Sample records for two-mile mesa complex

  1. Final Environmental Assessment for the Proposed Consolidation of Certain Dynamic Experimentation Activities at the Two-Mile Mesa Complex Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    N /A

    2003-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

    The National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA) requires Federal agency officials to consider the environmental consequences of their proposed actions before decisions are made. In complying with NEPA, the United States (U.S.) Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), follows the Council on Environmental Quality regulations (40 CFR 1500-1508) and DOE's NEPA implementing procedures (10 CFR 1021). The purpose of an environmental assessment (EA) is to provide Federal decision makers with sufficient evidence and analysis to determine whether to prepare an environmental impact statement (EIS) or issue a Finding of No Significant Impact. Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) is a national security laboratory located at Los Alamos, New Mexico, that comprises about 40 square miles (mi{sup 2}) (103.6 square kilometers [km{sup 2}]) of buildings, structures, and forested land (Figure 1). It is administered by NNSA for the Federal government and is managed and operated under contract by the University of California (UC). The NNSA must make a decision whether to consolidate and construct new facilities for the Dynamic Experimentation Division (DX) to create a central core area of facilities, including offices, laboratories, and other support structures, at LANL's Two-Mile Mesa Complex, which comprises portions of Technical Area (TA) 6, TA-22, and TA-40. This Proposed Action would involve constructing new buildings; consolidating existing operations and offices; enhancing utilities, roads, and security infrastructure; and demolishing or removing older buildings, structures, and transportables at various technical areas used by DX (Figure 2). This EA has been prepared to assess the potential environmental consequences of this proposed construction, operational consolidation, and demolition project. The objectives of this EA are to (1) describe the underlying purpose and need for NNSA action; (2) describe the Proposed Action and identify and describe any reasonable alternatives that satisfy the purpose and need for agency action; (3) describe baseline environmental conditions at LANL; (4) analyze the potential indirect, direct, and cumulative effects to the existing environment from implementation of the Proposed Action, and (5) compare the effects of the Proposed Action with the No Action Alternative and other reasonable alternatives. For the purposes of compliance with NEPA, reasonable alternatives are identified as being those that meet NNSA's purpose and need for action by virtue of timeliness, appropriate technology, and applicability to LANL. The EA process provides NNSA with environmental information that can be used in developing mitigative actions, if necessary, to minimize or avoid adverse effects to the quality of the human environment and natural ecosystems should NNSA decide to proceed with implementing the Proposed Action at LANL. Ultimately, the goal of NEPA, and this EA, is to aid NNSA officials in making decisions based on an understanding of environmental consequences and in taking actions that protect, restore, and enhance the environment.

  2. Red Sky with Red Mesa

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2014-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The Red Sky/Red Mesa supercomputing platform dramatically reduces the time required to simulate complex fuel models, from 4-6 months to just 4 weeks, allowing researchers to accelerate the pace at which they can address these complex problems. Its speed also reduces the need for laboratory and field testing, allowing for energy reduction far beyond data center walls.

  3. Uncompahgre Mesas Forest Restoration Project

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    March 2010 Uncompahgre Mesas Forest Restoration Project Collaboration Case Study #12;Uncompahgre Mesas Forest Restoration Project 1 1 Colorado Forest Restoration Institute Collaboration Case Study: Uncompahgre Mesas Forest Restoration Project Corrie Knapp Prepared for the Colorado Forest Restoration

  4. Results of the radiological survey at Two Mile Creek, Tonawanda, New York (TNY002)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Murray, M.E.; Rodriguez, R.E.; Uziel, M.S.

    1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    At the request of the US Department of Energy (DOE), a team from Oak Ridge National Laboratory conducted a radiological survey at Two Mile Creek, Tonawanda, New York. The survey was performed in November 1991 and May 1996. The purpose of the survey was to determine if radioactive materials from work performed under government contract at the Linde Air Products Division of Union Carbide Corporation, Tonawanda, New York, had been transported into the creek. The survey included a surface gamma scan in accessible areas near the creek and the collection of soil, sediment, and core samples for radionuclide analyses. Survey results indicate that no significant material originating at the Linde plant is presently in the creek. Three of the 1991 soil sample locations on the creek bank and one near the lake contained slightly elevated concentrations of {sup 238}U with radionuclide distributions similar to that found in materials resulting from former processing activities at the Linde site.

  5. Mesa Verde's New Museum Showcases Sustainable Building Technologies...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Mesa Verde's New Museum Showcases Sustainable Building Technologies Mesa Verde's New Museum Showcases Sustainable Building Technologies April 18, 2013 - 11:42am Addthis Mesa Verde...

  6. EA-1447: Final Environmental Assessment

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Proposed Consolidation of Certain Dynamic Experimentation Activities at the Two-Mile Mesa Complex Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico

  7. MESA Products, Inc. MESA Products, Inc. is a small, privately held business

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Magee, Joseph W.

    MESA Products, Inc. MESA Products, Inc. is a small, privately held business that designs in underground and submerged structures, such as pipelines and tanks. MESA sells products and materials and production facility are based in Tulsa, Okla.; branch offices are in Houston, Texas; Tallahassee, Fla

  8. High Mesa | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revision hasInformation Earth's Heat Jump to:Photon Place:NetHealthHigganum, Connecticut: EnergyMesa Jump to:

  9. Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Kenigson Hartman Hartman Mesa Kenigson

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rider, Brian

    Havasi Purkis Hower Mesa Limburg Shannon Scherer Nishikawa Liu Stein Pelfrey Blakestad Hower Pelfrey

  10. Completion Report for Well ER-EC-15 Corrective Action Units 101 and 102: Central and Western Pahute Mesa

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NSTec Environmental Management

    2011-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Well ER-EC-15 was drilled for the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office in support of the Nevada Environmental Restoration Project at the Nevada National Security Site (formerly known as the Nevada Test Site), Nye County, Nevada. The well was drilled in October and November 2010, as part of the Pahute Mesa Phase II drilling program. The primary purpose of the well was to provide detailed hydrogeologic information in the Tertiary volcanic section in the area between Pahute Mesa and the Timber Mountain caldera complex that will help address uncertainties within the Pahute Mesa–Oasis Valley hydrostratigraphic model. In particular, the well was intended to help define the structural position and hydraulic parameters of volcanic aquifers potentially down-gradient from underground nuclear tests on Pahute Mesa. It may also be used as a long-term monitoring well.

  11. Completion Report for Well ER-EC-12 Corrective Action Units 101 and 102: Central and Western Pahute Mesa

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NSTec Environmental Management

    2011-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Well ER-EC-12 was drilled for the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office in support of the Nevada Environmental Restoration Project at the Nevada National Security Site (formerly known as the Nevada Test Site), Nye County, Nevada. The well was drilled in June and July 2010 as part of the Pahute Mesa Phase II drilling program. The primary purpose of the well was to provide detailed hydrogeologic information in the Tertiary volcanic section in the area between Pahute Mesa and the Timber Mountain caldera complex that will help address uncertainties within the Pahute Mesa–Oasis Valley hydrostratigraphic model. In particular, the well was intended to help define the structural position and hydraulic parameters for volcanic aquifers potentially down-gradient from historic underground nuclear tests on Pahute Mesa. It may also be used as a long-term monitoring well.

  12. EIS-0472: Uranium Leasing Program, Mesa, Montrose, and San Miguel...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Uranium Leasing Program, Mesa, Montrose, and San Miguel Counties, Colorado March 15, 2013 EIS-0472: DOE Notice of Availability of a Draft Programmatic Environmental Impact...

  13. Survey of Critical Wetlands and Riparian Areas in Mesa County

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Survey of Critical Wetlands and Riparian Areas in Mesa County Colorado Natural Heritage Program, Colorado 80523 #12;Survey of Critical Wetlands and Riparian Areas in Mesa County Prepared for: Colorado Department of Natural Resources Division of Wildlife, Wetlands Program 6060 Broadway Denver, Colorado 80203

  14. Aragonne Mesa Wind Farm | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of InspectorConcentrating SolarElectricEnergyCT Biomass Facility JumpvolcanicPhaseAquila Inc Place:Aragonne Mesa

  15. Sandia National Laboratories: Mesa del Sol

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 -theErik Spoerke SSLS ExhibitIowaLosSandia Participated in AMII toandUsingMesa del

  16. Sandia National Laboratories: Mesa del Sol

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 -theErik Spoerke SSLS ExhibitIowaLosSandia Participated in AMII toandUsingMesa

  17. Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 99: Rainier Mesa/Shoshone Mountain, Nevada Test Site, Nevada with Errata and ROTC 1, Rev. No. 0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    John McCord; Marutzky, Sam

