contains the individual data results from monitoring programs.

  15. Petroleum Supply Annual 1997, Volume 1

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    7, Volume 1 Entire . The entire report as a single file. PDF 1.0MB . . Front Matter . Cover Page, Contacts, Preface, and Table of Contents Page PDF . . Summary Statistics . Summary...

  16. Petroleum Supply Annual 1998, Volume 2

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    8, Volume 2 Entire . The entire report as a single file. PDF 3.8MB . . Front Matter . Cover Page, Contacts, Preface, and Table of Contents Page PDF . . Monthly Statistics Tables ....

  17. Site Environmental Report for 2009, Volume 2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xu, Suying

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Volume I: Collection Stack Air Ambient Air Rainwater CreeksRainwater Radiological Activity Analyte Tritium Location* ENV-44 CollectionRainwater Radiological Activity Analyte Gross alpha Location* ENV-44 Collection

  18. Requirements & Status for Volume Fuel Cell Manufacturing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Requirements & Status for Volume Fuel Cell Manufacturing DOE Hydrogen Program, Washington, DC July ­Eliminate components, parts and process steps ­Standardize core components across products ­Standardize non-core

  19. Photoexcitation of a Volume Plasmon in Buckyballs

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    to study the interaction of ions and photons, Scully et al. have found that the geodesic-dome structure of buckyballs makes possible volume plasmons-which exhibit not the...

  20. Infinite volume limit for the dipole gas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Dimock

    2009-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider a classical dipole gas in with low activity and show that the pressure has a limit as the volume goes to infinity. The result is obtained by a renormalization group analysis of the model.

  1. Detonation Diffraction into a Confined Volume

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Polley, Nolan Lee

    2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    little attention. Experimental work needs to be conducted on detonation diffraction into a confined volume to better understand how the interaction of the diffracted shock wave with a confining wall impacts the detonation diffraction process. Therefore, a...

  2. Petroleum Supply Annual 2004 Volume 1

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Annual 2004 Volume 1 June 2005 Energy Information Administration Office of Oil and Gas U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 This report was prepared by the Energy...

  3. Definitions: Types of Commissioning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martinez, J. T.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Workshop on the Continuous Commissioning® Process Joseph T. Martinez, PCC Carlos Yagua, PE Hiroko Masuda, Juan-Carlos Baltazar, PhD, PE Ahmet Ugursal, PhD Clean Air Through Energy Efficiency (CATEE) Conference, Dallas, Texas. November 18, 2014... 5. Continuous Commissioning Measures 6. Measurement and Verification ESL-KT-14-11-41 CATEE 2014: Clean Air Through Efficiency Conference, Dallas, Texas Nov. 18-20 Definitions: Types of Commissioning Joseph T. Martinez, PCC Carlos Yagua, PE Hiroko...

  4. Method of measuring a liquid pool volume

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Garcia, Gabe V. (Las Cruces, NM); Carlson, Nancy M. (Idaho Falls, ID); Donaldson, Alan D. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of measuring a molten metal liquid pool volume and in particular molten titanium liquid pools, including the steps of (a) generating an ultrasonic wave at the surface of the molten metal liquid pool, (b) shining a light on the surface of a molten metal liquid pool, (c) detecting a change in the frequency of light, (d) detecting an ultrasonic wave echo at the surface of the molten metal liquid pool, and (e) computing the volume of the molten metal liquid.

  5. Volume 69, Numbers 1 & 2 (Complete)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dickson, Donald

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    EVENTEENTH- ENTURY EWS SPRING - SUMMER 2011 Vol. 69 Nos. 1&2 Including THE NEO-LATIN NEWS Vol. 59, Nos. 1&2 Seventeenth-Century newS VOLUME 68, Nos. 1&2 SPRING-SUMMER, 2010 SCN... University Matthew E. Davis, Texas A&M University EDITORIAL ASSISTANT Elise A. Beck, Texas A&M University contents volume 69, nos. 1&2 ................................ spring-summer, 2011 Helen Wilcox, ed. The English Poems of George Herbert. Review...

  6. Volume 68, Numbers 1&2 (Complete)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dickson, Donald

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    EVENTEENTH- ENTURY EWS SPRING - SUMMER 2010 Vol. 68 Nos. 1&2 Including THE NEO-LATIN NEWS Vol. 58, Nos. 1&2 Seventeenth-Century newS VOLUME 68, Nos. 1&2 SPRING-SUMMER, 2010 SCN... of the Lake University E. Joe Johnson, Clayton State University EDITORIAL ASSISTANTS Jacob Schornick, Texas A&M University contents volume 68, nos. 1&2 ............................... spring-summer, 2010 John Considine, Dictionaries in Early Modern Europe...

  7. Volume 60, Numbers 1&2 (Complete)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dickson, Donald

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    EVENTEENTH- ENTURY EWS SPRING - SUMMER 2002 Vol. 60 Nos. 1&2 budleafswbudleafse Including THE NEO-LATIN NEWS Vol. 50, Nos. 1&2 SEVENTEENTH-CENTURY NEWS VOLUME 60, Nos. 1&2 SPRING-SUMMER, 2002 SCN, an official organ of the Milton Society... Meter, Texas A&M University CONTENTS VOLUME 60, Nos. 1&2 SPRING-SUMMER, 2002 REVIEWS ?Vocation Homily, George Herbert, and the Cultural Criticism: A Review Essay? by JONATHAN NAUMAN...

