Sample records for type biochemical corn

  1. Biochemical Production of Ethanol from Corn Stover: 2007 State...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Process Design and Economics for Biochemical Conversion of Lignocellulosic Biomass to Ethanol: Dilute-Acid Pretreatment and Enzymatic Hydrolysis of Corn Stover Process...

  2. MBI Biorefinery: Corn to Biomass, Ethanol to Biochemicals and Biomaterials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2006-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

    The project is a continuation of DOE-funded work (FY02 and FY03) that has focused on the development of the ammonia fiber explosion (AFEX) pretreatment technology, fermentation production of succinic acid and new processes and products to enhance dry mill profitability. The primary objective for work beginning in April 2004 and ending in November 2005 is focus on the key issues related to the: (1) design, costing and construction plan for a pilot AFEX pretreatment system, formation of a stakeholder development team to assist in the planning and design of a biorefinery pilot plant, continued evaluation of corn fractionation technologies, corn oil extraction, AFEX treatment of corn fiber/DDGs; (2) development of a process to fractionate AFEX-treated corn fiber and corn stover--cellulose and hemicellulose fractionation and sugar recovery; and (3) development of a scalable batch succinic acid production process at 500 L at or below $.42/lb, a laboratory scale fed-batch process for succinic acid production at or below $.40/lb, a recovery process for succinic acid that reduces the cost of succinic acid by $.02/lb and the development of an acid tolerant succinic acid production strain at lab scale (last objective not to be completed during this project time period).

  3. Biochemical Production of Ethanol from Corn Stover: 2007 State of Technology Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aden, A.

    2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An update to the FY 2005 assessment of the state of technical research progress toward biochemical process goals. This assessment contains research results from 2006 and 2007.

  4. Biochemical Production of Ethanol from Corn Stover: 2008 State of Technology Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Humbird, D.; Aden, A.

    2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An update to the FY 2007 assessment of the state of technical research progress toward biochemical process goals, quantified in terms of Minimum Ethanol Selling Price.

  5. Process Design and Economics for Biochemical Conversion of Lignocellulosic Biomass to Ethanol: Dilute-Acid Pretreatment and Enzymatic Hydrolysis of Corn Stover

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Humbird, D.; Davis, R.; Tao, L.; Kinchin, C.; Hsu, D.; Aden, A.; Schoen, P.; Lukas, J.; Olthof, B.; Worley, M.; Sexton, D.; Dudgeon, D.

    2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes one potential biochemical ethanol conversion process, conceptually based upon core conversion and process integration research at NREL. The overarching process design converts corn stover to ethanol by dilute-acid pretreatment, enzymatic saccharification, and co-fermentation. Building on design reports published in 2002 and 1999, NREL, together with the subcontractor Harris Group Inc., performed a complete review of the process design and economic model for the biomass-to-ethanol process. This update reflects NREL's current vision of the biochemical ethanol process and includes the latest research in the conversion areas (pretreatment, conditioning, saccharification, and fermentation), optimizations in product recovery, and our latest understanding of the ethanol plant's back end (wastewater and utilities). The conceptual design presented here reports ethanol production economics as determined by 2012 conversion targets and 'nth-plant' project costs and financing. For the biorefinery described here, processing 2,205 dry ton/day at 76% theoretical ethanol yield (79 gal/dry ton), the ethanol selling price is $2.15/gal in 2007$.

  6. NREL 2012 Achievement of Ethanol Cost Targets: Biochemical Ethanol Fermentation via Dilute-Acid Pretreatment and Enzymatic Hydrolysis of Corn Stover

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tao, L.; Schell, D.; Davis, R.; Tan, E.; Elander, R.; Bratis, A.

    2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    For the DOE Bioenergy Technologies Office, the annual State of Technology (SOT) assessment is an essential activity for quantifying the benefits of biochemical platform research. This assessment has historically allowed the impact of research progress achieved through targeted Bioenergy Technologies Office funding to be quantified in terms of economic improvements within the context of a fully integrated cellulosic ethanol production process. As such, progress toward the ultimate 2012 goal of demonstrating cost-competitive cellulosic ethanol technology can be tracked. With an assumed feedstock cost for corn stover of $58.50/ton this target has historically been set at $1.41/gal ethanol for conversion costs only (exclusive of feedstock) and $2.15/gal total production cost (inclusive of feedstock) or minimum ethanol selling price (MESP). This year, fully integrated cellulosic ethanol production data generated by National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) researchers in their Integrated Biorefinery Research Facility (IBRF) successfully demonstrated performance commensurate with both the FY 2012 SOT MESP target of $2.15/gal (2007$, $58.50/ton feedstock cost) and the conversion target of $1.41/gal through core research and process improvements in pretreatment, enzymatic hydrolysis, and fermentation.

  7. Process Design and Economics for Biochemical Conversion of Lignocellul...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Biochemical Conversion of Lignocellulosic Biomass to Ethanol: Dilute-Acid Pretreatment and Enzymatic Hydrolysis of Corn Stover Process Design and Economics for Biochemical...

  8. Country Canada Type Blend (corn in oak + rye in charred oak + barley in medium-charred oak)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Izzard, Rob

    ) Distillery Forty Creek Name Double barrel reserve ABV 40% Cask Bourbon and sherry Colour Golden Bottle volume by an updraft of caramel corn and honeycomb. The whisky also brings forward strong dry woody notes (oak The whisky finishes with a dry spicy burst of orange peel and woody tannin. Hints of hazelnut and tea leaves

  9. Owens Corning

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion | Department ofT ib l L d F SSales LLCDieselEnergy Joining|ActionOWENS CORNING GOVERNMENT

  10. Corn Hybrids for Texas.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rogers, J. S.; Bockholt, A. J.; Collier, J. W.

    1957-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    - Corn Hybrid$ for . ;mE Tgmt 4.College Sta. 9Sulphw Spgr. @.Holland l9.GreenviUe 24Stephmville 5.Kibyvilb IO.(;brkrvilb B.Tanpb 20Mm 25.Chilkothe TEXAS AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATIC R. D. LEWIS. DIRECTOR, COLLEGE STATION, TEXAS DIGEST... of the production has been entering com- mercial channels. About 2.5 percent of the total Texas corn acreage is harvested as silage and about 1 percent of the annual corn crop is used for human consum~tion. .- -. of improved corn hybrids. More favora-ble grow...

  11. Potato Corn Chowder Ingredients

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liskiewicz, Maciej

    Potato Corn Chowder Ingredients: 2 potatoes, peeled and diced 15 ounces sweet corn, drained 2 potatoes, cut into bite size pieces. Place in microwave safe bowl with lid. Add 1/4 cup of water and cover to remove sodium. 4. While potatoes are cooking, melt margarine in saucepan over medium heat and add flour

  12. Corn Hybrids for Texas.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rogers, J. S.; McAfee, T. E.

    1954-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Stephenville ,J* 5.K'rbyvilb I0.Cbrkdb 15.Tanpk 2ODetiion 25.Wllothe TEXAS AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION R. D. LEWIS. DIRECTOR, COLLEGE STATION, TEXAS DIGEST The Texas corn acreage planted to hybrids increased from less than 1 percent of the total acrea....1 in 1941 to 74.5 percent in 1953. Most of the present acreage is devoted to the newer, better-adaptt hybrids-Texas 26, 28 and 30. These new hybrids usually outyield the older Texas hybrids h!. least 10 percent. Corn is one of the most important...

  13. Mechanical Harvesting of Corn.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sorenson, J. W. (Jerome Wallace); Smith, H. P. (Harris Pearson)

    1948-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    or Indian corn is the oldest food crop known in continental I and South America. When Columbus discovered America ;ears ago, he found in Cuba "a sort of grain they call Maiz which was well tosted, bak'd, dry'd and made into flour" (5). Thus... near Brownsville; from the Sabine on the east to El Paso on the west. Only one other crop-cotton- occupies a larger acreage in Texas. The largest acreages of corn are grown in the Blackland Prairie of Central Texas. Of the 254 counties in l...

  14. Biochemical Production of Ethanol from Corn Stover: 2008 State...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    hexose cofermentation using recombinant Zymomonas mobilis. Aspen Plus chemical process simulation software 2 was used to compute material and energy balances for a biorefinery...

  15. Biochemical Production of Ethanol from Corn Stover: 2007 State of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative FuelsBSCmemo.pdf BSCmemo.pdf BSCmemo.pdfBetter BuildingsBetter

  16. Estimating Corn Grain Yields

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Blumenthal, Jurg M.; Thompson, Wayne

    2009-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

    can collect samples from a corn field and use this data to calculate the yield estimate. An interactive grain yield calculator is provided in the Appendix of the pdf version of this publication. The calculator is also located in the publication.... Plan and prepare for sample and data collection. 2. Collect field samples and record data. 3. Analyze the data using the interactive grain yield calculator in the Appendix. Plan and prepare for sample and data collection Predetermine sample locations...

  17. Microscopic Analysis of Corn Fiber Using Corn Starch- and Cellulose-Specific Molecular Probes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Porter, S. E.; Donohoe, B. S.; Beery, K. E.; Xu, Q.; Ding, S.-Y.; Vinzant, T. B.; Abbas, C. A.; Himmel, M. E.

    2007-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ethanol is the primary liquid transportation fuel produced from renewable feedstocks in the United States today. The majority of corn grain, the primary feedstock for ethanol production, has been historically processed in wet mills yielding products such as gluten feed, gluten meal, starch, and germ. Starch extracted from the grain is used to produce ethanol in saccharification and fermentation steps; however the extraction of starch is not 100% efficient. To better understand starch extraction during the wet milling process, we have developed fluorescent probes that can be used to visually localize starch and cellulose in samples using confocal microscopy. These probes are based on the binding specificities of two types of carbohydrate binding modules (CBMs), which are small substrate-specific protein domains derived from carbohydrate degrading enzymes. CBMs were fused, using molecular cloning techniques, to a green fluorescent protein (GFP) or to the red fluorescent protein DsRed (RFP). Using these engineered probes, we found that the binding of the starch-specific probe correlates with starch content in corn fiber samples. We also demonstrate that there is starch internally localized in the endosperm that may contribute to the high starch content in corn fiber. We also surprisingly found that the cellulose-specific probe did not bind to most corn fiber samples, but only to corn fiber that had been hydrolyzed using a thermochemical process that removes the residual starch and much of the hemicellulose. Our findings should be of interest to those working to increase the efficiency of the corn grain to ethanol process.

  18. Corn Production in Texas.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Collier, Jesse W. (Jesse Wilton); Rogers, John S. (John Sinclair)

    1952-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . 25- Apr. 10 High Plains (Irrigated) Apr. 10- May 1 'Shown as pounds per acre of nitrogen (N), phosphoric acid (P20;,) and potash (K-0), respectively. 'Shown as po1111ds pel- acre of 1iitroge11 (N). I DIGEST 1 Corn is one of the more..., the average yield usually fluctuated between 1.0 and 20 bushels per acre. Yields were slightly higher at the beginning of the century as a result of inherent soil fertility. With continued cropping, however, fertility and yields grad- ually declined...

  19. Ethanol extraction of phytosterols from corn fiber

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Abbas, Charles (Champaign, IL); Beery, Kyle E. (Decatur, IL); Binder, Thomas P. (Decatur, IL); Rammelsberg, Anne M. (Decatur, IL)

    2010-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention provides a process for extracting sterols from a high solids, thermochemically hydrolyzed corn fiber using ethanol as the extractant. The process includes obtaining a corn fiber slurry having a moisture content from about 20 weight percent to about 50 weight percent solids (high solids content), thermochemically processing the corn fiber slurry having high solids content of 20 to 50% to produce a hydrolyzed corn fiber slurry, dewatering the hydrolyzed corn fiber slurry to achieve a residual corn fiber having a moisture content from about 30 to 80 weight percent solids, washing the residual corn fiber, dewatering the washed, hydrolyzed corn fiber slurry to achieve a residual corn fiber having a moisture content from about 30 to 80 weight percent solids, and extracting the residual corn fiber with ethanol and separating at least one sterol.

  20. National Bioenergy Center - Biochemical Platform Integration Project: Quarterly Update, Winter 2010

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schell, D.

    2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Winter 2011 edition of the National Bioenergy Center's Biochemical Platform Integration Project quarterly newsletter. Issue topics: 33rd Symposium on Biotechnology for Fuels and Chemicals program topic areas; results from reactive membrane extraction of inhibitors from dilute-acid pretreated corn stover; list of 2010 task publications.

  1. Staling in corn tortillas prepared from nixtamalized corn flour

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fernandez de Castro, Deborah Ann

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Effects of forming method and storage on starch and texture of corn tortillas were evaluated. Texture of tortillas was evaluated subjectively using rollability and crinkle methods and objectively using bending and extensibility methods on a texture...

  2. Biochemical transformation of coals

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lin, M.S.; Premuzic, E.T.

    1999-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of biochemically transforming macromolecular compounds found in solid carbonaceous materials, such as coal is provided. The preparation of new microorganisms, metabolically weaned through challenge growth processes to biochemically transform solid carbonaceous materials at extreme temperatures, pressures, pH, salt and toxic metal concentrations is also disclosed. 7 figs.

  3. Corn Storage Protein - A Molecular Genetic Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Messing, Joachim [Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey

    2013-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Corn is the highest yielding crop on earth and probably the most valuable agricultural product of the United States. Because it converts sun energy through photosynthesis into starch and proteins, we addressed energy savings by focusing on protein quality. People and animals require essential amino acids derived from the digestion of proteins. If proteins are relatively low in certain essential amino acids, the crop becomes nutritionally defective and has to be supplemented. Such deficiency affects meat and fish production and countries where corn is a staple. Because corn seed proteins have relatively low levels of lysine and methionine, a diet has to be supplemented with soybeans for the missing lysine and with chemically synthesized methionine. We therefore have studied genes expressed during maize seed development and their chromosomal organization. A critical technical requirement for the understanding of the molecular structure of genes and their positional information was DNA sequencing. Because of the length of sequences, DNA sequencing methods themselves were insufficient for this type of analysis. We therefore developed the so-called “DNA shotgun sequencing” strategy, where overlapping DNA fragments were sequenced in parallel and used to reconstruct large DNA molecules via overlaps. Our publications became the most frequently cited ones during the decade of 1981-1990 and former Associate Director of Science for the Office of Basic Energy Sciences Patricia M. Dehmer presented our work as one of the great successes of this program. A major component of the sequencing strategy was the development of bacterial strains and vectors, which were also used to develop the first biotechnology crops. These crops possessed new traits thanks to the expression of foreign genes in plants. To enable such expression, chimeric genes had to be constructed using our materials and methods by the industry. Because we made our materials and methods freely available to academia and industry, progress in plant research and new crop development could accelerate and benefit the public.

  4. Metabolic Engineering of Light and Dark Biochemical Pathways in Wild-Type and Mutant Strains of Synechocystis PCC 6803 for Maximal, 24-Hour Production of Hydrogen Gas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ely, Roger L.; Chaplen, Frank W.R.

    2014-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

    This project used the cyanobacterial species Synechocystis PCC 6803 to pursue two lines of inquiry, with each line addressing one of the two main factors affecting hydrogen (H2) production in Synechocystis PCC 6803: NADPH availability and O2 sensitivity. H2 production in Synechocystis PCC 6803 requires a very high NADPH:NADP+ ratio, that is, the NADP pool must be highly reduced, which can be problematic because several metabolic pathways potentially can act to raise or lower NADPH levels. Also, though the [NiFe]-hydrogenase in PCC 6803 is constitutively expressed, it is reversibly inactivated at very low O2 concentrations. Largely because of this O2 sensitivity and the requirement for high NADPH levels, a major portion of overall H2 production occurs under anoxic conditions in the dark, supported by breakdown of glycogen or other organic substrates accumulated during photosynthesis. Also, other factors, such as N or S limitation, pH changes, presence of other substances, or deletion of particular respiratory components, can affect light or dark H2 production. Therefore, in the first line of inquiry, under a number of culture conditions with wild type (WT) Synechocystis PCC 6803 cells and a mutant with impaired type I NADPH-dehydrogenase (NDH-1) function, we used H2 production profiling and metabolic flux analysis, with and without specific inhibitors, to examine systematically the pathways involved in light and dark H2 production. Results from this work provided rational bases for metabolic engineering to maximize photobiological H2 production on a 24-hour basis. In the second line of inquiry, we used site-directed mutagenesis to create mutants with hydrogenase enzymes exhibiting greater O2 tolerance. The research addressed the following four tasks: 1. Evaluate the effects of various culture conditions (N, S, or P limitation; light/dark; pH; exogenous organic carbon) on H2 production profiles of WT cells and an NDH-1 mutant; 2. Conduct metabolic flux analyses for enhanced H2 production profiles using selected culture conditions and inhibitors of specific pathways in WT cells and an NDH-1 mutant; 3. Create Synechocystis PCC 6803 mutant strains with modified hydrogenases exhibiting increased O2 tolerance and greater H2 production; and 4. Integrate enhanced hydrogenase mutants and culture and metabolic factor studies to maximize 24-hour H2 production.

  5. Broccoli and Corn Bake Ingredients

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liskiewicz, Maciej

    broccoli, frozen, thawed 20 low sodium whole-wheat crackers 1 egg, beaten 5 ounces evaporated skim milk and pour into a colander. Rinse under cool water to remove salt, set aside to drain. 3. Place crackers milk and add to egg. Beat until well mixed. 5. Add corn, thawed broccoli, half of the crushed crackers

  6. The Corn and Climate Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Debinski, Diane M.

    Climate Change Science Program Office Part 2: Climate Impacts on Midwestern Agriculture: MonitoringThe Corn and Climate Report An overview of climate science in the service of Midwestern agriculture Administration National Weather Service North Central Bioeconomy Consortium US Climate Change Science Program

  7. Biochemical upgrading of oils

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Premuzic, E.T.; Lin, M.S.

    1999-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

    A process for biochemical conversion of heavy crude oils is provided. The process includes contacting heavy crude oils with adapted biocatalysts. The resulting upgraded oil shows, a relative increase in saturated hydrocarbons, emulsions and oxygenates and a decrease in compounds containing organic sulfur, organic nitrogen and trace metals. Adapted microorganisms which have been modified under challenged growth processes are also disclosed. 121 figs.

  8. Oil recovery from condensed corn distillers solubles.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Majoni, Sandra

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ??Condensed corn distillers solubles (CCDS) contains more oil than dried distillers grains with solubles (DDGS), 20 vs. 12% (dry weight basis). Therefore, significant amount of… (more)

  9. Corn Ethanol -April 2006 11 Cover Story

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Patzek, Tadeusz W.

    Corn Ethanol - April 2006 11 Cover Story orn ethanol is the fuel du jour. It's domestic. It's not oil. Ethanol's going to help promote "energy independence." Magazines trumpet it as the motor vehicle Midwest fields, waiting to rot or be processed into ethanol. Interestingly, the National Corn Growers

  10. Researchers use corn waste to generate electricity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    directly. "People are looking at using cellulose to make ethanol," said Bruce E. Logan, the Kappe professor researchers thinks corn stover can be used not only to manufacture ethanol, but to generate electricity of environmental engineering. "You can make ethanol from exploded corn stover, but once you have the sugars, you

  11. September 2010 FAPRI-MU US Biofuels, Corn Processing,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Noble, James S.

    September 2010 FAPRI-MU US Biofuels, Corn Processing, Distillers Grains, Fats, Switchgrass-882-4256 or the US Department of Education, Office of Civil Rights. #12;1 Overview of FAPRI-MU Biofuels, Corn listed here represent US biofuel, corn processing, distillers grains, fats, switchgrass, and corn stover

  12. REGULAR ARTICLE European corn borer injury effects on lignin, carbon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beaudoin, Georges

    REGULAR ARTICLE European corn borer injury effects on lignin, carbon and nitrogen in corn tissues herbivores often stimulate lignin deposition in injured plant tissue, but it is not known whether corn (Zea (Bacillus thuringiensis) genetic modifica- tion is also reported to affect lignin in corn. This study

  13. Thermal Properties of Starch From New Corn Lines as Impacted by Environment and During Line Development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elizabeth M. Lenihan

    2003-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The objectives of this research were to further characterize exotic by adapted corn inbreds by studying the impact of environment on their starch thermal properties, and investigating the development of starch thermal properties during kernel maturation by using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). A method to expedite identification of unusual starch thermal traits was investigated by examining five corn kernels at a time, instead of one kernel, which the previous screening methods used. Corn lines with known thermal functions were blended with background starch (control) in ratios of unique starch to control starch, and analyzed by using DSC. Control starch was representative of typical corn starch. The values for each ratio within a mutant type were unique ({alpha} < 0.01) for most DSC measurements. These results supported the five-kernel method for rapidly screening large amounts of corn germplasm to identify unusual starch traits. The effects of 5 growing locations on starch thermal properties from exotic by adapted corn and Corn Belt lines were studied using DSC. The warmest location, Missouri, generally produced starch with greater gelatinization onset temperature (T{sub oG}), narrower range of gelatinization (R{sub G}), and greater enthalpy of gelatinization ({Delta}H{sub G}). The coolest location, Illinois, generally resulted in starch with lower T{sub oG}, wider R{sub G}, and lower {Delta}H{sub G}. Starch from the Ames 1 farm had thermal properties similar to those of Illinois, whereas starch from the Ames 2 farm had thermal properties similar to those of Missouri. The temperature at Ames 2 may have been warmer since it was located near a river; however, soil type and quality also were different. Final corn starch structure and function change during development and maturity. Thus, the changes in starch thermal properties during 5 stages of endosperm development from exotic by adapted corn and Corn Belt lines at two locations were studied by using DSC. The T{sub oG} tended to decrease during maturation of the kernel, whereas the {Delta}H{sub G} tended not to change. Retrogradation parameters did not vary greatly among days after pollination (DAP) and between locations. Genotypes were affected differently by environments and significant interactions were found between genotype, environment,and DAP.

  14. UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report Life Cycle Assessment of Bioethanol Derived from Corn and Corn Stover

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report Life Cycle Assessment Farbod Ahmadi Diba Derek Pope 4/16/2010 Life Cycle Assessment of Bioethanol Derived from Corn and Corn corn as well as corn stover in comparision to petroleum fuels. A Life Cycle Analysis (LCA) using the Ga

  15. Direct application of West Coast geothermal resources in a wet-corn-milling plant. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1981-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The engineering and economic feasibility of using the geothermal resources in East Mesa, California, in a new corn processing plant is evaluated. Institutional barriers were also identified and evaluated. Several alternative plant designs which used geothermal energy were developed. A capital cost estimate and rate of return type of economic analysis were performed to evaluate each alternative. (MHR)

  16. The estimated costs of corn, corn silage, soybeans, alfalfa, and pasture maintenance in this report are

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Duffy, Michael D.

    The estimated costs of corn, corn silage, soybeans, alfalfa, and pasture maintenance in this report significantly over time. Budgets for alfalfa hay establishment with an oat companion crop and by direct seeding are included in this publication. Annual production costs for established alfalfa or alfalfa-grass hay as well

  17. Biochemical Conversion Pilot Plant (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This fact sheet provides information about Biochemical Conversion Pilot Plant capabilities and resources at NREL.

  18. National Bioenergy Center Biochemical Platform Integration Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    April through June 2008 update on activities of the National Bioenergy Center's Biochemical Platform Integration Project.

  19. Effect of pelleting on the recalcitrance and bioconversion of dilute-acid pretreated corn stover

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Allison E Ray; Amber Hoover; Gary Gresham

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Background: Knowledge regarding the performance of densified biomass in biochemical processes is limited. The effects of densification on biochemical conversion are explored here. Methods: Pelleted corn stover samples were generated from bales that were milled to 6.35 mm. Low-solids acid pretreatment and simultaneous saccharification and fermentation were performed to evaluate pretreatment efficacy and ethanol yields achieved for pelleted and ground stover (6.35 mm and 2 mm) samples. Both pelleted and 6.35-mm ground stover were evaluated using a ZipperClaveź reactor under high-solids, process-relevant conditions for multiple pretreatment severities (Ro), followed by enzymatic hydrolysis of the washed, pretreated solids. Results: Monomeric xylose yields were significantly higher for pellets (approximately 60%) than for ground formats (approximately 38%). Pellets achieved approximately 84% of theoretical ethanol yield (TEY); ground stover formats had similar profiles, reaching approximately 68% TEY. Pelleting corn stover was not detrimental to pretreatment efficacy for both low- and high-solids conditions, and even enhanced ethanol yields.

  20. Biochemical Production of Ethanol from Corn Stover: 2007 State of Technology Model

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:Year in Review: Top Five EEREDepartment ofEnergyEnergyBetterMake Fuels and Chemicals

  1. Thermodynamics of the Corn-Ethanol Biofuel Cycle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Patzek, Tadeusz W.

    into Corn Production . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19 3.11 Solar Energy Input into Corn . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25 4.5 Overall Energy Balance of the Corn-Ethanol Process . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25 II.1 The Earth is an Open System to Heat Flow . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38 10.2 Conclusions

  2. Variations in Vitamin A and in Chemical Composition of Corn.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fraps, G. S. (George Stronach)

    1931-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    such as rickets, scurvy, or beri-beri. Vitamin A was one of the first vitamins discovered. It occurs in large quantity in yellow corn, while little or none is founcl in white corn. For the purpose of this study, samples of corn grown at the various substations...

  3. Energy Analysis of the Corn-Ethanol Biofuel Cycle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Patzek, Tadeusz W.

    Energy Analysis of the Corn-Ethanol Biofuel Cycle First Draft Tad W. Patzek Department of Civil legitimately ask: Why do the various energy balances of the corn-ethanol cycle still differ so much? Why do some authors claim that the corn-ethanol cycle has a positive net energy balance (Wang et al., 1997

  4. ANTHRAQUINONE CORN SEED TREATMENT (AVITECTM ) AS A FEEDING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ANTHRAQUINONE CORN SEED TREATMENT (AVITECTM ) AS A FEEDING REPELLENT FOR RING-NECKED PHEASANTS and Fisheries Sciences South Dakota State University 2009 #12;ANTHRAQUINONE CORN SEED TREATMENT (AVITECTM the South Dakota Department of Game, Fish, and Parks. #12;v ABSTRACT ANTHRAQUINONE CORN SEED TREATMENT

  5. Determination of the structural changes by Raman and {sup 13}C CP/MAS NMR spectroscopy on native corn starch with plasticizers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cozar, O. [Academy of Romanian Scientists, Splaiul Independentei 54, 050094, Bucharest, Romania and National Institute of Research-Development for Machines and Installations Designed to Agriculture and Food Industry - INMA Bucure?ti - Cluj-Napoca Branch (Romania)] [Academy of Romanian Scientists, Splaiul Independentei 54, 050094, Bucharest, Romania and National Institute of Research-Development for Machines and Installations Designed to Agriculture and Food Industry - INMA Bucure?ti - Cluj-Napoca Branch (Romania); Filip, C.; Tripon, C. [National Institute for Research and Development of Isotopic and Molecular Technologies, 65-103 Donath, 400293 Cluj-Napoca (Romania)] [National Institute for Research and Development of Isotopic and Molecular Technologies, 65-103 Donath, 400293 Cluj-Napoca (Romania); Cioica, N.; Co?a, C.; Nagy, E. M. [National Institute of Research-Development for Machines and Installations Designed to Agriculture and Food Industry - INMA Bucure?ti - Cluj-Napoca Branch, RO-400458 Cluj-Napoca (Romania)] [National Institute of Research-Development for Machines and Installations Designed to Agriculture and Food Industry - INMA Bucure?ti - Cluj-Napoca Branch, RO-400458 Cluj-Napoca (Romania)

    2013-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

    The plasticizing - antiplasticizing effect of water and glycerol contents on native corn starch samples is investigated by FT-Raman and {sup 13}C CP/MAS NMR spectroscopy. The presence of both amorphous and crystalline structural phases was evidenced in pure native corn starch and also in the samples containing plasticizers. Among the crystalline starch structures, the A- and V- types were suggested by CP/MAS NMR spectra.

  6. A supply forecasting model for Zimbabwe's corn sector: a time series and structural analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Makaudze, Ephias

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Zimbabwean government utilizes the corn supply forecasts to establish producer prices for the following growing season, estimate corn storage and handling costs, project corn import needs and associated costs, and to assess the Grain Marketing...

  7. Corn Belt Energy Corporation- Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Corn Belt Energy Corporation (CBEC), in association with the Wabash Valley Power Association, provides its customers with the "Power Moves" energy efficiency rebate program. Through this program,...

  8. Partnership Logging Accidents Cornelis de Hoop, LA Forest Products Lab

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Partnership Logging Accidents · by · Cornelis de Hoop, LA Forest Products Lab · Albert Lefort Agreement · 1998 & 1999 Accident Reports · 25 injuries reported · 185 loggers signed up · 8 deaths 1999

  9. NREL: Biomass Research - Biochemical Conversion Projects

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    NREL's projects in biochemical conversion involve three basic steps to convert biomass feedstocks to fuels: Converting biomass to sugar or other fermentation feedstock...

  10. Improved Multivariate Calibration Models for Corn Stover Feedstock and Dilute-Acid Pretreated Corn Stover

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wolfrum, E. J.; Sluiter, A. D.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We have studied rapid calibration models to predict the composition of a variety of biomass feedstocks by correlating near-infrared (NIR) spectroscopic data to compositional data produced using traditional wet chemical analysis techniques. The rapid calibration models are developed using multivariate statistical analysis of the spectroscopic and wet chemical data. This work discusses the latest versions of the NIR calibration models for corn stover feedstock and dilute-acid pretreated corn stover. Measures of the calibration precision and uncertainty are presented. No statistically significant differences (p = 0.05) are seen between NIR calibration models built using different mathematical pretreatments. Finally, two common algorithms for building NIR calibration models are compared; no statistically significant differences (p = 0.05) are seen for the major constituents glucan, xylan, and lignin, but the algorithms did produce different predictions for total extractives. A single calibration model combining the corn stover feedstock and dilute-acid pretreated corn stover samples gave less satisfactory predictions than the separate models.

  11. THE 2001 NET ENERGY BALANCE OF CORN-ETHANOL (PRELIMINARY)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Patzek, Tadeusz W.

    1 THE 2001 NET ENERGY BALANCE OF CORN-ETHANOL (PRELIMINARY) Hosein Shapouri*, U.S. Department Laboratory, 9700 South Cass Avenue, Argonne, IL. 60439 ABSTRACT This report estimates the net energy balance to produce ethanol and byproducts. The results indicate that corn ethanol has a positive energy balance, even

  12. Biofuel derived from Microalgae Corn-based Ethanol

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Blouin-Demers, Gabriel

    Biofuel derived from Microalgae Corn-based Ethanol #12;Outline · Production processes for each;Definitions Biofuel: clean fuel made from animal and plant fats and tissues (Hollebone, 2008) Ethanol species (sizes from a few- a few hundred ”m) (Wikipedia, 2008) #12;How is ethanol produced from corn

  13. Prediction of corn tortilla textural quality using stress relaxation methods

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guo, Zhihong

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ). The effects of moisture content and resting time on corn masa textural property were investigated. Texture of properties of corn tortilla (fresh up to stale) was evaluated using the stress relaxation technique in two different modes, pure tension and bending-tension...

  14. 774 BIOCHEMICAL SOCIETY TRANSACTIONS Bennett, J. (1983) Biochem. J. 212, 1-13

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Allen, John F.

    774 BIOCHEMICAL SOCIETY TRANSACTIONS Bennett, J. (1983) Biochem. J. 212, 1-13 Bennett, J. (1984)in Science Publishers, Amsterdam Bennett, J., Steinback,K. E. & Amtzen, C. J. (1980) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U. & Bennett, J. (1981) FEES Kyle, D. J., Staehelin,L. A. & Arntzen, C. J. (1983)Arch. Biochem. Lin, Z

  15. Suggestions for Weed Control in Corn

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baumann, Paul A.

    2002-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

    F r ontier ? for additional w eed contr ol. Consult (R efer to label for specific w eeds BASF U se rate determined b y inches of soil) or sur face applied the pr oduct label. R o tational cr o p r estrictions will contr olled.) C.E.C. (cationex...) or sur face contr olled.) BASF applied within 2 w eeks of U se rate is determined b y C.E.C. (cation ex change planting. Early postemergence capacity) or soil textur e and organic matter befor e corn is12 inches tall, but content. Can make split...

  16. Quad County Corn Processors | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revisionEnvReviewNonInvasiveExploration JumpSanyalTempWellheadWahkiakum CountyPzero Jump to:Quad County Corn

  17. Computing Resources at Chemical and Biochemical Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Main Site Dept. of Chemical and Biochemical Engineering, 98 Brett Road Piscataway, NJ 08854-8058 PhoneComputing Resources at Chemical and Biochemical Engineering Note that use of all Rutgers University at: http://rucs.rutgers.edu/acceptable- use.html. Microlab. The PC Microlab (Engineering Room C233

  18. Systems Security at Chemical and Biochemical Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and Biochemical Engineering. The Systems Administrator for Chemical and Biochemical Engineering regularly reviews network security.However, maintaining systems security is a group effort and a never-ending task. Here Administrator regarding security bugs that may affect your personal computer. If a patch is available, download

  19. Time Course Study of Substrate Utilization by Aspergillus flavus in Medium Simulating Corn (Zea mays) Kernels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cotty, Peter J.

    Utilization of the three major corn reserve materials, starch, triglycerides (refined corn oil), and zein composition in which proportions of reserve materials initially approximated proportions in mature corn. Reserve materials of corn include starch, lipids, and zein, a member of the prolamin class of storage

  20. Frontiers, Opportunities, and Challenges in Biochemical and Chemical...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Frontiers, Opportunities, and Challenges in Biochemical and Chemical Catalysis of CO2. Frontiers, Opportunities, and Challenges in Biochemical and Chemical Catalysis of CO2....

  1. 2011 Biomass Program Platform Peer Review: Biochemical Conversion...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Biochemical Conversion 2011 Biomass Program Platform Peer Review: Biochemical Conversion This document summarizes the recommendations and evaluations provided by an independent...

  2. The values and practices associated with high moisture corn

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Finch, Charles B

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    be characterized by rate of ruminal fermentation (Stock et al. , 1987). Grains are comprised mostly of starch (corn 64-78, grain sorghum 60-77, and barley 12-14'/0); and crude protein (corn 10-11, grain sorghum 8-12, and barley 12-14'/0) (Rooney, 1986). Many.... , 1986). The moisture percentage, degree of fermentation, and particle size influence not only rates of passage and digestion, but directly or indirectly, influence intake patterns. Cattle fed ground high moisture corn have reduced gains and intakes...

  3. Watergrass and Volunteer Sorghum Control in Corn.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiese, A.F.; Chenault, E.W.; Lavake, D.E.; Hollingsworth, Dale

    1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Corn Preplant LblA emergence LblA emergence herbicide (ai) herbicide (ail herbicide (ail (LbIA) (BulA) c*" (NolA) AAtrex 442 c-e 820 c-e 1,561 b-d 1506 3 e 2 350 de 12,192 ab 12,288 ab 1 1,328 a-c 11,616a-c Princep AAtrex 1ya iha 125... Aatrex 3 _ Evik + SC 2 202 e 123a-c 11,136a-c Check .- -_ 4,991 a 90 d 9,216 c Weans followed by the sgme letaer --&= fwel of significance. bSun 11Eoilat 1 gaHanper&cmin COupont WK surfactant at 0.5% of mtzi&k%ume. TABLE 8. WATERGRASS COMa AND...

  4. Design guidelines for optical resonator biochemical sensors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kimerling, Lionel C.

    In this paper, we propose a design tool for dielectric optical resonator-based biochemical refractometry sensors. Analogous to the widely accepted photodetector figure of merit, the detectivity D*, we introduce a new sensor ...

  5. Direct Comparison of Alfalfa Nitrogen Credits to Corn and Wheat

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Balser, Teri C.

    Station Ashland Ag Research Station #12;Alfalfa N credits to corn: · Infrequent fertilizer N responses Rate Aug Sep lb/a --------- bu/a --------- 15 48 48 35 55 43 55 52 51 75 62 49 Ashland, 2001

  6. Corn Belt Energy Coop- Commercial Energy Efficiency Rebate Program (Illinois)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Corn Belt Energy, through the Wabash Valley Power Association, offers business, school, and farm customers a variety of energy efficient rebates and incentives through its "Power Moves" program....

  7. STATEMENT OF CONSIDERATIONS REQUEST BY OWENS CORNING SCIENCE...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Film Solar Cells." OWENS CORNING is a sub-awardee under the cooperative agreement. Solexel Inc. is the prime awardee. This waiver only applies to subject inventions of OWENS...

  8. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Sylvania Corning Nuclear...

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    to SYLVANIA CORNING NUCLEAR CORP., INC., SYLVANIA LABORATORIES NY.07-1 - Letter, Smith to Norris, Contract at (30-1)-1293- U Metal Requirements, March 5, 1953 NY.07-2 -...

