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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "type carbon coefficient" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Type Ia Supernova Carbon Footprints  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present convincing evidence of unburned carbon at photospheric velocities in new observations of 5 Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) obtained by the Nearby Supernova Factory. These SNe are identified by examining 346 spectra from 124 SNe obtained before +2.5 d relative to maximum. Detections are based on the presence of relatively strong C II 6580 absorption "notches" in multiple spectra of each SN, aided by automated fitting with the SYNAPPS code. Four of the 5 SNe in question are otherwise spectroscopically unremarkable, with ions and ejection velocities typical of SNe Ia, but spectra of the fifth exhibits high-velocity (v > 20,000 km/s) Si II and Ca II features. On the other hand, the light curve properties are preferentially grouped, strongly suggesting a connection between carbon-positivity and broad band light curve/color behavior: Three of the 5 have relatively narrow light curves but also blue colors, and a fourth may be a dust-reddened member of this family. Accounting for signal-to-noise and phase, we ...

Thomas, R C; Aragon, C; Antilogus, P; Bailey, S; Baltay, C; Bongard, S; Buton, C; Canto, A; Childress, M; Chotard, N; Copin, Y; Fakhouri, H K; Gangler, E; Hsiao, E Y; Kerschhaggl, M; Kowalski, M; Loken, S; Nugent, P; Paech, K; Pain, R; Pecontal, E; Pereira, R; Perlmutter, S; Rabinowitz, D; Rigault, M; Rubin, D; Runge, K; Scalzo, R; Smadja, G; Tao, C; Weaver, B A; Wu, C; Brown, P J; Milne, P A

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

Limiting diffusion coefficients of heavy molecular weight organic contaminants in supercritical carbon dioxide  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

LIMITING DIFFUSION COEFFICIENTS OF HEAVY MOLECULAR WEIGHT ORGANIC CONTAMINANTS IN SUPERCRITICAL CARBON DIOXIDE A Thesis by MAURICIO OREJUELA Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment... of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1994 Major Subject: Chemical Engineering LIMITING DIFFUSION COEFFICIENTS OF HEAVY MOLECULAR WEIGHT ORGANIC CONTAMINANTS IN SUPERCRITICAL CARBON DIOXIDE A Thesis by MAURICIO OREJUELA Submitted...

Orejuela, Mauricio

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

Temperature and water vapor pressure effects on the friction coefficient of hydrogenated diamondlike carbon films.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Microtribological measurements of a hydrogenated diamondlike carbon film in controlled gaseous environments show that water vapor plays a significant role in the friction coefficient. These experiments reveal an initial high friction transient behavior that does not reoccur even after extended periods of exposure to low partial pressures of H{sub 2}O and O{sub 2}. Experiments varying both water vapor pressure and sample temperature show trends of a decreasing friction coefficient as a function of both the decreasing water vapor pressure and the increasing substrate temperature. Theses trends are examined with regard to first order gas-surface interactions. Model fits give activation energies on the order of 40 kJ/mol, which is consistent with water vapor desorption.

Dickrell, P. L.; Sawyer, W. G.; Eryilmaz, O. L.; Erdemir, A.; Energy Technology; Univ. of Florida

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

The interaction second virial coefficient for the ethane-carbon dioxide system between 250 and 300 K  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

THE INTERACTION SECOND VIRIAL COEFFICIENT FOR THE ETHANE-CARBON DIOXIDE SYSTEM BETWEEN 250 AND 300 K A Thesis by JOSEPH GLENN YOUNG Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas AAM University in partial fulfillment of the requirement... for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1978 Major Subject: Chemical Engineering THE INTERACTION SECOND VIRIAL COEFFICIENT FOR THE ETHANE-CARBON DIOXIDE SYSTEM BETWEEN 250 AND 300 K A Thesis by JOSEPH GLENN YOUNG Approved as to style and content by...

Young, Joseph Glenn

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

Modeling of Seismic Signatures of Carbonate Rock Types  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Carbonate reservoirs of different rock types have wide ranges of porosity and permeability, creating zones with different reservoir quality and flow properties. This research addresses how seismic technology can be used to identify different...

Jan, Badr H.

2011-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

6

Modeling Infinite Dilution and Fickian Diffusion Coefficients of Carbon Dioxide in Water  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in enhanced oil recovery (EOR), and recovery of coal-bed methane from unmineable coal seams.3 For CO2 these temperature and pressure conditions. A general formalism for Fickian diffusion coefficients is already well

Firoozabadi, Abbas

7

Black Carbon Emissions by Rocket Engines Types of rocket engines Emissions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Black Carbon Emissions by Rocket Engines Types of rocket engines Emissions Liquid Hydrogen. Note: Black carbon does not deplete ozone. What happens is the black carbon emissions from the rocket. Other black carbon emissions: The number one contributor to black carbon is burning biomass. Also

Toohey, Darin W.

8

Three Human Cell Types Respond to Multi-Walled Carbon Nanotubes...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Human Cell Types Respond to Multi-Walled Carbon Nanotubes and Titanium Dioxide Nanobelts with Cell-Specific Transcriptomic Three Human Cell Types Respond to Multi-Walled Carbon...

9

Influence of Rock Types on Seismic Monitoring of CO2 Sequestration in Carbonate Reservoirs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

) techniques such as high pressure CO2 injection may normally be required to recover oil in place in carbonate reservoirs. This study addresses how different rock types can influence the seismic monitoring of CO2 sequestration in carbonates. This research...

Mammadova, Elnara

2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

10

Black Carbon Concentrations and Diesel Vehicle Emission Factors Derived from Coefficient of Haze Measurements in California: 1967-2003  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We have derived ambient black carbon (BC) concentrations and estimated emission factors for on-road diesel vehicles from archived Coefficient of Haze (COH) data that was routinely collected beginning in 1967 at 11 locations in the San Francisco Bay Area. COH values are a measure of the attenuation of light by particles collected on a white filter, and available data indicate they are proportional to BC concentrations measured using the conventional aethalometer. Monthly averaged BC concentrations are up to five times greater in winter than summer, and, consequently, so is the population?s exposure to BC. The seasonal cycle in BC concentrations is similar for all Bay Area sites, most likely due to area-wide decreased pollutant dispersion during wintertime. A strong weekly cycle is also evident, with weekend concentrations significantly lower than weekday concentrations, consistent with decreased diesel traffic volume on weekends. The weekly cycle suggests that, in the Bay Area, diesel vehicle emissions are the dominant source of BC aerosol. Despite the continuous increase in diesel fuel consumption in California, annual Bay Area average BC concentrations decreased by a factor of ~;;3 from the late 1960s to the early 2000s. Based on estimated annual BC concentrations, on-road diesel fuel consumption, and recent measurements of on-road diesel vehicle BC emissions, diesel BC emission factors decreased by an order of magnitude over the study period. Reductions in the BC emission factor reflect improved engine technology, emission controls and changes in diesel fuel composition. A new BC monitoring network is needed to continue tracking ambient BC trends because the network of COH monitors has recently been retired.

Tast, CynthiaL; Kirchstetter, Thomas W.; Aguiar, Jeffery; Tonse, Shaheen; Novakov, T.; Fairley, David

2007-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

11

Black Carbon Concentrations and Diesel Vehicle Emission FactorsDerived from Coefficient of Haze Measurements in California:1967-2003  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We have derived ambient black carbon (BC) concentrations and estimated emission factors for on-road diesel vehicles from archived Coefficient of Haze (COH) data that was routinely collected beginning in 1967 at 11 locations in the San Francisco Bay Area. COH values are a measure of the attenuation of light by particles collected on a white filter, and available data indicate they are proportional to BC concentrations measured using the conventional aethalometer. Monthly averaged BC concentrations are up to five times greater in winter than summer, and, consequently, so is the population's exposure to BC. The seasonal cycle in BC concentrations is similar for all Bay Area sites, most likely due to area-wide decreased pollutant dispersion during wintertime. A strong weekly cycle is also evident, with weekend concentrations significantly lower than weekday concentrations, consistent with decreased diesel traffic volume on weekends. The weekly cycle suggests that, in the Bay Area, diesel vehicle emissions are the dominant source of BC aerosol. Despite the continuous increase in diesel fuel consumption in California, annual Bay Area average BC concentrations decreased by a factor of {approx}3 from the late 1960s to the early 2000s. Based on estimated annual BC concentrations, on-road diesel fuel consumption, and recent measurements of on-road diesel vehicle BC emissions, diesel BC emission factors decreased by an order of magnitude over the study period. Reductions in the BC emission factor reflect improved engine technology, emission controls and changes in diesel fuel composition. A new BC monitoring network is needed to continue tracking ambient BC trends because the network of COH monitors has recently been retired.

Kirchstetter, Thomas W.; Aguiar, Jeffery; Tonse, Shaheen; Novakov, T.

2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

ANALYTIC APPROXIMATION OF CARBON CONDENSATION ISSUES IN TYPE II SUPERNOVAE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

I present analytic approximations for some issues related to condensation of graphite, TiC, and silicon carbide in oxygen-rich cores of supernovae of Type II. Increased understanding, which mathematical analysis can support, renders researchers more receptive to condensation in O-rich supernova gases. Taking SN 1987A as typical, my first analysis shows why the abundance of CO molecules reaches an early maximum in which free carbon remains more abundant than CO. This analysis clarifies why O-rich gas cannot oxidize C if {sup 56}Co radioactivity is as strong as in SN 1987A. My next analysis shows that the CO abundance could be regarded as being in chemical equilibrium if the CO molecule is given an effective binding energy rather than its laboratory dissociation energy. The effective binding energy makes the thermal dissociation rate of CO equal to its radioactive dissociation rate. This preserves possible relevance for the concept of chemical equilibrium. My next analysis shows that the observed abundances of CO and SiO molecules in SN 1987A rule out frequent suggestions that equilibrium condensation of SUNOCONs has occurred following atomic mixing of the He-burning shell with more central zones in such a way as to reproduce roughly the observed spectrum of isotopes in SUNOCONs while preserving C/O > 1. He atoms admixed along with the excess carbon would destroy CO and SiO molecules, leaving their observed abundances unexplained. The final analysis argues that a chemical quasiequilibrium among grains (but not gas) may exist approximately during condensation, so that its computational use is partially justified as a guide to which mineral phases would be stable against reactions with gas. I illustrate this point with quasiequilibrium calculations by Ebel and Grossman that have shown that graphite is stable even when O/C >1 if prominent molecules are justifiably excluded from the calculation of chemical equilibrium.

Clayton, Donald D., E-mail: claydonald@gmail.com [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Clemson University, Clemson, SC (United States)

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

CARBON DEFLAGRATION IN TYPE Ia SUPERNOVA. I. CENTRALLY IGNITED MODELS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A leading model for Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) begins with a white dwarf near the Chandrasekhar mass that ignites a degenerate thermonuclear runaway close to its center and explodes. In a series of papers, we shall explore the consequences of ignition at several locations within such dwarfs. Here we assume central ignition, which has been explored before, but is worth revisiting, if only to validate those previous studies and to further elucidate the relevant physics for future work. A perturbed sphere of hot iron ash with a radius of {approx}100 km is initialized at the middle of the star. The subsequent explosion is followed in several simulations using a thickened flame model in which the flame speed is either fixed-within the range expected from turbulent combustion-or based on the local turbulent intensity. Global results, including the explosion energy and bulk nucleosynthesis (e.g., {sup 56}Ni of 0.48-0.56 M{sub Sun }) turn out to be insensitive to this speed. In all completed runs, the energy released by the nuclear burning is adequate to unbind the star, but not enough to give the energy and brightness of typical SNe Ia. As found previously, the chemical stratification observed in typical events is not reproduced. These models produce a large amount of unburned carbon and oxygen in central low velocity regions, which is inconsistent with spectroscopic observations, and the intermediate mass elements and iron group elements are strongly mixed during the explosion.

Ma, H.; Woosley, S. E.; Malone, C. M. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Almgren, A.; Bell, J. [Center for Computational Sciences and Engineering, Lawrence Berkeley National Lab, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Calculate thermal-expansion coefficients  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To properly design and use process equipment, an engineer needs a sound knowledge of physical and thermodynamic property data. A lack of such knowledge can lead to design or operating mistakes that can be dangerous, costly or even fatal. One useful type of property data is the thermal-expansion coefficient. This article presents equations and tables to find the thermal-expansion coefficients of many liquids that contain carbon. These data are useful in process-engineering applications, including the design of relief systems which are crucial to safeguarding process equipment. Data are provided for approximately 350 compounds. A computer software program, which contains the thermophysical property data for all of the compounds discussed in this article, is available for $43 prepaid from the author (Carl L. Yaws, Box 10053, Lamar University, beaumont, TX 77710; Tel. 409-880-8787; fax 409-880-8404). The program is in ASCII format, which can be accessed by most other types of computer software.

Yaws, C.L. [Lamar Univ., Beaumont, TX (United States)

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Ultra low friction carbon/carbon composites for extreme temperature applications  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A carbon/carbon composite in which a carbon matrix containing a controlled amount of boron or a boron compound is reinforced with carbon fiber exhibits a low coefficient of friction, i.e., on the order of 0.04 to 0.1 at temperatures up to 600.degree. C., which is one of the lowest frictional coefficients for any type of carbonaceous material, including graphite, glassy carbon, diamond, diamond-like carbon and other forms of carbon material. The high degree of slipperiness of the carbon composite renders it particularly adapted for limiting friction and wear at elevated temperatures such as in seals, bearings, shafts, and flexible joints

Erdemir, Ali (Naperville, IL); Busch, Donald E. (Hinsdale, IL); Fenske, George R. (Downers Grove, IL); Lee, Sam (Gardena, CA); Shepherd, Gary (Los Alamitos, CA); Pruett, Gary J. (Cypress, CA)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Concentration of carbon types from fly ash by density gradient centrifugation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Although the increasing amount of unburned carbon in fly ash is known to preclude the use of ash in the cement industry, very little is known about the characteristics of the unburned carbon. Three types of carbon particles have been identified microscopically: inertinite, isotropic coke and anisotropic coke. This manuscript describes a method to isolate these three types of carbon. A preliminary enrichment, followed by density gradient centrifugation (DGC) with a high-density polytungstate media (2.85 g/cm{sup 3} max), resulted in an enrichment of inertinites from a starting concentration of 3.8% to 61%, isotropic coke from 13.4% to 65%, and anisotropic coke from 19.2% to 74%. Large scale runs (LS) have been conducted to accumulate sufficient sample for subsequent analyses. The recovery weights and petrography composition of the PS and LS fractions are very similar.

Maroto-Valer, M.M.; Taulbee, D.N.; Hower, J.C. [Univ. of Kentucky, Lexington, KY (United States). Center for Applied Energy Research

1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

17

Bond Distortions in Armchair Type Single Wall Carbon Nanotubes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The energy band gap structure and stability of (3,3) and (10,10) nanotubes have been comparatively investigated in the frameworks of the traditional form of the Su-Schrieffer-Heeger (SSH) model and a toy model including the contributions of bonds of different types to the SSH Hamiltonian differently. Both models give the same energy band gap structure but bond length distortions in different characters for the nanotubes.

N. Sunel; E. Rizaoglu; K. Harigaya; O. Ozsoy

2005-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

18

N-Type Thermoelectric Performance of Functionalized Carbon Nanotube-Filled Polymer Composites  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the carbon honeycomb structure known as graphene, are semi-conductive depending on the lattice vector by which they are rolled. Intrinsically n-type, semiconducting nanotubes are highly susceptible to oxygen doping and become p-type in atmosphere.7... to the current research for a number of reasons. The first is that CNTs exhibit different electrical properties depending on their chirality, or the arrangement of the graphene hexagons relative to the tube axis. These electronic differences can make...

Freeman, Dallas

2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

19

FESD Preliminary Proposal, Type I VOICE: Volcano, Ocean, Ice, and Carbon Experiments  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

(University of Michigan), Jerry McManus (Columbia Univer- sity), Suzanne Carbotte (Columbia University), JoergFESD Preliminary Proposal, Type I VOICE: Volcano, Ocean, Ice, and Carbon Experiments Project Manager: Charles Langmuir (Harvard University) PIs: Peter Huybers (Harvard University), David Lund

Huybers, Peter

20

FESD Proposal, Type I VOICE: Volcano, Ocean, Ice, and Carbon Experiments  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in continental ice volume and sea level produce changes in pressure and stress within the crust and mantleFESD Proposal, Type I VOICE: Volcano, Ocean, Ice, and Carbon Experiments Project Manager: Charles during Pleistocene ice ages. We posit that changes in sea level and ice volume drive changes in volcanism

Huybers, Peter

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "type carbon coefficient" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

The CPA Equation of State and an Activity Coefficient Model for Accurate Molar Enthalpy Calculations of Mixtures with Carbon Dioxide and Water/Brine  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Thermodynamic property calculations of mixtures containing carbon dioxide (CO$_2$) and water, including brines, are essential in theoretical models of many natural and industrial processes. The properties of greatest practical interest are density, solubility, and enthalpy. Many models for density and solubility calculations have been presented in the literature, but there exists only one study, by Spycher and Pruess, that has compared theoretical molar enthalpy predictions with experimental data. In this report, we recommend two different models for enthalpy calculations: the CPA equation of state by Li and Firoozabadi, and the CO$_2$ activity coefficient model by Duan and Sun. We show that the CPA equation of state, which has been demonstrated to provide good agreement with density and solubility data, also accurately calculates molar enthalpies of pure CO$_2$, pure water, and both CO$_2$-rich and aqueous (H$_2$O-rich) mixtures of the two species. It is applicable to a wider range of conditions than the Spycher and Pruess model. In aqueous sodium chloride (NaCl) mixtures, we show that Duan and Sun's model yields accurate results for the partial molar enthalpy of CO$_2$. It can be combined with another model for the brine enthalpy to calculate the molar enthalpy of H$_2$O-CO$_2$-NaCl mixtures. We conclude by explaining how the CPA equation of state may be modified to further improve agreement with experiments. This generalized CPA is the basis of our future work on this topic.

P. C. Myint; Y. Hao; A. Firoozabadi

2015-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

22

Might Carbon-Atmosphere White Dwarfs Harbour a New Type of Pulsating Star?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In the light of the recent and unexpected discovery of a brand new type of white dwarfs, those with carbon-dominated atmospheres, we examine the asteroseismological potential of such stars. The motivation behind this is based on the observation that past models of carbon-atmosphere white dwarfs have partially ionized outer layers that bear strong resemblance with those responsible for mode excitation in models of pulsating DB (helium-atmosphere) and pulsating DA (hydrogen-atmosphere) white dwarfs. Our exciting main result is that, given the right location in parameter space, some carbon-atmosphere white dwarfs are predicted to show pulsational instability against gravity modes. We are eagerly waiting the results of observational searches for luminosity variations in these stars.

G. Fontaine; P. Brassard; P. Dufour

2008-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

23

IDENTIFICATION OF DAMAGE TYPES IN CARBON FIBER REINFORCED PLASTIC LAMINATES BY A NOVEL OPTICAL FIBER ACOUSTIC EMISSION SENSOR  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

IDENTIFICATION OF DAMAGE TYPES IN CARBON FIBER REINFORCED PLASTIC LAMINATES BY A NOVEL OPTICAL technology. PZT sensors have been being used as AE sensors. However, because this kind of sensor has bulk

Boyer, Edmond

24

Effect of p-type multi-walled carbon nanotubes for improving hydrogen storage behaviors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this study, the hydrogen storage behaviors of p-type multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) were investigated through the surface modification of MWNTs by immersing them in sulfuric acid (H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}) and hydrogen peroxide (H{sub 2}O{sub 2}) at various ratios. The presence of acceptor-functional groups on the p-type MWNT surfaces was confirmed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Measurement of the zeta-potential determined the surface charge transfer and dispersion of the p-type MWMTs, and the hydrogen storage capacity was evaluated at 77 K and 1 bar. From the results obtained, it was found that acceptor-functional groups were introduced onto the MWNT surfaces, and the dispersion of MWNTs could be improved depending on the acid-mixed treatment conditions. The hydrogen storage was increased by acid-mixed treatments of up to 0.36 wt% in the p-type MWNTs, compared with 0.18 wt% in the As-received MWNTs. Consequently, the hydrogen storage capacities were greatly influenced by the acceptor-functional groups of p-type MWNT surfaces, resulting in increased electron acceptor–donor interaction at the interfaces. - Graphical abstract: Hydrogen storage behaviors of the p-type MWNTs with the acid-mixed treatments are described. Display Omitted Display Omitted.

Lee, Seul-Yi [Department of Chemistry, Inha University, 253, Nam-gu, Incheon 402-751 (Korea, Republic of); Yop Rhee, Kyong [Industrial Liaison Research Institute, Department of Mechanical Engineering, College of Engineering, Kyung Hee University, 446-701 Yongin (Korea, Republic of); Nahm, Seung-Hoon [Center for New and Renewable Energy Measurement, Korea Research Institute of Standards and Science, Daejeon 305-340 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Soo-Jin, E-mail: sjpark@inha.ac.kr [Department of Chemistry, Inha University, 253, Nam-gu, Incheon 402-751 (Korea, Republic of)

2014-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

25

Use of ``rock-typing`` to characterize carbonate reservoir heterogeneity. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of the project was to apply techniques of ``rock-typing`` and quantitative formation evaluation to borehole measurements in order to identify reservoir and non-reservoir rock-types and their properties within the ``C`` zone of the Ordovician Red River carbonates in the northeast Montana and northwest North Dakota areas of the Williston Basin. Rock-typing discriminates rock units according to their pore-size distribution. Formation evaluation estimates porosities and pore fluid saturation. Rock-types were discriminated using crossplots involving three rock-typing criteria: (1) linear relationship between bulk density and porosity, (2) linear relationship between acoustic interval transit-time and porosity, and (3) linear relationship between acoustic interval transit-time and bulk density. Each rock-type was quantitatively characterized by the slopes and intercepts established for different crossplots involving the above variables, as well as porosities and fluid saturations associated with the rock-types. All the existing production was confirmed through quantitative formation evaluation. Highly porous dolomites and anhydritic dolomites contribute most of the production, and constitute the best reservoir rock-types. The results of this study can be applied in field development and in-fill drilling. Potential targets would be areas of porosity pinchouts and those areas where highly porous zones are downdip from non-porous and tight dolomites. Such areas are abundant. In order to model reservoirs for enhanced oil recovery (EOR) operations, a more localized (e.g. field scale) study, expanded to involve other rock-typing criteria, is necessary.

Ikwuakor, K.C.

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Solar-induced chemical vapor deposition of diamond-type carbon films  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An improved chemical vapor deposition method for depositing transparent continuous coatings of sp[sup 3]-bonded diamond-type carbon films, comprises: (a) providing a volatile hydrocarbon gas/H[sub 2] reactant mixture in a cold wall vacuum/chemical vapor deposition chamber containing a suitable substrate for said films, at pressure of about 1 to 50 Torr; and (b) directing a concentrated solar flux of from about 40 to about 60 watts/cm[sup 2] through said reactant mixture to produce substrate temperatures of about 750 C to about 950 C to activate deposition of the film on said substrate. 11 figs.

Pitts, J.R.; Tracy, C.E.; King, D.E.; Stanley, J.T.

1994-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

27

Solar-induced chemical vapor deposition of diamond-type carbon films  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An improved chemical vapor deposition method for depositing transparent continuous coatings of sp.sup.3 -bonded diamond-type carbon films, comprising: a) providing a volatile hydrocarbon gas/H.sub.2 reactant mixture in a cold wall vacuum/chemical vapor deposition chamber containing a suitable substrate for said films, at pressure of about 1 to 50 Torr; and b) directing a concentrated solar flux of from about 40 to about 60 watts/cm.sup.2 through said reactant mixture to produce substrate temperatures of about 750.degree. C. to about 950.degree. C. to activate deposition of the film on said substrate.

Pitts, J. Roland (Lakewood, CO); Tracy, C. Edwin (Golden, CO); King, David E. (Lakewood, CO); Stanley, James T. (Beaverton, OR)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

A NMR-Based Carbon-Type Analysis of Diesel Fuel Blends From Various Sources  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In collaboration with participants of the Coordinating Research Council (CRC) Advanced Vehicle/Fuels/Lubricants (AVFL) Committee, and project AVFL-19, the characteristics of fuels from advanced and renewable sources were compared to commercial diesel fuels. The main objective of this study was to highlight similarities and differences among the fuel types, i.e. ULSD, renewables, and alternative fuels, and among fuels within the different fuel types. This report summarizes the carbon-type analysis from 1H and 13C{1H} nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR) of 14 diesel fuel samples. The diesel fuel samples come from diverse sources and include four commercial ultra-low sulfur diesel fuels (ULSD), one gas-to-liquid diesel fuel (GTL), six renewable diesel fuels (RD), two shale oil-derived diesel fuels, and one oil sands-derived diesel fuel. Overall, the fuels examined fall into two groups. The two shale oil-derived samples and the oil-sand-derived sample closely resemble the four commercial ultra-low sulfur diesels, with SO1 and SO2 most closely matched with ULSD1, ULSD2, and ULSD4, and OS1 most closely matched with ULSD3. As might be expected, the renewable diesel fuels, with the exception of RD3, do not resemble the ULSD fuels because of their very low aromatic content, but more closely resemble the gas-to-liquid sample (GTL) in this respect. RD3 is significantly different from the other renewable diesel fuels in that the aromatic content more closely resembles the ULSD fuels. Fused-ring aromatics are readily observable in the ULSD, SO, and OS samples, as well as RD3, and are noticeably absent in the remaining RD and GTL fuels. Finally, ULSD3 differs from the other ULSD fuels by having a significantly lower aromatic carbon content and higher cycloparaffinic carbon content. In addition to providing important comparative compositional information regarding the various diesel fuels, this report also provides important information about the capabilities of NMR spectroscopy for the detailed characterization and comparison of fuels and fuel blends.

Bays, J. Timothy; King, David L.

2013-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

29

Identification of pore type and origin in a Lower Cretaceous carbonate reservoir using NMR T2 relaxation times  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

IDENTIFICATION OF PORE TYPE AND ORIGIN IN A LOWER CRETACEOUS CARBONATE RESERVOIR USING NMR T 2 RELAXATION TIMES A Thesis by DOMENICO LODOLA Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment... of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 2004 Major Subject: Geology IDENTIFICATION OF PORE TYPE AND ORIGIN IN A LOWER CRETACEOUS CARBONATE RESERVOIR USING NMR T2 RELAXATION TIMES A Thesis by DOMENICO LODOLA Submitted to Texas A&M University...

Lodola, Domenico Domenico

2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

30

Comparative Study of summer, Winter and Quinox Sky Type of India Using Daylight Coefficient Method and Cie Standard General Sky Model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Abstract:- Energy efficiency provided by daylight requires an accurate estimation of the amount of daylight entering a building. The actual daylight illuminance of a room is mainly influenced by the luminance levels and patterns of the sky in the direction of view of the window at that time. The daylight coefficient concept, which considers the changes in the luminance of the sky elements, offers a more effective way of computing indoor daylight illuminances. Recently, Kittler et al. have proposed a new range of 15 standard sky luminance distributions including the CIE (International Commission onIllumination) standard clear sky. Lately, these 15 sky luminance models have been adopted as the CIE Standard General Skies.This paper aims to find out representative CIE (International Commission on Illumination) Standard Clear Sky model(s) for three different seasons-winter solstice, equinox, and summer solstice applicable for prevailing clear sky climatic conditions in India [Roorkee]. Indian measured sky luminance distribution database is available only for Roorkee[29 0 51 ' N; 77 0 53 ' E]. To find out the best match between Indian measured sky luminance distribution and each of five CIE Standard Clear sky models, only sky component of spatial illuminance distribution over the working plane of a room was simulated by MATLABfor three different seasons. Daylight Coefficient method has been applied for the simulation using Indian sky luminance database.The simulation has been done for the room with eight different window orientations ranging from 0 0 to 315 0 with an interval of 45 0 to generate data for the entire sky vault. To find out the

Sutapa Mukherjee M. Tech

31

Energy efficiency and carbon dioxide emissions reduction opportunities in the U.S. cement industry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Table 2. Energy Consumption, Carbon Emissions Coefficients,and Carbon Emissions from Energy Consumption, and CarbonEnergy – Related Carbon Emissions Fuel Energy Use Carbon (

Martin, Nathan; Worrell, Ernst; Price, Lynn

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Carbon isotope chemostratigraphy of the Middle Riphean type section (Avzyan Formation, Southern Urals, Russia)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Urals, Russia): Signal recovery in a fold-and-thrust belt Julie K. Bartley a,, Linda C. Kah b , Julie L The Avzyan Formation of the southern Ural Mountains, Russia, forms part of the Middle Riphean (1300­1000 Ma Mesoproterozoic age. © 2006 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved. Keywords: Mesoproterozoic; Russia; Urals; Carbonate

Perfect, Ed

33

Production of exotic, short lived carbon isotopes in ISOL-type facilities  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The beam intensities of short-lived carbon isotopes at Isotope Separation On-Line (ISOL) facilities have been limited in the past for technical reasons. The production of radioactive ion beams of carbon isotopes is currently of high interest for fundamental nuclear physics research. To produce radioactive ions a target station consisting of a target in a container connected to an ion source via a transfer line is commonly used. The target is heated to vaporize the product for transport. Carbon in elementary form is a very reactive element and react strongly with hot metal surfaces. Due to the strong chemisorption interaction, in the target and ion source unit, the atoms undergo significant retention on their way from the target to the ion source. Due to this the short lived isotopes decays and are lost leading to low ion yields. A first approach to tackle these limitations consists of incorporating the carbon atoms into less reactive molecules and to use materials for the target housing and the transfer line ...

Franberg, Hanna; Köster, Ulli; Ammann, Markus

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

A new type of carbon resistance thermometer with excellent thermal contact at millikelvin temperatures  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Using a new brand of commercially available carbon resistor we built a cryogenic thermometer with an extremely good thermal contact to its thermal environment. Because of its superior thermal contact the thermometer is insensitive to low levels of spurious radio frequency heating. We calibrated our thermometer down to 5mK using a quartz tuning fork He-3 viscometer and measured its thermal resistance and thermal response time.

Samkharadze, Nodar; Csáthy, Gábor A

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Carbon-Type Analysis and Comparison of Original and Reblended FACE Diesel Fuels (FACE 2, FACE 4, and FACE 7)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes the carbon-type analysis from 1H and 13C{1H} nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR) of Fuels for Advanced Combustion Engines (FACE) diesel blends, FD-2B, FD 4B, and FD-7B, and makes comparison of the new blends with the original FACE diesel blends, FD 2A, FD 4A, and FD-7A, respectively. Generally, FD-2A and FD-2B are more similar than the A and B blends of FD-4 and FD-7. The aromatic carbon content is roughly equivalent, although the new FACE blends have decreased monoaromatic content and increased di- and tri-cycloaromatic content, as well as a higher overall aromatic content, than the original FACE blends. The aromatic components of the new FACE blends generally have a higher alkyl substitution with longer alkyl substituents. The naphthenic and paraffinic contents remained relatively consistent. Based on aliphatic methyl and methylene carbon ratios, cetane numbers for FD-2A and -2B, and FD-7A and -7B are predicted to be consistent, while the cetane number for FD-4B is predicted to be higher than FD-4A. Overall, the new FACE fuel blends are fairly consistent with the original FACE fuel blends, but there are observable differences. In addition to providing important comparative compositional information on reformulated FACE diesel blends, this report also provides important information about the capabilities of the team at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory in the use of NMR spectroscopy for the detailed characterization and comparison of fuels and fuel blends.

Bays, J. Timothy; King, David L.; O'Hagan, Molly J.

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Classification of Multiple Types of Organic Carbon Composition in Atmospheric Particles by Scanning Transmission X-Ray Microscopy Analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A scanning transmission X-ray microscope at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory is used to measure organic functional group abundance and morphology of atmospheric aerosols. We present a summary of spectra, sizes, and shapes observed in 595 particles that were collected and analyzed between 2000 and 2006. These particles ranged between 0.1 and 12 mm and represent aerosols found in a large range of geographical areas, altitudes, and times. They include samples from seven different field campaigns: PELTI, ACE-ASIA, DYCOMS II, Princeton, MILAGRO (urban), MILAGRO (C-130), and INTEX-B. At least 14 different classes of organic particles show different types of spectroscopic signatures. Different particle types are found within the same region while the same particle types are also found in different geographical domains. Particles chemically resembling black carbon, humic-like aerosols, pine ultisol, and secondary or processed aerosol have been identified from functional group abundance and comparison of spectra with those published in the literature.

Kilcoyne, Arthur L; Takahama, S.; Gilardoni, S.; Russell, L.M.; Kilcoyne, A.L.D.

2007-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

37

Measurements of thermal accommodation coefficients.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A previously-developed experimental facility has been used to determine gas-surface thermal accommodation coefficients from the pressure dependence of the heat flux between parallel plates of similar material but different surface finish. Heat flux between the plates is inferred from measurements of temperature drop between the plate surface and an adjacent temperature-controlled water bath. Thermal accommodation measurements were determined from the pressure dependence of the heat flux for a fixed plate separation. Measurements of argon and nitrogen in contact with standard machined (lathed) or polished 304 stainless steel plates are indistinguishable within experimental uncertainty. Thus, the accommodation coefficient of 304 stainless steel with nitrogen and argon is estimated to be 0.80 {+-} 0.02 and 0.87 {+-} 0.02, respectively, independent of the surface roughness within the range likely to be encountered in engineering practice. Measurements of the accommodation of helium showed a slight variation with 304 stainless steel surface roughness: 0.36 {+-} 0.02 for a standard machine finish and 0.40 {+-} 0.02 for a polished finish. Planned tests with carbon-nanotube-coated plates will be performed when 304 stainless-steel blanks have been successfully coated.

Rader, Daniel John; Castaneda, Jaime N.; Torczynski, John Robert; Grasser, Thomas W.; Trott, Wayne Merle

2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Operational Manual for Coating, SEM Lab., Inst. of Geophysics, NCU. July 20, 2007 Two types of coating material: Pt, Carbon  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

sure SPI-MODULE Carbon Coater is connected to SPI-MODULE Control) (Make sure Carbon Fiber is connected~40 amperes. 9.3 Outgassing: turn the switch to CONT, rotate VOLTAGE, heating Carbon Fiber until it become red. (This process is to remove entrapped gas in Carbon Fiber.) 9.4 Turn the switch to PULSE, push PULSE

Lin, Andrew Tien-Shun

39

Strong near-infrared carbon in the Type Ia supernova iPTF13ebh  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present near-infrared (NIR) time-series spectroscopy, as well as complementary ultraviolet (UV), optical, and NIR data, of the Type Ia supernova (SN Ia) iPTF13ebh, which was discovered within two days from the estimated time of explosion. The first NIR spectrum was taken merely 2.3 days after explosion and may be the earliest NIR spectrum yet obtained of a SN Ia. The most striking features in the spectrum are several NIR C I lines, and the C I {\\lambda}1.0693 {\\mu}m line is the strongest ever observed in a SN Ia. Interestingly, no strong optical C II counterparts were found, even though the optical spectroscopic time series began early and is densely-cadenced. Except at the very early epochs, within a few days from the time of explosion, we show that the strong NIR C I compared to the weaker optical C II appears to be general in SNe Ia. iPTF13ebh is a fast decliner with {\\Delta}m15(B) = 1.79 $\\pm$ 0.01, and its absolute magnitude obeys the linear part of the width-luminosity relation. It is therefore categ...

Hsiao, E Y; Contreras, C; Höflich, P; Sand, D; Marion, G H; Phillips, M M; Stritzinger, M; González-Gaitán, S; Mason, R E; Folatelli, G; Parent, E; Gall, C; Amanullah, R; Anupama, G C; Arcavi, I; Banerjee, D P K; Beletsky, Y; Blanc, G A; Bloom, J S; Brown, P J; Campillay, A; Cao, Y; De Cia, A; Diamond, T; Freedman, W L; Gonzalez, C; Goobar, A; Holmbo, S; Howell, D A; Johansson, J; Kasliwal, M M; Kirshner, R P; Krisciunas, K; Kulkarni, S R; Maguire, K; Milne, P A; Morrell, N; Nugent, P E; Ofek, E O; Osip, D; Palunas, P; Perley, D A; Persson, S E; Piro, A L; Rabus, M; Roth, M; Schiefelbein, J M; Srivastav, S; Sullivan, M; Suntzeff, N B; Surace, J; Wo?nia, P R; Yaron, O

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Symmetry energy coefficients for asymmetric nuclear matter  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Symmetry energy coefficients of asymmetric nuclear matter are investigated as the inverse of nuclear matter polarizabilities with two different approaches. Firstly a general calculation shows they may depend on the neutron-proton asymmetry itself. The choice of particular prescriptions for the density fluctuations lead to certain isospin (n-p asymmetry) dependences of the polarizabilities. Secondly, with Skyrme type interactions, the static limit of the dynamical polarizability is investigated corresponding to the inverse symmetry energy coefficient which assumes different values at different asymmetries (and densities and temperatures). The symmetry energy coefficient (in the isovector channel) is found to increase as n-p asymmetries increase. The spin symmetry energy coefficient is also briefly investigated.

Fábio L. Braghin

2003-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "type carbon coefficient" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Hydrogen storage and carbon dioxide capture in an iron-based sodalite-type metalorganic framework (Fe-BTT) discovered via high-throughput methods  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Hydrogen storage and carbon dioxide capture in an iron-based sodalite-type metal­organic framework the compound in methanol and heating at 135 C for 24 h under dynamic vacuum, most of the solvent is removed and open Fe2+ coordination sites. Hydrogen adsorption data collected at 77 K show a steep rise

42

su(3)k fusion coefficients  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A closed and explicit formula for all $\\su{(3)}_k$ fusion coefficients is presented which, in the limit $k \\rightarrow \\infty$, turns into a simple and compact expression for the $su(3)$ tensor product coefficients. The derivation is based on a new diagrammatic method which gives directly both tensor product and fusion coefficients.

L. Begin; P. Mathieu; M. A. Walton

1992-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

43

Nearby Supernova Factory Observations of SN 2006D: On Sporadic Carbon Signatures in Early Type Ia Supernova Spectra  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

with low volume-?lling factor. Subject headings: supernovae:general — supernovae: individual (SN 2006D)Introduction Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) make valuable

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Carbon Fiber Pilot Plant and Research Facilities  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

for the U.S. Department of Energy Presentationname Carbon Fiber Facilities Materials Carbon Fiber Research Facility Type Production Fiber Types Tow Size Tensioning Line...

45

Three Human Cell Types Respond to Multi-Walled Carbon Nanotubes and Titanium Dioxide Nanobelts with Cell-Specific Transcriptomic and Proteomic Expression Patterns.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The growing use of engineered nanoparticles (NPs) in commercial and medical applications raises the urgent need for tools that can predict NP toxicity. Global transcriptome and proteome analyses were conducted on three human cell types, exposed to two high aspect ratio NP types, to identify patterns of expression that might indicate high versus low NP toxicity. Three cell types representing the most common routes of human exposure to NPs, including macrophage-like (THP-1), small airway epithelial and intestinal (Caco-2/HT29-MTX) cells, were exposed to TiO2 nanobelts (TiO2-NB; high toxicity) and multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT; low toxicity) at low (10 µg/mL) and high (100 µg/mL) concentrations for 1 and 24 h. Unique patterns of gene and protein expressions were identified for each cell type, with no differentially expressed (p < 0.05, 1.5-fold change) genes or proteins overlapping across all three cell types. While unique to each cell type, the early response was primarily independent of NP type, showing similar expression patterns in response to both TiO2-NB and MWCNT. The early response might, therefore, indicate a general response to insult. In contrast, the 24 h response was unique to each NP type. The most significantly (p < 0.05) enriched biological processes in THP-1 cells indicated TiO2-NB regulation of pathways associated with inflammation, apoptosis, cell cycle arrest, DNA replication stress and genomic instability, while MWCNT-regulated pathways indicated increased cell proliferation, DNA repair and anti-apoptosis. These two distinct sets of biological pathways might, therefore, underlie cellular responses to high and low NP toxicity, respectively.