  8. Hottest spot temperatures in ventilated dry type transformers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pierce, L.W. (General Electric Co., Rome, GA (United States))

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The hottest spot temperature allowance to be used for the different insulation system temperature classes is a major unknown facing IEEE Working Groups developing standards and loading guides for ventilated dry type transformers. In 1944, the hottest spot temperature allowance for ventilated dry type transformers was established as 30 C for 80 C average winding temperature rise. Since 1944, insulation temperature classes have increased to 220 C but IEEE standards continue to use a constant 30 C hottest spot temperature allowance. IEC standards use a variable hottest spot temperature allowance from 5 to 30 C. Six full size test windings were manufactured with imbedded thermocouples and 133 test runs performed to obtain temperature rise data. The test data indicated that the hottest spot temperature allowance used in IEEE standards for ventilated dry type transformers above 500 kVA is too low. This is due to the large thermal gradient from the bottom to the top of the windings caused by natural convection air flow through the cooling ducts. A constant ratio of hottest spot winding temperature rise to average winding temperature rise should be used in product standards for all insulation temperature classes. A ratio of 1.5 is suggested for ventilated dry type transformers above 500 kVA. This would increase the hottest spot temperature allowance from 30 C to 60 C and decrease the permissible average winding temperature rise from 150 C to 120 C for the 220 C insulation temperature class.

  9. SAPHIRE 8 Volume 5 - Workspaces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    C. L. Smith; J. K. Knudsen; D. O'Neal

    2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Systems Analysis Programs for Hands-on Integrated Reliability Evaluations (SAPHIRE) Version 8 is a software application developed for performing a complete probabilistic risk assessment using a personal computer running the Microsoft Windows™ operating system. SAPHIRE 8 is funded by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). The role of the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) in this project is that of software developer and tester. In older versions of SAPHIRE, the model creation and analysis functions were intermingled. However, in SAPHIRE 8, the act of creating a model has been separated from the analysis of that model in order to improve the quality of both the model (e.g., by avoiding inadvertent changes) and the analysis. Consequently, in SAPHIRE 8, the analysis of models is performed by using what are called Workspaces. Currently, there are Workspaces for three types of analyses: (1) the NRC’s Accident Sequence Precursor program, where the workspace is called “Events and Condition Assessment (ECA);” (2) the NRC’s Significance Determination Process (SDP); and (3) the General Analysis (GA) workspace. Workspaces for each type are created and saved separately from the base model which keeps the original database intact. Workspaces are independent of each other and modifications or calculations made within one workspace will not affect another. In addition, each workspace has a user interface and reports tailored for their intended uses.

  10. Molecular Simulation of Henry's Constant at Vapor-Liquid and Liquid-Liquid Phase Richard J. Sadus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    coexistence. 1. Introduction Henry's constant is a well-known measure of a solute's solubility in a particularMolecular Simulation of Henry's Constant at Vapor-Liquid and Liquid-Liquid Phase Boundaries Richard to determine Henry's constant from the residual chemical potential at infinite dilution at the vapor-liquid

  11. Economical method for the determination of group constants for reactor lattices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rogow, R.

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The development of an economical method for determining accurately group constants of hexagonal and rectangular cells is considered in this dissertation. The mathematical model constructed for this purpose has the capability to characterize the group constants for the entire range of the neutron spectrum. Furthermore, this model is also rigorous enough to predict the group constants with the required accuracy for a specific range of interest in the energy spectrum and for a variety of energy group configurations. The group constants calculated wih the economical model have been benchmarked with those computed by the VIM Monte Carlo code. The values obtained for the group constants agree within 1-2% with those computed by VIM for the fast energy region. The agreements for the thermal energy region are within 2-3%. The CPU running time of the implemented model is about 3 1/2 minutes for a four group configuration. On the other hand a typical VIM run comprising 25,000 neutron histories and a four-group structure expends about 30 minutes of CPU time for light water moderated systems. Moreover, similar VIM runs utilizing heavy water as moderator require over one hour of CPU time. Therefore, the implemented model makes utilization of computer resources with a cost advantage of a factor of 10 or better as compared to VIM.

  12. The analogue cosmological constant in Bose-Einstein condensates: a lesson for quantum gravity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stefano Finazzi; Stefano Liberati; Lorenzo Sindoni

    2012-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

    For almost a century, the cosmological constant has been a mysterious object, in relation to both its origin and its very small value. By using a Bose-Einstein condensate analogue model for gravitational dynamics, we address here the cosmological constant issue from an analogue gravity standpoint. Starting from the fundamental equations describing a system of condensed bosons, we highlight the presence of a vacuum source term for the analogue gravitational field, playing the role of a cosmological constant. In this simple system it is possible to compute from scratch the value of this constant, to compare it with other characteristic energy scales and hence address the problem of its magnitude within this framework, suggesting a different path for the solution of this longstanding puzzle. We find that, even though this constant term is related with quantum vacuum effects, it is not immediately related to the ground state energy of the condensate. On the gravity side this result suggests that the interpretation and computation of the cosmological term as a form of renormalized vacuum energy might be misleading, its origin being related to the mechanism that instead produces spacetime from its pregeometric progenitor, shedding a different light on the subject and at the same time suggesting a potentially relevant role of analogue models in the understanding of quantum gravity.

  13. Microbial Indicators in Restaurant Salads: Correlation Between Salad Type, Restaurant Ownership Format, and Customer Business Volumes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prince, David Warren

    2013-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

    ). This outbreak was the largest outbreak to occur of listeriosis involving fatalities in the United States (93). In 2006, one of the most publicized outbreaks occurred involving E. coli O157:H7 contaminated spinach that caused 204 cases of foodborne illness.... Molecular methods have the ability to subtype and compare pathogen strains in food, water, and in clinical cases, and can aid principle investigators with identifying sources of contamination (13, 53, 58, 60, 108, 137, 156). Although there have been...