  9. Evaluation of mixing characteristics of corn dry masa flours

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lobeira Massu, Rodrigo

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Mixing characteristics of commercial and reformulated corn dry masa flours (DMF) were evaluated using a mixograph and a farinograph. The objectives were to evaluate the potential use of the mixograph and farinograph to study DMF mixing and hydration...

  10. Sweet Corn Tests in the Lower Rio Grande Valley.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pickett, B. S. (Barzalli Stewart)

    1947-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    in habit and character to Silvercross Evergreen. 10 BULLETIN NO. 689, TEXAS AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION Table 6. Variety test results with white sweet corn Other varieties of white sweet corn of merit are the Narrowgra Hybrids 5 x 22 and 26 x 15..... ....................... Winnebago ...................... Country Gentlemen 5 x 10. ........ Country Gentlemen 8 x 6. ........ Narrow Grain 17x1 1 .............. Narrow Grain 14x13. ............. Narrow Grain 26x15. ............. Shoeped Hybrid.. ................ Stowell...

  11. Characteristics of corn and sorghum for tortilla processing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gonzalez de Palacios, Maria de Jesus

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    CHARACTERISTICS OF CORN AND SORGHUM FOR TORTILLA PROCESSING A Thesis by MARIA DE JESUS GONZALEZ DE PALACIOS Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A8M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER... OF SCIENCE December 1980 Major Subject: Food Science and Technology CHARACTERISTICS OF CORN AND SORGHUM FOR TORTILLA PROCESSING A Thesis by MARIA DE JESUS GONZALEZ DE PALACIOS Approved as to style and content by: an o omm t em er em er ea o...

  12. Thermal analysis of biochemical systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McEuen, Scott Jacob

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Scientists, both academic and industrial, develop two main types of drugs: 1) small molecule drugs, which are usually chemically synthesized and are taken orally and 2) large molecule, biotherapeutic, or protein-based ...

  13. E-Print Network 3.0 - alkaline-pretreated corn stover Sample...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Sciences and Ecology 31 Identifica-tion of genes Summary: and products spread to new markets. One focus of the research is corn stover. The tons of corn plant left... -...

  14. INTERSPECIFIC AND INTRASPECIFIC COMPETITION OF COMMON SUNFLOWER (HELIANTHUS ANNUUS L.) IN FIELD CORN (ZEA MAYS L.)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Falkenberg, Nyland R.

    2010-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

    corn. Field studies were conducted in 2006 and 2007 to 1) define the density-dependent effects of common sunflower competition with corn; 2) define the necessary weed-free periods of common sunflower in corn; 3) evaluate common sunflower control...

  15. Characteristics of Herbicides and Weed Management Programs Most Important to Corn, Cotton, and Soybean Growers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mitchell, Paul D.

    Characteristics of Herbicides and Weed Management Programs Most Important to Corn, Cotton of Herbicides and Weed Management Programs Most Important to Corn, Cotton, and Soybean Growers T.M. Hurley characteristics that influence profitability, using data from a telephone survey of 1,205 corn, cotton

  16. Production of bioenergy and biochemicals from industrial and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Angenent, Lars T.

    Production of bioenergy and biochemicals from industrial and agricultural wastewater Largus T biological processing strat- egies that produce bioenergy or biochemicals while treating industrial on wastewater treatment from pollution control to resource exploitation. Many bioprocesses can provide bioenergy

  17. WMU Power Generation Study Task 2.0 Corn Cob Co-Combustion Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2009-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Much attention has been focused on renewable energy use in large-scale utilities and very small scale distributed energy systems. However, there is little information available regarding renewable energy options for midscale municipal utilities. The Willmar Municipal Utilities Corn Cob-Coal Co-Combustion Project was initiated to investigate opportunities available for small to midscale municipal utilities to "go green". The overall goal of the Project was to understand the current t'enewable energy research and energy efficiency projects that are or have been implemented at both larger and smaller scale and determine the applicability to midscale municipal utilities. More specific objectives for Task 2.0 of this project were to determine the technical feasibility of co-combusting com cobs with coal in the existing WMU boiler, and to identify any regulatory issues that might need to be addressed if WMU were to obtain a significant portion of its heat from such co-combustion. This report addresses the issues as laid out in the study proposal. The study investigated the feasibility of and demonstrated the technical effectiveness of co-combusting corn cobs with coal in the Willmar Municipal Utilities stoker boiler steam generation power plant. The results of the WMU Co-Combustion Project will serve as a model for other midscale utilities who wish to use corn cobs to generate renewable electrical energy. As a result of the Co-Combustion Project, the WMU plans to upgrade their stoker boiler to accept whole corn cobs as well as other types of biomass, while still allowing the fuel delivery system to use 100% coal as needed. Benefits of co-combustion will include: energy security, reduced Hg and CO2 air emissions, improved ash chemistry, potential future carbon credit sales, an immediate positive effect on the local economy, and positive attention focused on the WMU and the City of Willmar. The first step in the study was to complete a feasibility analysis. The feasibility analysis anticipated only positive results from the combustion of corn cobs with coal in the WMU power plant boiler, and therefore recommended that the project proceed. The study proceeded with a review of the existing WMU Power Plant configuration; cob fuel analyses; an application for an Air Quality Permit from the Minnesota Pollution Control Agency to conduct the co-combustion test burns; identification of and a site visit to a similar facility in Iowa; an evaluation of cob grinding machines; and agreements with a corn grower, a cob harvester, and the City of Willmar to procure, harvest, and store cobs. The WMU power plant staff constructed a temporary cob feed system whereby the cobs could be injected into the #3 Boiler firebox, at rates up to 40% of the boiler total heat input. Test burns were conducted, during which air emissions were monitored and fuel and ash samples analyzed. The results of the test burns indicated that the monitored flue gas quality improved slightly during the test burns. The WMU was able to determine that modifications to the #3 Boiler fuel feed system to accept com cobs on a permanent basis would be technically feasible and would enable the WMU to generate electricity from renewable fuels on a dispatchable basis.

  18. SECO - Dow Corning's Wood Fueled Industrial Cogeneration Project

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Betts, W. D.

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In 1979, Dow Corning Corporation decided to build a wood fueled steam and electric cogeneration (SECO) power plant at Midland, Michigan. This decision was prompted by the high cost of oil and natural gas, an abundant supply of wood in mid Michigan...

  19. The Real Corn-Ethanol Transportation Tad W. Patzek

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Patzek, Tadeusz W.

    research, mass transit systems, highway upgrades, etc. Corn and ethanol subsidies in the US channel money, and more efficient planes will save at least 7 million barrels of crude oil per day if the price of fuel.34. Consistently with this claim, for each 1 unit of input fossil energy, one would get 1.34 units of output fossil

  20. Life Cycle of the Corn-Soybean Agroecosystem for Biobased

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Illinois at Chicago, University of

    such as fertilizer production, energy production, and on- farm chemical and equipment use. Agroecosystem material increasingly important with the growth of biofuels (i.e., biodiesel, ethanol) and biobased products (eLife Cycle of the Corn-Soybean Agroecosystem for Biobased Production A M Y E . L A N D I S , * S H

  1. INDEX TO VIRGINIA CORN HYBRID AND MANAGEMENT TRIALS 1999 SECTION I. VIRGINIA CORN HYBRID TRIALS IN 1999.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liskiewicz, Maciej

    CORPORTATION AUGUSTA 106 FAIRBURN RD MT SOLON VA 22843 BIO GENE BIO GENE 5491 TRI COUNTY HWY SARDINIA OH 45171 at Middlesex County, Virginia in 1998 and at New Kent County, Virginia in 1999 37 Table 29. Three-year corn hybrid studies at Middlesex County, Virginia in 1997 and 1998 and at New Kent County in 1999. 37 SECTION

  2. Corn Varieties in Texas : Their Regional and Seasonal Adaptation.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mangelsdorf, Paul C. (Paul Christoph)

    1929-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    presented in Progress Reports from Angleton, Denton, Beaumont, Troup, Beeville, Temple, Spur, Lubbock, Pecos, and Nacogdoches, and in Bulletin 276, "Corn Variety Experiments, Substation No. 3, Angleton." SCOPE OF THE BULLETIN Two of the most important... to both regional ' and seasonal variations. To determine the adaptation of varieties to these two influences a variety-date-of-planting test was instituted in 1918. This test has been conducted at eleven substations throughout the State, in most cases...

  3. Leveraging Post-Translational Phosphopantetheinylation as a Versatile Biochemical Tool /

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kosa, Nicolas M.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    calf intestinal phosphatase (CIP) (Worthington Biochemicals,dissociation constants. CIP (100 U at 3800 U/mL) was addedconcentration. Incubation of CIP-treated and untreated Sfp

  4. apoptotic biochemical signaling: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Signal Transduction Condensed Matter (arXiv) Summary: We realize a biochemical filtering process by introducing a buffer in a biocatalytic signal-transduction logic system based...

  5. Modeling Tomorrow's Biorefinery--the NREL Biochemical Pilot Plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Brochure describing the capabilities of NREL's Biochemical Pilot Plant. In this facility, researchers test ideas for creating high-value products from cellulosic biomass.

  6. E-Print Network 3.0 - afex-treated corn stover Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Populations During High-Solids Summary: thermophilic high-solids fermentation of the bioenergy feedstocks switch- grass and corn stover. Methods... for switchgrass were more...

  7. Advancing Biorefining of Distillers Grain and Corn Stover Blends

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    pretreatment process for distiller's grains and corn stover to convert residual starch, cellulose, and hemicellulose to ethanol and high- converting residual starch in order to...

  8. Advanced biochemical processes for geothermal brines: Current developments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Premuzic, E.T.; Lin, M.S.; Bohenek, M. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States). Energy Science and Technology Div.; Bajsarowicz, V. [CET Environmental Services, Inc., Richmond, CA (United States); McCloud, M. [C.E. Holt/California Energy, Pasadena, CA (United States)

    1997-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

    A research program at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) which deals with the development and application of processes for the treatment of geothermal brines and sludges has led to the identification and design of cost-efficient and environmentally friendly treatment methodology. Initially the primary goal of the processing was to convert geothermal wastes into disposable materials whose chemical composition would satisfy environmental regulations. An expansion of the r and D effort identified a combination of biochemical and chemical processes which became the basis for the development of a technology for the treatment of geothermal brines and sludges. The new technology satisfies environmental regulatory requirements and concurrently converts the geothermal brines and sludges into commercially promising products. Because the chemical composition of geothermal wastes depends on the type of the resource, the emerging technology has to be flexible so that it can be readily modified to suit the needs of a particular type of resource. Recent conceptional designs for the processing of hypersaline and low salinity brines and sludges will be discussed.

  9. Techno-economic analysis of using corn stover to supply heat and power to a corn ethanol plant - Part 2: Cost of heat and power generation systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mani, Sudhagar [University of Georgia; Sokhansanj, Shahabaddine [ORNL; Togore, Sam [U.S. Department of Energy; Turhollow Jr, Anthony F [ORNL

    2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents a techno-economic analysis of corn stover fired process heating (PH) and the combined heat and power (CHP) generation systems for a typical corn ethanol plant (ethanol production capacity of 170 dam3). Discounted cash flow method was used to estimate both the capital and operating costs of each system and compared with the existing natural gas fired heating system. Environmental impact assessment of using corn stover, coal and natural gas in the heat and/or power generation systems was also evaluated. Coal fired process heating (PH) system had the lowest annual operating cost due to the low fuel cost, but had the highest environmental and human toxicity impacts. The proposed combined heat and power (CHP) generation system required about 137 Gg of corn stover to generate 9.5 MW of electricity and 52.3 MW of process heat with an overall CHP efficiency of 83.3%. Stover fired CHP system would generate an annual savings of 3.6 M$ with an payback period of 6 y. Economics of the coal fired CHP system was very attractive compared to the stover fired CHP system due to lower fuel cost. But the greenhouse gas emissions per Mg of fuel for the coal fired CHP system was 32 times higher than that of stover fired CHP system. Corn stover fired heat and power generation system for a corn ethanol plant can improve the net energy balance and add environmental benefits to the corn to ethanol biorefinery.

  10. Separation of Corn Fiber and Conversion to Fuels and Chemicals Phase II: Pilot-scale Operation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abbas, Charles; Beery, Kyle; Orth, Rick; Zacher, Alan

    2007-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of the Department of Energy (DOE)-supported corn fiber conversion project, “Separation of Corn Fiber and Conversion to Fuels and Chemicals Phase II: Pilot-scale Operation” is to develop and demonstrate an integrated, economical process for the separation of corn fiber into its principal components to produce higher value-added fuel (ethanol and biodiesel), nutraceuticals (phytosterols), chemicals (polyols), and animal feed (corn fiber molasses). This project has successfully demonstrated the corn fiber conversion process on the pilot scale, and ensured that the process will integrate well into existing ADM corn wet-mills. This process involves hydrolyzing the corn fiber to solubilize 50% of the corn fiber as oligosaccharides and soluble protein. The solubilized fiber is removed and the remaining fiber residue is solvent extracted to remove the corn fiber oil, which contains valuable phytosterols. The extracted oil is refined to separate the phytosterols and the remaining oil is converted to biodiesel. The de-oiled fiber is enzymatically hydrolyzed and remixed with the soluble oligosaccharides in a fermentation vessel where it is fermented by a recombinant yeast, which is capable of fermenting the glucose and xylose to produce ethanol. The fermentation broth is distilled to remove the ethanol. The stillage is centrifuged to separate the yeast cell mass from the soluble components. The yeast cell mass is sold as a high-protein yeast cream and the remaining sugars in the stillage can be purified to produce a feedstock for catalytic conversion of the sugars to polyols (mainly ethylene glycol and propylene glycol) if desirable. The remaining materials from the purification step and any materials remaining after catalytic conversion are concentrated and sold as a corn fiber molasses. Additional high-value products are being investigated for the use of the corn fiber as a dietary fiber sources.

  11. The conversion of corn stover and pig manure to carboxylic acids with the MixAlco process

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Black, Amanda Spring

    2013-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

    of these processes to a feedstock of corn stover and pig manure. During fermentation, corn stover was the energy source (carbohydrates) and pig manure was the nutrient source (vitamins, minerals, and growth factors). A countercurrent fermentation procedure...

  12. 16 CSA News March 2013 thanol from corn has been the primary biofuel for liq-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DeLucia, Evan H.

    16 CSA News March 2013 E thanol from corn has been the primary biofuel for liq- uid fuels in the United States, but perennial cellulosic biofuels are on the horizon. Intensive corn production with large of nitrogen losses on large, tile-drained fields planted with perennial biofuels in the Midwest of the United

  13. ETHANOL FROM CORN: CLEAN RENEWABLE FUEL FOR THE FUTURE, OR DRAIN ON OUR RESOURCES AND POCKETS?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Patzek, Tadeusz W.

    , surface water, soil and aquifers. The overall energy balance of corn conversion to ethanol demonstrates that 65% of the input energy is lost during the conversion. Carbon dioxide sequestration by corn, energy balance, ethanol, fuel, nitrate, oxygenate, pollution, sequestration. 1. Background Previous

  14. FARM NET INCOME IMPACT OF SWITCHGRASS PRODUCTION AND CORN STOVER COLLECTION FOR HEAT AND POWER GENERATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wisconsin at Madison, University of

    FARM NET INCOME IMPACT OF SWITCHGRASS PRODUCTION AND CORN STOVER COLLECTION FOR HEAT AND POWER and Corn Stover Collection for Heat and Power Generation Mitchell A. Myhre Advisor: Associate Professor heat and electric power. To perform this analysis, yield and production potentials were explored

  15. M. Lelic 12/7/99 1CORNING Inc. L 5033PRE PID Controllers in Nineties

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gajic, Zoran

    M. Lelic 12/7/99 1CORNING Inc. L 5033PRE PID Controllers in Nineties Muhidin Lelic CorningOverview Purpose: extract the essence of the most recent development of PID control Based on the survey of papers-Nichols based PIDs (10) Frequency domain based PIDs (22) Relay based PIDs (29) Optimization methods based PIDs

  16. Increasing corn for biofuel production reduces biocontrol services in agricultural landscapes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Landis, Doug

    November 5, 2008 (received for review May 22, 2008) Increased demand for corn grain as an ethanol feedstock of cellulosic ethanol production processes that use a variety of feedstocks could foster increased diversity has driven a rapid expansion of the corn ethanol industry in the United States. Continuing growth

  17. Global Indirect Effects of U.S. Corn Ethanol Production: A Review of the Evidence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grissino-Mayer, Henri D.

    Global Indirect Effects of U.S. Corn Ethanol Production: A Review of the Evidence Energy security) requires 36 billion gallons of ethanol by 2022 to replace about 20 percent of U.S. gasoline consumption. Since 2001 ethanol produc- tion, mainly from corn, has increased dramatically at an annual average

  18. Coproducts From Corn Processing 47 Applied Biochemistry and Biotechnology Vol. 128, 2006

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, University of

    Increased demand for ethanol as a fuel additive has resulted in dramatic growth in ethanol production production was 3 billion gal/yr (1). Much of the fuel ethanol production capacity in the United States. Ethanol is produced from corn by either wet milling or dry-grind processing. In wet milling, the corn

  19. The effect of CO regulations on the cost of corn ethanol production

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kammen, Daniel M.

    The effect of CO 2 regulations on the cost of corn ethanol production This article has been) 024003 (9pp) doi:10.1088/1748-9326/3/2/024003 The effect of CO2 regulations on the cost of corn ethanol the effect of CO2 price on the effective cost of ethanol production we have developed a model that integrates

  20. Supercritical carbon dioxide pretreatment of corn stover and switchgrass for lignocellulosic ethanol production

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gu, Tingyue

    ethanol production Naveen Narayanaswamy a , Ahmed Faik b , Douglas J. Goetz a , Tingyue Gu a, a Department). Increased demand in biofuels cannot be met by the use of corn and sugarcane. In the US, corn ethanol has in and Liska, 2007). The production of lignocellulosic ethanol from biomass gener- ally involves four major

  1. BIOETHANOL PRODUCTION FROM WET OXIDSED CORN STOVER USING PRE-TREATED MANURE AS A NUTRIENT SOURCE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to 65% of total available ethanol yield (based on the cellulose content in 100 g untreated corn stover resource for renewable fuel-ethanol production. Cellulose and hemicellulose, which are the principal, Roskilde, Denmark ABSTRACT: In the present study ethanol was produced from wet oxidised corn stover

  2. South Corning, New York: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia:FAQ < RAPID Jump to:Seadov Pty Ltd JumpGTZ Partner Central Energy FundInformationSouth CentralCorning is a

  3. Multiple capillary biochemical analyzer with barrier member

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dovichi, N.J.; Zhang, J.Z.

    1996-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

    A multiple capillary biochemical analyzer is disclosed for sequencing DNA and performing other analyses, in which a set of capillaries extends from wells in a microtiter plate into a cuvette. In the cuvette the capillaries are held on fixed closely spaced centers by passing through a sandwich construction having a pair of metal shims which squeeze between them a rubber gasket, forming a leak proof seal for an interior chamber in which the capillary ends are positioned. Sheath fluid enters the chamber and entrains filament sample streams from the capillaries. The filament sample streams, and sheath fluid, flow through aligned holes in a barrier member spaced close to the capillary ends, into a collection chamber having a lower glass window. The filament streams are illuminated above the barrier member by a laser, causing them to fluoresce. The fluorescence is viewed end-on by a CCD camera chip located below the glass window. The arrangement ensures an equal optical path length from all fluorescing spots to the CCD chip and also blocks scattered fluorescence illumination, providing more uniform results and an improved signal-to-noise ratio. 12 figs.

  4. G-Plus report to Owens Corning-thermal conductivity Measurements of Fiberglass

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, H

    2003-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Fiberglass made by Owens Corning is being used in noise reduction of automobile exhaust system. Specifically, the glass fibers are packed inside the muffler to achieve the desired acoustic effect. A secondary benefit of the fibers is to serve as a thermal insulation. Because of this insulating property, the glass fibers can serve to reduce the temperature of the muffler shell. This in turn reduces the need for heat shields around mufflers and reduces the amount of exterior temperature accelerated corrosion of the muffler shell, especially in the winter ''salt belts'' where large amounts of salt are placed on highways to minimize the safety impact of snow and ice. In addition, for some applications the use of the fiberglass could allow the use of lighter weight carbon based polymer composite materials in place of steel for muffler shells. However, in order to properly design exhaust systems without heat shields or to take advantage of new materials, the thermal conductivity of the fiberglass material at operating temperatures (for some applications above 750 C) must be known. We selected two types of Owens Corning glass fibers, 17 {micro}m and 24 {micro}m in diameter, for this study. There are some room temperature thermal conductivity data for the fiberglass, but high temperature data are not available. Based on the thermal radiation model, thermal conductivity should increase rapidly at high temperature, providing less thermal insulation. In addition, thermal conductivity depends on packing density of the glass fibers. We will study the effect of packing density on thermal conductivity. Another issue is that the glass fiber conducts heat better along the fiber, while the conduction across the fibers is poor, because thermal conduction from one fiber to another has to go through an interface with thermal resistance. In fiberglass, most fibers are not in good contact with the surrounding fibers, thus, most heat transfer is dependent on the thermal radiation effect. Among the many methods of measuring thermal conductivity, only a few can be used for glass fibers. The traditional heat flow meter is used in testing thermal insulations near room temperature. At higher temperatures this method cannot be used due to material and instrument limitations. Our plan is to use a transient plane source (TPS) method to measure thermal conductivity directly. The advantage of the TPS method is that measurements can be taken at over 700 C, and covers the temperature of the automobile exhausts. The following is a report for the G-Plus project conducted at ORNL to apply the TPS method to characterizing the thermal conductivity of two types of fiberglass and also the effect of packing density.

  5. Analyzing the Effect of Variations in Soil and Management Practices on the Sustainability of Corn Stover-Based Bioethanol Production in Mississippi

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Woli, Prem; Paz, Joel

    2011-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The inherent variability in corn stover productivity due to variations in soils and crop management practices might contribute to a variation in corn stover-based bioethanol sustainability. This study was carried out to examine how changes in soil types and crop management options would affect corn stover yield (CSY) and the sustainability of the stover-based ethanol production in the Delta region of Mississippi. Based on potential acreage and geographical representation, three locations were selected. Using CERES-Maize model, stover yields were simulated for several scenarios of soils and crop management options. Based on 'net energy value (NEV)' computed from CSYs, a sustainability indicator for stover-based bioethanol production was established. The effects of soils and crop management options on CSY and NEV were determined using ANOVA tests and regression analyses. Both CSY and NEV were significantly different across sandy loam, silt loam, and silty clay loam soils and also across high-, mid-, and low-yielding cultivars. With an increase in irrigation level, both CSY and NEV increased initially and decreased after reaching a peak. A third-degree polynomial relationship was found between planting date and CSY and NEV each. By moving from the lowest to the highest production scenario, values of CSY and NEV could be increased by 86 to 553%, depending on location and weather condition. The effects of variations in soils and crop management options on NEV were the same as on CSY. The NEV was positive for all scenarios, indicating that corn stover-based ethanol production system in the Delta region is sustainable.

  6. Analysis of robustness and stochasticity in biochemical networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ong, Mei-Lyn

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Cells are constantly faced with the challenge of functioning reliably while being subject to unpredictable changes from within and outside. Here, I present two studies in which I analyze how biochemical circuits that ...

  7. Update of distillers grains displacement ratios for corn ethanol life-cycle analysis.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arora, S.; Wu, M.; Wang, M.; Energy Systems

    2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Production of corn-based ethanol (either by wet milling or by dry milling) yields the following coproducts: distillers grains with solubles (DGS), corn gluten meal (CGM), corn gluten feed (CGF), and corn oil. Of these coproducts, all except corn oil can replace conventional animal feeds, such as corn, soybean meal, and urea. Displacement ratios of corn-ethanol coproducts including DGS, CGM, and CGF were last updated in 1998 at a workshop at Argonne National Laboratory on the basis of input from a group of experts on animal feeds, including Prof. Klopfenstein (University of Nebraska, Lincoln), Prof. Berger (University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign), Mr. Madson (Rapheal Katzen International Associates, Inc.), and Prof. Trenkle (Iowa State University) (Wang 1999). Table 1 presents current dry milling coproduct displacement ratios being used in the GREET model. The current effort focuses on updating displacement ratios of dry milling corn-ethanol coproducts used in the animal feed industry. Because of the increased availability and use of these coproducts as animal feeds, more information is available on how these coproducts replace conventional animal feeds. To glean this information, it is also important to understand how industry selects feed. Because of the wide variety of available feeds, animal nutritionists use commercial software (such as Brill Formulation{trademark}) for feed formulation. The software recommends feed for the animal on the basis of the nutritional characteristics, availability, and price of various animal feeds, as well as on the nutritional requirements of the animal (Corn Refiners Association 2006). Therefore, feed formulation considers both the economic and the nutritional characteristics of feed products.

  8. Biochemical changes in speckled trout (Cynoscion nebulosus) preserved with ice

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Glover, James Donald

    1970-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    BIOCHEMICAL CHANGES IN SPECKLED TROUT (CYNOSCION NEBULOSUS) PRESERVED WITH ICE A Thesis by JAMES DONALD GLOVER Approved as to style and content by: (C irman of Committee) emb ) (Head of Depa tment) (Member ) August 1970 ABSTRACT... Biochemical Changes in Speckled Trout (Cynoscion Nebulosus) Preserved with Ice. (August 1970) James Donald Glover, B. S. , Texas A&M University Directed by: Bryant F. Cobb III One hundred-sixty speckled trout were purchased from retail fish markets...

  9. Corn Meal in the Food Supply of Texans.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Winters, Jet C.; Scoular, Florence I.; McLaughlin, Laura; Lamb, Mina W.; Whitacre, Jessie

    1956-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of the non-enriched meal makes a variable contribution to the value of the corresponding enriched meal. TABLE 2. THIAMINE CONTENT OF CORN ME : ALS Mcg/g wet basis1 Kind of Non-enriched Enriche meal No. No. repli- Range Av. repli- Range Av. cations...-enriched Enriched Non-enriched Enriched bread No. repli- Range Avm NO. repli- Range cations Av. Range Av. Range Av. cations i Texas Tech. Sour milk Everlite 3 1.40 2 1.35 1.35 1.44 1.51 2.29 2.26 i::: 2.36 1.43 2.24 Aunt Jemima Sweet milk 1.28 1.40 2...

  10. National Bioenergy Center Biochemical Platform Integration Project: Quarterly Update #23, April-June 2009

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schell, D.

    2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    April to June, 2009 edition of the National Bioenergy Center's Biochemical Platform Integration Project quarterly newsletter.

  11. National Bioenergy Center Biochemical Platform Integration Project: Quarterly Update #24, July-September 2009

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schell, D.

    2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    July to September, 2009 edition of the National Bioenergy Center's Biochemical Platform Integration Project quarterly newsletter.

  12. National Bioenergy Center Biochemical Platform Integration Project: Quarterly Update #22, January - March 2009

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    January to March, 2009 edition of the National Bioenergy Center's Biochemical Platform Integration Project quarterly newsletter.

  13. National Bioenergy Center Biochemical Platform Integration Project: Quarterly Update #20, July-September 2008

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schell, D. J.

    2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    July to September, 2008 edition of the National Bioenergy Center's Biochemical Platform Integration Project quarterly newsletter.

  14. National Bioenergy Center Biochemical Platform Integration Project: Quarterly Update #25, October - December 2009

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schell, D.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    October to December, 2009 edition of the National Bioenergy Center's Biochemical Platform Integration Project quarterly newsletter.

  15. Makai Ocean Engineering, Inc. Otec Plume Biochemical Simulation of a 100MW

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    the Physical and Biochemical Influence of Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Plant Discharges into their Adjacent

  16. Developing and Testing a Trafficability Index for Planting Corn and Cotton in the Texas Blackland Prairie

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Helms, Adam J.

    2010-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

    , three workable soil moisture regimes were recreated in no-tillage and conventional tillage plots at the Stiles Farm Foundation in Thrall, Texas. The index nomenclature included: "Dry-Workable", "Optimal" and "Wet-Workable". After planting corn and cotton...

  17. Owens Corning and Silicon Valley Power Partner to Make Energy Savings a Reality (Brochure)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This case study describes how the Owens Corning plant in Santa Clara, California, participated in Save Energy Now energy assessments and used Silicon Valley Power utility incentives to save $252,000.

  18. Iowa farmer hopes corn cobs will bring in extra cash | Department...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    supply the United States with a biofuel that may have a promising future: cellulosic ethanol. He grows corn and soybeans at his farm in Cylinder, a little community of about 100...

  19. Energy Efficiency Improvements and Cost Saving Opportunities in the Corn Wet Milling Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Galitsky, C.; Worrell, E.

    Corn wet milling is the most energy intensive industry in the food and kindred products group (SIC 20). Plants typically spend approximately $15 to 25 million per year on energy, one of its largest operating costs, making energy efficiency...

  20. E-Print Network 3.0 - asian corn borer Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    to 1 and 14 inches long when mature. COMMON HOST PLANT(S): Tomato, corn, pepper and potato... weeds in late summer or early fall are the overwintering stage of stalk borers....

  1. Interrelationships among alternative export variables and their impacts on corn prices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clarke, Somkid Tammakrut

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    export variable. Corn export sales data (collected by USDA since 1973) provide an additional source of information on export movements, thus offering an alternative export demand indicator. Data on commercial stocks at terminals and port elevators...). The primary objective of this study was to assess the impacts of these alternative export variables (sales, stocks, and shipments) on corn prices, and to investigate the dynamic interrelationships among these variables. The observations were carried out...

  2. Dust suppression results using mineral oil applications on corn and milo

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wardlaw, Herman Douglas

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    distribution (MCPSD) analysis, to determine the amount and particle size of the dust captured on the grain surface. Statistical analyses were performed on the effects due to dust concentration, mineral oil application and mineral oil*dust interaction. Each... TO CORN BENEFITS OF ADDING MINERAL OIL TO MILO 96 . 97 23 TREATMENT DESCRIPTION OP CORN SAMPLES USED FOR TESTING. 104 TREATMENT DESCRIPTION OF MILO SAMPLES USED FOR TESTING, . . . . . . . . . . . . . . PARTICLE SIZE DISTRIBUTION STATISTICS...

  3. Interactions between the herbicide CGA-136872 and selected soil-applied insecticides in corn

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Biediger, Darrin Louis

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    INTERACTIONS BETWEEN THE HERBICIDE CGA-136872 AND SELECTED SOIL-APPLIED INSECTICIDES IN CORN A Thesis by DARRIN LOUIS BIEDIGER Approved as to style and content by M. G. Merkle (Co-Chair of Committee) D. N. Weaver (Co-Chair of Committee) I.... M. Chandler (Member) P. A. Baumann (Member) F. W. Plapp (Member) E. C. A. Rouge (Head of Department) May 1991 ABSTRACT Interactions Between the Herbicide CGA-136872 and Selected Soil-Applied Insecticides in Corn. (May 1991) Darrin L...

  4. A Study of the Black and the Yellow Molds of Ear Corn

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taubenhaus, J. J. (Jacob Joseph)

    1920-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    corn from t Lrne cause, it map be asserted that the Texas growers are sustaini yearly loss of $5,818,349. The thoughtful farmer will at once real the importance of being able to save this unnecessary waste. It sho~ be added that as far as the corn.... 25 onions, fully grown bulbs. .......... 25 onions, fully grown bulbs. .......... 25 onlons fully grown bulb;. .......... 25 onions' fully grown bulbs ......... 25 tuber$'Irish potatoes, var: ~ountain A. niger from cott ........... 'Irish...

  5. Techno-economic analysis of using corn stover to supply heat and power to a corn ethanol plant - Part 1: Cost of feedstock supply logistics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sokhansanj, Shahabaddine [ORNL; Mani, Sudhagar [University of Georgia; Togore, Sam [U.S. Department of Energy; Turhollow Jr, Anthony F [ORNL

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Supply of corn stover to produce heat and power for a typical 170 dam3 dry mill ethanol plant is proposed. The corn ethanol plant requires 5.6 MW of electricity and 52.3 MW of process heat, which creates the annual stover demand of as much as 140 Gg. The corn stover supply system consists of collection, preprocessing, transportation and on-site fuel storage and preparation to produce heat and power for the ethanol plant. Economics of the entire supply system was conducted using the Integrated Biomass Supply Analysis and Logistics (IBSAL) simulation model. Corn stover was delivered in three formats (square bales, dry chops and pellets) to the combined heat and power plant. Delivered cost of biomass ready to be burned was calculated at 73 $ Mg-1 for bales, 86 $ Mg-1 for pellets and 84 $ Mg-1 for field chopped biomass. Among the three formats of stover supply systems, delivered cost of pelleted biomass was the highest due to high pelleting cost. Bulk transport of biomass in the form of chops and pellets can provide a promising future biomass supply logistic system in the US, if the costs of pelleting and transport are minimized.

  6. Process Design and Economics for Biochemical Conversion of Lignocellulosic Biomass to Ethanol: Dilute-Acid Pretreatment and Enzymatic Hydrolysis of Corn Stover

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion | Department ofT ib l L d FNEPA/309Department of EnergyProcess Design and Economics for

  7. NREL 2012 Achievement of Ethanol Cost Targets: Biochemical Ethanol Fermentation via Dilute-Acid Pretreatment and Enzymatic Hydrolysis of Corn Stover

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary)morphinan antagonist Journal Article: CrystalFG36-08GO18149 Revision: - Date: 06/15/10 ABENGOANREL 2012 Achievement

  8. Oilseeds for Biofuels and Biochemicals in Texas BIOENERGY PROGRAM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oilseeds for Biofuels and Biochemicals in Texas BIOENERGY PROGRAM Description feedstocks (primarily soybean) with food and feed markets. The price of October 2009 Chicago soybean oil to be competitive in the domestic market. U.S. biodiesel manfacturers are closing, consolidating, or suspending

  9. Mutual information in time-varying biochemical systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Filipe Tostevin; Pieter Rein ten Wolde

    2010-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Cells must continuously sense and respond to time-varying environmental stimuli. These signals are transmitted and processed by biochemical signalling networks. However, the biochemical reactions making up these networks are intrinsically noisy, which limits the reliability of intracellular signalling. Here we use information theory to characterise the reliability of transmission of time-varying signals through elementary biochemical reactions in the presence of noise. We calculate the mutual information for both instantaneous measurements and trajectories of biochemical systems for a Gaussian model. Our results indicate that the same network can have radically different characteristics for the transmission of instantaneous signals and trajectories. For trajectories, the ability of a network to respond to changes in the input signal is determined by the timing of reaction events, and is independent of the correlation time of the output of the network. We also study how reliably signals on different time-scales can be transmitted by considering the frequency-dependent coherence and gain-to-noise ratio. We find that a detector that does not consume the ligand molecule upon detection can more reliably transmit slowly varying signals, while an absorbing detector can more reliably transmit rapidly varying signals. Furthermore, we find that while one reaction may more reliably transmit information than another when considered in isolation, when placed within a signalling cascade the relative performance of the two reactions can be reversed. This means that optimising signal transmission at a single level of a signalling cascade can reduce signalling performance for the cascade as a whole.

  10. Minimum Resource Characterization of Biochemical Analyses for Digital

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Akella, Srinivas

    ;2 Lingzhi Luo and Srinivas Akella 1 Introduction Low-cost, portable lab-on-a-chip systems capable of rapid versatile, yet low cost systems. Hence it is important to iden- tify the class of biochemical analyses requirements, towards the design of cost and space-efficient biochips. Mixers and storage units are two primary

  11. The Energy Balance of Corn Ethanol: An Update. By Hosein Shapouri, James A. Duffield, and Michael Wang. U.S. Department of Agriculture, Office of the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laughlin, Robert B.

    #12;The Energy Balance of Corn Ethanol: An Update. By Hosein Shapouri, James A. Duffield.34. Keywords: Ethanol, net energy balance, corn production, energy. About the Authors Shapouri and Duffield . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Energy Balance Issue

  12. Characterization and application of vortex flow adsorption for simplification of biochemical product downstream processing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ma, Junfen, 1972-

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    One strategy to reduce costs in manufacturing a biochemical product is simplification of downstream processing. Biochemical product recovery often starts from fermentation broth or cell culture. In conventional downstream ...

  13. National Bioenergy Center Biochemical Platform Integration Project: Quarterly Update #26, January - March 2010

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schell, D.

    2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    January-March, 2010 edition of the National Bioenergy Center's Biochemical Platform Integration Project quarterly newsletter. Issue topics: understanding and improving sugar measurements in biomass hydrolysates; expansion of the NREL/DOE Biochemical Pilot Plant.

  14. National Bioenergy Center Biochemical Platform Integration Project: Quarterly Update #13, October-December 2006

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schell, D. J.

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Volume 13 of a quarterly newsletter that describes the activities of the National Bioenergy Center's Biochemical Processing Integration Task.

  15. National Bioenergy Center Biochemical Platform Process Integration Project: Quarterly Update #18, January-March 2008

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schell, D.