Tilton, Susan C.; Karin, Norman J.; Tolic, Ana; Xie, Yumei; Lai, Xianyin; Hamilton, Raymond F.; Waters, Katrina M.; Holian, Andrij; Witzmann, Frank A.; Orr, Galya

2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

Effect of the type of carrier on the properties of cobalt catalysts in the synthesis of aliphatic hydrocarbons from carbon monoxide and hydrogen  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The properties of catalysts used in the synthesis of hydrocarbons from CO and H/sub 2/ are determined to a significant degree by the carriers used in their preparation. This paper deals with a study of the effect of the type of carrier on the properties of cobalt-based catalysts in the synthesis of aliphatic hydrocarbons from CO and H/sub 2/. Co catalysts that are active in the synthesis of hydrocarbons from CO and H/sub 2/ are those on which the adsorption of H/sub 2/ exceeds 3.10/sup -2/ mmole/g Co and the adsorptin of carbon monoxide exceeds 7.10/sup -2/ mmole/g Co. Carbon monoxide and hydrogen are adsorbed on active catalysts in weakly bound forms. A mechanism is proposed for the formatin of an active center and the adsorption of carbon monoxide on Co-catalysts which includes the appearance of a partial positive charge on the cobalt atom.

Lapidus, A.L.; Jem, H.C.; Krylova, A.Y.

1983-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

47

Seebeck coefficient in organic semiconductors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Seebeck coefficient in organic semiconductors A dissertation submitted for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy Deepak Venkateshvaran Fitzwilliam College & Optoelectronics Group, Cavendish Laboratory University of Cambridge February 2014 “The end...

Venkateshvaran, Deepak

2014-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

The Kauffman Constraint Coefficients Kw  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Kauffman Constraint Coefficients Kw and their corresponding Elementals Ew are presented as solutions to the construction of the (beta)-derivative of Kauffman's Theta-function. Additionally, a new recursion relation is provided to construct the (beta)-derivative of Theta that requires only operational substitutions and summations; this algorithmically simplifies Kauffman's original technique. To demonstrate Kw, we generate the 30 Kw Coefficients from the corresponding Elementals Ew for the (9)-derivative of Theta and find that our results are in complete agreement with Kauffman's Mathematica\\texttrademark solutions. We further present a calculation of two coefficients for the (12)-derivative of Theta and invite readers to use Mathematica\\texttrademark or any other means to calculate and verify our results. Finally, we present a challenging calculation for a coefficient of the (40)-derivative of Theta; owing to the vast numbers of permutations involved, a Mathematica\\texttrademark approach may require substantial computer resources to obtain the solution in a reasonable time.

Kenneth A. Griggs

2011-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

49

E-Print Network 3.0 - affects carbon partitioning Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Polarity to Aqueous Summary: and compared with published partition coefficients (Koc) of carbon tetrachloride (CT) from aqueous solution... of the measured partition coefficients...

50

Fuel Temperature Coefficient of Reactivity  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A method for measuring the fuel temperature coefficient of reactivity in a heterogeneous nuclear reactor is presented. The method, which is used during normal operation, requires that calibrated control rods be oscillated in a special way at a high reactor power level. The value of the fuel temperature coefficient of reactivity is found from the measured flux responses to these oscillations. Application of the method in a Savannah River reactor charged with natural uranium is discussed.

Loewe, W.E.

2001-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

51

The Production Coefficients of Feeds  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

TEXAS AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION BULLETIN NO. 185 FEBRUARY, 1916 DIVISION OF CHEMISTRY The Production Coefficients of Feeds POSTOFFICE: COLLEGE STATION, BRAZOS COUNTY, TEXAS [Blank Page in Original Bulletin] TEXAS AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT... STATION pp - -- - - BULLETIN NO. 185 FEBRUARY, 1916 DIVISION OF CHEMISTRY The Production Coefficients of Feeds G. S. FRAPS, Ph. D. CHEMIST IN CHARGE; STATE CHEMIST POSTOFFICE: COLLEGE STATION, BRAZOS COUNTY, TEXAS AUSTIN, TEXAS VON BOECKMANN...

Fraps, G. S. (George Stronach)

1916-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Voluntary Carbon Confusion: A Consumer's Guide to Purchasing Carbon Offsets  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Voluntary Carbon Confusion: A Consumer's Guide to Purchasing Carbon Offsets and Renewable Energy 4 Report Introduction 5 Product Types 5 A. Carbon Offsets 5 B. Certified Emission Reductions (CERs. Voluntary Carbon Confusion: A Consumer's Guide to Purchasing Carbon Offsets and Renewable Energy

Hoffman, Andrew J.

53

New Magellanic Cloud R Coronae Borealis and DY Per type stars from the EROS-2 database: the connection between RCBs, DYPers and ordinary carbon stars  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

R Coronae Borealis stars (RCB) are a rare type of evolved carbon-rich supergiant stars that are increasingly thought to result from the merger of two white dwarfs, called the Double degenerate scenario. This scenario is also studied as a source, at higher mass, of type Ia Supernovae (SnIa) explosions. Therefore a better understanding of RCBs composition would help to constrain simulations of such events. We searched for and studied RCB stars in the EROS Magellanic Clouds database. We also extended our research to DY Per type stars (DYPers) that are expected to be cooler RCBs (T~3500 K) and much more numerous than their hotter counterparts. The light curves of ~70 millions stars have been analysed to search for the main signature of RCBs and DYPers: a large drop in luminosity. Follow-up optical spectroscopy was used to confirm each photometric candidate found. We have discovered and confirmed 6 new Magellanic Cloud RCB stars and 7 new DYPers, but also listed new candidates: 3 RCBs and 14 DYPers. We estimated a...

Tisserand, P; Marquette, J B; Afonso, C; Albert, J N; Andersen, J; Ansari, R; Aubourg, E; Bareyre, P; Beaulieu, J P; Charlot, X; Coutures, C; Ferlet, R; Fouqué, P; Glicenstein, J F; Goldman, B; Gould, A; Gros, M; De Kat, J; Lesquoy, E; Loup, C; Magneville, C; Maurice, E; Maury, A; Milsztajn, A; Moniez, M; Palanque-Delabrouille, Nathalie; Perdereau, O; Rich, J; Schwemling, P; Spiro, M; Vidal-Madjar, A

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Portable vapor diffusion coefficient meter  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An apparatus for measuring the effective vapor diffusion coefficient of a test vapor diffusing through a sample of porous media contained within a test chamber. A chemical sensor measures the time-varying concentration of vapor that has diffused a known distance through the porous media. A data processor contained within the apparatus compares the measured sensor data with analytical predictions of the response curve based on the transient diffusion equation using Fick's Law, iterating on the choice of an effective vapor diffusion coefficient until the difference between the predicted and measured curves is minimized. Optionally, a purge fluid can forced through the porous media, permitting the apparatus to also measure a gas-phase permeability. The apparatus can be made lightweight, self-powered, and portable for use in the field.

Ho, Clifford K. (Albuquerque, NM)

2007-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

55

High temperature Seebeck coefficient metrology  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present an overview of the challenges and practices of thermoelectric metrology on bulk materials at high temperature (300 to 1300 K). The Seebeck coefficient, when combined with thermal and electrical conductivity, is an essential property measurement for evaluating the potential performance of novel thermoelectric materials. However, there is some question as to which measurement technique(s) provides the most accurate determination of the Seebeck coefficient at high temperature. This has led to the implementation of nonideal practices that have further complicated the confirmation of reported high ZT materials. To ensure meaningful interlaboratory comparison of data, thermoelectric measurements must be reliable, accurate, and consistent. This article will summarize and compare the relevant measurement techniques and apparatus designs required to effectively manage uncertainty, while also providing a reference resource of previous advances in high temperature thermoelectric metrology.

Martin, J. [Materials Science and Engineering Laboratory, National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, Maryland 20899 (United States); Tritt, T. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Clemson University, Clemson, South Carolina 29634 (United States); Uher, C. [Department of Physics, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States)

2010-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

56

High temperature Seebeck coefficient metrology  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present an overview of the challenges and practices of thermoelectric metrology on bulk materials at high temperature (300 to 1300 K). The Seebeck coefficient, when combined with thermal and electrical conductivity, is an essential propertymeasurement for evaluating the potential performance of novel thermoelectricmaterials. However, there is some question as to which measurement technique(s) provides the most accurate determination of the Seebeck coefficient at high temperature. This has led to the implementation of nonideal practices that have further complicated the confirmation of reported high ZT materials. To ensure meaningful interlaboratory comparison of data, thermoelectricmeasurements must be reliable, accurate, and consistent. This article will summarize and compare the relevant measurement techniques and apparatus designs required to effectively manage uncertainty, while also providing a reference resource of previous advances in high temperature thermoelectric metrology.

Martin, J.; Tritt, T.; Uher, Ctirad

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Hydrothermal synthesis of nanocubes of sillenite type compounds for photovoltaic applications and solar energy conversion of carbon dioxide to fuels  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention relates to formation of nanocubes of sillenite type compounds, such as bismuth titanate, i.e., Bi.sub.12TiO.sub.20, nanocubes, via a hydrothermal synthesis process, with the resulting compound(s) having multifunctional properties such as being useful in solar energy conversion, environmental remediation, and/or energy storage, for example. In one embodiment, a hydrothermal method is disclosed that transforms nanoparticles of TiO.sub.2 to bismuth titanate, i.e., Bi.sub.12TiO.sub.20, nanocubes, optionally loaded with palladium nanoparticles. The method includes reacting titanium dioxide nanotubes with a bismuth salt in an acidic bath at a temperature sufficient and for a time sufficient to form bismuth titanate crystals, which are subsequently annealed to form bismuth titanate nanocubes. After annealing, the bismuth titanate nanocubes may be optionally loaded with nano-sized metal particles, e.g., nanosized palladium particles.

Subramanian, Vaidyanathan; Murugesan, Sankaran

2014-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

58

Improved thermoelectric power output from multilayered polyethylenimine doped carbon nanotube based organic composites  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

By appropriately selecting the carbon nanotube type and n-type dopant for the conduction layers in a multilayered carbon nanotube composite, the total device thermoelectric power output can be increased significantly. The particular materials chosen in this study were raw single walled carbon nanotubes for the p-type layers and polyethylenimine doped single walled carbon nanotubes for the n-type layers. The combination of these two conduction layers leads to a single thermocouple Seebeck coefficient of 96 ± 4??VK{sup ?1}, which is 6.3 times higher than that previously reported. This improved Seebeck coefficient leads to a total power output of 14.7 nW per thermocouple at the maximum temperature difference of 50?K, which is 44 times the power output per thermocouple for the previously reported results. Ultimately, these thermoelectric power output improvements help to increase the potential use of these lightweight, flexible, and durable organic multilayered carbon nanotube based thermoelectric modules in low powered electronics applications, where waste heat is available.

Hewitt, Corey A.; Montgomery, David S.; Barbalace, Ryan L.; Carlson, Rowland D.; Carroll, David L., E-mail: carroldl@wfu.edu [Center for Nanotechnology and Molecular Materials, Wake Forest University, 501 Deacon Blvd., Winston Salem, North Carolina 27105 (United States)

2014-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

59

A dynamic model for the Lagrangian stochastic dispersion coefficient  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A stochastic sub-grid model is often used to accurately represent particle dispersion in turbulent flows using large eddy simulations. Models of this type have a free parameter, the dispersion coefficient, which is not universal and is strongly grid-dependent. In the present paper, a dynamic model for the evaluation of the coefficient is proposed and validated in decaying homogeneous isotropic turbulence. The grid dependence of the static coefficient is investigated in a turbulent mixing layer and compared to the dynamic model. The dynamic model accurately predicts dispersion statistics and resolves the grid-dependence. Dispersion statistics of the dynamically calculated constant are more accurate than any static coefficient choice for a number of grid spacings. Furthermore, the dynamic model produces less numerical artefacts than a static model and exhibits smaller sensitivity in the results predicted for different particle relaxation times.

Pesmazoglou, I.; Navarro-Martinez, S., E-mail: s.navarro@imperial.ac.uk [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Imperial College, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Kempf, A. M. [Chair of Fluid Dynamics, Institute for Combustion and Gasdynamics and Center for Computational Sciences and Simulation, Universität Duisburg-Essen, Duisburg, 47048 (Germany)] [Chair of Fluid Dynamics, Institute for Combustion and Gasdynamics and Center for Computational Sciences and Simulation, Universität Duisburg-Essen, Duisburg, 47048 (Germany)

2013-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

60

Characterization of carbon fibers: coefficient of thermal expansion and microstructure  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the high resolution and the capability of evaluating both the longitudinal and transverse CTE. The orthotropy in the CTE is tested by rotating the fibers through 45° about their axis. The method is validated by testing standard tungsten filaments of known...

Kulkarni, Raghav Shrikant

2006-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "type carbon coefficient" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

CARBON-CARBON COMPOSITE ALLCOMP Carbon-Carbon Composite  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

materials. MATERIALS AND DESIRED DATA Carbon-Carbon Composites(T300 & SWB): Crush Resistance, Bend StrengthCARBON-CARBON COMPOSITE ALLCOMP Carbon-Carbon Composite · C-C supplied in two forms · T300: C strength 4340 steel, carbon-carbon composite, and Carbon-Silicon Carbide composite were tested to examine

Rollins, Andrew M.

62

Phase behavior of carbon dioxide in admixture with n-butane, n-decane, n-butylcyclohexane, and n-butylbenzene at 344 K and approximately 9600 kPa  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Bubble point pressure data were acquired at 344 K and about 9600 kPa on ternary mixtures of carbon dioxide and n-butane with paraffinic (n-decane), naphthenic (n-butylcyclohexane), and aromatic (n-butylbenzene) compounds to determine what effect differences in compound type might have on carbon dioxide-hydrocarbon miscibility of such systems. The data on carbon dioxide-n-butane-n-decane, when compared with those from the literature, showed good agreement. This suggests that the remaining data reported here are reliable. The data were regressed by using the Soave-Redlich-Kwong equation of state to determine interaction coefficient sets for phase behavior prediction. These sets of interaction coefficients were used to calculate carbon dioxide-hydrocarbon miscibility. No significant difference in miscibility was found as the heavy hydrocarbon compound was changed from paraffinic to naphthenic to aromatic type.

Cramer, H.C.; Swift, G.W.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Carbon abundances of early B-type stars in the solar vicinity. Non-LTE line-formation for C II/III/IV and self-consistent atmospheric parameters  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Precise determinations of the chemical composition in early B-type stars consitute fundamental observational constraints on stellar and galactochemical evolution. Carbon is one of the most abundant metals in the Universe but analyses in early-type stars show inconclusive results, like large discrepancies between analyses of different lines in C II, a failure to establish the C II/III ionization balance and the derivation of systematically lower abundances than from other objects. We present a comprehensive and robust C II/III/IV model for non-LTE line-formation calculations based on carefully selected atomic data. The model is calibrated with high-S/N spectra of six apparently slow-rotating early B-type dwarfs and giants, which cover a wide parameter range and are randomly distributed in the solar neighbourhood. A self-consistent quantitative spectrum analysis is performed using an extensive iteration scheme to determine stellar atmospheric parameters and to select the appropriate atomic data used for the derivation of chemical abundances. We establish the carbon ionization balance for all sample stars based on a unique set of input atomic data, achieving consistency for all modelled lines. Highly accurate atmospheric parameters and a homogeneous carbon abundance with reduced systematic errors are derived. This results in a present-day stellar carbon abundance in the solar neighbourhood, which is in good agreement with recent determinations of the solar value and with the gas-phase abundance of the Orion H II region. The homogeneous present-day carbon abundance also conforms with predictions of chemical-evolution models for the Galaxy. The present approach allows us to constrain the effects of systematic errors on fundamental parameters and abundances. (abridged)

M. F. Nieva; N. Przybilla

2007-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

64

Formation of Carbon Dwarfs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We consider the formation of dwarf carbon stars via accretion from a carbon AGB companion in light of the new 107 object sample of Downes et al. (2004). This sample is now large enough to allow good mass determination via comparison of a composite spectrum to theoretical atmospheric models. Carbon dwarfs of spectral type M are indeed main sequence M dwarfs with enhanced metallicity and carbon abundance. We also calculate the predicted abundance of both M and of F/G carbon dwarfs, and show that the latter should be falsifiable in the near future.

Charles L. Steinhardt; Dimitar D. Sasselov

2012-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

65

APPENDIX H Partition Coefficients For Strontium  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

APPENDIX H Partition Coefficients For Strontium #12;Appendix H Partition Coefficients For Strontium H.1.0 Background Two simplifying assumptions underlying the selection of strontium Kd values included in the look-up table were made. These assumptions are that the adsorption of strontium adsorption

66

APPENDIX J Partition Coefficients For Uranium  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

APPENDIX J Partition Coefficients For Uranium #12;Appendix J Partition Coefficients For Uranium J.1.0 Background The review of uranium Kd values obtained for a number of soils, crushed rock and their effects on uranium adsorption on soils are discussed below. The solution pH was also used as the basis

67

Friction Coefficient for Quarks in Supergravity Duals  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We study quarks moving in strongly-coupled plasmas that have supergravity duals. We compute the friction coefficient of strings dual to such quarks for general static supergravity backgrounds near the horizon. Our results also show that a previous conjecture on the bound has to be modified and higher friction coefficients can be achieved.

E. Antonyan

2006-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

68

APPENDIX I Partition Coefficients For Thorium  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

APPENDIX I Partition Coefficients For Thorium #12;Appendix I Partition Coefficients For Thorium of thorium Kd values for the look-up table. These assumptions were based on the findings of the literature review conducted on the geochemical processes affecting thorium sorption. The assumptions are as follows

69

Absorption Coefficients and Impedance Daniel A. Russell  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Absorption Coefficients and Impedance Daniel A. Russell Science and Mathematics Department will measure the absorption coefficients and acoustic impedance of samples of acoustic absorbing materials material is responsible for almost 50% of sound absorption inside an automobile). The reverberation time

Russell, Daniel A.

70

Continuous dependence on the coefficients for a class of non-autonomous evolutionary equations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The continuous dependence of solutions to certain (non-autonomous, partial, integro-differential-algebraic, evolutionary) equations on the coefficients is addressed. We give criteria that guarantee that convergence of the coefficients in the weak operator topology implies weak convergence of the respective solutions. We treat three examples: A homogenization problem for a Kelvin-Voigt model for elasticity, the discussion of continuous dependence of the coefficients for acoustic waves with impedance type boundary conditions and a singular perturbation problem for a mixed type equation. By means of counter examples we show optimality of the results obtained.

Marcus Waurick

2014-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

71

Prediction of diffusion coefficients in cement-based materials on the basis of migration experiments  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The chloride diffusion and migration coefficients of 15 different mortar mixtures were systematically compared. Test parameters included water/binder ratio (0.25 and 0.45), type of binder (ASTM type 1, ASTM type 3, and ASTM type 5), use of silica fume and sand volume fractions (0%, 30%, and 50%). Test results indicate the various ways of evaluating chloride transport coefficients generally yield much different values. Test results also show that the assumption of non interacting diffusing flows, used in the mathematical treatment of diffusion and migration equations, is most probably incorrect.

Delagrave, A.; Marchand, J.; Samson, E. [Univ. Laval, Ste-Foy, Quebec (Canada)] [Univ. Laval, Ste-Foy, Quebec (Canada)

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Transport coefficients of a unitarized pion gas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The latest experimental results in relativistic heavy-ion collisions show that the matter there produced requires transport coefficients because of the important collective properties found. We review the theoretical calculation of these transport coefficients in the hadron side at low temperatures by computing them in a gas composed of low energy pions. The interaction of these pions is taken from an effective chiral theory and further requiring scattering unitarity. The propagation of D and D* mesons in the thermalized pion gas is also studied in order to extract the heavy quark diffusion coefficients in the system.

Juan M. Torres-Rincon

2011-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

73

Creating materials with a desired refraction coefficient  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A method is given for creating material with a desired refraction coefficient. The method consists of embedding into a material with known refraction coefficient many small particles of size $a$. The number of particles per unit volume around any point is prescribed, the distance between neighboring particles is $O(a^{\\frac{2-\\kappa}{3}})$ as $a\\to 0$, $0<\\kappa<1$ is a fixed parameter. The total number of the embedded particle is $O(a^{\\kappa-2})$. The physical properties of the particles are described by the boundary impedance $\\zeta_m$ of the $m-th$ particle, $\\zeta_m=O(a^{-\\kappa})$ as $a\\to 0$. The refraction coefficient is the coefficient $n^2(x)$ in the wave equation $[\

A. G. Ramm

2009-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

74

Symmetries and Interaction coefficients of Kelvin waves  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We considered symmetry restriction on the interaction coefficients of Kelvin waves and demonstrated that linear in small wave vector asymptotic is not forbidden, as one can expect by naive reasoning.

Vladimir V. Lebedev; Victor S. L'vov

2010-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

75

Computation of Clebsch-Gordan and Gaunt coefficients using binomial coefficients  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Using binomial coefficients the Clebsch-Gordan and Gaunt coefficients were calculated for extremely large quantum numbers. The main advantage of this approach is directly calculating these coefficients, instead of using recursion relations. Accuracy of the results is quite high for quantum numbers l{sub 1}, and l{sub 2} up to 100. Despite direct calculation, the CPU times are found comparable with those given in the related literature. 11 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

Guseinov, I.I.; Oezmen, A.; Atav, Ue [Selcuk Univ., Kampus, Konya (Turkey)] [and others] [Selcuk Univ., Kampus, Konya (Turkey); and others

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Bunching coefficients in Echo-Enabled Harmonic Generation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Coulombian diffusion determines a dilution of bunching coefficients in Free Electron Laser seeded devices. From the mathematical point of view the effect can be modeled through a heat type equation, which can be merged with the ordinary Liouville equation, ruling the evolution of the longitudinal phase space beam distribution. We will show that the use of analytical tools like the Generalized Bessel Functions and algebraic techniques for the solution of evolution problems may provide a useful method of analysis and shine further light on the physical aspects of the underlying mechanisms.

Dattoli, G

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Carbon Capture  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Carbon Capture Pre-Combustion Post-Combustion CO2 Compression Systems Analysis Regulatory Drivers Program Plan Capture Handbook Carbon capture involves the separation of CO2 from...

78

Electron Excitation Coefficients in Helium, Neon, Oxygen and Methane at High E/N  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Swarm analysis is performed by comparing experimental and calculated transport coefficients. Comparisons are repeated until a satisfactory agreement is achieved after modifications of the cross sections. We have made an analysis of our excitation coefficient data for neon and methane by using detailed Monte Carlo simulation scheme. In this work we also present experimental electron excitation coefficients for other gases: helium, neon and oxygen. We used a drift tube technique to measure the absolute emission intensities in low current self sustained Townsend type discharges.

Nikitovic, Zeljka D. [Institute of Physics, P.O.B. 68, 11080 Belgrade (Serbia and Montenegro)

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Influence of embedded-carbon nanotubes on the thermal properties of copper matrix nanocomposites processed  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-level mix- ing, exhibits CNTs homogeneously dispersed in the Cu matrix. Measured thermal conductivity: Metal matrix composites; Nanocomposite; Carbon and graphite; Thermal conductivity Carbon nanotubes (CNTs management applications, due to their extraordinarily low coefficient of thermal expan- sion (CTE) [1

Hong, Soon Hyung

80

Fractal diffusion coefficient from dynamical zeta functions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Dynamical zeta functions provide a powerful method to analyze low dimensional dynamical systems when the underlying symbolic dynamics is under control. On the other hand even simple one dimensional maps can show an intricate structure of the grammar rules that may lead to a non smooth dependence of global observable on parameters changes. A paradigmatic example is the fractal diffusion coefficient arising in a simple piecewise linear one dimensional map of the real line. Using the Baladi-Ruelle generalization of the Milnor-Thurnston kneading determinant we provide the exact dynamical zeta function for such a map and compute the diffusion coefficient from its smallest zero.

G. Cristadoro

2005-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "type carbon coefficient" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Development of carbon-carbon composites from solvent extracted pitch  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

There are several methods used to fabricate carbon-carbon composites. One used extensively in the fabrication of aerospace components such as rocket nozzles and reentry vehicle nosetips, as well as commercial components for furnace fixturing and glass manufacturing, is the densification of a woven preform with molten pitch, and the subsequent conversion of the pitch to graphite through heat treatment. Two types of pitch are used in this process; coal tar pitch and petroleum pitch. The objective of this program was to determine if a pitch produced by the direct extraction of coal could be used as a substitute for these pitches in the fabrication of carbon-carbon composites. The program involved comparing solvent extracted pitch with currently accepted pitches and rigidizing a carbon-carbon preform with solvent extracted pitch for comparison with carbon-carbon fabricated with currently available pitch.

NONE

1996-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

82

Carbon Smackdown: Carbon Capture  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this July 9, 2010 Berkeley Lab summer lecture, Lab scientists Jeff Long of the Materials Sciences and Nancy Brown of the Environmental Energy Technologies Division discuss their efforts to fight climate change by capturing carbon from the flue gas of power plants, as well as directly from the air

Jeffrey Long

2010-07-12T23:59:59.000Z

83

Carbon Smackdown: Carbon Capture  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

In this July 9, 2010 Berkeley Lab summer lecture, Lab scientists Jeff Long of the Materials Sciences and Nancy Brown of the Environmental Energy Technologies Division discuss their efforts to fight climate change by capturing carbon from the flue gas of power plants, as well as directly from the air

Jeffrey Long

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Thermodynamics of TiO{sub x} in blast furnace-type slags  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Equilibrium studies between CaO-SiO{sub 2}-10 pct MgO-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-TiO{sub 1.5}-TiO{sub 2} slags, carbon-saturated iron, and a carbon monoxide atmosphere were performed at 1773 K to determine the activities of TiO{sub 1.5} and TiO{sub 2} in the slag. These thermodynamic parameters are required to predict the formation of titanium carbonitride in the blast furnace. In order to calculate the activity of titanium oxide, the activity coefficient of titanium in carbon-saturated iron-carbon-titanium alloys was determined by measuring the solubility of titanium in carbon-saturated iron in equilibrium with titanium carbide. The solubility and the activity coefficient of titanium obtained were 1.3 pct and 0.023 relative to 1 wt pct titanium in liquid iron or 0.0013 relative to pure solid titanium at 1773 K, respectively. Over the concentration range studied, the effect of the TiO{sub x} content on its activity coefficient is small. In the slag system studied containing 35 to 50 pct CaO, 25 to 45 pct SiO{sub 2}, 7 to 22 pct Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, and 10 pct MgO, the activity coefficients of TiO{sub 1.5} and TiO{sub 2} relative to pure solid standard states range from 2.3 to 8.8 and from 0.1 to 0.3, respectively. Using thermodynamic data obtained, the prediction of the formation of titanium carbonitride was made. Assuming hypothetical TiO{sub 2}, i.e., total titanium in the slag expressed as TiO{sub 2}, and using the values of the activity coefficients of TiO{sub 1.5} and TiO{sub 2} determined, the equilibrium distribution of titanium between blast furnace-type slags and carbon-saturated iron was computed. The value of [pct Ti]/(pct TiO{sub 2}) ranges from 0.1 to 0.2.

Morizane, Y.; Ozturk, B.; Fruehan, R.J. [Carnegie Mellon Univ., Pittsburgh, PA (United States). Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering

1999-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Triboemission and wear of hydrogenated carbon films  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

It is suggested that perfluoropolyether lubricating oil coatings applied to the carbon overcoat film of magnetic recording layers become decomposed by electrons emitted from frictional surfaces. However, no work has as yet been reported as to triboemission of electrons from frictional carbon films. This paper describes the behavior of triboemission of electrons and the friction coefficient during wear of sputtered hydrogenated carbon films (with various hydrogen contents on the glass substrate). The triboemission of electrons, together with friction coefficient, was measured in a frictional system of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} sliding on carbon films in a reduced dry air atmosphere. The worn surfaces of the carbon films were then observed using both a SEM and an AFM. The results showed that intense triboemission of electrons were observed during wear of hydrogenated carbon films. The electron emission intensity and friction coefficient transit from low to high with hydrogen content in the film. These results are discussed including physical properties of the carbon films such as internal stress and surface wettability.

Nakayama, Keiji [Mechanical Engineering Lab., Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan)

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Transport coefficients of a massive pion gas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We review or main results concerning the transport coefficients of a light meson gas, in particular we focus on the case of a massive pion gas. Leading order results according to the chiral power-counting are presented for the DC electrical conductivity, thermal conductivity, shear viscosity, and bulk viscosity. We also comment on the possible correlation between the bulk viscosity and the trace anomaly in QCD, as well as the relation between unitarity and a minimum of the quotient $\\eta/s$ near the phase transition.

D. Fernandez-Fraile; A. Gomez Nicola

2009-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

87

Outside heat transfer coefficients for atmospheric coolers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for the same conditions of operation is given by Robinson ()i. 9). TABLE I Comparison of various authors' values of outside heat transfer coefficients Btugour x square foot x F ~ ) Adams (1 ) 1001 1041 915 74, 6 1021 981 910 Clarke 945 997 841... ozeventing any recycling of the wet air. "M~4~ 1 f jc, : 1 C. X L, w 38 Cooled water fro~ the tower is centrifugally pmnoed through a 2 inch pipe to a rotameter and a I and operated control valve, Figure 8, before entering a 1 1/g inch by 5 foot...

George, David Mark

1950-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

THE 3R ANTHRACITE CLEAN COAL TECHNOLOGY Economical Conversion of Browncoal to Anthracite Type Clean Coal by Low Temperature Carbonization Pre-Treatment Process  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The pre ven tive pre-treat ment of low grade solid fu els is safer, faster, better, and less costly vs. the “end-of-the-pipe ” post treat ment so lu tions. The “3R ” (Re cy cle-Re duce-Re use) in te grated en vi ron-ment con trol tech nol ogy pro vides pre ven tive pre-treat ment of low grade solid fu els, such as brown coal and con tam i nated solid fu els to achieve high grade cleansed fu els with an thra cite and coke com-pa ra ble qual ity. The goal of the 3R tech nol ogy is to pro vide cost ef fi cient and en vi ron men tally sus-tain able so lu tions by pre ven tive pre-treat ment means for ex tended op er a tions of the solid fuel com-bus tion power plants with ca pac ity up to 300 MWe power ca pac i ties. The 3R An thra cite Clean Coal end prod uct and tech nol ogy may ad van ta geously be in te grated to the oxyfuel – oxy-fir ing, Fos ter Wheeler an thra cite arc-fired util ity type boiler and Heat Pipe Re former tech nol o gies in com bi na tion with CO2 cap ture and stor age pro grams. The 3R tech nol ogy is pat ented orig i nal so lu tion. Ad van tages. Feedstock flex i bil ity: ap pli ca tion of pre-treated multi fu els from wider fuel se lec tion and avail abil ity. Im proved burn ing ef fi ciency. Tech nol ogy flex i bil ity: ef fi cient and ad van ta geous inter-link to proven boiler tech nol o gies, such as oxyfuel and arc-fired boil ers. Near zero pol lut ants for haz ard ous-air-pol lut ants: pre ven tive sep a ra tion of halo gens and heavy met als into small vol ume streams prior uti li za tion of cleansed fu els. ?97 % or ganic sul phur re moval achieved by the 3R ther-

Edward Someus

89

THE CORRELATION COEFFICIENTS A generalized method of defining and interpreting correlation coefficients is given. Seven  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

on the ranks of the data. A quick calculation of the rank based correlation coefficients using a 0-1 "graph effect so that they will tend to be small and the net effect is that the covariance will be large. One and the covariance will fluctuate around zero. When there is negative correlation the "distance" from positive

Gideon, Rudy A.

90

Carbon Nanotubes.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

?? Carbon nanotubes have extraordinary mechanical, electrical, thermal andoptical properties. They are harder than diamond yet exible, have betterelectrical conductor than copper, but can also… (more)

Fredriksson, Tore

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Total Organic Carbon Analyzer | EMSL  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Total Organic Carbon Analyzer Total Organic Carbon Analyzer The carbon analyzer is used to analyze total carbon (TC), inorganic carbon (IC), total organic carbon (TOC), purgeable...

92

New Carbon Allotropes with Helical Chains of Complementary Chirality  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

New Carbon Allotropes with Helical Chains of Complementary Chirality Connected by Ethene-type p of carbon in R3m and I41/amd symmetry, respectively, which comprise 3-fold and 4-fold helical chains with complementary chirality. The helical carbon chains are connected by an ethene-type planar p

Wang, Wei Hua

93

JOM: Journal of the Minerals, Metals, and Materials Society, 2012, Vol. 62, Issue 10, pp. 1148-1157 Thermal expansion of carbon nanofiber reinforced multiscale polymer composites  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-1157 Thermal expansion of carbon nanofiber reinforced multiscale polymer composites Ronald Poveda, Sriniket. Keywords: Polymer matrix composite; nanocomposite; carbon nanofibers; thermal properties; coefficient materials. Therefore, understanding the trends observed in the CTE of composites with respect

Gupta, Nikhil

94

Computational Geosciences Improved Semi-Analytical Simulation of Geological Carbon Sequestration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Computational Geosciences Improved Semi-Analytical Simulation of Geological Carbon Sequestration of Geological Carbon Sequestration Article Type: Manuscript Keywords: Semi-Analytical Modeling; Iterative Methods; Geological Carbon Sequestration; Injection Site Assessment Corresponding Author: Brent Cody

Bau, Domenico A.

95

Can fusion coefficients be calculated from the depth rule ?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The depth rule is a level truncation of tensor product coefficients expected to be sufficient for the evaluation of fusion coefficients. We reformulate the depth rule in a precise way, and show how, in principle, it can be used to calculate fusion coefficients. However, we argue that the computation of the depth itself, in terms of which the constraints on tensor product coefficients is formulated, is problematic. Indeed, the elements of the basis of states convenient for calculating tensor product coefficients do not have a well-defined depth! We proceed by showing how one can calculate the depth in an `approximate' way and derive accurate lower bounds for the minimum level at which a coupling appears. It turns out that this method yields exact results for $\\widehat{su}(3)$ and constitutes an efficient and simple algorithm for computing $\\widehat{su}(3)$ fusion coefficients.

A. N. Kirillov; P. Mathieu; D. Senechal; M. Walton

1992-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

96

Construction of operator product expansion coefficients via consistency conditions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this thesis an iterative scheme for the construction of operator product expansion (OPE) coefficients is applied to determine low order coefficients in perturbation theory for a specific toy model. We use the approach to quantum field theory proposed by S. Hollands [arXiv:0802.2198], which is centered around the OPE and a number of axioms on the corresponding OPE coefficients. This framework is reviewed in the first part of the thesis. In the second part we apply an algorithm for the perturbative construction of OPE coefficients to a toy model: Euclidean $\\varphi^6$-theory in 3-dimensions. Using a recently found formulation in terms of vertex operators and a diagrammatic notation in terms of trees [arXiv:0906.5313v1], coefficients up to second order are constructed, some general features of coefficients at arbitrary order are presented and an exemplary comparison to the corresponding customary method of computation is given.

Jan Holland

2009-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

97

Carbon Fiber  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

Lee McGetrick leads ORNL's effort to produce light, durable carbon fiber at lower cost -- a key to improvements in manufacturing that will produce more fuel-efficient vehicles and other advances.

McGetrick, Lee

2014-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

98

Carbon Fiber  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Lee McGetrick leads ORNL's effort to produce light, durable carbon fiber at lower cost -- a key to improvements in manufacturing that will produce more fuel-efficient vehicles and other advances.

McGetrick, Lee

2014-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

99

Carbon Sequestration  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Carbon Sequestration- the process of capturing the CO2 released by the burning of fossil fuels and storing it deep withing the Earth, trapped by a non-porous layer of rock.

None

2013-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

100

accurate rate coefficients: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

constant and the diffusion coefficient from molecular dynamics simulations: the case of SPCE water Condensed Matter (arXiv) Summary: The effect of the applied trajectory length...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "type carbon coefficient" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Diffusion coefficient of three-dimensional Yukawa liquids  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this work is an investigation of the diffusion coefficient of the dust component in complex plasma. The computer simulation of the Yukawa liquids was made on the basis of the Langevin equation, which takes into account the influence of buffer plasma on the dust particles dynamics. The Green–Kubo relation was used to calculate the diffusion coefficient. Calculations of the diffusion coefficient for a wide range of the system parameters were performed. Using obtained numerical data, we constructed the interpolation formula for the diffusion coefficient. We also show that the interpolation formula correctly describes experimental data obtained under microgravity conditions.

Dzhumagulova, K. N.; Ramazanov, T. S.; Masheeva, R. U. [IETP, Al Farabi Kazakh National University, 71, al Farabi ave., Almaty 050040 (Kazakhstan)] [IETP, Al Farabi Kazakh National University, 71, al Farabi ave., Almaty 050040 (Kazakhstan)

2013-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

102

ar diffusion coefficient: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

diffusion is examined. Kazuhiko Seki; Saurabh Mogre; Shigeyuki Komura 2014-02-05 4 Fractal diffusion coefficient from dynamical zeta functions Nonlinear Sciences (arXiv)...

103

axial diffusion coefficient: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

diffusion is examined. Kazuhiko Seki; Saurabh Mogre; Shigeyuki Komura 2014-02-05 5 Fractal diffusion coefficient from dynamical zeta functions Nonlinear Sciences (arXiv)...

104

Simulation of miscible displacement in soils and sensitivity to the dispersion coefficient  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in the porous media to the magnitude of the dispersion coefficient in the diffusion-type dispersion equation. Three simulation models were developed. One was capable of simulating unsaturated vertical infiltration of water into a homo- geneous, isotropic... porous media. The second simulated saturated dispersion of solutes during the steady state flow of water through homogeneous, isotropic porous media. The third general dispersion simulation model combined the aforementioned two and was capable...