  14. Refrigerator/freezer directory: sorted by type and volume, based on 1979 standards

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-02-29T23:59:59.000Z

    This directory identifies refrigerators, freezers and combinations thereof, that have been certified as complying with the regulations that became effective on November 3, 1979.

  15. Finite element and nite volume discretizations of Drift-Di usion type uid models for semiconductors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brezzi, Franco

    Milano Via Bonardi 9, 20133 Milano, Italy z University of Western Australia Department of Mathematics and Statistics Nedlands, Western Australia 6907, Australia This paper is to appear as a Chapter of Numerical the initial/boundary conditions which complete the model. We also consider in more detail the Energy

  16. Table 7. U.S. Refiner Motor Gasoline Volumes by Grade and Sales Type

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelinesProved ReservesFeet)per Thousand Cubic Feet)5.257 272Production3 January3 1993

  17. Table 7. U.S. Refiner Motor Gasoline Volumes by Grade and Sales Type

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelinesProved ReservesFeet)per Thousand Cubic Feet)5.257 272Production3 January3 1993

  18. Table 7. U.S. Refiner Motor Gasoline Volumes by Grade and Sales Type

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelinesProved ReservesFeet)per Thousand Cubic Feet)5.257 272Production3 January3 1993

  19. Table 7. U.S. Refiner Motor Gasoline Volumes by Grade and Sales Type

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelinesProved ReservesFeet)per Thousand Cubic Feet)5.257 272Production3 January3 1993

  20. Table 7. U.S. Refiner Motor Gasoline Volumes by Grade and Sales Type

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelinesProved ReservesFeet)per Thousand Cubic Feet)5.257 272Production3 January3 1993

  1. Table 9. U.S. Refiner Conventional Motor Gasoline Volumes by Grade and Sales Type

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelinesProved ReservesFeet)per Thousand Cubic Feet)5.257 272Production3 January33

  2. Table 9. U.S. Refiner Conventional Motor Gasoline Volumes by Grade and Sales Type

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelinesProved ReservesFeet)per Thousand Cubic Feet)5.257 272Production3 January33

  3. Table 9. U.S. Refiner Conventional Motor Gasoline Volumes by Grade and Sales Type

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelinesProved ReservesFeet)per Thousand Cubic Feet)5.257 272Production3 January33

  4. Table 9. U.S. Refiner Conventional Motor Gasoline Volumes by Grade and Sales Type

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelinesProved ReservesFeet)per Thousand Cubic Feet)5.257 272Production3 January33

  5. Table 9. U.S. Refiner Conventional Motor Gasoline Volumes by Grade and Sales Type

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelinesProved ReservesFeet)per Thousand Cubic Feet)5.257 272Production3 January331996

  6. Table 11. U.S. Refiner Oxygenated Motor Gasoline Volumes by Grade and Sales Type

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelinesProved ReservesFeet)per Thousand Cubic Feet)5.257 272Production33 January

  7. Table 11. U.S. Refiner Oxygenated Motor Gasoline Volumes by Grade and Sales Type

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelinesProved ReservesFeet)per Thousand Cubic Feet)5.257 272Production33 January

  8. Table 11. U.S. Refiner Oxygenated Motor Gasoline Volumes by Grade and Sales Type

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelinesProved ReservesFeet)per Thousand Cubic Feet)5.257 272Production33 January 1995

  9. Table 11. U.S. Refiner Oxygenated Motor Gasoline Volumes by Grade and Sales Type

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelinesProved ReservesFeet)per Thousand Cubic Feet)5.257 272Production33 January 1995

  10. Table 11. U.S. Refiner Oxygenated Motor Gasoline Volumes by Grade and Sales Type

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelinesProved ReservesFeet)per Thousand Cubic Feet)5.257 272Production33 January

  11. Table 13. U.S. Refiner Reformulated Motor Gasoline Volumes by Grade and Sales Type

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelinesProved ReservesFeet)per Thousand Cubic Feet)5.257 272Production33 January3

  12. Table 13. U.S. Refiner Reformulated Motor Gasoline Volumes by Grade and Sales Type

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelinesProved ReservesFeet)per Thousand Cubic Feet)5.257 272Production33 January3

  13. Table 13. U.S. Refiner Reformulated Motor Gasoline Volumes by Grade and Sales Type

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelinesProved ReservesFeet)per Thousand Cubic Feet)5.257 272Production33 January3

  14. Table 13. U.S. Refiner Reformulated Motor Gasoline Volumes by Grade and Sales Type

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelinesProved ReservesFeet)per Thousand Cubic Feet)5.257 272Production33 January3

  15. Table 13. U.S. Refiner Reformulated Motor Gasoline Volumes by Grade and Sales Type

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelinesProved ReservesFeet)per Thousand Cubic Feet)5.257 272Production33 January31996

  16. Table 43. Refiner Motor Gasoline Volumes by Grade, Sales Type, PAD District, and State

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelinesProved ReservesFeet)per Thousand Cubic Feet)5.257

  17. Table 43. Refiner Motor Gasoline Volumes by Grade, Sales Type, PAD District, and State

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelinesProved ReservesFeet)per Thousand Cubic Feet)5.2572,177.8 33,696.7 41,031.4

  18. Table 43. Refiner Motor Gasoline Volumes by Grade, Sales Type, PAD District, and State

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelinesProved ReservesFeet)per Thousand Cubic Feet)5.2572,177.8 33,696.7 41,031.45,594.9

  19. Table 43. Refiner Motor Gasoline Volumes by Grade, Sales Type, PAD District, and State

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelinesProved ReservesFeet)per Thousand Cubic Feet)5.2572,177.8 33,696.7