    2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    January-March, 2008 edition of the quarterly update for the National Bioenergy Center's Biochemical Platform Integration Project.

  16. National Bioenergy Center Biochemical Platform Integration Project: Quarterly Update #21, October - December 2008

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schell, D.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    October to December, 2008 edition of the National Bioenergy Center?s Biochemical Platform Integration Project quarterly newsletter.

  17. Elements of Dry-Grind Corn-Processing Streams 113 Applied Biochemistry and Biotechnology Vol. 134, 2006

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of ethanol as a fuel additive, ethanol production has increased markedly in the past decade. Ethanol-grind corn process is one of two technologies used to convert corn into ethanol. In this process, all kernel with solubles; ethanol; dry-grind processing; stillage; syrup; element concentrations. #12;114 Belyea et al

  18. Fuel-Cycle Fossil Energy Use and Greenhouse Gas Emissions of Fuel Ethanol Produced from U.S. Midwest Corn

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Patzek, Tadeusz W.

    #12;Fuel-Cycle Fossil Energy Use and Greenhouse Gas Emissions of Fuel Ethanol Produced from U essential to an informed choice about the corn-to-ethanol cycle are in need of updating, thanks to scientific and technological advances in both corn farming and ethanol production; and (2) generalized

  19. The effect of antimicrobial agents and modified atmosphere packaging on the microbial shelf life of corn tortillas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tellez-Giron, Alfredo

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    IX Experiment ?1: pHa and colorb of corn tortillas pack- aged (and stored) in polyethylene and modified atmos- phere bagsc 76 X Experiment ?1: shelf life of corn tortillas packaged in plastic and MAPa bags and stored at 25' and 4'C...

  20. A First-Law Thermodynamic Analysis of the Corn-Ethanol Cycle

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Patzek, Tad W. [University of California, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering (United States)], E-mail: patzek@patzek.berkeley.edu

    2006-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper analyzes energy efficiency of the industrial corn-ethanol cycle. In particular, it critically evaluates earlier publications by DOE, USDA, and UC Berkeley Energy Resources Group. It is demonstrated that most of the current First Law net-energy models of the industrial corn-ethanol cycle are based on nonphysical assumptions and should be viewed with caution. In particular, these models do not (i) define the system boundaries, (ii) conserve mass, and (iii) conserve energy. The energy cost of producing and refining carbon fuels in real time, for example, corn and ethanol, is high relative to that of fossil fuels deposited and concentrated over geological time. Proper mass and energy balances of corn fields and ethanol refineries that account for the photosynthetic energy, part of the environment restoration work, and the coproduct energy have been formulated. These balances show that energetically production of ethanol from corn is 2-4 times less favorable than production of gasoline from petroleum. From thermodynamics it also follows that ecological damage wrought by industrial biofuel production must be severe. With the DDGS coproduct energy credit, 3.9 gallons of ethanol displace on average the energy in 1 gallon of gasoline. Without the DDGS energy credit, this average number is 6.2 gallons of ethanol. Equivalent CO{sub 2} emissions from corn ethanol are some 50% higher than those from gasoline, and become 100% higher if methane emissions from cows fed with DDGS are accounted for. From the mass balance of soil it follows that ethanol coproducts should be returned to the fields.

  1. Factors affecting the efficiency of the mechanical corn picker in Mississippi

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kimbrough, Emmett Alexander

    2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

    . piciher s C~eett, Ph pt. hee nee ste-pes en hens Pets seethes e nle harvest approximately h75 acre pex. hour, depending on ths field con ditions and field cise General dimensions and s cificaticns, The machine weighs approxi mateIy 1~509 pounds...) picker net yield& {2) picker losses, (3) loose eax' losses x and (4) shelled cox?l losses s The last operation cr factor studied before the corn pickax' was operated in the corn plots wss to search for loose ears that, msy' have been knocked off...

  2. EFFECTS OF CHANGES IN U.S. ETHANOL PRODUCTION FROM CORN GRAIN, CORN STOVER, AND SWITCHGRASS ON WORLD AGRICULTURAL MARKETS AND TRADE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Campiche, Jody L.

    2010-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

    . The authors do note that assumptions regarding yield growth and the feasibility of expanding corn acres significantly affect the model outcome. Islas, Manzini, and Masera (2007) examined various scenarios of bioenergy use in Mexico based on moderate... and high usage of bioenergy in the electricity and transportation sectors. The authors analyzed three scenarios from 2005 to 2030. Results of their model indicate that ethanol, biodiesel, and electricity produced from biomass could make up 16...

  3. Would the heat of an oil pipeline buried 4 feet underground affect ground or surface water temperature or the roots of typical Nebraska crops like corn, soybeans, alfalfa? Would

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

    temperature or the roots of typical Nebraska crops like corn, soybeans, alfalfa? Would crop yield likely

  4. MICHIGAN'S SOIL NITRATE TEST FOR CORN MSU SOIL AND PLANT NUTRIENT LAB

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Isaacs, Rufus

    MICHIGAN'S SOIL NITRATE TEST FOR CORN MSU SOIL AND PLANT NUTRIENT LAB Michigan State University Extension Crop and Soil Sciences Department Michigan State University WHY TEST SOIL FOR NITRATES Nitrate testing of soil is an excellent and inexpensive way of evaluating the available nitrogen (N) status

  5. USDA Projections of Bioenergy-Related Corn and Soyoil Use for 2010-2019

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    USDA Projections of Bioenergy-Related Corn and Soyoil Use for 2010-2019 Daniel M. O released long term projections for grain and energy markets at its 2010 Agricultural Outlook Forum, and the quantity of U.S. feedgrains and oilseeds to be used in bioenergy production processes, The USDA's long term

  6. GEOSPATIAL DECISION SUPPORT FOR SEED COMPANIES IN THE CORN BELT Marcus E. Tooze1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reichenbach, Stephen E.

    GEOSPATIAL DECISION SUPPORT FOR SEED COMPANIES IN THE CORN BELT Marcus E. Tooze1 , S. Hatten2 , W in the seed industry, new applications emerge for mapping, analysis, and interpretation of cultivar. In addition, a geospatial framework was developed to identify the soil landscapes that had the best soil

  7. Impact of surfactants on pretreatment of corn stover Qing Qing, Bin Yang 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Riverside, University of

    glycol 4000 during water-only or dilute acid pretreatment of corn stover at 140­220 °C were evaluated energy security, trade deficit, environmental, and economic issues that are becoming more urgent in light of declining petroleum reserves and increasing international demand for transportation fuels. However

  8. Forest Fuel Reduction Survey Analysis: Forest Administrators Cornelis F. de Hoop

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Qinglin

    Forest Fuel Reduction Survey Analysis: Forest Administrators by Cornelis F. de Hoop Amith Hanumappa to seriously investigate and execute the methods required to carry out a successful fuel reduction project operations wherein fuel reduction is a primary management objective. Literature on this wave of activity

  9. Cornelis Zwaan, open principle, and the future of high-resolution solar telescopes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rutten, Rob

    Cornelis Zwaan, open principle, and the future of high-resolution solar telescopes Robert H erected up till 30 m height with sensors at several heights for the measurement of temperature; (iii) the design consequences for the new generation of high-resolution solar telescopes. Keywords

  10. The Integrated Biorefinery: Conversion of Corn Fiber to Value-added Chemicals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Susanne Kleff

    2007-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

    This presentation provides a summary of Michigan Biotechnology Institute's efforts to employ the corn fiber fraction of a dry grind ethanol plant as a feedstock to produce succinic acid which has potential as a building block intermediate for a wide range of commodity chemicals.

  11. Coupling Elastic Solids with SPH Fluids Nadir Akinci Jens Cornelis Gizem Akinci Matthias Teschner

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Teschner, Matthias

    . In the remainder of this section, we discuss the existing works about solid boundary handling in SPH (Sec. 1 these issues, for handling solid boundaries in SPH, most of the existing works rely on boundary particles, eCoupling Elastic Solids with SPH Fluids Nadir Akinci Jens Cornelis Gizem Akinci Matthias Teschner

  12. Examining strategies to improve the carbon balance of corn/soybean agriculture using eddy covariance and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    if it occurs rapidly. Consequently, there is intense interest in finding ways to damp projected changesExamining strategies to improve the carbon balance of corn/soybean agriculture using eddy There is much interest in the role that agricultural practices might play in sequestering carbon to help offset

  13. Agricultural Robot Turning in the Headland of Corn Fields Jinlin Xue1,a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of variable FOV of camera. A settled FOV has been always used in autonomous vehicles for field applications so robot in corn fields. 1. Introduction Since agricultural vehicle navigation based on machine vision was first proposed, methods based on machine vision have been studied extensively in agricultural vehicles

  14. Fractionation of phenolic compounds from a purple corn extract and evaluation of antioxidant and antimutagenic activities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pedreschi, Romina Paola

    2005-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

    anthocyanin-glucosides. Cyadinin-3glucoside was the main constituent (44.4 ?? 4.7%) followed by the acylated cyanidin-3-glucoside (26.9 ?? 8.0%). Other phenolic compounds present in the purple corn corresponded to protocatechuic acid, vanillic acid, and p...

  15. Wednesday, July 19, 2006 Researchers use corn waste to generate electricity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to manufacture ethanol, but to generate electricity directly. "People are looking at using cellulose to make ethanol," said Bruce E. Logan, the Kappe professor of environmental engineering. "You can make ethanol stover is left unused in the field. Corn stover is about 70 percent cellulose or hemicellulose, complex

  16. Size reduction of high- and low-moisture corn stalks by linear knife grid system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Womac, A.R. [University of Tennessee; Igathinathane, C. [Mississippi State University (MSU); Sokhansanj, Shahabaddine [ORNL; Narayan, S. [First American Scientific Co.

    2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    High- and low-moisture corn stalks were tested using a linear knife grid size reduction device developed for first-stage size reduction. The device was used in conjunction with a universal test machine that quantified shearing stress and energy characteristics for forcing a bed of corn stalks through a grid of sharp knives. No published engineering performance data for corn stover with similar devices are available to optimize performance; however, commercial knife grid systems exist for forage size reduction. From the force displacement data, mean and maximum ultimate shear stresses, cumulative and peak mass-based cutting energies for corn stalks, and mean new surface area-based cutting energies were determined from 4 5 refill runs at two moisture contents (78.8% and 11.3% wet basis), three knife grid spacings (25.4, 50.8, and 101.6 mm), and three bed depths (50.8, 101.6, and 152.4 mm). In general, the results indicated that peak failure load, ultimate shear stress, and cutting energy values varied directly with bed depth and inversely with knife grid spacing. Mean separation analysis established that high- and low-moisture conditions and bed depths 101.6 mm did not differ significantly (P < 0.05) for ultimate stress and cutting energy values, but knife grid spacing were significantly different. Linear knife grid cutting energy requirements for both moisture conditions of corn stalks were much smaller than reported cutting energy requirements. Ultimate shear stress and cutting energy results of this research should aid the engineering design of commercial scale linear knife gird size reduction equipment for various biomass feedstocks.

  17. Development of a performance-based industrial energy efficiency indicator for corn refining plants.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boyd, G. A.; Decision and Information Sciences; USEPA

    2006-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Organizations that implement strategic energy management programs have the potential to achieve sustained energy savings if the programs are carried out properly. A key opportunity for achieving energy savings that plant managers can take is to determine an appropriate level of energy performance by comparing their plant's performance with that of similar plants in the same industry. Manufacturing facilities can set energy efficiency targets by using performance-based indicators. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), through its ENERGY STAR{reg_sign} program, has been developing plant energy performance indicators (EPIs) to encourage a variety of U.S. industries to use energy more efficiently. This report describes work with the corn refining industry to provide a plant-level indicator of energy efficiency for facilities that produce a variety of products--including corn starch, corn oil, animal feed, corn sweeteners, and ethanol--for the paper, food, beverage, and other industries in the United States. Consideration is given to the role that performance-based indicators play in motivating change; the steps needed to develop indicators, including interacting with an industry to secure adequate data for an indicator; and the actual application and use of an indicator when complete. How indicators are employed in the EPA's efforts to encourage industries to voluntarily improve their use of energy is discussed as well. The report describes the data and statistical methods used to construct the EPI for corn refining plants. Individual equations are presented, as are the instructions for using them in an associated Excel spreadsheet.

  18. The Future of Corn-Ethanol in Fuel Sector of United States from Environmental and Economic Standpoint

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tulva, Arya Nath

    2007-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

    per gallon to the cost. ? Corn production in the U.S. erodes soil about 12 times faster than the soil can be reformed and irrigating corn mines groundwater 25 percent faster than the natural recharge rate of ground water. The environmental system...-products. Shapouri and Graboski estimates NEV of 16,193 Btu/gal. They indicate that ethanol production utilizes abundant domestic energy supplies of coal and natural gas to convert corn into a premium liquid fuel that can replace petroleum imports by a factor of 7...

  19. Corn versus three sorghums grown under the same dryland conditions as feeds for growing-finishing swine

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meadows, Doyle Gene

    1974-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ), received the same fertilisation rate and. were cleaned prior to feeding. The four gra, ins and the diets in which they werc used were designated. : corn, non-yellow sorghum (N-Y), hetero-yellow sorghum (H-Y) and yellow sorghum (Y). The grains...-Y sorghum to S. 02fo for the N-Y sorghum. Lysinc content was higher in corn than the average of the sorghums (0. 25 us. 0. 22fo). Corn had a. slightly higher gross energy value (8. 97 kcal/g) than the average of the sorghums (g. 94 kcal/g) which resulted...

  20. Electron irradiation of Co, Ni, and P-doped BaFe2As2type iron-based superconductors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    ± superconductivity in the multiband iron-based superconductors [1, 2], with a sign-changing order parameter betweenElectron irradiation of Co, Ni, and P-doped BaFe2As2­type iron-based superconductors Cornelis-scale point-like disorder on superconductivity in these materials [5, 6]. In particular, interband scattering

  1. Building Technologies Program: Tax Deduction Qualified Software- Owens Corning Commercial Energy Calculator (OC-CEC) version 1.1

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Provides required documentation that Owens Corning Commercial Energy Calculator (OC-CEC) version 1.1 meets Internal Revenue Code §179D, Notice 2006-52, dated June 2, 2006, for calculating commercial building energy and power cost savings.

  2. E-Print Network 3.0 - attenuate biochemical indices Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Vanderbilt University Collection: Biology and Medicine 45 Influences of biomass heat and biochemical energy storages on the land surface fluxes and radiative temperature...

  3. Development of a system for characterizing biomass quality of lignocellulosic feedstocks for biochemical conversion.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Murphy, Patrick Thomas

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ??The purpose of this research was twofold: (i) to develop a system for screening lignocellulosic biomass feedstocks for biochemical conversion to biofuels and (ii) to… (more)

  4. E-Print Network 3.0 - anhydrase ix biochemical Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ix biochemical Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Prokaryotic carbonic anhydrases Kerry S. Smith *, James G. Ferry Summary: Prokaryotic carbonic anhydrases Kerry S. Smith *, James G....

  5. E-Print Network 3.0 - analytical chemistry biochemical Sample...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: analytical chemistry biochemical Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 UNIVERSITY OF CENTRAL FLORIDA Undergraduate...

  6. Energy and greenhouse gas emission effects of corn and cellulosic ethanol with technology improvements and land use changes.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, M.; Han, J.; Haq, Z; Tyner, .W.; Wu, M.; Elgowainy, A. (Energy Systems)

    2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Use of ethanol as a transportation fuel in the United States has grown from 76 dam{sup 3} in 1980 to over 40.1 hm{sup 3} in 2009 - and virtually all of it has been produced from corn. It has been debated whether using corn ethanol results in any energy and greenhouse gas benefits. This issue has been especially critical in the past several years, when indirect effects, such as indirect land use changes, associated with U.S. corn ethanol production are considered in evaluation. In the past three years, modeling of direct and indirect land use changes related to the production of corn ethanol has advanced significantly. Meanwhile, technology improvements in key stages of the ethanol life cycle (such as corn farming and ethanol production) have been made. With updated simulation results of direct and indirect land use changes and observed technology improvements in the past several years, we conducted a life-cycle analysis of ethanol and show that at present and in the near future, using corn ethanol reduces greenhouse gas emission by more than 20%, relative to those of petroleum gasoline. On the other hand, second-generation ethanol could achieve much higher reductions in greenhouse gas emissions. In a broader sense, sound evaluation of U.S. biofuel policies should account for both unanticipated consequences and technology potentials. We maintain that the usefulness of such evaluations is to provide insight into how to prevent unanticipated consequences and how to promote efficient technologies with policy intervention.

  7. Enzymatic Digestibility of Corn Stover Fractions in Response to Fungal Pretreatment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cui, Z. F.; Wan, C. X.; Shi, J.; Sykes, R. W.; Li, Y. B.

    2012-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Corn stover fractions (leaves, cobs, and stalks) were studied for enzymatic digestibility after pretreatment with a white rot fungus, Ceriporiopsis subvermispora. Among the three fractions, leaves had the least recalcitrance to fungal pretreatment and the lignin degradation reached 45% after 30 days of pretreatment. The lignin degradation of stalks and cobs was similar but was significantly lower than that of leaves (p < 0.05). For all fractions, xylan and glucan degradation followed a pattern similar to lignin degradation, with leaves having a significantly higher percentage of degradation (p < 0.05). Hydrolytic enzyme activity also revealed that the fungus was more active in the degradation of carbohydrates in leaves. As a result of fungal pretreatment, the highest sugar yield, however, was obtained with corn cobs.

  8. Prececal, postileal and total tract starch digestion in ponies fed corn, oats, barley or sorghum grain

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arnold, Fairfax Ferguson

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of the foot during the acute disease . J. Equine Mad . and Surg. 2: 439. Householder, D. D. 1978. Prececal, postileal and total tract digestion and growth performance in horses fed concentrate rations containing oats or sorghum grain processed by crimping...PRECECAL, POSTILEAL AND TOTAL TRACT STARCH DIGESTION IN PONIES FED CORN, OATS, BARLEY OR SORGHUM GRAIN A Thesis by FAIRFAX FERGUSON ARNOLD Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements...

  9. Life-cycle assessment of corn-based butanol as a potential transportation fuel.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu, M.; Wang, M.; Liu, J.; Huo, H.; Energy Systems

    2007-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Butanol produced from bio-sources (such as corn) could have attractive properties as a transportation fuel. Production of butanol through a fermentation process called acetone-butanol-ethanol (ABE) has been the focus of increasing research and development efforts. Advances in ABE process development in recent years have led to drastic increases in ABE productivity and yields, making butanol production worthy of evaluation for use in motor vehicles. Consequently, chemical/fuel industries have announced their intention to produce butanol from bio-based materials. The purpose of this study is to estimate the potential life-cycle energy and emission effects associated with using bio-butanol as a transportation fuel. The study employs a well-to-wheels analysis tool--the Greenhouse Gases, Regulated Emissions and Energy Use in Transportation (GREET) model developed at Argonne National Laboratory--and the Aspen Plus{reg_sign} model developed by AspenTech. The study describes the butanol production from corn, including grain processing, fermentation, gas stripping, distillation, and adsorption for products separation. The Aspen{reg_sign} results that we obtained for the corn-to-butanol production process provide the basis for GREET modeling to estimate life-cycle energy use and greenhouse gas emissions. The GREET model was expanded to simulate the bio-butanol life cycle, from agricultural chemical production to butanol use in motor vehicles. We then compared the results for bio-butanol with those of conventional gasoline. We also analyzed the bio-acetone that is coproduced with bio-butanol as an alternative to petroleum-based acetone. Our study shows that, while the use of corn-based butanol achieves energy benefits and reduces greenhouse gas emissions, the results are affected by the methods used to treat the acetone that is co-produced in butanol plants.

  10. A Test of the Producing Power of Some Texas Seed Corn.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bennett, R. L. (Robert Love)

    1906-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    6 TEXAS AGRIClnTURAL EXPERIMENT STATIONS. - A BULLETIN NO. 92. Agricultural Seetion-Decem ber 1906. A TEST OF THE PRODUCING POWER OF SOME TEXAS SEED CORN. BY R. L. BENNETT In Charge of Cotton Inve~tigation and Breeding POSTOFFICE... Stenographer STATE SUB-STATIONS. S. A. WASCHKA, Superintendent - Beeville, Bee Countv W. S. HOTCHKISS, Superintendent , - - 'Troupe, Smith Coun NoTE.-The main station is located on the grounds of the Agrieu tzmal and Mechanical College, in Rrazos Coz...

  11. Fattening Lambs on Corn, Milo, Hegari, Wheat, and Oats, with Cottonseed Cake and Alfalfa

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mackey, A. K. (Arthur Kapp); Jones, J. M. (John McKinley)

    1932-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    TEXAS AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT A. B. CONNER, DIRECT01 COLLEGE STATION, BRAZOS COUNTY BULLETIN NO. 465 DIVISION OF RANGE ANIMAL HUSBANDRY Fattening Lambs on Corn, Milo, Megari, Wheat, and Oats, with Cottonseed Cake and Alfalfa AGRICULTURAL.... **In cooperation with U. S. Department of Agriculture. ??On leave. $In cooperation with Texas Extension Service. Four feeding trials were conducted to compare lamb-fatten- ng rations using different common grains with alfalfa hay .s the roughage...

  12. Development and evaluation of corn cooking procedures for the production of tortillas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Des Rosiers, Mary Candace

    1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    each cooking treatment. The texture of the tortillas was then measured by the Instron. Extent of gelatinization via enzyme susceptibility was negatively correlated with the Instron grain shear values. Amylograph peaks and particle size determination... Samples of Corn. Chemical Analysis. Preparation of Nixtamal Preparation of Masa. Preparation of Tortillas Evaluation of Particle Size Measurement of Gelatinization. Evaluation of Optimum Cook Time. Color Measurement and Subjective Tests Evaluation...

  13. Succinic Acid as a Byproduct in a Corn-based Ethanol Biorefinery

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    MBI International

    2007-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    MBI endeavored to develop a process for succinic acid production suitable for integration into a corn-based ethanol biorefinery. The project investigated the fermentative production of succinic acid using byproducts of corn mill operations. The fermentation process was attuned to include raw starch, endosperm, as the sugar source. A clean-not-sterile process was established to treat the endosperm and release the monomeric sugars. We developed the fermentation process to utilize a byproduct of corn ethanol fermentations, thin stillage, as the source of complex nitrogen and vitamin components needed to support succinic acid production in A. succinogenes. Further supplementations were eliminated without lowering titers and yields and a productivity above 0.6 g l-1 hr-1was achieved. Strain development was accomplished through generation of a recombinant strain that increased yields of succinic acid production. Isolation of additional strains with improved features was also pursued and frozen stocks were prepared from enriched, characterized cultures. Two recovery processes were evaluated at pilot scale and data obtained was incorporated into our economic analyses.

  14. Biochem. J. (2003) 369, 153161 (Printed in Great Britain) 153 Biochemical and genetic characterization of PpcA, a periplasmic c-type

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lovley, Derek

    acids; 9.1 kDa [5,19]) that reduces polysulphide Abbreviations used: AQDS, anthraquinone 2 of electrons from acetate to anthraquinone 2,6-disulphonate (AQDS; a humic acid analogue) and to U(VI) was also

  15. Spatial Querying of Imaging Mass Spectrometry Data for the Biochemical Characterization of Anatomical Regions in Tissue

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Spatial Querying of Imaging Mass Spectrometry Data for the Biochemical Characterization tissue section. In this paper we develop methods that enable spatial querying of MSI data. The objective that adds spatial information to mass spectral biochemical analysis. It delivers insight into the spatial

  16. Optimal adaptive control of (bio)chemical reactors: past, present and future

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bastin, Georges

    Optimal adaptive control of (bio)chemical reactors: past, present and future Ilse Y. Smets Abstract In this paper an overview of optimal adaptive control of (bio)chemical reactors is presented. Following the paradigm of the Minimum Principle of Pontryagin the derivation of optimal control sequences

  17. Modeling the Physical and Biochemical Influence of Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Plant Discharges into their Adjacent Waters

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Modeling the Physical and Biochemical Influence of Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Plant Discharges into their Adjacent Waters

  18. The effects of Biozyme on the germination and emergence of bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) and sweet corn (Zea mays L.) seeds under suboptimal temperatures, pesticide overdose, and salinity stress

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Campos Cruz, Armando

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    -decreased bean respiratory quotient and increased sweet corn respiratory quotient. The increase in the respiratory quotient of bean and sweet corn seeds with increasing levels of pesticide suggests an increase in C02 evolution through a pathway that does...

  19. A comparison of yellow corn and three sorghum grains with different endosperm types for growing-finishing swine

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Copelin, Johnny Landon

    1973-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    1, 1' SVI)'ill, I. . LC ~ f 0 't&Q &vX'", Cl'L~Bf. 6 CG33&. '&'f~ Qf 78?hf8 A6~&( Ull:i~(B~:83?6$~ LQ pc3f ~~'l kQ, tVI'fL1ltMRAf' Gf tt'8 769Vc). "8K&kli, "f~C fOX f 48 86gT68 6"' 51~%8 t. HRJ, VP S~ P?WbVCB (C48%?RSB Gf' CA&SMEf. t 'CS...'". '* '. ': &RC11 WBS i'"18'M88 vi t1'k 3, JiiX" XAig@ 8. B. f plat CA l'AEAGV8 f'OPi'~ gA Tl' i't&x LG1 tl', f. , ) If jl, t, , t t. ' I t lj '. ' ti. :1. . :t, :!Ill", t:I t. 'l. . flit: I ?I j 'I' lt "I' +tt l;Jk'. StttgltLII gr. 63. tt8 XG f. "4t. gj...

  20. The evaluation of different maturity corn hybrids and plant populations under irrigation and dryland on two contrasting soil types

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bockholt, Anton John

    2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

    populations and four hybrids on Norwood soil, irrigated 14 3. Analysis of variance *f silking data on Norwood soil, dryland 4. Days to silk of five plant populations and four hybrids on Norwood soil, dryland 15 5. Analysis of variance of silkidg data... hybrids to deter- mine the plant population best suited for a particular environment, In Texas at College Station, Fisher and Smith (6) obtained the highest yields with plant populations of 6, 500, 8, 700, and 13, 100 plants per acre rather than 5, 200...

  1. Energy efficiency improvement and cost saving opportunities for the Corn Wet Milling Industry: An ENERGY STAR Guide for Energy and Plant Managers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Galitsky, Christina; Worrell, Ernst; Ruth, Michael

    2003-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Corn wet milling is the most energy intensive industry within the food and kindred products group (SIC 20), using 15 percent of the energy in the entire food industry. After corn, energy is the second largest operating cost for corn wet millers in the United States. A typical corn wet milling plant in the United States spends approximately $20 to $30 million per year on energy, making energy efficiency improvement an important way to reduce costs and increase predictable earnings, especially in times of high energy-price volatility. This report shows energy efficiency opportunities available for wet corn millers. It begins with descriptions of the trends, structure and production of the corn wet milling industry and the energy used in the milling and refining process. Specific primary energy savings for each energy efficiency measure based on case studies of plants and references to technical literature are provided. If available, typical payback periods are also listed. The report draws upon the experiences of corn, wheat and other starch processing plants worldwide for energy efficiency measures. The findings suggest that given available resources and technology, there are opportunities to reduce energy consumption cost-effectively in the corn wet milling industry while maintaining the quality of the products manufactured. Further research on the economics of the measures, as well as the applicability of these to different wet milling practices, is needed to assess the feasibility of implementation of selected technologies at individual plants.

  2. Induced biochemical interactions in immature and biodegraded heavy crude oils

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Premuzic, E.T.; Lin, M.S.; Bohenek, M.; Joshi-Tope, G.; Shelenkova, L.; Zhou, W.M.

    1998-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Studies in which selective chemical markers have been used to explore the mechanisms by which biocatalysts interact with heavy crude oils have shown that the biochemical reactions follow distinct trends. The term biocatalyst refers to a group of extremophilic microorganisms which, under the experimental conditions used, interact with heavy crude oils to (1) cause a redistribution of hydrocarbons, (2) cause chemical changes in oil fractions containing sulfur compounds and lower the sulfur content, (3) decrease organic nitrogen content, and (4) decrease the concentration of trace metals. Current data indicate that the overall effect is due to simultaneous reactions yielding products with relatively higher concentration of saturates and lower concentrations of aromatics and resins. The compositional changes depend on the microbial species and the chemistry of the crudes. Economic analysis of a potential technology based on the available data indicate that such a technology, used in a pre-refinery mode, may be cost efficient and promising. In the present paper, the background of oil biocatalysis and some recent results will be discussed.

  3. INDUCED BIOCHEMICAL INTERACTIONS IN IMMATURE AND BIODEGRADED HEAVY CRUDE OILS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    PREMUZIC,E.T.; LIN,M.S.; BOHENEK,M.; JOSHI-TOPE,G.; SHELENKOVA,L.; ZHOU,W.M.

    1998-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Studies in which selective chemical markers have been used to explore the mechanisms by which biocatalysts interact with heavy crude oils have shown that the biochemical reactions follow distinct trends. The term biocatalyst refers to a group of extremophilic microorganisms which, under the experimental conditions used, interact with heavy crude oils to (1) cause a redistribution of hydrocarbons, (2) cause chemical changes in oil fractions containing sulfur compounds and lower the sulfur content, (3) decrease organic nitrogen content, and (4) decrease the concentration of trace metals. Current data indicate that the overall effect is due to simultaneous reactions yielding products with relatively higher concentration of saturates and lower concentrations of aromatics and resins. The compositional changes depend on the microbial species and the chemistry of the crudes. Economic analysis of a potential technology based on the available data indicate that such a technology, used in a pre-refinery mode, may be cost efficient and promising. In the present paper, the background of oil biocatalysis and some recent results will be discussed.

  4. Dust suppression characteristics of mineral oil when applied to corn, wheat, or soybeans

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jones, David Don

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and must be added repeatedly. Several water applications could raise the mo i stu re content of grain to the point of encouraging mold growth. Peterson (1977) reported that an average worker wi 1 1 breathe from 4 to 10 m of air during an eight hour work... Jones, B. S. , Texas Al!M University Chairman of Advisory Committee: Dr. Calvin B. Parnell, Jr. Corn, wheat, and soybean samples weighing 454 g each were treated with mineral oil at rates of 50, 100, 200, 400, and 600 ppm and grain dust...

  5. The effect of seed source on some agronomic and genetic characters of five Texas corn hybrids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Douglas, Alvin Gene

    2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

    and hybrids in bushels of shelled corn per acre 12 3. Analysis of variance of source yields 4. Analysis of variance of hybrid yields 12 12 5. Correlation and regression of emergence percentages with germination percentages 14 6. Average plant heights... in harvesting and seed processing. Neal (4) has found that the average actual loss of vigor of F2 plants as represented by yield is 29. 5V. for single-cross hybrids. He also states that "the stalks and leaves of the advanced generations (of single...

  6. The Effect of Rock Phosphate Upon the Corn Possibility of Phosphoric Acid of the Soil

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fraps, G. S. (George Stronach)

    1922-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of Veterinary Medicine, A. and M. College of Texas. **In cooperation with United Statee Department of Agriculture. THE EFFECT OF ROCK PHOSPHATE UPON THE CORN POS- SIBILITY OF PHOSPHORIC ACID OF THE SOIL. In connection vith oil-fertilit~ stuclies..., it is important to lcnow the relation between the effect of the phosphoric acid of the rock phosphate on crops and the phosphoric acid that can be withdrawn from the soil by crops. The phosphoric acid of rock phosphate is readily soluble in K/5 nitric acid...

  7. Effect of genotype on cooking and texture of corn for tortilla production

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bedolla, Santiago

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Cell to measure n1xtamal texture . . . Plunger (A) and Ottawa cell (C) to measure tortilla texture Page 13 17 Effect of cook1ng time on n1xtamal texture of corneous, 1ntermediate and floury hybrids (Linear model) Effect of cooking time... composition of corn on the average is: water, 13. 5K; protein, 10K; oil, 4%; carbohydrates 70. 7X; and ash, 1. 4X. The germ contains about 35% oil, 20K protein and 10% ash (Hopkins et al. , 1903; Katz et al. , 1974). Nixtamal Preparation Nethods...

  8. Influence of Genetic Background on Anthocyanin and Co-Pigment Profile and Stability of Colored Corn

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Collison, Amy Elizabeth

    2014-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

    of these compounds in a limited set of samples (De la Parra et al., 2007; Del Pozo-Insfran 3 et al., 2006; Mora-Rochin et al., 2010). However, no studies have investigated the potential impact of anthocyanin and co-pigment composition on stability of color..., the anthocyanin losses in blue corn were found to further increase when the raw kernels were processed into nixtamal, tortillas, and chips (losses of 37%, 54%, and 75%, respectively) (Del Pozo-Insfran et al., 2006). This and other studies suggest...

  9. The effect of stress cracked and broken corn kernels on alkaline processing losses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jackson, David Scott

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    used and the final product desirecL Then the cooked corn and water mixture is, &equently, pumped to a soaking tank for a 8-15 br steep, Other commercial operations utilize large cooking tanks which, after cooking, serve as steeping tanks. After...-samples of Pioneer 3780 (P3780) were also preparezL The first sub- sample was dried in a continuous elevator drying system at 46' C and steeped in a bin for 6 hr, then cooled with ambient temperature air. The second Pioneer 3780 sub- sample was bin (batch) dried...

  10. Spacing of Rows in Corn and Its Effect Upon Grain Yield.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Conner, A. B. (Arthur Benjamin)

    1918-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    , was added as a third distribution. The results for the five-year period are shown in the follnn.ing table. S,PACING ROWS IN CORN AND EFFECT UPON GRAIN YIELD 9 hould be pointed out that the low ~ield from the six-foot spacing I2 mss, undouhteclly, due... comparable. It is noticeable that the grain yield each pear is consistently in favor of the three-foot spacing, as is also the average for the whole period of five years. These results indicate that the actual yield in grain secure:l from the three-foot...

  11. National Bioenergy Center, Biochemical Platform Integration Project: Quarterly Update, Winter 2011-2012 (Newsletter)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Winter 2011-2012 issue of the National Bioenergy Center Biochemical Platform Integration Project quarterly update. Issue topics: 34th Symposium on Biotechnology for Fuels and Chemicals; feasibility of NIR spectroscopy-based rapid feedstock reactive screening; demonstrating integrated pilot-scale biomass conversion. The Biochemical Process Integration Task focuses on integrating the processing steps in enzyme-based lignocellulose conversion technology. This project supports the U.S. Department of Energy's efforts to foster development, demonstration, and deployment of 'biochemical platform' biorefineries that economically produce ethanol or other fuels, as well as commodity sugars and a variety of other chemical products, from renewable lignocellulosic biomass.

  12. Effect of Enrichment on the Thiamine, Riboflavin and Niacin of Corn Meal and Grits as Prepared for Eating.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Whitacre, Jessie; Pace, June K.; Thomas, Kathreen

    1952-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    calculated on the total batch moist basis. Table 7 gives the retention data along with the pH values before cooking for corn bread, pone and spoonbread, and af- ter cooking for mush and grits. The data in Table 7 indicate that pH of batter has a bear... by the five groups of corn breads which contained from 84 to 89 percent of the content of this vitamin in the corresponding batters. The variation within the groups was greater than between the groups, the respective mean squares being 19.98 and 5...

  13. Hairy Vetch, Bur Clover and Oats as Soil-Building Crops for Cotton and Corn in Texas.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Morris, H. F. (Harry Forest); Johnson, P. R. (Paul Rufus); Reynolds, E. B. (Elbert Brunner)

    1950-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    for soil improvement increased the average yields of cot- ton ancl corn about 40 percent at College Station for the 11 years, 1937-47. Vetch increased the average yield of cotton 75 to 84 percent and practically doubled the yield of corn at Tyler... yields of cotton than the use of 400 pounds of a 4-8-4 fertilizer per acre at Tyler and Nacog- doches. Hairy vetch was a better green-manure crop than oats at Tyler and oats or bur clover at Nacogdoches. The effects of plowing under hairy vetch lasted...

  14. National Bioenergy Center--Biochemical Platform Integration Project: Quarterly Update, Fall 2010

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schell, D.

    2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fall 2010 edition of the National Bioenergy Center's Biochemical Platform Integration Project quarterly newsletter. Issue topics: rapid analysis models for compositional analysis of intermediate process streams; engineered arabinose-fermenting Zymomonas mobilis strain.

  15. BIOENERGY/BIOFUELS/BIOCHEMICALS Chromatographic determination of 1, 4-b-xylooligosaccharides

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Riverside, University of

    BIOENERGY/BIOFUELS/BIOCHEMICALS Chromatographic determination of 1, 4-b. Li Á R. Kumar Á C. E. Wyman BioEnergy Science Center, Oak Ridge, TN 37831, USA 123 J Ind Microbiol

  16. Soy Isoflavone Supplementation and Biochemical Recurrence After Curative Treatment for Localized Prostate Cancer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Camey, Sarah

    2013-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Background: Despite an abundance of soy interventions, the effect of soy isoflavones prior to curative treatment for localized prostate cancer on biochemical recurrence has not been evaluated. Objective: To determine if ...