    2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Corrective Action Investigation Plan (CAIP) was developed for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 99, Rainier Mesa/Shoshone Mountain. The CAIP is a requirement of the ''Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order'' (FFACO) agreed to by the State of Nevada, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), and the U.S. Department of Defense (DoD) (FFACO, 1996). The FFACO addresses environmental restoration activities at U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) facilities and sites including the underground testing area(s) of the Nevada Test Site (NTS). This CAIP describes the investigation activities currently planned for the Rainier Mesa/Shoshone Mountain CAU. These activities are consistent with the current Underground Test Area (UGTA) Project strategy described in Section 3.0 of Appendix VI, Revision No. 1 (December 7, 2000) of the FFACO (1996) and summarized in Section 2.1.2 of this plan. The Rainier Mesa/Shoshone Mountain CAU extends over several areas of the NTS (Figure 1-1) and includes former underground nuclear testing locations in Areas 12 and 16. The area referred to as ''Rainier Mesa'' includes the geographical area of Rainier Mesa proper and the contiguous Aqueduct Mesa. Figure 1-2 shows the locations of the tests (within tunnel complexes) conducted at Rainier Mesa. Shoshone Mountain is located approximately 20 kilometers (km) south of Rainier Mesa, but is included within the same CAU due to similarities in their geologic setting and in the nature and types of nuclear tests conducted. Figure 1-3 shows the locations of the tests conducted at Shoshone Mountain. The Rainier Mesa/Shoshone Mountain CAU falls within the larger-scale Rainier Mesa/Shoshone Mountain Investigation Area, which also includes the northwest section of the Yucca Flat CAU as shown in Figure 1-1. Rainier Mesa and Shoshone Mountain lie adjacent to the Timber Mountain Caldera Complex and are composed of volcanic rocks that erupted from the caldera as well as from more distant sources. This has resulted in a layered volcanic stratigraphy composed of thick deposits of welded and nonwelded ash-flow tuff and lava flows. These deposits are proximal to the source caldera and are interstratified with the more distal facies of fallout tephra and bedded reworked tuff from more distant sources. In each area, a similar volcanic sequence was deposited upon Paleozoic carbonate and siliciclastic rocks that are disrupted by various thrust faults, normal faults, and strike-slip faults. In both Rainier Mesa (km) to the southwest, and Tippipah Spring, 4 km to the north, and the tunnel complex is dry. Particle-tracking simulations performed during the value of information analysis (VOIA) (SNJV, 2004b) indicate that most of the regional groundwater that underlies the test locations at Rainier Mesa and Shoshone Mountain eventually follows similar and parallel paths and ultimately discharges in Death Valley and the Amargosa Desert. Particle-tracking simulations conducted for the regional groundwater flow and risk assessment indicated that contamination from Rainier Mesa and Shoshone Mountain were unlikely to leave the NTS during the 1,000-year period of interest (DOE/NV, 1997a). It is anticipated that CAU-scale modeling will modify these results somewhat, but it is not expected to radically alter the outcome of these previous particle-tracking simulations within the 1,000-year period of interest. The Rainier Mesa/Shoshone Mountain CAIP describes the corrective action investigation (CAI) to be conducted at the Rainier Mesa/Shoshone Mountain CAU to evaluate the extent of contamination in groundwater due to the underground nuclear testing. The CAI will be conducted by the UGTA Project, which is part of the NNSA/NSO Environmental Restoration Project (ERP). The purpose and scope of the CAI are presented in this section, followed by a summary of the entire document.

  18. Inversion of Gravity Data to Define the Pre-Cenozoic Surface and Regional Structures Possibly Influencing Groundwater Flow in the Rainier Mesa Region, Nye County, Nevada.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thomas G. Hildenbrand; Geoffrey A. Phelps; Edward A. Mankinen

    2006-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

    A three-dimensional inversion of gravity data from the Rainier Mesa area and surrounding regions reveals a topographically complex pre-Cenozoic basement surface. This model of the depth to pre-Cenozoic basement rocks is intended for use in a 3D hydrogeologic model being constructed for the Rainier Mesa area. Prior to this study, our knowledge of the depth to pre-Cenozoic basement rocks was based on a regional model, applicable to general studies of the greater Nevada Test Site area but inappropriate for higher resolution modeling of ground-water flow across the Rainier Mesa area. The new model incorporates several changes that lead to significant improvements over the previous regional view. First, the addition of constraining wells, encountering old volcanic rocks lying above but near pre-Cenozoic basement, prevents modeled basement from being too shallow. Second, an extensive literature and well data search has led to an increased understanding of the change of rock density with depth in the vicinity of Rainier Mesa. The third, and most important change, relates to the application of several depth-density relationships in the study area instead of a single generalized relationship, thereby improving the overall model fit. In general, the pre-Cenozoic basement surface deepens in the western part of the study area, delineating collapses within the Silent Canyon and Timber Mountain caldera complexes, and shallows in the east in the Eleana Range and Yucca Flat regions, where basement crops out. In the Rainier Mesa study area, basement is generally shallow (< 1 km). The new model identifies previously unrecognized structures within the pre-Cenozoic basement that may influence ground-water flow, such as a shallow basement ridge related to an inferred fault extending northward from Rainier Mesa into Kawich Valley.

  19. Pollen analysis of Anasazi sites at Black Mesa, Arizona

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Murry, Robert Earl

    2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

    POLLEN ANALYSIS OF ANASAZI SITES AT BLACK MESA, ARIZONA A Thesis by ROBERT EARL MURRY, JR. Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas ASM IJnlversity in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF ARTS August 1983... Major Subject: Anthropology POLLEN ANALYSIS OF ANASAZI SITES AT BLACK MESA, ARIZONA A Thesis by ROBERT EARL MURRY, "Jr. Approved as to style and content by: G en on H. Weir (Chairman of Committee) a . Sha e e er) Hug D. Wilson (Member) Va ghn...

  20. Completion Report for Well ER-EC-13 Corrective Action Units 101 and 102: Central and Western Pahute Mesa

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NSTec Environmental Management

    2011-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Well ER-EC-13 was drilled for the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office, in support of the Nevada Environmental Restoration Project at the Nevada National Security Site (formerly Nevada Test Site), Nye County, Nevada. The well was drilled in October 2010 as part of the Pahute Mesa Phase II drilling program. A main objective was to provide detailed hydrogeologic information for the Fortymile Canyon composite unit hydrostratigraphic unit in the Timber Mountain moat area, within the Timber Mountain caldera complex, that will help address uncertainties within the Pahute Mesa–Oasis Valley hydrostratigraphic framework model. This well may also be used as a long-term monitoring well.

  1. Hydraulic Property and Soil Textural Classification Measurements for Rainier Mesa, Nevada Test Site, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ebel, Brian A.; Nimmo, John R.

    2009-12-29T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents particle size analysis, field-saturated hydraulic conductivity measurements, and qualitative descriptions of surficial materials at selected locations at Rainier Mesa, Nevada. Measurements and sample collection were conducted in the Rainier Mesa area, including unconsolidated sediments on top of the mesa, an ephemeral wash channel near the mesa edge, and dry U12n tunnel pond sediments below the mesa. Particle size analysis used a combination of sieving and optical diffraction techniques. Field-saturated hydraulic conductivity measurements employed a single-ring infiltrometer with analytical formulas that correct for falling head and spreading outside the ring domain. These measurements may prove useful to current and future efforts at Rainier Mesa aimed at understanding infiltration and its effect on water fluxes and radionuclide transport in the unsaturated zone.

  2. South Trent Mesa Wind Farm | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revisionEnvReviewNonInvasiveExplorationUT-g GrantAtlas (PACA Region -Sonelgaz JumpSouthDakota‎ |SouthTrent Mesa

  3. MESA Two-Year Anniversary | National Nuclear Security Administration

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: VegetationEquipment Surfaces and InterfacesAdministration -Lowell L. Wood,3,March 26,MEMSMESA OtherMESA

  4. Processes Limiting the Performance of InAs/GaSb Superlattice Mid-Infrared PIN Mesa Photodiodes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Flatte, Michael E.

    Processes Limiting the Performance of InAs/GaSb Superlattice Mid-Infrared PIN Mesa Photodiodes J. P superlattice pin photodiodes for different temperature and mesa size regimes. We show that the performance of large mesa photodiodes at low temperature is most severely limited by a trap-assisted tunneling leakage

  5. A Hydrostrat Model and Alternatives for Groundwater Flow and Contaminant Transport Model of Corrective Action Unit 99: Rainer Mesa-Shoshone Mountain, Nye County, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NSTec Geotechnical Sciences Group

    2007-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The three-dimensional hydrostratigraphic framework model for the Rainier Mesa-Shoshone Mountain Corrective Action Unit was completed in Fiscal Year 2006. The model extends from eastern Pahute Mesa in the north to Mid Valley in the south and centers on the former nuclear testing areas at Rainier Mesa, Aqueduct Mesa, and Shoshone Mountain. The model area also includes an overlap with the existing Underground Test Area Corrective Action Unit models for Yucca Flat and Pahute Mesa. The model area is geologically diverse and includes un-extended yet highly deformed Paleozoic terrain and high volcanic mesas between the Yucca Flat extensional basin on the east and caldera complexes of the Southwestern Nevada Volcanic Field on the west. The area also includes a hydrologic divide between two groundwater sub-basins of the Death Valley regional flow system. A diverse set of geological and geophysical data collected over the past 50 years was used to develop a structural model and hydrostratigraphic system for the model area. Three deep characterization wells, a magnetotelluric survey, and reprocessed gravity data were acquired specifically for this modeling initiative. These data and associated interpretive products were integrated using EarthVision{reg_sign} software to develop the three-dimensional hydrostratigraphic framework model. Crucial steps in the model building process included establishing a fault model, developing a hydrostratigraphic scheme, compiling a drill-hole database, and constructing detailed geologic and hydrostratigraphic cross sections and subsurface maps. The more than 100 stratigraphic units in the model area were grouped into 43 hydrostratigraphic units based on each unit's propensity toward aquifer or aquitard characteristics. The authors organized the volcanic units in the model area into 35 hydrostratigraphic units that include 16 aquifers, 12 confining units, 2 composite units (a mixture of aquifer and confining units), and 5 intrusive confining units. The underlying pre-Tertiary rocks are divided into six hydrostratigraphic units, including three aquifers and three confining units. Other units include an alluvial aquifer and a Mesozoic-age granitic confining unit. The model depicts the thickness, extent, and geometric relationships of these hydrostratigraphic units ('layers' in the model). The model also incorporates 56 Tertiary normal faults and 4 Mesozoic thrust faults. The complexity of the model area and the non-uniqueness of some of the interpretations incorporated into the base model made it necessary to formulate alternative interpretations for some of the major features in the model. Four of these alternatives were developed so they can be modeled in the same fashion as the base model. This work was done for the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office in support of the Underground Test Area Subproject of the Environmental Restoration Project.