Smajstrla, Allen George

1973-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

FREQUENCY DEPENDENT ULTRASONIC ATTENUATION COEFFICIENT ASSESSMENT IN FRESH  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

dependency of the ultrasonic attenuation coefficient ranges from f * e to fl.3 6 and its magnitude at 1 MHz dependent attenuation coefficient must be described by a higher ordered function than a simple power fit at the Bioacoustics Research Laboratory (2). A system block diagram appears in Figure 1. CHART ATTENUATOR ALU Ml

Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, University of

106

The effective pyroelectric and thermal expansion coefficients of ferroelectric ceramics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The effective pyroelectric and thermal expansion coefficients of ferroelectric ceramics JiangYu Li an estimate on the effective pyroelectric and thermal expansion coefficients of fer- roelectric ceramics, and thermal-medical diagnostics (Cross, 1993). A ceramic made of pyroelectric grains does not necessarily

Li, Jiangyu

107

Micro- and macroscale coefficients of friction of cementitious materials  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Millions of metric tons of cementitious materials are produced, transported and used in construction each year. The ease or difficulty of handling cementitious materials is greatly influenced by the material friction properties. In the present study, the coefficients of friction of cementitious materials were measured at the microscale and macroscale. The materials tested were commercially-available Portland cement, Class C fly ash, and ground granulated blast furnace slag. At the microscale, the coefficient of friction was determined from the interaction forces between cementitious particles using an Atomic Force Microscope. At the macroscale, the coefficient of friction was determined from stresses on bulk cementitious materials under direct shear. The study indicated that the microscale coefficient of friction ranged from 0.020 to 0.059, and the macroscale coefficient of friction ranged from 0.56 to 0.75. The fly ash studied had the highest microscale coefficient of friction and the lowest macroscale coefficient of friction. -- Highlights: •Microscale (interparticle) coefficient of friction (COF) was determined with AFM. •Macroscale (bulk) COF was measured under direct shear. •Fly ash had the highest microscale COF and the lowest macroscale COF. •Portland cement against GGBFS had the lowest microscale COF. •Portland cement against Portland cement had the highest macroscale COF.

Lomboy, Gilson [Department of Civil, Construction, and Environmental Engineering, Iowa State University, Ames, IA 50011 (United States)] [Department of Civil, Construction, and Environmental Engineering, Iowa State University, Ames, IA 50011 (United States); Sundararajan, Sriram, E-mail: srirams@iastate.edu [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Iowa State University, Ames, IA 50011 (United States)] [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Iowa State University, Ames, IA 50011 (United States); Wang, Kejin [Department of Civil, Construction, and Environmental Engineering, Iowa State University, Ames, IA 50011 (United States)] [Department of Civil, Construction, and Environmental Engineering, Iowa State University, Ames, IA 50011 (United States)

2013-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

108

METHODS PAPER Addressing Practical Challenges of Low Friction Coefficient  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

sensitive to the lubrication, environment, and contact conditions, and under nominally constant conditions Tribol Trans ASME 127:673­678, 2005), ``...the measurement of friction coefficient is extremely sensitive, friction coefficients range from about 0.2 to 1 for typical material pairs under standard conditions

Sawyer, Wallace

109

Defining the coupling coefficient for electrodynamic transducers Shuo Chenga)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-density permanent magnets4 has enabled more com- pact and powerful electrodynamic transducers.5 More recentlyDefining the coupling coefficient for electrodynamic transducers Shuo Chenga) and David P. Arnold September 2013) This paper provides a simple, practical definition of the coupling coefficient

Allen, Jont

110

Long-Time Dynamics of Variable Coefficient mKdV Solitary Waves  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We study the Korteweg-de Vries-type equation dt u=-dx(dx^2 u+f(u)-B(t,x)u), where B is a small and bounded, slowly varying function and f is a nonlinearity. Many variable coefficient KdV-type equations can be rescaled into this equation. We study the long time behaviour of solutions with initial conditions close to a stable, B=0 solitary wave. We prove that for long time intervals, such solutions have the form of the solitary wave, whose centre and scale evolve according to a certain dynamical law involving the function B(t,x), plus an H^1-small fluctuation.

S. I. Dejak; B. L. G. Jonsson

2005-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

111

Normality of Monte Carlo criticality eigenfunction decomposition coefficients  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A proof is presented, which shows that after a single Monte Carlo (MC) neutron transport power method iteration without normalization, the coefficients of an eigenfunction decomposition of the fission source density are normally distributed when using analog or implicit capture MC. Using a Pearson correlation coefficient test, the proof is corroborated by results from a uniform slab reactor problem, and those results also suggest that the coefficients are normally distributed with normalization. The proof and numerical test results support the application of earlier work on the convergence of eigenfunctions under stochastic operators. Knowledge of the Gaussian shape of decomposition coefficients allows researchers to determine an appropriate level of confidence in the distribution of fission sites taken from a MC simulation. This knowledge of the shape of the probability distributions of decomposition coefficients encourages the creation of new predictive convergence diagnostics. (authors)

Toth, B. E.; Martin, W. R. [Department of Nuclear Engineering and Radiological Sciences, University of Michigan, 2355 Bonisteel Boulevard, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Griesheimer, D. P. [Bechtel Bettis, Inc., P.O. Box 79, West Mifflin, PA 15122 (United States)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Is the Gini coefficient a stable measure of galaxy structure?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Gini coefficient, a non-parametric measure of galaxy morphology, has recently taken up an important role in the automated identification of galaxy mergers. I present a critical assessment of its stability, based on a comparison of HST/ACS imaging data from the GOODS and UDF surveys. Below a certain signal-to-noise level, the Gini coefficient depends strongly on the signal-to-noise ratio, and thus becomes useless for distinguishing different galaxy morphologies. Moreover, at all signal-to-noise levels the Gini coefficient shows a strong dependence on the choice of aperture within which it is measured. Consequently, quantitative selection criteria involving the Gini coefficient, such as a selection of merger candidates, cannot always be straightforwardly applied to different datasets. I discuss whether these effects could have affected previous studies that were based on the Gini coefficient, and establish signal-to-noise limits above which measured Gini values can be considered reliable.

Thorsten Lisker

2008-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

113

Low Carbon Fuel Standards  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

gas, or even coal with carbon capture and sequestration. Afuels that facilitate carbon capture and sequestration. Forenergy and could capture and sequester carbon emissions.

Sperling, Dan; Yeh, Sonia

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Carbon supercapacitors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Carbon supercapacitors are represented as distributed RC networks with transmission line equivalent circuits. At low charge/discharge rates and low frequencies these networks approximate a simple series R{sub ESR}C circuit. The energy efficiency of the supercapacitor is limited by the voltage drop across the ESR. The pore structure of the carbon electrode defines the electrochemically active surface area which in turn establishes the volume specific capacitance of the carbon material. To date, the highest volume specific capacitance reported for a supercapacitor electrode is 220F/cm{sup 3} in aqueous H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} (10) and {approximately}60 F/cm{sup 3} in nonaqueous electrolyte (8).

Delnick, F.M.

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Carbon microtubes  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A carbon microtube comprising a hollow, substantially tubular structure having a porous wall, wherein the microtube has a diameter of from about 10 .mu.m to about 150 .mu.m, and a density of less than 20 mg/cm.sup.3. Also described is a carbon microtube, having a diameter of at least 10 .mu.m and comprising a hollow, substantially tubular structure having a porous wall, wherein the porous wall comprises a plurality of voids, said voids substantially parallel to the length of the microtube, and defined by an inner surface, an outer surface, and a shared surface separating two adjacent voids.

Peng, Huisheng (Shanghai, CN); Zhu, Yuntian Theodore (Cary, NC); Peterson, Dean E. (Los Alamos, NM); Jia, Quanxi (Los Alamos, NM)

2011-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

116

Comparison of attenuation coefficients for VVER-440 and VVER-1000 pressure vessels  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The paper summarizes the attenuation coefficient of the neutron fluence with E > 0.5 MeV through a reactor pressure vessel for vodo-vodyanoi energetichesky reactor (VVER) reactor types measured and/or calculated for mock-up experiments, as well as for operated nuclear power plant (NPP) units. The attenuation coefficient is possible to evaluate directly only by using the retro-dosimetry, based on a combination of the measured activities from the weld sample and concurrent ex-vessel measurement. The available neutron fluence attenuation coefficients (E > 0.5 MeV), calculated and measured at a mock-up experiment simulating the VVER-440-unit conditions, vary from 3.5 to 6.15. A similar situation is used for the calculations and mock-up experiment measurements for the VVER-1000 RPV, where the attenuation coefficient of the neutron fluence varies from 5.99 to 8.85. Because of the difference in calculations for the real units and the mock-up experiments, the necessity to design and perform calculation benchmarks both for VVER-440 and VVER-1000 would be meaningful if the calculation model is designed adequately to a given unit. (authors)

Marek, M.; Rataj, J.; Vandlik, S. [Reactor Physics Dept., Research Centre Rez, Husinec 130, 25068 (Czech Republic)

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

aligned carbon nanofiber: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

with a variety of cell types 12 Manganese Oxide-Doped Carbon Nanofiber as Electrode Materials for Electric Double Layer Capacitors. Open Access Theses and Dissertations Summary:...

118

aligned carbon nanofibers: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

with a variety of cell types 12 Manganese Oxide-Doped Carbon Nanofiber as Electrode Materials for Electric Double Layer Capacitors. Open Access Theses and Dissertations Summary:...

119

Comparative Study on the Sulfur Tolerance and Carbon Resistance...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

and Carbon Resistance of Supported Noble Metal Catalysts in Steam Reforming of Liquid Abstract: This work was conducted to clarify the influence of the type of metal and...

120

Carbon Storage Program  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Carbon Sequestration Partnership MSU . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Montana State University MVA . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Monitoring,...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "type carbon coefficient" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Vibration, buckling and impact of carbon nanotubes.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Natural frequencies of the double and triple-walled carbon nanotubes are determined exactly and approximately for both types. Approximate solutions are found by using Bubnov-Galerkin and… (more)

Pentaras, Demetris.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Carbon Additionality: Discussion Paper  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ahead, and identifying the carbon pools and other green house gas emissions sources and savings coveredCarbon Additionality: A review Discussion Paper Gregory Valatin November 2009 Forest Research. Voluntary Carbon Standards American Carbon Registry Forest Carbon Project Standard (ACRFCPS) 27 Carbon

123

Experimental identification of structural force coefficients in a bump-type foil bearing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

includes a rigid shaft support structure and a suspended electromagnetic shaker. Dynamic load (from 13 N to 31 N) test results show that the test foil bearing stiffness increases by as much as 50% with amplitude of dynamic load above a lightly loaded region...

Breedlove, Anthony Wayne

2009-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

124

attenuation coefficient determination: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

The emissivity-reduction coefficient ranges from about 0.44 to 1.00 within the umbra and 0.29 to 0.72 in the sunspot, and accounts for only abo... Ilonidis, Stathis;...

125

activity coefficient model: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

coefficient and viscosity of popular rigid water models: Two non polarizable ones (SPCE with 3 sites, and TIP4P2005 with 4 sites) and a polarizable one (Dang-Chang, 4...

126

activity coefficient models: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

coefficient and viscosity of popular rigid water models: Two non polarizable ones (SPCE with 3 sites, and TIP4P2005 with 4 sites) and a polarizable one (Dang-Chang, 4...

127

Commuting differential operators of rank 2 with polynomial coefficients  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this paper we study self-adjoint commuting ordinary differential operators with polynomial coefficients. These operators define commutative subalgebras of the first Weyl algebra. We find new examples of commuting operators of rank 2.

Vardan Oganesyan

2014-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

128

Measurements of molecular and thermal diffusion coefficients in ternary mixtures  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of a polymer and a colloid in a water-ethanol solvent, treating the ternary mixture as a pseudobinary; Gans et polymer in a water-ethanol solvent mixture. They reported a sign change in the Soret coefficient

Firoozabadi, Abbas

129

On the friction coefficient of straight-chain aggregates  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A methodology to calculate the friction coefficient of an aggregate in the continuum regime is proposed. The friction coefficient and the monomer shielding factors, aggregate-average or individual, are related to the molecule-aggregate collision rate that is obtained from the molecular diffusion equation with an absorbing boundary condition on the aggregate surface. Calculated friction coefficients of straight chains are in very good agreement with previous results, suggesting that the friction coefficients may be accurately calculated from the product of the collision rate and an average momentum transfer,the latter being independent of aggregate morphology. Langevin-dynamics simulations show that the diffusive motion of straight-chain aggregates may be described either by a monomer-dependent or an aggregate-average random force, if the shielding factors are appropriately chosen.

Lorenzo Isella; Yannis Drossinos

2010-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

130

apparent diffusion coefficient: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

4 sites). We exploit the dependence of the diffusion coefficient on the system size Yeh and Hummer, J. Phys. Chem. B 108, 15873 (2004) to obtain the size-independent...

131

apparent diffusion coefficients: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

4 sites). We exploit the dependence of the diffusion coefficient on the system size Yeh and Hummer, J. Phys. Chem. B 108, 15873 (2004) to obtain the size-independent...

132

Use of structure coefficients in published reports of regression analysis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for the multiplicative weights can no longer be used alone in formulating interpretations. Although many techniques have been suggested to help in these situations, structure coefficients, or the correlations between predictor variables and the synthetic variable...

Courville, Troy Gerard

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Coefficient quantization effects in block state variable digital filters  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

COEFFICIENT QUANTIZATION EFFECTS IN BLOCK STATE VARIABLE DIGITAL FILTERS A Thesis by KAB JOO LEE Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas ARM University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER... OF SCIENCE August 1991 Major Subject: Electrical Engineering COEFFICIENT QIJANTIZATIOU EFFECTS IN l3LOCI~ STATE VARIABLE DIGITAL FILTERS A Thesis hs IiAB JOO LEE Approved as to style and content by: WVilliam G. )3liss (Chair of Comnaittee) Norman C...

Lee, Kab Joo

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

134

Notes 14. Experimental identification of bearing force coefficients  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

An example of system parameter identification (Hybrid Brush Seal) Luis San Andr?s (lecturer) Thanks to Adolfo Delgado, Jos? Baker (RAs) & support from Siemens Power Generation MEEN 617 - April 2008 Structural parameters K shaft = 243 lbf/in (42...Notes 14. IDENTIFICATION OF BEARING FORCE COEFFICIENTS. ? Dr. Luis San Andr?s (2009) 1 Handout # 14 (MEEN 626) Application example Experimental identification of bearing force coefficients Experimental identification of the dynamic force...

San Andres, Luis

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Coefficient ? as a growth analysis parameter for wheat  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Subject: Agronony COEFFICIENT u AS A GROWTH ANALYSIS PARAMETER FOR WHEAT A Thesis by JEAN-FRANCOIS LEDENT Approved as to style and content by: c x& W&~ (Chairman of Committee) (Member ) (Head of Department) Member) (Member) /'L~C e (Memb er...) August 1969 ABSTRACT COEFFICIL'NT u AS A GROWTH ANALYSIS PARAMETER FOR WHEAT (August 1969) Jean-Francoi. s Ledent, Ingenieur Agronome, Universite de Louvain (Belgium) Directed by: Dr. E. C. Holt Coefficient u , a growth parameter. , was calculated...

Ledent, Jean-Francois

1969-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Experimental investigation of single carbon compounds under hydrothermal conditions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Experimental investigation of single carbon compounds under hydrothermal conditions Jeffrey S; accepted in revised form 8 September 2005 Abstract The speciation of carbon in subseafloor hydrothermal reactant during the abiotic synthesis of reduced carbon compounds via Fischer­Tropsch-type processes

Rhoads, James

137

Carbon Trading, Carbon Taxes and Social Discounting  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Carbon Trading, Carbon Taxes and Social Discounting Elisa Belfiori belf0018@umn.edu University of Minnesota Abstract This paper considers the optimal design of policies to carbon emissions in an economy, such as price or quantity controls on the net emissions of carbon, are insufficient to achieve the social

Weiblen, George D

138

Type A Accident Investigation Board Report of the July 28, 1998, Fatality and Multiple Injuries Resulting from Release of Carbon Dioxide at Building 648, Test Reactor Area, Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This report is an independent product of the Type A Accident Investigation Board appointed by Peter N. Brush, Acting Assistant Secretary for Environment, Safety and Health (EH-1).

139

Public Review Draft: A Method for Assessing Carbon Stocks, Carbon  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Public Review Draft: A Method for Assessing Carbon Stocks, Carbon Sequestration, and Greenhouse, and Zhu, Zhiliang, 2010, Public review draft; A method for assessing carbon stocks, carbon sequestration

140

Carbon-Optimal and Carbon-Neutral Supply Chains  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Li, M. Daskin. 2009. Carbon Footprint and the Management ofThe Importance of Carbon Footprint Estimation Boundaries.Carbon accounting and carbon footprint - more than just

Caro, F.; Corbett, C. J.; Tan, T.; Zuidwijk, R.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "type carbon coefficient" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

LIMB-DARKENING COEFFICIENTS FOR ECLIPSING WHITE DWARFS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present extensive calculations of linear and nonlinear limb-darkening coefficients as well as complete intensity profiles appropriate for modeling the light-curves of eclipsing white dwarfs. We compute limb-darkening coefficients in the Johnson-Kron-Cousins UBVRI photometric system as well as the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST) ugrizy system using the most up to date model atmospheres available. In all, we provide the coefficients for seven different limb-darkening laws. We describe the variations of these coefficients as a function of the atmospheric parameters, including the effects of convection at low effective temperatures. Finally, we discuss the importance of having readily available limb-darkening coefficients in the context of present and future photometric surveys like the LSST, Palomar Transient Factory, and the Panoramic Survey Telescope and Rapid Response System (Pan-STARRS). The LSST, for example, may find {approx}10{sup 5} eclipsing white dwarfs. The limb-darkening calculations presented here will be an essential part of the detailed analysis of all of these systems.

Gianninas, A.; Strickland, B. D.; Kilic, Mukremin [Homer L. Dodge Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Oklahoma, 440 W. Brooks St., Norman, OK 73019 (United States)] [Homer L. Dodge Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Oklahoma, 440 W. Brooks St., Norman, OK 73019 (United States); Bergeron, P., E-mail: alexg@nhn.ou.edu, E-mail: benstrickland@ou.edu, E-mail: kilic@ou.edu, E-mail: bergeron@astro.umontreal.ca [Departement de Physique, Universite de Montreal, C.P. 6128, Succ. Centre-Ville, Montreal, Quebec H3C 3J7 (Canada)

2013-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

142

Carbon 40 (2002) 781786 Copper and strontium adsorption by a novel carbon material  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Carbon 40 (2002) 781­786 Copper and strontium adsorption by a novel carbon material manufactured a significantly higher capacity for copper and strontium sorption than that of 21 21 a commercial material used and strontium. CAC can be produced from different types of raw materi- als, including wood, coal, fruit stones

Shawabkeh, Reyad A.

143

A novel analytical operator method to solve linear ordinary differential equations with variable coefficients  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A new analytical operator method is discussed which solves linear ordinary differential equations with regular singularities. Solutions are obtained in analytic series form and also in Mellin-Barnes-type contour integral form. Exact series solution is obtained without having to calculate series coefficients by recurrence relation.Both homogeneous and inhomogeneous equations are solved identically without having to calculate the Green's function explicitly in the case of inhomogeneous equation.Closed-form solutions are obtained for all the special functions appearing in mathematical physics. For a second-order equation both the independent solutions are obtained without invoking Wronskians, even when the indices differ by an integer.

Wrick Sengupta

2009-02-05T23:59:59.000Z

144

Structure of middle distillate fuels on the atomic carbon and hydrogen to carbon ratio at alpha position to aromatic rings  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The alkyl, naphthenic, or total carbon atoms of the functional groups at alpha position to aromatic rings and their hydrogen to carbon ratio are some of the important parameters for structural analysis of fossil fuel products. In this paper, the authors present a number of novel formula-structure relationships for precise determination of different carbon atom types at alpha position to aromatic rings and the average number of hydrogens per alpha-carbon.

Glavincevski, B.; Gulder, O.L.; Gardner, L

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Heart Rate Variability Analysis Using Threshold of Wavelet Package Coefficients  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this paper, a new efficient feature extraction method based on the adaptive threshold of wavelet package coefficients is presented. This paper especially deals with the assessment of autonomic nervous system using the background variation of the signal Heart Rate Variability HRV extracted from the wavelet package coefficients. The application of a wavelet package transform allows us to obtain a time-frequency representation of the signal, which provides better insight in the frequency distribution of the signal with time. A 6 level decomposition of HRV was achieved with db4 as mother wavelet, and the above two bands LF and HF were combined in 12 specialized frequencies sub-bands obtained in wavelet package transform. Features extracted from these coefficients can efficiently represent the characteristics of the original signal. ANOVA statistical test is used for the evaluation of proposed algorithm.

Kheder, G; Massoued, M Ben; Samet, M

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

RECOMBINATION RATE COEFFICIENTS OF Be-LIKE Si  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Recombination of Be-like Si{sup 10+} over the 0-43 eV electron-ion energy range is measured at the CRYRING electron cooler. In addition to radiative and dielectronic recombination, the recombination spectrum also shows strong contributions from trielectronic recombination. Below 100 meV, several very strong resonances associated with a spin-flip of the excited electron dominate the spectrum and also dominate the recombination in the photoionized plasma. The resonant plasma rate coefficients corrected for the experimental field ionization are in good agreement with calculated results by Gu and with AUTOSTRUCTURE calculations. All other calculations significantly underestimate the plasma rate coefficients at low temperatures.

Orban, I.; Boehm, S.; Schuch, R. [Department of Physics, Stockholm University, 10691 Stockholm (Sweden); Loch, S. D. [Department of Physics, Auburn University, Auburn, AL 36849 (United States)

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

CIP methods for hyperbolic system with variable and discontinuous coefficient  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We propose a multi-moment method for one-dimensional hyperbolic equations with smooth coefficient and piecewise constant coefficient. The method is entirely based on the backward characteristic method and uses the solution and its derivative as unknowns and cubic Hermite interpolation for each computational cell. The exact update formula for solution and its derivative is derived and used for an efficient time integration. At points of discontinuity of wave speed we define a piecewise cubic Hermite interpolation based on immersed interface method. The method is extended to the one-dimensional Maxwell's equations with variable material properties.

Ito, Kazufumi

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Heat-transfer coefficients in agitated vessels. Latent heat models  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Latent heat models were developed to calculate heat-transfer coefficients in agitated vessels for two cases: (1) heating with a condensable fluid flowing through coils and jackets; (2) vacuum reflux cooling with an overhead condenser. In either case the mathematical treatment, based on macroscopic balances, requires no iterative schemes. In addition to providing heat-transfer coefficients, the models predict flow rates of service fluid through the coils and jackets, estimate the percentage of heat transfer due to latent heat, and compute reflux rates.

Kumpinsky, E. [Ashland Chemical Co., Columbus, OH (United States)] [Ashland Chemical Co., Columbus, OH (United States)

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Connection coefficients for basic Harish-Chandra series  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Basic Harish-Chandra series are asymptotically free meromorphic solutions of the system of basic hypergeometric difference equations associated to root systems. The associated connection coefficients are explicitly computed in terms of Jacobi theta functions. We interpret the connection coefficients as the transition functions for asymptotically free meromorphic solutions of Cherednik's root system analogs of the quantum Knizhnik-Zamolodchikov equations. They thus give rise to explicit elliptic solutions of root system analogs of dynamical Yang-Baxter and reflection equations. Applications to quantum c-functions, basic hypergeometric functions, reflectionless difference operators and multivariable Baker-Akhiezer functions are discussed.

Jasper V. Stokman

2014-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

150

Lattice-structures and constructs with designed thermal expansion coefficients  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A thermal expansion-managed lattice structure having a plurality of unit cells each having flexure bearing-mounted tabs supported on a base and actuated by thermal expansion of an actuator having a thermal expansion coefficient greater than the base and arranged so that the tab is inwardly displaced into a base cavity. The flexure bearing-mounted tabs are connected to other flexure-bearing-mounted tabs of adjacent unit cells so that the adjacent unit cells are spaced from each other to accommodate thermal expansion of individual unit cells while maintaining a desired bulk thermal expansion coefficient of the lattice structure as a whole.

Spadaccini, Christopher; Hopkins, Jonathan

2014-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

151

Anomalous thermal relaxation in carbon nanoclusters Alexander V. Savin1,2,a  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. The experimental demonstrations employed two types of absorbing particles, i carbon nano- clusters produced by laser ablation and ii hollow glass carbon-coated microspheres. Being inspired by the experimental of carbon clusters, in this let- ter, we study how the thermal relaxation of the carbon nano- clusters

152

Photophysics of carbon nanotubes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This thesis reviews the recent advances made in optical studies of single-wall carbon nanotubes. Studying the electronic and vibrational properties of carbon nanotubes, we find that carbon nanotubes less than 1 nm in ...

Samsonidze, Georgii G

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

CALIFORNIA CARBON SEQUESTRATION THROUGH  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION CARBON SEQUESTRATION THROUGH CHANGES IN LAND USE IN WASHINGTON. Carbon Sequestration Through Changes in Land Use in Washington: Costs and Opportunities. California for Terrestrial Carbon Sequestration in Oregon. Report to Winrock International. #12;ii #12;iii Preface

154

Backscattering and absorption coefficients for electrons: Solutions of invariant embedding transport equations using a method of convergence  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The backscattering coefficient is a magnitude whose measurement is fundamental for the characterization of materials with techniques that make use of particle beams and particularly when performing microanalysis. In this work, we report the results of an analytic method to calculate the backscattering and absorption coefficients of electrons in similar conditions to those of electron probe microanalysis. Starting on a five level states ladder model in 3D, we deduced a set of integro-differential coupled equations of the coefficients with a method know as invariant embedding. By means of a procedure proposed by authors, called method of convergence, two types of approximate solutions for the set of equations, namely complete and simple solutions, can be obtained. Although the simple solutions were initially proposed as auxiliary forms to solve higher rank equations, they turned out to be also useful for the estimation of the aforementioned coefficients. In previous reports, we have presented results obtained with the complete solutions. In this paper, we present results obtained with the simple solutions of the coefficients, which exhibit a good degree of fit with the experimental data. Both the model and the calculation method presented here can be generalized to other techniques that make use of different sorts of particle beams.

Figueroa, C.; Brizuela, H.; Heluani, S. P. [Laboratorio de Física del Sólido, Dpto. de Física, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Tecnología, Universidad Nacional de Tucumán (Argentina)

2014-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

155

Method of making carbon-carbon composites  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process for making 2D and 3D carbon-carbon composites having a combined high crystallinity, high strength, high modulus and high thermal and electrical conductivity. High-modulus/high-strength mesophase derived carbon fibers are woven into a suitable cloth. Layers of this easily graphitizible woven cloth are infiltrated with carbon material to form green composites. The carbonized composite is then impregnated several times with pitch by covering the composite with hot pitch under pressure. The composites are given a heat treatment between each impregnant step to crack up the infiltrated carbon and allow additional pitch to enter the microstructure during the next impregnation cycle. The impregnated composites are then given a final heat treatment in the range 2500.degree. to 3100.degree. C. to fully graphitize the fibers and the matrix carbon. The composites are then infiltrated with pyrolytic carbon by chemical vapor deposition in the range 1000.degree. C. to 1300.degree. C. at a reduced. pressure.

Engle, Glen B. (16716 Martincoit Rd., Poway, CA 92064)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Carbon monoxide sensor and method of use thereof  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Carbon monoxide sensors suitable for use in hydrogen feed streams and methods of use thereof are disclosed. The sensors are palladium metal/insulator/semiconductor (Pd-MIS) sensors which may possess a gate metal layer having uniform, Type 1, or non-uniform, Type 2, film morphology. Type 1 sensors display an increased sensor response in the presence of carbon monoxide while Type 2 sensors display a decreased response to carbon monoxide. The methods and sensors disclosed herein are particularly suitable for use in proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs).

McDaniel; Anthony H. (Livermore, CA), Medlin; J. Will (Boulder, CO), Bastasz; Robert J. (Livermore, CA)

2007-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

157

Toward Zero Carbon Energy Production Toward Zero Carbon Energy Production  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

#12;Toward Zero Carbon Energy Production Toward Zero Carbon Energy Production Toward Zero Carbon Energy Production Toward Zero Carbon Energy Production Toward Zero Carbon Energy Production Toward Zero Carbon Energy Production Toward Zero Carbon Energy Production Toward Zero Carbon Energy Production Toward

Narasayya, Vivek

158

Carbon Code Requirements for voluntary carbon sequestration projects  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Woodland Carbon Code Requirements for voluntary carbon sequestration projects ® Version 1.2 July trademark 10 3. Carbon sequestration 11 3.1 Units of carbon calculation 11 3.2 Carbon baseline 11 3.3 Carbon leakage 12 3.4 Project carbon sequestration 12 3.5 Net carbon sequestration 13 4. Environmental quality 14

159

Heat-transfer coefficients in agitated vessels. Sensible heat models  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Transient models for sensible heat were developed to assess the thermal performance of agitated vessels with coils and jackets. Performance is quantified with the computation of heat-transfer coefficients by introducing vessel heating and cooling data into model equations. Of the two model categories studied, differential and macroscopic, the latter is preferred due to mathematical simplicity and lower sensitivity to experimental data variability.

Kumpinsky, E. [Ashland Chemical Co., Columbus, OH (United States). Research and Development Dept.

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Adaptive Calculation of Variable Coefficients Elliptic Differential Equations via Wavelets  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Description Generating a "good" discrete representation for continuous operators is one of the basic problemsAdaptive Calculation of Variable Coefficients Elliptic Differential Equations via Wavelets Amir rather than in the original physical space can speed up the performance of the sparse solver by a factor

Averbuch, Amir

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "type carbon coefficient" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

On signal reconstruction from absolute value of frame coefficients  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Edidinb a Siemens Corporate Research, 755 College Road East, Princeton, NJ 08540; b Department transformation from the initial Hilbert space to the space of coefficients obtained by taking the inner product frames, Further author information: Send correspondence to Radu Balan Radu Balan: E-mail: radu.balan@siemens

Casazza, Pete

162

The effective magnetoelectric coefficients of polycrystalline multiferroic composites  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, emphasizing the effects of shape, volume fraction, and orien- tation distribution of particles of both phases and coupling factors, while randomly oriented particles lead to essentially zero ME coupling, even though that the large discrepancy between theoretical calculations and experimental measurements for ME coefficients

Li, Jiangyu

163

Does the photon-diffusion coefficient depend on absorption?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Does the photon-diffusion coefficient depend on absorption? T. Durduran and A. G. Yodh Department independent of absorption, i.e., D0 v/3 s . After presentation of the general theoretical arguments underlying this assertion, Monte Carlo simulations are performed and explicitly reveal that the absorption- independent

Boas, David

164

Electromagnetic fields and transport coefficients in a hot pion gas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present recent results on finite temperature electromagnetic form factors and the electrical conductivity in a pion gas. The standard Chiral Perturbation Theory power counting needs to be modified for transport coefficients. We pay special attention to unitarity and to possible applications for dilepton and photon production.

A. Gomez Nicola; D. Fernandez-Fraile

2006-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

165

Indoor Dose Conversion Coefficients for Radon Progeny for Different  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Indoor Dose Conversion Coefficients for Radon Progeny for Different Ambient Environments K . N . Y Inhaled progeny of 222Rn (radon progeny) are the most important source of irradiation of the human-, urban-, and marine-influenced aerosols. The ASDs of attached radon progeny for all three studied ambient

Yu, K.N.

166

IDENTIFICATION OF UNDERWATER VEHICLE HYDRODYNAMIC COEFFICIENTS USING FREE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

been an ever increasing num- ber of applications for unmanned underwater vehicles (UUV) in variousIDENTIFICATION OF UNDERWATER VEHICLE HYDRODYNAMIC COEFFICIENTS USING FREE DECAY TESTS Andrew Ross the potential accuracy of these new methods. Copyright c 2004 IFAC. Keywords: Low-speed underwater vehicles

Johansen, Tor Arne

167

Lifshitz tails for the Interband Light Absorption Coefficient  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this paper we consider the Interband Light Absorption Coefficient for various models. We show that at the lower and upper edges of the spectrum the Lifshitz tails behaviour of the density of states implies similar behaviour for the ILAC at appropriate energies. The Lifshitz tails property is also exhibited at some points corresponding to the internal band edges of the density of states.

W. Kirsch; M. Krishna

2009-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

168

Low Carbon Fuel Standards  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in 1990. These many alternative-fuel initiatives failed tolow-cost, low-carbon alternative fuels would thrive. Theto introduce low-carbon alternative fuels. Former Federal

Sperling, Dan; Yeh, Sonia

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

E-Print Network 3.0 - activity coefficient Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

USING INTERSCALE PHASE RELATIONSHIPS OF COMPLEX WAVELET COEFFICIENTS... Wavelet Transform (DT- CWT) but a phase rotation is applied to the coefficients to create complex...

170

Carbon Capture (Carbon Cycle 2.0)  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

Berend Smit speaks at the Carbon Cycle 2.0 kick-off symposium Feb. 3, 2010. We emit more carbon into the atmosphere than natural processes are able to remove - an imbalance with negative consequences. Carbon Cycle 2.0 is a Berkeley Lab initiative to provide the science needed to restore this balance by integrating the Labs diverse research activities and delivering creative solutions toward a carbon-neutral energy future. http://carboncycle2.lbl.gov/

Smit, Berend

2011-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

171

Heat transfer coefficients in three phase fluidized beds  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In order to obtain a semitheoretical correlation for the heat transfer coefficients in three phase fluidized beds, Deckwer's semitheoretical correlation for the heat transfer coefficients in the bubble column, which was derived from Higbie's surface renewal theory of interphase mass transfer with the concept of isotropic turbulence, has been extended to three phase fluidized beds with the modification of the energy dissipation rate. One of the desirable characteristics of three phase fluidized beds is the uniformity of temperature in the bed. The intense longitudinal and transverse turbulent mixing in a fluidized bed may induce the uniform fields of temperature and solids concentration. For highly exothermic reactions, the uniform temperature in the bed is essential to avoid the local hot spots. In order to control the uniform temperature of three phase fluidized beds, the addition or removal of heat in the bed is required and the information on heat transfer surface and the bed is essential to designing the heat exchanger. Recently, Chiu and Ziegler (1983) determined wall-to-bed heat transfer coefficients in three phase fluidized bed (5.08 cm ID) of glass beads and cylindrical gamma alumina particles which were fluidized by cocurrent flow of air and water. Their data were correlated in terms of the modified Colburn j factor. Kato et al. (1981) measured wall-to-bed heat transfer coefficients in three phase fluidized beds of 5.2 and 12.0 cm internal diameter. Four different sizes of glass beads (0.42-2.2 mm) were fluidized by air and aqueous carboxymethyl cellulose solutions. The coefficients increased with decrease in liquid viscosity and with increase in gas and liquid velocity.

Suh, I.S.; Jin, G.T.; Kim, S.D.

1985-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Composite carbon foam electrode  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Carbon aerogels used as a binder for granularized materials, including other forms of carbon and metal additives, are cast onto carbon or metal fiber substrates to form composite carbon thin film sheets. The thin film sheets are utilized in electrochemical energy storage applications, such as electrochemical double layer capacitors (aerocapacitors), lithium based battery insertion electrodes, fuel cell electrodes, and electrocapacitive deionization electrodes. The composite carbon foam may be formed by prior known processes, but with the solid particles being added during the liquid phase of the process, i.e. prior to gelation. The other forms of carbon may include carbon microspheres, carbon powder, carbon aerogel powder or particles, graphite carbons. Metal and/or carbon fibers may be added for increased conductivity. The choice of materials and fibers will depend on the electrolyte used and the relative trade off of system resistivty and power to system energy.

Mayer, Steven T. (San Leandro, CA); Pekala, Richard W. (Pleasant Hill, CA); Kaschmitter, James L. (Pleasanton, CA)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Composite carbon foam electrode  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Carbon aerogels used as a binder for granulated materials, including other forms of carbon and metal additives, are cast onto carbon or metal fiber substrates to form composite carbon thin film sheets. The thin film sheets are utilized in electrochemical energy storage applications, such as electrochemical double layer capacitors (aerocapacitors), lithium based battery insertion electrodes, fuel cell electrodes, and electrocapacitive deionization electrodes. The composite carbon foam may be formed by prior known processes, but with the solid particles being added during the liquid phase of the process, i.e. prior to gelation. The other forms of carbon may include carbon microspheres, carbon powder, carbon aerogel powder or particles, graphite carbons. Metal and/or carbon fibers may be added for increased conductivity. The choice of materials and fibers will depend on the electrolyte used and the relative trade off of system resistivity and power to system energy. 1 fig.

Mayer, S.T.; Pekala, R.W.; Kaschmitter, J.L.

1997-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

174

Parameterization of the Extinction Coefficient in Ice and Mixed-Phase Arctic Clouds during the ISDAC Field Campaign  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report documents the history of attempts to directly measure cloud extinction, the current measurement device known as the Cloud Extinction Probe (CEP), specific problems with direct measurement of extinction coefficient, and the attempts made here to address these problems. Extinction coefficient is one of the fundamental microphysical parameters characterizing bulk properties of clouds. Knowledge of extinction coefficient is of crucial importance for radiative transfer calculations in weather prediction and climate models given that Earth's radiation budget (ERB) is modulated much by clouds. In order for a large-scale model to properly account for ERB and perturbations to it, it must ultimately be able to simulate cloud extinction coefficient well. In turn this requires adequate and simultaneous simulation of profiles of cloud water content and particle habit and size. Similarly, remote inference of cloud properties requires assumptions to be made about cloud phase and associated single-scattering properties, of which extinction coefficient is crucial. Hence, extinction coefficient plays an important role in both application and validation of methods for remote inference of cloud properties from data obtained from both satellite and surface sensors (e.g., Barker et al. 2008). While estimation of extinction coefficient within large-scale models is relatively straightforward for pure water droplets, thanks to Mie theory, mixed-phase and ice clouds still present problems. This is because of the myriad forms and sizes that crystals can achieve, each having their own unique extinction properties. For the foreseeable future, large-scale models will have to be content with diagnostic parametrization of crystal size and type. However, before they are able to provide satisfactory values needed for calculation of radiative transfer, they require the intermediate step of assigning single-scattering properties to particles. The most basic of these is extinction coefficient, yet it is rarely measured directly, and therefore verification of parametrizations is difficult. The obvious solution is to be able to measure microphysical properties and extinction at the same time and for the same volume. This is best done by in situ sampling by instruments mounted on either balloon or aircraft. The latter is the usual route and the one employed here. Yet the problem of actually measuring extinction coefficient directly for arbitrarily complicated particles still remains unsolved.

Korolev, A; Shashkov, A; Barker, H

2012-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

175

Mercury capture by distinct fly ash carbon forms  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Carbon was separated from the fly ash from a Kentucky power plant using density gradient centrifugation. Using a lithium heterolpolytungstate high-density media, relative concentrations of inertinite (up to 85% vol.), isotropic carbon (up to 79% vol.), and anisotropic carbon (up to 76% vol.) were isolated from the original fly ash. Mercury concentration was lowest in the parent fly ash (which contains non-carbon components); followed by inertinite, isotropic coke, mixed isotropic-anisotropic coke fraction, and, with the highest concentration, the anisotropic coke concentrate. The latter order corresponds to the increase in BET surface area of the fly ash carbons. Previous studies have demonstrated the capture of mercury by fly ash carbon. This study confirms prior work demonstrating the varying role of carbon types in the capture, implying that variability in the carbon content influences the amount of mercury retained on the fly ash.

Hower, J.C.; Maroto-Valer, M.M.; Taulbee, D.N.; Sakulpitakphon, T.

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

The Woodland Carbon Code  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Woodland Carbon Code While society must continue to make every effort to reduce greenhouse gas a role by removing carbon dioxide from the atmosphere. The potential of woodlands to soak up carbon to help compensate for their carbon emissions. But before investing in such projects, people want to know

177

Graphene: Materially Better Carbon  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Graphene, a single atom–thick plane of carbon atoms arranged in a honeycomb lattice, has captivated the attention of physicists, materials scientists, and engineers alike over the five years following its experimental isolation. Graphene is a fundamentally new type of electronic material whose electrons are strictly confined to a two-dimensional plane and exhibit properties akin to those of ultrarelativistic particles. Graphene's two-dimensional form suggests compatibility with conventional wafer processing technology. Extraordinary physical properties, including exceedingly high charge carrier mobility, current-carrying capacity, mechanical strength, and thermal conductivity, make it an enticing candidate for new electronic technologies both within and beyond complementary metal oxide semiconductors (CMOS). Immediate graphene applications include high-speed analog electronics and highly conductive, flexible, transparent thin films for displays and optoelectronics. Currently, much graphene research is focused on generating and tuning a bandgap and on novel device structures that exploit graphene's extraordinary electrical, optical, and mechanical properties.