  20. Table 43. Refiner Motor Gasoline Volumes by Grade, Sales Type, PAD District, and State

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelinesProved ReservesFeet)per Thousand Cubic Feet)5.2572,177.8 33,696.78,415.8 39,569.3

  1. Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Sales to End Users Refiner Sales Volumes

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines About U.S.30Natural Gas Glossary529 6330 0 14 15IndustrialVehicleThousand60,94137,954.6

  2. Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Sales to End Users Refiner Sales Volumes

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines AboutDecember 2005 (Thousand9,0, 1997EnvironmentElectricityrgy ConsumptionFields32,887.5

  3. Petroleum Products Table 43. Refiner Motor Gasoline Volumes by Grade, Sales Type, PAD District, and State

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia,(Million Barrels) Crude Oil Reserves in Nonproducing ReservoirsYear-MonthCoalbedPricethe PricetheCity Gate69.61,312.3

  4. Petroleum Products Table 43. Refiner Motor Gasoline Volumes by Grade, Sales Type, PAD District, and State

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia,(Million Barrels) Crude Oil Reserves in Nonproducing ReservoirsYear-MonthCoalbedPricethe PricetheCity

  5. Petroleum Products Table 43. Refiner Motor Gasoline Volumes by Grade, Sales Type, PAD District, and State

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia,(Million Barrels) Crude Oil Reserves in Nonproducing ReservoirsYear-MonthCoalbedPricethe PricetheCity5,594.9 37,614.8

  6. Petroleum Products Table 43. Refiner Motor Gasoline Volumes by Grade, Sales Type, PAD District, and State

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia,(Million Barrels) Crude Oil Reserves in Nonproducing ReservoirsYear-MonthCoalbedPricethe PricetheCity5,594.9

  7. ,"Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Sales to End Users Refiner Sales Volumes"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia:FAQ < RAPID Jump to:SeadovCooperativeA2. World9, 2014 International PetroleumFuelAnnual Energy* j o049

  8. Forecast Technical Document Forecast Types

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Forecast Technical Document Forecast Types A document describing how different forecast types are implemented in the 2011 Production Forecast system. Tom Jenkins Robert Matthews Ewan Mackie Lesley Halsall #12;PF2011 ­ Forecast Types Background Different `types' of forecast are possible for a specified area

  9. PET functional volume delineation: a robustness and repeatability study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    1 PET functional volume delineation: a robustness and repeatability study Mathieu Hatt1 , Ph: Robustness of functional volume determination in PET Keywords: PET uptake volume determination, robustness;2 Abstract Purpose: Current state of the art algorithms for functional uptake volume segmentation in PET

  10. Rendering Implicit Flow Volumes Daqing Xue, Caixia Zhang, Roger Crawfis*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Crawfis, Roger

    Rendering Implicit Flow Volumes Daqing Xue, Caixia Zhang, Roger Crawfis* Department of Computer and then rendered using an unstructured volume rendering technique. Unless a detailed refinement of the flow volume-dimensional texture mapping and an interval volume segmentation coupled with a tetrahedron projection-based renderer

  11. Size distribution of recruited alveolar volumes in airway reopening

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alencar, Adriano Mesquita

    during the reopening process can influence the distribution of recruited alveolar volumes and, hence, gas distribution of recruited alveolar volumes that become available for gas exchange during inflation from important quantity is the amount of alveolar volume available for gas exchange. This alveolar volume

  12. Volume Rendering by Adaptive Refinement (revised January, 1989)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    . 1988; Sabella 1988; Upson and Keeler 1988). The principal advantages of volume rendering over other

  13. ASEAN--USAID Buildings Energy Conservation Project final report. Volume 2, Technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Levine, M.D.; Busch, J.F. [eds.

    1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This volume reports on research in the area of energy conservation technology applied to commercial buildings in the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN) region. Unlike Volume I of this series, this volume is a compilation of original technical papers prepared by different authors in the project. In this regard, this volume is much like a technical journal. The papers that follow report on research conducted by both US and ASEAN researchers. The authors representing Indonesia, Malaysia, Philippines, and Thailand, come from a range of positions in the energy arena, including government energy agencies, electric utilities, and universities. As such, they account for a wide range of perspectives on energy problems and the role that technology can play in solving them. This volume is about using energy more intelligently. In some cases, the effort is towards the use of more advanced technologies, such as low-emittance coatings on window glass, thermal energy storage, or cogeneration. In others, the emphasis is towards reclaiming traditional techniques for rendering energy services, but in new contexts such as lighting office buildings with natural light, or cooling buildings of all types with natural ventilation. Used in its broadest sense, the term ``technology`` encompasses all of the topics addressed in this volume. Along with the more customary associations of technology, such as advanced materials and equipment and the analysis of their performance, this volume treats design concepts and techniques, analysis of ``secondary`` impacts from applying technologies (i.e., unintended impacts, or impacts on parties not directly involved in the purchase and use of the technology), and the collection of primary data used for conducting technical analyses.