  6. MODULES FOR EXPERIMENTS IN STELLAR ASTROPHYSICS (MESA): PLANETS, OSCILLATIONS, ROTATION, AND MASSIVE STARS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paxton, Bill; Cantiello, Matteo; Bildsten, Lars [Kavli Institute for Theoretical Physics, University of California, Santa Barbara, CA 93106 (United States); Arras, Phil [Department of Astronomy, University of Virginia, P.O. Box 400325, Charlottesville, VA 22904-4325 (United States); Brown, Edward F. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory, and Joint Institute for Nuclear Astrophysics, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48864 (United States); Dotter, Aaron [Research School of Astronomy and Astrophysics, The Australian National University, Weston, ACT 2611 (Australia); Mankovich, Christopher [Department of Physics, University of California, Santa Barbara, CA 93106 (United States); Montgomery, M. H. [Department of Astronomy and McDonald Observatory, University of Texas, Austin, TX 78712 (United States); Stello, Dennis [Sydney Institute for Astronomy (SIfA), School of Physics, University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); Timmes, F. X. [School of Earth and Space Exploration, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 85287 (United States); Townsend, Richard, E-mail: matteo@kitp.ucsb.edu [Department of Astronomy, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI 53706 (United States)

    2013-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We substantially update the capabilities of the open source software package Modules for Experiments in Stellar Astrophysics (MESA), and its one-dimensional stellar evolution module, MESA star. Improvements in MESA star's ability to model the evolution of giant planets now extends its applicability down to masses as low as one-tenth that of Jupiter. The dramatic improvement in asteroseismology enabled by the space-based Kepler and CoRoT missions motivates our full coupling of the ADIPLS adiabatic pulsation code with MESA star. This also motivates a numerical recasting of the Ledoux criterion that is more easily implemented when many nuclei are present at non-negligible abundances. This impacts the way in which MESA star calculates semi-convective and thermohaline mixing. We exhibit the evolution of 3-8 M{sub Sun} stars through the end of core He burning, the onset of He thermal pulses, and arrival on the white dwarf cooling sequence. We implement diffusion of angular momentum and chemical abundances that enable calculations of rotating-star models, which we compare thoroughly with earlier work. We introduce a new treatment of radiation-dominated envelopes that allows the uninterrupted evolution of massive stars to core collapse. This enables the generation of new sets of supernovae, long gamma-ray burst, and pair-instability progenitor models. We substantially modify the way in which MESA star solves the fully coupled stellar structure and composition equations, and we show how this has improved the scaling of MESA's calculational speed on multi-core processors. Updates to the modules for equation of state, opacity, nuclear reaction rates, and atmospheric boundary conditions are also provided. We describe the MESA Software Development Kit that packages all the required components needed to form a unified, maintained, and well-validated build environment for MESA. We also highlight a few tools developed by the community for rapid visualization of MESA star results.

  7. East Mesa geothermal pump test facility (EMPTF). Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Olander, R.G.; Roberts, G.K.

    1984-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Barber-Nichols has completed the design, fabrication and installation of a geothermal pump test facility at the DOE geothermal site at East Mesa, California which is capable of testing 70 to 750 horsepower downwell pumps in a controlled geothermal environment. The facility consists of a skid-mounted brine control module, a 160 foot below ground test well section, a hydraulic turbine for power recovery, a gantry-mounted hoist for pump handling and a 3-phase, 480 VAC, 1200 amp power supply to handle pump electric requirements. Geothermal brine is supplied to the EMPTF from one of the facility wells at East Mesa. The EMPTF is designed with a great amount of flexibility to attract the largest number of potential users. The 20-inch diameter test well can accommodate a wide variety of pumps. The controls are interactive and can be adjusted to obtain a full complement of pump operation data, or set to maintain constant conditions to allow long-term testing with a minimum of operator support. The hydraulic turbine allows the EMPTF user to recover approximately 46% of the input pump power to help defray the operating cost of the unit. The hoist is provided for material handling and pump servicing and reduces the equipment that the user must supply for pump installation, inspection and removal.

  8. East Mesa geothermal pump test facility (EMPTF). Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Olander, R.G.; Roberts, G.K.

    1984-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The design, fabrication and installation of a geothermal pump test facility (EMPFT) at the DOE geothermal site at East Mesa, California which is capable of testing 70 to 750 horsepower downwell pumps in a controlled geothermal environment were completed. The facility consists of a skid-mounted brine control module, a 160 foot below test well section, a hydraulic turbine for power recovery, a gantry-mounted hoist for pump handling and a 3-phase, 480 VAC, 1200 amp power supply to handle pump electric requirements. Geothermal brine is supplied to the EMPTF from one of the facility wells at East Mesa. The EMPTF is designed with a great amount of flexibility. The 20-inch diameter test well can accommodate a wide variety of pumps. The controls are interactive and can be adjusted to obtain a full complement of pump operation data, or set to maintain constant conditions to allow long-term testing with a minimum of operator support. The hydraulic turbine allows the EMPTF user to recover approximately 46% of the input pump power to help defray the operating cost of the unit. The hoist is provided for material handling and pump servicing and reduces the equipment that the user must supply for pump installation, inspection and removal.

  9. TYBO/BENHAM: Model Analysis of Groundwater Flow and Radionuclide Migration from Underground Nuclear Tests in Southwestern Pahute Mesa, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Andrew Wolfsberg; Lee Glascoe; Guoping Lu; Alyssa; Olson; Peter Lichtner; Maureen McGraw; Terry Cherry; ,; Guy Roemer

    2002-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent field studies have led to the discovery of trace quantities of plutonium originating from the BENHAM underground nuclear test in two groundwater observation wells on Pahute Mesa at the Nevada Test Site. These observation wells are located 1.3 km from the BENHAM underground nuclear test and approximately 300 m from the TYBO underground nuclear test. In addition to plutonium, several other conservative (e.g. tritium) and reactive (e.g. cesium) radionuclides were found in both observation wells. The highest radionuclide concentrations were found in a well sampling a welded tuff aquifer more than 500m above the BENHAM emplacement depth. These measurements have prompted additional investigations to ascertain the mechanisms, processes, and conditions affecting subsurface radionuclide transport in Pahute Mesa groundwater. This report describes an integrated modeling approach used to simulate groundwater flow, radionuclide source release, and radionuclide transport near the BENHAM and TYBO underground nuclear tests on Pahute Mesa. The components of the model include a flow model at a scale large enough to encompass many wells for calibration, a source-term model capable of predicting radionuclide releases to aquifers following complex processes associated with nonisothermal flow and glass dissolution, and site-scale transport models that consider migration of solutes and colloids in fractured volcanic rock. Although multiple modeling components contribute to the methodology presented in this report, they are coupled and yield results consistent with laboratory and field observations. Additionally, sensitivity analyses are conducted to provide insight into the relative importance of uncertainty ranges in the transport parameters.

  10. Internal Technical Report, Hydrothermal Injection Program - East Mesa 1983-84 Test Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Freiburger, R.M.

    1984-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents a test data index and a data plots for a series of 12 drawdown and tracer injection-withdrawal tests in porous-media aquifers at the East Mesa Geothermal Field located in the Imperial Valley near El Centro, California. Test and instrumentation summaries are also provided. The first 10 of these tests were completed during July and August 1983. The remaining 2 tests were completed in February 1984, after a 6-month quiescent period, in which tracers were left in the reservoir. The test wells used were 56-30 and 56-19, with 38-30 supplying water for the injection phase and 52-29 used as a disposal well during the backflowing of the test wells. Six other wells in the surrounding area were measured periodically for possible hydrologic effects during testing. It is not the intent of this report to supply analyzed data, but to list the uninterpreted computer stored data available for analysis. The data have been examined only to the extent to ensure that they are reasonable and internally consistent. This data is stored on permanent files at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) Cyber Computer Complex. The main processors for this complex are located at the Computer Science Center (CSC) in Idaho Falls, Idaho. The Hydrothermal Injection Test program, funded by the Department of Energy, was a joint effort between EG and G Idaho, Inc., the University of Utah Research Institute (UURI) and Republic Geothermal, Inc. (RGI) of Santa Fe Springs, California.