Fuhrer, M. S.; Lau, C. N.; MacDonald, A. H.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Mesoporous carbon materials  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A conductive mesoporous carbon composite comprising conductive carbon nanoparticles contained within a mesoporous carbon matrix, wherein the conductive mesoporous carbon composite possesses at least a portion of mesopores having a pore size of at least 10 nm and up to 50 nm, and wherein the mesopores are either within the mesoporous carbon matrix, or are spacings delineated by surfaces of said conductive carbon nanoparticles when said conductive carbon nanoparticles are fused with each other, or both. Methods for producing the above-described composite, devices incorporating them (e.g., lithium batteries), and methods of using them, are also described.

Dai, Sheng; Fulvio, Pasquale Fernando; Mayes, Richard T.; Wang, Xiqing; Sun, Xiao-Guang; Guo, Bingkun

2014-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

179

Iterative solution of ordinary differential equations with polynomial coefficients  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ITERATIVE SOLUTION OF ORDINARY DIFFERENTIAL EQUATIONS WITH POLYNOMIAL COEFFICIENTS A Thesis By JIMMIE CHARLES RHEA FOREHAND Submitted to the Graduate College of the Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements... for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1965 Major Subject Mathematics FAMILIES OF FIFTH ORDER RUNGE-KUTTA FORMULAS A Thesis By HARRY PAUL KONEN 4 0 0 IXI v 0 Approved as to style and content by: (Chairman of Committee) (Head of Departmen...

Forehand, Jimmie Charles Rhea

1965-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

ARM: 10-minute Raman Lidar: aerosol scattering ratio and backscattering coefficient profiles, from first Ferrare algorithm  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

10-minute Raman Lidar: aerosol scattering ratio and backscattering coefficient profiles, from first Ferrare algorithm

Newsom, Rob; Goldsmith, John

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "type carbon coefficient" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

ARM: 2-minute Raman Lidar: aerosol scattering ratio and backscattering coefficient profiles, from first Ferrare algorithm  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

2-minute Raman Lidar: aerosol scattering ratio and backscattering coefficient profiles, from first Ferrare algorithm

Sivaraman, Chitra; Flynn, Connor

182

ARM: 10-second Raman Lidar: aerosol scattering ratio and backscattering coefficient profiles, from first Ferrare algorithm  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

10-second Raman Lidar: aerosol scattering ratio and backscattering coefficient profiles, from first Ferrare algorithm

Sivaraman, Chitra; Flynn, Connor

183

ARM: 1-minute Raman Lidar: aerosol scattering ratio and backscattering coefficient profiles, from first Ferrare algorithm  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

1-minute Raman Lidar: aerosol scattering ratio and backscattering coefficient profiles, from first Ferrare algorithm

Sivaraman, Chitra; Flynn, Connor

184

NUMERICAL CALCULATIONS FOR THE ASYMPTOTIC, DIFFUSION DOMINATED MASS-TRANSFER COEFFICIENT IN PACKED BED REACTORS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Calculations for the Asymptotic, Diffusion Dominated Mass-Transfer Coefficient in Packed Bed Reactors

Fedkiw, Peter

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Estimation of tracer diffusion coefficients of ions in aqueous solution  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Equations are given for estimating tracer diffusion coefficients D/sub i//sup 0/ of ions at infinite dilution in terms of limiting ionic conductances ..lambda../sub i//sup 0/. Also given are generalized Nernst-Hartley equations for binary and multicomponent diffusion coefficients D/sup 0/ and D/sub ij//sup 0/, respectively, at infinite dilution. Data, estimates, and correlations for ..lambda../sub i//sup 0/ at 25/sup 0/C and other temperatures are discussed. Estimated values of ..lambda../sub i//sup 0/ are tabulated from 0-300/sup 0/C for ions of waste isolation interest and for ions of economic interest in geothermal brines. Estimates of their tracer diffusion coefficients at infinite dilution are tabulated. A rule of thumb, good to a factor of 2, is presented. Very limited data (available only at 25/sup 0/C) indicate that D/sub i//D/sub i//sup 0/ generally declines as the concentration of salt or supporting electrolyte increases. 6 figures, 2 tables.

Miller, D.G.

1982-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

186

Ultrafast Nonlinear Spectroscopy of Semiconducting Carbon Nanotubes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

metallic nanotubes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Carbon2 Carbon Nanotubes Physical and ElectronicStructure of Carbon Nanotubes . . . . . . . . . .

Graham, Matthew Werden

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Ultrafast Nonlinear Spectroscopy of Semiconducting Carbon Nanotubes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2 Carbon Nanotubes Physical andElectronic Structure of Carbon Nanotubes . . . . . . . . . .Photophysics in Semiconducting Carbon Nanotubes . . . . .

Graham, Matthew Werden

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

The effect of an evaporation suppressant upon the liquid film oxygen transfer coefficient  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

" ? By Winkler Method 32 Oxygen Transfer Coefficient At 21'C Using Distilled Water Without "Aquasave" ? By Winkler Method 33 Oxygen Transfer Coefficient At 36'C Using Distilled Water With "Aquasave" ? By Winkler Method 34 Oxygen Transfer Coefficient At 36'C... Using Distilled Water Without "Aquasave" ? By Winkler Method 35 Oxygen Transfer Coefficient At 21'C Using Blended Water With "Aquasave" ? By D. O. Meter 37 10. Oxygen Transfer Coefficient At 21'C Using Blended Water Without "Aquasave" ? By D. 0...

Amad, Mohamad Towfic

1967-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Composites with extremal thermal expansion coefficients O. Sigmunda)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Materials Institute and Department of Civil Engineering and Operations Research, Princeton University include Kevlar, carbon fibers, plastically deformed anisotropic Invar Fe­Ni alloys ,4 and certain is a modification9 of standard methods10 see also Ref. 6 . The design domain is the periodic base cell

Torquato, Salvatore

190

Carbon fuel cells with carbon corrosion suppression  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An electrochemical cell apparatus that can operate as either a fuel cell or a battery includes a cathode compartment, an anode compartment operatively connected to the cathode compartment, and a carbon fuel cell section connected to the anode compartment and the cathode compartment. An effusion plate is operatively positioned adjacent the anode compartment or the cathode compartment. The effusion plate allows passage of carbon dioxide. Carbon dioxide exhaust channels are operatively positioned in the electrochemical cell to direct the carbon dioxide from the electrochemical cell.

Cooper, John F. (Oakland, CA)

2012-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

191

Soil metagenomics and carbon cycling  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Soil metagenomics and carbon cycling Soil metagenomics and carbon cycling Establishing a foundational understanding of the microbial and ecosystem factors that control carbon...

192

Carbon Nanostructure-Based Sensors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Control of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotube Functionalization.M. S. Characterizing carbon nanotube samples with resonancewith a Single-Walled Carbon Nanotube Capacitor. Science

Sarkar, Tapan

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

The Australian terrestrial carbon budget  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Australian terrestrial carbon budget Open Access 3 , G. P.The Australian terrestrial carbon budget Luo, C. , Mahowald,terrestrial carbon budget Richards, G. P. , Borough, C. ,

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Large Magnetization at Carbon Surfaces  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Large Magnetization at Carbon Surfaces Large Magnetization at Carbon Surfaces Print Wednesday, 31 August 2011 00:00 From organic matter to pencil lead, carbon is a versatile...

195

Asymptotic normalization coefficients for B-10->Be-9+p  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

started the Asymptotic normalization coefficient A. M. Mukhamedzhanov, H. L. Clark, C. A. Gagliardi, Y.-W Cyclotron Institute, Texas A&M University V. Burjan, J. Cejpek Institute for Nuclear Physics, Czech Academ F. Carstoi Institute of Atomic...! the 7Be(p ,g)8B radiative capture cross section at ver astrophysics. @S0556-2813~97!02109-2# PACS number~s!: 25.70.Hi, 21.10.Jx, 24.10.Ht, 25.70.B I. INTRODUCTION Despite considerable experimental and theoretical progress in determining...

Mukhamedzhanov, AM; Clark, HL; Gagliardi, Carl A.; Lui, YW; Trache, L.; Tribble, Robert E.; Xu, HM; Zhou, XG; Burjan, V.; Cejpek, J.; Kroha, V.; Carstoiu, F.

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Strong and Ductile Colossal Carbon Tubes with Walls of Rectangular Macropores Huisheng Peng,1,2,* Daoyong Chen,3  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

carbon on the outer surface of CCTs also contributes to the Raman spectra. The intensity ratio betweenStrong and Ductile Colossal Carbon Tubes with Walls of Rectangular Macropores Huisheng Peng,1; published 3 October 2008) We report a new type of carbon material--porous colossal carbon tubes. Compared

Zhu, Yuntian T.

197

Temperature effects on the electronic conductivity of single-walled carbon nanotubes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The room-temperature electronic conductivity and temperature dependence of conductivity were measured for samples of carbon nanotubes of three types: pristine; functionalized with a nitrobenzene covalent functionalization, ...

Mascaro, Mark Daniel

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Method of making carbon-carbon composites  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process for making a carbon-carbon composite having a combination of high crystallinity, high strength, high modulus and high thermal and electrical conductivity. High-modulus/high-strength mesophase derived carbon fibers are woven into a suitable cloth. Layers of this easily graphitizable woven cloth are covered with petroleum or coal tar pitch and pressed at a temperature a few degrees above the softening point of the pitch to form a green laminated composite. The green composite is restrained in a suitable fixture and heated slowly to carbonize the pitch binder. The carbonized composite is then impregnated several times with pitch by covering the composite with hot pitch under pressure. The composites are given a heat treatment between each impregnation step to crack up the infiltrated carbon and allow additional pitch to enter the microstructure during the next impregnation cycle. The impregnated composites are then given a final heat treatment in the range 2500.degree. to 3000.degree. C. to fully graphitize the fibers and the matrix carbon. The composites are then infiltrated with pyrolytic carbon by chemical vapor deposition in the range 1000.degree. to 1300.degree. C. at a reduced pressure for approximately one hundred and fifty (150) hours.

Engle, Glen B. (16716 Martincoit Rd., Poway, CA 92064)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Carbon nanotube nanoelectrode arrays  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention relates to microelectode arrays (MEAs), and more particularly to carbon nanotube nanoelectrode arrays (CNT-NEAs) for chemical and biological sensing, and methods of use. A nanoelectrode array includes a carbon nanotube material comprising an array of substantially linear carbon nanotubes each having a proximal end and a distal end, the proximal end of the carbon nanotubes are attached to a catalyst substrate material so as to form the array with a pre-determined site density, wherein the carbon nanotubes are aligned with respect to one another within the array; an electrically insulating layer on the surface of the carbon nanotube material, whereby the distal end of the carbon nanotubes extend beyond the electrically insulating layer; a second adhesive electrically insulating layer on the surface of the electrically insulating layer, whereby the distal end of the carbon nanotubes extend beyond the second adhesive electrically insulating layer; and a metal wire attached to the catalyst substrate material.

Ren, Zhifeng (Newton, MA); Lin, Yuehe (Richland, WA); Yantasee, Wassana (Richland, WA); Liu, Guodong (Fargo, ND); Lu, Fang (Burlingame, CA); Tu, Yi (Camarillo, CA)

2008-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

200

Carbon Monoxide Safety Tips  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Protect yourself and your family from the deadly effects of carbon monoxide--a colorless, odorless poisonous gas. This publication describes the warning signs of carbon monoxide exposure and includes a home safety checklist....

Shaw, Bryan W.; Garcia, Monica L.

1999-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "type carbon coefficient" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

ESM 271 Carbon Footprints and Carbon Accounting Instructor: Sangwon Suh  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 ESM 271 Carbon Footprints and Carbon Accounting Instructor: Sangwon Suh Bren hall 3422, suh Week 1: Introduction to carbon footprint and carbon account - Background: carbon awareness, major out a report or a web site about carbon footprint results of a product or of a company. Write a two

California at Santa Barbara, University of

202

Big Sky Carbon Atlas  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

(Acknowledgment to the Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Partnership (BSCSP); see home page at http://www.bigskyco2.org/)

203

Chemical reaction model for oil and gas generation from type 1 and type 2 kerogen  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A global model for the generation of oil and gas from petroleum source rocks is presented. The model consists of 13 chemical species and 10 reactions, including an alternate-pathway mechanism for kerogen pyrolysis. Reaction rate parameters and stoichiometry coefficients determined from a variety of pyrolysis data are given for both type I and type II kerogen. Use of the chemical reaction model is illustrated for typical geologic conditions.

Braun, R.L.; Burnham, A.K.

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

The aerocapacitor: A carbon aerogel based supercapacitor  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

During the 1980`s, a wide variety of carbon foams, formed by the pyrolysis of polymeric foams, were developed at several Department of Energy Laboratories. These foams are known for their monolithic structure and the ability to tailor their critical parameters (e.g. porosity, density). Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) exclusively developed a unique type of carbon foam, known as carbon aerogels. Carbon aerogels are a special class of open-cell foams with (1) homogeneous ultrafine particle and pore size, (2) very large useful surface area per unit volume, and (3) monolithic structure, that yields (4) excellent electrical conductivity due to the intimate connection of the particles. We have applied carbon aerogels to make an ``Aerocapacitor``; a high power- and energy-density electrochemical double layer capacitor (EDLC) that uses carbon aerogels as electrodes. Carbon aerogel surface areas range from about 100 to 700 m{sup 2}/cc (as measured by BET analysis), with bulk densities of 0.05 to 1.0 g/cm{sup 3} and their morphology allows stored energy to be released rapidly, resulting in high power-densities.

Mayer, S.T.; Pekala, R.W.; Kaschmitter, J.L.

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

The aerocapacitor: A carbon aerogel based supercapacitor  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

During the 1980's, a wide variety of carbon foams, formed by the pyrolysis of polymeric foams, were developed at several Department of Energy Laboratories. These foams are known for their monolithic structure and the ability to tailor their critical parameters (e.g. porosity, density). Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) exclusively developed a unique type of carbon foam, known as carbon aerogels. Carbon aerogels are a special class of open-cell foams with (1) homogeneous ultrafine particle and pore size, (2) very large useful surface area per unit volume, and (3) monolithic structure, that yields (4) excellent electrical conductivity due to the intimate connection of the particles. We have applied carbon aerogels to make an Aerocapacitor''; a high power- and energy-density electrochemical double layer capacitor (EDLC) that uses carbon aerogels as electrodes. Carbon aerogel surface areas range from about 100 to 700 m[sup 2]/cc (as measured by BET analysis), with bulk densities of 0.05 to 1.0 g/cm[sup 3] and their morphology allows stored energy to be released rapidly, resulting in high power-densities.

Mayer, S.T.; Pekala, R.W.; Kaschmitter, J.L.

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Introduction Poly(3-hydroxybutyrate), PHB, is an energy and carbon  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Introduction Poly(3-hydroxybutyrate), PHB, is an energy and carbon reserve material synthesized and methods Bacterial strains and plasmid DNA Nine wild-type E. coli strains that grew well in a defined

207

Intro to Carbon Sequestration  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

NETL's Carbon Sequestration Program is helping to develop technologies to capture, purify, and store carbon dioxide (CO2) in order to reduce greenhouse gas emissions without adversely influencing energy use or hindering economic growth. Carbon sequestration technologies capture and store CO2 that would otherwise reside in the atmosphere for long periods of time.

None

2010-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

208

Intro to Carbon Sequestration  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

NETL's Carbon Sequestration Program is helping to develop technologies to capture, purify, and store carbon dioxide (CO2) in order to reduce greenhouse gas emissions without adversely influencing energy use or hindering economic growth. Carbon sequestration technologies capture and store CO2 that would otherwise reside in the atmosphere for long periods of time.

2008-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

209

Calculation of combined diffusion coefficients in SF{sub 6}-Cu mixtures  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Diffusion coefficients play an important role in the description of the transport of metal vapours in gas mixtures. This paper is devoted to the calculation of four combined diffusion coefficients, namely, the combined ordinary diffusion coefficient, combined electric field diffusion coefficient, combined temperature diffusion coefficient, and combined pressure diffusion coefficient in SF{sub 6}-Cu mixtures at temperatures up to 30?000?K. These four coefficients describe diffusion due to composition gradients, applied electric fields, temperature gradients, and pressure gradients, respectively. The influence of copper fluoride and sulfide species on the diffusion coefficients is shown to be negligible. The effect of copper proportion and gas pressures on these diffusion coefficients is investigated. It is shown that increasing the proportion of copper generally increases the magnitude of the four diffusion coefficients, except for copper mole fractions of 90% or more. It is further found that increasing the pressure reduces the magnitude of the coefficients, except for the combined temperature diffusion coefficient, and shifts the maximum of all four coefficients towards higher temperatures. The results presented in this paper can be applied to the simulation of high-voltage circuit breaker arcs.

Zhong, Linlin; Wang, Xiaohua, E-mail: xhw@mail.xjtu.edu.cn; Rong, Mingzhe, E-mail: mzrong@mail.xjtu.edu.cn; Wu, Yi [State Key Laboratory of Electrical Insulation and Power Equipment, School of Electrical Engineering, Xi'an Jiaotong University, Xi'an 710049 (China); Murphy, Anthony B. [CSIRO Manufacturing Flagship, P.O. Box 218, Lindfield, NSW 2070 (Australia)

2014-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

210

Equation calculates activated carbon's capacity for adsorbing pollutants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Adsorption on activated carbon is an effective method for removing volatile organic compound (VOC) contaminants from gases. A new, simple equation has been developed for calculating activated carbon's adsorption capacity as a function of the VOC concentration in the gas. The correlation shows good agreement with experimental results. Results from the equation are applicable for conditions commonly encountered in air pollution control techniques (25 C, 1 atm). The only input parameters needed are VOC concentrations and a table of correlation coefficients for 292 C[sub 8]-C[sub 14] compounds. The table is suitable for rapid engineering usage with a personal computer or hand calculator.

Yaws, C.L.; Bu, L.; Nijhawan, S. (Lamar Univ., Beaumont, TX (United States))

1995-02-13T23:59:59.000Z

211

SmallholderSmallholder CarbonCarbon AgroforestryAgroforestry && Carbon for Poverty ReductionCarbon for Poverty Reduction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SmallholderSmallholder CarbonCarbon AgroforestryAgroforestry && Carbon for Poverty ReductionCarbon for Poverty Reduction Roundtable (CAPR)Roundtable (CAPR) GEO Forest Monitoring SymposiumGEO Forest Monitoring)Amazon Initiative Consortium (IA) #12;Carbon for Poverty Reduction Roundtable (CAPR)Carbon for Poverty Reduction

212

Optical Sensing of Ecosystem Carbon Fluxes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Solar Induced Fluorescence (peaks at 690 and 735 nm) #12;GEP = ! fAPAR PARin Where: GEP is the gross and absorbed carbon - In existing models ! is assigned a maximum value based on cover type and downregulated Calibration panel AMSPEC FUSION #12;SK-Old Aspen Seasonality: NDVI, EVI, GEP Data from T. Hilker, T.A. Black

213

Condensation coefficients in plasma sputtering Pascal Brault , Anne-Lise Thomann, Jean-Philippe  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Condensation coefficients in plasma sputtering deposition Pascal Brault §, Anne-Lise Thomann, Jean Backscattering Spectrom- etry are combined to determine condensation coefficients for plasma sputtering depo- sition. The method is applied for palladium deposition onto various substrates and condensation

Boyer, Edmond

214

Environmental Radioactivity 56 (2001) 327340 Radon progeny dose conversion coefficients for  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Journal of Environmental Radioactivity 56 (2001) 327­340 Radon progeny dose conversion coefficients; Dose conversion coefficients; Scaling factors; Radon progeny 1. Introduction Epidemiological studies cancer associated with exposure to radon progeny (Lubin, 1988). More recently, Lubin et al (1994

Yu, K.N.

215

Carbon in detonations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We review three principal results from a five year study of carbon and its properties in detonations and discuss the implications of these results to the behavior of explosives. We first present a new determination of the carbon melt line from release wave velocity measurements in the shocked state. We then outline a colloidal theory of carbon clustering which from diffusion limited coagulation predicts a slow energy release rate for the carbon chemistry. Finally, we show the results from the examination of recovered soot. Here we see support for the colloid theory and find the diamond phase of carbon. The main theme of this paper is that the carbon in detonation products is in the form of a colloidal suspension of carbon clusters which grow through diffusion limited collisions. Even the final state is not bulk graphite or diamond, but is a collection of small, less than 100 /angstrom/A, diamond and graphitic clusters. 23 refs., 4 figs.

Johnson, J.D.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

The Coefficient of Thermal Expansion in PBX 9502  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary)morphinanInformation InInformation In closing, an National Carbon Capture Center at the PowerCentennialLA-14003

217

Impact of logistical choices on freight transport carbon efficiency Rizet, Christophe; Cruz, Cecilia; De Lapparent Matthieu  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

variability of carbon intensity per shipment: from less than 0.01 to more than 100 kgCO2/tkm. We then analyse this carbon intensity per shipment according to two types of shipment characteristics: the shippers shipped to the same client). Using a log log model, where carbon intensity is a function

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

218

Researchers develop bistable nano switch Carbon nanotubes (CNT) have been under intense study by scientists all  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Researchers develop bistable nano switch Carbon nanotubes (CNT) have been under intense study for nanoelectromechanical systems (NEMS). A type of one-dimensional structure with high-aspect ratio, carbon nanotubes have properties. Now scientists from Northwestern University have demonstrated a novel carbon nanotube

Espinosa, Horacio D.

219

Carbon offsets as a cost containment instrument : a case study of reducing emissions from deforestation and forest degradation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Carbon offset is one type of flexibility mechanism in greenhouse gas emission trading schemes that helps nations meet their emission commitments at lower costs. Carbon offsets take advantage of lower abatement cost ...

Kim, Jieun, S.M. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

CORRELATING EVAPORATION HEAT TRANSFER COEFFICIENT OF REFRIGERANT R-134a IN A PLATE HEAT EXCHANGER  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 CORRELATING EVAPORATION HEAT TRANSFER COEFFICIENT OF REFRIGERANT R-134a IN A PLATE HEAT EXCHANGER for evaporation heat transfer coefficient of refrigerant R-134a flowing in a plate heat exchanger. Correlation schemes proposed by Yan and Lin (1999b) for modeling the heat transfer coefficient in both a single- phase

Kandlikar, Satish

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "type carbon coefficient" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Collective friction coefficients in the relaxation time approximation F. A. Ivanyuk  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Collective friction coefficients in the relaxation time approximation F. A. Ivanyuk Institute components of the friction coefficient for various single-particle potentials and have found that the nondiagonal component of the friction coefficient depends generally on the diffuseness of the potential

Pomorski, Krzysztof

222

Cyclodextrin Cuprate Sandwich-Type Complexes Abdulaziz A. Bagabas,*,,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

porosity of these new complexes. Carbon dioxide (CO2) adsorption studies show that the extended structure, obtained upon crystallization of the Rb+ -based sandwich-type dimers, has the highest CO2 sequestration

223

Carbon dioxide sensor  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention generally relates to carbon dioxide (CO.sub.2) sensors. In one embodiment, the present invention relates to a carbon dioxide (CO.sub.2) sensor that incorporates lithium phosphate (Li.sub.3PO.sub.4) as an electrolyte and sensing electrode comprising a combination of lithium carbonate (Li.sub.2CO.sub.3) and barium carbonate (BaCO.sub.3). In another embodiment, the present invention relates to a carbon dioxide (CO.sub.2) sensor has a reduced sensitivity to humidity due to a sensing electrode with a layered structure of lithium carbonate and barium carbonate. In still another embodiment, the present invention relates to a method of producing carbon dioxide (CO.sub.2) sensors having lithium phosphate (Li.sub.3PO.sub.4) as an electrolyte and sensing electrode comprising a combination of lithium carbonate (Li.sub.2CO.sub.3) and barium carbonate (BaCO.sub.3).

Dutta, Prabir K. (Worthington, OH); Lee, Inhee (Columbus, OH); Akbar, Sheikh A. (Hilliard, OH)

2011-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

224

DEVELOPMENT OF CONTINUOUS SOLVENT EXTRACTION PROCESSES FOR COAL DERIVED CARBON PRODUCTS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this DOE-funded effort is to develop continuous processes for solvent extraction of coal for the production of carbon products. These carbon products include materials used in metals smelting, especially in the aluminum and steel industries, as well as porous carbon structural material referred to as ''carbon foam'' and carbon fibers. There are a number of parameters which are important for the production of acceptable cokes, including purity, structure, density, electrical resistivity, thermal conductivity etc. From the standpoint of a manufacturer of graphite electrodes such as GrafTech, one of the most important parameters is coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE). Because GrafTech material is usually fully graphitized (i.e., heat treated at 3100 C), very high purity is automatically achieved. The degree of graphitization controls properties such as CTE, electrical resistivity, thermal conductivity, and density. Thus it is usually possible to correlate these properties using a single parameter. CTE has proven to be a useful index for the quality of coke. Pure graphite actually has a slightly negative coefficient of thermal expansion, whereas more disordered carbon has a positive coefficient.

Elliot B. Kennel; Philip L. Biedler; Chong Chen; Dady Dadyburjor; Liviu Magean; Peter G. Stansberry; Alfred H. Stiller; John W. Zondlo

2005-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

225

The theoretical ultimate magnetoelectric coefficients of magnetoelectric composites by optimization design  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper investigates what is the largest magnetoelectric (ME) coefficient of ME composites, and how to realize it. From the standpoint of energy conservation, a theoretical analysis is carried out on an imaginary lever structure consisting of a magnetostrictive phase, a piezoelectric phase, and a rigid lever. This structure is a generalization of various composite layouts for optimization on ME effect. The predicted theoretical ultimate ME coefficient plays a similar role as the efficiency of ideal heat engine in thermodynamics, and is used to evaluate the existing typical ME layouts, such as the parallel sandwiched layout and the serial layout. These two typical layouts exhibit ME coefficient much lower than the theoretical largest values, because in the general analysis the stress amplification ratio and the volume ratio can be optimized independently and freely, but in typical layouts they are dependent or fixed. To overcome this shortcoming and achieve the theoretical largest ME coefficient, a new design is presented. In addition, it is found that the most commonly used electric field ME coefficient can be designed to be infinitely large. We doubt the validity of this coefficient as a reasonable ME effect index and consider three more ME coefficients, namely the electric charge ME coefficient, the voltage ME coefficient, and the static electric energy ME coefficient. We note that the theoretical ultimate value of the static electric energy ME coefficient is finite and might be a more proper measure of ME effect.

Wang, H.-L.; Liu, B., E-mail: liubin@tsinghua.edu.cn [AML, CNMM, Department of Engineering Mechanics, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China)

2014-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

226

Carbon RRLs Carbon RRLs towards Ultra-compact HII Regions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Carbon RRLs Carbon RRLs towards Ultra-compact HII Regions Dana S. Balser D. Anish Roshi (Raman (Agnes Scott College) #12;Carbon RRLs Carbon Radio Recombination Lines (RRLs) NGC 2024 (Orion B) IC 1795 (W3) Palmer et al. (1967) #12;Carbon RRLs Photodissociation Regions (PDRs) Hollenbach & Tielens (1997

Balser, Dana S.

227

Would Border Carbon Adjustments prevent carbon leakage and heavy industry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

No 52-2013 Would Border Carbon Adjustments prevent carbon leakage and heavy industry halshs-00870689,version1-7Oct2013 #12;Would Border Carbon Adjustments prevent carbon leakage and heavy The efficiency of unilateral climate policies may be hampered by carbon leakage and competitiveness losses

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

228

Cumulative Carbon and Just Allocation of the Global Carbon Commons  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Cumulative Carbon and Just Allocation of the Global Carbon Commons R.T. Pierrehumbert1 on climate can be characterized by a single statistic, called Cumulative Carbon. This is the aggregate amount of carbon emitted in the form of carbon dioxide by activities such as fossil fuel burning and deforestation

Pierrehumbert, Raymond

229

Carbon Sequestration via Mineral Carbonation: Overview and Assessment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Carbon Sequestration via Mineral Carbonation: Overview and Assessment 14 March 2002 Howard Herzog overview and assessment of carbon sequestration by mineral carbonation (referred to as "mineral sequestration R&D. The first is that carbonates have a lower energy state than CO2. Therefore, at least

230

Mesoporous carbon materials  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The invention is directed to a method for fabricating a mesoporous carbon material, the method comprising subjecting a precursor composition to a curing step followed by a carbonization step, the precursor composition comprising: (i) a templating component comprised of a block copolymer, (ii) a phenolic compound or material, (iii) a crosslinkable aldehyde component, and (iv) at least 0.5 M concentration of a strong acid having a pKa of or less than -2, wherein said carbonization step comprises heating the precursor composition at a carbonizing temperature for sufficient time to convert the precursor composition to a mesoporous carbon material. The invention is also directed to a mesoporous carbon material having an improved thermal stability, preferably produced according to the above method.

Dai, Sheng; Wang, Xiqing

2013-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

231

Mesoporous carbon materials  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The invention is directed to a method for fabricating a mesoporous carbon material, the method comprising subjecting a precursor composition to a curing step followed by a carbonization step, the precursor composition comprising: (i) a templating component comprised of a block copolymer, (ii) a phenolic compound or material, (iii) a crosslinkable aldehyde component, and (iv) at least 0.5 M concentration of a strong acid having a pKa of or less than -2, wherein said carbonization step comprises heating the precursor composition at a carbonizing temperature for sufficient time to convert the precursor composition to a mesoporous carbon material. The invention is also directed to a mesoporous carbon material having an improved thermal stability, preferably produced according to the above method.

Dai, Sheng (Knoxville, TN); Wang, Xiqing (Oak Ridge, TN)

2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

232

A new carbon-13 method for determining aromatic, naphthenic and paraffinic carbon  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The determination of the relative percentages of aromatic, naphthenic and paraffinic carbon in samples of natural origin is important for many petroleum related studies including processing, geological studies, and certain product specifications. The normal method is the n-d-M method which requires the measurement of refractive index, density and molecular weight and a ternary correlation diagram to obtain the relative carbon percentages. It is difficult or inconvenient to make n-d-M measurements of very heavy products and the presence of significant amounts of polar materials makes n-d-M results inaccurate. The average molecular parameters determinable by a number of NMR techniques are directly or indirectly related to the percentage of various carbon types present in the mixture. Unfortunately, all the standard techniques we have examined have some built-in assumption which does not allow the accurate calculation of relative carbon percentages. For example, any proton technique applicable to aromatic fractions will give potentially low values for naphthenic carbon because naphthenic carbon is normally determined from the ..beta..-CH/sub 2/ region of tetralin-type structures (1.65-1.9 ppm). This is a very specific kind of naphthenic structure and to the extent that more than one saturate ring is asymmetrically condensed to the aromatic ring or that the saturate rings are not directly condensed to the aromatic rings, the method will fail.

Galya, L.G.; Young, D.C.

1983-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Accounting for forest carbon pool dynamics in product carbon footprints: Challenges and opportunities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Modification and loss of forests due to natural and anthropogenic disturbance contribute an estimated 20% of annual greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions worldwide. Although forest carbon pool modeling rarely suggests a 'carbon neutral' flux profile, the life cycle assessment community and associated product carbon footprint protocols have struggled to account for the GHG emissions associated with forestry, specifically, and land use generally. Principally, this is due to underdeveloped linkages between life cycle inventory (LCI) modeling for wood and forest carbon modeling for a full range of forest types and harvest practices, as well as a lack of transparency in globalized forest supply chains. In this paper, through a comparative study of U.S. and Chinese coated freesheet paper, we develop the initial foundations for a methodology that rescales IPCC methods from the national to the product level, with reference to the approaches in three international product carbon footprint protocols. Due to differences in geographic origin of the wood fiber, the results for two scenarios are highly divergent. This suggests that both wood LCI models and the protocols need further development to capture the range of spatial and temporal dimensions for supply chains (and the associated land use change and modification) for specific product systems. The paper concludes by outlining opportunities to measure and reduce uncertainty in accounting for net emissions of biogenic carbon from forestland, where timber is harvested for consumer products. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Typical life cycle assessment practice for consumer products often excludes significant land use change emissions when estimating carbon footprints. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The article provides a methodology to rescale IPCC guidelines for product-level carbon footprints. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Life cycle inventories and product carbon footprint protocols need more comprehensive land use-related accounting. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Interdisciplinary collaboration linking the LCA and forest carbon modeling communities is necessary.

Newell, Joshua P., E-mail: jpnewell@umich.edu [School of Natural Resources and Environment, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor (United States); Vos, Robert O., E-mail: vos@usc.edu [Spatial Sciences Institute, University of Southern California (United States)

2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

234

The shielding effect of wild type iron reducing bacterial flora on the corrosion of linepipe steel  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The shielding effect of wild type iron reducing bacterial flora on the corrosion of linepipe steel (iron reducing bacteria (IRB)) on API 5L Ã?52 carbon steel coupons was investigated. A wild type of IRB

235

SOLAR MAGNETIC FIELD SIGNATURES IN HELIOSEISMIC SPLITTING COEFFICIENTS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Normal modes of oscillation of the Sun are useful probes of the solar interior. In this work, we use the even-order splitting coefficients to study the evolution of magnetic fields in the convection zone over solar cycle 23, assuming that the frequency splitting is only due to rotation and a large-scale magnetic field. We find that the data are best fit by a combination of a poloidal field and a double-peaked near-surface toroidal field. The toroidal fields are centered at r {sub 0} = 0.999 R {sub sun} and r = 0.996 R {sub sun} and are confined to the near-surface layers. The poloidal field is a dipole field. The peak strength of the poloidal field is 124 +- 17 G. The toroidal field peaks at 380 +- 30 G and 1.4 +- 0.2 kG for the shallower and deeper fields, respectively. The field strengths are highly correlated with surface activity. The toroidal field strength shows a hysteresis-like effect when compared to the global 10.7 cm radio flux. The poloidal field strength shows evidence of saturation at high activity.

Baldner, Charles S.; Basu, Sarbani [Department of Astronomy, Yale University, P.O. Box 208101, New Haven, CT, 06520-8101 (United States); Antia, H. M. [Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Homi Bhabha Road, Mumbai 400005 (India); Larson, Timothy P., E-mail: charles.baldner@yale.ed [Hansen Experimental Physics Laboratory, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305-4085 (United States)

2009-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

236

Diffusion coefficient and radial gradient of galactic cosmic rays  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present the temporal changes of the diffusion coefficient K of galactic cosmic rays (GCRs) at the Earth orbit calculated based on the experimental data using two different methods. The first approach is based on the Parker convection-diffusion approximation of GCR modulation [1]: i.e. K~Vr=dI where dI is the variation of the GCR intensity measured by neutron monitors (NM),V is the solar wind velocity and r is the radial distance. The second approach is based on the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) data. It was suggested that parallel mean free path can be expressed in terms of B as in [2]-[4]. Using data of the product of the parallel mean free path and radial gradient of GCR calculated based on the GCR anisotropy data (Ahluwalia et al., this conference ICRC 2013, poster ID: 487 [5]), we estimate the temporal changes of the radial gradient of GCR at the Earth orbit. We show that the radial gradient exhibits a strong solar cycle dependence (11-year variation) and a weak solar magnetic cycle dependence (2...

Modzelewska, Renata

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Reinforced Carbon Nanotubes.  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention relates generally to reinforced carbon nanotubes, and more particularly to reinforced carbon nanotubes having a plurality of microparticulate carbide or oxide materials formed substantially on the surface of such reinforced carbon nanotubes composite materials. In particular, the present invention provides reinforced carbon nanotubes (CNTs) having a plurality of boron carbide nanolumps formed substantially on a surface of the reinforced CNTs that provide a reinforcing effect on CNTs, enabling their use as effective reinforcing fillers for matrix materials to give high-strength composites. The present invention also provides methods for producing such carbide reinforced CNTs.

Ren, Zhifen (Newton, MA); Wen, Jian Guo (Newton, MA); Lao, Jing Y. (Chestnut Hill, MA); Li, Wenzhi (Brookline, MA)

2005-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

238

Carbon Fiber SMC  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

110,000 ACC capital) in 2008 * 54,000 for 2009 Partners * Continental Structural Plastic (CSP), a Tier One supplier * Discounted compounding and molding * Zoltek, a carbon...

239

Activated Carbon Injection  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

History of the Clean Air Act and how the injection of carbon into a coal power plant's flu smoke can reduce the amount of mercury in the smoke.

None

2014-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

240

Activated Carbon Injection  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

History of the Clean Air Act and how the injection of carbon into a coal power plant's flu smoke can reduce the amount of mercury in the smoke.

None

2014-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "type carbon coefficient" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Liquid-solid phase diagrams of binary carbonates for lithium batteries  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The authors present the liquid-solid phase diagrams that they mapped with a differential scanning calorimeter (DSC) for the following seven binary carbonates: dimethyl carbonate (DMC)-ethylene carbonate (EC), ethyl methyl carbonate (EMC)-EC, EMC-propylene carbonate (PC), EMC-dimethyl ethylene carbonate (DMEC), EMC-isobutylene carbonate (iBC), PC-EC, and EMC-DMC. Many of these are among the most frequently used solvent systems for making the nonaqueous electrolytes for lithium batteries. The phase diagrams of these carbonate systems are all of the simple eutectic type but with vastly different particular features. Comparison of these phase diagrams shows that to expand the liquid region of a carbonate system toward low temperature, the two components of the system need to have comparable melting temperatures and compatible molecular structures. These results are consistent with thermodynamic considerations and have significant practical implications.

Ding, M.S.; Xu, K.; Jow, T.R.

2000-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

EMBODIED CARBON TARIFFS Christoph Bhringer  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

EMBODIED CARBON TARIFFS Christoph Böhringer Jared C. Carbone Thomas F. Rutherford Revised: August 2013 Abstract Embodied carbon tariffs tax the direct and indirect carbon emissions embodied in trade -- an idea popularized by countries seeking to extend the reach of domestic carbon regu- lations. We

243

Uncertainties in Cancer Risk Coefficients for Environmental Exposure to Radionuclides. An Uncertainty Analysis for Risk Coefficients Reported in Federal Guidance Report No. 13  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Federal Guidance Report No. 13 (FGR 13) provides risk coefficients for estimation of the risk of cancer due to low-level exposure to each of more than 800 radionuclides. Uncertainties in risk coefficients were quantified in FGR 13 for 33 cases (exposure to each of 11 radionuclides by each of three exposure pathways) on the basis of sensitivity analyses in which various combinations of plausible biokinetic, dosimetric, and radiation risk models were used to generate alternative risk coefficients. The present report updates the uncertainty analysis in FGR 13 for the cases of inhalation and ingestion of radionuclides and expands the analysis to all radionuclides addressed in that report. The analysis indicates that most risk coefficients for inhalation or ingestion of radionuclides are determined within a factor of 5 or less by current information. That is, application of alternate plausible biokinetic and dosimetric models and radiation risk models (based on the linear, no-threshold hypothesis with an adjustment for the dose and dose rate effectiveness factor) is unlikely to change these coefficients by more than a factor of 5. In this analysis the assessed uncertainty in the radiation risk model was found to be the main determinant of the uncertainty category for most risk coefficients, but conclusions concerning the relative contributions of risk and dose models to the total uncertainty in a risk coefficient may depend strongly on the method of assessing uncertainties in the risk model.