  14. Alternative fuels for vehicles fleet demonstration program. Final report, volume 2: Appendices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Alternative Fuels for Vehicles Fleet Demonstration Program (AFV-FDP) was a multiyear effort to collect technical data for use in determining the costs and benefits of alternative-fuel vehicles (AFVs) in typical applications in New York State. This report, Volume 2, includes 13 appendices to Volume 1 that expand upon issues raised therein. Volume 1 provides: (1) Information about the purpose and scope of the AFV-FDP; (2) A summary of AFV-FDP findings organized on the basis of vehicle type and fuel type; (3) A short review of the status of AFV technology development, including examples of companies in the State that are active in developing AFVs and AFV components; and (4) A brief overview of the status of AFV deployment in the State. Volume 3 provides expanded reporting of AFV-FDP technical details, including the complete texts of the brochure Garage Guidelines for Alternative Fuels and the technical report Fleet Experience Survey Report, plus an extensive glossary of AFV terminology. The appendices cover a wide range of issues including: emissions regulations in New York State; production and health effects of ozone; vehicle emissions and control systems; emissions from heavy-duty engines; reformulated gasoline; greenhouse gases; production and characteristics of alternative fuels; the Energy Policy Act of 1992; the Clean Fuel Fleet Program; garage design guidelines for alternative fuels; surveys of fleet managers using alternative fuels; taxes on conventional and alternative fuels; and zero-emission vehicle technology.

  15. On the thermodynamics of volume/mass diffusion in fluids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Kokou Dadzie; Jason M. Reese

    2012-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

    In Physica A vol 387(24) (2008) pp6079-6094 [1], a kinetic equation for gas flows was proposed that leads to a set of four macroscopic conservation equations, rather than the traditional set of three equations. The additional equation arises due to local spatial random molecular behavior, which has been described as a volume or mass diffusion process. In this present paper, we describe a procedure to construct a Gibbs-type equation and a second-law associated with these kinetic and continuum models. We also point out the close link between the kinetic equation in [1] and that proposed previously by Klimontovich, and we discuss some of their compatibilities with classical mechanical principles. Finally, a dimensional analysis highlights the nature of volume/mass diffusion: it is a non-conventional diffusive process, with some similarities to the `ghost effect', which cannot be obtained from a fluid mechanical derivation that neglects non-local-equilibrium structures, as the conventional Navier-Stokes-Fourier model does.

  16. Fort Drum integrated resource assessment. Volume 3, Resource assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dixon, D.R.; Armstrong, P.R.; Daellenbach, K.K.; Dagle, J.E.; Di Massa, F.V.; Elliott, D.B.; Keller, J.M.; Richman, E.E.; Shankle, S.A.; Sullivan, G.P.; Wahlstrom, R.R.

    1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The US Army Forces Command (FORSCOM) has tasked Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) as the lead laboratory supporting the US Department of Energy (DOE) Federal Energy Management Program`s (FEMP) mission to identify, evaluate, and assist in acquiring all cost-effective energy projects at Fort Drum. This is a model program PNL is designing for federal customers served by the Niagara Mohawk Power Company (Niagara Mohawk). It will (1) identify and evaluate all electric and fossil fuel cost-effective energy projects; (2) develop a schedule at each installation for project acquisition considering project type, size, timing, capital requirements, as well as energy and dollar savings; and (3) secure 100% of the financing required to implement electric energy efficiency projects from Niagara Mohawk and have Niagara Mohawk procure the necessary contractors to perform detailed audits and install the technologies. This report provides the results of the fossil fuel and electric energy resource opportunity (ERO) assessments performed by PNL at one of Niagara Mohawk`s primary federal facilities, the FORSCOM Fort Drum facility located near Watertown, New York. It is a companion report to Volume 1, the Executive Summary, and Volume 2, the Baseline Detail.

  17. On the Dorsal Glands as Characters of Constant Specific Value in the Coccid Genus, Parlatoria

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Palmer, Miriam A.

    1904-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Vaster Thesis Fntoaologv Palmer, Miriam 1904 On dorsal glands 0 charac­ t e r s of constant s p e c i f i c • alue in the Coccid genus, P a r l a t o r i a , On the D o r s a l Glands as Characters of Constant S p e c i f i c Value i n the Coccid... Genus, P a r l a t o r i a . Miriam A. Palmer. On the D o r s a l Glands as Characters of Constant S p e c i f i c Value i n the Coccid Genus, P a r l a t o r i a . I n t r o d u c t i o n . There has "been much confusion as to c l a s s i f i c a...

  18. The Cosmological Constant of One-Dimensional Matter Coupled Quantum Gravity is Quantized

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Govaerts, J

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Coupling any interacting quantum mechanical system to gravity in one dimension requires the cosmological constant to belong to the matter energy spectrum and thus to be quantized, even though the gravity sector is free of any quantum dynamics, while physical states are also confined to the subspace of matter quantum states whose energy coincides with the cosmological constant value. These general facts are illustrated through some simple examples. The physical projector quantization approach readily leads to the correct representation of such systems, whereas other approaches relying on gauge fixing methods are often plagued by Gribov problems in which case the quantization rule is not properly recovered. Whether such a quantization of the cosmological constant as well as the other ensuing consequences in terms of physical states extend to higher dimensional matter-gravity coupled quantum systems is clearly a fascinating open issue.

  19. Dynamical friction in constant density cores: a failure of the Chandrasekhar formula

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. I. Read; Tobias Goerdt; Ben Moore; A. P. Pontzen; Joachim Stadel; George Lake

    2006-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Using analytic calculations and N-body simulations we show that in constant density (harmonic) cores, sinking satellites undergo an initial phase of very rapid (super-Chandrasekhar) dynamical friction, after which they experience no dynamical friction at all. For density profiles with a central power law profile of log-slope, $-\\alpha$, the infalling satellite heats the background and causes $\\alpha$ to decrease. For $\\alpha < 0.5$ initially, the satellite generates a small central constant density core and stalls as in the $\\alpha = 0$ case. We discuss some astrophysical applications of our results to decaying satellite orbits, galactic bars and mergers of supermassive black hole binaries. In a companion paper we show that a central constant density core can provide a natural solution to the timing problem for Fornax's globular clusters.