  17. Modification of Corn Starch Ethanol Refinery to Efficiently Accept Various High-Impact Cellulosic Feedstocks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Derr, Dan

    2013-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The goal of the Corn-to-Cellulosic Migration (CCM) pilot facility was to demonstrate the implementation of advanced technologies and methods for conversion of non-food, cellulosic feedstocks into ethanol, assess the economics of the facility and evaluate potential environmental benefits for biomass to fuels conversion. The CCM project was comprised of design, build, and operate phases for the CCM pilot facility as well as research & development, and modeling components. The CCM pilot facility was designed to process 1 tonne per day of non-food biomass and biologically convert that biomass to ethanol at a rate of 70 gallons per tonne. The plant demonstrated throughputs in excess of 1 tonne per day for an extended run of 1400 hours. Although target yields were not fully achieved, the continuous operation validated the design and operability of the plant. These designs will permit the design of larger scale operations at existing corn milling operations or for greenfield plants. EdeniQ, a partner in the project and the owner of the pilot plant, continues to operate and evaluate other feedstocks.

  18. Modeled Impacts of Cover Crops and Vegetative Barriers on Corn Stover Availability and Soil Quality

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ian J. Bonner; David J. Muth Jr.; Joshua B. Koch; Douglas L. Karlen

    2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Environmentally benign, economically viable, and socially acceptable agronomic strategies are needed to launch a sustainable lignocellulosic biofuel industry. Our objective was to demonstrate a landscape planning process that can ensure adequate supplies of corn (Zea mays L.) stover feedstock while protecting and improving soil quality. The Landscape Environmental Assessment Framework (LEAF) was used to develop land use strategies that were then scaled up for five U.S. Corn Belt states (Nebraska, Iowa, Illinois, Indiana, and Minnesota) to illustrate the impact that could be achieved. Our results show an annual sustainable stover supply of 194 million Mg without exceeding soil erosion T values or depleting soil organic carbon [i.e., soil conditioning index (SCI)?>?0] when no-till, winter cover crop, and vegetative barriers were incorporated into the landscape. A second, more rigorous conservation target was set to enhance soil quality while sustainably harvesting stover. By requiring erosion to be <1/2 T and the SCI-organic matter (OM) subfactor to be >?0, the annual sustainable quantity of harvestable stover dropped to148 million Mg. Examining removal rates by state and soil resource showed that soil capability class and slope generally determined the effectiveness of the three conservation practices and the resulting sustainable harvest rate. This emphasizes that sustainable biomass harvest must be based on subfield management decisions to ensure soil resources are conserved or enhanced, while providing sufficient biomass feedstock to support the economic growth of bioenergy enterprises.

  19. EFFECT OF ANATOMICAL FRACTIONATION ON THE ENZYMATIC HYDROLYSIS OF ACID AND ALKALINE PRETREATED CORN STOVER

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    K. B. Duguid; M. D. Montross; C. W. Radtke; C. L. Crofcheck; L. M. Wendt; S. A. Shearer

    2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Due to concerns with biomass collection systems and soil sustainability there are opportunities to investigate the optimal plant fractions to collect for conversion. An ideal feedstock would require low severity pretreatment to release a maximum amount of sugar during enzymatic hydrolysis. Corn stover fractions were separated by hand and analyzed for glucan, xylan, acid soluble lignin, acid insoluble lignin, and ash composition. The stover fractions were also pretreated with either 0, 0.4, or 0.8% NaOH for 2 hours at room temperature, washed, autoclaved and saccharified. In addition, acid pretreated samples underwent simultaneous saccharification and fermentation (SSF) to ethanol. In general, the two pretreatments produced similar trends with cobs, husks, and leaves responding best to the pretreatments, the tops of stalks responding slightly less, and the bottom of the stalks responding the least. For example, corn husks pretreated with 0.8% NaOH released over 90% (standard error of 3.8%) of the available glucan, while only 45% (standard error of 1.1%) of the glucan was produced from identically treated stalk bottoms. Estimates of the theoretical ethanol yield using acid pretreatment followed by SSF were 65% (standard error of 15.9%) for husks and 29% (standard error of 1.8%) for stalk bottoms. This suggests that integration of biomass collection systems to remove sustainable feedstocks could be integrated with the processes within a biorefinery to minimize overall ethanol production costs.

  20. Exploring the Pinhole: Biochemical and Genetic Studies on the Prototype Pinholin, S21

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pang, Ting

    2011-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

    EXPLORING THE PINHOLE: BIOCHEMICAL AND GENETIC STUDIES ON THE PROTOTYPE PINHOLIN, S21 A Dissertation by TING PANG Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements... for the degree of DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY May 2010 Major Subject: Biochemistry EXPLORING THE PINHOLE: BIOCHEMICAL AND GENETIC STUDIES ON THE PROTOTYPE PINHOLIN, S21 A Dissertation by TING PANG Submitted to the Office of Graduate...

  1. Soil compaction is a manageable factor that can lim-it grain or silage yield on many Virginia soils. Corn

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liskiewicz, Maciej

    Soil compaction is a manageable factor that can lim- it grain or silage yield on many Virginia soils. Corn plants growing on compacted areas are often stunted and have slower root penetration rates grown in these areas. Compaction is created when soil particles are pressed together, reducing the pore

  2. As corn-based biofuels reach their practical limits, advanced algae-based biofuels are poised to supply

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reisslein, Martin

    SEMTE abstract As corn-based biofuels reach their practical limits, advanced algae-based biofuels of Energy, General Electric, Algenol Biofuels, and Southern Company. Currently a post-doctoral fellow working for Algenol Biofuels, Dr. Lively is expanding his expertise in gas and liquid separations

  3. Current biofuel feedstock crops such as corn lead to large environmental losses of N through nitrate leaching and N2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DeLucia, Evan H.

    219 Current biofuel feedstock crops such as corn lead to large environmental losses of N through biofuel crops established on a rich Mollisol soil. Reduced Nitrogen Losses after Conversion of Row Crop Agriculture to Perennial Biofuel Crops Candice M. Smith, Mark B. david,* Corey A. Mitchell, Michael d. Masters

  4. Land Use and Water Efficiency in Current and Potential Future U.S. Corn and Brazilian Sugarcane Ethanol Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ethanol Systems Ethan Warner1, Yimin Zhang1, Helena Chum2 , Robin Newmark1 Biofuels represent technological learning, sugarcane and corn ethanol industries have achieved steady improvements in resource Scope Abstract Conclusions The GHG savings and land energy productivity of both ethanol systems have

  5. Keeping Corn Farmers Seeing Green As recently as 100 years ago, farmers plowed their fields with horses and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , and agencies such as U.S. Department of Agriculture have long relied on NOAA's weather and climate begins. The economic ties between climate information and agriculture are considerable. For example: Global Climate Change Impacts in the U.S., 2009) #12;impacts. Corn is particularly susceptible to heat

  6. Owens Corning

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Residential Insulation, Frank O'Brien Bernini, VP & Chief Sustainability Officer, Paul Smith, VP Building Materials Group Marketing, John Libonati, VP Government and Public...

  7. Corn fodder

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Curtis, Geo. W. (George Washington)

    1891-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    from stalks below; 4th best-or poorest plan of all-to strip leaves from entire stalk. PLAT 1. Tope cut, only, above eara 14.375 4.258 2.145 65.558 1.587 9.750 -- Protein ....................... Fat .......................... Crude Fibre...

  8. Response of corn to fertilizer placement on a Hockley fine sandy loam

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Matocha, John Edward

    1964-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    , Texas AikM University. RESPONSE OF CORN TO FERT'lLLZER PLACEMENT ON HOCKLEY FfNE SANDY LOAM I, f N T R OD 'JC T1ON TI . . eff ici. . ncy of farci I i z er i&sage aff. ct'ing th e production of r or n. on medium t extu red roii- in East Texa may..., iiize" i?der conditions i- -i&pi r ior tri o? er rriethod nf appi ication. TI: - opi imi. rn location of the f crt il' zer bi "rl i- rela' 'on to 'I" e you ng p! a "t ma y be a factor affecting fina! p's n' yield. ?. TI. e vigor of' a young seed...

  9. Comparison of Dow Corning 544 antifoam to IIT747 antifoam in the 1/240 SRAT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koopman, D.C.

    2000-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The Defense Waste Processing Facility requested that the Immobilization Technology Section compare the relative foaming tendencies of sludge simulant during simulated Chemical Processing Cell operations (HLW-DWPF-TTR-99-0012). Dow Corning 544 antifoam, currently used in DWPF, was compared to a new antifoam formulation developed at the Illinois Institute of Technology. A task plan was written and approved. The task plan deliverables included a recommendation on the choice of antifoam, an evaluation of the influence of solids concentration on foaming, an evaluation on the effect of boil-up rate on foaming, an estimate of the mass of steam stripped to remove 90 percent of the mercury, and a determination of the fate of mercury. Additional parameters to be investigated during experimentation included the maximum foam height observed, hydrogen generation rates, and nitrite destruction rates.

  10. Effects of feeding stimulant and insecticide mixtures on feeding response and morality of adult male corn earworm, Helicoverpa zea (Boddie)(Lepidoptera:Noctuidae)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clemens, Christopher Glen

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    stimulants on feeding behavior and mortality of pheromone trap captured adult male corn earworms, Helicoverpa zea (Boddie), to screen and evaluate toxicants for use in an attracticide formulation. Commercially-available formulations of acephate, boric acid...

  11. Effect of reducing amino acid excess in a corn-soybean meal diet on performance, nitrogen balance and nutrient digestibilities of growing pigs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kelly, Katherine Ann

    2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

    EFFECT OF REDUCING AMINO ACID EXCESS IN A CORN-SOYBEAN MEAL DIET ON PERFORMANCE, NITROGEN BALANCE AND NUTRIENT DIGESTIBILITIES OF GROWING PIGS A Thesis by KATHERINE ANN KELLY Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University... in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 1988 Major Subject: Nutrition EFFECT OF REDUCING AMINO ACID EXCESS IN A CORN-SOYBEAN MEAL DIET ON PERFORMANCE, NITROGEN BALANCE AND NUTRIFNT DIGESTIBILITIES OF GROWING...

  12. Comparison of lines of corn selected on Lufkin fine sandy loam and Norwood silt loam with and without commercial fertilizer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McAfee, Thomas Edison

    1953-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    .ITHOUT COMMERCIAL FERTILIZER Introduction There is general agreement in Mendelian genetics that the san? gene allele may affect the survival value of an organism differently when the organism is placed under different conditions ( 5 ) . I f selections are made...COMPARISON OF LINES OF CORN SELE CTED ON LUFKIN FINE SANDY LOAM AND NORWOOD SILT LOAM WITH AND WITHOUT COMMERCIAL FERTILIZER A Dissertation By Thomas Edison MoAfee Approved as to style and content by: Chairman of Committee Heac...

  13. Forecasting Mexican imports of U.S. corn, sorghum and soybeans under free trade and debt reduction scenarios

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lyford, Conrad Power

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    INFORMATION Mexican External Debt and Structural Adjustment U. S. - Mexico Agricultural Trade Commodity Specific Factors LITERATURE REVIEW Economic Integration and the Welfare Impacts of a FTA Modeling Methods METHOD OF ANALYSIS AND DATA Description... BACKGROUND INFORMATION To analyze corn, sorghum and soybean trade it is useful to outline several background factors. First, Mexican external debt and its impact on U. S. -Mexican agricultural trade will be discussed. Second, U. S. -Mexican agricultural...

  14. A double exponential model for biochemical oxygen demand Ian G. Mason a,*, Robert I. McLachlan b

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McLachlan, Robert

    A double exponential model for biochemical oxygen demand Ian G. Mason a,*, Robert I. McLachlan b , Daniel T. GeÂŽrard a a Institute of Technology and Engineering, Massey University, Palmerston North, New 2005 Abstract Biochemical oxygen demand (BOD) exertion patterns in anaerobically treated farm dairy

  15. Table 2 -Lime use and practices on Corn, major producing states, 2001 CO GA IL IN IA KS KY MI MN MO NE NY NC ND OH PA SD TX WI Area

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kammen, Daniel M.

    Table 2 - Lime use and practices on Corn, major producing states, 2001 CO GA IL IN IA KS KY MI MN.7 Table 2 - Lime use and practices on Corn, major producing states, 2000 CO IL IN IA KS KY MI MN MO NE NY use and practices on Corn, major producing states, 1999 CO IL IN IA KS KY MI MN MO NE NC OH SD TX WI

  16. National Bioenergy Center, Biochemical Platform Integration Project: Quarterly Update, Summer 2011 (Newsletter)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Summer 2011 issue of the National Bioenergy Center Biochemical Platform Integration Project quarterly update. Issue topics: evaluating new analytical techniques for measuring soluble sugars in the liquid portion of biomass hydrolysates, and measurement of the fraction of insoluble solids in biomass slurries.

  17. Can bio-inspired information processing steps be realized as synthetic biochemical processes?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vladimir Privman; Evgeny Katz

    2014-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider possible designs and experimental realiza-tions in synthesized rather than naturally occurring bio-chemical systems of a selection of basic bio-inspired information processing steps. These include feed-forward loops, which have been identified as the most common information processing motifs in many natural pathways in cellular functioning, and memory-involving processes, specifically, associative memory. Such systems should not be designed to literally mimic nature. Rather, we can be guided by nature's mechanisms for experimenting with new information/signal processing steps which are based on coupled biochemical reactions, but are vastly simpler than natural processes, and which will provide tools for the long-term goal of understanding and harnessing nature's information processing paradigm. Our biochemical processes of choice are enzymatic cascades because of their compatibility with physiological processes in vivo and with electronics (e.g., electrodes) in vitro allowing for networking and interfacing of enzyme-catalyzed processes with other chemical and biochemical reactions. In addition to designing and realizing feed-forward loops and other processes, one has to develop approaches to probe their response to external control of the time-dependence of the input(s), by measuring the resulting time-dependence of the output. The goal will be to demonstrate the expected features, for example, the delayed response and stabilizing effect of the feed-forward loops.

  18. Topographic Variations in Biomechanical and Biochemical Properties in the Ankle Joint: An In Vitro Bovine Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Athanasiou, Kyriacos

    Topographic Variations in Biomechanical and Biochemical Properties in the Ankle Joint: An In Vitro the articulating surfaces of the ankle joint and to evaluate the functional and biological properties of engineered neo- cartilage generated using chondrocytes from different locations in the ankle joint. Methods

  19. Biochemical characterization of Cdc6/Orc1 binding to the replication origin of the euryarchaeon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berger, James M.

    Biochemical characterization of Cdc6/Orc1 binding to the replication origin of the euryarchaeon (Cdc6)/Origin Replication Complex subunit 1 (Orc1) proteins share sequence homology with eukaryotic DNA under- stand whether Cdc6/Orc1 functions in an eukaryotic or bacterial-like manner, we have

  20. Radial Basis Function Neural Networks in Variable Structure Control of a Class of Biochemical Processes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wilamowski, Bogdan Maciej

    is that the method presented does not require the analytical details describing the plant dynamics available. I conditions and unknown plant dynamics. In this paper, an analytic approach towards the calculation@ieee.org X.Yu@cqu.edu.au Abstract ­ Biochemical processes often display a complicated dynamic behavior

  1. Eur. J. Biochem. 78, 585-598 (1977) Binding of Modified Adenine Nucleotides

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Govindjee

    Eur. J. Biochem. 78, 585-598 (1977) Binding of Modified Adenine Nucleotides to Isolated Coupling) 1. Fluorescent nucleotides (1,N6-ethenoadenosine diphosphate and triphosphate, EADP and EATP)replace the natural nucleotides rather efficiently (65- 85%) in several chloroplast reactions (ADP inhibition

  2. Biochemical Engineering Journal 89 (2014) 2127 Contents lists available at ScienceDirect

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Raghavan, Srinivasa

    Direct Biochemical Engineering Journal journal homepage: www.elsevier.com/locate/bej Regular article Tyrosinase: Biofabrication Caffeic acid Chitosan Electrodeposition Redox Tyrosinase a b s t r a c t Physics and chemistry and function. Here, we describe one such biofabrication methodology, the use of tyrosinase to graft phenolics

  3. Changes in the Mechanical and Biochemical Properties of Aortic Tissue due to Cold Storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Katherine Yanhang

    Changes in the Mechanical and Biochemical Properties of Aortic Tissue due to Cold Storage Ming Background. Temporary cold storage is a common procedure for preserving tissues for a short time be- fore; collagen; mechan- ical properties; arteries; cold storage; soft tissue; mechanical testing; vascular

  4. National Bioenergy Center Biochemical Platform Integration Project: Quarterly Update #28, Spring 2011

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schell, D. J.

    2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Spring 2011 edition of the National Bioenergy Center's Biochemical Platform Integration Project quarterly newsletter. Issue topics: 33rd Symposium on Biotechnology for Fuels and Chemicals program sessions and special topic sessions; assessment of waste water treatment needs; and an update on new arabinose-to-ethanol fermenting Zymomonas mobilis strains.

  5. National Bioenergy Center Biochemical Platform Integration Project: Quarterly Update #27, April - June 2010

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schell, D.

    2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    April-June, 2010 edition of the National Bioenergy Center's Biochemical Platform Integration Project quarterly newsletter. Issue topics: understanding performance of alternative process configurations for producing ethanol from biomass; investigating Karl Fischer Titration for measuring water content of pretreated biomass slurries.

  6. 155:427 CHEMICAL & BIOCHEMICAL ENGINEERING DESIGN AND ECONOMICS I FALL 2014 (3 credits)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Muzzio, Fernando J.

    of the steps involved in the design and economic evaluation of chemical and biochemical processes. We elaborate and economic evaluation of their project forms their major task during the Spring semester design course (155, optimization and economic evaluation: planning, cost estimation, fixed capital investments, working capital

  7. Department of Chemical and Biochemical Engineering Institute for Chemicals and Fuels from Alternative Resources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sinnamon, Gordon J.

    . The successful candidate will be an important member of the Institute for Chemicals and Fuels from AlternativeDepartment of Chemical and Biochemical Engineering Institute for Chemicals and Fuels from Alternative Resources The University of Western Ontario Applications are invited for a junior faculty position

  8. Final Technical Report Modeling the Physical and Biochemical Influence of Ocean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Influence of Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Plant Discharges into their Adjacent Waters DOE AWARD NO. DE sustainably with acceptably low biological impact. Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) uses large flowsFinal Technical Report Modeling the Physical and Biochemical Influence of Ocean Thermal Energy

  9. Volume 6(2): 068-074 (2014) -068 J Microb Biochem Technol

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gu, Tingyue

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    are lacking on anaerobic corrosion by acid producing bacteria (APB) that undergo anaerobic fermentation the possibility of very high MIC pitting corrosion rates due to free organic acids (represented by acetic acid of Acid Producing Bacteria Causing Fast Pitting Bioc`orrosion. J Microb Biochem Technol 6: 067-073. doi:10

  10. STABILITY OF DOW CORNING Q2-3183A ANTIFOAM IN IRRADIATED HYDROXIDE SOLUTION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    White, T; Crawford, C; Burket, P; Calloway, B

    2009-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Researchers at the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) examined the stability of Dow Corning Q2-3183A antifoam to radiation and aqueous hydroxide solutions. Initial foam control studies with Hanford tank waste showed the antifoam reduced foaming. The antifoam was further tested using simulated Hanford tank waste spiked with antifoam that was heated and irradiated (2.1 x 10{sup 4} rad/h) at conditions (90 C, 3 M NaOH, 8 h) expected in the processing of radioactive waste through the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) at Hanford. After irradiation, the concentration of the major polymer components polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) and polypropylene glycol (PPG) in the antifoam was determined by gel permeation chromatography (GPC). No loss of the major polymer components was observed after 24 h and only 15 wt% loss of PDMS was reported after 48 h. The presence of degradation products were not observed by gas chromatography (GC), gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GCMS) or high performance liquid chromatography mass spectrometry (HPLC-MS). G values were calculated from the GPC analysis and tabulated. The findings indicate the antifoam is stable for 24 h after exposure to gamma radiation, heat, and alkaline simulated waste.

  11. Biotechnol. Appl. Biochem. (2005) 42, 119131 (Printed in Great Britain) doi:10.1042/BA20040207 119 Clonal evolution of stem and differentiated cells can be

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zandstra, Peter W.

    Biotechnol. Appl. Biochem. (2005) 42, 119­131 (Printed in Great Britain) doi:10.1042/BA20040207 119

  12. Transcriptome and Biochemical Analyses of Fungal Degradation of Wood

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tien, Ming

    2009-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Lignocellulosic accounts for a large percentage of material that can be utilized for biofuels. The most costly part of lignocellulosic material processing is the initial hydrolysis of the wood which is needed to circumvent the lignin barrier and the crystallinity of cellulose. Enzymes will play an increased role in this conversion in that they potentially provide an alternative to costly and caustic high temperature and acid treatment. The increasing use of enzymes in biotechnology is facilitated by both continued improvements in enzyme technology but also in the discovery of new and novel enzymes. The present proposal is aimed at identifying the enzymes which are known to depolymerize woody biomass. Fundamental understanding of how nature gains access to cellulose and hemicellulose will impact all applications. Because fungi are the only known microbes capable of circumventing the lignin barrier, knowledge of the enzyme they use is of great potential for biofuel processing. Nature has evolved different fungal mechanisms for enzymatic hydrolysis of wood. Most notable are the white-rot fungi (wrf) and the brown-rot fungi (brf). This proposed research aims at determining the complete transcriptome of three wrf and two brf to determine the enzymes involved in lignocellulose degradation. The transcriptome work will be supported by enzyme characterization (and zymograms) and finally analysis of the lignin component to determine the mode of lignin modification. In this proposed research, we hypothesize that: 1) Determination of the complete transcriptome of closely related white and brown rot fungi will lead to knowledge of the relevant enzymes involved in wood degradation. 2) Knowledge of the extracellular transcriptome and the mechanism of wood decay can only be obtained if the products of the decay are known. As such, characterization of the lignin oxidation products will correlate the enzymes involved (obtained from the transcriptome) to the lignin oxidation products. The Department of Energy has sequenced the P. chrysosporium genome and has approved the sequencing of the genome of the closely-related brown rot fungus P. placenta. This comparative genomics approach will yield important information on differences between these two fungi. Analysis of gene unique to each fungus (which have been lost or gained) can potentially lead to determining the enzymes which are responsible for each type of decay. This comparison, however, would not be complete without comparing the transcriptome and the proteome/enzymes. Comparative genomics may tell us which genes may be important, but it will not tell us when these genes are expressed, at what levels and will not necessarily tell us what these genes do.

  13. Types of Costs Types of Cost Estimates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boisvert, Jeff

    · Types of Costs · Types of Cost Estimates · Methods to estimate capital costs MIN E 408: Mining% accuracy. ­ 2-5% of pre-production capital Types of Cost Estimates #12;3. Definitive ­ Based on definitive-even $ Production Level Fixed Cost Break-even $ Production Level Cost-Revenue Relationships · Capital Costs (or

  14. Influence of Airflow on Laboratory Storage of High Moisture Corn Stover

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lynn M. Wendt; Ian J. Bonner; Amber N. Hoover; Rachel M. Emerson; William A. Smith

    2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Storing high moisture biomass for bioenergy use is a reality in many areas of the country where wet harvest conditions and environmental factors prevent dry storage from being feasible. Aerobic storage of high moisture biomass leads to microbial degradation and self-heating, but oxygen limitation can aid in material preservation. To understand the influence of oxygen presence on high moisture biomass (50 %, wet basis), three airflow rates were tested on corn stover stored in laboratory reactors. Temperature, carbon dioxide production, dry matter loss, chemical composition, fungal abundance, pH, and organic acids were used to monitor the effects of airflow on storage conditions. The results of this work indicate that oxygen availability impacts both the duration of self-heating and the severity of dry matter loss. High airflow systems experienced the greatest initial rates of loss but a shortened microbially active period that limited total dry matter loss (19 %). Intermediate airflow had improved preservation in short-term storage compared to high airflow systems but accumulated the greatest dry matter loss over time (up to 27 %) as a result of an extended microbially active period. Low airflow systems displayed the best performance with the lowest rates of loss and total loss (10 %) in storage at 50 days. Total structural sugar levels of the stored material were preserved, although glucan enrichment and xylan loss were documented in the high and intermediate flow conditions. By understanding the role of oxygen availability on biomass storage performance, the requirements for high moisture storage solutions may begin to be experimentally defined.

  15. Biochemical changes in the proteins of sorghum grain during moisture reconstitution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Billings, Toby Jackson

    1972-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    MICROORGANISM INHABITING SORGHUM GRAIN AFTER RECONSTITUTION Medium Growth Acid Gas MR VP Nitrate Reduction Mannose yes yes no Glucose yes yes no Sucrose yes no no Gal actos e yes yes no Mannitol Starch Maltose yes yes yes no no yes...BIOCHEMICAL CHANGES IN THE PROTEINS OF SORGHUM GRAIN DURING MOISTURE RECONSTITUTION A Thesis by TOBY JACKSON BILLINGS Submitted to the Graduate College of the Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree...

  16. Chemical residues and biochemical responses in wild and cultured European sea bass (Dicentrarchus labrax L.)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fernandes, Denise [C.I.M.A., University of Algarve, F.C.M.A., Campus de Gambelas, 8005-139-Faro (Portugal); Department of Environmental Chemistry, IIQAB-CSIC, Jordi Girona 18, 08034-Barcelona (Spain); Porte, Cinta [Department of Environmental Chemistry, IIQAB-CSIC, Jordi Girona 18, 08034-Barcelona (Spain)]. E-mail: cpvqam@cid.csic.es; Bebianno, Maria Joao [C.I.M.A., University of Algarve, F.C.M.A., Campus de Gambelas, 8005-139-Faro (Portugal)

    2007-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Cultured and wild sea bass (Dicentrarchus labrax) from the Arade Estuary were sampled in summer and winter and the degree of exposure to metals and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) assessed, together with some biochemical responses against those and other pollutants. The highest levels of copper (up to 997 {mu}g g{sup -1} dry weight) and cadmium (up to 4.22 {mu}g g{sup -1} dry weight) were detected in the liver and kidney of cultured specimens, whereas the highest exposure to PAHs was observed in wild fish. Significant alterations in some biochemical markers were detected and associated to pollutant exposure. Thus, metallothionein concentrations were higher in the tissues of cultured fish and positively correlated with metal residues. The activity 7-ethoxyresorufin O-deethylase ranged from 28 pmol/min/mg protein in cultured fish to 83 pmol/min/mg protein in wild fish collected near a marina area. Cultured fish and wild fish from the marina area had depressed acetylcholinesterase in muscle tissue and a parasitic infection in the gonads. The obtained results support the usefulness of the combined use of chemical and biochemical markers to assess the impact of anthropogenic pollutants in both wild and cultured fish.

  17. A physiological basis for determining a possible mechanism for migration in Helicoverpa zea (Boddie), the corn earworm

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weise, Carolyn Joan

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    to the stimulation and capacity of a migratory insect. 13 2. Restraining of the insect in the dissecting dish using modeling clay (a), so that the neck membrane is exposed (b) for the allatectomy procedure... 18 3. Tethered corn earworm moth on a flight mill 19 4... dissecting dish. To restrain the insect, a clay "seat" was molded in the bottom of the dish. The insect was then laid in the seat with its ventral side up and held by placing one strip of clay across the thorax, as illustrated in Figure 2a. The head...

  18. Assessment of Cerebellar and Hippocampal Morphology and Biochemical Parameters in the Compound Heterozygous, Tottering/leaner Mouse

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Murawski, Emily M.

    2010-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

    and death in cells of the hippocampal dentate gyrus and 3) changes in basic biochemical parameters in granule cells of the cerebellum and hippocampus. This study revealed no volume abnormalities within the hippocampus of the mutant mice, but a decrease...

  19. White food-type sorghum in direct-expansion extrusion applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Acosta Sanchez, David

    2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    distribution similar to corn meal produced extrudates with higher expansion, lower bulk density and similar texture. In addition, sorghum extrudates were rated equal to corn meal extrudates by a taste panel for appearance, flavor, texture and overall...

  20. Summary of Findings from the Biomass Refining Consortium for Applied Fundamentals and Innovation (CAFI): Corn Stover Pretreatment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elander, R. T.; Dale, B. E.; Holtzapple, M.; Ladisch, M. R.; Lee, Y. Y.; Mitchinson, C.; Saddler, J. N.; Wyman, C. E.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Biomass Refining Consortium for Applied Fundamentals and Innovation, with members from Auburn University, Dartmouth College, Michigan State University, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Purdue University, Texas A&M University, the University of British Columbia, and the University of California at Riverside, has developed comparative data on the conversion of corn stover to sugars by several leading pretreatment technologies. These technologies include ammonia fiber expansion pretreatment, ammonia recycle percolation pretreatment, dilute sulfuric acid pretreatment, flowthrough pretreatment (hot water or dilute acid), lime pretreatment, controlled pH hot water pretreatment, and sulfur dioxide steam explosion pretreatment. Over the course of two separate USDA- and DOE-funded projects, these pretreatment technologies were applied to two different corn stover batches, followed by enzymatic hydrolysis of the remaining solids from each pretreatment technology using identical enzyme preparations, enzyme loadings, and enzymatic hydrolysis assays. Identical analytical methods and a consistent material balance methodology were employed to develop comparative sugar yield data for each pretreatment and subsequent enzymatic hydrolysis. Although there were differences in the profiles of sugar release, with the more acidic pretreatments releasing more xylose directly in the pretreatment step than the alkaline pretreatments, the overall glucose and xylose yields (monomers + oligomers) from combined pretreatment and enzymatic hydrolysis process steps were very similar for all of these leading pretreatment technologies. Some of the water-only and alkaline pretreatment technologies resulted in significant amounts of residual xylose oligomers still remaining after enzymatic hydrolysis that may require specialized enzyme preparations to fully convert xylose oligomers to monomers.

  1. Metabolism of carbaryl, chloropyrifos, DDT, and parathion in the European corn borer: effects of microsporidiosis on toxicity and detoxication

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tetreault, G.E.

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An investigation was conducted to examine the effects of microsporidiosis on an insect's response to insecticide intoxication. Healthy European corn borer, Ostrinia nubilalis, larvae and those heavily infected with the microsporidian pathogen, Nosema pyrausta, were bioassayed with ten insecticides. The compounds used were carbaryl, carbofuran, chlorophrifos, DDT, diazinon, fonofos, methomyl, parathion, permethrin, and terbufos. Third instar larvae were used for topical bioassays. The compounds carbaryl, carbofuran, chlorophrifos, methomyl and terbufos were found to be significantly more toxic to diseased insects than healthy insects at the 0.05 probability level. To examine the effect of Nosema pyrausta infection on the European corn borer's ability to detoxify insecticides, /sup 14/C ring-labeled carbaryl, chlorophrifos, DDT, and parathion were topically applied to fourth instar larvae. Qualitative differences between healthy and diseased insects were found in the metabolic pathways of carbaryl, DDT, and parathion. The degradative fate of chlorophrifos was the same in both groups. Quantitatively, each insecticide penetrated diseased larvae faster. This resulted in larger amounts of the applied dose of parent compound and metabolites being found in the feces from diseased insects. Conversely, healthy insects had more of these materials present in the body and associated with the cuticle.

  2. Types of Costs Types of Cost Estimates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boisvert, Jeff

    05-1 · Types of Costs · Types of Cost Estimates · Methods to estimate capital costs MIN E 408-Revenue Relationships · Capital Costs (or first cost or capital investment): ­ Expenditures made to acquire or develop capital assets ­ Three main classes of capital costs: 1. Depreciable Investment: · Investment allocated

  3. Microfluidic Technology Platforms for Synthesizing, Labeling and Measuring the Kinetics of Transport and Biochemical Reactions for Developing Molecular Imaging Probes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Phelps, Michael E.

    2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Radiotracer techniques are used in environmental sciences, geology, biology and medicine. Radiotracers with Positron Emission Tomography (PET) provided biological examinations of ~3 million patients 2008. Despite the success of positron labeled tracers in many sciences, there is limited access in an affordable and convenient manner to develop and use new tracers. Integrated microfluidic chips are a new technology well matched to the concentrations of tracers. Our goal is to develop microfluidic chips and new synthesis approaches to enable wide dissemination of diverse types of tracers at low cost, and to produce new generations of radiochemists for which there are many unfilled jobs. The program objectives are to: 1. Develop an integrated microfluidic platform technology for synthesizing and 18F-labeling diverse arrays of different classes of molecules. 2. Incorporate microfluidic chips into small PC controlled devices (“Synthesizer”) with a platform interfaced to PC for electronic and fluid input/out control. 3. Establish a de-centralized model with Synthesizers for discovering and producing molecular imaging probes, only requiring delivery of inexpensive [18F]fluoride ion from commercial PET radiopharmacies vs the centralized approach of cyclotron facilities synthesizing and shipping a few different types of 18F-probes. 4. Develop a position sensitive avalanche photo diode (PSAPD) camera for beta particles embedded in a microfluidic chip for imaging and measuring transport and biochemical reaction rates to valid new 18F-labeled probes in an array of cell cultures. These objectives are met within a research and educational program integrating radio-chemistry, synthetic chemistry, biochemistry, engineering and biology in the Crump Institute for Molecular Imaging. The Radiochemistry Training Program exposes PhD and post doctoral students to molecular imaging in vitro in cells and microorganisms in microfluidic chips and in vivo with PET, from new technologies for radiochemistry (macro to micro levels), biochemistry and biology to imaging principles, tracer kinetics, pharmacokinetics and biochemical assays. New generations of radiochemists will be immersed in the biochemistry and biology for which their labeled probes are being developed for assays of these processes. In this program engineers and radio-chemists integrate the principles of microfluidics and radiolabeling along with proper system design and chemistry rule sets to yield Synthesizers enabling biological and pharmaceutical scientists to develop diverse arrays of probes to pursue their interests. This progression would allow also radiochemists to focus on the further evolution of rapid, high yield synthetic reactions with new enabling technologies, rather than everyday production of radiotracers that should be done by technologists. The invention of integrated circuits in electronics established a platform technology that allowed an evolution of ideas and applications far beyond what could have been imagined at the beginning. Rather than provide a technology for the solution to a single problem, it is hoped that microfluidic radiochemistry will be an enabling platform technology for others to solve many problems. As part of this objective, another program goal is to commercialize the technologies that come from this work so that they can be provided to others who wish to use it.

  4. Instructions for Corning Model 220 pH Meter The electrode tip is a fragile glass bulb. Be careful or you will break it with a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cross, George

    Instructions for Corning Model 220 pH Meter The electrode tip is a fragile glass bulb. Be careful. Two Point Calibration Routine · The pH meter should be turned "ON". · Your buffers should from your sample, rinse with distilled water, and BLOT with a kimwipe. 4. Turn pH meter OFF and store

  5. Regional-Scale Assessment of Nitrous Oxide Emissions within the US Corn Belt: The Impact of Precipitation and Agricultural Drainage on Indirect Emissions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    Regional-Scale Assessment of Nitrous Oxide Emissions within the US Corn Belt: The Impact of Precipitation and Agricultural Drainage on Indirect Emissions Tim Griffis1, Xuhui Lee2, John Baker3, Peter, but mitigation strategies have been limited by the large uncertainties in both direct and indirect emission

  6. Investment in Corn-Ethanol Plants in the Midwestern United States: An Analysis Using Reduced-Form and Structural Models1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, C.-Y. Cynthia

    1 Investment in Corn-Ethanol Plants in the Midwestern United States: An Analysis Using Reduced-Form and Structural Models1 C.-Y. Cynthia Lin and Karen E. Thome Abstract Ethanol has attracted considerable policy policy and strategic interactions affect decisions about when and where to invest in building new ethanol

  7. A novel mechanism and kinetic model to explain enhanced xylose yields from dilute sulfuric acid compared to hydrothermal pretreatment of corn stover

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Riverside, University of

    A novel mechanism and kinetic model to explain enhanced xylose yields from dilute sulfuric acid stover Dilute sulfuric acid Hydrothermal pretreatment Kinetic model Xylose a b s t r a c t Pretreatment of corn stover in 0.5% sulfuric acid at 160 °C for 40 min realized a maximum monomeric plus oligomeric

  8. Techno-Economic Analysis of Bioconversion of Methane into Biofuel and Biochemical (Poster)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fei, Q.; Tao, L.; Pienkos, P .T.; Guarnieri, M.; Palou-Rivera, I.

    2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In light of the relatively low price of natural gas and increasing demands of liquid transportation fuels and high-value chemicals, attention has begun to turn to novel biocatalyst for conversion of methane (CH4) into biofuels and biochemicals [1]. A techno-economic analysis (TEA) was performed for an integrated biorefinery process using biological conversion of methane, such as carbon yield, process efficiency, productivity (both lipid and acid), natural gas and other raw material prices, etc. This analysis is aimed to identify research challenges as well provide guidance for technology development.