Pawel, David [U.S. Environmental Protection Agency; Leggett, Richard Wayne [ORNL; Eckerman, Keith F [ORNL; Nelson, Christopher [U.S. Environmental Protection Agency

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Reversing Climate Change: Using Carbon Technology to Offset Carbon Emissions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Reversing Climate Change: Using Carbon Technology to Offset Carbon Emissions Climate change is real not only emitting less greenhouse gas (GHG), but actually sources of negative carbon. We then present two

245

Carbon-Optimal and Carbon-Neutral Supply Chains  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Y. Li, M. Daskin. 2009. Carbon Footprint and the ManagementJ. van Houtum. 2011. E?ect of carbon emission regulations onStreamlined Enterprise Carbon Footprinting. Environmental

Caro, F.; Corbett, C. J.; Tan, T.; Zuidwijk, R.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Black Carbon Concentrations and Diesel Vehicle Emission Factors Derived from Coefficient of Haze Measurements in California: 1967-2003  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Inventory for Heavy-Duty Diesel Truck Emissions. J. Air &T. A. Cackette (2001), Diesel engines: Environmental impact2003), http://www.arb.ca.gov/diesel/diesel.htm BAAQMD, Bay

Kirchstetter, Thomas W.; Aguiar, Jeffery; Tonse, Shaheen; Novakov, T.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

The interaction second virial coefficient for the helium-carbon dioxide system between 230 and 300 K  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, the differential pressure cell, associated tubing, valves and heat transfer system are encased by a stainless steel Dewar. The jacket of the Dewar is insulated by polystyrene foam and wood. It is sealed by a k" thick brass plate with an 0-ring gasket. All... by successive expansiors without measurirg volume. Initially, one cell is filled with gas to some pressure and the other cell is evacuated. The temperature and pressure are measured. The connecting valve is opened~ time is allowed for equilibration...

Watson, Michael Quealy

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Lateral solids dispersion coefficient in large-scale fluidized beds  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The design of fuel feed ports in a large-scale fluidized bed combustor depends on the fuel characteristics and lateral solids mixing. However, the reported values of the effective lateral solids dispersion coefficient (D{sub sr}) are scattered in the broad range of 0.0001-0.1 m{sup 2}/s. With the aim of predicting D{sub sr} in wider fluidized beds which is difficult to measure directly or deduce from experimental results in lab-scale facilities, a computational method is proposed. It combines the Eulerian-Granular simulation and fictitious particle tracing technique. The value of D{sub sr} is calculated based on the movement of the tracers. The effect on D{sub sr} of bed width (W) ranging from 0.4 m up to 12.8 m at different levels of superficial gas velocity (U{sub 0}) is investigated. It is found that increasing W whilst maintaining U{sub 0}, D{sub sr} initially increases markedly, then its increase rate declines, and finally it stays around a constant value. The computed values of D{sub sr} are examined quantitatively and compared with a thorough list of the measured D{sub sr} in the literature since 1980s. Agreed with the measurements performed in the pilot-scale fluidized beds, the value of D{sub sr} in wider facilities at higher fluidizing velocities is predicted to be around the order of magnitude of 0.1 m{sup 2}/s, much higher than that in lab-scale beds. Finally, the effect of D{sub sr} on the distribution of fuel particles over the cross section in fluidized beds with the specified layout of feed ports is discussed. (author)

Liu, Daoyin; Chen, Xiaoping [School of Energy and Environment, Southeast University, Nanjing 210096 (China)

2010-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

249

Thermal expansion of multiwall carbon nanotube reinforced nanocrystalline silver matrix composite  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Multiwall carbon nanotube reinforced silver matrix composite was fabricated by novel molecular level mixing method, which involves nucleation of Ag ions inside carbon nanotube dispersion at the molecular level. As a result the carbon nanotubes get embedded within the powder rather than on the surfaces. Micro structural characterization by X- ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy reveals that the nanotubes are homogeneously dispersed and anchored within the matrix. The thermal expansion of the composite with the multiwall nanotube content (0, 1.5 vol%) were investigated and it is found that coefficient of thermal expansion decreases with the addition of multiwall nanotube content and reduce to about 63% to that of pure Ag.

Sharma, Manjula, E-mail: manjula.physics@gmail.com; Sharma, Vimal [Department of Physics, NIT Hamirpur - 177005, HP (India); Pal, Hemant [Department of Physics, NIT Hamirpur - 177005, HP, India and Department of Physics, Govt. College Chamba - 176310, HP (India)

2014-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

250

Carbon-Optimal and Carbon-Neutral Supply Chains  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Pearce, D. 2003. The Social Cost Of Carbon And Its PolicyR.S.J. 2008. The Social Cost of Carbon: Trends, Outliers and

Caro, F.; Corbett, C. J.; Tan, T.; Zuidwijk, R.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Carbonation Mechanism of Reservoir Rock by Supercritical Carbon...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

from reservoir rock formation. - Task 2: Carbonation study of minerals. - Task 3: Mechanical behaviors of carbonated minerals. - Task 4: Modeling of CO2- reservoir rock...

252

Carbon monoxide absorbing liquid  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The present disclosure is directed to a carbon monoxide absorbing liquid containing a cuprous ion, hydrochloric acid and titanum trichloride. Titanium trichloride is effective in increasing the carbon monoxide absorption quantity. Furthermore, titanium trichloride remarkably increases the oxygen resistance. Therefore, this absorbing liquid can be used continuously and for a long time.

Arikawa, Y.; Horigome, S.; Kanehori, K.; Katsumoto, M.

1981-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

253

Fly ash carbon passivation  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A thermal method to passivate the carbon and/or other components in fly ash significantly decreases adsorption. The passivated carbon remains in the fly ash. Heating the fly ash to about 500 and 800 degrees C. under inert gas conditions sharply decreases the amount of surfactant adsorbed by the fly ash recovered after thermal treatment despite the fact that the carbon content remains in the fly ash. Using oxygen and inert gas mixtures, the present invention shows that a thermal treatment to about 500 degrees C. also sharply decreases the surfactant adsorption of the recovered fly ash even though most of the carbon remains intact. Also, thermal treatment to about 800 degrees C. under these same oxidative conditions shows a sharp decrease in surfactant adsorption of the recovered fly ash due to the fact that the carbon has been removed. This experiment simulates the various "carbon burnout" methods and is not a claim in this method. The present invention provides a thermal method of deactivating high carbon fly ash toward adsorption of AEAs while retaining the fly ash carbon. The fly ash can be used, for example, as a partial Portland cement replacement in air-entrained concrete, in conductive and other concretes, and for other applications.

La Count, Robert B; Baltrus, John P; Kern, Douglas G

2013-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

254

Electronic Properties of Carbon Nanotubes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

P. Avouris, in Carbon Nanotubes M. S. Dresselhaus, P.Physics of Carbon Nanotubes S. V. Rotkin, S. Subramoney,Properties of Carbon Nanotubes Philip G. Collins 1 and

Collins, Philip G

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

Carbon Park Environmental Impact Assessment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of offsetting the University's carbon footprint, promoting biodiversity and establishing easily maintained Carbon Park Environmental Impact Assessment A B.E.S.T. Project By, Adam Bond 2011 #12; Bishop's University Carbon Park

256

Electronic Properties of Carbon Nanotubes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

P. Avouris, in Carbon Nanotubes M. S. Dresselhaus, P.in Applied Physics of Carbon Nanotubes S. V. Rotkin, S.Electronic Properties of Carbon Nanotubes Philip G. Collins

Collins, Philip G

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

BIG SKY CARBON SEQUESTRATION PARTNERSHIP  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Partnership, led by Montana State University, is comprised of research institutions, public entities and private sectors organizations, and the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes and the Nez Perce Tribe. Efforts under this Partnership fall into four areas: evaluation of sources and carbon sequestration sinks; development of GIS-based reporting framework; designing an integrated suite of monitoring, measuring, and verification technologies; and initiating a comprehensive education and outreach program. At the first two Partnership meetings the groundwork was put in place to provide an assessment of capture and storage capabilities for CO{sub 2} utilizing the resources found in the Partnership region (both geological and terrestrial sinks), that would complement the ongoing DOE research. During the third quarter, planning efforts are underway for the next Partnership meeting which will showcase the architecture of the GIS framework and initial results for sources and sinks, discuss the methods and analysis underway for assessing geological and terrestrial sequestration potentials. The meeting will conclude with an ASME workshop. The region has a diverse array of geological formations that could provide storage options for carbon in one or more of its three states. Likewise, initial estimates of terrestrial sinks indicate a vast potential for increasing and maintaining soil C on forested, agricultural, and reclaimed lands. Both options include the potential for offsetting economic benefits to industry and society. Steps have been taken to assure that the GIS-based framework is consistent among types of sinks within the Big Sky Partnership area and with the efforts of other western DOE partnerships. Efforts are also being made to find funding to include Wyoming in the coverage areas for both geological and terrestrial sinks and sources. The Partnership recognizes the critical importance of measurement, monitoring, and verification technologies to support not only carbon trading but all policies and programs that DOE and other agencies may want to pursue in support of GHG mitigation. The efforts begun in developing and implementing MMV technologies for geological sequestration reflect this concern. Research is also underway to identify and validate best management practices for soil C in the Partnership region, and to design a risk/cost effectiveness framework to make comparative assessments of each viable sink, taking into account economic costs, offsetting benefits, scale of sequestration opportunities, spatial and time dimensions, environmental risks, and long-term viability. Scientifically sound information on MMV is critical for public acceptance of these technologies. Two key deliverables were completed in the second quarter--a literature review/database to assess the soil carbon on rangelands, and the draft protocols, contracting options for soil carbon trading. The protocols developed for soil carbon trading are unique and provide a key component of the mechanisms that might be used to efficiently sequester GHG and reduce CO{sub 2} concentrations. While no key deliverables were due during the third quarter, progress on other deliverables is noted in the PowerPoint presentations and in this report. A series of meetings held during the second and third quarters have laid the foundations for assessing the issues surrounding carbon sequestration in this region, the need for a holistic approach to meeting energy demands and economic development potential, and the implementation of government programs or a market-based setting for soil C credits. These meetings provide a connection to stakeholders in the region and a basis on which to draw for the DOE PEIS hearings. In the fourth quarter, three deliverables have been completed, some in draft form to be revised and updated to include Wyoming. This is due primarily to some delays in funding to LANL and INEEL and the approval of a supplemental proposal to include Wyoming in much of the GIS data sets, analysis, and related materials. The de

Susan M. Capalbo

2004-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

258

Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Partnership  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Partnership, led by Montana State University, is comprised of research institutions, public entities and private sectors organizations, and the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes and the Nez Perce Tribe. Efforts under this Partnership in Phase I fall into four areas: evaluation of sources and carbon sequestration sinks that will be used to determine the location of pilot demonstrations in Phase II; development of GIS-based reporting framework that links with national networks; designing an integrated suite of monitoring, measuring, and verification technologies and assessment frameworks; and initiating a comprehensive education and outreach program. The groundwork is in place to provide an assessment of storage capabilities for CO2 utilizing the resources found in the Partnership region (both geological and terrestrial sinks), that would complement the ongoing DOE research agenda in Carbon Sequestration. The region has a diverse array of geological formations that could provide storage options for carbon in one or more of its three states. Likewise, initial estimates of terrestrial sinks indicate a vast potential for increasing and maintaining soil C on forested, agricultural, and reclaimed lands. Both options include the potential for offsetting economic benefits to industry and society. Steps have been taken to assure that the GIS-based framework is consistent among types of sinks within the Big Sky Partnership area and with the efforts of other DOE regional partnerships. The Partnership recognizes the critical importance of measurement, monitoring, and verification technologies to support not only carbon trading but all policies and programs that DOE and other agencies may want to pursue in support of GHG mitigation. The efforts in developing and implementing MMV technologies for geological sequestration reflect this concern. Research is also underway to identify and validate best management practices for soil C in the Partnership region, and to design a risk/cost effectiveness framework to make comparative assessments of each viable sink, taking into account economic costs, offsetting benefits, scale of sequestration opportunities, spatial and time dimensions, environmental risks, and long-term viability. Scientifically sound MMV is critical for public acceptance of these technologies. Deliverables for the 7th Quarter reporting period include (1) for the geological efforts: Reports on Technology Needs and Action Plan on the Evaluation of Geological Sinks and Pilot Project Deployment (Deliverables 2 and 3), and Report on the Feasibility of Mineralization Trapping in the Snake River Plain Basin (Deliverable 14); (2) for the terrestrial efforts: Report on the Evaluation of Terrestrial Sinks and a Report of the Best Production Practices for Soil C Sequestration (Deliverables 8 and 15). In addition, the 7th Quarter activities for the Partnership included further development of the proposed activities for the deployment and demonstration phase of the carbon sequestration pilots including geological and terrestrial pilots, expansion of the Partnership to encompass regions and institutions that are complimentary to the steps we have identified, building greater collaborations with industry and stakeholders in the region, contributed to outreach efforts that spanned all partnerships, co-authorship on the Carbon Capture and Separation report, and developed a regional basis to address future energy opportunities in the region. The deliverables and activities are discussed in the following sections and appended to this report. The education and outreach efforts have resulted in a comprehensive plan which serves as a guide for implementing the outreach activities under Phase I. The public website has been expanded and integrated with the GIS carbon atlas. We have made presentations to stakeholders and policy makers including two tribal sequestration workshops, and made connections to other federal and state agencies concerned with GHG emissions, climate change, and efficient and environmental

Susan M. Capalbo

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Pacific Northwest rangeland carbon sequestration.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??This paper models the supply curve of carbon sequestration on Pacific Northwest rangelands. Rangeland managers have the ability to sequester carbon in agricultural soils by… (more)

Wiggins, Seth T.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

CARBON SEQUESTRATION STRATEGIES FOR CALIFORNIA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

GEOLOGIC CARBON SEQUESTRATION STRATEGIES FOR CALIFORNIA: REPORT TO THE LEGISLATURE Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership (WESTCARB) studies that we used, including Cameron Downey

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "type carbon coefficient" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Materials with a desired refraction coefficient can be made by embedding small particles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A method is proposed to create materials with a desired refraction coefficient, possibly negative one. The method consists of embedding into a given material small particles. Given $n_0(x)$, the refraction coefficient of the original material in a bounded domain $D \\subset \\R^3$, and a desired refraction coefficient $n(x)$, one calculates the number $N(x)$ of small particles, to be embedded in $D$ around a point $x \\in D$ per unit volume of $D$, in order that the resulting new material has refraction coefficient $n(x)$.

A. G. Ramm

2007-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

262

E-Print Network 3.0 - absorption coefficient based Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

67 Optical nonlinearity in low-temperature-grown GaAs: Microscopic limitations and optimization strategies Summary: is the absorption coefficient, d the physical thickness of the...

263

Estimation of effective diffusion coefficients in porous catalysts  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

'usivities were obtained for diR'usion of toluene in zeolites LaZSM-5, FeZSM-5 and BZSM-5. The corrected difl'usivities obtained for the zeolites showed a, dependence on the concentrat1on of' adsorbed species. Uptake experiments were conducted f' or studying... diffusion of n- hexane in a type II crystalline titanate, and the intracrystalline diffusivities were found to be independent of the adsorbate concentration. sv ACKNOWLEDGEMENT I would like to acknowledge my research advisor, Dr. R. G. Anthony...

Kulkarni, Shrikant Ulhas

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Flattening coefficient of aerosols collected on treated slides  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

collected from oleic acid and DOP (dioctylphthalate) aerosols, The microscope slides were made oilphobic by immersion in a widely used fluorocarbon sur- factant (NYE BAR Type CT 2X or 3' Co. Chemical FC-721). The mean value of F f' or oleic acid... to the fluorocarbon surfactant coatina is larger than that for DOP. A theoretical formulism is presented for the flattening factor of a spherical droplet on a smooth, flat, treated surface. It is based on the assumption that the drop shape on the flat surface...

Olan-Figueroa, Excel

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

A comparison of alumina, carbon, and carbon-covered alumina as supports for Ni-Mo-F additives: Carbon deposition and model compound reaction studies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Fluoride-promoted Ni-Mo catalysts supported on alumina, carbon, and carbon-coveres alumina have been investigated for their activity in cumene cracking, hydrocracking (reduced and sulfided forms), and thiophene HDS. The carbon-covered alumina was prepared by pyrolysis of cyclohexene over either {gamma}-alumina or boehmite and the carbon deposition followed adsorption isotherm-type behavior. The cumene reaction studies indicate that the resulting support system successfully merges the properties of carbon and alumina, possessing improved dehydrogenation-hydrogenation functionality due to carbon and acidic properties due to alumina, such as the generation of Broensted acidity upon fluoride impregnation. In the thiophene HDS reaction the catalyst activities followed the order Al{sub 2} > C-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} > C, suggesting that alumina, and not carbon, is the superior HDS support at atmospheric H{sub 2} pressure and at the metal loadings used in this study. Carbon deposition onto Ni-Mo-F/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalysts revealed that cyclohexene polymerization is promoted by the metal centers, resulting in multilayer islands on these sites, and not by the fluoride-associated Broensted acid sites. However, the Broensted acid sites do promote coke formation when the polymerization reaction is easier such as for {alpha}-methylstyrene.

Boorman, P.M.; Chong, K.; Kydd, R.A.; Lewis, J.M. (Univ. of Calgary, Alberta (Canada))

1991-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Cumulative Carbon and Just Allocation of the Global Carbon Commons  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Cumulative Carbon and Just Allocation of the Global Carbon Commons R.T. Pierrehumbert* Abstract statistic, called cumulative carbon. This statistic is the aggregate amount ofcarbon emitted in theform such activitiespersist.In thispaper the conceptis usedto addressthe question offair allocation of carbon emissions

Pierrehumbert, Raymond

267

International Conference on Carbon Nanotechnology: Potential and Challenges (Carbon 10)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

International Conference on Carbon Nanotechnology: Potential and Challenges (Carbon 10) 15 - 17th Since the discovery of the carbon nanotube (CNT) about two decades ago, research related to its of Materials and Process Engineering Kanpur Chapter hosted the `International Conference on Carbon

Srivastava, Kumar Vaibhav

268

Trading Water for Carbon with Biological Carbon Sequestration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Trading Water for Carbon with Biological Carbon Sequestration Robert B. Jackson,1 * Esteban G. Farley,1 David C. le Maitre,5 Bruce A. McCarl,6 Brian C. Murray7 Carbon sequestration strategies plantations feature prominently among tools for carbon sequestration (1­8). Plantations typi- cally combine

Nacional de San Luis, Universidad

269

IMPACCT: Carbon Capture Technology  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

IMPACCT Project: IMPACCT’s 15 projects seek to develop technologies for existing coal-fired power plants that will lower the cost of carbon capture. Short for “Innovative Materials and Processes for Advanced Carbon Capture Technologies,” the IMPACCT Project is geared toward minimizing the cost of removing carbon dioxide (CO2) from coal-fired power plant exhaust by developing materials and processes that have never before been considered for this application. Retrofitting coal-fired power plants to capture the CO2 they produce would enable greenhouse gas reductions without forcing these plants to close, shifting away from the inexpensive and abundant U.S. coal supply.

None

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

advanced carbon-carbon composites: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 CARBON-CARBON COMPOSITE ALLCOMP Carbon-Carbon Composite Biology and Medicine Websites Summary: CARBON-CARBON...

271

Carbon nanotubes : synthesis, characterization, and applications  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

fibers, carbon nanotubes, and carbon capsule structures canand multi-walled nanotubes and carbon fiber, and occurs withMulti- walled carbon nanotubes”, Carbon, v.43, pp.2608-2617,

Deck, Christian Peter

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Process for producing carbon monoxide and hydrogen from methanol  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A process is described for producing carbon monoxide and hydrogen which comprises contacting methanol vapor at a temperature of 200 degrees to 300 degrees C with an indirectly heated zinc containing catalyst to obtain an effluent gas in which the components of carbon monoxide and hydrogen constitute at least 90% by volume of said gas. At least a part of the impurities from said effluent gas are removed and said effluent gas is deparated into its carbon monoxide and hydrogen components by adsorption. The effluent gas can be separated into its carbon monoxide and hydrogen components by use of a plurality of adsorbers containing zeolite-type molecular sieve material where the zeolite is substantially permeable to hydrogen but sorbs carbon monoxide.

Jockel, H.; Marschner, F.; Moller, F.W.; Mortel, H.

1982-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

273

Electrolyte matrix for molten carbonate fuel cells  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A matrix for a carbonate electrolyte including a support material and an additive constituent having a relatively low melting temperature and a relatively high coefficient of thermal expansion. The additive constituent is from 3 to 45 weight percent of the matrix and is formed from raw particles whose diameter is in a range of 0.1 .mu.m to 20 .mu.m and whose aspect ratio is in a range of 1 to 50. High energy intensive milling is used to mix the support material and additive constituent during matrix formation. Also disclosed is the use of a further additive constituent comprising an alkaline earth containing material. The further additive is mixed with the support material using high energy intensive milling.

Huang, Chao M. (Danbury, CT); Yuh, Chao-Yi (New Milford, CT)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Electrolyte matrix for molten carbonate fuel cells  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A matrix is described for a carbonate electrolyte including a support material and an additive constituent having a relatively low melting temperature and a relatively high coefficient of thermal expansion. The additive constituent is from 3 to 45 weight percent of the matrix and is formed from raw particles whose diameter is in a range of 0.1 {micro}m to 20 {micro}m and whose aspect ratio is in a range of 1 to 50. High energy intensive milling is used to mix the support material and additive constituent during matrix formation. Also disclosed is the use of a further additive constituent comprising an alkaline earth containing material. The further additive is mixed with the support material using high energy intensive milling. 5 figs.

Huang, C.M.; Yuh, C.Y.

1999-02-09T23:59:59.000Z

275

Weakcontrast R/T coefficients in weakly anisotropic media: Pwave 9iFODY#9DYU\\XN  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of transversely isotropic halfspaces. Zillmer, Gajewski & Kashtan (1998) derived PP reflection coefficient

Cerveny, Vlastislav

276

ARM: 10-minute TEMPORARY Raman Lidar: aerosol scattering ratio and backscattering coefficient profiles, from first Ferrare algorithm  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

10-minute TEMPORARY Raman Lidar: aerosol scattering ratio and backscattering coefficient profiles, from first Ferrare algorithm

Sivaraman, Chitra; Flynn, Connor

277

BIG SKY CARBON SEQUESTRATION PARTNERSHIP  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Big Sky Partnership, led by Montana State University, is comprised of research institutions, public entities and private sectors organizations, and the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes and the Nez Perce Tribe. Efforts during the second performance period fall into four areas: evaluation of sources and carbon sequestration sinks; development of GIS-based reporting framework; designing an integrated suite of monitoring, measuring, and verification technologies; and initiating a comprehensive education and outreach program. At the first two Partnership meetings the groundwork was put in place to provide an assessment of capture and storage capabilities for CO{sub 2} utilizing the resources found in the Partnership region (both geological and terrestrial sinks), that would complement the ongoing DOE research. The region has a diverse array of geological formations that could provide storage options for carbon in one or more of its three states. Likewise, initial estimates of terrestrial sinks indicate a vast potential for increasing and maintaining soil C on forested, agricultural, and reclaimed lands. Both options include the potential for offsetting economic benefits to industry and society. Steps have been taken to assure that the GIS-based framework is consistent among types of sinks within the Big Sky Partnership area and with the efforts of other western DOE partnerships. Efforts are also being made to find funding to include Wyoming in the coverage areas for both geological and terrestrial sinks and sources. The Partnership recognizes the critical importance of measurement, monitoring, and verification technologies to support not only carbon trading but all policies and programs that DOE and other agencies may want to pursue in support of GHG mitigation. The efforts begun in developing and implementing MMV technologies for geological sequestration reflect this concern. Research is also underway to identify and validate best management practices for soil C in the partnership region, and to design a risk/cost effectiveness framework to make comparative assessments of each viable sink, taking into account economic costs, offsetting benefits, scale of sequestration opportunities, spatial and time dimensions, environmental risks, and long term viability. Scientifically sound information on MMV is critical for public acceptance of these technologies. Two key deliverables were completed this quarter--a literature review/database to assess the soil carbon on rangelands, and the draft protocols, contracting options for soil carbon trading. To date, there has been little research on soil carbon on rangelands, and since rangeland constitutes a major land use in the Big Sky region, this is important in achieving a better understanding of terrestrial sinks. The protocols developed for soil carbon trading are unique and provide a key component of the mechanisms that might be used to efficiently sequester GHG and reduce CO{sub 2} concentrations. Progress on other deliverables is noted in the PowerPoint presentations. A series of meetings held during the second quarter have laid the foundations for assessing the issues surrounding the implementation of a market-based setting for soil C credits. These meetings provide a connection to stakeholders in the region and a basis on which to draw for the DOE PEIS hearings. Finally, the education and outreach efforts have resulted in a comprehensive plan and process which serves as a guide for implementing the outreach activities under Phase I. While we are still working on the public website, we have made many presentations to stakeholders and policy makers, connections to other federal and state agencies concerned with GHG emissions, climate change, and efficient and environmentally-friendly energy production. In addition, we have laid plans for integration of our outreach efforts with the students, especially at the tribal colleges and at the universities involved in our partnership. This includes collaboration with the film and media arts departments at MSU, with outreach effort

Susan M. Capalbo

2004-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Carbon Offsets as a Cost Containment Instrument: A Case Study of Reducing Emissions from Deforestation and Forest Degradation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Carbon Offsets as a Cost Containment Instrument: A Case Study of Reducing Emissions from and Policy Program #12;2 #12;3 Carbon Offsets as a Cost Containment Instrument: A Case Study of Reducing in Technology and Policy Abstract Carbon offset is one type of flexibility mechanism in greenhouse gas emission

279

Journal of Electronic Materials, Vol. 19, No, 4, 1990 Carbon Tetrachloride Doped AIxGa_xAS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Journal of Electronic Materials, Vol. 19, No, 4, 1990 Carbon Tetrachloride Doped AIx been shown to be a suitable carbon doping source for obtaining p-type GaAs grown by metalorganic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) with carbon acceptor concentrations in excess of 1 x 1019cm-3

Cunningham, Brian

280

Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Partnership  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Partnership, led by Montana State University, is comprised of research institutions, public entities and private sectors organizations, and the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes and the Nez Perce Tribe. Efforts under this Partnership in Phase I are organized into four areas: (1) Evaluation of sources and carbon sequestration sinks that will be used to determine the location of pilot demonstrations in Phase II; (2) Development of GIS-based reporting framework that links with national networks; (3) Design of an integrated suite of monitoring, measuring, and verification technologies, market-based opportunities for carbon management, and an economic/risk assessment framework; (referred to below as the Advanced Concepts component of the Phase I efforts) and (4) Initiation of a comprehensive education and outreach program. As a result of the Phase I activities, the groundwork is in place to provide an assessment of storage capabilities for CO{sub 2} utilizing the resources found in the Partnership region (both geological and terrestrial sinks), that complements the ongoing DOE research agenda in Carbon Sequestration. The geology of the Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Partnership Region is favorable for the potential sequestration of enormous volume of CO{sub 2}. The United States Geological Survey (USGS 1995) identified 10 geologic provinces and 111 plays in the region. These provinces and plays include both sedimentary rock types characteristic of oil, gas, and coal productions as well as large areas of mafic volcanic rocks. Of the 10 provinces and 111 plays, 1 province and 4 plays are located within Idaho. The remaining 9 provinces and 107 plays are dominated by sedimentary rocks and located in the states of Montana and Wyoming. The potential sequestration capacity of the 9 sedimentary provinces within the region ranges from 25,000 to almost 900,000 million metric tons of CO{sub 2}. Overall every sedimentary formation investigated has significant potential to sequester large amounts of CO{sub 2}. Simulations conducted to evaluate mineral trapping potential of mafic volcanic rock formations located in the Idaho province suggest that supercritical CO{sub 2} is converted to solid carbonate mineral within a few hundred years and permanently entombs the carbon. Although MMV for this rock type may be challenging, a carefully chosen combination of geophysical and geochemical techniques should allow assessment of the fate of CO{sub 2} in deep basalt hosted aquifers. Terrestrial carbon sequestration relies on land management practices and technologies to remove atmospheric CO{sub 2} where it is stored in trees, plants, and soil. This indirect sequestration can be implemented today and is on the front line of voluntary, market-based approaches to reduce CO{sub 2} emissions. Initial estimates of terrestrial sinks indicate a vast potential for increasing and maintaining soil Carbon (C) on rangelands, and forested, agricultural, and reclaimed lands. Rangelands can store up to an additional 0.05 mt C/ha/yr, while the croplands are on average four times that amount. Estimates of technical potential for soil sequestration within the region in cropland are in the range of 2.0 M mt C/yr over 20 year time horizon. This is equivalent to approximately 7.0 M mt CO{sub 2}e/yr. The forestry sinks are well documented, and the potential in the Big Sky region ranges from 9-15 M mt CO{sub 2} equivalent per year. Value-added benefits include enhanced yields, reduced erosion, and increased wildlife habitat. Thus the terrestrial sinks provide a viable, environmentally beneficial, and relatively low cost sink that is available to sequester C in the current time frame. The Partnership recognizes the critical importance of measurement, monitoring, and verification technologies to support not only carbon trading but all policies and programs that DOE and other agencies may want to pursue in support of GHG mitigation. The efforts in developing and implementing MMV technologies for geological and terrestrial sequestration re

Susan Capalbo

2005-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "type carbon coefficient" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Electro-optic coefficients of lithium tantalate at near-infrared wavelengths  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Electro-optic coefficients of lithium tantalate at near-infrared wavelengths Joanna L. Casson April 27, 2004 The unclamped linear electro-optic coefficients r13 and r33 for lithium tantalate. In the unclamped mode the effects of mechanical changes caused by piezoelectric and elasto-optic effects

Gopalan, Venkatraman

282

Scaling of Heat Transfer Coefficients Along Louvered Fins A. C. Lyman1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Scaling of Heat Transfer Coefficients Along Louvered Fins A. C. Lyman1 , R. A. Stephan2 , and K 23681-2199 #12;2 Abstract Louvered fins provide a method for improving the heat transfer performance for evaluating the spatially-resolved louver heat transfer coefficients using various reference temperatures

Thole, Karen A.

283

Flow Boiling Heat Transfer Coefficient In Minichannels Correlation and Trends Satish G. Kandlikar  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Flow Boiling Heat Transfer Coefficient In Minichannels ­ Correlation and Trends Satish G. Kandlikar York 14623, USA The flow boiling heat transfer in small diameter passages is being applied in many boiling heat transfer coefficient with the correlations developed for conventional channels. It is found

Kandlikar, Satish

284

A Rank-Corrected Procedure for Matrix Completion with Fixed Basis Coefficients  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A Rank-Corrected Procedure for Matrix Completion with Fixed Basis Coefficients Weimin Miao, Shaohua address low-rank matrix completion problems with fixed basis coefficients, which include the low-rank correlation matrix completion in various fields such as the financial market and the low-rank density matrix

Chaudhuri, Sanjay

285

Empirical Distributions of DFT-Domain Speech Coefficients Based on Estimated Speech Variances  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

obtained from a short-time discrete Fourier transform (DFT) in the context of speech enhancement frameworks. The distribution of clean speech spectral coefficients is of great importance for speech enhancement algorithmsEmpirical Distributions of DFT-Domain Speech Coefficients Based on Estimated Speech Variances Timo

286

Demonstrations: blocks on planes, scales, to find coefficients of static and kinetic friction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Demonstrations: ·blocks on planes, scales, to find coefficients of static and kinetic friction Text: Fishbane 5-1, 5-2 Problems: 18, 21, 28, 30, 34 from Ch. 5 What's important: ·frictional forces ·coefficients of static and kinetic friction Friction Where objects move in contact with other objects, we know

Boal, David

287

Estimation of the inherent optical properties of natural waters from the irradiance attenuation coefficient and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Estimation of the inherent optical properties of natural waters from the irradiance attenuation, and the backscattering bb coefficients in the upper ocean from irradiance reflectance just beneath the sea surface, R 0 , and the average attenuation coefficient for downwelling irradiance, Kd 1, between the surface and the first

Stramski, Dariusz

288

Asymptotic normalization coefficients and the Be-7(p, gamma)B-8 astrophysical S factor  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We consider the results of two proton transfer reactions, B-10(Be-7, B-8)Be-9 and N-14(Be-7, B-8)C-13, to obtain a weighted average of the measured asymptotic normalization coefficients for the virtual transition 7Be +pB-8. These coefficients...

Azhari, A.; Burjan, V.; Carstoiu, F.; Gagliardi, Carl A.; Kroha, V.; Mukhamedzhanov, AM; Nunes, FM; Tang, X.; Trache, L.; Tribble, Robert E.

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Model equations in rarefied gas dynamics: Viscous-slip and thermal-slip coefficients  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Model equations in rarefied gas dynamics: Viscous-slip and thermal-slip coefficients C. E. Siewert-slip and the thermal-slip coefficients in rarefied gas dynamics. More specifically, the BGK model, the S model In reviewing numerous papers devoted to model equa- tions in rarefied gas dynamics, we have found no definitive

Siewert, Charles E.

290

ATK - Supersonic Carbon Capture  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

ATK and ACEnt Laboratories, with the help of ARPA-E funding, have taken an aerospace problem, supersonic condensation, and turned it into a viable clean energy solution for carbon capture.

Castrogiovanni, Anthony (ACEnT Laboratories, President and CEO); Calayag, Bon (ATK, Program Manager)

2014-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

291

Extrasolar Carbon Planets  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We suggest that some extrasolar planets planets and low-mass white dwarf planets are especially good candidate members of this new class of planets, but these objects could also conceivably form around stars like the Sun. This planet-formation pathway requires only a factor of two local enhancement of the protoplanetary disk's C/O ratio above solar, a condition that pileups of carbonaceous grains may create in ordinary protoplanetary disks. Hot, Neptune-mass carbon planets should show a significant paucity of water vapor in their spectra compared to hot planets with solar abundances. Cooler, less massive carbon planets may show hydrocarbon-rich spectra and tar-covered surfaces. The high sublimation temperatures of diamond, SiC, and other carbon compounds could protect these planets from carbon depletion at high temperatures.

Marc J. Kuchner; S. Seager

2005-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

292

ATK - Supersonic Carbon Capture  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

ATK and ACEnt Laboratories, with the help of ARPA-E funding, have taken an aerospace problem, supersonic condensation, and turned it into a viable clean energy solution for carbon capture.

Castrogiovanni, Anthony (ACEnT Laboratories, President and CEO) [ACEnT Laboratories, President and CEO; Calayag, Bon (ATK, Program Manager) [ATK, Program Manager

2014-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

293

Carbon Capture Pilots (Kentucky)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Support for the Carbon Management Research Group (CMRG), a public/private partnership consisting of most of the Commonwealth’s utilities, the Electric Power Research Institute, the Center for...

294

Activated carbon aerogels  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Activated carbon aerogels were obtained from the CO{sub 2} activation of the carbon aerogels. The adsorption isotherms of nitrogen on activated carbon aerogels at 77 K were measured and analyzed by the high-resolution {alpha}{sub s} plot to evaluate their porosities. The {alpha}{sub s} plot showed an upward deviation from linearity below {alpha}{sub s} = 0.5, suggesting that the presence of micropores becomes more predominant with the extent of the activation. Activation increased noticeably the pore volume and the surface area (the maximum value: 2600 m{sup 2}.g{sup -1}) without change of the basic network structure of primary particles. Activated carbon aerogels had a bimodal pore size distribution of uniform micropores and mesopores. 16 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

Hanzawa, Y.; Kaneko, K. [Chiba Univ. (Japan)] [Chiba Univ. (Japan); Pekala, R.W. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)] [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Dresselhaus, M.S. [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology, Cambridge, MA (United States)] [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology, Cambridge, MA (United States)

1996-12-25T23:59:59.000Z

295

Low Carbon Fuel Standards  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

S O N I A YE H Low Carbon Fuel Standards The most direct andalternative transportation fuels is to spur innovation withstandard for upstream fuel producers. hen it comes to energy

Sperling, Dan; Yeh, Sonia

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnerships  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

DOE has created a network of seven Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnerships (RCSPs) to help develop the technology, infrastructure, and regulations to implement large-scale CO2 storage (also...

297

Research Summary Carbon Additionality  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the quality assurance of emissions reduction and carbon sequestration activities, but remains a source of much/reporting additionality rules. Technological Application of specific technology. Term Abatement arises within a specified

298

4, 1367, 2007 Modelling carbon  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

BGD 4, 13­67, 2007 Modelling carbon overconsumption and extracellular POC formation M. Schartau et carbon overconsumption and the formation of extracellular particulate organic carbon M. Schartau1 , A Correspondence to: M. Schartau (markus.schartau@gkss.de) 13 #12;BGD 4, 13­67, 2007 Modelling carbon

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

299

Method for synthesizing carbon nanotubes  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for preparing a precursor solution for synthesis of carbon nanomaterials, where a polar solvent is added to at least one block copolymer and at least one carbohydrate compound, and the precursor solution is processed using a self-assembly process and subsequent heating to form nanoporous carbon films, porous carbon nanotubes, and porous carbon nanoparticles.

Fan, Hongyou

2012-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

300

Research Report Forests and carbon  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, baseline, carbon, climate change mitigation, forestry, quality assurance, sequestration. FCRP013/FCResearch Report Forests and carbon: a review of additionality #12;#12;Forests and carbon: a review. ISBN 978-0-85538-816-4 Valatin, G. (2011). Forests and carbon: a review of additionality. Forestry

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "type carbon coefficient" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Carbon dioxide removal process  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process and apparatus for separating carbon dioxide from gas, especially natural gas, that also contains C.sub.3+ hydrocarbons. The invention uses two or three membrane separation steps, optionally in conjunction with cooling/condensation under pressure, to yield a lighter, sweeter product natural gas stream, and/or a carbon dioxide stream of reinjection quality and/or a natural gas liquids (NGL) stream.

Baker, Richard W.; Da Costa, Andre R.; Lokhandwala, Kaaeid A.

2003-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

302

Lead carbonate scintillator materials  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Improved radiation detectors containing lead carbonate or basic lead carbonate as the scintillator element are disclosed. Both of these scintillators have been found to provide a balance of good stopping power, high light yield and short decay constant that is superior to other known scintillator materials. The radiation detectors disclosed are favorably suited for use in general purpose detection and in medical uses. 3 figures.

Derenzo, S.E.; Moses, W.W.