  20. Direct Test of the Time-Independence of Fundamental Nuclear Constants Using the Oklo Natural Reactor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alexander I. Shlyakhter

    2003-07-03T23:59:59.000Z

    [NOTE: This 1983 preprint is being uploaded to arXiv.org after the death of its author, who supported online distribution of his work. Contact info of the submitter is at http://ilya.cc .] The positions of neutron resonances have been shown to be highly sensitive to the variation of fundamental nuclear constants. The analysis of the measured isotopic shifts in the natural fossil reactor at Oklo gives the following restrictions on the possible rates of the interaction constants variation: strong ~2x10^-19 yr^-1, electromagnetic ~5x10^-18 yr^-1, weak ~10^-12 yr^-1. These limits permit to exclude all the versions of nuclear constants contemporary variation discussed in the literature. URL: http://alexonline.info >. For more recent analyses see hep-ph/9606486, hep-ph/0205206 and astro-ph/0204069 .

  1. Phase-constant-nonreciprocal composite right/left-handed metamaterials based on coplanar waveguides

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Porokhnyuk, Andrey, E-mail: d1821008@edu.kit.ac.jp; Ueda, Tetsuya; Kado, Yuichi [Department of Electronics, Kyoto Institute of Technology, Kyoto 606-8585 (Japan); Itoh, Tatsuo [Department of Electrical Engineering, University of California at Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California 90095 (United States)

    2014-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The purely phase-constant-nonreciprocal composite right-left handed metamaterial structure is proposed based on coplanar waveguides loaded with a ferrite layer. The structure exhibits considerably large nonreciprocity in phase constant which depends on the effective magnetization and whose magnitude can remain in leaky wave region of wavenumbers or can overcome a boundary to slow wave region. The nonreciprocity in amplitude of transmission coefficients, on the other hand, is effectively reduced by using a cavity-backed design to prevent undesired nonreciprocal radiation loss.

  2. Low red-shift formula for the luminosity distance in a LTB model with cosmological constant

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Antonio Enea Romano; Pisin Chen

    2014-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

    We calculate the low red-shift Taylor expansion for the luminosity distance for an observer at the center of a spherically symmetric matter inhomogeneity with a non vanishing cosmological constant. We then test the accuracy of the formulas comparing them to the numerical calculation for different cases for both the luminosity distance and the radial coordinate. The formulas can be used as a starting point to understand the general non linear effects of a local inhomogeneity in presence of a cosmological constant, without making any special assumption about the inhomogeneity profile.

  3. On the Verdet constant and Faraday rotation for graphene-like materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mikkel H. Brynildsen; Horia D. Cornean

    2013-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a rigorous and rather self-contained analysis of the Verdet constant in graphene- like materials. We apply the gauge-invariant magnetic perturbation theory to a nearest- neighbour tight-binding model and obtain a relatively simple and exactly computable formula for the Verdet constant, at all temperatures and all frequencies of sufficiently large absolute value. Moreover, for the standard nearest neighbour tight-binding model of graphene we show that the transverse component of the conductivity tensor has an asymptotic Taylor expansion in the external magnetic field where all the coefficients of even powers are zero.

  4. Determination of foam stability at constant pressure in the Plateau-Biggs borders of the foam

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khristov, K.I.; Exerowa, D.R.; Kurgljakov, P.M.

    1981-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The lifetime of a foam column (or of a part of the column) is a parameter widely used as a characteristic of foam stability. During the destruction process, the pressure in the upper layers of the foam changes (the height H of the foam column decreases) and the lifetime of the different layers of the foam column will be different. Therefore, the lifetime of a foam column at constant pressure in the Plateau-Gibbs borders (constant along the height of the column and with time) is a much more accurate characteristic of foam stability.

  5. Electronic constant current and current pulse signal generator for nuclear instrumentation testing

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Brown, R.A.

    1994-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Circuitry is described for testing the ability of an intermediate range nuclear instrument to detect and measure a constant current and a periodic current pulse. The invention simulates the resistance and capacitance of the signal connection of a nuclear instrument ion chamber detector and interconnecting cable. An LED flasher/oscillator illuminates an LED at a periodic rate established by a timing capacitor and circuitry internal to the flasher/oscillator. When the LED is on, a periodic current pulse is applied to the instrument. When the LED is off, a constant current is applied. An inductor opposes battery current flow when the LED is on. 1 figures.

  6. Electronic constant current and current pulse signal generator for nuclear instrumentation testing

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Brown, Roger A. (Amsterdam, NY)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Circuitry for testing the ability of an intermediate range nuclear instrut to detect and measure a constant current and a periodic current pulse. The invention simulates the resistance and capacitance of the signal connection of a nuclear instrument ion chamber detector and interconnecting cable. An LED flasher/oscillator illuminates an LED at a periodic rate established by a timing capacitor and circuitry internal to the flasher/oscillator. When the LED is on, a periodic current pulse is applied to the instrument. When the LED is off, a constant current is applied. An inductor opposes battery current flow when the LED is on.

  7. Superselection rule for the cosmological constant in three-dimensional spacetime

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bunster, Claudio

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Efforts to understand the origin of the cosmological constant {\\Lambda} and its observed value have led to consider it as a dynamical field rather than as a universal constant. Then the possibility arises that the universe, or regions of it, might be in a superposition of quantum states with different values of {\\Lambda}, so that its actual value would not be definite. There appears to be no argument to rule out this possibility for a generic spacetime dimension D. However, as proved herein, for D=3 there exists a superselection rule that forbids such superpositions. The proof is based on the asymptotic symmetry algebra.