  11. Archaeological investigations on the Buckboard Mesa Road Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Amick, D.S.; Henton, G.H.; Pippin, L.C.

    1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In 1986, the Desert Research Institute (DRI) conducted an archaeological reconnaissance of a new alignment for the Buckboard Mesa Road on the Nevada Test Site for the Department of Energy (DOE). During this reconnaissance, several archaeological sites of National Register quality were discovered and recorded including a large quarry, site 26Ny4892, and a smaller lithic scatter, site 26Ny4894. Analysis of the debitage at 26Ny4892 indicates that this area was used primarily as a quarry for relatively small cobbles of obsidian found in the alluvium. Lithic reduction techniques used here are designed for efficiently reducing small pieces of toolstone and are oriented towards producing flake blanks from small cores and bifacially reducing exhausted cores. Projectile point cross references indicate that the area has seen at least casual use for about 10,000 years and more sustained use for the last 3,000 years. Initial obsidian hydration measurements indicate sustained use of the quarry for about the last 3,000 years although the loci of activities appear to change over time. Based on this study, the DRI recommends that quarrying activities in the area of 26Ny4892 are sufficiently sampled and that additional investigations into that aspect of prehistoric activity in the area are not necessary. This does not apply to other aspects of prehistoric use. DRI recommends that preconstruction surveys continue to identify nonquarrying, prehistoric utilization of the area. With the increased traffic on the Buckboard Mesa Road, there is a greater potential for vandalism to sites of National Register-quality located near the road. The DRI recommends that during the orientation briefing the workers at the Test Site be educated about the importance of cultural resources and the need for their protection. 202 refs., 41 figs., 52 tabs.

  12. Completion Report for Well ER-EC-14, Corrective Action Units 101 and 102: Central and Western Pahute Mesa

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2013-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Well ER-EC-14 was drilled for the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office in support of the Nevada Environmental Management Operations Underground Test Area (UGTA) Activity at the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS; formerly Nevada Test Site), Nye County, Nevada. The well was drilled in September and October 2012, as part of the Central and Western Pahute Mesa Corrective Action Unit Phase II drilling program. The primary purpose of the well was to provide detailed hydrogeologic information for the Fortymile Canyon composite hydrostratigraphic unit in the Timber Mountain moat area, within the Timber Mountain caldera complex, that will help address uncertainties within the Pahute Mesa–Oasis Valley hydrostratigraphic framework model. The main 55.9-centimeter (cm) hole was drilled to a total depth of 325.5 meters (m) and cased with 40.6-cm casing to 308.1 m. The hole diameter was then decreased to 37.5 cm, and drilling continued to a total depth of 724.8 m. The completion casing string, set to the depth of 690.9 m, consists of 16.8-cm stainless-steel casing hanging from 19.4-cm carbon-steel casing. The stainless-steel casing has two slotted intervals open to the Rainier Mesa Tuff. Two piezometer strings were installed in Well ER-EC-14. Both piezometer strings, each with one slotted interval, consist of 6.0-cm carbon-steel tubing at the surface, then cross over to 7.3-cm stainless-steel tubing just above the water table. The shallow piezometer string was landed at 507.8 m, and the deep piezometer string was landed at 688.6 m. Both piezometer strings are set to monitor groundwater within moderately to densely welded Rainier Mesa Tuff. Data collected during and shortly after hole construction include composite drill cuttings samples collected every 3.0 m, various geophysical logs, water quality (including tritium and other radionuclides) measurements, and water level measurements. The well penetrated 15.2 m of alluvium and 709.6 m of Tertiary volcanic rocks. The stratigraphy and general lithology were not as expected due to the position of Well ER-EC-14 relative to the buried caldera margins of the Timber Mountain caldera complex. The well is located inside the Rainier Mesa caldera, but outside the younger Ammonia Tanks caldera. On November 5, 2012, a preliminary fluid level in the shallow piezometer string was measured at the depth of 311.8 m. This water level depth was taken before installation of the bridge plug (to be placed within the main completion casing to separate the two slotted zones). Well development, hydrologic testing, and sampling, will be conducted at a later date. No tritium above levels detectable by field methods were encountered in this hole. All Fluid Management Plan (FMP) requirements for Well ER-EC-14 were met. Analysis of monitoring samples and FMP confirmatory samples indicated that fluids generated during drilling at Well ER-EC-14 met the FMP criteria for discharge to an unlined sump or designated infiltration area. All sanitary and hydrocarbon waste generated was properly handled and disposed of.

  13. Offsite Construction Comparative Study of Panelized and Modular Construction for Rio Mesa Facilities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tipple, Brett

    Offsite Construction Comparative Study of Panelized and Modular Construction: This research is to evaluate the opportunities of prefabricated construction for remote the logistics of prefab construction on the Rio Mesa site, we hope that this project

  14. E-Print Network 3.0 - additional east mesa Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Geosciences 51 Interaction of hot spots and terahertz waves in Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8 intrinsic Josephson junction stacks of various geometry Summary: of the mesa, although less clear as...

  15. Geohydrology of Pahute Mesa-3 test well, Nye County, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kilroy, K.C.; Savard, C.S.

    1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Pahute Mesa-3 test well is on Pahute Mesa about 3 miles west of the Nevada Test Site and 20 miles northeast of Oasis Valley near Beatty, Nevada. The well was drilled for the U.S. Department of Energy Radionuclide Migration Program to monitor conditions near the western edge of the Nevada Test Site. The well was drilled with conventional rotary methods and an air-foam drilling fluid to a depth of 3,019 feet. A 10.75-inch diameter steel casing was installed to a depth of 1,473 feet. The test well penetrates thick units of non-welded to partly welded ash-flow and air-fall tuff of Tertiary age with several thin layers of densely welded tuff, rhyolite and basalt flows, and breccia. Geophysical logs indicate that fractures are significant in the Tiva Canyon Tuff of the Paintbrush Group and this was confirmed by high flow in this unit during a borehole-flow survey. The geophysical logs also show that the effective porosity in tuffaceous units ranges from 19 to 38 percent and averages 30 percent, and the total porosity ranges from 33 to 55 percent and averages 42 percent. The measured temperature gradient of 1.00 degree Celsius per 100 feet is steep, but is similar to that of other nearby wells, one of which penetrates a buried granite intrusion. Injection tests for six intervals of the well yielded transmissivities that ranged from 3.1 x 10{sup -3} to 25 feet squared per day and hydraulic conductivities that ranged from 6 x 10{sup -5} to 0.12 foot per day. The sum of the transmissivities is 28 feet squared per day and the geometric mean of hydraulic conductivity is 1.7 x 10{sup -3} foot per day. Estimates of storage coefficient range from 2.1 x 10{sup -5} to 3.8 x 10{sup -3}, indicating that the aquifer responded to the injection tests in a confined manner. An aquifer test produced a drawdown of 78 feet during 31 hours of testing at 169 gallons per minute.

  16. GEOTHERMAL RESOURCE AND RESERVOIR INVESTIGATIONS OF U.S. BUREAU OF RECLAMATION LEASEHOLDS AT EAST MESA, IMPERIAL VALLEY, CALIFORNIA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    on the Republic geothermal wells, East Mesa, California.evalu- ation of five geothermal wells, Proc. second UNhydrologic continuity Geothermal Well Inferred barrier

  17. GEOTHERMAL RESOURCE AND RESERVOIR INVESTIGATIONS OF U.S. BUREAU OF RECLAMATION LEASEHOLDS AT EAST MESA, IMPERIAL VALLEY, CALIFORNIA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    document. LBL-7094 UC-66~1 GEOTHERMAL RESOURCE AND RESERVOIRInc. , 1976. Study of the geothermal reservoir underlyingtest, 1976, East Mesa geothermal field in California.

  18. Estimation of Groundwater Recharge at Pahute Mesa using the Chloride Mass-Balance Method

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cooper, Clay A [DRI] [DRI; Hershey, Ronald L [DRI] [DRI; Healey, John M [DRI] [DRI; Lyles, Brad F [DRI] [DRI

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Groundwater recharge on Pahute Mesa was estimated using the chloride mass-balance (CMB) method. This method relies on the conservative properties of chloride to trace its movement from the atmosphere as dry- and wet-deposition through the soil zone and ultimately to the saturated zone. Typically, the CMB method assumes no mixing of groundwater with different chloride concentrations; however, because groundwater is thought to flow into Pahute Mesa from valleys north of Pahute Mesa, groundwater flow rates (i.e., underflow) and chloride concentrations from Kawich Valley and Gold Flat were carefully considered. Precipitation was measured with bulk and tipping-bucket precipitation gauges installed for this study at six sites on Pahute Mesa. These data, along with historical precipitation amounts from gauges on Pahute Mesa and estimates from the PRISM model, were evaluated to estimate mean annual precipitation. Chloride deposition from the atmosphere was estimated by analyzing quarterly samples of wet- and dry-deposition for chloride in the bulk gauges and evaluating chloride wet-deposition amounts measured at other locations by the National Atmospheric Deposition Program. Mean chloride concentrations in groundwater were estimated using data from the UGTA Geochemistry Database, data from other reports, and data from samples collected from emplacement boreholes for this study. Calculations were conducted assuming both no underflow and underflow from Kawich Valley and Gold Flat. Model results estimate recharge to be 30 mm/yr with a standard deviation of 18 mm/yr on Pahute Mesa, for elevations >1800 m amsl. These estimates assume Pahute Mesa recharge mixes completely with underflow from Kawich Valley and Gold Flat. The model assumes that precipitation, chloride concentration in bulk deposition, underflow and its chloride concentration, have been constant over the length of time of recharge.