1991-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

303

Black Carbon’s Properties and Role in the Environment: A Comprehensive Review  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Keywords: soil carbon sequestration; carbon budget;of an energy efficient carbon sequestration mechanism, asin the later section on carbon sequestration. In atmospheric

Shrestha, Gyami

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Black Carbon’s Properties and Role in the Environment: A Comprehensive Review  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

H. Can reducing black carbon emissions counteract globalinventory of black carbon emissions. Atmos. Environ. 1993,commonly studied form of carbon emissions. Black carbon (BC)

Shrestha, Gyami

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Iron-Doped Carbon Aerogels: Novel Porous Substrates for Direct Growth of Carbon Nanotubes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present the synthesis and characterization of Fe-doped carbon aerogels (CAs) and demonstrate the ability to grow carbon nanotubes directly on monoliths of these materials to afford novel carbon aerogel-carbon nanotube composites. Preparation of the Fe-doped CAs begins with the sol-gel polymerization of the potassium salt of 2,4-dihydroxybenzoic acid with formaldehyde, affording K{sup +}-doped gels that can then be converted to Fe{sup 2+}- or Fe{sup 3+}-doped gels through an ion exchange process, dried with supercritical CO{sub 2} and subsequently carbonized under an inert atmosphere. Analysis of the Fe-doped CAs by TEM, XRD and XPS revealed that the doped iron species are reduced during carbonization to form metallic iron and iron carbide nanoparticles. The sizes and chemical composition of the reduced Fe species were related to pyrolysis temperature as well as the type of iron salt used in the ion exchange process. Raman spectroscopy and XRD analysis further reveal that, despite the presence of the Fe species, the CA framework is not significantly graphitized during pyrolysis. The Fe-doped CAs were subsequently placed in a thermal CVD reactor and exposed to a mixture of CH{sub 4} (1000 sccm), H{sub 2} (500 sccm), and C{sub 2}H{sub 4} (20 sccm) at temperatures ranging from 600 to 800 C for 10 minutes, resulting in direct growth of carbon nanotubes on the aerogel monoliths. Carbon nanotubes grown by this method appear to be multiwalled ({approx}25 nm in diameter and up to 4 mm long) and grow through a tip-growth mechanism that pushes catalytic iron particles out of the aerogel framework. The highest yield of CNTs were grown on Fe-doped CAs pyrolyzed at 800 C treated at CVD temperatures of 700 C.

Steiner, S A; Baumann, T F; Kong, J; Satcher, J H; Dresselhaus, M S

2007-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

306

Types of Costs Types of Cost Estimates  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

· Types of Costs · Types of Cost Estimates · Methods to estimate capital costs MIN E 408: Mining% accuracy. ­ 2-5% of pre-production capital Types of Cost Estimates #12;3. Definitive ­ Based on definitive-even $ Production Level Fixed Cost Break-even $ Production Level Cost-Revenue Relationships · Capital Costs (or

Boisvert, Jeff

307

Carbon based prosthetic devices  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This is the final report of a one-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The project objective was to evaluate the use of carbon/carbon-fiber-reinforced composites for use in endoprosthetic devices. The application of these materials for the metacarpophalangeal (MP) joints of the hand was investigated. Issues concerning mechanical properties, bone fixation, biocompatibility, and wear are discussed. A system consisting of fiber reinforced materials with a pyrolytic carbon matrix and diamond-like, carbon-coated wear surfaces was developed. Processes were developed for the chemical vapor infiltration (CVI) of pyrolytic carbon into porous fiber preforms with the ability to tailor the outer porosity of the device to provide a surface for bone in-growth. A method for coating diamond-like carbon (DLC) on the articulating surface by plasma-assisted chemical vapor deposition (CVD) was developed. Preliminary results on mechanical properties of the composite system are discussed and initial biocompatibility studies were performed.

Devlin, D.J.; Carroll, D.W.; Barbero, R.S.; Archuleta, T. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (US); Klawitter, J.J.; Ogilvie, W.; Strzepa, P. [Ascension Orthopedics (US); Cook, S.D. [Tulane Univ., New Orleans, LA (US). School of Medicine

1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

308

BIG SKY CARBON SEQUESTRATION PARTNERSHIP  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Partnership, led by Montana State University, is comprised of research institutions, public entities and private sectors organizations, and the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes and the Nez Perce Tribe. Efforts under this Partnership in Phase I fall into four areas: evaluation of sources and carbon sequestration sinks that will be used to determine the location of pilot demonstrations in Phase II; development of GIS-based reporting framework that links with national networks; designing an integrated suite of monitoring, measuring, and verification technologies and assessment frameworks; and initiating a comprehensive education and outreach program. The groundwork is in place to provide an assessment of storage capabilities for CO{sub 2} utilizing the resources found in the Partnership region (both geological and terrestrial sinks), that would complement the ongoing DOE research. Efforts are underway to showcase the architecture of the GIS framework and initial results for sources and sinks. The region has a diverse array of geological formations that could provide storage options for carbon in one or more of its three states. Likewise, initial estimates of terrestrial sinks indicate a vast potential for increasing and maintaining soil C on forested, agricultural, and reclaimed lands. Both options include the potential for offsetting economic benefits to industry and society. Steps have been taken to assure that the GIS-based framework is consistent among types of sinks within the Big Sky Partnership area and with the efforts of other western DOE partnerships. The Partnership recognizes the critical importance of measurement, monitoring, and verification technologies to support not only carbon trading but all policies and programs that DOE and other agencies may want to pursue in support of GHG mitigation. The efforts in developing and implementing MMV technologies for geological sequestration reflect this concern. Research is also underway to identify and validate best management practices for soil C in the Partnership region, and to design a risk/cost effectiveness framework to make comparative assessments of each viable sink, taking into account economic costs, offsetting benefits, scale of sequestration opportunities, spatial and time dimensions, environmental risks, and long-term viability. Scientifically sound information on MMV is critical for public acceptance of these technologies.

Susan M. Capalbo

2005-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

309

CARBON NANOTUBES: PROPERTIES AND APPLICATIONS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Carbon nanotubes were discovered in 1991 as a minority byproduct of fullerene synthesis. Remarkable progress has been made in the ensuing years, including the discovery of two basic types of nanotubes (single-wall and multi-wall), great strides in synthesis and purification, elucidation of many fundamental physical properties, and important steps towards practical applications. Both the underlying science and technological potential of SWNT can profitably be studied at the scale of individual tubes and on macroscopic assemblies such as fibers. Experiments on single tubes directly reveal many of the predicted quantum confinement and mechanical properties. Semiconductor nanowires have many features in common with nanotubes, and many of the same fundamental and practical issues are in play – quantum confinement and its effect on properties; possible device structures and circuit architectures; thermal management; optimal synthesis, defect morphology and control, etc. In 2000 we began a small effort in this direction, conducted entirely by undergraduates with minimal consumables support from this grant. With DOE-BES approval, this grew into a project in parallel with the carbon nanotube work, in which we studied of inorganic semiconductor nanowire growth, characterization and novel strategies for electronic and electromechanical device fabrication. From the beginnings of research on carbon nanotubes, one of the major applications envisioned was hydrogen storage for fuel-cell powered cars and trucks. Subsequent theoretical models gave mixed results, the most pessimistic indicating that the fundamental H2-SWNT interaction was similar to flat graphite (physisorption) with only modest binding energies implying cryogenic operation at best. New material families with encouraging measured properties have emerged, and materials modeling has gained enormously in predictive power, sophistication, and the ability to treat a realistically representative number of atoms. One of the new materials, highly porous carbide-derived carbons (CDC), is the subject of an add-on to this grant awarded to myself and Taner Yildirim (NIST). Results from the add-on led eventually to a new 3-year award DE-FG02-08ER46522 “From Fundamental Understanding to Predicting New Nanomaterials for High Capacity Hydrogen Storage”, $1000K, (05/31/2008 - 05/01/2011) with Taner Yildirim and myself as co-PI’s.

Fischer, John, E.

2009-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

310

Study of fire retardant behavior of carbon nanotube membranes and carbon nanofiber paper in carbon fiber  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

were incorporated onto the surface of epoxy carbon fiber composites, as proposed fire shieldsStudy of fire retardant behavior of carbon nanotube membranes and carbon nanofiber paper in carbon fiber reinforced epoxy composites Qiang Wu, Wei Zhu, Chuck Zhang *, Zhiyong Liang, Ben Wang Department

Das, Suman

311

A Semi-Empirical Two Step Carbon Corrosion Reaction Model in PEM Fuel Cells  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The cathode CL of a polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) was exposed to high potentials, 1.0 to 1.4 V versus a reversible hydrogen electrode (RHE), that are typically encountered during start up/shut down operation. While both platinum dissolution and carbon corrosion occurred, the carbon corrosion effects were isolated and modeled. The presented model separates the carbon corrosion process into two reaction steps; (1) oxidation of the carbon surface to carbon-oxygen groups, and (2) further corrosion of the oxidized surface to carbon dioxide/monoxide. To oxidize and corrode the cathode catalyst carbon support, the CL was subjected to an accelerated stress test cycled the potential from 0.6 VRHE to an upper potential limit (UPL) ranging from 0.9 to 1.4 VRHE at varying dwell times. The reaction rate constants and specific capacitances of carbon and platinum were fitted by evaluating the double layer capacitance (Cdl) trends. Carbon surface oxidation increased the Cdl due to increased specific capacitance for carbon surfaces with carbon-oxygen groups, while the second corrosion reaction decreased the Cdl due to loss of the overall carbon surface area. The first oxidation step differed between carbon types, while both reaction rate constants were found to have a dependency on UPL, temperature, and gas relative humidity.

Young, Alan; Colbow, Vesna; Harvey, David; Rogers, Erin; Wessel, Silvia

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Measurement of carbon capture efficiency and stored carbon leakage  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Data representative of a measured carbon dioxide (CO.sub.2) concentration and of a measured oxygen (O.sub.2) concentration at a measurement location can be used to determine whether the measured carbon dioxide concentration at the measurement location is elevated relative to a baseline carbon dioxide concentration due to escape of carbon dioxide from a source associated with a carbon capture and storage process. Optionally, the data can be used to quantify a carbon dioxide concentration increase at the first location that is attributable to escape of carbon dioxide from the source and to calculate a rate of escape of carbon dioxide from the source by executing a model of gas-phase transport using at least the first carbon dioxide concentration increase. Related systems, methods, and articles of manufacture are also described.

Keeling, Ralph F.; Dubey, Manvendra K.

2013-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

313

A literature review of actinide-carbonate mineral interactions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Chemical retardation of actinides in groundwater systems is a potentially important mechanism for assessing the performance of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), a facility intended to demonstrate safe disposal of transuranic waste. Rigorous estimation of chemical retardation during transport through the Culebra Dolomite, a water-bearing unit overlying the WIPP, requires a mechanistic understanding of chemical reactions between dissolved elements and mineral surfaces. This report represents a first step toward this goal by examining the literature for pertinent experimental studies of actinide-carbonate interactions. A summary of existing models is given, along with the types of experiments on which these models are based. Articles pertaining to research into actinide interactions with carbonate minerals are summarized. Select articles involving trace element-carbonate mineral interactions are also reviewed and may serve as templates for future research. A bibliography of related articles is included. Americium(III), and its nonradioactive analog neodymium(III), partition strongly from aqueous solutions into carbonate minerals. Recent thermodynamic, kinetic, and surface studies show that Nd is preferentially removed from solution, forming a Nd-Ca carbonate solid solution. Neptunium(V) is rapidly removed from solution by carbonates. Plutonium incorporation into carbonates is complicated by multiple oxidation states. Little research has been done on the radium(H) and thorium(IV) carbonate systems. Removal of uranyl ion from solution by calcite is limited to monolayer surface coverage.

Stout, D.L. [Missouri Univ., Columbia, MO (United States). Dept. of Geological Sciences; Carroll, S.A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Implications of Carbon Regulation for Green Power Markets  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper examines the potential effects that emerging mandatory carbon markets have for voluntary markets for renewable energy, or green power markets. In an era of carbon regulation, green power markets will continue to play an important role because many consumers may be interested in supporting renewable energy development beyond what is supported through mandates or other types of policy support. The paper examines the extent to which GHG benefits motivate consumers to make voluntary renewable energy purchases and summarizes key issues emerging as a result of these overlapping markets, such as the implications of carbon regulation for renewable energy marketing claims, the demand for and price of renewable energy certificates (RECs), and the use of RECs in multiple markets (disaggregation of attributes). It describes carbon regulation programs under development in the Northeast and California, and how these might affect renewable energy markets in these regions, as well as the potential interaction between voluntary renewable energy markets and voluntary carbon markets, such as the Chicago Climate Exchange (CCX). It also briefly summarizes the experience in the European Union, where carbon is already regulated. Finally, the paper presents policy options for policymakers and regulators to consider in designing carbon policies to enable carbon markets and voluntary renewable energy markets to work together.

Bird, L.; Holt, E.; Carroll, G.

2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

CARBON DIOXIDE CAPTURE FROM FLUE GAS USING DRY REGENERABLE SORBENTS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes research conducted between April 1, 2005 and June 30, 2005 on the use of dry regenerable sorbents for removal of carbon dioxide from flue gas from coal combustion and synthesis gas from coal gasification. Supported sodium carbonate sorbents removed up to 76% of the carbon dioxide from simulated flue gas in a downflow cocurrent flow reactor system, with an approximate 15 second gas-solid contact time. This reaction proceeds at temperatures as low as 25 C. Lithium silicate sorbents remove carbon dioxide from high temperature simulated flue gas and simulated synthesis gas. Both sorbent types can be thermally regenerated and reused. The lithium silicate sorbent was tested in a thermogravimetric analyzer and in a 1-in quartz reactor at atmospheric pressure; tests were also conducted at elevated pressure in a 2-in diameter high temperature high pressure reactor system. The lithium sorbent reacts rapidly with carbon dioxide in flue gas at 350-500 C to absorb about 10% of the sorbent weight, then continues to react at a lower rate. The sorbent can be essentially completely regenerated at temperatures above 600 C and reused. In atmospheric pressure tests with synthesis gas of 10% initial carbon dioxide content, the sorbent removed over 90% of the carbon dioxide. An economic analysis of a downflow absorption process for removal of carbon dioxide from flue gas with a supported sodium carbonate sorbent suggests that a 90% efficient carbon dioxide capture system installed at a 500 MW{sub e} generating plant would have an incremental capital cost of $35 million ($91/kWe, assuming 20 percent for contingencies) and an operating cost of $0.0046/kWh. Assuming capital costs of $1,000/kW for a 500 MWe plant the capital cost of the down flow absorption process represents a less than 10% increase, thus meeting DOE goals as set forth in its Carbon Sequestration Technology Roadmap and Program Plan.

David A. Green; Thomas Nelson; Brian S. Turk; Paul Box; Weijiong Li; Raghubir P. Gupta

2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

WESTCARB Carbon Atlas  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

The West Coast Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership (known as WESTCARB) was established in Fall 2003. It is one of seven research partnerships co-funded by DOE to characterize regional carbon sequestration opportunities and conduct pilot-scale validation tests. The California Energy Commission manages WESTCARB and is a major co-funder. WESTCARB is characterizing the extent and capacity of geologic formations capable of storing CO2, known as sinks. Results are entered into a geographic information system (GIS) database, along with the location of major CO2-emitting point sources in each of the six WESTCARB states, enabling researchers and the public to gauge the proximity of candidate CO2 storage sites to emission sources and the feasibility of linking them via pipelines. Specifically, the WESTCARB GIS database (also known as the carbon atlas) stores layers of geologic information about potential underground storage sites, such as porosity and nearby fault-lines and aquifers. Researchers use these data, along with interpreted geophysical data and available oil and gas well logs to estimate the region's potential geologic storage capacity. The database also depicts existing pipeline routes and rights-of-way and lands that could be off-limits, which can aid the development of a regional carbon management strategy. The WESTCARB Carbon Atlas, which is accessible to the public, provides a resource for public discourse on practical solutions for regional CO2 management. A key WESTCARB partner, the Utah Automated Geographic Reference Center, has developed data serving procedures to enable the WESTCARB Carbon Atlas to be integrated with those from other regional partnerships, thereby supporting the U.S. Department of Energy's national carbon atlas, NATCARB

317

Carbon Aerogels for Hydrogen Storage  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This effort is focused on the design of new nanostructured carbon-based materials that meet the DOE 2010 targets for on-board vehicle hydrogen storage. Carbon aerogels (CAs) are a unique class of porous materials that possess a number of desirable structural features for the storage of hydrogen, including high surface areas (over 3000 m{sup 2}/g), continuous and tunable porosities, and variable densities. In addition, the flexibility associated with CA synthesis allows for the incorporation of modifiers or catalysts into the carbon matrix in order to alter hydrogen sorption enthalpies in these materials. Since the properties of the doped CAs can be systematically modified (i.e. amount/type of dopant, surface area, porosity), novel materials can be fabricated that exhibit enhanced hydrogen storage properties. We are using this approach to design new H{sub 2} sorbent materials that can storage appreciable amounts of hydrogen at room temperature through a process known as hydrogen spillover. The spillover process involves the dissociative chemisorption of molecular hydrogen on a supported metal catalyst surface (e.g. platinum or nickel), followed by the diffusion of atomic hydrogen onto the surface of the support material. Due to the enhanced interaction between atomic hydrogen and the carbon support, hydrogen can be stored in the support material at more reasonable operating temperatures. While the spillover process has been shown to increase the reversible hydrogen storage capacities at room temperature in metal-loaded carbon nanostructures, a number of issues still exist with this approach, including slow kinetics of H{sub 2} uptake and capacities ({approx} 1.2 wt% on carbon) below the DOE targets. The ability to tailor different structural aspects of the spillover system (i.e. the size/shape of the catalyst particle, the catalyst-support interface and the support morphology) should provide valuable mechanistic information regarding the critical aspects of the spillover process (i.e. kinetics of hydrogen dissociation, diffusion and recombination) and allow for optimization of these materials to meet the DOE targets for hydrogen storage. In a parallel effort, we are also designing CA materials as nanoporous scaffolds for metal hydride systems. Recent work by others has demonstrated that nanostructured metal hydrides show enhanced kinetics for reversible hydrogen storage relative to the bulk materials. This effect is diminished, however, after several hydriding/dehydriding cycles, as the material structure coarsens. Incorporation of the metal hydride into a porous scaffolding material can potentially limit coarsening and, therefore, preserve the enhanced kinetics and improved cycling behavior of the nanostructured metal hydride. Success implementation of this approach, however, requires the design of nanoporous solids with large accessible pore volumes (> 4 cm{sup 3}/g) to minimize the gravimetric and volumetric capacity penalties associated with the use of the scaffold. In addition, these scaffold materials should be capable of managing thermal changes associated with the cycling of the incorporated metal hydride. CAs are promising candidates for the design of such porous scaffolds due to the large pore volumes and tunable porosity of aerogel framework. This research is a joint effort with HRL Laboratories, a member of the DOE Metal Hydride Center of Excellence. LLNL's efforts have focused on the design of new CA materials that can meet the scaffolding requirements, while metal hydride incorporation into the scaffold and evaluation of the kinetics and cycling performance of these composites is performed at HRL.

Baumann, T F; Worsley, M; Satcher, J H

2008-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

318

RESTORING SUSTAINABLE FORESTS ON APPALACHIAN MINED LANDS FOR WOOD PRODUCTS, RENEWABLE ENERGY, CARBON SEQUESTRATION, AND OTHER ECOSYSTEM SERVICES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The overall purpose of this project is to evaluate the biological and economic feasibility of restoring high-quality forests on mined land, and to measure carbon sequestration and wood production benefits that would be achieved from forest restoration procedures. In this quarterly report, we present a preliminary comparison of the carbon sequestration benefits for two forest types used to convert abandoned grasslands for carbon sequestration. Annual mixed hardwood benefits, based on total stand carbon volume present at the end of a given year, range from a minimum of $0/ton of carbon to a maximum of $5.26/ton of carbon (low prices). White pine benefits based on carbon volume range from a minimum of $0/ton of carbon to a maximum of $18.61/ton of carbon (high prices). The higher maximum white pine carbon payment can primarily be attributed to the fact that the shorter rotation means that payments for white pine carbon are being made on far less cumulative carbon tonnage than for that of the long-rotation hardwoods. Therefore, the payment per ton of white pine carbon needs to be higher than that of the hardwoods in order to render the conversion to white pine profitable by the end of a rotation. These carbon payments may seem appealingly low to the incentive provider. However, payments (not discounted) made over a full rotation may add up to approximately $17,493/ha for white pine (30-year rotation), and $18,820/ha for mixed hardwoods (60-year rotation). The literature suggests a range of carbon sequestration costs, from $0/ton of carbon to $120/ton of carbon, although the majority of studies suggest a cost below $50/ ton of carbon, with van Kooten et al. (2000) suggesting a cutoff cost of $20/ton of carbon sequestered. Thus, the ranges of carbon payments estimated for this study fall well within the ranges of carbon sequestration costs estimated in previous studies.

J. Burger; J. Galbraith; T. Fox; G. Amacher; J. Sullivan; C. Zipper

2003-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

319

Extraction of the symmetry energy coefficients from the masses differences of isobaric nuclei  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The nuclear symmetry energy coefficients of finite nuclei are extracted by using the differences between the masses of isobaric nuclei. Based on the masses of more than 2400 nuclei with $A=9-270$, we investigate the model dependence in the extraction of symmetry energy coefficient. We find that the extraction of the symmetry energy coefficients is strongly correlated with the forms of the Coulomb energy and the mass dependence of the symmetry energy coefficient adopted. The values of the extracted symmetry energy coefficients increase by about 2 MeV for heavy nuclei when the Coulomb correction term is involved. We obtain the bulk symmetry energy coefficient $S_0=28.26\\pm1.3$ MeV and the surface-to-volume ratio $\\kappa=1.26\\pm 0.25 $ MeV if assuming the mass dependence of symmetry energy coefficient $a_{\\rm sym}(A)=S_0(1-\\kappa/A^{1/3})$, and $S_0=32.80\\pm1.7$ MeV, $\\kappa=2.82\\pm0.57$ MeV when $a_{\\rm sym}(A)=S_0 (1+\\kappa/A^{1/3})^{-1}$ is adopted.

Junlong Tian; Haitao Cui; Kuankuan Zheng; Ning Wang

2014-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

320

Carbon Fuel Particles Used in Direct Carbon Conversion Fuel Cells  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A system for preparing particulate carbon fuel and using the particulate carbon fuel in a fuel cell. Carbon particles are finely divided. The finely dividing carbon particles are introduced into the fuel cell. A gas containing oxygen is introduced into the fuel cell. The finely divided carbon particles are exposed to carbonate salts, or to molten NaOH or KOH or LiOH or mixtures of NaOH or KOH or LiOH, or to mixed hydroxides, or to alkali and alkaline earth nitrates.

Cooper, John F. (Oakland, CA); Cherepy, Nerine (Oakland, CA)

2008-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "type carbon coefficient" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Carbon fuel particles used in direct carbon conversion fuel cells  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A system for preparing particulate carbon fuel and using the particulate carbon fuel in a fuel cell. Carbon particles are finely divided. The finely dividing carbon particles are introduced into the fuel cell. A gas containing oxygen is introduced into the fuel cell. The finely divided carbon particles are exposed to carbonate salts, or to molten NaOH or KOH or LiOH or mixtures of NaOH or KOH or LiOH, or to mixed hydroxides, or to alkali and alkaline earth nitrates.

Cooper, John F. (Oakland, CA); Cherepy, Nerine (Oakland, CA)

2011-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

322

Carbon fuel particles used in direct carbon conversion fuel cells  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A system for preparing particulate carbon fuel and using the particulate carbon fuel in a fuel cell. Carbon particles are finely divided. The finely dividing carbon particles are introduced into the fuel cell. A gas containing oxygen is introduced into the fuel cell. The finely divided carbon particles are exposed to carbonate salts, or to molten NaOH or KOH or LiOH or mixtures of NaOH or KOH or LiOH, or to mixed hydroxides, or to alkali and alkaline earth nitrates.

Cooper, John F. (Oakland, CA); Cherepy, Nerine (Oakland, CA)

2012-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

323

Carbon fuel particles used in direct carbon conversion fuel cells  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A system for preparing particulate carbon fuel and using the particulate carbon fuel in a fuel cell. Carbon particles are finely divided. The finely dividing carbon particles are introduced into the fuel cell. A gas containing oxygen is introduced into the fuel cell. The finely divided carbon particles are exposed to carbonate salts, or to molten NaOH or KOH or LiOH or mixtures of NaOH or KOH or LiOH, or to mixed hydroxides, or to alkali and alkaline earth nitrates.

Cooper, John F.; Cherepy, Nerine

2012-10-09T23:59:59.000Z

324

Chemically modified carbonic anhydrases useful in carbon capture systems  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present disclosure relates to chemically modified carbonic anhydrase polypeptides and soluble compositions, homogenous liquid formulations comprising them. The chemically modified carbonic anhydrase polypeptides have improved properties relative to the same carbonic anhydrase polypeptide that is not chemically modified including the improved properties of increased activity and/or stability in the presence of amine compounds, ammonia, or carbonate ion. The present disclosure also provides methods of preparing the chemically modified polypeptides and methods of using the chemically modified polypeptides for accelerating the absorption of carbon dioxide from a gas stream into a solution as well as for the release of the absorbed carbon dioxide for further treatment and/or sequestering.

Novick, Scott J; Alvizo, Oscar

2013-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

325

Chemically modified carbonic anhydrases useful in carbon capture systems  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present disclosure relates to chemically modified carbonic anhydrase polypeptides and soluble compositions, homogenous liquid formulations comprising them. The chemically modified carbonic anhydrase polypeptides have improved properties relative to the same carbonic anhydrase polypeptide that is not chemically modified including the improved properties of increased activity and/or stability in the presence of amine compounds, ammonia, or carbonate ion. The present disclosure also provides methods of preparing the chemically modified polypeptides and methods of using the chemically modified polypeptides for accelerating the absorption of carbon dioxide from a gas stream into a solution as well as for the release of the absorbed carbon dioxide for further treatment and/or sequestering.

Novick, Scott; Alvizo, Oscar

2013-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

326

Comparative study of methods used to estimate ionic diffusion coefficients using migration tests  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Ionic diffusion coefficients are estimated rapidly using electromigration tests. In this paper, electromigration tests are accurately simulated by numerically solving the Nernst-Planck (NP) equation (coupled with the electroneutrality condition (EN)) using the finite element method. Numerical simulations are validated against experimental data obtained elsewhere [E. Samson, J. Marchand, K.A. Snyder, Calculation of ionic diffusion coefficients on the basis of migration test results, Materials and Structures/Materiaux et Constructions 36 (257) (2003) 156-165., H. Friedmann, O. Amiri, A. Ait-Mokhtar, A direct method for determining chloride diffusion coefficient by using migration test, Cement and Concrete Research 34 (11) (2004) 1967-1973.]. It is shown that migration due to the non-linear electric potential completely overwhelms diffusion due to concentration gradients. The effects of different applied voltage differences and chloride source concentrations on estimations of chloride diffusion coefficients are explored. We show that the pore fluid within concrete and mortar specimens generally differs from the curing solution, lowering the apparent diffusion coefficient, primarily due to interactions of chloride ions with other ions in the pore fluid. We show that the variation of source chloride concentration strongly affects the estimation of diffusion coefficients in non-steady-state tests; however this effect vanishes under steady-state conditions. Most importantly, a comparison of diffusion coefficients obtained from sophisticated analyses (i.e., NP-EN) and a variety of commonly used simplifying methods to estimate chloride diffusion coefficients allows us to identify those methods and experimental conditions where both approaches deliver good estimates for chloride diffusion coefficients. Finally, we demonstrate why simultaneous use and monitoring of current density and fluxes are recommended for both the non-steady and steady-state migration tests.

Narsilio, G.A. [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, School of Engineering, University of Melbourne, Victoria 3010 (Australia)], E-mail: narsilio@unimelb.edu.au; Li, R. [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, School of Engineering, University of Melbourne, Victoria 3010 (Australia); Institute of Geotechnical Engineering, Southeast University (SEU), Nanjing, Jiangsu (China)], E-mail: lirenmin@seu.edu.cn; Pivonka, P. [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, School of Engineering, University of Melbourne, Victoria 3010 (Australia)], E-mail: ppivonka@unimelb.edu.au; Smith, D.W. [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, School of Engineering, University of Melbourne, Victoria 3010 (Australia)], E-mail: david.smith@unimelb.edu.au

2007-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

327

Particles of spilled oil-absorbing carbon in contact with water  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Hydrogen generator coupled to or integrated with a fuel cell for portable power applications. Hydrogen is produced via thermocatalytic decomposition (cracking, pyrolysis) of hydrocarbon fuels in oxidant-free environment. The apparatus can utilize a variety of hydrocarbon fuels, including natural gas, propane, gasoline, kerosene, diesel fuel, crude oil (including sulfurous fuels). The hydrogen-rich gas produced is free of carbon oxides or other reactive impurities, so it could be directly fed to any type of a fuel cell. The catalysts for hydrogen production in the apparatus are carbon-based or metal-based materials and doped, if necessary, with a sulfur-capturing agent. Additionally disclosed are two novel processes for the production of two types of carbon filaments, and a novel filamentous carbon product. Carbon particles with surface filaments having a hydrophobic property of oil film absorption, compositions of matter containing those particles, and a system for using the carbon particles for cleaning oil spills.

Muradov, Nazim (Melbourne, FL)

2011-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

328

Hydrogen in Type Ic Supernovae?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

By definition, a Type Ic supernova (SN Ic) does not have conspicuous lines of hydrogen or helium in its optical spectrum. SNe Ic usually are modelled in terms of the gravitational collapse of bare carbon-oxygen cores. We consider the possibility that the spectra of ordinary (SN 1994I-like) SNe Ic have been misinterpreted, and that SNe Ic eject hydrogen. An absorption feature usually attributed to a blend of Si II 6355 and C II 6580 may be produced by H-alpha. If SN 1994I-like SNe Ic eject hydrogen, the possibility that hypernova (SN 1998bw-like) SNe Ic, some of which are associated with gamma-ray bursts, also eject hydrogen should be considered. The implications of hydrogen for SN Ic progenitors and explosion models are briefly discussed.

David Branch; David J. Jeffery; Timothy R. Young; E. Baron

2006-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

329

ammonium carbonates: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

T300: C strength 4340 steel, carbon-carbon composite, and Carbon-Silicon Carbide composite were tested to examine materials. MATERIALS AND DESIRED DATA Carbon-Carbon...

330

a537 carbon steel: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

T300: C strength 4340 steel, carbon-carbon composite, and Carbon-Silicon Carbide composite were tested to examine materials. MATERIALS AND DESIRED DATA Carbon-Carbon...

331

americium carbonates: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

T300: C strength 4340 steel, carbon-carbon composite, and Carbon-Silicon Carbide composite were tested to examine materials. MATERIALS AND DESIRED DATA Carbon-Carbon...

332

affecting carbon tetrachloride: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

T300: C strength 4340 steel, carbon-carbon composite, and Carbon-Silicon Carbide composite were tested to examine materials. MATERIALS AND DESIRED DATA Carbon-Carbon...

333

Electrochemical implications of defects in carbon nanotubes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in Hollow Carbon Nanotubes . . . . . . 4.3.2.1 IncreasingThe electrochemistry of carbon nanotubes. Journal of Thethe sidewalls of carbon nanotubes. Journal of the American

Hoefer, Mark

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

A cell nanoinjector based on carbon nanotubes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

based on carbon nanotubes Xing Chen *|| , Andras Kis †|| ,that uses carbon nanotubes to deliver cargo into cells. Astrength (2, 3), carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are ideal nanoscale

Chen, Xing; Kis, Andras; Zettl, Alex; Bertozzi, Carolyn R.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Electron transport through single carbon nanotubes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

through single carbon nanotubes G. Chai Apollo Technologies,aligned multi-wall carbon nanotubes (CNT). Embedding of CNTsuse of fiber coated carbon nanotubes makes the handling of

Chai, G

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

Ultrafast Nonlinear Spectroscopy of Semiconducting Carbon Nanotubes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Exciton binding energies in carbon nanotubes from two-photonExciton binding energies in carbon nanotubes from two-photonoptical transition energies of carbon nanotubes: the role of

Graham, Matthew Werden

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Participatory Carbon Monitoring: Operational Guidance for National...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Participatory Carbon Monitoring: Operational Guidance for National REDD+ Carbon Accounting Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Participatory Carbon...

338

Carbon Trading Protocols for Geologic Sequestration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

H. , 2005, IPCC: Carbon Capture and Storage: Technical05CH11231. INTRODUCTION Carbon capture and storage (CCS)Development Mechanism CCS: Carbon Capture and Storage C02e:

Hoversten, Shanna

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

ASSESSMENT OF HOUSEHOLD CARBON FOOTPRINT REDUCTION POTENTIALS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of  American household carbon footprint. ” Ecological and  limitations) of carbon footprint estimates toward of the art in carbon footprint analyses for California, 

Masanet, Eric

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

On carbon footprints and growing energy use  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

On carbon footprints and growing energy use Curtis M.reductions in the carbon footprint of a growing organizationhis own organization's carbon footprint and answers this

Oldenburg, C.M.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "type carbon coefficient" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Carbon Nanotubes: Bearing Stress Like Never Before  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Hart, A.J. (2013). Carbon Nanotubes: Present and Futureproduction of carbon nanotubes, and can be used to producesynthesized properly, and carbon nanotubes are no exception.

Limaye, Aditya

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Electrochemical implications of defects in carbon nanotubes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

parameters. Fullerenes, Nanotubes and Carbon Nanostructures,in Hollow Carbon Nanotubes . . . . . . 4.3.2.1 Increasingmigration in graphite and carbon nanotubes. Chemical Physics

Hoefer, Mark

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Carbon Nanotube and Graphene Nanoelectromechanical Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Carbon Nanotubes on the2.4 Static Deformation of Carbon Nanotubes . . . . . .3.2 Field Emission from Carbon Nanotubes: Electrostatics

Aleman, Benjamin Jose

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Defects and Disorder in Carbon Nanotubes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Perebeinos, V. (2008) Carbon Nanotubes 111 423. Bachilo, S.M. & Mceuen, P. L. (2008) Carbon Nanotubes 111 Biro, L. P. ,sectional structure of carbon nanotubes. Fullerenes '96.

Collins, Philip G

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Electron transport through single carbon nanotubes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

transport through single carbon nanotubes G. Chai Apolloaligned multi-wall carbon nanotubes (CNT). Embedding of CNTsuse of fiber coated carbon nanotubes makes the handling of

Chai, G

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

How Carbon Capture Works | Department of Energy  

Energy Savers [EERE]

past two decades. Carbon capture, utilization and storage (CCUS) -- also referred to as carbon capture, utilization and sequestration -- is a process that captures carbon dioxide...

347

Carbon nanotubes : synthesis, characterization, and applications  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

around Surface-Attached Carbon Nanotubes. Ind. Eng. Chem.the flexural rigidity of carbon nanotube ensembles. AppliedNanotechnology in Carbon Materials. Acta Metallurgica, 1997.

Deck, Christian Peter

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Distributed Energy Resources for Carbon Emissions Mitigation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Energy Resources for Carbon Emissions Mitigation RyanEnergy Resources for Carbon Emissions Mitigation Ryanand/or site-attributable carbon emissions at commercial and

Firestone, Ryan; Marnay, Chris

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

The Carbon balance of sorghum from anthesis to black layer  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Measured Changes in Y and m The Integrated Carbon Balance Parameters dS, dW, and dSm as Functions of Biomass Page 87 96 Effects of Tissue Composi tion on Y g V CONCLUSIONS REFERENCES VI TA 101 117 122 125 LIST OF FIGURES Figure Page 2. 1 2... over time. . . . 91 g A plot of the maintenance coefficient, m over time. . 93 Figure Page 4, 4 Plot of the total percent nitrogen in six plants across three growth stages. . . . . . . . 94 4. 5 Plots of dS and dW as functions of biomass, W. 4. 6...

Stahl, Randal Scott

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Carbon-particle generator  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method and apparatus whereby small carbon particles are made by pyrolysis of a mixture of acetylene carried in argon. The mixture is injected through a nozzle into a heated tube. A small amount of air is added to the mixture. In order to prevent carbon build-up at the nozzle, the nozzle tip is externally cooled. The tube is also elongated sufficiently to assure efficient pyrolysis at the desired flow rates. A key feature of the method is that the acetylene and argon, for example, are premixed in a dilute ratio, and such mixture is injected while cool to minimize the agglomeration of the particles, which produces carbon particles with desired optical properties for use as a solar radiant heat absorber.

Hunt, A.J.

1982-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

351

Formation of rare earth carbonates using supercritical carbon dioxide  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The invention relates to a process for the rapid, high yield conversion of select rare earth oxides or hydroxides, to their corresponding carbonates by contact with supercritical carbon dioxide.

Fernando, Quintus (Tucson, AZ); Yanagihara, Naohisa (Zacopan, MX); Dyke, James T. (Santa Fe, NM); Vemulapalli, Krishna (Tuscon, AZ)

1991-09-03T23:59:59.000Z

352

SoftTemplated Mesoporous CarbonCarbon Nanotube Composites for...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Mesoporous Carbon-Carbon Nanotube Composites for High Performance Lithium-ion Batteries Dr. B. K. Guo, Dr. X. Q. Wang, Dr. P. F. Fulvio , Dr. S. M. Mahurin, Dr. X.-G. Sun,...

353

Ultrahard carbon nanocomposite films  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Modest thermal annealing to 600 C of diamondlike amorphous-carbon (a-C) films grown at room temperature results in the formation of carbon nanocomposites with hardness similar to diamond. These nanocomposite films consist of nanometer-sized regions of high density a-C embedded in an a-C matrix with a reduced density of 5--10%. The authors report on the evolution of density and bonding topologies as a function of annealing temperature. Despite a decrease in density, film hardness actually increases {approximately} 15% due to the development of the nanocomposite structure.

SIEGAL,MICHAEL P.; TALLANT,DAVID R.; PROVENCIO,PAULA P.; OVERMYER,DONALD L.; SIMPSON,REGINA L.; MARTINEZ-MIRANDA,L.J.

2000-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

354

Structural response of oxidation resistant carbon-carbon composites  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE Approved as to style and content by: zden O. Ochoa (Chair of Committee) Tho . o k (Member) Paul . Roschke (Member) J. A. Caton (Head of Department) December l996 Major Subject: Mechanical Engineering ABSTRACT... Structural Response of Oxidation Resistant Carbon-carbon Composites. (December 1996) Timothy Harold Ashley, B. S. , Texas ARM University Chair of Advisory Committee: Dr. Ozden O. Ochoa Since carbon-carbon composites maintain their strength at high...

Ashley, Timothy Harold

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

355

Quantifying the economic and commercial potential of a high strength, low thermal coefficient super-alloy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Inspired by the importance of having a favourable sheathing material for superconducting wires, a high-strength, low thermal coefficient (CTE) super-alloy has been developed. Known as Incoloy 908, this super-alloy's material ...

Liew, Heng Lee Henry

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

Identification of dynamic force coefficients of a labyrinth and gas damper seal using impact load excitations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, and the seal displacement and acceleration time responses in two orthogonal directions are measured. A frequency domain parameter identification procedure allows the determination of the seals' dynamic force coefficients over a frequency range. Tests are made...

Ransom, David Lawrence

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Identification of force coefficients in flexible rotor-bearing systems - enhancements and further validations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

identification of bearing force parameters, i.e. stiffness and damping coefficients, is one of the most difficult to achieve. Field identification by imbalance response measurements is a simple and often reliable way to determine synchronous speed force...

Balantrapu, Achuta Kishore Rama Krishna

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

Identification of Force Coefficients in Two Squeeze Film Dampers with a Central Groove  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

frequency over the frequency range of the tests. Predictions derived from a novel SFD computational tool that includes flow interactions in the central groove and oil supply orifices agree well with the experimental force coefficients for both dampers...