  8. Architectures of Test Automation 1 High Volume Test AutomationHigh Volume Test Automation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Architectures of Test Automation 1 High Volume Test AutomationHigh Volume Test Automation Cem Kaner Institute of Technology October 2003 #12;Architectures of Test Automation 2 Acknowledgements developed a course on test automation architecture, and in the Los Altos Workshops on Software Testing

  9. Transient Thermal and Stress Response of A Helium-Cooled Tungsten Plate-Type Divertor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Raffray, A. René

    .R. Raffray Center for Energy Research University of California, San Diego La Jolla, USA xrwang, which tend to have a negative impact on reliability. The helium-cooled plate- type divertor design maintenance or after the scheduled maintenance because of the different thermal time constants in the front

  10. Griffiss AFB integrated resource assessment. Volume 2, Electric baseline detail

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dixon, D.R.; Armstrong, P.R.; Keller, J.M.

    1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The US Air Force Air Combat Command has tasked the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) as the lead laboratory supporting the US Department of Energy (DOE) Federal Energy Management Program`s (FEMP) mission to identify, evaluate, and assist in acquiring all cost-effective energy projects at Griffiss Air Force Base (AFB). This is a model program PNL is designing for federal customers served by the Niagara Mohawk Power Company (Niagara Mohawk). It will (1) identify and evaluate all electric cost-effective energy projects; (2) develop a schedule at each installation for project acquisition considering project type, size, timing, and capital requirements, as well as energy and dollar savings; and (3) secure 100% of the financing required to implement electric energy efficiency projects from Niagara Mohawk and have Niagara Mohawk procure the necessary contractors to perform detailed audits and install the technologies. This report documents the assessment of baseline energy use at one of Niagara Mohawk`s primary federal facilities, Griffiss AFB, an Air Combat Command facility located near Rome, New York. It is a companion report to Volume 1, the Executive Summary, and Volume 3, the Electric Resource Assessment. The analysis examines the characteristics of electric, gas, oil, propane, coal, and purchased thermal capacity use for fiscal year (FY) 1990. The results include energy-use intensities for the facilities at Griffiss AFB by building type and electric energy end use. A complete electric energy consumption reconciliation is presented that accounts for the distribution of all major electric energy uses and losses among buildings, utilities, and central systems.

  11. Mixed waste focus area integrated technical baseline report. Phase I, Volume 2: Revision 0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

    This document (Volume 2) contains the Appendices A through J for the Mixed Waste Focus Area Integrated Technical Baseline Report Phase I for the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. Included are: Waste Type Managers` Resumes, detailed information on wastewater, combustible organics, debris, unique waste, and inorganic homogeneous solids and soils, and waste data information. A detailed list of technology deficiencies and site needs identification is also provided.

  12. Metal melting for volume reduction and recycle

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, R.L.

    1987-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper summarizes the experiences with melting contaminated steel materials for volume reduction and melting uranium-contaminated copper and aluminum for possible recycle. In the past there has not been an economic incentive to reduce the volume of low-level beta-gamma contaminated metallic scrap materials in the United States. With the rising cost of transportation and burial facility fees new interest in volume reduction is being generated. This new interest has been primarily focused at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) where the Waste Experimental Reduction Facility (WERF) was established to demonstrate both metal melting and incineration of combustible material for volume reduction. Other demonstration programs involving melting for volume reduction and recycle of aluminum and copper, as well as ferrous scrap, were related to the Cascade Improvement and Cascade Upgrade Programs (CIP/CUP) at the Paducah, Kentucky facility. While the melting demonstrations for the CIP/CUP material were not primarily based on economic incentives, several observations recorded during the programs are of interest with regard to melting of copper and aluminum. (4 refs., 8 tabs.)

  13. Spent Fuel Working Group Report. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    O`Toole, T.

    1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Department of Energy is storing large amounts of spent nuclear fuel and other reactor irradiated nuclear materials (herein referred to as RINM). In the past, the Department reprocessed RINM to recover plutonium, tritium, and other isotopes. However, the Department has ceased or is phasing out reprocessing operations. As a consequence, Department facilities designed, constructed, and operated to store RINM for relatively short periods of time now store RINM, pending decisions on the disposition of these materials. The extended use of the facilities, combined with their known degradation and that of their stored materials, has led to uncertainties about safety. To ensure that extended storage is safe (i.e., that protection exists for workers, the public, and the environment), the conditions of these storage facilities had to be assessed. The compelling need for such an assessment led to the Secretary`s initiative on spent fuel, which is the subject of this report. This report comprises three volumes: Volume I; Summary Results of the Spent Fuel Working Group Evaluation; Volume II, Working Group Assessment Team Reports and Protocol; Volume III; Operating Contractor Site Team Reports. This volume presents the overall results of the Working Group`s Evaluation. The group assessed 66 facilities spread across 11 sites. It identified: (1) facilities that should be considered for priority attention. (2) programmatic issues to be considered in decision making about interim storage plans and (3) specific vulnerabilities for some of these facilities.

  14. Site Environmental Report for 2002, Volume 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pauer, Ron

    2003-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Each year, Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory prepares an integrated report on its environmental programs to satisfy the requirements of United States Department of Energy Order 231.1. The ''Site Environmental Report for 2002'' summarizes Berkeley Lab's compliance with environmental standards and requirements, characterizes environmental management efforts through surveillance and monitoring activities, and highlights significant programs and efforts for calendar year 2002. Throughout this report, Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory is referred to as ''Berkeley Lab,'' ''the Laboratory,'' ''Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory,'' and ''LBNL.'' The report is separated into two volumes. Volume I contains a general overview of the Laboratory, the status of environmental programs, and summarized results from surveillance and monitoring activities. Volume II contains individual data results from the monitoring programs. This year, the ''Site Environmental Report'' was distributed on a CD in PDF format that includes Volume I, Volume II, and related documents. The report is also available on the Web at http://www.lbl.gov/ehs/esg/. The report follows the Laboratory's policy of using the International System of Units (SI), also known as the metric system of measurements. Whenever possible, results are additionally reported using the more conventional (non-SI) system of measurements because this system is referenced by some current regulatory standards and is more familiar to some readers. The tables included at the end of the Glossary are intended to help readers understand the various prefixes used with SI units of measurement and convert these units from one system to the other.