  9. Method and apparatus for energy efficient self-aeration in chemical, biochemical, and wastewater treatment processes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gao, Johnway [Richland, WA; Skeen, Rodney S [Pendleton, OR

    2002-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention is a pulse spilling self-aerator (PSSA) that has the potential to greatly lower the installation, operation, and maintenance cost associated with aerating and mixing aqueous solutions. Currently, large quantities of low-pressure air are required in aeration systems to support many biochemical production processes and wastewater treatment plants. Oxygen is traditionally supplied and mixed by a compressor or blower and a mechanical agitator. These systems have high-energy requirements and high installation and maintenance costs. The PSSA provides a mixing and aeration capability that can increase operational efficiency and reduce overall cost.

  10. Genomic and biochemical approaches in the discovery of mechanisms for selective neuronal vulnerability to oxidative stress

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Xinkun; Zaidi, Asma; Pal, Ranu; Garrett, Alexander S.; Braceras, Rogelio; Chen, Xue-wen; Michaelis, Mary L.; Michaelis, Elias K.

    2009-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

    ral ssBioMed CentBMC Neuroscience Open AcceResearch article Genomic and biochemical approaches in the discovery of mechanisms for selective neuronal vulnerability to oxidative stress Xinkun Wang*1,2, Asma Zaidi2,3, Ranu Pal1,2, Alexander S Garrett4...: Daiichi Sankyo Inc., Two Hilton Court, Parsippany, NJ 07054, USA Email: Xinkun Wang* - xwang@ku.edu; Asma Zaidi - azaidi@kcumb.edu; Ranu Pal - ranupal@ku.edu; Alexander S Garrett - asg@stowers- institute.org; Rogelio Braceras - rbraceras@dsus.com; Xue...

  11. Advanced biochemical processes for geothermal brines FY 1998 annual operating plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As part of the overall Geothermal Energy Research which is aimed at the development of economical geothermal resources production systems, the aim of the Advanced Biochemical Processes for Geothermal Brines (ABPGB) effort is the development of economic and environmentally acceptable methods for disposal of geothermal wastes and conversion of by-products to useful forms. Methods are being developed for dissolution, separation and immobilization of geothermal wastes suitable for disposal, usable in inert construction materials, suitable for reinjection into the reservoir formation, or used for recovery of valuable metals.

  12. Biochemical Conversion Pilot Plant (Fact Sheet), NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth (AOD)ProductssondeadjustsondeadjustAboutScienceCareers Apply for aCould WorkVehicles,000 mrem SiteBiochemical

  13. Types of Reuse

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The following provides greater detail regarding the types of reuse pursued for LM sites. It should be noted that many actual reuses combine several types of the uses listed below.

  14. Optimization of Enzymatic Biochemical Logic for Noise Reduction and Scalability: How Many Biocomputing Gates Can Be Interconnected in a Circuit?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. Privman; G. Strack; D. Solenov; M. Pita; E. Katz

    2008-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

    We report an experimental evaluation of the "input-output surface" for a biochemical AND gate. The obtained data are modeled within the rate-equation approach, with the aim to map out the gate function and cast it in the language of logic variables appropriate for analysis of Boolean logic for scalability. In order to minimize "analog" noise, we consider a theoretical approach for determining an optimal set for the process parameters to minimize "analog" noise amplification for gate concatenation. We establish that under optimized conditions, presently studied biochemical gates can be concatenated for up to order 10 processing steps. Beyond that, new paradigms for avoiding noise build-up will have to be developed. We offer a general discussion of the ideas and possible future challenges for both experimental and theoretical research for advancing scalable biochemical computing.

  15. Identification of Catalysts and Materials for a High-Energy Density Biochemical Fuel Cell: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-09-345

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ghirardi, M.; Svedruzic, D.

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The proposed research attempted to identify novel biochemical catalysts, catalyst support materials, high-efficiency electron transfer agents between catalyst active sites and electrodes, and solid-phase electrolytes in order to maximize the current density of biochemical fuel cells that utilize various alcohols as substrates.

  16. Rock types, pore types, and hydrocarbon exploration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coalson, E.B.; Hartmann, D.J.; Thomas, J.B.

    1985-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A proposed exploration-oriented method of classifying porosity in sedimentary rocks is based on microscopic examination cores or cuttings. Factors include geometry, size, abundance, and connectivity of the pores. The porosity classification is predictive of key petrophysical characteristics: porosity-permeability relationships, capillary pressures, and (less certainly) relative permeabilities. For instance, intercrystalline macroporosity typically is associated with high permeability for a given porosity, low capillarity, and favorable relative permeabilities. This is found to be true whether this porosity type occurs in a sucrosic dolomite or in a sandstone with pervasive quartz overgrowths. This predictive method was applied in three Rocky Mountain oil plays. Subtle pore throat traps could be recognized in the J sandstone (Cretaceous) in the Denver basin of Colorado by means of porosity permeability plotting. Variations in hydrocarbon productivity from a Teapot Formation (Cretaceous) field in the Powder River basin of Wyoming were related to porosity types and microfacies; the relationships were applied to exploration. Rock and porosity typing in the Red River Formation (Ordovician) reconciled apparent inconsistencies between drill-stem test, log, and mud-log data from a Williston basin wildcat. The well was reevaluated and completed successfully, resulting in a new field discovery. In each of these three examples, petrophysics was fundamental for proper evaluation of wildcat wells and exploration plays.

  17. Biochem. J. (2013) 449, 167173 (Printed in Great Britain) doi:10.1042/BJ20121271 167 Cytosolic [Ca2 +

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Parker, Ian

    Biochem. J. (2013) 449, 167­173 (Printed in Great Britain) doi:10.1042/BJ20121271 167 Cytosolic [Ca* *Department of Neurobiology and Behavior, University of California, Irvine, CA 92697, U.S.A., and Department of Physiology and Biophysics, University of California, Irvine, CA 92697, U.S.A. InsP3-mediated puffs

  18. Micromorphological and (bio)chemical organic matter changes in a formerly cutover peat bog : Le Russey, Jura Mountains, France.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Micromorphological and (bio)chemical organic matter changes in a formerly cutover peat bog : Le. In order to moniter peat reaccumulation and hence long-term carbon sequestration in peatlands which have ([1]). Among these indicators, it has previously been shown that physico-chemical properties of peat

  19. Eur. J. Biochem. 85, 529-534 (1978) X-Ray and Neutron Small-Angle Scattering Studies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eur. J. Biochem. 85, 529-534 (1978) X-Ray and Neutron Small-Angle Scattering Studies of the Complex-ray and neutron scattering techniques. In this work, we concentrated mainly on radius of gyration analyses and a neutron scattering experiment is performed in 21-Iz0 solvent. This decrease simply reflects the fact

  20. 210 Biochemical Society Transactions (2012) Volume 40, part 1 PKA phosphorylation of the small heat-shock

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scott, John D.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    210 Biochemical Society Transactions (2012) Volume 40, part 1 PKA phosphorylation of the small heat The small heat-shock protein Hsp20 (heat-shock protein 20), also known as HspB6, has been shown to protect infarcts, and improved recovery of contractile performance during the reperfusion phase, compared with wild

  1. Molecular structure and biochemical properties of lignins in relation to possible self-organization of lignin networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Molecular structure and biochemical properties of lignins in relation to possible self-organization of lignin networks B. Monties Laboratoire de Chimie Biologique, INRA (CBAI), Institut National Agronomique recalls chemical data related to the variations in the molecular structure of lignin and mainly discusses

  2. Typed Self-Optimization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown, Matt

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    type T y[O]. The operator IsIs is self-applicative, in thatargument t is any of Is[O] or IsIs, and otherwise behavesproof constant introduced by IsIs proves that the type of t

  3. Direct application of west coast geothermal resources in a wet corn milling plant supplementary analyses and information dissemination. Final report, addendum

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1982-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

    In an extension to the scope of the previous studies, supplementary analyses were to be performed for both plants which would assess the economics of geothermal energy if coal had been the primary fuel rather than oil and gas. The studies include: supplementary analysis for a coal fired wet corn milling plant, supplementary analysis for an East Coast frozen food plant with coal fired boilers, and information dissemination activities.

  4. Evaluation of lysine deficient grower diets for heavy breed replacement pullets and a comparison of sorghum grains and corn as a carbohydrate source for broiler-breeder hens

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tolan, Alan

    1967-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    EVALUATION OF LYSINE DEFICIENT GROWER DIETS FOR HEAVY BREED REPLACEMENT PULLETS AND A COMPARISON OF SORGHUM GRAINS AND CORN AS A CARBOHYDRATE SOURCE FOR BROILER-BREEDER HENS A Thesis ALAN TOLAN Submitted to the Graduate College of the Texas... ARM University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE January 1967 Major Subject: Animal Nutrition EVALUATION OF LYSINE DEFICIENT GROWER DIETS FOR HEAVY BREED REPLACEMENT PULLETS AND A COMPARISON OF SORGHUM...

  5. Document Type: Subject Terms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Major, Arkady

    Title: Authors: Source: Document Type: Subject Terms: Abstract: Full Text Word Count: ISSN at creating team results. In fact, it's priceless. Managers in Western corporations have received a lifetime

  6. Monolithic piezoelectric sensor (MPS) for sensing chemical, biochemical and physical measurands

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Andle, Jeffrey C. (Bangor, ME); Lec, Ryszard M. (Orono, ME)

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A piezoelectric sensor and assembly for measuring chemical, biochemical and physical measurands is disclosed. The piezoelectric sensor comprises a piezoelectric material, preferably a crystal, a common metal layer attached to the top surface of the piezoelectric crystal, and a pair of independent resonators placed in close proximity on the piezoelectric crystal such that an efficacious portion of acoustic energy couples between the resonators. The first independent resonator serves as an input port through which an input signal is converted into mechanical energy within the sensor and the second independent resonator serves an output port through which a filtered replica of the input signal is detected as an electrical signal. Both a time delay and an attenuation at a given frequency between the input signal and the filtered replica may be measured as a sensor output. The sensor may be integrated into an assembly with a series feedback oscillator and a radio frequency amplifier to process the desired sensor output. In the preferred embodiment of the invention, a selective film is disposed upon the grounded metal layer of the sensor and the resonators are encapsulated to isolate them from the measuring environment. In an alternative embodiment of the invention, more than two resonators are used in order to increase the resolution of the sensor.

  7. Application of Biochemical and Physiological Indicators for Assessing Recovery of Fish Populations in a Disturbed Stream

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adams, Marshall [ORNL; Ham, Kenneth [ORNL

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Recovery dynamics in a previously disturbed streamwere investigated to determine the influence of a series of remedial actions on stream recovery and to evaluate the potential application of bioindicators as an environmental management tool. A suite of bioindicators, representing five different functional response groups, were measured annually for a sentinel fish species over a 15 year period during which a variety of remedial and pollution abatement actions were implemented. Trends in biochemical, physiological, condition, growth, bioenergetic, and nutritional responses demonstrated that the health status of a sentinel fish species in the disturbed stream approached that of fish in the reference stream by the end of the study. Two major remedial actions, dechlorination and water flow management, had large effects on stream recovery resulting in an improvement in the bioenergetic, disease, nutritional, and organ condition status of the sentinel fish species. A subset of bioindicators responded rather dramatically to temporal trends affecting all sites, but some indicators showed little response to disturbance or to restoration activities. In assessing recovery of aquatic systems, application of appropriate integrative structural indices along with a variety of sensitive functional bioindicators should be used to understand the mechanistic basis of stress and recovery and to reduce the risk of false positives. Understanding the mechanistic processes involved between stressors, stress responses of biota, and the recovery dynamics of aquatic systems reduces the uncertainty involved in environmental management and regulatory decisions resulting in an increased ability to predict the consequences of restoration and remedial actions for aquatic systems.

  8. Application of Biochemical and Physiological Indicators for Assessing Recovery of Fish Populations in a Disturbed Stream

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adams, S. M.; Ham, Kenneth D.

    2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Recovery dynamics in a previously disturbed streamwere investigated to determine the influence of a series of remedial actions on stream recovery and to evaluate the potential application of bioindicators as an environmental management tool. A suite of bioindicators, representing five different functional response groups, were measured annually for a sentinel fish species over a 15 year period during which a variety of remedial and pollution abatement actions were implemented. Trends in biochemical, physiological, condition, growth, bioenergetic, and nutritional responses demonstrated that the health status of a sentinel fish species in the disturbed stream approached that of fish in the reference stream by the end of the study. Two major remedial actions, dechlorination and water flow management, had large effects on stream recovery resulting in an improvement in the bioenergetic, disease, nutritional, and organ condition status of the sentinel fish species. A subset of bioindicators responded rather dramatically to temporal trends affecting all sites, but some indicators showed little response to disturbance or to restoration activities. In assessing recovery of aquatic systems, application of appropriate integrative structural indices along with a variety of sensitive functional bioindicators should be used to understand the mechanistic basis of stress and recovery and to reduce the risk of false positives. Understanding the mechanistic processes involved between stressors, stress responses of biota, and the recovery dynamics of aquatic systems reduces the uncertainty involved in environmental management and regulatory decisions resulting in an increased ability to predict the consequences of restoration and remedial actions for aquatic systems.

  9. Structural and Biochemical Investigations of the Mechanism of Heme Capture by the Hemophore HasAp from Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lagat, Grace Jepkorir

    2011-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

    (loops). 310-helices, reflecting a gain in secondary structure elements are colored purple (Fig. B and C). ?5* and ?7* (Fig C and D) are new hairpin loops xxii resulting from loss of corresponding beta sheet character. Missing electron density...STRUCTURAL AND BIOCHEMICAL INVESTIGATIONS OF THE MECHANISM OF HEME CAPTURE BY THE HEMOPHORE HasAp SECRETED BY PSEUDOMONAS AERUGINOSA BY GRACE JEPKORIR LAGAT B.Ed. (Sci.), Kenyatta University, 1999 Nairobi, Kenya M.Ed. (Adm.), University...

  10. Circulating peroxiredoxin 4 and type 2 diabetes risk: the Prevention of Renal and Vascular Endstage Disease (PREVEND) study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abbasi, Ali; Corpeleijn, Eva; Gansevoort, Ron T.; Gans, Rijk O. B.; Struck, Joachim; Schulte, Janin; Hillege, Hans L.; van der Harst, Pim; Stolk, Ronald P.; Navis, Gerjan; Bakker, Stephan J. L.

    2014-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

    A, Corpeleijn E, Postmus D et al (2011) Plasma procalcitonin and risk of type 2 diabetes in the general population. Diabetologia 54: 2463–2465 21. Noble D, Mathur R, Dent T, Meads C, Greenhalgh T (2011) Risk models and scores for type 2 diabetes... (2006) Reactive oxygen species have a causal role in multiple forms of insulin resistance. Nature 440: 944–948 34. Wood ZA, Schroder E, Robin Harris J, Poole LB (2003) Structure, mechanism and regulation of peroxiredoxins. Trends Biochem Sci 28:32–40 35...

  11. High-Dose-Rate Brachytherapy Alone for Localized Prostate Cancer in Patients at Moderate or High Risk of Biochemical Recurrence

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hoskin, Peter [Cancer Centre, Mount Vernon Hospital, Northwood, Middlesex (United Kingdom); Rojas, Ana, E-mail: arc03@btconnect.com [Cancer Centre, Mount Vernon Hospital, Northwood, Middlesex (United Kingdom); Lowe, Gerry; Bryant, Linda; Ostler, Peter; Hughes, Rob; Milner, Jessica; Cladd, Helen [Cancer Centre, Mount Vernon Hospital, Northwood, Middlesex (United Kingdom)

    2012-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To evaluate genitourinary (GU) and gastrointestinal (GI) morbidity and biochemical control of disease in patients with localized prostate adenocarcinoma treated with escalating doses per fraction of high-dose rate brachytherapy alone. Methods and Materials: A total of 197 patients were treated with 34 Gy in four fractions, 36 Gy in four fractions, 31.5 Gy in three fractions, or 26 Gy in two fractions. Median follow-up times were 60, 54, 36, and 6 months, respectively. Results: Incidence of early Grade {>=} 3 GU morbidity was 3% to 7%, and Grade 4 was 0% to 4%. During the first 12 weeks, the highest mean International Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS) value was 14, and between 6 months and 5 years it was 8. Grade 3 or 4 early GI morbidity was not observed. The 3-year actuarial rate of Grade 3 GU was 3% to 16%, and was 3% to 7% for strictures requiring surgery (4-year rate). An incidence of 1% Grade 3 GI events was seen at 3 years. Late Grade 4 GU or GI events were not observed. At 3 years, 99% of patients with intermediate-risk and 91% with high-risk disease were free of biochemical relapse (log-rank p = 0.02). Conclusions: There was no significant difference in urinary and rectal morbidity between schedules. Biochemical control of disease in patients with intermediate and high risk of relapse was good.

  12. Effect of process variables on the density and durability of the pellets made from high moisture corn stover

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jaya Shankar Tumuluru

    2014-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A flat die pellet mill was used to understand the effect of high levels of feedstock moisture content in the range of 28–38% (w.b.), with die rotational speeds of 40–60 Hz, and preheating temperatures of 30–110 °C on the pelleting characteristics of 4.8 mm screen size ground corn stover using an 8 mm pellet die. The physical properties of the pelletised biomass studied are: (a) pellet moisture content, (b) unit, bulk and tapped density, and (c) durability. Pelletisation experiments were conducted based on central composite design. Analysis of variance (ANOVA) indicated that feedstock moisture content influenced all of the physical properties at P < 0.001. Pellet moisture content decreased with increase in preheating temperature to about 110 °C and decreasing the feedstock moisture content to about 28% (w.b.). Response surface models developed for quality attributes with respect to process variables has adequately described the process with coefficient of determination (R2) values of >0.88. The other pellet quality attributes such as unit, bulk, tapped density, were maximised at feedstock moisture content of 30–33% (w.b.), die speeds of >50 Hz and preheating temperature of >90 °C. In case of durability a medium moisture content of 33–34% (w.b.) and preheating temperatures of >70 °C and higher die speeds >50 Hz resulted in high durable pellets. It can be concluded from the present study that feedstock moisture content, followed by preheating, and die rotational speed are the interacting process variables influencing pellet moisture content, unit, bulk and tapped density and durability.

  13. Biochemical characterization of purified OmcS, a c-type cytochrome required for insoluble Fe(III) reduction in Geobacter sulfurreducens

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lovley, Derek

    . A ten-fold faster reaction rate with anthraquinone-2,6-disulfonate (AQDS) (25.2 s- 1 ) was observed

  14. Hierarchical graphs for better annotations of rule-based models of biochemical systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hu, Bin [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Hlavacek, William [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the graph-based formalism of the BioNetGen language (BNGL), graphs are used to represent molecules, with a colored vertex representing a component of a molecule, a vertex label representing the internal state of a component, and an edge representing a bond between components. Components of a molecule share the same color. Furthermore, graph-rewriting rules are used to represent molecular interactions, with a rule that specifies addition (removal) of an edge representing a class of association (dissociation) reactions and with a rule that specifies a change of vertex label representing a class of reactions that affect the internal state of a molecular component. A set of rules comprises a mathematical/computational model that can be used to determine, through various means, the system-level dynamics of molecular interactions in a biochemical system. Here, for purposes of model annotation, we propose an extension of BNGL that involves the use of hierarchical graphs to represent (1) relationships among components and subcomponents of molecules and (2) relationships among classes of reactions defined by rules. We illustrate how hierarchical graphs can be used to naturally document the structural organization of the functional components and subcomponents of two proteins: the protein tyrosine kinase Lck and the T cell receptor (TCR)/CD3 complex. Likewise, we illustrate how hierarchical graphs can be used to document the similarity of two related rules for kinase-catalyzed phosphorylation of a protein substrate. We also demonstrate how a hierarchical graph representing a protein can be encoded in an XML-based format.

  15. Molecular and biochemical characterization of the jasmonic acid methyltransferase gene from black cottonwood (Populus trichocarpa)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhao, Nan [ORNL; Yao, Jianzhuang [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Chaiprasongsuk, Minta [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Li, Guanglin [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Guan, Ju [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Tschaplinski, Timothy J [ORNL; Guo, Hong [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Chen, Feng [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK)

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Methyl jasmonate is a metabolite known to be produced by many plants and has roles in diverse biological processes. It is biosynthesized by the action of S-adenosyl-L-methionine:jasmonic acid carboxyl methyltransferase (JMT), which belongs to the SABATH family of methyltransferases. Herein is reported the isolation and biochemical characterization of a JMT gene from black cottonwood (Populus trichocarpa). The genome of P. trichocarpa contains 28 SABATH genes (PtSABATH1 to PtSABATH28). Recombinant PtSABATH3 expressed in Escherichia coli showed the highest level of activity with jasmonic acid (JA) among carboxylic acids tested. It was therefore renamed PtJMT1. PtJMT1 also displayed activity with benzoic acid (BA), with which the activity was about 22% of that with JA. PtSABATH2 and PtSABATH4 were most similar to PtJMT1 among all PtSABATHs. However, neither of them had activity with JA. The apparent Km values of PtJMT1 using JA and BA as substrate were 175 lM and 341 lM, respectively. Mutation of Ser-153 and Asn-361, two residues in the active site of PtJMT1, to Tyr and Ser respectively, led to higher specific activity with BA than with JA. Homology-based structural modeling indicated that substrate alignment, in which Asn-361 is involved, plays a role in determining the substrate specificity of PtJMT1. In the leaves of young seedlings of black cottonwood, the expression of PtJMT1 was induced by plant defense signal molecules methyl jasmonate and salicylic acid and a fungal elicitor alamethicin, suggesting that PtJMT1 may have a role in plant defense against biotic stresses. Phylogenetic analysis suggests that PtJMT1 shares a common ancestor with the Arabidopsis JMT, and functional divergence of these two apparent JMT orthologs has occurred since the split of poplar and Arabidopsis lineages.

  16. Structural and Biochemical Determinants of Ligand Binding by the c-di-GMP Riboswitch

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, K.; Lipchock, S; Livingston,; Shanahan, C; Strobel, S

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The bacterial second messenger c-di-GMP is used in many species to control essential processes that allow the organism to adapt to its environment. The c-di-GMP riboswitch (GEMM) is an important downstream target in this signaling pathway and alters gene expression in response to changing concentrations of c-di-GMP. The riboswitch selectively recognizes its second messenger ligand primarily through contacts with two critical nucleotides. However, these two nucleotides are not the most highly conserved residues within the riboswitch sequence. Instead, nucleotides that stack with c-di-GMP and that form tertiary RNA contacts are the most invariant. Biochemical and structural evidence reveals that the most common natural variants are able to make alternative pairing interactions with both guanine bases of the ligand. Additionally, a high-resolution (2.3 {angstrom}) crystal structure of the native complex reveals that a single metal coordinates the c-di-GMP backbone. Evidence is also provided that after transcription of the first nucleotide on the 3{prime}-side of the P1 helix, which is predicted to be the molecular switch, the aptamer is functional for ligand binding. Although large energetic effects occur when several residues in the RNA are altered, mutations at the most conserved positions, rather than at positions that base pair with c-di-GMP, have the most detrimental effects on binding. Many mutants retain sufficient c-di-GMP affinity for the RNA to remain biologically relevant, which suggests that this motif is quite resilient to mutation.

  17. Development of Advanced CdTe Solar Cells Based on High Temperature Corning Glass Substrates: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-10-373

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barnes, T.

    2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    NREL has developed advanced processes for CdTe solar cells, but because of the temperature limitations of conventional soda lime glass, many of these processes have not been transferred to manufacturing. Corning is developing high temperature substrate glasses that are believed to be manufacturable and will lead to lower $/watt modules costs. The purpose of this CRADA is to evaluate these glasses in the advanced NREL processes. In addition, the CRADA seeks to develop manufacturable processes for transparent conductive oxide layers based on cadmium stannate.

  18. Owens Corning and Silicon Valley Power Partner to Make Energy Savings a Reality, Save Energy Now (SEN), Industrial Technologies Program (ITP), Utility Case Study (Brochure)

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion | Department ofT ib l L d F SSales LLCDieselEnergy Joining|ActionOWENS CORNING

  19. Dust around Type Ia supernovae

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Lifan

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Dust around Type Ia supernovae Lifan Wang 1,2 LawrenceIa. Subject headings: Supernovae: General, Dust, Extinctionline) bands for Type Ia supernovae. (a), upper panel, shows

  20. Wolter type i LAMAR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Catura, R.C.; Joki, E.G.

    1981-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Observational objectives for the LAMAR and their influence on the instrument design are discussed. It is concluded that the most important design parameter is the angular resolution of the LAMAR modules since it so strongly influences sensitivity, optical identifications, source confusion, spectral resolution for objective gratings and the ability to resolve small extended sources. A high resolution Wolter Type I LAMAR module is described, its hardware status discussed, and the performance of a LAMAR observatory presented. A promising technique for enhancing the reflectivity of Wolter Type I X-ray optics in a selected bandpass at high energy has been investigated and the performance of the LAMAR module, utilizing this method, has been calculated.

  1. Definitions: Types of Commissioning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martinez, J. T.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Workshop on the Continuous Commissioningź Process Joseph T. Martinez, PCC Carlos Yagua, PE Hiroko Masuda, Juan-Carlos Baltazar, PhD, PE Ahmet Ugursal, PhD Clean Air Through Energy Efficiency (CATEE) Conference, Dallas, Texas. November 18, 2014... 5. Continuous Commissioning Measures 6. Measurement and Verification ESL-KT-14-11-41 CATEE 2014: Clean Air Through Efficiency Conference, Dallas, Texas Nov. 18-20 Definitions: Types of Commissioning Joseph T. Martinez, PCC Carlos Yagua, PE Hiroko...

  2. Forecast Technical Document Forecast Types

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Forecast Technical Document Forecast Types A document describing how different forecast types are implemented in the 2011 Production Forecast system. Tom Jenkins Robert Matthews Ewan Mackie Lesley Halsall #12;PF2011 ­ Forecast Types Background Different `types' of forecast are possible for a specified area

  3. A multicenter study demonstrating discordant results from electronic prostate-specific antigen biochemical failure calculation systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Williams, Scott G. [Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre and University of Melbourne, Melbourne (Australia)]. E-mail: scott.williams@petermac.org; Pickles, Tom [British Columbia Cancer Agency, Vancouver, BC (Canada); Kestin, Larry [William Beaumont Hospital, Royal Oak, MI (United States); Potters, Louis [New York Prostate Institute, South Nassau Communities Hospital, Oceanside, NY (United States); Fearn, Paul [New York Prostate Institute, South Nassau Communities Hospital, Oceanside, NY (United States); Smith, Ryan [William Buckland Radiotherapy Centre, The Alfred Hospital, Melbourne (Australia); Pratt, Gary [Division of Oncology, Royal Brisbane Hospital, Brisbane (Australia)

    2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To evaluate the interobserver variation of four electronic biochemical failure (bF) calculators using three bF definitions. Methods and Materials: The data of 1200 men were analyzed using the electronic bF calculators of four institutions. Three bF definitions were examined for their concordance of bF identification across the centers: the American Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology consensus definition (ACD), the lowest prostate-specific antigen (PSA) level to date plus 2 ng/mL (L2), and a threshold of 3 ng/mL (T3). Results: Unanimous agreement regarding bF status using the ACD, L2, and T3 definitions occurred in 87.3%, 96.4%, and 92.7% of cases, respectively. Using the ACD, 63% of the variation was from one institution, which allowed the bF status to be reversed if a PSA decline was seen after bF (PSA 'bounce'). A total of 270 men had an ACD bF time variation of >2 months across the calculators, and the 5-year freedom from bF rate was 49.8-60.9%. The L2 definition had a 20.5% rate of calculated bF times; which varied by >2 months (median, 6.4; range, 2.1-75.6) and a corresponding 5-year freedom from bF rate of 55.9-61.0%. The T3 definition had a 2.0% range in the 5-year freedom from bF. Fifteen definition interpretation variations were identified. Conclusion: Reported bF results vary not only because of bF definition differences, but because of variations in how those definitions are written into computer-based calculators, with multiple interpretations most prevalent for the ACD. An algorithm to avoid misinterpretations is proposed for the L2 definition. A verification system to guarantee consistent electronic bF results requires development.

  4. Eur. J. Biochem. 234, 766-772 (1995) 0 FEBS 1995

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    catalyse the reduction of niirate with artificial electron donors such as benzyl viologen, so that it is suitable for studying the transfer of electrons between these two types of redox centre. To examine whether the electrons from reduced benzyl viologen are initially delivered to the Fe-S centres, or directly

  5. Southern corn rootworm control

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wipprecht, Read

    1952-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    in all tbe plots ssjcing reylaccting neoesssrN, Expericent No, 4. vas a dupjisate of lbrperisant No, 1 aud vas oondust ed aa Nurleson else ~ soL1 and ad)aoent to Rq?raiment N'o, 2, Cbcs occrn rootsorm damaged plant vas found in a obeob plcct, R... Vg 0 7$ 0 74 0 7& 0 0 0 0 93 0 0 92 0 90 0 90 0 88 0 88 0 95 0 0 0 0 0 3 2 78 73 Vg 75 XETAIL OF TABES 1 Kxyer %naacp Ro RHLLKIS OF VARIA5CE 30, 00 33, 21 0 00 0~00 10, 00 14~ 5 V5 33, %j K, 9Q 27 A +36 ~65 RC $2 35~4~ 365T...

  6. Cotton and Corn Experiments.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pittuck, B. C.

    1897-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the different characteristics, if any, of the entiTe :field: Soil Plot. No.- 1. 3. I 5. 7. 9. 11. 13. 15. 17. 20. 25. 26. ------------------ ---- Silica and Sand ..... 94.39 94.28 94.4 94.62 94.11 95.15 94.63 94.06 93.65 94.81 94.07 93.85 Water-air dry....89 38.89 42.45 44.84 41.06 55.01 Diameter-Sand. Between .05 and 0.01 mm. 10.71 6. 87 4. 70 5. 37 8. 40 8. 44 6. 71 10.01 14. 93 3. 78 8. 57 13.18 6. 61 5.06 3. 74 3. 59 15.23 8. 62 14.22 9. 26 2. 76 4. 99 3. 98 5. 87 6. 32 10.02 Diameter-Silt. ? Below...

  7. Corn Hybrids for Texas.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bockholt, A. J.; Collier, J. W.

    1960-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Loams and sandy loams Sandy soils Coast Prairie Blackland Loams and sandy loams Blackland Prairies Blackland Mixed land Grand Prairie Blackland Mixed land West Cross Timbers Rio Grande Plain Blackland Sands and sandy loams Lower Rio Grande... Valley and Winter Garden Dist. (under irrigation) Clays and loams Sands and sandy loams Rolling Plains Clay loams Sands and sandy loams High Plains (irrigated) Clay loams Sandy loams Sands Spac- Fertilizer dress- I " ing at ing of Planting...

  8. BETO Webinar: Computational Studies of Lignocellulose Deconstruction...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Process Design and Economics for Biochemical Conversion of Lignocellulosic Biomass to Ethanol: Dilute-Acid Pretreatment and Enzymatic Hydrolysis of Corn Stover Home About the...

  9. Mechanism design with approximate types

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhu, Zeyuan Allen

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In mechanism design, we replace the strong assumption that each player knows his own payoff type exactly with the more realistic assumption that he knows it only approximately: each player i only knows that his true type ...

  10. Types of Farming in Texas.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bonnen, C. A.

    1960-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    .......... .......-.----------------------. 8 Labor -..-.....-----...------------------------------------------------. 9 Land Tenure .--.----....---....--------------------------------- 9 Number and Size of Farms ....----...----.-._--------- 10 Capital... -------------...-------.---------------------------- 21 Hogs -......-....--------------------------------------------------- 22 Poultry .-.---.-.....--.-..------.---------------------------------- 22 Horses and Mules ---..-....---..--..------------------------ 23 Types of Farming and Type-of-farming...

  11. CODE MINOR NAME TYPE ACCT Accounting MINOR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    FernĂĄndez-Juricic, Esteban

    Accounting/MIS MINOR ACOP Accounting/Op Mgmt MINOR ACST Acoustical Engineering CONC AERE Aeronautical/Avionics Tech MINOR ATRE Aircraft Recipr Engine Tec MINOR ATET Aircraft Turbine Eng Tech MINOR AIRL Airline Engineering CONC BEHV Behavior/Well-Being MINOR/CONC BCHM Biochemistry CONC BCHN Biochem-Molecular Biology

  12. Tornado type wind turbines

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hsu, Cheng-Ting (Ames, IA)

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A tornado type wind turbine has a vertically disposed wind collecting tower with spaced apart inner and outer walls and a central bore. The upper end of the tower is open while the lower end of the structure is in communication with a wind intake chamber. An opening in the wind chamber is positioned over a turbine which is in driving communication with an electrical generator. An opening between the inner and outer walls at the lower end of the tower permits radially flowing air to enter the space between the inner and outer walls while a vertically disposed opening in the wind collecting tower permits tangentially flowing air to enter the central bore. A porous portion of the inner wall permits the radially flowing air to interact with the tangentially flowing air so as to create an intensified vortex flow which exits out of the top opening of the tower so as to create a low pressure core and thus draw air through the opening of the wind intake chamber so as to drive the turbine.

  13. Corn steep liquor and fermented ammoniated condensed whey as protein sources for lactating cows and yearling heifers grazing winter native range

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wagner, J.J.; Lusby, K.S.; Horn, G.W.; Dvorak, M.J.

    1982-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Corn steep liquor (CSL) and fermented ammoniated condensed whey (FACW) were compared to cottonseed meal (CSM) as protein sources for wintering 61 lactating first-calf Hereford heifers and 32 yearling Hereford heifers on native range. Cattle were allotted by weight and individually fed 6 days per week for 12 weeks one of four protein treatments: negative control (NC), positive control (PC), CSL and FACW to provide .7, 1.5, .15 and 1.5 lb crude protein (CP) per day, respectively, to the lacating heifers and .2, .4, .4 and .4lb cP per day, respectively, to the yearling heifers. CMS was supplied in the CSL and FACW treatments at the same level as in the negative control. Lactating heifers fed the NC lost more (P less than .005) weight and body condition (120 lb and 1.6 units) than those fed the PC (45.8 lb and .9 units). Weight and condition losses were similar (P more than .05) for lactating heifers fed PC, CSL and FACW. Yearling heifers fed the NC lost more (P less than .005) weight than those fed the PC (49.4 vs 10.6 lb). Yearling heifers fed CSL and FACW gained more (P less than .005) weight than those fed the PC (17.6 and 9.3 vs - 10.6 lb). Feeding CSL resulted in signficantly lower rumen pH, lower ruminal acetate and higher ruminal butyrate, isovalerate and caproate levels than did feeding either control. Supplementing with FACW produced significantly lower rumen pH, higher rumen ammonia and soluble carbohydrate levels, lower ruminal acetate, and higher ruminal propionate and butyrate concentrations than did either control supplement. Corn steep liquor and FDCW appear to be effective protein sources for cows and heifers grazing winter native range.

  14. On the asymptotic homotopy type of inductive limit Type ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    In this note we exhibit large classes of (projeetionless) stable, nuclear C*- algebras whose asymptotic homotopy type is determined by K-theoretical data.

  15. Soft Typing PHP Patrick Camphuijsen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Utrecht, Universiteit

    Soft Typing PHP Patrick Camphuijsen Jurriaan Hage Stefan Holdermans Technical Report UU-CS-2009.O. Box 80.089 3508 TB Utrecht The Netherlands #12;Soft Typing PHP with PHP-validator Patrick Camphuijsen@cs.uu.nl Abstract PHP is a popular language for building websites, but also notori- ously lax in that almost every

  16. Cofinal types of directed orders

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MĂĄtrai, TamĂĄs

    , ) directed partial orders #12;Cofinal types (P, ), (Q, ) directed partial orders Tukey reducibility: (P orders Tukey reducibility: (P, ) T (Q, ) if f : P Q X P unbounded = f [X] Q unbounded g : Q P Y Q cofinal = g[Y ] P cofinal #12;Cofinal types (P, ), (Q, ) directed partial orders Tukey reducibility: (P

  17. New approaches for modeling type Ia supernovae

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zingale, Michael; Almgren, Ann S.; Bell, John B.; Day, Marcus S.; Rendleman, Charles A.; Woosley, Stan

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    runaway in Type Ia supernovae: How to run away? oIgnition in Type Ia Supernovae. II. A Three- dimensionalnumber modeling of type Ia supernovae. I. hydrodynamics.