  19. The mesa merging oxidation method for creating low-loss dielectrics and transmission lines on low-resistivity silicon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bowers, John

    The mesa merging oxidation method for creating low-loss dielectrics and transmission lines on low.1088/0960-1317/21/6/065020 The mesa merging oxidation method for creating low-loss dielectrics and transmission lines on low steps to create high aspect ratio coplanar waveguide (hicoplanar) transmission lines. The large SiO2

  20. Coal petrographic genetic units in deltaic-plain deposits of the Campanian Mesa Verde Group (New Mexico, USA)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Coal petrographic genetic units in deltaic-plain deposits of the Campanian Mesa Verde Group (New stratigraphy; Coal; Maceral analysis; Microlithotype Abstract The Campanian rocks of the Mesa Verde Group units, i.e. intermediate term cycles. The continental facies consist of coastal-plain deposits (coals

  1. A macrofossil analysis of materials recovered from Hovenweep National Monument, Cajon Mesa, Colorado and Utah

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chapman, Donna Ruth

    1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    -mesa area (where it is V 0 5 IO Km ~Pinyon LJWOODLAND El . . . . Sage :::: GRASSLAND 8 Hopsage SHRUBLAND Q Shadscale SHRUBLAND 58 Blackbrush BRUSHLAND E3 -. . Alluvial '-' BRUSHLAND Figure 2. Cajon Mesa vegetation zones (After Weir, 1976) 12... to th do i nts, Pinus edulis a d ~J i e s ~o teos enaa oth , m jo pla ts i this zone incl d tl s 2 mbel'I, ~nt I la canesce s, p rshi t id t t . G mus tecto m, 1 b t nmar th s sp. , d ~Cheno odi m alb m. This o ts i eludes othe grasses, shrubs, herbs...

  2. Transportation of the MOAB Uranium Mill Tailings to White Mesa Mill by Slurry Pipeline

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hochstein, R. F.; Warner, R.; Wetz, T. V.

    2003-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The Moab uranium mill tailings pile, located at the former Atlas Minerals Corporation site approximately three miles north of Moab, Utah, is now under the control of the US Department of Energy (''DOE''). The location of the tailings pile adjacent to the Colorado River, and the ongoing contamination of groundwater and seepage of pollutants into the river, have lead to the investigation, as part of the final site remediation program, of alternatives to relocate the tailings to a qualified permanent disposal site. This paper will describe the approach being taken by the team formed between International Uranium (USA) Corporation (''IUC'') and Washington Group International (''WGINT'') to develop an innovative technical proposal to relocate the Moab tailings to IUC's White Mesa Mill south of Blanding, Utah. The proposed approach for relocating the tailings involves using a slurry pipeline to transport the tailings to the White Mesa Mill. The White Mesa Mill is a fully licensed, active uranium mill site that is uniquely suited for permanent disposal of the Moab tailings. The tailings slurry would be dewatered at the White Mesa Mill, the slurry water would be recycled to the Moab site for reuse in slurry makeup, and the ''dry'' tailings would be permanently disposed of in an approved below grade cell at the mill site.

  3. Ryan E. Smith, Associate Professor of Architecture Research Director, Rio Mesa Center

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tipple, Brett

    Ryan E. Smith, Associate Professor of Architecture Research Director, Rio Mesa Center ARCH 6360 1 in architecture and engineering, and science students in biology will evaluate organisms' response to collaborate with other disciplines in order to innovate and invent sustainable and potentially marketable

  4. Thermal management in large Bi2212 mesas used for terahertz sources.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kurter, C.; Gray, K. E.; Zasadzinski, J. F.; Ozyuzer, L.; Koshelev, A. E.; Li, Q.; Yamamoto, T.; Kadowaki, K.; Kwok, W.-K.; Tachiki, M.; Welp, U.; Materials Science Division; Izmir Inst. of Tech.; Illinois Inst. of Tech.; Univ. Tsukuba; Univ. Tokyo

    2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a thermal analysis of a patterned mesa on a Bi{sub 2}Sr{sub 2}CaCu{sub 2}O{sub 8} (Bi2212) single crystal that is based on tunneling characteristics of the c-axis stack of {approx}800 intrinsic Josephson junctions in the mesa. Despite the large mesa volume (e.g., 40 times 300 times 1.2 mum{sup 3}) and power dissipation that result in self-heating and backbending of the current-voltage curve (I-V), there are accessible bias conditions for which significant polarized THz-wave emission can be observed. We estimate the mesa temperature by equating the quasiparticle resistance, R{sub qp}(T), to the ratio V/I over the entire I-V including the backbending region. These temperatures are used to predict the unpolarized black-body radiation reaching our bolometer and there is substantial agreement over the entire I-V. As such, backbending results from the particular R{sub qp}(T) for Bi2212, as first discussed by Fenton, rather than a significant suppression of the energy gap. This model also correctly predicts the observed disappearance of backbending above {approx}60 K.

  5. Completion Report for Well ER-20-4 Corrective Action Units 101 and 102: Central and Western Pahute Mesa

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NSTec Environmental Management

    2011-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Well ER-20-4 was drilled for the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office in support of the Nevada Environmental Restoration Project at the Nevada National Security Site, Nye County, Nevada. The well was drilled in August and September 2010 as part of the Pahute Mesa Phase II drilling program. The primary purpose of the well was to investigate the possibility of radionuclide transport from up-gradient underground nuclear tests conducted in central Pahute Mesa. This well also provided detailed hydrogeologic information in the Tertiary volcanic section that will help reduce uncertainties within the Pahute Mesa-Oasis Valley hydrostratigraphic framework model.

  6. Tunable terahertz emission from Bi{<_2}Sr{<_2}CaCu{<_2}O{<_8+delta} mesa devices.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Benseman, T. M.; Koshelev, A. E.; Gray, K. E.; Kwok, W.-K.; Welp, U.; Kadowaki, K.; Tachiki, M.; Yamamoto, T. (Materials Science Division); (Univ. Tsukuba); (Japan Atomic Energy Agency)

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We have measured coherent terahertz emission spectra from Bi{sub 2}Sr{sub 2}CaCu{sub 2}O{sub 8+{delta}} mesa devices as a function of temperature and mesa bias voltage. The emission frequency is found to be tunable by up to 12% by varying the temperature and bias voltage. We attribute the appearance of tunability to asymmetric boundaries at the top and bottom and the nonrectangular cross section of the mesas. This interpretation is consistent with numerical simulations of the dynamics of intrinsic Josephson junctions in the mesa. Easily tunable emission frequency may have important implications for the design of terahertz devices based on stacked intrinsic Josephson junctions.

  7. Facies, depositional environments, and reservoir properties of the Shattuck sandstone, Mesa Queen Field and surrounding areas, southeastern New Mexico

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haight, Jared

    2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    iii FACIES, DEPOSITIONAL ENVIRONMENTS, AND RESERVOIR PROPERTIES OF THE SHATTUCK SANDSTONE, MESA QUEEN FIELD AND SURROUNDING AREAS, SOUTHEASTERN NEW MEXICO A Thesis by JARED BRANDON HAIGHT Submitted to the Office... PROPERTIES OF THE SHATTUCK SANDSTONE, MESA QUEEN FIELD AND SURROUNDING AREAS, SOUTHEASTERN NEW MEXICO A Thesis by JARED BRANDON HAIGHT Submitted to Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree...

  8. Variation in the annual average radon concentration measured in homes in Mesa County, Colorado

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rood, A.S.; George, J.L.; Langner, G.H. Jr.

    1990-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this study is to examine the variability in the annual average indoor radon concentration. The TMC has been collecting annual average radon data for the past 5 years in 33 residential structures in Mesa County, Colorado. This report is an interim report that presents the data collected up to the present. Currently, the plans are to continue this study in the future. 62 refs., 3 figs., 12 tabs.

  9. Origin of elevated water levels encountered in Pahute Mesa emplacement boreholes: Preliminary investigations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brikowski, T.; Chapman, J.; Lyles, B.; Hokett, S.

    1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The presence of standing water well above the predicted water table in emplacement boreholes on Pahute Mesa has been a recurring phenomenon at the Nevada Test Site (NTS). If these levels represent naturally perched aquifers, they may indicate a radionuclide migration hazard. In any case, they can pose engineering problems in the performance of underground nuclear tests. The origin of these elevated waters is uncertain. Large volumes of water are introduced during emplacement drilling, providing ample source for artificially perched water, yet elevated water levels can remain constant for years, suggesting a natural origin instead. In an effort to address the issue of unexpected standing water in emplacement boreholes, three different sites were investigated in Area 19 on Pahute Mesa by Desert Research Institute (DRI) staff from 1990-93. These sites were U-19az, U-19ba, and U-19bh. As of this writing, U-19bh remains available for access; however, nuclear tests were conducted at the former two locations subsequent to this investigations. The experiments are discussed in chronological order. Taken together, the experiments indicate that standing water in Pahute Mesa emplacement holes originates from the drainage of small-volume naturally perched zones. In the final study, the fluids used during drilling of the bottom 100 m of emplacement borehole U-19bh were labeled with a chemical tracer. After hole completion, water level rose in the borehole, while tracer concentration decreased. In fact, total mass of tracer in the borehole remained constant, while water levels rose. After water levels stabilized in this hole, no change in tracer mass was observed over two years, indicating that no movement of water out of the borehole is taking place (as at U- 19ba). Continued labeling tests of standing water are recommended to confirm the conclusions made here, and to establish their validity throughout Pahute Mesa.