  15. Predicting oropharyngeal tumor volume throughout the course of radiation therapy from pretreatment computed tomography data using general linear models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yock, Adam D., E-mail: ADYock@mdanderson.org; Kudchadker, Rajat J. [Department of Radiation Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas 77030 and The Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston, Houston, Texas 77030 (United States)] [Department of Radiation Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas 77030 and The Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston, Houston, Texas 77030 (United States); Rao, Arvind [Department of Bioinformatics and Computational Biology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas 77030 and the Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, the University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston, Houston, Texas 77030 (United States)] [Department of Bioinformatics and Computational Biology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas 77030 and the Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, the University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston, Houston, Texas 77030 (United States); Dong, Lei [Scripps Proton Therapy Center, San Diego, California 92121 and The Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston, Houston, Texas 77030 (United States)] [Scripps Proton Therapy Center, San Diego, California 92121 and The Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston, Houston, Texas 77030 (United States); Beadle, Beth M.; Garden, Adam S. [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas 77030 (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas 77030 (United States); Court, Laurence E. [Department of Radiation Physics and Department of Imaging Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas 77030 and The Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston, Houston, Texas 77030 (United States)] [Department of Radiation Physics and Department of Imaging Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas 77030 and The Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston, Houston, Texas 77030 (United States)

    2014-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: The purpose of this work was to develop and evaluate the accuracy of several predictive models of variation in tumor volume throughout the course of radiation therapy. Methods: Nineteen patients with oropharyngeal cancers were imaged daily with CT-on-rails for image-guided alignment per an institutional protocol. The daily volumes of 35 tumors in these 19 patients were determined and used to generate (1) a linear model in which tumor volume changed at a constant rate, (2) a general linear model that utilized the power fit relationship between the daily and initial tumor volumes, and (3) a functional general linear model that identified and exploited the primary modes of variation between time series describing the changing tumor volumes. Primary and nodal tumor volumes were examined separately. The accuracy of these models in predicting daily tumor volumes were compared with those of static and linear reference models using leave-one-out cross-validation. Results: In predicting the daily volume of primary tumors, the general linear model and the functional general linear model were more accurate than the static reference model by 9.9% (range: ?11.6%–23.8%) and 14.6% (range: ?7.3%–27.5%), respectively, and were more accurate than the linear reference model by 14.2% (range: ?6.8%–40.3%) and 13.1% (range: ?1.5%–52.5%), respectively. In predicting the daily volume of nodal tumors, only the 14.4% (range: ?11.1%–20.5%) improvement in accuracy of the functional general linear model compared to the static reference model was statistically significant. Conclusions: A general linear model and a functional general linear model trained on data from a small population of patients can predict the primary tumor volume throughout the course of radiation therapy with greater accuracy than standard reference models. These more accurate models may increase the prognostic value of information about the tumor garnered from pretreatment computed tomography images and facilitate improved treatment management.

  16. Locating Faults in a Constant Number of Parallel Testing Rounds (Preliminary Version)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beigel, Richard

    the total number of processors and t denotes the number of faulty processors. Both of these results improve processor (diagnosis­with­repair) and identifying a single good processor, we present an oblivious constant­time algorithm using a fixed 3­regular in­ terconnect that tolerates a linear number of faults. This contrasts

  17. Non-chiral fusion rules, structure constants of D_m minimal models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Rida; T. Sami

    1999-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a technique to construct, for $D_{m}$ unitary minimal models, the non-chiral fusion rules which determines the operator content of the operator product algebra. Using these rules we solve the bootstrap equations and therefore determine the structure constants of these models. Through this approach we emphasize the role played by some discrete symmetries in the classification of minimal models.

  18. Photon emission in a constant magnetic field in 2+1 dimensional space-time

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. T. S. Amaral; S. I. Zlatev

    2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We calculate by the proper-time method the amplitude of the two-photon emission by a charged fermion in a constant magnetic field in (2+1)-dimensional space-time. The relevant dynamics reduces to that of a supesymmetric quantum-mechanical system with one bosonic and one fermionic degrees of freedom.

  19. FTIR Emission Spectra, Molecular Constants, and Potential Curve of Ground State GeO

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Le Roy, Robert J.

    FTIR Emission Spectra, Molecular Constants, and Potential Curve of Ground State GeO Edward G. Lee-resolution FTIR emission spectroscopy measurements for the five common isoto- pomers of GeO are combined­9), photoelectron spectroscopy (10), electronic absorption (11­13), and emission (14) spectroscopy, and in matrix

  20. EFFET DE LA DILATATION THERMIQUE SUR LA VALEUR DE LA CONSTANTE DE CURIE DES FERRITES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    EFFET DE LA DILATATION THERMIQUE SUR LA VALEUR DE LA CONSTANTE DE CURIE DES FERRITES Par LOUIS N�EL Sommaire. - L'auteur montre que l'existence de fortes anomalies de dilatation dans les ferrites entraîne ferrites varie au-dessus de leur point de Curie, en fonction de la température absolue ~', suivant la loi