  18. The effects of calcitic and dolomitic limestone rates and particle sizes on soil chemical changes, plant nutrient concentration, and yields of corn and Coastal bermudagrass on two acid Texas soils

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haby, Vincent A

    1969-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    soil pH and in decreasing soil acidity with depth under heavy applications of residual acid forming N fertilizer, even after a seven year reaction period. Meyer and Volk (38) reported that calcitic limestone was slightly more effective than...THE EFFECTS OF CALCITIC AND DOLOMITIC LIMESTO11E RATES AND PARTICLE SIZES ON SOIL CHEMICAL CHANGES, PLANT NUTRIE. "1T CONCENTRATION, AND YIELDS OF CORN AND COASTAL BERMUDAGPXSS ON TWO ACID TEXAS SOILS A Thesis by VINCENT ANDREW HABY Submitted...

  19. Regular Type III and Type N Approximate Solutions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Philip Downes; Paul MacAllevey; Bogdan Nita; Ivor Robinson

    2001-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

    New type III and type N approximate solutions which are regular in the linear approximation are shown to exist. For that, we use complex transformations on self-dual Robinson-Trautman metrics rather then the classical approach. The regularity criterion is the boundedness and vanishing at infinity of a scalar obtained by saturating the Bel-Robinson tensor of the first approximation by a time-like vector which is constant with respect to the zeroth approximation.

  20. P-type gallium nitride

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rubin, M.; Newman, N.; Fu, T.; Ross, J.; Chan, J.

    1997-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Several methods have been found to make p-type gallium nitride. P-type gallium nitride has long been sought for electronic devices. N-type gallium nitride is readily available. Discovery of p-type gallium nitride and the methods for making it will enable its use in ultraviolet and blue light-emitting diodes and lasers. pGaN will further enable blue photocathode elements to be made. Molecular beam epitaxy on substrates held at the proper temperatures, assisted by a nitrogen beam of the proper energy produced several types of p-type GaN with hole concentrations of about 5{times}10{sup 11} /cm{sup 3} and hole mobilities of about 500 cm{sup 2} /V-sec, measured at 250 K. P-type GaN can be formed of unintentionally-doped material or can be doped with magnesium by diffusion, ion implantation, or co-evaporation. When applicable, the nitrogen can be substituted with other group III elements such as Al. 9 figs.

  1. P-type gallium nitride

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rubin, Michael (Berkeley, CA); Newman, Nathan (Montara, CA); Fu, Tracy (Berkeley, CA); Ross, Jennifer (Pleasanton, CA); Chan, James (Berkeley, CA)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Several methods have been found to make p-type gallium nitride. P-type gallium nitride has long been sought for electronic devices. N-type gallium nitride is readily available. Discovery of p-type gallium nitride and the methods for making it will enable its use in ultraviolet and blue light-emitting diodes and lasers. pGaN will further enable blue photocathode elements to be made. Molecular beam epitaxy on substrates held at the proper temperatures, assisted by a nitrogen beam of the proper energy produced several types of p-type GaN with hole concentrations of about 5.times.10.sup.11 /cm.sup.3 and hole mobilities of about 500 cm.sup.2 /V-sec, measured at 250.degree. K. P-type GaN can be formed of unintentionally-doped material or can be doped with magnesium by diffusion, ion implantation, or co-evaporation. When applicable, the nitrogen can be substituted with other group III elements such as Al.

  2. Oculocutaneous albinism type 1A: A case report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Karaman, Ali

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    diseases:mutation of tyrosinase or Tyrp1 can affect thebase insertion in the tyrosinase gene.Biochem Biophys Resa cDNA clone for human tyrosinase that maps at the mouse c-

  3. Structure and Biochemical Properties of PRL-1, a Phosphatase Implicated in Cell Growth, Differentiation, and Tumor Invasion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sun,J.; Wang, W.; Yang, H.; Liu, S.; Liang, F.; Fedorov, A.; Almo, S.; Zhang, Z.

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The PRL (phosphatase of regenerating liver) phosphatases constitute a novel class of small, prenylated phosphatases that are implicated in promoting cell growth, differentiation, and tumor invasion, and represent attractive targets for anticancer therapy. Here we describe the crystal structures of native PRL-1 as well as the catalytically inactive mutant PRL-1/C104S in complex with sulfate. PRL-1 exists as a trimer in the crystalline state, burying 1140 Angstroms{sup 2} of accessible surface area at each dimer interface. Trimerization creates a large, bipartite membrane-binding surface in which the exposed C-terminal basic residues could cooperate with the adjacent prenylation group to anchor PRL-1 on the acidic inner membrane. Structural and kinetic analyses place PRL-1 in the family of dual specificity phosphatases with closest structural similarity to the Cdc14 phosphatase and provide a molecular basis for catalytic activation of the PRL phosphatases. Finally, native PRL-1 is crystallized in an oxidized form in which a disulfide is formed between the active site Cys104 and a neighboring residue Cys49, which blocks both substrate binding and catalysis. Biochemical studies in solution and in the cell support a potential regulatory role of this intramolecular disulfide bond formation in response to reactive oxygen species such as H{sub 2}O{sub 2}.

  4. Requirements for Foreign National Payments Type of Payment Visa Type

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wolpert, Robert L

    8233 36% 36% Royalty* NA NA NA NA Yes NA* No Yes W8BEN Varies 1. The visa types listed are the most related to the field of study on the I-20. 10. For Royalty payments the visa doc is not needed when

  5. 15-Year biochemical relapse free survival in clinical Stage T1-T3 prostate cancer following combined external beam radiotherapy and brachytherapy; Seattle experience

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sylvester, John E. [Seattle Prostate Institute, Seattle, WA (United States)]. E-mail: johnsylvester@seattleprostate.com; Grimm, Peter D. [Seattle Prostate Institute, Seattle, WA (United States); Blasko, John C. [Seattle Prostate Institute, Seattle, WA (United States); Millar, Jeremy [Department Radiation Oncology, William Buckland Radiotherapy Centre, Melbourne (Australia); Orio, Peter F. [Department Radiation Oncology, University of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States); Skoglund, Scott [Seattle Prostate Institute, Seattle, WA (United States); Galbreath, Robert W. [Schiffler Cancer Center and Wheeling Jesuit University, Wheeling, WV (United States); Ohio University Eastern, St. Clairsville, OH (United States); Merrick, Gregory [Schiffler Cancer Center and Wheeling Jesuit University, Wheeling, WV (United States)

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: Long-term biochemical relapse-free survival (BRFS) rates in patients with clinical Stages T1-T3 prostate cancer continue to be scrutinized after treatment with external beam radiation therapy and brachytherapy. Methods and Materials: We report 15-year BRFS rates on 223 patients with clinically localized prostate cancer that were consecutively treated with I{sup 125} or Pd {sup 103} brachytherapy after 45-Gy neoadjuvant EBRT. Multivariate regression analysis was used to create a pretreatment clinical prognostic risk model using a modified American Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology consensus definition (two consecutive serum prostate-specific antigen rises) as the outcome. Gleason scoring was performed by the pathologists at a community hospital. Time to biochemical failure was calculated and compared by using Kaplan-Meier plots. Results: Fifteen-year BRFS for the entire treatment group was 74%. BRFS using the Memorial Sloan-Kettering risk cohort analysis (95% confidence interval): low risk, 88%, intermediate risk 80%, and high risk 53%. Grouping by the risk classification described by D'Amico, the BRFS was: low risk 85.8%, intermediate risk 80.3%, and high risk 67.8% (p = 0.002). Conclusions: I{sup 125} or Pd{sup 103} brachytherapy combined with supplemental EBRT results in excellent 15-year biochemical control. Different risk group classification schemes lead to different BRFS results in the high-risk group cohorts.

  6. Biochem. J. (2009) 420, 221227 (Printed in Great Britain) doi:10.1042/BJ20090110 221 GlcNAcstatins are nanomolar inhibitors of human O-GlcNAcase inducing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Aalten, Daan

    Biochem. J. (2009) 420, 221­227 (Printed in Great Britain) doi:10.1042/BJ20090110 221 GlcA/B (hexosaminidases A/B; CAZY family GH20), genetic inactivation of which has been associated with the Tay

  7. Dark fleshed varieties (Bing type) in regular type, light fleshed varieties (Rainier type) in italics Sweet Cherries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dark fleshed varieties (Bing type) in regular type, light fleshed varieties (Rainier type and Royalton. For more information about these and other varieties, visit our web site at www

  8. Country Scotland Type Single malt

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Izzard, Rob

    Country Scotland Type Single malt Distillery Aberfeldy Region Highlands Age 12 years ABV 40% Cask, the perfume characteristics become more spicy, with a bitter hint of Seville oranges in a decidedly dry finish. Drying citrus/oak with a gentle spiciness, held in a warm embrace of cigar smoke, and a little vanilla

  9. Country Scotland Type Single malt

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Izzard, Rob

    Country Scotland Type Single malt Distillery Jura Region Island Name Prophecy ABV 46 Cask French airport Notes Limited annual release: 10,000 bottles only. Nose Some peat, aniseed, oily, dry, pungent, dried hay, and anise round things out. Palate Smoky and dry, a muscular, powerful Jura with notes

  10. Impact of Ultrahigh Baseline PSA Levels on Biochemical and Clinical Outcomes in Two Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Prostate Clinical Trials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rodrigues, George, E-mail: george.rodrigues@lhsc.on.c [Department of Oncology, University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario (Canada); Bae, Kyounghwa [Department of Statistics, Radiation Therapy Oncology Group, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Roach, Mack [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, California (United States); Lawton, Colleen [Department of Radiation Oncology, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, Wisconsin (United States); Donnelly, Bryan [Department of Surgical Oncology, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta (Canada); Grignon, David [Department of Pathology, Indiana Pathology Institute, Indianapolis, Indiana (United States); Hanks, Gerald [Department of Radiation Oncology, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Porter, Arthur [Department of Oncology, McGill University Health Centre, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Lepor, Herbert [Department of Urology, NY University Langone Medical Center, New York, New York (United States); Sandler, Howard [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, California (United States)

    2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To assess ultrahigh (UH; prostate-specific antigen [PSA]levels {>=}50 ng/ml) patient outcomes by comparison to other high-risk patient outcomes and to identify outcome predictors. Methods and Materials: Prostate cancer patients (PCP) from two Phase III Radiation Therapy Oncology Group clinical trials (studies 9202 and 9413) were divided into two groups: high-risk patients with and without UH baseline PSA levels. Predictive variables included age, Gleason score, clinical T stage, Karnofsky performance score, and treatment arm. Outcomes included overall survival (OS), distant metastasis (DM), and biochemical failure (BF). Unadjusted and adjusted hazard ratios (HRs) were calculated using either the Cox or Fine and Gray's regression model with associated 95% confidence intervals (CI) and p values. Results: There were 401 patients in the UH PSA group and 1,792 patients in the non-UH PSA PCP group of a total of 2,193 high-risk PCP. PCP with UH PSA were found to have inferior OS (HR, 1.19; 95% CI, 1.02-1.39, p = 0.02), DM (HR, 1.51; 95% CI, 1.19-1.92; p = 0.0006), and BF (HR, 1.50; 95% CI, 1.29-1.73; p < 0.0001) compared to other high-risk PCP. In the UH cohort, PSA level was found to be a significant factor for the risk of DM (HR, 1.01; 95% CI, 1.001-1.02) but not OS and BF. Gleason grades of 8 to 10 were found to consistently predict for poor OS, DM, and BF outcomes (with HR estimates ranging from 1.41-2.36) in both the high-risk cohort and the UH cohort multivariable analyses. Conclusions: UH PSA levels at diagnosis are related to detrimental changes in OS, DM, and BF. All three outcomes can be modeled by various combinations of all predictive variables tested.

  11. Performance of incross egg-type pullets as affected by coccidiostats and granite grit during the growing period and varying levels of corn and milo during the laying period

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Malik, Dharam Dev

    1962-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    :Mao~ Rg@cej-. ef Reiel8y ~ m4. ~ ~, -eij ~ ~ ks~ pf ~+@"gle 842ssss p, 'i . . s, ~ s, o ~ s + ~ s a s 2 sf ~Jg04e ~ ' ~ 's' ~ e' ~ ' ~ i. r e + e' a ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ , . 5 ~ Assk~ el ~~ee es lNffsies'e ~e Rseyh?f 8 @lges ~l ~ ~s) 1 ~ 1 ~ ~ II a e ~ P N, * ~ 0... ~ ~ t ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ i * ~ ~ i 0 ~ ggigf'. @ ' . 4$, 85eg~tfk81:, Aqel'jj668 yf Cge Rfflch'0' ik'fee4Log:Vee@W, 5we OC j4JKffII. C5W a%i. +klfte4s Oe Zeee@Q ~'~eights~ fly Cn~Wfieg XAtN4sCK@%''fkg49Q'8tIOCk 's e, 'f ' ~, ~ ' e r", s ~ ' ~, ''e ' ~, ~ 'e "e ~ ' ' f...

  12. Automatic Utterance Type Detection Using Suprasegmental Features 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wright, Helen

    that different types of utterances have different suprasegmental characteristics. The categorisation of these utterance types is based on the theory of conversation games and consists of 12 move types (e.g. reply to a question, wh-question, acknowledgement...

  13. Multiple capillary biochemical analyzer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dovichi, N.J.; Zhang, J.Z.

    1995-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

    A multiple capillary analyzer allows detection of light from multiple capillaries with a reduced number of interfaces through which light must pass in detecting light emitted from a sample being analyzed, using a modified sheath flow cuvette. A linear or rectangular array of capillaries is introduced into a rectangular flow chamber. Sheath fluid draws individual sample streams through the cuvette. The capillaries are closely and evenly spaced and held by a transparent retainer in a fixed position in relation to an optical detection system. Collimated sample excitation radiation is applied simultaneously across the ends of the capillaries in the retainer. Light emitted from the excited sample is detected by the optical detection system. The retainer is provided by a transparent chamber having inward slanting end walls. The capillaries are wedged into the chamber. One sideways dimension of the chamber is equal to the diameter of the capillaries and one end to end dimension varies from, at the top of the chamber, slightly greater than the sum of the diameters of the capillaries to, at the bottom of the chamber, slightly smaller than the sum of the diameters of the capillaries. The optical system utilizes optic fibers to deliver light to individual photodetectors, one for each capillary tube. A filter or wavelength division demultiplexer may be used for isolating fluorescence at particular bands. 21 figs.

  14. Tara Watkins Biochem 218

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    they lack the "clues" provided by template proteins, relying mainly on atomic interactions to predict even Resolution Protein Structure Prediction? 1. Introduction The number of novel proteins discovered each year the discovery of new proteins is certainly exciting, it is difficult to put this new knowledge to use without

  15. Chemical and Biochemical

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neimark, Alexander V.

    carrying out two experi- ments each semester. Graduates find careers at hospitals, nuclear plants, research how plastics, petrochemicals, or certain foods are made? Chemical engineers develop ways of converting to a variety of industries including the chemical and petrochemical fields and the pharmaceutical and biotech

  16. Spatial Data Types: Conceptual Foundation for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    GĂŒting, Ralf Hartmut

    Spatial Data Types: Conceptual Foundation for the Design and Implementation of Spatial Database markus.schneider@fernuni-hagen.de #12;Markus Schneider, Tutorial "Spatial Data Types" 2 Abstract Spatial are usually called spatial data types, such as point, line, and region but also include more complex types

  17. XML Document XML Document Types and Validation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weber, Gregory D.

    XML Document Types and Validation IIM-I340 Objectives XML Document Types and Validation IIM-I340 April, 2010 #12;XML Document Types and Validation IIM-I340 Objectives Learning Objectives Understand: The need for validation Two ways to specify validity: Document Type Definitions (DTDs) XML Schemas #12;XML

  18. hal00270574, Testing Data Types Implementations from

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    is data type abstraction, testing a concrete implementation raises the issue of the gap betweenhal­00270574, version 1 ­ 6 Apr 2008 Testing Data Types Implementations from Algebraic Speci#12.legall@ibisc.univ-evry.fr Abstract. Algebraic speci#12;cations of data types provide a natural basis for testing data types

  19. Wheel-type magnetic refrigerator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Barclay, J.A.

    1983-10-11T23:59:59.000Z

    The disclosure is directed to a wheel-type magnetic refrigerator capable of cooling over a large temperature range. Ferromagnetic or paramagnetic porous materials are layered circumferentially according to their Curie temperature. The innermost layer has the lowest Curie temperature and the outermost layer has the highest Curie temperature. The wheel is rotated through a magnetic field perpendicular to the axis of the wheel and parallel to its direction of rotation. A fluid is pumped through portions of the layers using inner and outer manifolds to achieve refrigeration of a thermal load. 7 figs.

  20. Algorthmique Types abstraits de donns

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brun, Chez Luc

    abstrait de données (TAD) est : 1. un ensemble de données organisé et 2. d'opérations sur ces données. Il appel aux données et aux opérations abstraites du TAD (cou supérieure), 2. suivi d'un choix de représentation du TAD en mémoire (couche inférieure). Types abstraits de donnŽees ­ p.3/90 #12;Décomposition en

  1. Window Types | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion |Energy UsageAUDITVehiclesTankless or Demand-TypeWelcome toFarm Growth Through theofWindow

  2. Modeling the Physical and Biochemical Influence of Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Plant Discharges into their Adjacent Waters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    PAT GRANDELLI, P.E.; GREG ROCHELEAU; JOHN HAMRICK, Ph.D.; MATT CHURCH, Ph.D.; BRIAN POWELL, Ph.D.

    2012-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes the modeling work by Makai Ocean Engineering, Inc. to simulate the biochemical effects of of the nutrient-enhanced seawater plumes that are discharged by one or several 100 megawatt OTEC plants. The modeling is needed to properly design OTEC plants that can operate sustainably with acceptably low biological impact. In order to quantify the effect of discharge configuration and phytoplankton response, Makai Ocean Engineering implemented a biological and physical model for the waters surrounding O`ahu, Hawai`i, using the EPA-approved Environmental Fluid Dynamics Code (EFDC). Each EFDC grid cell was approximately 1 square kilometer by 20 meters deep, and used a time step of three hours. The biological model was set up to simulate the biochemical response for three classes of organisms: Picoplankton (< 2 um) such as prochlorococccus, nanoplankton (2-20 um), and microplankton (> 20 um) e.g., diatoms. The dynamic biological phytoplankton model was calibrated using chemical and biological data collected for the Hawaii Ocean Time Series (HOTS) project. Peer review of the biological modeling was performed. The physical oceanography model uses boundary conditions from a surrounding Hawai'i Regional Ocean Model, (ROM) operated by the University of Hawai`i and the National Atmospheric and Oceanic Administration. The ROM provided tides, basin scale circulation, mesoscale variability, and atmospheric forcing into the edges of the EFDC computational domain. This model is the most accurate and sophisticated Hawai'ian Regional Ocean Model presently available, assimilating real-time oceanographic observations, as well as model calibration based upon temperature, current and salinity data collected during 2010 near the simulated OTEC site. The ROM program manager peer-reviewed Makai's implementation of the ROM output into our EFDC model. The supporting oceanographic data was collected for a Naval Facilities Engineering Command / Makai project. Results: The model was run for a 100 MW OTEC Plant consisting of four separate ducts, discharging a total combined flow rate of 420 m3/s of warm water and 320 m3/s of cold water in a mixed discharge at 70 meters deep. Each duct was assumed to have a discharge port diameter of 10.5m producing a downward discharge velocity of about 2.18 m/s. The natural system, as measured in the HOTS program, has an average concentration of 10-15 mgC/m3. To calibrate the biological model, we first ran the model with no OTEC plant and varied biological parameters until the simulated data was a good match to the HOTS observations. This modeling showed that phytoplankton concentration were patchy and highly dynamic. The patchiness was a good match with the data variability observed within the HOTS data sets. We then ran the model with simulated OTEC intake and discharge flows and associated nutrients. Directly under the OTEC plant, the near-field plume has an average terminal depth of 172 meters, with a volumetric dilution of 13:1. The average terminal plume temperature was 19.8oC. Nitrate concentrations are 1 to 2 umol/kg above ambient. The advecting plume then further dilutes to less than 1 umol/kg above ambient within a few kilometers downstream, while remaining at depth. Because this terminal near-field plume is well below the 1% light limited depths (~120m), no immediate biological utilization of the nutrients occurs. As the nitrate is advected and dispersed downstream, a fraction of the deep ocean nutrients (< 0.5 umol/kg perturbation) mix upward where they are utilized by the ambient phytoplankton population. This occurs approximately twenty-five kilometers downstream from the plant at 110 - 70 meters depth. For pico-phytoplankton, modeling results indicate that this nutrient perturbation causes a phytoplankton perturbation of approximately 1 mgC/m3 (~10% of average ambient concentrations) that covers an area 10x5 km in size at the 70 to 90m depth. Thus, the perturbations are well within the natural variability of the system, generally corresponding to a 10 to 15% increase above the a

  3. Effect of decimeter waves on functional state of cardiovascular system, some biochemical and immunological parameters of patients recovering from myocardial infarction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sorokina, Y.I.; Poshkus, N.B.; Tupitsina, Y.Y.; Volkova, L.P.; Shubina, A.V.; Krasnikov, V.Y.

    1983-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Optimum localization of decimeter wave (DMW) treatment and its intensity was determined to investigate the effect of DMW on functional state of the cardiovascular system, and clinical biochemical parameters of patients with myocardial infarction in the early posthospitalization period. It is assumed that the effect of DMW via the segmented autonomic system leads to marked changes in the systems. With delivery of treatment to the DI-DV region, the effect on the heart occurs first through the autonomic nervous system which is shown by its vagotropic effect.

  4. An Introduction to Type Theory Dan Christensen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Christensen, Dan

    : Type a : A B : Type inl(a) : A + B A : Type b : B inr(b) : A + B C : Type p : A + B , x : A cA : C , y : B cB : C case(p, cA, cB) : C C : Type a : A , x : A cA : C , y : B cB : C case(inl(a), c

  5. The BEI hydrolysis process and reactor system refined engineering proto-type. BEI pilot-plant improvement and operations demonstrations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brelsford, Donald L.

    1999-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This BEI project involves BEI-HP and RS's applications toward potential commercial validity demonstrations for dilute-acid corn-fiber cellulose-hydrolysis processing with an aim toward fuel ethanol production.

  6. Hydrogen in Type Ic Supernovae?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    David Branch; David J. Jeffery; Timothy R. Young; E. Baron

    2006-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

    By definition, a Type Ic supernova (SN Ic) does not have conspicuous lines of hydrogen or helium in its optical spectrum. SNe Ic usually are modelled in terms of the gravitational collapse of bare carbon-oxygen cores. We consider the possibility that the spectra of ordinary (SN 1994I-like) SNe Ic have been misinterpreted, and that SNe Ic eject hydrogen. An absorption feature usually attributed to a blend of Si II 6355 and C II 6580 may be produced by H-alpha. If SN 1994I-like SNe Ic eject hydrogen, the possibility that hypernova (SN 1998bw-like) SNe Ic, some of which are associated with gamma-ray bursts, also eject hydrogen should be considered. The implications of hydrogen for SN Ic progenitors and explosion models are briefly discussed.

  7. Hemoglobin levels do not predict biochemical outcome for localized prostate cancer treated with neoadjuvant androgen-suppression therapy and external-beam radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pai, Howard Huaihan [Radiation Oncology Program, British Columbia Cancer Agency-Vancouver Island Centre, Victoria, British Columbia (Canada)]. E-mail: hpai@bccancer.bc.ca; Ludgate, Charles [Radiation Oncology Program, British Columbia Cancer Agency-Vancouver Island Centre, Victoria, British Columbia (Canada); Pickles, Tom [Radiation Oncology Program, British Columbia Cancer Agency-Vancouver Centre, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada); Paltiel, Chuck M.Sc. [Department of Biostatistics, British Columbia Cancer Agency, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada); Agranovich, Alex [Radiation Oncology Program, British Columbia Cancer Agency-Fraser Valley Centre, Surrey, British Columbia (Canada); Berthelet, Eric [Radiation Oncology Program, British Columbia Cancer Agency-Vancouver Island Centre, Victoria, British Columbia (Canada); Duncan, Graeme [Radiation Oncology Program, British Columbia Cancer Agency-Vancouver Centre, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada); Kim-Sing, Charmaine [Radiation Oncology Program, British Columbia Cancer Agency-Vancouver Centre, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada); Kwan, Winkle [Radiation Oncology Program, British Columbia Cancer Agency-Fraser Valley Centre, Surrey, British Columbia (Canada); Lim, Jan [Radiation Oncology Program, British Columbia Cancer Agency-Vancouver Island Centre, Victoria, British Columbia (Canada); Liu, Mitchell [Radiation Oncology Program, British Columbia Cancer Agency-Fraser Valley Centre, Surrey, British Columbia (Canada); Tyldesley, Scott [Radiation Oncology Program, British Columbia Cancer Agency-Vancouver Centre, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada)

    2006-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To investigate whether hemoglobin (Hb) levels affect outcome in men with localized prostate adenocarcinoma (LPA) treated with neoadjuvant androgen-suppression therapy (NAST) and external-beam radiotherapy (EBRT). Methods and Materials: A total of 563 men with LPA treated with NAST (median: 5.3 months) and EBRT who had Hb levels during treatment were retrospectively reviewed. Patient, tumor, and treatment variables, including the following Hb variables, were subjected to univariate and multivariable analyses to identify factors that predict biochemical control (bNED) and overall survival (OS): pre-EBRT Hb, Hb nadir during EBRT, and change in Hb from pre-EBRT to nadir during EBRT. Results: Median PSA follow-up was 4.25 years. Forty-nine percent of men were anemic during EBRT, with a median Hb of 13.4 g/dL, and 68% experienced a decline in Hb from pre-EBRT to during EBRT of median 0.6 g/dL. Five-year Nadir + 2 bNED and OS rates were similar for anemic and nonanemic patients during EBRT. High percent-positive biopsies, PSA and Gleason score, and use of AA monotherapy predicted worse bNED. High stage and age predicted worse OS. Hb variables were not predictive of bNED or OS. Conclusions: Anemia is a common side effect of NAST and is usually mild. Hb levels, however, do not predict biochemical control or survival.

  8. Ideal bandpasses for type Ia supernova cosmology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Davis, Tamara M.; Schmidt, Brian P.; Kim, Alex G.

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    diversity of type Ia Supernovae, in preparation. Kim, A.error in measurements of supernovae depends on a periodicABSTRACT To use type Ia supernovae as standard candles for

  9. New approaches for modeling type Ia supernovae

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zingale, Michael; Almgren, Ann S.; Bell, John B.; Day, Marcus S.; Rendleman, Charles A.; Woosley, Stan

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ich and J. Stein. On the thermonuclear runaway in Type IaSmall-Scale Stability of Thermonuclear Flames o in Type IaS. E. Woosley. The thermonuclear explosion of chandrasekhar

  10. Archive Reference Buildings by Building Type: Warehouse

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Here you will find past versions of the reference buildings for new construction commercial buildings, organized by building type and location. A summary of building types and climate zones is...

  11. Archive Reference Buildings by Building Type: Supermarket

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Here you will find past versions of the reference buildings for new construction commercial buildings, organized by building type and location. A summary of building types and climate zones is...

  12. Rates and progenitors of type Ia supernovae

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wood-Vasey, William Michael

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Supernovae . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Supernovae Found 5.1 Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . .1.2 Non-Type Ia Supernovae . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1.3

  13. Overload permit rules applicable to H-type and HS-type bridges

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Litchfield, Stephen Charles

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document defines standards for issuing permits for overweight vehicles crossing standard H-type and HS-type Texas highway bridges. A general formula and a bridge specific formula have been developed for simple spans of both bridge types...

  14. Fuzzy Typing for Document Management Alison HUETTNER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Dekai

    Fuzzy Typing for Document Management Alison HUETTNER Clairvoyance Corporation 5301 Fifth Avenue method of document analysis and management, based on a combination of techniques from NLP and fuzzy logic typing for document management. The fuzzy typing approach is general in scope and can be applied to many

  15. Aspectual Session Types Nicolas Tabareau Mario Sdholt

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Aspectual Session Types Nicolas Tabareau Mario SĂŒdholt ASCOLA Team Mines Nantes & Inria & LINA locally in each peer. Well-typed processes behave accordingly to the global protocol specification to support modular extensions with aspectual session types, a static pointcut/advice mechanism at the session

  16. Type Ia Supernova Carbon Footprints

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas, R C; Aragon, C; Antilogus, P; Bailey, S; Baltay, C; Bongard, S; Buton, C; Canto, A; Childress, M; Chotard, N; Copin, Y; Fakhouri, H K; Gangler, E; Hsiao, E Y; Kerschhaggl, M; Kowalski, M; Loken, S; Nugent, P; Paech, K; Pain, R; Pecontal, E; Pereira, R; Perlmutter, S; Rabinowitz, D; Rigault, M; Rubin, D; Runge, K; Scalzo, R; Smadja, G; Tao, C; Weaver, B A; Wu, C; Brown, P J; Milne, P A

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present convincing evidence of unburned carbon at photospheric velocities in new observations of 5 Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) obtained by the Nearby Supernova Factory. These SNe are identified by examining 346 spectra from 124 SNe obtained before +2.5 d relative to maximum. Detections are based on the presence of relatively strong C II 6580 absorption "notches" in multiple spectra of each SN, aided by automated fitting with the SYNAPPS code. Four of the 5 SNe in question are otherwise spectroscopically unremarkable, with ions and ejection velocities typical of SNe Ia, but spectra of the fifth exhibits high-velocity (v > 20,000 km/s) Si II and Ca II features. On the other hand, the light curve properties are preferentially grouped, strongly suggesting a connection between carbon-positivity and broad band light curve/color behavior: Three of the 5 have relatively narrow light curves but also blue colors, and a fourth may be a dust-reddened member of this family. Accounting for signal-to-noise and phase, we ...

  17. Integrated Corn-Based Biorefinery

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This fact sheet summarizes a U.S. Department of Energy Biomass Program research and development project.

  18. The Heating of Corn Chops.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fraps, G. S.

    1912-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    OF SUB-STATIONS. E. E. B in fobd , Beeville Sub-Station......... ................................... Beeville, Bee County W, S. H o tc h k is s , Troup Sub-Station........................................ Troup, Smith County E. M. J oh n s to n... , Cooperative Rice Station................Beaumont, Jefferson County I. S. Y o rk , Spur Sub-Station.......................................................... Spur, Dickens County T. W . B u e l l , Denton, Sub...

  19. Cooking with Corn Syrup (Spanish)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anding, Jenna

    2001-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

    utilizar. Para asegurar una mejor calidad utilice el jarabe en un periodo que no exceda un a?o desde el momento en que lo adquiri?. Imitaci?n de Pay de Nuez (rinde 8 porciones) Ingredientes 1 /2 taza de az?car 1 /4 de taza (media barrita) de mantequilla o... Extensionista Especialista en Nutrici?n, El Sistema Universitario Texas A&M. Producido por Agricultural Communications, El Sistema Universitario Texas A&M. Conforme a la ley federal y la pol...

  20. Corn Plus | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address: 160Benin:EnergyWisconsin:2003) |Cordova Electric Coop, IncKilauea Jump to: navigation,

  1. Owens Corning | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revision hasInformation Earth'sOklahoma/GeothermalOrange County is aOrmesa IOvonic Battery Company

  2. Interval to Biochemical Failure Predicts Clinical Outcomes in Patients With High-Risk Prostate Cancer Treated by Combined-Modality Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shilkrut, Mark; McLaughlin, P. William [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan Health System, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan Health System, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Merrick, Gregory S. [Schiffler Cancer Center, Wheeling Jesuit University, Wheeling, West Virginia (United States)] [Schiffler Cancer Center, Wheeling Jesuit University, Wheeling, West Virginia (United States); Vainshtein, Jeffrey M.; Feng, Felix Y. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan Health System, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan Health System, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Hamstra, Daniel A., E-mail: dhamm@med.umich.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan Health System, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States)

    2013-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To validate the prognostic value of interval to biochemical failure (IBF) in patients with high-risk prostate cancer (HiRPCa) treated with combined-modality radiation therapy (CMRT) with or without androgen deprivation therapy (ADT). Methods and Materials: We conducted a retrospective review of HiRPCa (prostate-specific antigen >20 ng/mL, Gleason score [GS] 8-10, or clinical T stage T3-T4) treated with either dose-escalated external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) or CMRT. Interval to biochemical failure was classified as ?18 or >18 months from the end of all therapy to the date of biochemical failure (BF). Kaplan-Meier methods and Cox proportional hazards regression were used to evaluate the prognostic value of IBF ?18 months for distant metastasis (DM) and prostate cancer-specific mortality (PCSM). Results: Of 958 patients with a median follow-up of 63.2 months, 175 patients experienced BF. In those with BF, there were no differences in pretreatment clinical characteristics between the EBRT and CMRT groups, except for a higher proportion of patients with GS 8-10 in the CMRT group (70% vs 52%, P=.02). Median IBF after all therapy was 24.0 months (interquartile range 9.6-46.0) in the EBRT group and 18.9 months (interquartile range 9.2-34.5) in the CMRT group (P=.055). On univariate analysis, IBF ?18 months was associated with increased risk of DM and PCSM in the entire cohort and the individual EBRT and CMRT groups. On multivariate analysis, only GS 9-10 and IBF ?18 months, but not the radiation therapy regimen or ADT use, predicted DM (hazard ratio [HR] 3.7, P<.01, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.4-10.3 for GS 9-10; HR 3.9, P<.0001, 95% CI 2.4-6.5 for IBF ?18 months) and PCSM (HR 14.8, P<.009, 95% CI 2.0-110 for GS 9-10; HR 4.4, P<.0001, 95% CI 2.4-8.1 for IBF ?18 months). Conclusions: Short IBF was highly prognostic for higher DM and PCSM in patients with HiRPCa. The prognostic value of IBF for DM and PCSM was not affected by the radiation therapy regimen or ADT use.

  3. Cost Effective Bioethanol via Acid Pretreatment of Corn Stover, Saccharification, and Conversion via a Novel Fermentation Organism: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number: CRD-12-485

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dowe, N.

    2014-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This research program will convert acid pretreated corn stover to sugars at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and then transfer these sugars to Honda R&D and its partner the Green Earth Institute (GEI) for conversion to ethanol via a novel fermentation organism. In phase one, NREL will adapt its pretreatment and saccharification process to the unique attributes of this organism, and Honda R&D/GEI will increase the sugar conversion rate as well as the yield and titer of the resulting ethanol. In later phases, NREL, Honda R&D, and GEI will work together at NREL to optimize and scale-up to pilot-scale the Honda R&D/GEI bioethanol production process. The final stage will be to undertake a pilot-scale test at NREL of the optimized bioethanol conversion process.

  4. The Interval to Biochemical Failure Is Prognostic for Metastasis, Prostate Cancer-Specific Mortality, and Overall Mortality After Salvage Radiation Therapy for Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, Skyler, E-mail: Skylerjohn3101@gmail.com [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Michigan Medical Center, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Michigan Medical Center, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Jackson, William; Li, Darren; Song, Yeohan; Foster, Corey; Foster, Ben; Zhou, Jessica; Vainshtein, Jeffrey; Feng, Felix; Hamstra, Daniel [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Michigan Medical Center, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Michigan Medical Center, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To investigate the utility of the interval to biochemical failure (IBF) after salvage radiation therapy (SRT) after radical prostatectomy (RP) for prostate cancer as a surrogate endpoint for distant metastasis (DM), prostate cancer-specific mortality (PCSM), and overall mortality (OM). Methods and Materials: A retrospective analysis of 575 patients treated with SRT after RP from a single institution. Of those, 250 patients experienced biochemical failure (BF), with the IBF defined as the time from commencement of SRT to BF. The IBF was evaluated by Kaplan-Meier and Cox proportional hazards models for its association with DM, PCSM, and OM. Results: The median follow-up time was 85 (interquartile range [IQR] 49.8-121.1) months, with a median IBF of 16.8 (IQR, 8.5-37.1) months. With a cutoff time of 18 months, as previously used, 129 (52%) of patients had IBF ?18 months. There were no differences among any clinical or pathologic features between those with IBF ? and those with IBF >18 months. On log–rank analysis, IBF ?18 months was prognostic for increased DM (P<.0001, HR 4.9, 95% CI 3.2-7.4), PCSM (P<.0001, HR 4.1, 95% CI 2.4-7.1), and OM (P<.0001, HR 2.7, 95% CI 1.7-4.1). Cox proportional hazards models with adjustment for other clinical variables demonstrated that IBF was independently prognostic for DM (P<.001, HR 4.9), PCSM (P<.0001, HR 4.0), and OM (P<.0001, HR 2.7). IBF showed minimal change in performance regardless of androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) use. Conclusion: After SRT, a short IBF can be used for early identification of patients who are most likely to experience progression to DM, PCSM, and OM. IBF ?18 months may be useful in clinical practice or as an endpoint for clinical trials.