Seshagiri, Sanjeev

2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

359

Sediment-Water Partition Coefficients of Hydrophobic Persistent Organic Pollutants (POPs)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Sediment-Water Partition Coefficients of Hydrophobic Persistent Organic Pollutants (POPs) for Different Sediments with Passive Sampler Benoit Charrasse (benoit.charrasse@ineris.fr) and Pierre Hennebert aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) were determined in sediments from five

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

360

ErAs/InGaAs superlattice Seebeck coefficient Gehong Zeng, John E. Bowers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

material, and the output power of thermal-to- electricity power generator is proportional to the square or generators. For TE coolers, the cooling power is proportional to the Seebeck coefficient of the element

Bowers, John

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "type carbon coefficient" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Modeling of activity coefficients of aqueous solutions of quaternary ammonium salts with the  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

with the electrolyte-NRTL equation Lionel S. Belvèze, Joan F. Brennecke* and Mark A. Stadtherr Department of Chemical-liquid (NRTL) model proposed by Chen et al.,1 can be applied to model activity coefficients of quaternary

Stadtherr, Mark A.

362

Hardy-Littlewood theorem for trigonometric series with {alpha}-monotone coefficients  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Hardy-Littlewood theorem is established for trigonometric series with {alpha}-monotone coefficients. Inequalities of Hardy-Littlewood kind are proved. Examples of series demonstrating that the results obtained are sharp are constructed. Bibliography: 15 titles.

Dyachenko, Mikhail I [M. V. Lomonosov Moscow State University, Faculty of Mechanics and Mathematics, Moscow (Russian Federation); Nursultanov, Erlan D [Kazakhstan Branch of Lomonosov Moscow State University, Astana (Kazakhstan)

2009-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

363

E-Print Network 3.0 - accurate long-range coefficients Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

in Journal of Statistical Planning and Inference A critical look at Lo's modified RS statistic Lambdayz Summary: )-coefficient, OE 0:5; 0:9, and 5 different values for the...

364

Experimental determination of dynamic force coefficients of a pocket damper seal at higher frequencies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

repeated on the modified PDS. These tests show positive damping and negative stiffness in both the horizontal and vertical directions. The tests also show that the magnitude of both the damping and the stiffness coefficients increase with the inlet pressure...

Sharma, Ashish

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

Thermocatalytic process for CO.sub.2-free production of hydrogen and carbon from hydrocarbons  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A novel process and apparatus are disclosed for sustainable CO.sub.2-free production of hydrogen and carbon by thermocatalytic decomposition (dissociation, pyrolysis, cracking) of hydrocarbon fuels over carbon-based catalysts in the absence of air and/or water. The apparatus and thermocatalytic process improve the activity and stability of carbon catalysts during the thermocatalytic process and produce both high purity hydrogen (at least, 99.0 volume %) and carbon, from any hydrocarbon fuel, including sulfurous fuels. In a preferred embodiment, production of hydrogen and carbon is achieved by both internal and external activation of carbon catalysts. Internal activation of carbon catalyst is accomplished by recycling of hydrogen-depleted gas containing unsaturated and aromatic hydrocarbons back to the reactor. External activation of the catalyst can be achieved via surface gasification with hot combustion gases during catalyst heating. The process and apparatus can be conveniently integrated with any type of fuel cell to generate electricity.

Muradov, Nazim Z. (Melbourne, FL)

2011-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

366

Types of Costs Types of Cost Estimates  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

05-1 · Types of Costs · Types of Cost Estimates · Methods to estimate capital costs MIN E 408-Revenue Relationships · Capital Costs (or first cost or capital investment): ­ Expenditures made to acquire or develop capital assets ­ Three main classes of capital costs: 1. Depreciable Investment: · Investment allocated

Boisvert, Jeff

367

Operational factorization of the linear second-order differential equation with variable coefficients  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

OPERATIONAL FACTORIZATION OF THE LINEAR SECOND-ORDER DIFFERENTIAL EQUATION WITH VARIABLE COEFFICIENTS A Thesis By LARRY MORTON AUSTIN Submitted to the Graduate College of the Texas ASM University in partial fulfillment of the requirements... for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 1966 Major Subject: Mathematics OPERATIONAL FACTORIZATION OF THE LINEAR SECOND-ORDER DIFFERENTIAL EQUATION WITH VARIABLE COEFFICIENTS A Thesis By LARRY MORTON AUSTIN Approved as to style and content by: (Ch rman...

Austin, Larry Morton

1966-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

Identification of force coefficients in a squeeze film damper with a mechanical seal  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

IDENTIFICATION OF FORCE COEFFICIENTS IN A SQUEEZE FILM DAMPER WITH A MECHANICAL SEAL A Thesis by ADOLFO DELGADO-MARQUEZ Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment... of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 2005 Major Subject: Mechanical Engineering IDENTIFICATION OF FORCE COEFFICIENTS IN A SQUEEZE FILM DAMPER WITH A MECHANICAL SEAL A Thesis by ADOLFO DELGADO...

Delgado-Marquez, Adolfo

2006-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

369

Effect of surfactant on evaporative heat transfer coefficients in vertical film forced convection  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for different concentrations of surfactant (log-log scale) (Boiling liquid flow rate of 1. 025 gpm) Evaporative coefficient as function of tempera- ture drop over the liquid film for different concentrations of surfactant (log-log scale) (Boiling liquid... flow rate of 1. 275 gpm) Evaporative coefficient as function of tempera- ture drop over the liquid film for different concentrations of surfactant (log-log scale) (Boiling liquid flow rate of 1. 55 gpm) 47 84 85 86 87 10 Evaporative...

Shah, Basit Husain

1972-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Indirect methods of determination of the asymptotic normalization coefficients and their application for nuclear astrophysics  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The basic methods of the determination of asymptotic normalization coefficient for A+a?B of astrophysical interest are briefly presented. The results of the application of the specific asymptotic normalization coefficients derived within these methods for the extrapolation of the astrophysical S factors to experimentally inaccessible energy regions (E ? 25 keV) for the some specific radiative capture A(a,?)B reactions of the pp-chain and the CNO cycle are presented.

Yarmukhamedov, R. [Institute of Nuclear Physics, Academy of Sciences of Uzbekistan, 100214 Tashkent (Uzbekistan)

2014-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

371

An experimental and theoretical comparison of rotordynamic coefficients for sawtooth-pattern damper seals  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

AN EXPERIMENTAL AND THEORETICAL COMPARISON OF ROTORDYNAMIC COEFFICIENTS FOR SAWTOOTH-PATTERN DAMPER SEALS A Thesis by STEVEN ANTHONY NOLAN Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas AlkM University in partial fulfillment of the requirements... for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May &9BT Major Subject: Mechanical Engineering AN EXPERIMENTAL AND THEORETICAL COMPARISON OF ROTORDYNAMIC COEFFICIENTS FOR SAWTOOTH-PATTERN DAMPER SEALS A Thesis by STEVEN ANTHONY NOLAN Approved as to style...

Nolan, Steven Anthony

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

A comparison of Lagrangian inertia coefficients for robot manipulator dynamics to examine real-time applicability  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A COMPARISON OF LAGRANGIAN INERTIA COEFFICIENTS FOR ROBOT MANIPULATOR DYNAMICS TO EXAMINE REAL-TIME APPLICABILITY A Thesis by GERALD PAUL ROSTON Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment... of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1985 Major Subject: Mechanical Engineering A COMPARISON OF LAGRANGIAN INERTIA COEFFICIENTS FOR ROBOT MANIPULATOR DYiNAMICS TO EXAMINE REAL-TIME APPLICABILITY A Thesis by GERALD PAUL ROSTON...

Roston, Gerald Paul

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

Experimental measurements and methods for data analysis to determine the rotordynamic coefficients of a labyrinth seal  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

subsynchronous instability, which means that rotor whirl occurs at a frequency less than the rotating speed with amplitudes which grow as running speed increases. Synchronous response of high pressure turbines, compressors and other rotating machinery can also... equation turns out to be overdetermined. The present method consists of two parts; one a part to identify the rotor support properties - stifFness and damping coefficients of roller bearings, and the other a part to identify seal force coefficients...

Choi, Sang Kyu

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Friction coefficients of sorghum grain on steel, teflon, and concrete surfaces  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

FRICTION COEFFICIENTS OF SORGHUM GRAIN ON STEEL, TEFLON, AND CONCRETE SURFACES A Thesis By QUAZI ANWAR HOSSAIN Submitted to the Graduate College of the Texas A6M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER... OF SCIENCE January 1967 Major Subject: Agricultural Engineering FRICTION COEFFICIENTS OF SORGHUM GRMN ON STEEL, TEFLON, AND CONCRETE SURFACES A Thesis By QUAZI ANWAR HOSSAIN Approved as to style and content by: (Chairma Com ' ee) ead o D'epart nt...

Hossain, Quazi A

1967-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

Low Cost Carbon Fiber Production Carbon Fiber Manufacturing Cost Modeling  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to bond with composite matrix material. It is important that a carbon fiber manufacturing cost model manufactured with carbon fiber as opposed to traditional materials such as steel, automotive parts are able associated with both the manufacture of carbon fibers themselves as well as their composites. Traditional

376

ISSUES IN EVALUATING CARBON SEQUESTRATION AND ATTRIBUTING CARBON CREDITS TO GRASSLAND RESTORATION EFFORTS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ISSUES IN EVALUATING CARBON SEQUESTRATION AND ATTRIBUTING CARBON CREDITS TO GRASSLAND RESTORATION examines biological carbon sequestration using a grassland restoration as a model system. Chapter 1 for biological carbon sequestration. In this analysis, we found that significantly greater soil carbon

Wisconsin at Madison, University of

377

Carbon monoxide exposure of subjects with documented cardiac arrhythmias  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The impact of low-level carbon monoxide exposure on ventricular arrhythmia frequency in patients with ischemic heart disease has not been thoroughly studied. The issue is of concern because of the potential proarrhythmic effect of carbon monoxide in patients with ischemic heart disease. We studied 30 subjects with well-documented coronary artery disease who had an average of at least 30 ventricular ectopic beats per hour over a 20-hour monitoring interval. By using appropriate inclusion and exclusion criteria, subjects were selected and enrolled in a randomized double-blind study to determine the effects of carbon monoxide exposure on ventricular arrhythmia frequency at rest, during exercise, and during ambulatory activities. The carbon monoxide exposure was designed to result in 3% or 5% carboxyhemoglobin levels, as measured by gas chromatography. The carbon monoxide exposure protocol produced target levels in 60 minutes, and the levels were maintained for an additional 90 minutes to provide adequate time to assess the impact of carbon monoxide on the frequency of ventricular ectopic beats. The data on total and repetitive ventricular arrhythmias were analyzed for seven specific time intervals: (1) two hours before carbon monoxide exposure; (2) during the two-hour carbon monoxide or air exposure; (3) during a two-hour rest period; (4) during an exercise period; (5) during an exercise recovery period; (6) six hours after carbon monoxide or air exposure; and (7) approximately 10 hours after exposure, or the remaining recording interval on the Holter monitor. There was no increase in ventricular arrhythmia frequency after carbon monoxide exposure, regardless of the level of carboxyhemoglobin or the type of activity.

Chaitman, B.R.; Dahms, T.E.; Byers, S.; Carroll, L.W.; Younis, L.T.; Wiens, R.D. (St. Louis Univ. School of Medicine, MO (United States))

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Non-local thermodynamic equilibrium effects on isentropic coefficient in argon and helium thermal plasmas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the present work, two cases of thermal plasma have been considered; the ground state plasma in which all the atoms and ions are assumed to be in the ground state and the excited state plasma in which atoms and ions are distributed over various possible excited states. The variation of Z?, frozen isentropic coefficient and the isentropic coefficient with degree of ionization and non-equilibrium parameter ?(= T{sub e}/T{sub h}) has been investigated for the ground and excited state helium and argon plasmas at pressures 1?atm, 10?atm, and 100?atm in the temperature range from 6000?K to 60?000?K. For a given value of non-equilibrium parameter, the relationship of Z? with degree of ionization does not show any dependence on electronically excited states in helium plasma whereas in case of argon plasma this dependence is not appreciable till degree of ionization approaches 2. The minima of frozen isentropic coefficient shifts toward lower temperature with increase of non-equilibrium parameter for both the helium and argon plasmas. The lowering of non-equilibrium parameter decreases the frozen isentropic coefficient more emphatically in helium plasma at high pressures in comparison to argon plasma. The increase of pressure slightly reduces the ionization range over which isentropic coefficient almost remains constant and it does not affect appreciably the dependence of isentropic coefficient on non-equilibrium parameter.

Sharma, Rohit [Satyam Institute of Engineering and Technology, Amritsar 143107 (India)] [Satyam Institute of Engineering and Technology, Amritsar 143107 (India); Singh, Kuldip [Department of Physics, Guru Nanak Dev University, Amritsar 143005 (India)] [Department of Physics, Guru Nanak Dev University, Amritsar 143005 (India)

2014-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

379

Carbon nanotubes: synthesis and functionalization   

E-Print Network [OSTI]

conditions were then used as the basis of several comparative CVD experiments showing that the quality of nanotubes and the yield of carbon depended on the availability of carbon to react. The availability could be controlled by the varying concentration...

Andrews, Robert

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Irradiation Stability of Carbon Nanotubes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ion irradiation of carbon nanotubes is a tool that can be used to achieve modification of the structure. Irradiation stability of carbon nanotubes was studied by ion and electron bombardment of the samples. Different ion species at various energies...

Aitkaliyeva, Assel

2010-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "type carbon coefficient" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Sensor applications of carbon nanotubes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A search of published research on sensing mechanisms of carbon nanotubes was performed to identify applications in which carbon nanotubes might improve on current sensor technologies, in either offering improved performance, ...

Rushfeldt, Scott I

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Anisotropic decay dynamics of photoexcited aligned carbon nanotube bundles Y. Hashimoto,1,2,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, and magnetic proper- ties are under intensive investigations world wide.1 Various types of recent opticalAnisotropic decay dynamics of photoexcited aligned carbon nanotube bundles Y. Hashimoto,1,2, * Y-probe spectroscopy of a film of aligned single- walled carbon nanotube bundles. By taking into account imperfect

Kono, Junichiro

383

CURE MONITORING AND SHM OF CARBON FIBER REINFORCED PART II : MULTI-PHYSICAL CORRELATIONS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CURE MONITORING AND SHM OF CARBON FIBER REINFORCED POLYMER PART II : MULTI-PHYSICAL CORRELATIONS. The material (made of T700 carbon /M21 epoxy prepegs) is here used as a sensor but could be also used]. The electrical resistivity of CFRP composites depends on the type and the orientation of the fiber

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

384

Water-soluble carbon nanotube compositions for drug delivery and medicinal applications  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Compositions comprising a plurality of functionalized carbon nanotubes and at least one type of payload molecule are provided herein. The compositions are soluble in water and PBS in some embodiments. In certain embodiments, the payload molecules are insoluble in water. Methods are described for making the compositions and administering the compositions. An extended release formulation for paclitaxel utilizing functionalized carbon nanotubes is also described.

Tour, James M.; Lucente-Schultz, Rebecca; Leonard, Ashley; Kosynkin, Dmitry V.; Price, Brandi Katherine; Hudson, Jared L.; Conyers, Jr., Jodie L.; Moore, Valerie C.; Casscells, S. Ward; Myers, Jeffrey N.; Milas, Zvonimir L.; Mason, Kathy A.; Milas, Luka

2014-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

385

Carbon microspheres as network nodes in a novel biocompatible gel J. E. St. Dennis,a  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

through the incorporation of uniform carbon micro- spheres. The carbon particles act as nodes in the gel on the gelation of vesicles using other types of hydro- phobically modified polymers.9 It is noteworthy that gelation of vesicles is not observed if the added polymer does not have hydro- phobic tails.10 The above

Raghavan, Srinivasa

386

Development of carbon-metal oxide supercapacitors from sol-gel derived carbon-ruthenium xerogels  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

There has been increasing interest in electrochemical capacitors as energy storage systems because of their high power density and long cycle life, compared to battery devices. According to the mechanism of energy storage, there are two types of electrochemical capacitors. One type is based on double layer (dl) formation due to charge separation, and the other type is based on a faradaic process due to redox reactions. Sol-gel derived high surface area carbon-ruthenium xerogels were prepared from carbonized resorcinol-formaldehyde resins containing an electrochemically active form of ruthenium oxide. The electrochemical capacitance of these materials increased with an increase in the ruthenium content indicating the presence of pseudocapacitance associated with the ruthenium oxide undergoing reversible faradaic redox reactions. A specific capacitance of 256 F/g (single electrode) was obtained from a carbon xerogel containing 14 wt% Ru, which corresponded to more than 50% utilization of the ruthenium. The double layer accounted for 40% of this capacitance. This material was also electrochemically stable, showing no change in a cyclic voltammogram for over 2,000 cycles.

Lin, C.; Ritter, J.A.; Popov, B.N.

1999-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Carbon Footprint Calculator  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This calculator estimates the amount of carbon emissions you and members of your household are responsible for. It does not include emissions associated with your work or getting to work if you commute by public transportation. It was developed by IEEE Spectrum magazine.

388

Carbon smackdown: wind warriors  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

July 16. 2010 carbon smackdown summer lecture: learn how Berkeley Lab scientists are developing wind turbines to be used in an urban setting, as well as analyzing what it will take to increase the adoption of wind energy in the U.S.

Glen Dahlbacka of the Accelerator & Fusion Research Division and Ryan Wiser of the Environmental Energy Technologies Division are the speakers.

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Carbon smackdown: wind warriors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

July 16. 2010 carbon smackdown summer lecture: learn how Berkeley Lab scientists are developing wind turbines to be used in an urban setting, as well as analyzing what it will take to increase the adoption of wind energy in the U.S.

Glen Dahlbacka of the Accelerator & Fusion Research Division and Ryan Wiser of the Environmental Energy Technologies Division are the speakers.

2010-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

390

CARBON DIOXIDE EMISSION REDUCTION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.5 Primary Energy Use and Carbon Dioxide Emissions for Selected US Chemical Subsectors in 1994 ...............................................................................................................16 Table 2.7 1999 Energy Consumption and Specific Energy Consumption (SEC) in the U.S. Cement Efficiency Technologies and Measures in Cement Industry.................22 Table 2.9 Energy Consumption

Delaware, University of

391

Carbon-Fuelled Future  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Whether due to changes in policy or consumption of available fossil fuels, alternative sources of energy will be required, especially given the rising global energy demand. However, one of the main factors limiting the widespread utilization of renewable energy, such as wind, solar, wave or geothermal, is our ability to store energy. Storage of energy from carbon-neutral sources, such as electricity from solar or wind, can be accomplished through many routes. One approach is to store energy in the form of chemical bonds, as fuels. The conversion of low-energy compounds, such as water and carbon dioxide, to higher energy molecules, such as hydrogen or carbon-based fuels, enables the storage of carbon-neutral energy on a very large scale. The author¹s work in this area is supported by the US Department of Energy Basic Energy Sciences, Division of Chemical Sciences, Geosciences & Biosciences. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is operated by Battelle for the US Department of Energy.

Appel, Aaron M.

2014-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

392

Carbon smackdown: smart windows  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

August 3, 2010 Berkeley Lab talk: In the fourth of five Carbon Smackdown matches, Berkeley Lab researchers Delia Milliron of the Materials Sciences Division and Stephen Selkowitz of the Environmental Energy Technologies Division talk about their work on energy-saving smart windows.

Delia Milliron

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

14 April 2001 tmospheric carbon dioxide  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

emissions is through increased carbon sequestration into forests. In a large-scale assessment, Birdsey- ing carbon sequestration in southern forests. Carbon sequestration via southern pine forests may policy commitments. Keywords: carbon sequestration; southern pine forests ABSTRACT MEETING GLOBAL POLICY

Teskey, Robert O.

394

The design of a test rig for the identification of dynamic coefficients of a high temperature magnetic bearing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This thesis is a report on the research and Micrographics. development to design a test rig for the identification of the dynamic coefficients of a radial magnetic bearing. The test rig development is intended for dynamic coefficient observation...

Rahtika, I Putu Gede Sopan

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

Short communication Mesoporous nitrogen-rich carbon materials as cathode catalysts in  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

activity for ORR [7]. The procedures to make these materials have required several synthesis steps, long that are pyridinic or pyrrole/pyridine, and/or quaternary types of nitrogen [8e10]. Preparation of carbon materials

396

SYNTHESIS, CHARACTERIZATION AND CATALYTIC STUDIES OF CARBON-BASED NANO MATERIALS.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

?? Nano-scaled carbons were produced by thermal treatment of pine wood chips and bio-char. The influence of temperature, heating rate, pyrolysis time, and type and… (more)

Yan, Qiangu

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Future Carbon Regulations and Current Investments in Alternative Coal-Fired Power Plant Designs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This paper assesses the role of uncertainty over future U.S. carbon regulations in shaping the current choice of which type of power plant to build. The pulverized coal technology (PC) still offer the lowest cost power— ...

Sekar, Ram C.

398

1, 167193, 2004 Terrestrial carbon  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

BGD 1, 167­193, 2004 Terrestrial carbon budget at country-scale I. A. Janssens et al. Title Page Biogeosciences Discussions is the access reviewed discussion forum of Biogeosciences The carbon budget.janssens@ua.ac.be) 167 #12;BGD 1, 167­193, 2004 Terrestrial carbon budget at country-scale I. A. Janssens et al. Title

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

399

Carbon Nanotubes for Data Processing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Carbon Nanotubes for Data Processing Joerg Appenzeller, T. J. Watson Research Center, IBM Research.2 Electronic Structure of Graphene 4 2.3 Electronic Structure of Carbon Nanotubes 4 2.4 Transport Properties 6 2.5 Contacts 9 3 Synthesis of Carbon Nanotubes 10 3.1 Synthetic Methods 10 3.2 Growth Mechanisms 12

Joselevich, Ernesto

400

Dispersion toughened silicon carbon ceramics  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Fracture resistant silicon carbide ceramics are provided by incorporating therein a particulate dispersoid selected from the group consisting of (a) a mixture of boron, carbon and tungsten, (b) a mixture of boron, carbon and molybdenum, (c) a mixture of boron, carbon and titanium carbide, (d) a mixture of aluminum oxide and zirconium oxide, and (e) boron nitride. 4 figures.

Wei, G.C.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "type carbon coefficient" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

CARBON NANOTUBE TRANSISTORS: AN EVALUATION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CARBON NANOTUBE TRANSISTORS: AN EVALUATION L.C. Castro, D.L. John, and D.L. Pulfrey Department A simple, non-equilibrium model is used to evaluate the likely DC performance of carbon nanotube field and transcon- ductance close to the low-quantum-capacitance limit. Keywords: Carbon nanotubes, field

Pulfrey, David L.

402

4, 99123, 2007 Amazon carbon  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, suggested much larger estimates for tropical forest carbon sequestration in the Ama- zon BasinBGD 4, 99­123, 2007 Amazon carbon balanc J. Lloyd et al. Title Page Abstract Introduction Discussions is the access reviewed discussion forum of Biogeosciences An airborne regional carbon balance

Boyer, Edmond

403

International Journal of Structural Changes in Solids (IJSCS), 2, N2, (2010), Materials with a desired refraction coefficient can  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and discussed. The desired refraction coefficient can be complex-valued. This means that the enrgy absorption

404

Materials with a desired refraction coefficient can be created by embedding small particles into a given material  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

coefficient can be complex-valued. This means that the enrgy absorption in the new material can also

405

Effect of guar gum upon the partition coefficients of diacetyl, acetaldehyde, and ethanol in acidified milk products  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. At 30 and 50'C, the partition coefficient for acetaldehyde was lowest at 9% SNF regardless of milk fat concentration or temperature of analysis. The partition coefficient of acetaldehyde decreased as the concentration of the flavor compound increased... with increasing concentration of milk fat and diacetyl. Guar gum did not affect the partition coefficients of the flavor compounds under any experimental condition. Partition coefficients for ethanol and diacetyl were similar at 30'C, however, at 5(PC...

Lo, Chih-Yang

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Project Profile: Direct Supercritical Carbon Dioxide Receiver...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Carbon Dioxide Receiver Development Project Profile: Direct Supercritical Carbon Dioxide Receiver Development National Renewable Energy Laboratory logo The National...

407

*** How PAN based Carbon Fibers are  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

*** How PAN based Carbon Fibers are Manufactured *** How Carbon Fiber Material Properties are Achieved *** Carbon Fiber Markets/Applications CarbonFiber AerospaceEngineeringGuestLecture: Friday as a Business Development Manager for Amoco's carbon fiber business unit (manufacturers of T-300 carbon fiber

Hu, Hui

408

6, 34193463, 2006 Black carbon or  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ACPD 6, 3419­3463, 2006 Black carbon or brown carbon M. O. Andreae and A. Gelencs´er Title Page Chemistry and Physics Discussions Black carbon or brown carbon? The nature of light-absorbing carbonaceous;ACPD 6, 3419­3463, 2006 Black carbon or brown carbon M. O. Andreae and A. Gelencs´er Title Page

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

409

CALCULATING THE CARBON FOOTPRINT SUPPLY CHAIN FOR  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CALCULATING THE CARBON FOOTPRINT SUPPLY CHAIN FOR THE SEMICONDUCTOR INDUSTRY By: Yasser Dessouky #12;Carbon Footprint Supply Chain Carbon Trust defines carbon footprint of a supply chain as follows: "The carbon footprint of a product is the carbon dioxide emitted across the supply chain for a single

Su, Xiao

410

Spectro-Microscopic Study of Laser-Modified Carbon Nanotubes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

as an integrated device.(10) The types *mtlin@phys.ntu.edu.tw 11 #12;2 Carbon Nanotubes of chemical modification active position for effective hybrid utilization. In terms of the chemical modification in field emission experiments, plasma effect,(12) heat process,(13) and laser effect(14) are found to be effective methods

Lin, Minn-Tsong

411

ccsd00001984, Selective production of metallic carbon nanotubes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ccsd­00001984, version 1 ­ 18 Oct 2004 Selective production of metallic carbon nanotubes Yasushi- type nanotubes (metallic character) evaluated using the previous Huckel-Poisson method can be applied at the tip of a nanotube in a realistic system. Setting the cross-section of a nanotube and the external #12

412

THE COST OF CARBON CAPTURE Jeremy David and Howard Herzog  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

THE COST OF CARBON CAPTURE Jeremy David and Howard Herzog Massachusetts Institute of Technology's technology for CO2 separation and capture at three types of power plants: integrated coal gasification (NGCC). The analysis was based on studies from the literature that analyzed the economics of capturing

413

A Universal Model for Nanoporous Carbon Supercapacitors Applicable to Diverse Pore Regimes, Carbons, and Electrolyte  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Supercapacitors, commonly called electric double-layer capacitors (EDLCs), are emerging as a novel type of energy storage device with the potential to substitute batteries in applications requiring high power densities. In response to the latest experimental breakthrough in nanoporous carbon supercapacitors, we propose a heuristic theoretical model that takes pore curvature into account as a replacement for the EDLC model which is based on a traditional parallel-plate capacitor. When the pore size is in the mesopore regime (2-50 nm), counterions enter mesoporous carbons and approach the pore wall to form an electric double-cylinder capacitor (EDCC); in the micropore regime (< 2 nm), solvated/desolvated counterions line up along the pore axis to form an electric wire-in-cylinder capacitor (EWCC). In the macropore regime (> 50 nm) where pores are large enough so that the pore curvature is no longer significant, the EDCC model can be reduced naturally to the EDLC model. We present density functional theory calculations and detailed analyses of available experimental data in various pore regimes, showing the significant effects of pore curvature on the supercapacitor properties of nanoporous carbons. It is shown that the EDCC/EWCC model is universal to carbon supercapacitors with diverse carbon materials including activated carbons, template carbons, and novel carbide-derived carbons, and with diverse electrolytes including organic electrolytes such as tetraethylammonium tetrafluoroborate (TEABF4), tetraethylammonium methyl-sulfonate (TEAMS) in acetonitrile, aqueous H2SO4 and KOH electrolytes, and even ionic liquid electrolyte such as 1-ethyl-3-methylimmidazolium bis(trifluromethane-sulfonyl)imide (EMI-TFSI). The EDCC/EWCC model allows the supercapacitor properties to be correlated with pore size, specific surface area, Debye length, electrolyte concentration and dielectric constant, and solute ion size, and may lend a support for the systematic optimization of the properties of carbon supercapacitors via experiments. On the basis of the insight obtained from the new model, we also discuss the effects of the kinetic solvation/desolvation process, multimodal (versus unimodal) pore size distribution, and exohedral (versus endohedral) capacitors on the electrochemical properties of supercapacitors.

Sumpter, Bobby G [ORNL; Huang, Jingsong [ORNL; Meunier, Vincent [ORNL

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

RESEARCH ARTICLE A novel soil organic C model using climate, soil type  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

RESEARCH ARTICLE A novel soil organic C model using climate, soil type and management data-Verlag, France 2012 Abstract This report evidences factors controlling soil or- ganic carbon at the national scale by modelling data of 2,158 soil samples from France. The global soil carbon amount, of about 1

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

415

Carbon Capture and Storage, 2008  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy is researching the safe implementation of a technology called carbon sequestration, also known as carbon capture and storage, or CCS. Based on an oilfield practice, this approach stores carbon dioxide, or CO2 generated from human activities for millennia as a means to mitigate global climate change. In 2003, the Department of Energys National Energy Technology Laboratory formed seven Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnerships to assess geologic formations suitable for storage and to determine the best approaches to implement carbon sequestration in each region. This video describes the work of these partnerships.

2009-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

416

Carbon Capture and Storage, 2008  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy is researching the safe implementation of a technology called carbon sequestration, also known as carbon capture and storage, or CCS. Based on an oilfield practice, this approach stores carbon dioxide, or CO2 generated from human activities for millennia as a means to mitigate global climate change. In 2003, the Department of Energys National Energy Technology Laboratory formed seven Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnerships to assess geologic formations suitable for storage and to determine the best approaches to implement carbon sequestration in each region. This video describes the work of these partnerships.

None

2010-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

417

Types of Reuse  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The following provides greater detail regarding the types of reuse pursued for LM sites. It should be noted that many actual reuses combine several types of the uses listed below.

418

HYDROGEN EMBRITTLEMENT IN LOW CARBON STEEL  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Many metals and alloys absorb hydrogen and diffusion of hydrogen under certain conditions can seriously weaken and produces embrittlement in steel. Hydrogen embrittlement is a type of metal deterioration that is related to stress corrosion cracking. Although steels are well known for their susceptibility to hydrogen embrittlement, the mechanism of transportation of hydrogen is not very clear in low carbon steels. Standard tensile steel specimens were hydrogenated from 1 to 5 hours and deformed by cold worked to 50%,60%,70 % 80 % and were investigated for mechanical properties.

Rafiq A. Siddiqui; Sabah A. Abdul-wahab; Tasneem Pervez; Sayyad Z. Qamar

419

Sandbag Carbon Offset Map | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of InspectorConcentrating Solar PowerstoriesNrelPartnerType JumpJersey)CarbonOrganization JumpR EMountainSandbag

420

Effects Of Milling On Surface Integrity Of Low-Carbon Steel  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This work measured the effect of milling parameters on the surface integrity of low-carbon alloy steel. The Variance Analysis showed that only depth of cut did not influence on the workpiece roughness and the Pearson's Coefficient indicated that cutting speed was more influent than tool feed. All cutting parameters introduced tensile residual stress in workpiece surface. The chip formation mechanism depended specially on cutting speed and influenced on the roughness and residual stress of workpiece.

Rodrigues, Alessandro Roger; Matsumoto, Hidekasu; Yamakami, Wyser Jose; Tokimatsu, Ruis Camargo; Menezes, Miguel Angelo; Suyama, Daniel Iwao; Norcino, Adriana Bruno; Vendrame, Saimon [UNESP-Univ Estatual Paulista, Engineering Faculty of Ilha Solteira, Av. Brasil Centro, 56-Zip Code 15.385-000-Ilha Solteira, Sao Paulo (Brazil)

2011-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "type carbon coefficient" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

EB2012-MS-43 ADVANCES IN THE MODELLING OF CARBON/CARBON  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, the Carbon-Carbon composites (C/C) are materials frequently used in industrial applications such as planeEB2012-MS-43 ADVANCES IN THE MODELLING OF CARBON/CARBON COMPOSITE UNDER TRIBOLOGICAL CONSTRAINTS 1, homogenization, carbon ABSTRACT Thermo mechanical properties of Carbon-Carbon composite (C/C) allow them

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

422

Electrochimica Acta 52 (2007) 39653975 Elucidating differences between carbon paper and carbon  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of them are carbon-fiber-based porous materials: carbon paper is non-woven, while carbon cloth is wovenElectrochimica Acta 52 (2007) 3965­3975 Elucidating differences between carbon paper and carbon the performance differences between carbon paper (CP) and carbon cloth (CC). Three-dimensional simulations, based

423

Carbon Cycle Discussion After the warm-up quiz, discuss the carbon cycle.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Carbon Cycle Discussion After the warm-up quiz, discuss the carbon cycle. Carbon is one is without carbon. Where else is carbon on our Earth? In rocks, living organisms, the atmosphere, oceans Does carbon stay in one place? What processes include moving carbon? Introduce residence time: How long does

Carrington, Emily

424

Relative and kinetic properties of carbon monoxide and carbon dioxide on a graphite surface  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Temperature-programmed desorption (TPD) results after chemisorption of carbon monoxide (CO) and carbon dioxide (CO/sub 2/) on polycrystalline graphite are presented. CO adsorbs onto graphite with a very low sticking coefficient. After CO chemisorption CO (mass 28 amu) desorbs in two temperature regions, between 400 and 700 K and between 1000 and 1300 K, and CO/sub 2/ (mass 44 amu) desorbs below 950 K. The intensity of the CO/sub 2/ signal is less than 1 order of magnitude lower than the CO intensity. After CO/sub 2/ adsorption the major desorption product is CO at high temperatures (1000 < T (K) < 1300), whereas a small amount of CO/sub 2/ desorbs around 450 K. The adsorption of C/sup 16/O/sub 2/ and C/sup 18/O/sub 2/ mixture leads to a nearly total oxygen scrambling of the CO/sub 2/ desorbed. A mechanism for CO and CO/sub 2/ interconversion on the graphite surface is presented in terms of surface oxide species, mainly lactones and semiquinones, and their relative stability. Assignments of the TPD features are proposed accordingly. Reaction studies on the CO/sub 2/ gasification of clean graphite and the CO disproportionation (Boudouard reaction) have been performed. A good agreement is found between the activation energies obtained and the desorption energies calculated from the analysis of the TPD results.

Marchon, B.; Tysoe, W.T.; Carrazza, J.; Heinemann, H.; Somorjai, G.A.

1988-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

425

CARBON DIOXIDE FIXATION.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Solar carbon dioxide fixation offers the possibility of a renewable source of chemicals and fuels in the future. Its realization rests on future advances in the efficiency of solar energy collection and development of suitable catalysts for CO{sub 2} conversion. Recent achievements in the efficiency of solar energy conversion and in catalysis suggest that this approach holds a great deal of promise for contributing to future needs for fuels and chemicals.

FUJITA,E.

2000-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

426

Carbon taxes and India  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Using the Indian module of the Second Generation Model 9SGM, we explore a reference case and three scenarios in which greenhouse gas emissions were controlled. Two alternative policy instruments (carbon taxes and tradable permits) were analyzed to determine comparative costs of stabilizing emissions at (1) 1990 levels (the 1 X case), (2) two times the 1990 levels (the 2X case), and (3) three times the 1990 levels (the 3X case). The analysis takes into account India`s rapidly growing population and the abundance of coal and biomass relative to other fuels. We also explore the impacts of a global tradable permits market to stabilize global carbon emissions on the Indian economy under the following two emissions allowance allocation methods: (1) {open_quotes}Grandfathered emissions{close_quotes}: emissions allowances are allocated based on 1990 emissions. (2) {open_quotes}Equal per capita emissions{close_quotes}: emissions allowances are allocated based on share of global population. Tradable permits represent a lower cost method to stabilize Indian emissions than carbon taxes, i.e., global action would benefit India more than independent actions.

Fisher-Vanden, K.A.; Pitcher, H.M.; Edmonds, J.A.; Kim, S.H. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Shukla, P.R. [Indian Institute of Management, Ahmedabad (India)

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

Solute retention in column liquid chromatography. X. Determination of solute infinite-dilution activity coefficients in methanol, water, and their mixtures, by combined gas-liquid and liquid-liquid chromatography  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Raoult's-law activity coefficients of 3- to 7-carbon aliphatic aldehyde, ketone, ester, and alcohol solutes at infinite dilution in methanol, water, and mixtures of the two and in polydimethysiloxane, all at 293-308 K, have been determined for the first time by appropriate combination of GLC and LLC retention data. The latter data are reported in terms of mole factions, while the former are given in concentration units of molality. However, interpretation of the data is difficult because of the multiplicity of the retention mechanisms. Nevertheless, the combined GLC/LLC technique, which had been applied previously only to pure solvents, is said to offer a number of advantages over static techniques for the determination of solute infinite-dilution activity coefficients with volatile solvents, especially with mixtures of solvents.

Djerki, R.A.; Laub, R.J.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

Neutralizing Carbonic Acid in Deep Carbonate Strata below the North Atlantic  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Our research is aimed at investigating several technical issues associated with carbon dioxide sequestration in calcium carbonate sediments below the sea floor through laboratory experiments and chemical transport modeling. Our goal is to evaluate the basic feasibility of this approach, including an assessment of optimal depths, sediment types, and other issues related to site selection. The results of our modeling efforts were published this past summer in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. We are expanding on that work through a variety of laboratory and modeling efforts. In the laboratories at Columbia and at Harvard, we are studying the flow of liquid carbon dioxide and carbon dioxide-water mixtures through calcium carbonate sediments to better understand the geomechanical and structural stability of the sediments during and after injection. We are currently preparing the results of these findings for publication. In addition, we are investigating the kinetics of calcium carbonate dissolution in the presence of CO{sub 2}-water fluids, which is a critical feature of the system as it allows for increased permeability during injection. We are also investigating the possibility of carbon dioxide hydrate formation in the pore fluid, which might complicate the injection procedure by reducing sediment permeability but might also provide an upper seal in the sediment-pore fluid system, preventing release of CO{sub 2} into the deep ocean, particularly if depth and temperature at the injection point rule out immediate hydrate formation. This is done by injecting liquid CO{sub 2} into various types of porous media, and then monitoring the changes in permeability. Finally, we are performing an economic analysis to estimate costs of drilling and gas injection, site monitoring as well as the availability of potential disposal sites with particular emphasis on those sites that are within the 200-mile economic zone of the United States. We present some preliminary results from these analyses. A paper discussing the site selection based on data from the Ocean Drilling Program and Deep Sea Drilling Program is currently in preparation.