  10. Modeling Approach/Strategy for Corrective Action Unit 99: Rainier Mesa and Shoshone Mountain, Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada, Revision 1, with ROTC-1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Greg Ruskauff

    2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document describes an approach for preliminary (Phase I) flow and transport modeling for the Rainier Mesa/Shoshone Mountain (RMSM) Corrective Action Unit (CAU). This modeling will take place before the planned Phase II round of data collection to better identify the remaining data gaps before the fieldwork begins. Because of the geologic complexity, limited number of borings, and large vertical gradients, there is considerable uncertainty in the conceptual model for flow; thus different conceptual models will be evaluated, in addition to different framework and recharge models. The transport simulations will not be used to formally calculate the Contaminant Boundary at this time. The modeling (Phase II) will occur only after the available data are considered sufficient in scope and quality.

  11. Geology, hydrothermal petrology, stable isotope geochemistry, and fluid inclusion geothermometry of LASL geothermal test well C/T-1 (Mesa 31-1), East Mesa, Imperial Valley, California, USA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, K.R.; Elders, W.A.

    1980-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Borehole Mesa 31-1 (LASL C/T-1) is an 1899-m (6231-ft) deep well located in the northwestern part of the East Mesa Geothermal Field. Mesa 31-1 is the first Calibration/Test Well (C/T-1) in the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory (LASL), Geothermal Log Interpretation Program. The purpose of this study is to provide a compilation of drillhole data, drill cuttings, well lithology, and formation petrology that will serve to support the use of well LASL C/T-1 as a calibration/test well for geothermal logging. In addition, reviews of fluid chemistry, stable isotope studies, isotopic and fluid inclusion geothermometry, and the temperature log data are presented. This study provides the basic data on the geology and hydrothermal alteration of the rocks in LASL C/T-1 as background for the interpretation of wireline logs.

  12. Thoughts Regarding the Dimensions of Faults at Rainier and Aqueduct Mesas, Nye County, Nevada, Based on Surface and Underground Mapping

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Drellack, S.L.; Prothro, L.B.; Townsend, M.J.; Townsend, D.R.

    2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The geologic setting and history, along with observations through 50 years of detailed geologic field work, show that large-displacement (i.e., greater than 30 meters of displacement) syn- to post-volcanic faults are rare in the Rainier Mesa area. Faults observed in tunnels and drill holes are mostly tight, with small displacements (most less than 1.5 meters) and small associated damage zones. Faults are much more abundant in the zeolitized tuffs than in the overlying vitric tuffs, and there is little evidence that faults extend downward from the tuff section through the argillic paleocolluvium into pre-Tertiary rocks. The differences in geomechanical characteristics of the various tuff lithologies at Rainier Mesa suggest that most faults on Rainer Mesa are limited to the zeolitic units sandwiched between the overlying vitric bedded tuffs and the underlying pre-Tertiary units (lower carbonate aquifer–3, lower clastic confining unit–1, and Mesozoic granite confining unit).

  13. Deep Resistivity Structure of Rainier Mesa-Shoshone Mountain, Nevada Test Site, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Theodore H. Asch; Brian D. Rodriguez; Jay A. Sampson; Jackie M. Williams; Maryla Deszcz-Pan

    2006-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) at their Nevada Site Office (NSO) are addressing groundwater contamination resulting from historical underground nuclear testing through the Environmental Management (EM) program and, in particular, the Underground Test Area (UGTA) project. During 2005, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), funded by the DOE and NNSA-NSO, collected and processed data from twenty-six Magnetotelluric (MT) and Audio-Magnetotelluric (AMT) sites at the Nevada Test Site. Data stations were located in and near Rainier Mesa and Shoshone Mountain to assist in characterizing the pre-Tertiary geology in those areas. These new stations extend to the west the hydrogeologic study that was conducted in Yucca Flat in 2003. This work has helped to refine the character, thickness, and lateral extent of pre Tertiary confining units. In particular, a major goal has been to define the upper clastic confining unit (UCCU – late Devonian to Mississippian-age siliciclastic rocks assigned to the Eleana Formation and Chainman Shale(Bechtel Nevada, 2006)) in the Yucca Flat area and west towards Shoshone Mountain in the south, east of Buckboard Mesa, and onto Rainier Mesa in the north. The Nevada Test Site magnetotelluric data interpretation presented in this report includes the results of detailed two-dimensional (2 D) resistivity modeling for each profile (including alternative interpretations) and gross inferences on the three dimensional (3 D) character of the geology within the region. The character, thickness, and lateral extent of the Chainman Shale and Eleana Formation that comprise the Upper Clastic Confining Unit (UCCU) are generally characterized in the upper 5 km. The interpretation is not well determined where conductive TCU overlies conductive Chainman Shale, where resistive Eleana Formation overlies resistive LCA units, or where resistive VTA rock overlies units of the Eleana Formation. The nature of the volcanic units in the west has been refined as are large and small fault structures such as the CP Thrust Fault, the Carpetbag Fault, and the Yucca Fault that cross Yucca Flat. The subsurface electrical resistivity distribution and inferred geologic structures determined by this investigation should help constrain the hydrostratigraphic framework model that is under development for the Rainier Mesa/Shoshone Mountain Corrective Action Unit and areas to the west and in understanding the effects on ground-water flow in the area.

  14. Completion Report for Well ER-EC-11 Corrective Action Units 101 and 102: Central and Western Pahute Mesa

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NSTec Environmental Management

    2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Well ER-EC-11 was drilled for the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office, in support of the Nevada Environmental Restoration Project at the Nevada National Security Site (formerly Nevada Test Site), Nye County, Nevada. The well was drilled in September and October 2009 as part of the Pahute Mesa Phase II drilling program. A main objective was to investigate radionuclide migration down-gradient from Well Cluster ER-20-5 and Well ER-20-7 and across the northern Timber Mountain moat structural zone into the area referred to as the Bench, between Pahute Mesa and the Timber Mountain caldera complex. A secondary purpose of the well was to provide detailed hydrogeologic information for the shallow- to intermediate-depth Tertiary volcanic section in the Bench area. This well also provided detailed hydrogeologic information in the Tertiary volcanic section to reduce uncertainties within the Pahute Mesa-Oasis Valley hydrostratigraphic framework model (Bechtel Nevada, 2002). The main 52.1-centimeter hole was drilled to a depth of 507.5 meters and then opened to a diameter of 66.0 centimeters. It was cased with 50.8-centimeter casing to 504.9 meters. The hole diameter was then decreased to 47.0 centimeters, and drilling continued to a total depth of 979.3 meters. It was then cased with 34.0-centimeter casing set at 965.5 meters. The hole diameter was then decreased to 31.1 centimeters and the borehole was drilled to a total depth of 1,264.3 meters. The completion casing string, set to the depth of 1,262.5 meters, consists of 19.4-centimeter stainless-steel casing hanging from 19.4-centimeter carbon-steel casing. The stainless-steel casing has two slotted intervals open to the Tiva Canyon and Topopah Spring aquifers. Four piezometer strings were installed in Well ER-EC-11. A string of carbon-steel 6.0-centimeter tubing with one slotted interval was inserted outside the 50.8-centimeter casing, within the 66.0-centimeter borehole for access to the Timber Mountain aquifer, and landed at 475.3 meters. A second string of 6.0-centimeter tubing with one slotted interval was inserted outside the 34.0-centimeter casing, within the 47.0-centimeter borehole for access to the Benham aquifer, and landed at 911.7 meters. A third piezometer string consists of 7.3-centimeter stainless-steel tubing that hangs from 6.0-centimeter carbon-steel tubing via a crossover sub. This string was landed at 1,029.5 meters to monitor the Tiva Canyon aquifer. The deepest string of 7.3-centimeter tubing was landed at 1,247.8 meters to monitor the Topopah Spring aquifer. Data collected during and shortly after hole construction include composite drill cuttings samples collected every 3.0 meters, 67 percussion gun and rotary sidewall core samples, various geophysical logs, fluid samples (for groundwater chemistry analysis and tritium measurements), and water-level measurements. The well penetrated 1,264.3 meters of Tertiary volcanic rock, including three saturated welded-tuff aquifers and one saturated lava-flow aquifer. A water level was measured in the Timber Mountain aquifer at 449.6 meters, during open-hole geophysical logging on September 20, 2009. The fluid level measured after the total depth was reached and the upper aquifer was cased off was 450.0 meters when measured in the open borehole on October 17, 2009. Measurements on samples taken from the undeveloped well indicated that tritium levels averaging approximately 12,430 picocuries per liter (less than Safe Drinking Water Act levels) were encountered within the Benham aquifer. Tritium was below the minimum detectable activity concentration for samples collected from the Tiva Canyon aquifer and the Topopah Spring aquifer.