  5. Type Inferencing and MATLAB to Modelica Translation.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohammad, Jahanzeb

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ?? Matlab is a proprietary, interactive, dynamically-typed language for technical computing. It is widely used for prototyping algorithms and applications of scientific computations. Since it… (more)

  6. Type B Accident Investigation, Subcontractor Employee Personal...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    ignited the right leg of his 100% cotton anticontamination (anti-c) coveralls and the plastic bootie. Type B Accident Investigation, Subcontractor Employee Personal Protective...

  7. Playing games with EPR-type experiments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Azhar Iqbal

    2005-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

    An approach towards quantum games is proposed that uses the unusual probabilities involved in EPR-type experiments directly in two-player games.

  8. Turbulent Combustion in Type Ia Supernova Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    F. K. Roepke; W. Hillebrandt

    2006-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We review the astrophysical modeling of type Ia supernova explosions and describe numerical methods to implement numerical simulations of these events. Some results of such simulations are discussed.

  9. Convolution type operators on locally compact groups

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shtein--~erg, Convolution Type Operators on Locally Compact Groups [in Russian],. Manuscript Deposited in the All-Union Institute of Scientific and Technical ...

  10. Structural and Biochemical Characterization of Human Adenylosuccinate Lyase (ADSL) and the R303C ADSL Deficiency-Associated Mutation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ray, Stephen P.; Deaton, Michelle K.; Capodagli, Glenn C.; Calkins, Lauren A.F.; Sawle, Lucas; Ghosh, Kingshuk; Patterson, David; Pegan, Scott D. (Denver)

    2014-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Adenylosuccinate lyase (ADSL) deficiency is a rare autosomal recessive disorder, which causes a defect in purine metabolism resulting in neurological and physiological symptoms. ADSL executes two nonsequential steps in the de novo synthesis of AMP: the conversion of phosphoribosylsuccinyl-aminoimidazole carboxamide (SAICAR) to phosphoribosylaminoimidazole carboxamide, which occurs in the de novo synthesis of IMP, and the conversion of adenylosuccinate to AMP, which occurs in the de novo synthesis of AMP and also in the purine nucleotide cycle, using the same active site. Mutation of ADSL's arginine 303 to a cysteine is known to lead to ADSL deficiency. Interestingly, unlike other mutations leading to ADSL deficiency, the R303C mutation has been suggested to more significantly affect the enzyme's ability to catalyze the conversion of succinyladenosine monophosphate than that of SAICAR to their respective products. To better understand the causation of disease due to the R303C mutation, as well as to gain insights into why the R303C mutation potentially has a disproportional decrease in activity toward its substrates, the wild type (WT) and the R303C mutant of ADSL were investigated enzymatically and thermodynamically. Additionally, the X-ray structures of ADSL in its apo form as well as with the R303C mutation were elucidated, providing insight into ADSL's cooperativity. By utilizing this information, a model for the interaction between ADSL and SAICAR is proposed.

  11. Archived Reference Building Type: Medium office

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Here you will find past versions of the commercial reference building models for existing buildings constructed in or after 1980, organized by building type and location. A summary of building types and climate zones is available for reference. Current versions are also available.

  12. Archived Reference Building Type: Medium office

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Here you will find past versions of the commercial reference building models for existing buildings constructed before 1980, organized by building type and location. A summary ofbuilding types and climate zones is available for reference. Current versions are also available.

  13. WASTE DESCRIPTION TYPE OF PROJECT POUNDS REDUCED,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fuel oil and Turkey Based Biofuel Energy Rocovery 12,000 Industrial Waste $30,000 $500 $29,500 1500WASTE DESCRIPTION TYPE OF PROJECT POUNDS REDUCED, REUSED, RECYCLED OR CONSERVED IN 2006 WASTE TYPE DESCRIPTION DETAILS * Aerosol Can Disposal System Recycling 528 66 pounds of hazardous waste per unit $7

  14. Archived Reference Building Type: Secondary school

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Here you will find past versions of the commercial reference building models for existing buildings constructed in or after 1980, organized by building type and location. A summary of building types and climate zones is available for reference. Current versions are also available.

  15. Project Name Project Number Tagging Type

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Project Name Project Number Primary Tagging Type Secondary Tagging Type Fish Species Tagging/ Secondary Legal Driver (BiOp, MOA, Accord, etc.) Tagging Purpose Funded Entity Tagging Location Retrieval CWT Recovery Project 2010-036-00 CWT PIT Chinook, coho retrieval, analysis, address PSMFC sampling

  16. Archived Reference Building Type: Secondary school

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Here you will find past versions of the commercial reference building models for existing buildings constructed before 1980, organized by building type and location. A summary ofbuilding types and climate zones is available for reference. Current versions are also available.

  17. Repairing Type Errors in Functional Programs 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McAdam, Bruce J

    Type systems for programming languages can be used by compilers to reject programs which are found to be unsound and which may, therefore, fail to execute successfully. When a program is rejected the programmer must repair it so that it can be type...

  18. Archived Reference Building Type: Outpatient health care

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Here you will find past versions of the commercial reference building models for existing buildings constructed in or after 1980, organized by building type and location. A summary of building types and climate zones is available for reference. Current versions are also available.

  19. Archived Reference Building Type: Outpatient health care

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Here you will find past versions of the commercial reference building models for existing buildings constructed before 1980, organized by building type and location. A summary ofbuilding types and climate zones is available for reference. Current versions are also available.

  20. Serum markers for type II diabetes mellitus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Metz, Thomas O; Qian, Wei-Jun; Jacobs, Jon M; Polpitiya, Ashoka D; Camp, II, David G; Smith, Richard D

    2014-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for identifying persons with increased risk of developing type 2 diabetes mellitus utilizing selected biomarkers described hereafter either alone or in combination. The present invention allows for broad based, reliable, screening of large population bases and provides other advantages, including the formulation of effective strategies for characterizing, archiving, and contrasting data from multiple sample types under varying conditions.

  1. Testing Type Class Laws Johan Jeuring

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Utrecht, Universiteit

    ]. Instances of Monad should satisfy the following laws: return a>>=k k a m >>=return m m >>=(x k x>>=h) (m>>=k)>>=hTesting Type Class Laws Johan Jeuring Patrik Jansson ClÂŽaudio Amaral Technical Report UU-CS-2012.089 3508 TB Utrecht The Netherlands #12;Testing Type Class Laws Johan Jeuring Utrecht University and Open

  2. WASTE DESCRIPTION TYPE OF PROJECT POUNDS REDUCED,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    WASTE DESCRIPTION TYPE OF PROJECT POUNDS REDUCED, REUSED, RECYCLED OR CONSERVED IN 2004 WASTE TYPE Brake Cleaner Recycling System Mercury Utility Devices Substitution 60 Hazardous Waste $1,750 $2,500 $1 of one PCB spill and clean-up event. Organic Solvents Substitution 678 Hazardous Waste $1,355 $36,500 $26

  3. Advanced Topics in Types and Programming Languages

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pitts, Andrew

    Advanced Topics in Types and Programming Languages Benjamin C. Pierce, editor The MIT Press Advanced Topics in Types and programming languages / Benjamin C. Pierce, editor p. cm. Includes bibliographical references and index. ISBN 0-262-16228-8 (hc.: alk. paper) 1. Programming languages (Electronic

  4. Improving Type Ia Supernova Standard Candle Cosmology Measurements Using Observations of Early-Type Host Galaxies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meyers, Joshua Evan

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Host Galaxies of Type Ia Supernovae Introduction SN Ia Hosts109 C HAPTER 1 Cosmology, Type Ia Supernovae and HostGalaxies Observations of supernovae have played a role in

  5. Theoretical cosmic Type Ia supernova rates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. Valiante; F. Matteucci; S. Recchi; F. Calura

    2009-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The aim of this work is the computation of the cosmic Type Ia supernova rates at very high redshifts (z>2). We adopt various progenitor models in order to predict the number of explosions in different scenarios for galaxy formation and to check whether it is possible to select the best delay time distribution model, on the basis of the available observations of Type Ia supernovae. We also computed the Type Ia supernova rate in typical elliptical galaxies of different initial luminous masses and the total amount of iron produced by Type Ia supernovae in each case. It emerges that: it is not easy to select the best delay time distribution scenario from the observational data and this is because the cosmic star formation rate dominates over the distribution function of the delay times; the monolithic collapse scenario predicts an increasing trend of the SN Ia rate at high redshifts whereas the predicted rate in the hierarchical scheme drops dramatically at high redshift; for the elliptical galaxies we note that the predicted maximum of the Type Ia supernova rate depends on the initial galactic mass. The maximum occurs earlier (at about 0.3 Gyr) in the most massive ellipticals, as a consequence of downsizing in star formation. We find that different delay time distributions predict different relations between the Type Ia supernova rate per unit mass at the present time and the color of the parent galaxies and that bluer ellipticals present higher supernova Type Ia rates at the present time.

  6. Renewable Energy Opportunities by Renovation Type

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Renewable energy opportunities should be considered and identified in the earliest stages of Federal project planning and the team should assess the renewable energy options based on the type of...

  7. CHARACTERIZATION OF SIALON-TYPE MATERIALS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Spencer, P.N.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    an Economical Refractory Material", Industrial Heating, 50-of Sialon-Type Materials Newman Spencer Lawrence BerkeleyEXPERIHENTAL PROCEDURES A. The Material L Ml H2 M3 and M4 B.

  8. Operations and Maintenance for Major Equipment Types

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Equipment lies at the heart of all operations and maintenance (O&M) activities. This equipment varies greatly across the Federal sector in age, size, type, model, condition, etc.

  9. The BMW Algebras of Type Dn

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cohen, Arjeh M; Wales, David B

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Birman-Murakami-Wenzl algebra (BMW algebra) of type Dn is shown to be free over the quotient of a polynomial algebra of dimension (2^n+1)n!!-(2^(n-1)+1)n! where n!! is the product of the first n odd integers. The Brauer algebra of type Dn is a homomorphic ring image and is also semisimple and free of the same dimesion, but over a different ring. A rewrite system for the Brauer algebra is used in upper bounding the dimension of the BMW algebra. As a consequence or our results, the generalized Temperley-Lieb algebra of type Dn is a subalgebra of the BMW algebra of the same type.

  10. Amendment 1 - Dry-type power transformers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    International Electrotechnical Commission. Geneva

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Specifies requirements for dry-type power transformers (including auto-transformers) having values of highest voltage for equipment up to and including 36 kV. The following small and special dry-type transformers are not covered by this standard: -instrument transformers (covered by IEC 60185 and 60186); -transformers for static convertors (covered by IEC 60084, 60119 and 60146). Where IEC standards do not exist for other special transformers, this standard may be applicable as a whole or in part.

  11. Types of Land Degradation in Bhutan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chencho Norbu et al,

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of other nutrients Possible eutrophication or contamination of streams Excessive P fertiliser (potato and apple crops) Possible excess P fertiliser applied to apples in W Bhutan Eutrophicatio n unlikely in fast flowing streams... highly vulnerable to surface erosion Effluents from plants, workshops & urban waste Not extensive – but some cases around Thimphu & in South Table 2: Types of Degradation (In Situ Degradation-Physical) 1. Soil Type: Topsoil...

  12. Trace element geochemistry of ordinary chondrite chondrules: the type I/type II chondrule dichotomy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jacquet, Emmanuel; Gounelle, Matthieu

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We report trace element concentrations of silicate phases in chondrules from LL3 ordinary chondrites Bishunpur and Semarkona. Results are similar to previously reported data for carbonaceous chondrites, with rare earth element (REE) concentrations increasing in the sequence olivine ~ 10 K/h) than type I chondrules. Appreciable Na concentrations (3-221 ppm) are measured in olivine from both chondrule types; type II chondrules seem to have behaved as closed systems, which may require chondrule formation in the vicinity of protoplanets or planetesimals. At any rate, higher solid concentrations in type II chondrule forming regions may explain the higher oxygen fugacities they record compared to type I chondrules. Type I and type II chondrules formed in different environments and the correlation between high solid concentrations and/or oxygen fugacities with rapid cooling rates is a key constraint that chondrule formation models must account for.

  13. Lignocellulosic Biomass to Ethanol Process Design and Economics Utilizing Co-Current Dilute Acid Prehydrolysis and Enzymatic Hydrolysis For Corn Stover

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:Year in3.pdfEnergy Health andofIanJenniferLeslie Pezzullo:Lighting Control TypesPeer Review9* *

  14. Virgo Early-Type Dwarfs in ALFALFA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Koopmann, Rebecca A

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Early-type dwarf galaxies dominate cluster populations, but their formation and evolutionary histories are poorly understood. The ALFALFA (Arecibo Legacy Fast ALFA) survey has completed observations of the Virgo Cluster in the declination range of 6 - 16 degrees. Less than 2% of the early-type dwarf population is detected, a significantly lower fraction than reported in previous papers based on more limited samples. In contrast ~30 of the irregular/BCD dwarf population is detected. The detected early-type galaxies tend to be located in the outer regions of the cluster, with a concentration in the direction of the M Cloud. Many show evidence for ongoing/recent star formation. Galaxies such as these may be undergoing morphological transition due to cluster environmental effects.

  15. Virgo Early-Type Dwarfs in ALFALFA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rebecca A. Koopmann

    2007-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Early-type dwarf galaxies dominate cluster populations, but their formation and evolutionary histories are poorly understood. The ALFALFA (Arecibo Legacy Fast ALFA) survey has completed observations of the Virgo Cluster in the declination range of 6 - 16 degrees. Less than 2% of the early-type dwarf population is detected, a significantly lower fraction than reported in previous papers based on more limited samples. In contrast ~30 of the irregular/BCD dwarf population is detected. The detected early-type galaxies tend to be located in the outer regions of the cluster, with a concentration in the direction of the M Cloud. Many show evidence for ongoing/recent star formation. Galaxies such as these may be undergoing morphological transition due to cluster environmental effects.

  16. Fiber-type dosimeter with improved illuminator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fox, Richard J. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A single-piece, molded plastic, Cassigrainian-type condenser arrangement is incorporated in a tubular-shaped personal pocket dosimeter of the type which combines an ionization chamber with an optically-read fiber electrometer to provide improved illumination of the electrometer fiber. The condenser routes incoming light from one end of the dosimeter tubular housing around a central axis charging pin assembly and focuses the light at low angles to the axis so that it falls within the acceptance angle of the electrometer fiber objective lens viewed through an eyepiece lens disposed in the opposite end of the dosimeter. This results in improved fiber illumination and fiber image contrast.

  17. Fiber-type dosimeter with improved illuminator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fox, R.J.

    1985-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

    A single-piece, molded plastic, Cassigrainian-type condenser arrangement is incorporated in a tubular-shaped personal pocket dosimeter of the type which combines an ionization chamber with an optically-read fiber electrometer to provide improved illumination of the electrometer fiber. The condenser routes incoming light from one end of the dosimeter tubular housing around a central axis charging pin assembly and focuses the light at low angles to the axis so that it falls within the acceptance angle of the electrometer fiber objective lens viewed through an eyepiece lens disposed in the opposite end of the dosimeter. This results in improved fiber illumination and fiber image contrast.

  18. Transformations of $W$-Type Entangled States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. K?nta?; S. Turgut

    2010-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The transformations of $W$-type entangled states by using local operations assisted with classical communication are investigated. For this purpose, a parametrization of the $W$-type states which remains invariant under local unitary transformations is proposed and a complete characterization of the local operations carried out by a single party is given. These are used for deriving the necessary and sufficient conditions for deterministic transformations. A convenient upper bound for the maximum probability of distillation of arbitrary target states is also found.

  19. Journal of Leukocyte Biology 47:332-343 (1990) Influenza A Virus Alters Structural and Biochemical Functions of the Neutrophil Cytoskeleton

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Gary Wheeler; Lisa S. Winkler; Michael Seeds; David Bass; Jon S. Abramson

    Influenza A virus (lAy) has previousiy been shown to alter chemotactic, oxidative, and secretory functIons of polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNL). Because of the role of cytoskeletal proteins In these processes, studies were carried out to determine if IAV altered the PMNL cytoskeleton. PMNL were incubated with buffer or lAy, stimulated with f-met-Ieu-phe (FMLP), fixed and stained with NBD-phallacldln (NBD-Ph) and studied by flow cytometry. Mean F-actin fluorescence was increased 18 % in virus treated cells pre-FMLP stimulation and 13 % Sand 10 mm post-FMLP (P <.03); no significant difference in F-actln fluorescence was noted in virus treated PMNL 15-30 a post-FMLP compared to control cells. PMNL exposed to the same conditions were solubilized and actin content was determined following SDS-PAGE of triton insoluble precipitates. Increased actln was recovered from virus treated compared to buffer treated cells before and after FMLP stImulation in the 8,0009 precipitates (P <.001). Immunofluorescent microscopy studies of F-actln distribution were done in PMNL stained with NBD-Ph following FMLP stimulation for 10 mm. These studies showed an increased lamellipod F-actin/uropod F-actin ratio in PMNL pre-incubated with IAV compared to controls (4.6 vs. 1.0; P <.025). Phosphorylation of specific cytoskeletal proteins was examined after immunoprecipitation. IAV alone altered phosphorylation of both vimentin and vinculin, and in stimulated PMNL virus led to decreased phosphorylation of vimentin and vinculin. These data show distributional and biochemical effects of IAV on PMNL cytoskeietal proteins, indicating additional targets for IAV interference in the PMNL sIgnal-transduction-function process.

  20. Programming with Dependent Types in Coq Matthieu Sozeau

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sozeau, Matthieu

    , generating Type-checking conditions. + Practical success ; t : T P[t/x] t : { x : T | P } t : { x : T | P, generating Type-checking conditions. + Practical success ; ­ No strong safety guarantee in PVS. t : T P typing algorithm for subset types, generating Type-checking conditions. + Practical success ; ­ No strong

  1. Title: Academic Advisor Employment Type: Administrative Professional

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Title: Academic Advisor Employment Type: Administrative Professional College: Engineering is seeking a full time academic advisor to collaborate with faculty and ECE staff to coordinate and advise faculty, 250 undergraduate students and 150 graduate students. The advisor will work closely together

  2. Reference Buildings by Building Type: Secondary school

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    In addition to the ZIP file for each building type, you can directly view the "scorecard" spreadsheet that summarizes the inputs and results for each location. This Microsoft Excel spreadsheet is also included in the ZIP file. For version 1.4, only the IDF file is included.

  3. Reference Buildings by Building Type: Primary school

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    In addition to the ZIP file for each building type, you can directly view the "scorecard" spreadsheet that summarizes the inputs and results for each location. This Microsoft Excel spreadsheet is also included in the ZIP file. For version 1.4, only the IDF file is included.

  4. mathematics Study program cycle and type

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Â?umer, Slobodan

    mathematics academic study programmm 11 #12;12 #12;· Study program cycle and type: First cycle academic study program. · AAnnttiicciippaatteedd aaccaaddeemmiicc ttiittllee:: Bachelor in Mathematics ggooaallss:: The principal goal of the academic study program in Mathematics is to qualify its graduates

  5. Ankle Injury TYPES OF ANKLE INJURIES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Virginia Tech

    Ankle Injury TYPES OF ANKLE INJURIES: Ankle injuries can be acute or chronic in nature. Inverting (turning in) of the ankle, accounts for most acute injuries. Damage occurs when ankle is twisted or moved beyond its normal range. Overuse of the ankle can cause tearing of the ligaments or strain tendon fibers

  6. Graduate Assistant Stipend Enhancement Project Proposal Type

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Karonis, Nicholas T.

    1 Graduate Assistant Stipend Enhancement Project Proposal Type The Graduate Assistant Stipend Strategic Plan. Goals The Graduate Assistant Stipend Enhancement project consists of two programs: the Great. Fundamentally, the project seeks to increase the number of graduate students who receive assistantships

  7. Data Management Plan Types of Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tam, Tin-Yau

    Data Management Plan Types of Data The research described herein will lead to the discovery of new will be followed by electrochemistry, Raman spectroscopy and optical spectroscopy. All data will be stored electronically in word processing documents. Data Standards All data will be stored in an electronic format

  8. Deforestation of Functional Programs through Type Inference

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kent, University of

    Deforestation of Functional Programs through Type Inference Olaf Chitil Lehrstuhl fšur Informatik II, RWTH Aachen, Germany chitil@informatik.rwth-aachen.de Abstract. Deforestation optimises structures. Short cut deforestation is a deforestation method which is based on a single, local

  9. Types of Utility Energy Service Contracts

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Several types of contracts are used as utility energy service contracts (UESCs). Many agency sites procure electricity services under a contract with the local utility, and most of these contracts have provisions that can also cover energy efficiency projects. Agencies not covered by such agreements may enter contracts with the utility for the sole purpose of implementing energy projects.

  10. Reference Buildings by Building Type: Hospital

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    In addition to the ZIP file for each building type, you can directly view the "scorecard" spreadsheet that summarizes the inputs and results for each location. This Microsoft Excel spreadsheet is also included in the ZIP file. For version 1.4, only the IDF file is included.

  11. Reference Buildings by Building Type: Large office

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    In addition to the ZIP file for each building type, you can directly view the "scorecard" spreadsheet that summarizes the inputs and results for each location. This Microsoft Excel spreadsheet is also included in the ZIP file. For version 1.4, only the IDF file is included.

  12. RECYCLING PROGRAM TYPE LOCATION ALLOWED NOT ALLOWED

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miami, University of

    RECYCLING PROGRAM TYPE LOCATION ALLOWED NOT ALLOWED Batteries, toner, ink cartridges & cell phones and recycling is an important part of that effort. Below is a guide to on-campus recycling at RSMAS: Visit http://www.rsmas.miami.edu/msgso/ for map of recycling bin locations. NOTE: This is not an exhaustive list. If unauthorized items are found

  13. Type-Logical Hyperedge Replacement Grammars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Type-Logical and Hyperedge Replacement Grammars Draft Richard Moot LaBRI (CNRS), INRIA Bordeaux SW2009 #12;CONTENTS 1 Introduction 1 2 Hyperedge Replacement Grammars 3 2.1 Hypergraphs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 2.2 Hyperedge Replacement . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 2.3 Hyperedge

  14. Fiber type, meal frequency and colonic cytokinetics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Jianhu

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The effects of dietary fiber type (cellulose, pectin or oat bran) and meal frequency (gorge or nibble) on colonic short chain fatty acids (SCFAs), in vivo colonic pH and epithelial cell proliferation were examined in male Sprague-Dawley rats...

  15. Updated May 22, 2014 Equipment Type Type of Service Requested Est Hrs Est $

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    system 3 $165 "PM" service 1 $55 Research Equipment Support & Engineering Services Core List of Services $ Research Equipment Support & Engineering Services Core List of Services with Time and Cost EstimatesUpdated May 22, 2014 Equipment Type Type of Service Requested Est Hrs Est $ CO2 Incubator

  16. New Type-2 Rule Ranking Indices for Designing Parsimonious Interval Type-2 Fuzzy Logic Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aickelin, Uwe

    rules can be effectively selected to construct parsimonious type-2 fuzzy models while the system processing [7][8], traffic forecasting [9], mobile robot control [10], pattern recognition [11] [12FLS mod- elling. As a matter of fact, even in type-I fuzzy logic system (FLS) modelling, developing

  17. New Type-2 Rule Ranking Indices for Designing Parsimonious Interval Type-2 Fuzzy Logic Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Granada, Universidad de

    rules can be effectively selected to construct parsimonious type-2 fuzzy models while the system processing [7][8], traffic forecasting [9], mobile robot control [10], pattern recognition [11FLS mod- elling. As a matter of fact, even in type-1 fuzzy logic system (FLS) modelling, developing

  18. Aspen Ecology in the MixedAspen Ecology in the Mixed Conifer TypeConifer Type

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aspen Ecology in the MixedAspen Ecology in the Mixed Conifer TypeConifer Type Wayne D. Shepperd Colorado State University Fort Collins, CO Aspen Ecology in the MixedAspen Ecology in the Mixed ConiferAssumptions Mixed conifer forests are a collection of different species, each with different ecologic requirements

  19. Problem Type Problem Type Description Air Conditioning Air conditioner not working, leaking, etc

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tennessee, University of

    Problem Type Problem Type Description Air Conditioning Air conditioner not working, leaking, etc, Microfridges Doors and Hardware Door repair/replace Lock, latch or hinge repair, key stuck; Lost or stolen key, repair or replace Shades/Blinds Window treatment - repair or replace Washer/Dryer Washer/Dryer repair

  20. Turbulence-Flame Interactions in Type Ia Supernovae

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aspden, Andrew J; Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, 1 Cyclotron Road, MS 50A-1148, Berkeley, CA 94720 (Authors 1, 2 & 3); Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of California at Santa Cruz, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (Author 4); Department of Physics and Astronomy, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY 11794 (Author 5)

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Interactions in Type Ia Supernovae A. J. Aspden 1 , J. B.involved in type Ia supernovae (SN Ia) requires the use of ?generated by RT in type Ia supernovae should obey Bolgiano-

  1. Biochemical Conversion | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative FuelsBSCmemo.pdf BSCmemo.pdf BSCmemo.pdfBetter BuildingsBetter Plants»NewsConversion

  2. BioChem Cover story

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-Series to someone6 M. Babzien, I.ProgramBig Sol Big SolLSU Researcher discovers a

  3. An automated tool for three types of saturated hydraulic conductivity...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    automated tool for three types of saturated hydraulic conductivity laboratory measurements. An automated tool for three types of saturated hydraulic conductivity laboratory...

  4. A Segmented, Enriched N-type Germanium Detector for Neutrinoless...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Segmented, Enriched N-type Germanium Detector for Neutrinoless Double Beta-Decay Experiments. A Segmented, Enriched N-type Germanium Detector for Neutrinoless Double Beta-Decay...

  5. Type B Accident Investigation of the Subcontractor Employee Injuries...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Type B Accident Investigation of the Subcontractor Employee Injuries from a November 15, 2000, Fall Accident at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory Type B Accident Investigation of...

  6. Identification of soybean proteins from a single cell type: The...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    soybean proteins from a single cell type: The root hair. Identification of soybean proteins from a single cell type: The root hair. Abstract: Root hairs are a terminally...

  7. Anisotropic criteria for the type of superconductivity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kogan, Vladimir G [Ames Laboratory; Prozorov, Ruslan [Ames Laboratory

    2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The classical criterion for classification of superconductors as type I or type II based on the isotropic Ginzburg-Landau theory is generalized to arbitrary temperatures for materials with anisotropic Fermi surfaces and order parameters. We argue that the relevant quantity for this classification is the ratio of the upper and thermodynamic critical fields Hc2/Hc, rather than the traditional ratio of the penetration depth and the coherence length ?/?. Even in the isotropic case, Hc2/Hc coincides with 2??/? only at the critical temperature Tc and they differ as T decreases, the long-known fact. Anisotropies of Fermi surfaces and order parameters may amplify this difference and render false the criterion based on the value of ?=?/?.

  8. Manufacture of naphthenic type lubricating oils

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reynolds, R.W.

    1981-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

    A process for making naphthenic type lubricating oils from a low viscosity waxy crude which comprises distilling said low viscosity waxy crude to 500 to 650/sup 0/F. At atmospheric pressure to separate distillable fractions therefrom, subjecting the residue to a vacuum distillation at about 25 to about 125 mm Hg absolute pressure to obtain one or more gas oil fractions, optionally hydrotreating said gas oil fractions in the presence of a Ni/Mo catalyst at 550 to 650/sup 0/F, 0.25 to 1.0 lhsv, and 700-1500 psig, and catalytically dewaxing said distillates in the presence of a H+ form mordenite catalyst containing a group VI or group VIII metal at 550 to 750/sup 0/F, 500 to 1500 psig and 0.25 to 5.0 lhsv, to obtain said naphthenic type oils having pour points of from about -60 to +20/sup 0/F.

  9. Hypergeometric type operators and their supersymmetric partners

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cotfas, Nicolae [Faculty of Physics, University of Bucharest, PO Box 76 - 54, Post Office 76, 062590 Bucharest (Romania); Cotfas, Liviu Adrian [Faculty of Economic Cybernetics, Statistics and Informatics, Academy of Economic Studies, 6 Piata Romana, 010374 Bucharest (Romania)

    2011-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The generalization of the factorization method performed by Mielnik [J. Math. Phys. 25, 3387 (1984)] opened new ways to generate exactly solvable potentials in quantum mechanics. We present an application of Mielnik's method to hypergeometric type operators. It is based on some solvable Riccati equations and leads to a unitary description of the quantum systems exactly solvable in terms of orthogonal polynomials or associated special functions.

  10. 2Cosmic Bar Graphs Galaxy Type

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in the cluster are spirals? Problem 2 ­ Gamma-ray bursts happen about once each day. The bar graph to the right there are 160 total galaxies, the fraction of spirals is 137/160 = 0.86, or equivalently 86%. Problem 2 ­ Gamma-ray2Cosmic Bar Graphs 0 20 40 60 80 100 S E SB I Galaxy Type Number 0 200 400 600 800 1000 FB SB Burst

  11. Property:ProjectType | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: EnergyPotentialUrbanUtilityScalePVCapacity Jump to: navigation, search PropertyTransfer MethodProjectType Jump

  12. Nonperturbative Type I-I' String Theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shyamoli Chaudhuri

    2005-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

    We propose a nonperturbative framework for the O(32) type I open and closed string theory. The short distance degrees of freedom are bosonic and fermionic hermitian matrices belonging respectively to the adjoint and fundamental representations of the special unitary group SU(N). We identify a closed matrix algebra at finite N which corresponds to the Lorentz, gauge, and supersymmetry algebras of the large N continuum limit. The planar reduction of our matrix theory coincides with the low energy spacetime effective action of the d=10 type I O(32) unoriented open and closed string theory. We show that matrix T-duality transformations can yield a nonperturbative framework for the T-dual type I' closed string theory with 32 D8branes. We show further that under a strong-weak coupling duality transformation the large N reduced action coincides with the low energy spacetime effective action of the d=10 heterotic string, an equivalence at leading order in the inverse string tension and with either gauge group Spin(32)/Z2 or E8xE8. Our matrix formalism has the potential of providing a nonperturbative framework encapsulating all of the weak coupling limits of M theory.

  13. Larger Maximum Tumor Diameter at Radical Prostatectomy Is Associated With Increased Biochemical Failure, Metastasis, and Death From Prostate Cancer After Salvage Radiation for Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, Skyler B.; Hamstra, Daniel A.; Jackson, William C.; Zhou, Jessica; Foster, Benjamin; Foster, Corey; Song, Yeohan; Li, Darren [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Palapattu, Ganesh S. [Department of Urology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Kunju, Lakshmi; Mehra, Rohit [Department of Pathology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Sandler, Howard [Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, California (United States); Feng, Felix Y., E-mail: ffeng@med.umich.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States)

    2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To investigate the maximum tumor diameter (MTD) of the dominant prostate cancer nodule in the radical prostatectomy specimen as a prognostic factor for outcome in patients treated with salvage external beam radiation therapy (SRT) for a rising prostate-specific antigen (PSA) value after radical prostatectomy. Methods and Materials: From an institutional cohort of 575 patients treated with SRT, data on MTD were retrospectively collected. The impact of MTD on biochemical failure (BF), metastasis, and prostate cancer-specific mortality (PCSM) was assessed on univariate and multivariate analysis using Kaplan-Meier and Cox proportional hazards models. Results: In the 173 patients with MTD data available, median follow-up was 77 months (interquartile range, 47-104 months) after SRT, and median MTD was 18 mm (interquartile range, 13-22 mm). Increasing MTD correlated with increasing pT stage, Gleason score, presence of seminal vesicle invasion, and lymph node invasion. Receiver operating characteristic curve analysis identified MTD of >14 mm to be the optimal cut-point. On univariate analysis, MTD >14 mm was associated with an increased risk of BF (P=.02, hazard ratio [HR] 1.8, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.2-2.8), metastasis (P=.002, HR 4.0, 95% CI 2.1-7.5), and PCSM (P=.02, HR 8.0, 95% CI 2.9-21.8). On multivariate analysis MTD >14 mm remained associated with increased BF (P=.02, HR 1.9, 95% CI 1.1-3.2), metastasis (P=.02, HR 3.4, 95% CI 1.2-9.2), and PCSM (P=.05, HR 9.7, 95% CI 1.0-92.4), independent of extracapsular extension, seminal vesicle invasion, positive surgical margins, pre-RT PSA value, Gleason score, and pre-RT PSA doubling time. Conclusions: For patients treated with SRT for a rising PSA value after prostatectomy, MTD at time of radical prostatectomy is independently associated with BF, metastasis, and PCSM. Maximum tumor diameter should be incorporated into clinical decision making and future clinical risk assessment tools for those patients receiving SRT.

  14. Chemical reaction model for oil and gas generation from type 1 and type 2 kerogen

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Braun, R.L.; Burnham, A.K.

    1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A global model for the generation of oil and gas from petroleum source rocks is presented. The model consists of 13 chemical species and 10 reactions, including an alternate-pathway mechanism for kerogen pyrolysis. Reaction rate parameters and stoichiometry coefficients determined from a variety of pyrolysis data are given for both type I and type II kerogen. Use of the chemical reaction model is illustrated for typical geologic conditions.

  15. Type Policy Title Here Effective Date: [Insert Date

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Salzman, Daniel

    Type Policy Title Here Effective Date: [Insert Date] Policy Statement [Type Statement Text Here] Reason(s) for the Policy [Type Reason Text Here] Primary Guidance to Which This Policy Responds [Type Primary Policy Here ­ If there is NOT a Primary Policy indicate that] Responsible University Office

  16. Type II Seesaw at LHC: the Roadmap

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alejandra Melfo; Miha Nemevsek; Fabrizio Nesti; Goran Senjanovic; Yue Zhang

    2012-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

    In this Letter we revisit the type-II seesaw mechanism based on the addition of a weak triplet scalar to the standard model. We perform a comprehensive study of its phenomenology at the LHC energies, complete with the electroweak precision constraints. We pay special attention to the doubly-charged component, object of collider searches for a long time, and show how the experimental bound on its mass depends crucially on the particle spectrum of the theory. Our study can be used as a roadmap for future complete LHC studies.

  17. Type II Seesaw at LHC: the Roadmap

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Melfo, Alejandra; Nesti, Fabrizio; Senjanovic, Goran; Zhang, Yue

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this Letter we revisit the type-II seesaw mechanism based on the addition of a weak triplet scalar to the standard model. We perform a comprehensive study of its phenomenology at the LHC energies, complete with the electroweak precision constraints. We pay special attention to the doubly-charged component, object of collider searches for a long time, and show how the experimental bound on its mass depends crucially on the particle spectrum of the theory. Our study can be used as a roadmap for future complete LHC studies.

  18. Down Type Isosinglet Quarks in ATLAS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. Mehdiyev; A. Siodmok; S. Sultansoy; G. Unel

    2007-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

    We evaluate the discovery reach of the ATLAS experiment for down type isosinglet quarks, $D$, using both their neutral and charged decay channels, namely the process $pp\\to D\\bar{D}+X$ with subsequent decays resulting in $2\\ell+2j+E^{miss}_{T}$, $3\\ell+2j+E^{miss}_{T}$ and $2\\ell+4j$ final states. The integrated luminosity required for observation of a heavy quark is estimated for a mass range between 600 and 1000 GeV using the combination of results from different search channels.

  19. Dynamics of Bianchi type I elastic spacetimes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Simone Calogero; J. Mark Heinzle

    2007-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the global dynamical behavior of spatially homogeneous solutions of the Einstein equations in Bianchi type I symmetry, where we use non-tilted elastic matter as an anisotropic matter model that naturally generalizes perfect fluids. Based on our dynamical systems formulation of the equations we are able to prove that (i) toward the future all solutions isotropize; (ii) toward the initial singularity all solutions display oscillatory behavior; solutions do not converge to Kasner solutions but oscillate between different Kasner states. This behavior is associated with energy condition violation as the singularity is approached.

  20. Types of Insulation | Department of Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas ConchasPassiveSubmittedStatusButlerTransportation6/14/11 Page 1Two NovelTwoTypes ofInsulation

  1. Types of Lighting | Department of Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas ConchasPassiveSubmittedStatusButlerTransportation6/14/11 Page 1Two NovelTwoTypes

  2. Types of Lighting in Commercial Buildings - Introduction

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines AboutDecemberSteamYearTexas--State Offshore Shale ProvedCountry:Data FilesTypes

  3. MEMORANDUM TO: FILE TYPE OF OPERATION

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarlyEnergyDepartment ofDepartment ofof EnergyYou$ EGcG ENERGYELIkNATIONHEALXH:LTS-S IDCSTE 1TYPE OF

  4. Property:DIA/Type | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revision hasInformationInyoCoolingTowerWaterUseSummerConsumed Jump to: navigation,Cost(perEconomicDIA/Types

  5. Property:TypeOf | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revisionEnvReviewNonInvasiveExploration JumpSanyalTempWellhead Jump to:Technology ReadinessTimePeriodTypeOf Jump

  6. Lighting Control Types | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:Year in3.pdfEnergy Health andofIanJenniferLeslie Pezzullo:Lighting Control Types Lighting

  7. Systems of Hess-Appel'rot type

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vladimir Dragovic; Borislav Gajic

    2006-02-09T23:59:59.000Z

    We construct higher-dimensional generalizations of the classical Hess-Appel'rot rigid body system. We give a Lax pair with a spectral parameter leading to an algebro-geometric integration of this new class of systems, which is closely related to the integration of the Lagrange bitop performed by us recently and uses Mumford relation for theta divisors of double unramified coverings. Based on the basic properties satisfied by such a class of systems related to bi-Poisson structure, quasi-homogeneity, and conditions on the Kowalevski exponents, we suggest an axiomatic approach leading to what we call the "class of systems of Hess-Appel'rot type".