Daniel P. Schrag

2006-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

429

Extraction of carbonate complexes of trivalent transplutonium elements with alkyl pyrocatechols  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Extraction of trivalent americium curium, californium, and europium with a technical mixture of mono-and didecyl pyrocatechols (TAP) in different diluents from carbonate solutions is studied. The influence of various factors (pH, K/sub 2/CO/sub 3/, TAP and metal concentration, phase contact time) on the degree of extraction and separation of the elements is clarified. It is shown that the elements concerned are extracted quantitatively by TAP solution in toluene and cyclohexane in the K/sub 2/CO/sub 3/ concentration range 0.25-1.5 M. A difference is noted in the coefficients of americium and curium distribution when they are extracted with TAP from 0.25 M K/sub 2/CO/sub 3/ solution. The separation coefficients of this pair rise with the pH of the carbonate solution. The separation coefficients of this pair rise with the pH of the carbonate solution. The separation can be improved at the stage of reextraction of the elements with a mixture of K/sub 2/CO/sub 3/ and DTPA or EDTA from alkyl pyrocatechol because the americium and curium reextraction rate constants differ widely. The composition of the compounds in the organic phase based on 4-(..cap alpha..,..cap alpha..-dioctylethyl)pyrocatechol (DOP) is studied by /sup 13/C NMR spectroscopy.

Karalova, Z.K.; Bukina, T.I.; Myasoedov, B.F.; Fedorov, L.A.; Sokolovskii, S.A.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

JV Task 90 - Activated Carbon Production from North Dakota Lignite  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) has pursued a research program for producing activated carbon from North Dakota lignite that can be competitive with commercial-grade activated carbon. As part of this effort, small-scale production of activated carbon was produced from Fort Union lignite. A conceptual design of a commercial activated carbon production plant was drawn, and a market assessment was performed to determine likely revenue streams for the produced carbon. Activated carbon was produced from lignite coal in both laboratory-scale fixed-bed reactors and in a small pilot-scale rotary kiln. The EERC was successfully able to upgrade the laboratory-scale activated carbon production system to a pilot-scale rotary kiln system. The activated carbon produced from North Dakota lignite was superior to commercial grade DARCO{reg_sign} FGD and Rheinbraun's HOK activated coke product with respect to iodine number. The iodine number of North Dakota lignite-derived activated carbon was between 600 and 800 mg I{sub 2}/g, whereas the iodine number of DARCO FGD was between 500 and 600 mg I{sub 2}/g, and the iodine number of Rheinbraun's HOK activated coke product was around 275 mg I{sub 2}/g. The EERC performed both bench-scale and pilot-scale mercury capture tests using the activated carbon made under various optimization process conditions. For comparison, the mercury capture capability of commercial DARCO FGD was also tested. The lab-scale apparatus is a thin fixed-bed mercury-screening system, which has been used by the EERC for many mercury capture screen tests. The pilot-scale systems included two combustion units, both equipped with an electrostatic precipitator (ESP). Activated carbons were also tested in a slipstream baghouse at a Texas power plant. The results indicated that the activated carbon produced from North Dakota lignite coal is capable of removing mercury from flue gas. The tests showed that activated carbon with the greatest iodine number was superior to commercial DARCO FGD for mercury capture. The results of the activated carbon market assessment indicate an existing market for water treatment and an emerging application for mercury control. That market will involve both existing and new coal-fired plants. It is expected that 20% of the existing coal-fired plants will implement activated carbon injection by 2015, representing about 200,000 tons of annual demand. The potential annual demand by new plants is even greater. In the mercury control market, two characteristics are going to dominate the customer's buying habit-performance and price. As continued demonstration testing of activated carbon injection at the various coal-fired power plants progresses, the importance of fuel type and plant configuration on the type of activated carbon best suited is being identified.

Steven Benson; Charlene Crocker; Rokan Zaman; Mark Musich; Edwin Olson

2008-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

431

Equation of state at finite net-baryon density using Taylor coefficients up to sixth order  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We employ the lattice QCD data on Taylor expansion coefficients up to sixth order to construct an equation of state at finite net-baryon density. When we take into account how hadron masses depend on lattice spacing and quark mass, the coefficients evaluated using the p4 action are equal to those of hadron resonance gas at low temperature. Thus the parametrised equation of state can be smoothly connected to the hadron resonance gas equation of state. We see that the equation of state using Taylor coefficients up to second order is realistic only at low densities, and that at densities corresponding to s/n_B > 40, the expansion converges by the sixth order term.

Pasi Huovinen; Peter Petreczky; Christian Schmidt

2014-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

432

Dynamic measurement of heat loss coefficients through Trombe wall glazing systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A Trombe wall presents a unique opportunity to measure the heat-loss coefficient through the glazing system because the wall itself can be used as a heat meter. Since the instantaneous heat flux through the outer wall surface can be determined, the heat loss coefficient at night can be calculated by dividing by the wall surface-to-ambient temperature difference. This technique has been used to determine heat-loss coefficients for Los Alamos test rooms during the winter of 1980-1981. Glazing systems studied include single and double glazing both with and without night insulation used in conjunction with a flat black paint, and both single and double glazing used in conjunction with a selective surface.

Balcomb, J.D.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

Black Carbon’s Properties and Role in the Environment: A Comprehensive Review  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

NOAA/ESRL. Mauna Loa Carbon Dioxide Annual Mean Data.H. Can reducing black carbon emissions counteract globalanalysis of black carbon in soils. Global Biogeochem. Cycle.

Shrestha, Gyami

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

Carbon Capital: The Political Ecology of Carbon Forestry and Development in Chiapas, Mexico  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

B v + B d ) C T = Total carbon B v = biomass contained indevelopment through carbon sequestration: experiences in2000) Rural livelihoods and carbon management, IIED Natural

Osborne, Tracey Muttoo

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

Metastable Changes to the Temperature Coefficients of Thin-Film Photovoltaic Modules  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Transient changes in the performance of thin-film modules with light exposure are a well-known and widely reported phenomenon. These changes are often the result of reversible metastabilities rather than irreversible changes. Here we consider how these metastable changes affect the temperature dependence of photovoltaic performance. We find that in CIGS modules exhibiting a metastable increase in performance with light exposure, the light exposure also induces an increase in the magnitude of the temperature coefficient. It is important to understand such changes when characterizing temperature coefficients and when analyzing the outdoor performance of newly installed modules.

Deceglie, M. G.; Silverman, T. J.; Marion, B.; Kurtz, S. R.

2014-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

Method for joining carbon-carbon composites to metals  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for joining carbon-carbon composites to metals by brazing. Conventional brazing of recently developed carbon-bonded carbon fiber (CBCF) material to a metal substrate is limited by the tendency of the braze alloy to ``wick`` into the CBCF composite rather than to form a strong bond. The surface of the CBCF composite that is to be bonded is first sealed with a fairly dense carbonaceous layer achieved by any of several methods. The sealed surface is then brazed to the metal substrate by vacuum brazing with a Ti-Cu-Be alloy. 1 fig.

Lauf, R.J.; McMillan, A.D.; Moorhead, A.J.

1997-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

437

Method for joining carbon-carbon composites to metals  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for joining carbon-carbon composites to metals by brazing. Conventional brazing of recently developed carbon-bonded carbon fiber (CBCF) material to a metal substrate is limited by the tendency of the braze alloy to "wick" into the CBCF composite rather than to form a strong bond. The surface of the CBCF composite that is to be bonded is first sealed with a fairly dense carbonaceous layer achieved by any of several methods. The sealed surface is then brazed to the metal substrate by vacuum brazing with a Ti-Cu-Be alloy.

Lauf, Robert J. (Oak Ridge, TN); McMillan, April D. (Knoxville, TN); Moorhead, Arthur J. (Knoxville, TN)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

Geologic Carbon Sequestration and Biosequestration (Carbon Cycle 2.0)  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

Don DePaolo, Director of LBNL's Earth Sciences Division, speaks at the Carbon Cycle 2.0 kick-off symposium Feb. 3, 2010. We emit more carbon into the atmosphere than natural processes are able to remove - an imbalance with negative consequences. Carbon Cycle 2.0 is a Berkeley Lab initiative to provide the science needed to restore this balance by integrating the Labs diverse research activities and delivering creative solutions toward a carbon-neutral energy future. http://carboncycle2.lbl.gov/

DePaolo, Don [Director, LBNL Earth Sciences Division

2011-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

439

Carbonation Mechanism of Reservoir Rock by Supercritical Carbon...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

chemistrybutchercarbonationmechanism.pdf More Documents & Publications Synchrotron X-ray Studies of Super-critical Carbon Dioxide Reservoir Rock Interfaces Innovative...

440

TESTING GUIDELINES FOR TECHNETIUM-99 ABSORPTION ON ACTIVATED CARBON  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company (CHPRC) is currently evaluating the potential use of activated carbon adsorption for removing technetium-99 from groundwater as a treatment method for the Hanford Site's 200 West Area groundwater pump-and-treat system. The current pump-and-treat system design will include an ion-exchange (IX) system for selective removal of technetium-99 from selected wells prior to subsequent treatment of the water in the central treatment system. The IX resin selected for technetium-99 removal is Purolite A530E. The resin service life is estimated to be approximately 66.85 days at the design technetium-99 loading rate, and the spent resin must be replaced because it cannot be regenerated. The resulting operating costs associated with resin replacement every 66.85 days are estimated at $0.98 million/year. Activated carbon pre-treatment is being evaluated as a potential cost-saving measure to offset the high operating costs associated with frequent IX resin replacement. This document is preceded by the Literature Survey of Technetium-99 Groundwater Pre-Treatment Option Using Granular Activated Carbon (SGW-43928), which identified and evaluated prior research related to technetium-99 adsorption on activated carbon. The survey also evaluated potential operating considerations for this treatment approach for the 200 West Area. The preliminary conclusions of the literature survey are as follows: (1) Activated carbon can be used to selectively remove technetium-99 from contaminated groundwater. (2) Technetium-99 adsorption onto activated carbon is expected to vary significantly based on carbon types and operating conditions. For the treatment approach to be viable at the Hanford Site, activated carbon must be capable of achieving a designated minimum technetium-99 uptake. (3) Certain radionuclides known to be present in 200 West Area groundwater are also likely to adsorb onto activated carbon. (4) Organic solvent contaminants of concern (COCs) will load heavily onto activated carbon and should be removed from groundwater upstream of the activated carbon pre-treatment system. Unless removed upstream, the adsorbed loadings of these organic constituents could exceed the land disposal criteria for carbon.

BYRNES ME

2010-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "type carbon coefficient" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Assessment of Brine Management for Geologic Carbon Sequestration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for  Geologic  Carbon  Sequestration. ”   International  of  Energy.  “Carbon  Sequestration  Atlas  of  the  Water  Extracted  from  Carbon  Sequestration  Projects."  

Breunig, Hanna M.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

Quasi-steady carbon plasma source for neutral beam injector  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Carbon plasma is successfully sustained during 1000 s without any carrier gas in the bucket type ionization chamber with cusp magnetic field. Every several seconds, seed plasmas having ?3 ms duration time are injected into the ionization chamber by a shunting arch plasma gun. The weakly ionized carbon plasma ejected from the shunting arch is also ionized by 2.45 GHz microwave at the electron cyclotron resonance surface and the plasma can be sustained even in the interval of gun discharges. Control of the gun discharge interval allows to keep high pressure and to sustain the plasma for long duration.

Koguchi, H., E-mail: h-koguchi@aist.go.jp; Sakakita, H.; Kiyama, S.; Shimada, T.; Sato, Y.; Hirano, Y. [Innovative Plasma Technologies Grope, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), 1-1-1 Umezono, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8568 (Japan)] [Innovative Plasma Technologies Grope, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), 1-1-1 Umezono, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8568 (Japan)

2014-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

443

Carbonate fuel cell anodes  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A molten alkali metal carbonates fuel cell porous anode of lithium ferrite and a metal or metal alloy of nickel, cobalt, nickel/iron, cobalt/iron, nickel/iron/aluminum, cobalt/iron/aluminum and mixtures thereof wherein the total iron content including ferrite and iron of the composite is about 25 to about 80 percent, based upon the total anode, provided aluminum when present is less than about 5 weight percent of the anode. A process is described for production of the lithium ferrite containing anode by slipcasting.

Donado, R.A.; Hrdina, K.E.; Remick, R.J.

1993-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

444

Carbonate fuel cell anodes  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A molten alkali metal carbonates fuel cell porous anode of lithium ferrite and a metal or metal alloy of nickel, cobalt, nickel/iron, cobalt/iron, nickel/iron/aluminum, cobalt/iron/aluminum and mixtures thereof wherein the total iron content including ferrite and iron of the composite is about 25 to about 80 percent, based upon the total anode, provided aluminum when present is less than about 5 weight percent of the anode. A process for production of the lithium ferrite containing anode by slipcasting.

Donado, Rafael A. (Chicago, IL); Hrdina, Kenneth E. (Glenview, IL); Remick, Robert J. (Bolingbrook, IL)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

RMOTC - Testing - Carbon Management  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas ConchasPassive Solar HomePromising Science for1 20115, 2001Data setsSTWAClarke Turner,Carbon

446

Capturing carbon | EMSL  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation Proposed New Substation Sites Proposed Route BTRICGEGR-N-Capture of Carbon Dioxide

447

Carbon Capture FAQs  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation Proposed New Substation Sites Proposed Route BTRICGEGR-N-Capture of CarbonLangmuircarbon

448

ARM - Carbon Dioxide  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary)morphinanInformationbudapest Comments? We would love to heartotdngovInstrumentswrf-chem Comments?CampaignCarbon

449

Carbon Fiber Technology Facility  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-Up fromDepartmentTie Ltd:June 20154:04-21-2014 (866) 448 - DEPOMeetingIndustriesCarbon

450

Carbon Fiber Consortium | Partnerships | ORNL  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

in 2011 to accelerate the development and deployment of new, lower cost carbon fiber composite materials. The Consortium draws on the broad experience that the Oak Ridge National...

451

Carbon-assisted flyer plates  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A laser driven flyer plate utilizing an optical fiber connected to a laser. The end of the optical fiber has a layer of carbon and a metal layer deposited onto it. The carbon layer provides the laser induced plasma which is superior to the plasma produced from most metals. The carbon layer plasma is capable of providing a flatter flyer plate, converting more of the laser energy to driving plasma, promoting a higher flyer plate acceleration, and providing a more uniform pulse behind the plate. In another embodiment, the laser is in optical communication with a substrate onto which a layer of carbon and a layer of metal have been deposited.

Stahl, David B. (Los Alamos, NM); Paisley, Dennis L. (Santa Fe, NM)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

452

Industrial Carbon Management Initiative (ICMI)  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

heat in a combustion process while producing a concentrated CO 2 stream to facilitate carbon capture. Chemical looping research efforts can be categorized as: modeling tool...

453

Carbon nanotube IR detectors (SV)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Sandia National Laboratories (Sandia) and Lockheed Martin Corporation (LMC) collaborated to (1) evaluate the potential of carbon nanotubes as channels in infrared (IR) photodetectors; (2) assemble and characterize carbon nanotube electronic devices and measure the photocurrent generated when exposed to infrared light;(3) compare the performance of the carbon nanotube devices with that of traditional devices; and (4) develop and numerically implement models of electronic transport and opto-electronic behavior of carbon nanotube infrared detectors. This work established a new paradigm for photodetectors.

Leonard, F. L.

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

Carbon Sequestration Atlas IV Video  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Carbon Sequestration Atlas is a collection of all the storage sites of CO2 such as, petroleum, natural gas, coal, and oil shale.

Rodosta, Traci

2013-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

455

Carbon Sequestration Advisory Committee (Nebraska)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Under this statute, the Director of Natural Resources will document and quantify carbon sequestration and greenhouse emissions reductions associated with agricultural practices, management systems,...

456

Carbon Sequestration Atlas IV Video  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

The Carbon Sequestration Atlas is a collection of all the storage sites of CO2 such as, petroleum, natural gas, coal, and oil shale.

Rodosta, Traci

2014-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

457

Self-assembling functionalized single-walled carbon nanotubes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Single-walled carbon nanotubes Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) arescale synthesis of carbon nanotubes." Nature, Vol.358, 220-Ropes of Metallic Carbon Nanotubes." Science, Vol.273(5274),

Gao, Yan

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

458

In Situ Infrared Spectroscopic Study of Brucite Carbonation in...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Carbonation in Dry to Water-Saturated Supercritical Carbon Dioxide. Abstract: In geologic carbon sequestration, while part of the injected carbon dioxide will dissolve into host...

459

The internal and translational energy dependence of molecular condensation coefficients: SF6 and CC&,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and the target surface since the gas-surface interaction potential is sampled by "single collision" scatteringThe internal and translational energy dependence of molecular condensation coefficients: SF6 and CC examine the internal and translational energy dependence of the molecular condensation probabilities

Mills, Allen P.

460

Correlation for the Second Virial Coefficient of Water Allan H. Harveya...  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

by results calculated from a high- quality intermolecular pair potential. The new correlation agrees well rights reserved. DOI: 10.1063/1.1587731 Key words: H2O, second virial coefficient, steam, thermodynamicsVT Measurements. . . . . . . . 370 2.2. Data for B from Saturated Vapor Measurements

Magee, Joseph W.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "type carbon coefficient" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Benefits of the International Residential Code's Maximum Solar heat Gain Coefficient Requirement for Windows  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Texas adopted in its residential building energy code a maximum 0.40 solar heat gain coefficient (SHGC) for fenestration (e.g., windows, glazed doors and skylights)-a critical driver of cooling energy use, comfort and peak demand. An analysis...

Stone, G. A.; DeVito, E. M.; Nease, N. H.

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

462

Fretting Corrosion Damage of Total Hip Prosthesis: Friction Coefficient and Damage Rate Constant Approach  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Fretting Corrosion Damage of Total Hip Prosthesis: Friction Coefficient and Damage Rate Constant Building, University Park 16802 PA USA 4 Chair Professor Center for Research Excellence in Corrosion hip prosthesis. Fretting corrosion tests were conducted with stainless steel and poly (methyl

Boyer, Edmond

463

Measurement of the thermal expansion coefficients of ferroelectric crystals by a moire interferometer  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

reserved. Keywords: Moire´ interferometry; Ferroelectric; Thermal expansion 1. Introduction Lithium niobate-phase-matched interactions [4­6]. Design of such devices requires accurate knowledge of the relevant physi- cal parameters properties, as the thermo-optic coefficients [7]. Further- more, in quasi-phase-match nonlinear processes

Arie, Ady

464

Study of the effect of {sup 135}Xe poison on the temperature coefficient of TRIGA fuel  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A study of the influence of {sup 135}Xe on the prompt negative temperature coefficient of the 14-MW Romanian TRIGA reactor has been performed. Because of its large absorption cross section below 0.1 eV, we expected that {sup 135}Xe might make a positive contribution to the temperature coefficient because the higher-energy neutrons are less likely to be absorbed by the Xe. This effect would be largest about 16 hours after reactor shutdown. In order to investigate this phenomenon, we have performed cell and core calculations for various fuel temperatures, burnups, and {sup 135}Xe levels. These calculations indeed show a positive contribution of {sup 135}Xe to the temperature coefficient, especially for high burnups, where little {sup 167}Er remains to absorb the higher-energy neutrons. Work is in progress to evaluate the effect of the smaller negative temperature coefficient on the consequences of reactivity insertion accidents in unfavorable situations of {sup 135}Xe poisoning of the Romanian TRIGA core. (author)

Iorgulis, Constantin [TRIGA Reactor Facility, Institute for Nuclear Research, Pitesti (Romania)

1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

465

ATMOSPHERIC DISPERSION COEFFICIENTS AND RADIOLOGICAL AND TOXICOLOGICAL EXPOSURE METHODOLOGY FOR USE IN TANK FARMS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents the atmospheric dispersion coefficients used in Tank Farms safety analysis. The basis equations for calculating radiological and toxicological exposures are also included. In this revision, the time averaging for toxicological consequence evaluations is clarified based on a review of DOE complex guidance and a review of tank farm chemicals.

GRIGSBY KM

2011-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

466

Virial coefficients and vapor-liquid equilibria of the EXP6 and 2-Yukawa fluids  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Virial coefficients $B_2$ through $B_4$ and the vapor-liquid equilibria for the EXP6 and 2-Yukawa (2Y) fluids have been determined using numerical integrations and Gibbs ensemble simulations, respectively. The chosen 2Y models have been recently determined as an appropriate reference fluid for the considered EXP6 models.

J. Krejcí; I. Nezbeda; R. Melnyk; A. Trokhymchuk

2011-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

467

Specular highlights of plastic surfaces and the Fresnel Coefficient Elli Angelopoulou*  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Specular highlights of plastic surfaces and the Fresnel Coefficient Elli Angelopoulou* and Sofya that the color of specularities for materials like plastics and ceramics can be approximated by the color by experiments performed on multispectral images of different colored plastic tiles. The refractive indices

Angelopoulou, Elli

468

On the Inversion of Mel-Frequency Cepstral Coefficients for Speech Enhancement Applications  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

On the Inversion of Mel-Frequency Cepstral Coefficients for Speech Enhancement Applications Laura E recognition system. The use of GMMs for speech enhancement applications has only recently been proposed present a means to invert MFCCs for use in speech enhancement applications. Results for cepstral inversion

De Leon, Phillip

469

Ultrasonic backscatter coefficient quantitative estimates from Chinese hamster ovary cell pellet biophantoms  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ultrasonic backscatter coefficient quantitative estimates from Chinese hamster ovary cell pellet August 2010; accepted 6 August 2010 A cell pellet biophantom technique is introduced, and applied verification purposes. BSC estimates from CHO cell pellet biophantoms of known number density were performed

Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, University of

470

Estimating ProteinLigand Binding Free Energy: Atomic Solvation Parameters for Partition Coefficient and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

on the assumption that the overall solvation free energy is the sum of all atomic solvation contributions: Gs iAi (1Estimating Protein­Ligand Binding Free Energy: Atomic Solvation Parameters for Partition Coefficient and Solvation Free Energy Calculation Jianfeng Pei,1,2 Qi Wang,1,2 Jiaju Zhou,3 and Luhua Lai1

Luhua, Lai

471

Supporting Information Field-Effect modulation of Seebeck Coefficient in Single PbSe  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Supporting Information Field-Effect modulation of Seebeck Coefficient in Single PbSe Nanowires to dry the solution and form Pb oleate. After cooling the Pb oleate solution to 60ºC, 4 mL of 0.16M and Scientific Instrument voltage amplifier, respectively. Thermoelectric power measurements were done

Yang, Peidong

472

Internal conversion coefficients in (134)Cs, (137)Ba, and (139)La: A precise test of theory  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Recently we measured the ratio of K-shell internal conversion coefficients, alpha(K), for the 127.5-keV E3 transition in (134)Cs and the 661.7-keV M4 transition in (137)Ba. We here report a measurement of the 165.9-keV M1 transition in (139)La...

Nica, N.; Hardy, John C.; Iacob, V. E.; Balonek, C.; Trzhaskovskaya, M. B.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

473

Infrared and ultraviolet problem for the Nelson model with variable coefficients  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Infrared and ultraviolet problem for the Nelson model with variable coefficients C. G´erard,1 , F of the Hamiltonian in the presence of the infrared problem, i.e. assuming that the boson mass tends to 0 at infinity state one usually speaks of the infrared problem or infrared divergence. The infrared problem arises

474

Relaxation Time Constants and Apparent Diffusion Coefficients of Rat Retina at 7 Tesla  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Relaxation Time Constants and Apparent Diffusion Coefficients of Rat Retina at 7 Tesla Govind Nair* and ADC of the rat eyes were measured at 50 3 50 3 800 lm at 7 Tesla. Profiles of T1, T2, T2* and ADC

Duong, Timothy Q.

475

The relationship of the distribution coefficient to surface area for microcline and albite feldspars  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-liquid, or liquid- solid, will distribute itself between the two layers in a constant con- centration ratio, at constant temperature (Glasstone and Lewis, 1960)], a distribution coefficient may be obtained for the ion-exchange reac- tion between iona in solution...

Maxwell, John Reed

1968-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

476

National Poverty Center Working Paper Series The GINI Coefficient and Segregation on a Continuous Variable  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

National Poverty Center Working Paper Series #05-2 March 2005 The GINI Coefficient and Segregation at Dallas This paper is available online at the National Poverty Center Working Paper Series index at: http of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the view of the National Poverty Center or any sponsoring agency

Shyy, Wei

477

Heteroleptic diimine copper (I) complexes with large extinction coefficients: synthesis, quantum chemistry calculations and physico-  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Heteroleptic diimine copper (I) complexes with large extinction coefficients: synthesis, quantum. . Abstract Using the HETPHEN approach, five new heteroleptic copper(I) complexes composed of a push-pull 4 complexes experimentally demonstrate that large light harvesting properties with bis-diimine copper

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

478

Chemical oxygen diffusion coefficient measurement by conductivity relaxation--correlation between tracer diffusion  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Chemical oxygen diffusion coefficient measurement by conductivity relaxation--correlation between J. P., Grenier J. C., Loup J. P. ABSTRACT Chemical oxygen diusion coecient ¯(D)was measured the oxygen partial pressure in the surrounding atmosphere of the sample. The consequent evolution

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

479

Cross-Plane Seebeck Coefficient Anomaly in a High Barrier Superlattice with Miniband Formation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

is equivalent to a material with a positive Seebeck coefficient. This will be useful in cascading thermoelements for measurements. First, we calibrated the heater resistance with the stage temperature. To reduce the influence of the contact wires and pads, we used a four-wire measurement for gauging the resistance. At a given heater

480

Absorbed dose in target cell nuclei and dose conversion coefficient of radon progeny  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Absorbed dose in target cell nuclei and dose conversion coefficient of radon progeny in the human Abstract To calculate the absorbed dose in the human lung due to inhaled radon progeny, ICRP focussed and secretory cells). The absorbed energy for alpha particles emitted by radon progeny in the human respiratory

Yu, K.N.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "type carbon coefficient" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

Analysis of Clustering Coefficients of Online Social Networks by Duplication Models  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the micro operations that lead to the formation of social networks. The objective is to devise a growthAnalysis of Clustering Coefficients of Online Social Networks by Duplication Models Duan-Shin Lee of online social networks by a duplication model. In this model vertices are added into the network one

Chang, Cheng-Shang

482

Vertically Loaded Anchor: Drag Coefficient, Fall Velocity, and Penetration Depth using Laboratory Measurements  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

anchor point. Values such as drag coefficient and terminal velocity are vital in predicting embedment depth to obtain the mooring capacity required by the floating facility. Two scaled models of the Mark I OMNI-Max anchor were subjected to a series...

Cenac, William

2011-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

483

Row spacing effects on the canopy light extinction coefficient of upland cotton  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

coefficient (k) in cotton (Gossypium hirsutum). Treatments consisted of four row spacings (0.19-m, 0.38-m, 0.76-m, and 1.00-m) and four plant densities [148, 222, 296, 445 (1998) and 371 (1999) thousand plants ha-1] with each treatment replicated three times...

Steglich, Evelyn Marie

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

484

Hydrodynamic Coefficients and Wave Loads for a WEC Device in Heaving Mode  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. This model is intended to be used for WEC control purposes. A semi-analytical approach is therefore proposed for the computation of the hydrodynamic coefficients and the excitation forces. The boundary value problem is solved--Wave Energy Converter, potential theory, eigen- function expansion, wave-loads, heaving mode, scattering

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

485

Carbon/Ternary Alloy/Carbon Optical Stack on Mylar as an Optical...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

CarbonTernary AlloyCarbon Optical Stack on Mylar as an Optical Data Storage Medium to Potentially Replace Magnetic Tape. CarbonTernary AlloyCarbon Optical Stack on Mylar as an...

486

Adaptive Algebraic Multigrid for Finite Element Elliptic Equations with Random Coefficients  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This thesis presents a two-grid algorithm based on Smoothed Aggregation Spectral Element Agglomeration Algebraic Multigrid (SA-{rho}AMGe) combined with adaptation. The aim is to build an efficient solver for the linear systems arising from discretization of second-order elliptic partial differential equations (PDEs) with stochastic coefficients. Examples include PDEs that model subsurface flow with random permeability field. During a Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) simulation process, that draws PDE coefficient samples from a certain distribution, the PDE coefficients change, hence the resulting linear systems to be solved change. At every such step the system (discretized PDE) needs to be solved and the computed solution used to evaluate some functional(s) of interest that then determine if the coefficient sample is acceptable or not. The MCMC process is hence computationally intensive and requires the solvers used to be efficient and fast. This fact that at every step of MCMC the resulting linear system changes, makes an already existing solver built for the old problem perhaps not as efficient for the problem corresponding to the new sampled coefficient. This motivates the main goal of our study, namely, to adapt an already existing solver to handle the problem (with changed coefficient) with the objective to achieve this goal to be faster and more efficient than building a completely new solver from scratch. Our approach utilizes the local element matrices (for the problem with changed coefficients) to build local problems associated with constructed by the method agglomerated elements (a set of subdomains that cover the given computational domain). We solve a generalized eigenproblem for each set in a subspace spanned by the previous local coarse space (used for the old solver) and a vector, component of the error, that the old solver cannot handle. A portion of the spectrum of these local eigen-problems (corresponding to eigenvalues close to zero) form the coarse basis used to define the new two-level method of our interest. We illustrate the performance of this adaptive two-level procedure with a large set of numerical experiments that demonstrate its efficiency over building the solvers from scratch.

Kalchev, D

2012-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

487

University of Aberdeen Carbon Management Plan  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Aberdeen is committed to reducing its carbon footprint and to playing its part in limiting the worstUniversity of Aberdeen Carbon Management Plan Higher Education Carbon Management Programme working with Page 1 The University of Aberdeen Carbon Management Programme Carbon Management Plan (CMP

Levi, Ran

488

Fabrication of carbon microcapsules containing silicon nanoparticles-carbon nanotubes nanocomposite by sol-gel method for anode in lithium ion battery  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Carbon microcapsules containing silicon nanoparticles (Si NPs)-carbon nanotubes (CNTs) nanocomposite (Si-CNT-C) have been fabricated by a surfactant mediated sol-gel method followed by a carbonization process. Silicon nanoparticles-carbon nanotubes (Si-CNT) nanohybrids were produced by a wet-type beadsmill method. To obtain Si-CNT nanocomposites with spherical morphologies, a silica precursor (tetraethylorthosilicate, TEOS) and polymer (PMMA) mixture was employed as a structure-directing medium. Thus the Si-CNT/Silica-Polymer microspheres were prepared by an acid catalyzed sol-gel method. Then a carbon precursor such as polypyrrole (PPy) was incorporated onto the surfaces of pre-existing Si-CNT/silica-polymer to generate Si-CNT/Silica-Polymer-PPy microspheres. Subsequent thermal treatment of the precursor followed by wet etching of silica produced Si-CNT-C microcapsules. The intermediate silica/polymer must disappear during the carbonization and etching process resulting in the formation of an internal free space. The carbon precursor polymer should transform to carbon shell to encapsulate remaining Si-CNT nanocomposites. Therefore, hollow carbon microcapsules containing Si-CNT nanocomposites could be obtained (Si-CNT-C). The successful fabrication was confirmed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). These final materials were employed for anode performance improvement in lithium ion battery. The cyclic performances of these Si-CNT-C microcapsules were measured with a lithium battery half cell tests. - Graphical Abstract: Carbon microcapsules containing silicon nanoparticles (Si NPs)-carbon nanotubes (CNTs) nanocomposite (Si-CNT-C) have been fabricated by a surfactant mediated sol-gel method. Highlights: > Polymeric microcapsules containing Si-CNT transformed to carbon microcapsules. > Accommodate volume changes of Si NPs during Li ion charge/discharge. > Sizes of microcapsules were controlled by experimental parameters. > Lithium storage capacity and coulombic efficiency were demonstrated. > Use of sol-gel procedure as intermediate reaction.

Bae, Joonwon, E-mail: joonwonbae@gmail.com [Samsung Advanced Institute of Technology, Yong-In City 446-712, Gyeong-Gi Province (Korea, Republic of)

2011-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

489

n-Type diamond and method for producing same  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A new n-type semiconducting diamond is disclosed, which is doped with n-type dopant atoms. Such diamond is advantageously formed by chemical vapor deposition from a source gas mixture comprising a carbon source compound for the diamond, and a volatile hot wire filament for the n-type impurity species, so that the n-type impurity atoms are doped in the diamond during its formation. A corresponding chemical vapor deposition method of forming the n-type semiconducting diamond is disclosed. The n-type semiconducting diamond of the invention may be usefully employed in the formation of diamond-based transistor devices comprising pn diamond junctions, and in other microelectronic device applications.

Anderson, Richard J. (Oakland, CA)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

490

Carbonation Mechanism of Reservoir Rock by Supercritical Carbon Dioxide  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Project Objectives: Elucidate comprehensively the carbonation reaction mechanisms between supercritical carbon dioxide (scCO2) and reservoir rocks consisting of different mineralogical compositions in aqueous and non-aqueous environments at temperatures of up to 250ºC, and to develop chemical modeling of CO2-reservior rock interactions.

491

Pyrolytic carbon electrodes Lithographically Defined Porous Carbon Electrodes**  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to the intrinsic material properties of carbon, functionalized films can be produced through chemical modification fabrication method capable of producing large area (%100 s cm2 ) submicrometer porous carbon films. In our methodology. The palladium-modified electrodes exhibit a catalytic response for methanol oxidation

New Mexico, University of

492

Rock types, pore types, and hydrocarbon exploration  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A proposed exploration-oriented method of classifying porosity in sedimentary rocks is based on microscopic examination cores or cuttings. Factors include geometry, size, abundance, and connectivity of the pores. The porosity classification is predictive of key petrophysical characteristics: porosity-permeability relationships, capillary pressures, and (less certainly) relative permeabilities. For instance, intercrystalline macroporosity typically is associated with high permeability for a given porosity, low capillarity, and favorable relative permeabilities. This is found to be true whether this porosity type occurs in a sucrosic dolomite or in a sandstone with pervasive quartz overgrowths. This predictive method was applied in three Rocky Mountain oil plays. Subtle pore throat traps could be recognized in the J sandstone (Cretaceous) in the Denver basin of Colorado by means of porosity permeability plotting. Variations in hydrocarbon productivity from a Teapot Formation (Cretaceous) field in the Powder River basin of Wyoming were related to porosity types and microfacies; the relationships were applied to exploration. Rock and porosity typing in the Red River Formation (Ordovician) reconciled apparent inconsistencies between drill-stem test, log, and mud-log data from a Williston basin wildcat. The well was reevaluated and completed successfully, resulting in a new field discovery. In each of these three examples, petrophysics was fundamental for proper evaluation of wildcat wells and exploration plays.

Coalson, E.B.; Hartmann, D.J.; Thomas, J.B.

1985-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

493

CaMn1-x NbxO3 (x e 0.08) Perovskite-Type Phases As Promising New High-Temperature n-Type Thermoelectric Materials  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-Type Thermoelectric Materials L. Bocher, M. H. Aguirre, D. Logvinovich, A. Shkabko, R. Robert, M. Trottmann, and A candidates as n-type polycrystalline thermoelectric materials operating in air at high temperatures of their high-temperature thermoelectric properties (Seebeck coefficient, electrical resistivity, and thermal

494

Carbon dioxide and climate  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Scientific and public interest in greenhouse gases, climate warming, and global change virtually exploded in 1988. The Department's focused research on atmospheric CO{sub 2} contributed sound and timely scientific information to the many questions produced by the groundswell of interest and concern. Research projects summarized in this document provided the data base that made timely responses possible, and the contributions from participating scientists are genuinely appreciated. In the past year, the core CO{sub 2} research has continued to improve the scientific knowledge needed to project future atmospheric CO{sub 2} concentrations, to estimate climate sensitivity, and to assess the responses of vegetation to rising concentrations of CO{sub 2} and to climate change. The Carbon Dioxide Research Program's goal is to develop sound scientific information for policy formulation and governmental action in response to changes of atmospheric CO{sub 2}. The Program Summary describes projects funded by the Carbon Dioxide Research Program during FY 1990 and gives a brief overview of objectives, organization, and accomplishments.

Not Available

1990-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

495

Laboratory-scale sodium-carbonate aggregate concrete interactions. [LMFBR  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A series of laboratory-scale experiments was made at 600/sup 0/C to identify the important heat-producing chemical reactions between sodium and carbonate aggregate concretes. Reactions between sodium and carbonate aggregate were found to be responsible for the bulk of heat production in sodium-concrete tests. Exothermic reactions were initiated at 580+-30/sup 0/C for limestone and dolostone aggregates as well as for hydrated limestone concrete, and at 540+-10/sup 0/C for dehydrated limestone concrete, but were ill-defined for dolostone concrete. Major reaction products included CaO, MgO, Na/sub 2/CO/sub 3/, Na/sub 2/O, NaOH, and elemental carbon. Sodium hydroxide, which forms when water is released from cement phases, causes slow erosion of the concrete with little heat production. The time-temperature profiles of these experiments have been modeled with a simplified version of the SLAM computer code, which has allowed derivation of chemical reaction rate coefficients.

Westrich, H.R.; Stockman, H.W.; Suo-Anttila, A.

1983-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

496

Intermediate Temperature Carbon - Carbon Composite Structures. CRADA Final Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) between UT-Battelle, LLC (the "Contractor") and Synterials, Inc. (the "Participant") was to demonstrate promising processing methods, which can lead to producing Carbon-Carbon Composites (CCC), with tensile and interlaminar properties comparable to those of organic matrix composites and environmental stability at 1200 F for long periods of time. The participant synthesized carbon-carbon composites with two different fiber coatings and three different matrices. Both parties evaluated the tensile and interlaminar properties of these materials and characterized the microstructure of the matrices and interfaces. It was found that fiber coatings of carbon and boron carbide provided the best environmental protection and resulted in composites with high tensile strength.

Lara-Curzio, Edgar [ORNL

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

497

Hydrogenation of Carbon Dioxide by Water: Alkali-Promoted Synthesis of Formate  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Conversion of carbon dioxide utilizing protons from water decomposition is likely to provide a sustainable source of fuels and chemicals in the future. We present here a time-evolved infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy (IRAS) and temperature-programmed desorption (TPD) study of the reaction of CO{sub 2} + H{sub 2}O in thin potassium layers. Reaction at temperatures below 200 K results in the hydrogenation of carbon dioxide to potassium formate. Thermal stability of the formate, together with its sequential transformation to oxalate and to carbonate, is monitored and discussed. The data of this model study suggest a dual promoter mechanism of the potassium: the activation of CO{sub 2} and the dissociation of water. Reaction at temperatures above 200 K, in contrast, is characterized by the absence of formate and the direct reaction of CO{sub 2} to oxalate, due to a drastic reduction of the sticking coefficient of water at higher temperatures.

Hrbek, J.; Hoffmann, F.M.; Yang, Y.; Paul, J.; White, M.G.

2010-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

498

Typed Self-Optimization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

type T y[O]. The operator IsIs is self-applicative, in thatargument t is any of Is[O] or IsIs, and otherwise behavesproof constant introduced by IsIs proves that the type of t

Brown, Matt

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

499

46 (2009-6) Nucleation of a single-walled carbon nanotube inside a carbon nanotube  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the metal-carbide. Key Words : Molecular Dynamics, Double-Walled Carbon Nanotube, Growth Mechanism, Carbon functions of carbon atoms and metal atoms in the metal carbide cluster #12;,10) Carbon (11,11) Carbon (15,6) Carbon (10,10) Metal (11,11) Metal (15,6) Metal Fig. 4 Density distribution

Maruyama, Shigeo

500

Carbon Dioxide Sequestration in Concrete Using Vacuum-Carbonation Alain Azar, Prof. Yixin Shao  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Carbon Dioxide Sequestration in Concrete Using Vacuum-Carbonation Alain Azar, Prof. Yixin Shao promising carbon uptake results and is a viable option for carbonation curing. Carbon sequestration increase in Carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions over the past five decades, specific ways to reduce

Barthelat, Francois