  15. Hydrologic Data for the Groundwater Flow and Contaminant Transport Model of Corrective Action Units 101 and 102: Central and Western Pahute Mesa, Nye County, Nevada, Revision 0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Drici, Warda

    2004-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report documents the analysis of the available hydrologic data conducted in support of the development of a Corrective Action Unit (CAU) groundwater flow model for Central and Western Pahute Mesa: CAUs 101 and 102.

  16. Contaminant Transport Parameters for the Groundwater Flow and Contaminant Transport Model of Corrective Action Units 101 and 102: Central and Western Pahute Mesa, Nye County, Nevada, Revision 0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Drici, Warda

    2003-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report documents the analysis of the available transport parameter data conducted in support of the development of a Corrective Action Unit (CAU) groundwater flow model for Central and Western Pahute Mesa: CAUs 101 and 102.

  17. Recording experiment on Rainier Mesa in conjunction with a reflection survey

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, L.R.

    1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The chemical explosion of the NPE was recorded on the surface of Rainier Mesa along the same line which had previously been the site of a high resolution reflection survey. Six three-component accelerometer stations where distributed along the 550 meter line, which was offset about 600 meters from the epicenter of the explosion. The bandwidth of the acceleration data extends to 100 Hz. Even though the separations of the stations was only about 100 meters, the waveforms and the amplitudes exhibited considerable variability, especially for the transverse component of motion. The maximum accelerations ranged between 0.27 g and 1.46 g, with the maximums of the average traces being 0.57 g on the radial component, 0.28 on the transverse component, and 0.50 g on the vertical component. Using the results of the reflection survey to help constrain the velocity model, the acceleration data were inverted to obtain a preliminary estimate of the seismic moment tensor of the NPE. This result is a strong diagnostic for the NPE being an explosion, showing a somewhat asymmetric extensional source with very small shear components. When interpreted in terms of a spectral model and scaling relationships, the isotropic moment tensor indicates a yield of 1.4 kt, an elastic radius of 116 meters and a cavity radius of 15.5 meters. This interpretation includes a source time function which contains appreciable overshoot, and, if shown to be reliable, this feature of the explosion could have a significant effect upon the analyses of other types of seismic data.

  18. Completion Report for Wells ER-20-8 and ER-20-8#2 Corrective Action Units 101 and 102: Central and Western Pahute Mesa

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NSTec Environmental Management

    2011-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Wells ER-20-8 and ER-20-8#2 were drilled for the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office in support of the Nevada Environmental Restoration Project at the Nevada National Security Site (formerly Nevada Test Site), Nye County, Nevada. The holes were drilled in July and August 2009, as part of the Pahute Mesa Phase II drilling program. The primary purpose of these wells was to provide detailed hydrogeologic information in the Tertiary volcanic section that will help address uncertainties within the Pahute Mesa–Oasis Valley hydrostratigraphic framework model. They may also be used as long-term monitoring wells.

  19. Data Report: Meteorological and Evapotranspiration Data from Sagebrush and Pinyon Pine/Juniper Communities at Pahute Mesa, Nevada National Security Site, 2011-2012

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jasoni, Richard L [DRI; Larsen, Jessica D [DRI; Lyles, Brad F. [DRI; Healey, John M [DRI; Cooper, Clay A [DRI; Hershey, Ronald L [DRI; Lefebre, Karen J [DRI

    2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Pahute Mesa is a groundwater recharge area at the Nevada National Security Site. Because underground nuclear testing was conducted at Pahute Mesa, groundwater recharge may transport radionuclides from underground test sites downward to the water table; the amount of groundwater recharge is also an important component of contaminant transport models. To estimate the amount of groundwater recharge at Pahute Mesa, an INFIL3.0 recharge-runoff model is being developed. Two eddy covariance (EC) stations were installed on Pahute Mesa to estimate evapotranspiration (ET) to support the groundwater recharge modeling project. This data report describes the methods that were used to estimate ET and collect meteorological data. Evapotranspiration was estimated for two predominant plant communities on Pahute Mesa; one site was located in a sagebrush plant community, the other site in a pinyon pine/juniper community. Annual ET was estimated to be 310±13.9 mm for the sagebrush site and 347±15.9 mm for the pinyon pine/juniper site (March 26, 2011 to March 26, 2012). Annual precipitation measured with unheated tipping bucket rain gauges was 179 mm at the sagebrush site and 159 mm at the pinyon pine/juniper site. Annual precipitation measured with bulk precipitation gauges was 222 mm at the sagebrush site and 227 mm at the pinyon pine/juniper site (March 21, 2011 to March 28, 2012). A comparison of tipping bucket versus bulk precipitation data showed that total precipitation measured by the tipping bucket rain gauges was 17 to 20 percent lower than the bulk precipitation gauges. These differences were most likely the result of the unheated tipping bucket precipitation gauges not measuring frozen precipitation as accurately as the bulk precipitation gauges. In this one-year study, ET exceeded precipitation at both study sites because estimates of ET included precipitation that fell during the winter of 2010-2011 prior to EC instrumentation and the precipitation gauges started collecting data in March 2011.

  20. Using The SLAC Two-Mile Accelerator for Powering an FEL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barletta, W.A.; /LLNL, Livermore; Sessler, A.M.; /LBL, Berkeley; Yu, L.H.; /Brookhaven

    2012-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

    A parameter survey is made, employing the recently developed 2D formalism for an FEL, of the characteristics of an FEL using the SLAC accelerator. Attention is focused upon a wavelength of 40 {angstrom} (the water window) and 1 {angstrom} case is also presented. They consider employing the SLAC linac with its present operating parameters and with improved parameters such as would be supplied by a new photo-cathode injector. They find that improved parameters are necessary, but that the parameters presently achieved with present-day photo-cathode guns are adequate to reach the water window.

  1. Development of Phenomenological Models of Underground Nuclear Tests on Pahute Mesa, Nevada Test Site - BENHAM and TYBO

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pawloski, G.A.

    1999-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Although it is well accepted that underground nuclear explosions modify the in situ geologic media around the explosion point, the details of these changes are neither well understood nor well documented. As part of the engineering and containment process before a nuclear test, the physical environment is characterized to some extent to predict how the explosion will interact with the in situ media. However, a more detailed characterization of the physical environment surrounding an expended site is needed to successfully model radionuclide transport in the groundwater away from the detonation point. It is important to understand how the media have been altered and where the radionuclides are deposited. Once understood, this information on modified geologic media can be incorporated into a phenomenological model that is suitable for input to computer simulations of groundwater flow and radionuclide transport. The primary goals of this study are to (1) identify the modification of the media at a pertinent scale, and (2) provide this information to researchers modeling radionuclide transport in groundwater for the US Department of Energy (DOE) Nevada Operations Office Underground Test Area (UGTA) Project. Results from this study are most applicable at near-field scale (a model domain of about 500 m) and intermediate-field scale (a model domain of about 5 km) for which detailed information can be maximized as it is incorporated in the modeling grids. UGTA collected data on radionuclides in groundwater during recent drilling at the ER-20-5 site, which is near BENHAM and TYBO on Pahute Mesa at the Nevada Test Site (NTS). Computer simulations are being performed to better understand radionuclide transport. The objectives of this modeling effort include: evaluating site-specific information from the BENHAM and TYBO tests on Pahute Mesa; augmenting the above data set with generalized containment data; and developing a phenomenological model suitable for input to groundwater flow and transport modeling efforts that describes the physical in situ environment after the BENHAM and TYBO nuclear explosions.

  2. Unclassified Source Term and Radionuclide Data for the Groundwater Flow and Contaminant Transport Model of Corrective Action Units 101 and 102: Central and Western Pahute Mesa, Nye County, Nevada, Revision 0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McCord, John

    2004-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report documents the evaluation of the information and data available on the unclassified source term and radionuclide contamination for Central and Western Pahute Mesa: Corrective Action Units (CAUs) 101 and 102.

  3. Space Complexity Algorithms & Complexity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Way, Andy

    Space Complexity Algorithms & Complexity Space Complexity Nicolas Stroppa Patrik Lambert - plambert@computing.dcu.ie CA313@Dublin City University. 2008-2009. December 4, 2008 #12;Space Complexity Hierarchy of problems #12;Space Complexity NP-intermediate Languages If P = NP, then are there languages which neither in P

  4. Hunter-gatherer adaptations and environmental change in the southern Great Basin: The evidence from Pahute and Rainier mesas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pippin, L.C.

    1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper reviews the evidence for fluctuations in past environments in the southern Great Basin and examines how these changes may have affected the strategies followed by past hunter and gatherers in their utilization of the resources available on a highland in this region. The evidence used to reconstruct past environments for the region include botanical remains from packrat middens, pollen spectra from lake and spring deposits, faunal remains recovered from archaeological and geologic contexts, tree-ring indices from trees located in sensitive (tree-line) environments, and eolian, alluvial and fluvial sediments deposited in a variety of contexts. Interpretations of past hunter and gatherer adaptive strategies are based on a sample of 1,311 archaeological sites recorded during preconstruction surveys on Pahute and Rainier mesas in advance of the US Department of Energy`s nuclear weapons testing program. Projectile point chronologies and available tree-ring, radiocarbon, thermoluminescence and obsidian hydration dates were used to assign these archaeological sites to specific periods of use.