  8. Biochemical Characterization of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis Ni(II) Sensor NmtR and Streptococcus pneumoniae Zn(II) Sensor AdcR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reyes Caballero, Hermes

    2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    stoichiometry to one per dimer and greatly reduced Ni(II) responsiveness. H3Q and ?111 NmtR also show important perturbations in the rank order of metal responsiveness, with both different from wild-type NmtR. The use of both presumably unstructured N- and C...

  9. Probing Cosmological Isotropy With Type IA Supernovae

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bengaly, C A P; Alcaniz, J S

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate the validity of the Cosmological Principle by mapping the cosmological parameters $H_0$ and $q_0$ through the celestial sphere. In our analysis, performed in a low-redshift regime to follow a model-independent approach, we use two compilations of type Ia Supernovae (SNe Ia), namely the Union2.1 and the JLA datasets. Firstly, we show that the angular distributions for both SNe Ia datasets are statistically anisotropic at high confidence level ($p$-value $<$ 0.0001), in particular the JLA sample. Then we find that the cosmic expansion and acceleration are mainly of dipolar type, with maximal anisotropic expansion [acceleration] pointing towards $(l,b) \\simeq (326^{\\circ},12^{\\circ})$ [$(l,b) \\simeq (174^{\\circ},27^{\\circ})$], and $(l,b) \\simeq (58^{\\circ},-60^{\\circ})$ [$(l,b) \\simeq (225^{\\circ},51^{\\circ})$] for the Union2.1 and JLA data, respectively. Secondly, we use a geometrical method to test the hypothesis that the non-uniformly distributed SNe Ia events could introduce anisotropic imp...

  10. Simultaneous acquisition of differing image types

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Demos, Stavros G

    2012-10-09T23:59:59.000Z

    A system in one embodiment includes an image forming device for forming an image from an area of interest containing different image components; an illumination device for illuminating the area of interest with light containing multiple components; at least one light source coupled to the illumination device, the at least one light source providing light to the illumination device containing different components, each component having distinct spectral characteristics and relative intensity; an image analyzer coupled to the image forming device, the image analyzer decomposing the image formed by the image forming device into multiple component parts based on type of imaging; and multiple image capture devices, each image capture device receiving one of the component parts of the image. A method in one embodiment includes receiving an image from an image forming device; decomposing the image formed by the image forming device into multiple component parts based on type of imaging; receiving the component parts of the image; and outputting image information based on the component parts of the image. Additional systems and methods are presented.

  11. The Sizes of Early-type Galaxies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Joachim Janz; Thorsten Lisker

    2008-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

    In this letter we present a study of the size luminosity relation of 475 early-type galaxies in the Virgo Cluster with Sloan Digital Sky Survey imaging data. The analysis of our homogeneous, model-independent data set reveals that giant and dwarf early-type galaxies do not form one common sequence in this relation. The dwarfs seem to show weak or no dependence on luminosity, and do not fall on the extension of the rather steep relation of the giants. Under the assumption that the light profile shape varies continuously with magnitude, a curved relation of size and magnitude would be expected. While the galaxies do roughly follow this trend overall, we find that the dwarf galaxies are significantly larger and the low-luminosity giants are significantly smaller than what is predicted. We come to the conclusion that in this scaling relation there is not one common sequence from dwarfs to giants, but a dichotomy which can not be resolved by varying profile shapes. The comparison of our data to a semi-analytic model supports the idea of a physical origin of this dichotomy.

  12. Practical kerogen typing for petroleum exploration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Horsfield, B.; Larter, S.R.

    1989-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The explorationist requires basic quantitative information on the size, gas-oil ratio (GOR), and timing of petroleum charges. Yet only a part of this crucial information is obtainable from the data currently used to define kerogen types. The authors describe here a practical approach and solution to this problem by defining kerogen type according to three fundamental criteria. One of these is total hydrocarbon-generating potential, as determined by Rock-Eval pyrolysis (S2). The other equally important criteria are source quality (GOR, wax content, etc), as determined by pyrolysis-gas chromatography (PY-GC), and thermal lability (response to thermal stress), as determined by PY-GC and microscale simulation pyrolysis techniques. With regard to source quality determination, paraffinic oil-generating potential (both high wax and low wax), paraffinic-naphthenic-aromatic oil-generating potential (both high wax and low wax), and gas condensate-generating potentials are readily discernible and quantifiable. Concerning thermal lability, the influence of extreme maturation levels on source rock and petroleum composition has been assessed. In the case of some kerogens, bulk compositional features can be preserved to high levels of thermal stress. This means that original oil-generating potential can sometimes be discerned from the analysis of overmature kerogens.

  13. Function: GTP:-`type/gradedmonom` -define a type 'gradedmonom' Calling Sequence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ablamowicz, Rafal

    :with(Clifford):with(GTP): > type(e1 &t e1,gradedmonom),type(Pi*(e1we2 &t e1 &t e2),gradedmonom); Cliplus has been loaded Id &t e1 Id &t e2 Id &t e1we2 e1 &t Id e1 &t e1 e1 &t e2 e1 &t e1we2, , , , , , , ,[:= e2 &t Id e2 &t e1 e2 &t e2 e2 &t e1we2 e1we2 &t Id e1we2 &t e1 e1we2 &t e2, , , , , , , e1we2 &t e1we2] > map

  14. Boost type PWM HVDC transmission system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ooi, B.T.; Wang, X. (McGill Univ., Montreal, PQ (Canada). Dept. of Electrical Engineering)

    1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper reports that conventional HVdc is built around the mercury arc rectifier or the thyristor which requires line commutation. The advances of fast, high power GTO's and future devices such as MCT's with turn off capabilities, are bringing PWM techniques within the range of HVdc applications. By combining PWM techniques to the boost type bridge topology, one has an alternate system of HVdc Transmission. On the ac side, the converter station has active controls over: the voltage amplitude, the voltage angle and the frequency. On the dc side, parallel connections facilitate multi-terminal load sharing by simple local controls so that redundant communication channels are not required. Bidirectional power through each station is accomplished by the reversal of the direction of dc current flow. These claims have been substantiated by experimental results from laboratory size multi-terminal models.

  15. Crop Improvement Extended Towards Crops for Health Goal: Colorado State University will continue undergraduate education, graduate education, applied research, and outreach in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    .g., cardiovascular disease, Type 2 diabetes, cancer, and obesity. Metabolites are biochemical compounds that carry

  16. Could there be a hole in type Ia supernovae?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kasen, Daniel; Nugent, Peter; Thomas, R.C.; Wang, Lifan

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Highlight: The Physics of Supernovae. Pro- ceedings of the EThere Be A Hole In Type l a Supernovae? Daniel Kasen, Peterscenario, Type l a Supernovae (SNe la) arise from a white

  17. Type B Accident Investigation, Response to the 24 Command Wildland...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Type B Accident Investigation, Response to the 24 Command Wildland Fire on the Hanford Site, June 27-July 1, 2000 Type B Accident Investigation, Response to the 24 Command Wildland...

  18. Archive Reference Buildings by Building Type: Large office

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Here you will find past versions of the reference buildings for new construction commercial buildings, organized by building type and location. A summary of building types and climate zones is...

  19. Archive Reference Buildings by Building Type: Strip mall

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Here you will find past versions of the reference buildings for new construction commercial buildings, organized by building type and location. A summary of building types and climate zones is...

  20. Archive Reference Buildings by Building Type: Stand-alone retail

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Here you will find past versions of the reference buildings for new construction commercial buildings, organized by building type and location. A summary of building types and climate zones is...

  1. Archive Reference Buildings by Building Type: Small office

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Here you will find past versions of the reference buildings for new construction commercial buildings, organized by building type and location. A summary of building types and climate zones is...

  2. Archive Reference Buildings by Building Type: Primary school

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Here you will find past versions of the reference buildings for new construction commercial buildings, organized by building type and location. A summary of building types and climate zones is...

  3. Archive Reference Buildings by Building Type: Fast food

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Here you will find past versions of the reference buildings for new construction commercial buildings, organized by building type and location. A summary of building types and climate zones is...

  4. Archive Reference Buildings by Building Type: Secondary school

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Here you will find past versions of the reference buildings for new construction commercial buildings, organized by building type and location. A summary of building types and climate zones is...

  5. Supporting dependently typed functional programming with proof automation and testing 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wilson, Sean

    2011-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Dependent types can be used to capture useful properties about programs at compile time. However, developing dependently typed programs can be difficult in current systems. Capturing interesting program properties usually ...

  6. BMW ALGEBRA, QUANTIZED COORDINATE ALGEBRA AND TYPE C SCHURWEYL DUALITY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sydney, University of

    BMW ALGEBRA, QUANTIZED COORDINATE ALGEBRA AND TYPE C SCHUR­WEYL DUALITY JUN HU Abstract. We prove enveloping algebra of type C 6 3. BMW algebras and a generalized FRT construction 9 4. A comparison of two

  7. Tankless or Demand-Type Water Heaters | Department of Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Tankless or Demand-Type Water Heaters Tankless or Demand-Type Water Heaters May 2, 2012 - 6:47pm Addthis Diagram of a tankless water heater. Diagram of a tankless water heater. How...

  8. Nonminimal coupling and Bianchi type-I cosmologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Accioly, A.J.; Vaidya, A.N.; Som, M.M.

    1983-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Bianchi type-I exact solutions are obtained in two models involving nonminimal coupling of gravitation and other fields.

  9. Type-Based Termination, Inflationary Fixed-Points, and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abel, Andreas

    Type-Based Termination, Inflationary Fixed-Points, and Mixed Inductive-Coinductive Types Andreas Science (FICS 2012) ETAPS 2012, Tallinn, Estonia 24 March 2012 Andreas Abel (LMU) Type-Based Termination AIM XV 1 / 1 #12;Introduction Aspects of Termination What the talk is about: foundational approach

  10. Alexandria Digital Earth ProtoType The Alexandria Digital Earth

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Janée, Greg

    Alexandria Digital Earth ProtoType The Alexandria Digital Earth Prototype System Terence Smith Greg Janée James Frew Anita Coleman #12;Alexandria Digital Earth ProtoType 2Smith et al. / JCDL 2001 / 2x Earth ProtoType 3Smith et al. / JCDL 2001 / 2x-Jun-2001 Core System (inherited from ADL) Components

  11. Recurrence formulas for Macdonald polynomials of type A

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schlosser, Michael

    Recurrence formulas for Macdonald polynomials of type A Michel Lassalle Centre National de la://www.mat.univie.ac.at/~schlosse Abstract We consider products of two Macdonald polynomials of type A, indexed by dominant weights which­th fundamental weight. We give the explicit decomposition of any Macdonald polynomial of type A in terms

  12. Recurrence formulas for Macdonald polynomials of type A

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schlosser, Michael

    Recurrence formulas for Macdonald polynomials of type A Michel Lassalle Centre National de la://www.mat.univie.ac.at/~schlosse Abstract We consider products of two Macdonald polynomials of type A, indexed by dominant weights which-th fundamental weight. We give the explicit decomposition of any Macdonald polynomial of type A in terms

  13. FROM MACDONALD POLYNOMIALS TO A CHARGE STATISTIC BEYOND TYPE A

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lenart, Cristian

    FROM MACDONALD POLYNOMIALS TO A CHARGE STATISTIC BEYOND TYPE A CRISTIAN LENART Abstract. The charge Lie types, based on the recent Ram-Yip formula for Macdonald polynomials and the quantum Bruhat order, and in type C we obtain a new statistic. This method is based on the theory of Macdonald polynomials and

  14. TUKEY TYPES OF ULTRAFILTERS NATASHA DOBRINEN AND STEVO TODORCEVIC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dobrinen, Natasha

    TUKEY TYPES OF ULTRAFILTERS NATASHA DOBRINEN AND STEVO TODORCEVIC Abstract. We investigate the structure of the Tukey types of ultrafilters on countable sets partially ordered by reverse inclusion to study the Tukey types of p-points and selective ultrafilters. Results fall into three main categories

  15. Polymorphic CSP Type Checking Ping Gao and Robert Esser

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Esser, Robert

    Polymorphic CSP Type Checking Ping Gao and Robert Esser Concurrent and Real­time Systems Laboratory@cs.adelaide.edu.au Abstract Communicating Sequential Processes (CSP) is a lan­ guage used to describe and reason about between a conventional functional lan­ guage type checker and a type checker for the CSP language

  16. Formal Type Soundness for Cyclone's Region System Dan Grossman

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hicks, Michael

    management of Cyclone and its static typing discipline. The design incorporates several advance- mentsFormal Type Soundness for Cyclone's Region System Dan Grossman Greg Morrisett Trevor Jim Mike Hicks Yanling Wang James Cheney November 2001 Abstract Cyclone is a polymorphic, type-safe programming language

  17. GUTs on Compact Type IIB Orientifolds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blumenhagen, Ralph; /Munich, Max Planck Inst.; Braun, Volker; /Dublin Inst.; Grimm, Thomas W.; /Bonn U.; Weigand, Timo; /SLAC

    2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We systematically analyze globally consistent SU(5) GUT models on intersecting D7-branes in genuine Calabi-Yau orientifolds with O3- and O7-planes. Beyond the well-known tadpole and K-theory cancellation conditions there exist a number of additional subtle but quite restrictive constraints. For the realization of SU(5) GUTs with gauge symmetry breaking via U(1)Y flux we present two classes of suitable Calabi-Yau manifolds defined via del Pezzo transitions of the elliptically fibred hypersurface P{sub 1,1,1,6,9}[18] and of the Quintic P{sub 1,1,1,1,1}[5], respectively. To define an orientifold projection we classify all involutions on del Pezzo surfaces. We work out the model building prospects of these geometries and present five globally consistent string GUT models in detail, including a 3-generation SU(5) model with no exotics whatsoever. We also realize other phenomenological features such as the 10 10 5{sub H} Yukawa coupling and comment on the possibility of moduli stabilization, where we find an entire new set of so-called swiss-cheese type Calabi-Yau manifolds. It is expected that both the general constrained structure and the concrete models lift to F-theory vacua on compact Calabi-Yau fourfolds.

  18. EARLY EMISSION FROM TYPE Ia SUPERNOVAE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rabinak, Itay; Waxman, Eli [Department of Particle Physics and Astrophysics, Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovot 76100 (Israel); Livne, Eli, E-mail: itay.rabinak@weizmann.ac.il [Racah Institute of Physics, Hebrew University, Jerusalem (Israel)

    2012-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

    A unique feature of deflagration-to-detonation (DDT) white dwarf explosion models of supernovae of type Ia is the presence of a strong shock wave propagating through the outer envelope. We consider the early emission expected in such models, which is produced by the expanding shock-heated outer part of the ejecta and precedes the emission driven by radioactive decay. We expand on earlier analyses by considering the modification of the pre-detonation density profile by the weak shocks generated during the deflagration phase, the time evolution of the opacity, and the deviation of the post-shock equation of state from that obtained for radiation pressure domination. A simple analytic model is presented and shown to provide an acceptable approximation to the results of one-dimensional numerical DDT simulations. Our analysis predicts a {approx}10{sup 3} s long UV/optical flash with a luminosity of {approx}1 to {approx}3 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 39} erg s{sup -1}. Lower luminosity corresponds to faster (turbulent) deflagration velocity. The luminosity of the UV flash is predicted to be strongly suppressed at t > t{sub drop} {approx} 1 hr due to the deviation from pure radiation domination.

  19. EPICS Version 4 - Implementing Complex Data Types

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marty Kraimer,; John dalesio

    2012-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Through phase 1 and phase 2 SBIR grants, s fully functional I/O Controller and communication protocol for version 4 of EPICS is completed. This new software architecture provides a flexible and extendible architecture. Version 4 is implemented fully in Java. The performance metrics look promising. The final portion of phase 2 is to optimize the communication mechanisms. Subsequent work on different aspects of this are required to provide a viable solutions in various areas. Version 3 of EPICS is able to provide a platform for implementing channel based control, because the channel and attributes for time stamping, alarm, display and control were narrow, well defined, and complete. To extend EPICS functionality beyond this, it is necessary to define attributes needed for archive data, array, image data, and directory services. The proper handling of several array types enables the development of middle layer servers such as orbit and bump control in accelerators. Phase 1 should produce a well defined, reviewed, and agreed upon definition of the metadata required for these services. A Phase 2 grant would provide tools that implemented archiving, general array, imaging, and directory applications.

  20. Behavior of type 304 and type 316 austenitic stainless in 55% lithium bromide heavy brine environments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Itzhak, D.; Elias, O. (Ben-Gurion Univ., Beer-Sheva (Israel). Dept. of Materials Engineering)

    1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Cylindrical tensile specimens of AISI type 304 (UNS S30400) and type 316 (UNS S31600) stainless steels (SS) were tested under constant-load conditions in 55% lithium bromide (LiBr) heavy brines at temperatures of 120 C and 140 C. Elongation and open-circuit potential (OCP) were recorded during the tensile test. Potentiodynamic polarization measurements were conducted, and the failed surface fractures were examined by scanning electron microscopy. The tested SS were subjected to stress corrosion under the test environments. Sensitivity was affected strongly by pH values. In LiBr brine of pH = 11.6, the passivation processes were more effective than in brine of pH = 6 [approximately] 8. Because of effective passivation behavior in brine of pH = 11.6, lower values of [delta]l[sub 0] were measured, indicating lower dislocation relaxation processes and high resistance to stress corrosion cracking.

  1. Constraining Cosmic Evolution of Type Ia Supernovae

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Foley, Ryan J.; Filippenko, Alexei V.; Aguilera, C.; Becker, A.C.; Blondin, S.; Challis, P.; Clocchiatti, A.; Covarrubias, R.; Davis, T.M.; Garnavich, P.M.; Jha, S.; Kirshner, R.P.; Krisciunas, K.; Leibundgut, B.; Li, W.; Matheson, T.; Miceli, A.; Miknaitis, G.; Pignata, G.; Rest, A.; Riess, A.G.; /UC, Berkeley, Astron. Dept. /Cerro-Tololo InterAmerican Obs. /Washington U., Seattle, Astron. Dept. /Harvard-Smithsonian Ctr. Astrophys. /Chile U., Catolica /Bohr Inst. /Notre Dame U. /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Texas A-M /European Southern Observ. /NOAO, Tucson /Fermilab /Chile U., Santiago /Harvard U., Phys. Dept. /Baltimore, Space Telescope Sci. /Johns Hopkins U. /Res. Sch. Astron. Astrophys., Weston Creek /Stockholm U. /Hawaii U. /Illinois U., Urbana, Astron. Dept.

    2008-02-13T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the first large-scale effort of creating composite spectra of high-redshift type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) and comparing them to low-redshift counterparts. Through the ESSENCE project, we have obtained 107 spectra of 88 high-redshift SNe Ia with excellent light-curve information. In addition, we have obtained 397 spectra of low-redshift SNe through a multiple-decade effort at Lick and Keck Observatories, and we have used 45 ultraviolet spectra obtained by HST/IUE. The low-redshift spectra act as a control sample when comparing to the ESSENCE spectra. In all instances, the ESSENCE and Lick composite spectra appear very similar. The addition of galaxy light to the Lick composite spectra allows a nearly perfect match of the overall spectral-energy distribution with the ESSENCE composite spectra, indicating that the high-redshift SNe are more contaminated with host-galaxy light than their low-redshift counterparts. This is caused by observing objects at all redshifts with similar slit widths, which corresponds to different projected distances. After correcting for the galaxy-light contamination, subtle differences in the spectra remain. We have estimated the systematic errors when using current spectral templates for K-corrections to be {approx}0.02 mag. The variance in the composite spectra give an estimate of the intrinsic variance in low-redshift maximum-light SN spectra of {approx}3% in the optical and growing toward the ultraviolet. The difference between the maximum-light low and high-redshift spectra constrain SN evolution between our samples to be < 10% in the rest-frame optical.

  2. SHOCK BREAKOUT FROM TYPE Ia SUPERNOVA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Piro, Anthony L.; Chang, Philip; Weinberg, Nevin N., E-mail: tpiro@astro.berkeley.ed, E-mail: pchang@astro.berkeley.ed, E-mail: nweinberg@astro.berkeley.ed [Astronomy Department and Theoretical Astrophysics Center, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The mode of explosive burning in Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) remains an outstanding problem. It is generally thought to begin as a subsonic deflagration, but this may transition into a supersonic detonation (the delayed detonation transition, DDT). We argue that this transition leads to a breakout shock, which would provide the first unambiguous evidence that DDTs occur. Its main features are a hard X-ray flash (approx20 keV) lasting approx10{sup -2} s with a total radiated energy of approx10{sup 40} erg, followed by a cooling tail. This creates a distinct feature in the visual light curve, which is separate from the nickel decay. This cooling tail has a maximum absolute visual magnitude of M{sub V} approx -9 to -10 at approx1 day, which depends most sensitively on the white dwarf radius at the time of the DDT. As the thermal diffusion wave moves in, the composition of these surface layers may be imprinted as spectral features, which would help to discern between SN Ia progenitor models. Since this feature should accompany every SNe Ia, future deep surveys (e.g., m = 24) will see it out to a distance of approx80 Mpc, giving a maximum rate of approx60 yr{sup -1}. Archival data sets can also be used to study the early rise dictated by the shock heating (at approx20 days before maximum B-band light). A similar and slightly brighter event may also accompany core bounce during the accretion-induced collapse to a neutron star, but with a lower occurrence rate.

  3. Grain Sorghums Versus Corn for Fattening Lambs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jones, J. M. (John McKinley); Brewer, Roy A.

    1922-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    , DIRECTOR COLLEGE STATION, BRAZOS COUNTY, TEXAS A8-122-15M-L STATION STAFF? ADMINISTRATION ENTOMOLOGY B. YOUNGBLOOD M. S Ph. D Director CHARLES A. FEL~ER, chief ~le& A. S. WARE Secretary A. D. JACK~ON Ezecutive Assistant CHARLES GOR~YCKI Technical.... gain. ....................... Initial cost per lamb at feed lot.. ..................... ..... Interest, labor, selling and shipping cost per lamb. Average feed cost ~er lamb.. ........................ ............................... Total cost per...

  4. Influence of Climate on Composition of Corn.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harrington, H. H. (Henry Hill); Adriance, Duncan

    1891-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ........................... ......................... Water Ash ........................... Albuminoidu ................... Fiber .......................... Xi trogen-free Ex .............. Fat ............................ 4.49 5.14 23.78 64.50 2.09 3.58 3.86 4.14 6.38 22.54 65.11 1.93 ;7... ............................ ................... Albuminoids Fiber .......................... ............... Nitrogen-free Ex .......................... Fats 5 1.81 10.52 2.09 10.97 2.06 69.97 4.36 1.02 11.60 1.83 80.12 5.43 617 1.56 1.65 9.73 11.62 2.00, 2.07 4 ------- 1.71 9.75 1...

  5. Maximizing the enzymic saccharification of corn stover

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kaar, William Edward

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    /g i3-glucosidase (Novozyme 188) and 5 FPU/g cellulase (Spezyme-CP) were added The flasks were then cultured in an incubated shaker (50 'C, 100 rpm, Amerex Instruments ' All enzyme loadings given as activity units per gram of dry biomass. Orbital...

  6. Factors affecting viscosity changes in corn

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McGill, Kendra Louise

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of heating rate, holding temperature and CMC. Differences were found to exist between meals from different crop years which were not attributable to particle size. When tested at 13, 15 and 17% solids, new meal consistently developed viscosity earliest...

  7. 2013 New York Hybrid Corn Grain

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pawlowski, Wojtek

    Hall Ithaca, NY 14853-1901 Building Strong and Vibrant New York Communities Cornell Cooperative Extension provides equal program and employment opportunities. NYS College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, NYS College of Human Ecology, and NYS College of Veterinary Medicine at Cornell University

  8. 2012 New York Hybrid Corn Grain

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pawlowski, Wojtek

    -1901 Building Strong and Vibrant New York Communities Cornell Cooperative Extension provides equal program and employment opportunities. NYS College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, NYS College of Human Ecology, and NYS

  9. 2010 New York Hybrid Corn Grain

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pawlowski, Wojtek

    -1901 Building Strong and Vibrant New York Communities Cornell Cooperative Extension provides equal program and employment opportunities. NYS College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, NYS College of Human Ecology, and NYS

  10. 2011 New York Hybrid Corn Grain

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pawlowski, Wojtek

    -1901 Building Strong and Vibrant New York Communities Cornell Cooperative Extension provides equal program and employment opportunities. NYS College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, NYS College of Human Ecology, and NYS

  11. 2008 New York Hybrid Corn Grain

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pawlowski, Wojtek

    -1901 Building Strong and Vibrant New York Communities Cornell Cooperative Extension provides equal program and employment opportunities. NYS College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, NYS College of Human Ecology, and NYS

  12. 2009 New York Hybrid Corn Grain

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pawlowski, Wojtek

    -1901 Building Strong and Vibrant New York Communities Cornell Cooperative Extension provides equal program and employment opportunities. NYS College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, NYS College of Human Ecology, and NYS

  13. Corn Belt Power Coop | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address: 160Benin:EnergyWisconsin:2003) |Cordova Electric Coop, IncKilauea Volcano,2A,CorixPower

  14. Corning, Iowa: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address: 160Benin:EnergyWisconsin:2003) |Cordova Electric Coop, IncKilauea Jump

  15. Dow Corning Corp | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address:011-DNA Jump to:52c8ff988c1DeringDolgeville,Massachusetts: Energy

  16. Heartland Corn Products | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation,Ohio:Greer CountyCorridorPart A Permit ApplicationHeartland Biofuel

  17. Corn and Cotton Experiments for 1908.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Welborn, W. C. (Wayne C.)

    1908-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    be judged. The beds were dragged down, and planted at the usual time. No. 2 was center furro~ved and bedded, the plow running six inches deep as nearly as could be judged, and the beds were dragged down as before. Acre No. 3 v,-as flat broken 6 inches.... Rennett's. Dallas Fair No. 12, Dallas Fair No. 5. - -. - Bennett's. 31.66 Da1la.j Fair No. 6. 28.33 Dallas Fair No. 2. 27.08 Crib. 24.16 - . -- - -- Bennett's. Dallas Fair No. 4. Crib. Dallas Fair No. 3. Kennett's. 'Jrih. Dallas Fair No...

  18. Corn Plus Wind Farm | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of InspectorConcentratingRenewable Solutions LLC Jump to:Information NewAdvisors Jump2007) |

  19. Pro Corn LLC | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: Energy ResourcesLoadingPenobscot County, Maine:Plug Power IncPowderClimateMeadows, NewPrior Lake,Sector Jump

  20. Al Corn Clean Fuel | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address: 160 East 300 SouthWaterBrasil JumpAerowattOpen2008 | Open

  1. Corn Belt Energy Corporation | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of InspectorConcentrating Solar Power Basics (The following text is derivedCoReturnCookson HillsCoral

  2. Tall Corn Ethanol LLC | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia:FAQ < RAPID Jump to:Seadov Pty LtdSteen,Ltd Jump to: navigation,Open EnergyFacilityTEPCounty,TaliaferroTall

  3. Logs Wood Chips Straw Corn Switchgrass

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:Year in3.pdfEnergy Health andofIanJenniferLeslieEnergy Loan LossProjects | Clean energy can

  4. Grain Sorghum Vs. Corn for Fattening Lambs.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jones, J. M. (John McKinley); Brewer, Roy A.; Dickson, R. E.

    1920-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    , Ezecutive Assisfant Apiculturist CHARLES SOSOLIK. Technical Assistant C. 's.' RGDE: B. 's.','A ssistant EntornoIog~ VETERINARY SCIENCE *M FRANCIS D. V M Chief H. SCHMIDT, D. V. s., herinarian D. H. BENNETT. V. M. D., Veterinarian CHEMISTRY G S FRAPS...

  5. Bioaugmentation for Electricity Generation from Corn Stover

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    for microbial fermenta- tion to ethanol. This conversion of cellulose to sugars can,suchascornstover,forethanolproduction (1-3). One of the main technical obstacles is that cellulose needs to first be converted to sugars gas through cellulose fermentation or electricity in microbial fuel cells (MFCs) (3, 4). On the anode

  6. THE LOCAL HOSTS OF TYPE Ia SUPERNOVAE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Neill, James D.; Martin, D. Christopher; Barlow, Tom A.; Foster, Karl; Friedman, Peter G.; Morrissey, Patrick; Wyder, Ted K. [California Institute of Technology, 1200 E. California Blvd., Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Sullivan, Mark [University of Oxford, Denys Wilkinson Building, Keble Road, Oxford, OX1 3RH (United Kingdom); Howell, D. Andrew [Las Cumbres Observatory Global Telescope Network, 6740 Cortona Dr., Suite 102, Goleta, CA 93117 (United States); Conley, Alex [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of Toronto, 50 St. George Street, Toronto, ONM5S3H8 (Canada); Seibert, Mark; Madore, Barry F. [The Observatories of the Carnegie Institute of Washington, 813 Santa Barbara Street, Pasadena, CA, 91101 (United States); Neff, Susan G. [Laboratory for Astronomy and Solar Physics, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Schiminovich, David [Department of Astronomy, Columbia University, New York, NY 10027 (United States); Bianchi, Luciana [Center for Astrophysical Sciences, Johns Hopkins University, 3400 N. Charles St., Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Donas, Jose; Milliard, Bruno [Laboratoire d'Astrophysique de Marseille, BP 8, Traverse du Siphon, 13376 Marseille Cedex 12 (France); Heckman, Timothy M. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Johns Hopkins University, Homewood Campus, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Lee, Young-Wook [Center for Space Astrophysics, Yonsei University, Seoul 120-749 (Korea, Republic of); Rich, R. Michael [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States)

    2009-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We use multi-wavelength, matched aperture, integrated photometry from the Galaxy Evolution Explorer (GALEX), the Sloan Digital Sky Survey, and the RC3 to estimate the physical properties of 166 nearby galaxies hosting 168 well-observed Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia). The ultraviolet (UV) imaging of local SN Ia hosts from GALEX allows a direct comparison with higher-redshift hosts measured at optical wavelengths that correspond to the rest-frame UV. Our data corroborate well-known features that have been seen in other SN Ia samples. Specifically, hosts with active star formation produce brighter and slower SNe Ia on average, and hosts with luminosity-weighted ages older than 1 Gyr produce on average more faint, fast, and fewer bright, slow SNe Ia than younger hosts. New results include that in our sample, the faintest and fastest SNe Ia occur only in galaxies exceeding a stellar mass threshold of approx10{sup 10} M{sub sun}, leading us to conclude that their progenitors must arise in populations that are older and/or more metal rich than the general SN Ia population. A low host extinction subsample hints at a residual trend in peak luminosity with host age, after correcting for light-curve shape, giving the appearance that older hosts produce less-extincted SNe Ia on average. This has implications for cosmological fitting of SNe Ia, and suggests that host age could be useful as a parameter in the fitting. Converting host mass to metallicity and computing {sup 56}Ni mass from the supernova light curves, we find that our local sample is consistent with a model that predicts a shallow trend between stellar metallicity and the {sup 56}Ni mass that powers the explosion, but we cannot rule out the absence of a trend. We measure a correlation between {sup 56}Ni mass and host age in the local universe that is shallower and not as significant as that seen at higher redshifts. The details of the age-{sup 56}Ni mass correlations at low and higher redshift imply a luminosity-weighted age threshold of approx3 Gyr for SN Ia hosts, above which they are less likely to produce SNe Ia with {sup 56}Ni masses above approx0.5 M{sub sun}.

  7. n-Type diamond and method for producing same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Anderson, Richard J. (Oakland, CA)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A new n-type semiconducting diamond is disclosed, which is doped with n-type dopant atoms. Such diamond is advantageously formed by chemical vapor deposition from a source gas mixture comprising a carbon source compound for the diamond, and a volatile hot wire filament for the n-type impurity species, so that the n-type impurity atoms are doped in the diamond during its formation. A corresponding chemical vapor deposition method of forming the n-type semiconducting diamond is disclosed. The n-type semiconducting diamond of the invention may be usefully employed in the formation of diamond-based transistor devices comprising pn diamond junctions, and in other microelectronic device applications.

  8. P-type and N-type multi-gate polycrystalline silicon vertical thin film transistors based on low-temperature technology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    is obtained. P-type and N-type vertical TFTs have shown symmetric electrical characteristics. DifferentP-type and N-type multi-gate polycrystalline silicon vertical thin film transistors based on low) ABSTRACT P-type and N-type multi-gate vertical thin film transistors (vertical TFTs) have been fabricated

  9. Three Sources of Disjunction in a Typed Feature Structurebased Resolution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carpenter, Bob

    coffee. (d) The Ukranian drinks tea. (e) The green house is immediately to the right of the ivory house) The Englishman lives in the red house. (b) The Spaniard owns the dog. (c) The man in the green house drinks, it is not only true that objects of type ivory, blue, red, yellow, and green are of type col­type 4 , but also

  10. Soil-site relationships to photodelineated forest types

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    King, Dale Robert

    1975-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    SOIL-SITE RELATIONSHIPS TO PHOTODELINEATED FOREST TYPES A Thesis by DALE ROBERT KING Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A(M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1975 Major... to Photodelineated Forest Types (December 1975) Dale Robert King, B. A. , Catawba College; Directed by: Dr. David M. Moehring The objective of this study was to determine the structural characteristics of selected forest types and investigate the feasibility...

  11. Renewal processes of Mittag-Leffler and Wright type

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Francesco Mainardi; Rudolf Gorenflo; Alessandro Vivoli

    2007-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

    After sketching the basic principles of renewal theory we discuss the classical Poisson process and offer two other processes, namely the renewal process of Mittag-Leffler type and the renewal process of Wright type, so named by us because special functions of Mittag-Leffler and of Wright type appear in the definition of the relevant waiting times. We compare these three processes with each other, furthermore consider corresponding renewal processes with reward and numerically their long-time behaviour.

  12. Quality attributes of four morphological types of tomatoes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shaw, Ronnie Joe

    1971-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ABSTRACT QUALITY ATTRIBUTL'S OF FOUR MORPHOLOGICAL TYPES OF TOMATOES December 1971 RONNIE J. SHAW B. S. , Texas A&M University Directed by: Dr. E, E. Burns Field ripened tomato fruit of four morphological types (blocky- pear, pear, plum, cherry...) were evaluated for raw fruit characteristics and for product characteristics of tomato juice and canned whole tomatoes produced from these fruit types. Correlations between attributes of raw tomato fruit and product quality were noted. Comparisons...

  13. assisting type regional: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Assistant Job Type: ASU GRA Environmental Sciences and Ecology Websites Summary: , statistics, qualitative, and semi-qualitative research methodologies is desired. Excellent...

  14. Type Ia Supernova Hubble Residuals and Host-Galaxy Properties

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, A. G.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    magnitudes of type Ia supernovae from multi-band lightsuch an analysis on the supernovae of the Nearby Supernovaheadings: distance scale, supernovae: general 1 Physics

  15. K-corrections and spectral templates of Type Ia supernovae

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hsiao, E. Y.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    templates of Type Ia supernovae E. Y. Hsiao 1 , A. Conleyobservations of low-redshift supernovae are less a?ected byobservations, stars: supernovae Department of Physics and

  16. Type B Accident Investigation Board Report Subcontractor Radioactive...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Subcontractor Radioactive Release During Transportation Activities on May 14, 2004, Bechtel Jacobs Company LLC, Oak Ridge, Tennessee (Amended) Type B Accident Investigation Board...

  17. Type B Accident Investigation Board Report of the September 29...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    at the Separations Process Research Unit (SPRU), Building H2 Demolition, in Niskayuna, New, York Type B Accident Investigation Board Report of the September 29, 2010,...

  18. COLLOQUIUM: Type II Solar Radio Bursts: From Fundamental Plasma...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Auditorium COLLOQUIUM: Type II Solar Radio Bursts: From Fundamental Plasma Physics to Space Weather Research Professor Iver Cairns University of Sydney - School of Physics For...

  19. Type B Accident Investigation Board Report of the Brookhaven...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Closure Hanford, LLC, Employee Fall Injury on July 1, 2009, At The 336 Building, Hanford Site, Washington Type B Accident Investigation Board Report on the September 4,...

  20. A polynomial relaxation-type algorithm for linear programming

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2011-02-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Feb 6, 2011 ... The paper proposes a polynomial algorithm for solving systems of ... a polynomial relaxation-type procedure which either finds a solution for.