  5. Investigations on the Structure Tectonics, Geophysics, Geochemistry, and Hydrocarbon Potential of the Black Mesa Basin, Northeastern Arizona

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barker, Colin; Carroll, Herbert; Erickson, Richard; George, Steve; Guo, Genliang; Reeves,T.K.; Sharma, Bijon; Szpakiewicz, Michael; Volk, Len

    1999-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has instituted a basin-analysis study program to encourage drilling in underexplored and unexplored areas and increase discovery rates for hydrocarbons by independent oil companies within the continental United States. The work is being performed at the DOE's National Institute for Petroleum and Energy Research (NIPER) in Bartlesville, Oklahoma, by the Exploration and Drilling Group within BDM-Oklahoma (BDM), the manager of the facility for DOE. Several low-activity areas in the Mid-Continent, west, and southwest were considered for the initial study area (Reeves and Carroll 1994a). The Black Mesa region in northwestern Arizona is shown on the U.S. Geological Survey 1995 oil and gas map of the United States as an undrilled area, adapted from Takahashi and Gautier 1995. This basin was selected by DOE s the site for the initial NIPER-BDM survey to develop prospects within the Lower-48 states (Reeves and Carroll 1994b).

  6. Archaeological studies at Drill Hole U20az Pahute Mesa, Nye county, Nevada. [Contains bibliography

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Simmons, A.H.; Hemphill, M.L.; Henton, G.H.; Lockett, C.L.; Nials, F.L.; Pippin, L.C.; Walsh, L.

    1991-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    During the summer of 1987, the Quaternary Sciences Center (formerly Social Science Center) of the Desert Research Institute (DRI), University of Nevada System, conducted data recovery investigations at five archaeological sites located near Drill Hole U20az on the Nevada Test Site in southern Nevada. These sites were among 12 recorded earlier during an archaeological survey of the drill hole conducted as part of the environmental compliance activities of the Department of Energy (DOE). The five sites discussed in this report were considered eligible for the National Register of Historic Places and were in danger of being adversely impacted by construction activities or by effects of the proposed underground nuclear test. Avoidance of these sites was not a feasible alternative; thus DRI undertook a data recovery program to mitigate expected adverse impacts. DRI's research plan included controlled surface collections and excavation of the five sites in question, and had the concurrence of the Nevada Division of Historic Preservation and Archaeology and the Advisory Council of Historic Preservation. Of the five sites investigated, the largest and most complex, 26Ny5207, consists of at least three discrete artifact concentrations. Sites 26Ny5211 and 26Ny5215, both yielded considerable assemblages. Site 26Ny5206 is very small and probably is linked to 26Ny5207. Site 26Ny5205 contained a limited artifact assemblage. All of the sites were open-air occurrences, and, with one exception contained no or limited subsurface cultural deposits. Only two radiocarbon dates were obtained, both from 26Ny5207 and both relatively recent. While the investigations reported in the volume mitigate most of the adverse impacts from DOE activities at Drill Hole U20az, significant archaeological sites may still exist in the general vicinity. Should the DOE conduct further activities in the region, additional cultural resource investigations may be required. 132 refs., 71 figs., 44 tabs.

  7. Phase I Contaminant Transport Parameters for the Groundwater Flow and Contaminant Transport Model of Corrective Action Unit 99: Rainier Mesa/Shoshone Mountain, Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada, Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nathan Bryant

    2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document presents a summary and framework of available transport data and other information directly relevant to the development of the Rainier Mesa/Shoshone Mountain (RMSM) Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 99 groundwater transport model. Where appropriate, data and information documented elsewhere are briefly summarized with reference to the complete documentation.

  8. Phase I Hydrologic Data for the Groundwater Flow and Contaminant Transport Model of Corrective Action Unit 99: Rainier Mesa/Shoshone Mountain, Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada, Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nathan Bryant

    2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document presents a summary and framework of the available hydrologic data and other information directly relevant to the development of the Rainier Mesa/Shoshone Mountain (RMSM) Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 99 groundwater flow models. Where appropriate, data and information documented elsewhere are briefly summarized with reference to the complete documentation.

  9. Well Completion Report for Well ER-20-11, Corrective Action Units 101 and 102: Central and Western Pahute Mesa

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NSTec Environmental Management

    2013-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Well ER-20-11 was drilled for the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office in support of the Nevada Environmental Management Operations Underground Test Area (UGTA) Activity at the Nevada National Security Site (formerly Nevada Test Site), Nye County, Nevada. The well was drilled in September 2012 as part of the Central and Western Pahute Mesa Corrective Action Unit Phase II drilling program. Well ER-20-11 was constructed to further investigate the nature and extent of radionuclidecontaminated groundwater encountered in two nearby UGTA wells, to help define hydraulic and transport parameters for the contaminated Benham aquifer, and to provide data for the UGTA hydrostratigraphic framework model. The 44.5-centimeter (cm) surface hole was drilled to a depth of 520.0 meters (m) and cased with 34.0-cm casing to 511.5 m. The hole diameter was then decreased to 31.1 cm, and the borehole was drilled to a total depth of 915.6 m. The hole was completed to allow access for hydrologic testing and sampling in the target aquifer, which is a lava-flow aquifer known as the Benham aquifer. The completion casing string, set to the depth of 904.3 m, consists of a string of 6?-inch (in.) stainless-steel casing hanging from a string of 7?-in. carbon-steel casing. The stainless-steel casing has one slotted interval at 796.3 to 903.6 m. One piezometer string was installed, which consists of 2?-in. stainless-steel tubing that hangs from 2?-in. carbon-steel tubing via a crossover sub. This string was landed at 903.8 m and is slotted in the interval 795.3 to 903.1 m. Data collected during and shortly after hole construction include composite drill cuttings samples collected every 3.0 m, various geophysical logs, fluid samples (for groundwater chemistry analysis and tritium measurements), and water-level measurements. The well penetrated 915.6 m of Tertiary volcanic rock, including one saturated lava flow aquifer. Measurements on samples taken from the undeveloped well indicated elevated tritium levels within the Benham aquifer. The maximum tritium level measured with field equipment was 146,131 picocuries per liter from a sample obtained at the depth of 912.0 m. The fluid level was measured in the piezometer string at a depth of 504.5 m on September 26, 2012. All Fluid Management Plan (FMP) requirements for Well ER-20-11 were met. Analysis of monitoring samples and FMP confirmatory samples indicated that fluids generated during drilling at Well ER-20-11 met the FMP criteria for discharge to an unlined sump or designated infiltration area. Well development, hydrologic testing, and sampling will be conducted at a later date.

  10. Complex Dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Complex Dynamics Bernardo Da Costa, Koushik Ramachandran, Jingjing Qu, and I had a two semester learning seminar in complex analysis and potential ...

  11. Phase I Transport Model of Corrective Action Units 101 and 102: Central and Western Pahute Mesa, Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada with Errata Sheet 1, 2, 3, Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Greg Ruskauff

    2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As prescribed in the Pahute Mesa Corrective Action Investigation Plan (CAIP) (DOE/NV, 1999) and Appendix VI of the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) (1996, as amended February 2008), the ultimate goal of transport analysis is to develop stochastic predictions of a contaminant boundary at a specified level of uncertainty. However, because of the significant uncertainty of the model results, the primary goal of this report was modified through mutual agreement between the DOE and the State of Nevada to assess the primary model components that contribute to this uncertainty and to postpone defining the contaminant boundary until additional model refinement is completed. Therefore, the role of this analysis has been to understand the behavior of radionuclide migration in the Pahute Mesa (PM) Corrective Action Unit (CAU) model and to define, both qualitatively and quantitatively, the sensitivity of such behavior to (flow) model conceptualization and (flow and transport) parameterization.

  12. Estimation of unsaturated zone traveltimes for Rainier Mesa and Shoshone Mountain, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, using a source-responsive preferential-flow model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brian A. Ebel; John R. Nimmo

    2009-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Traveltimes for contaminant transport by water from a point in the unsaturated zone to the saturated zone are a concern at Rainier Mesa and Shoshone Mountain in the Nevada Test Site, Nevada. Where nuclear tests were conducted in the unsaturated zone, contaminants must traverse hundreds of meters of variably saturated rock before they enter the saturated zone in the carbonate rock, where the regional groundwater system has the potential to carry them substantial distances to a location of concern. The unsaturated-zone portion of the contaminant transport path may cause a significant delay, in addition to the time required to travel within the saturated zone, and thus may be important in the overall evaluation of the potential hazard from contamination. Downward contaminant transport through the unsaturated zone occurs through various processes and pathways; this can lead to a broad distribution of contaminant traveltimes, including exceedingly slow and unexpectedly fast extremes. Though the bulk of mobile contaminant arrives between the time-scale end members, the fastest contaminant transport speed, in other words the speed determined by the combination of possible processes and pathways that would bring a measureable quantity of contaminant to the aquifer in the shortest time, carries particular regulatory significance because of its relevance in formulating the most conservative hazard-prevention scenarios. Unsaturated-zone flow is usually modeled as a diffusive process responding to gravity and pressure gradients as mediated by the unsaturated hydraulic properties of the materials traversed. The mathematical formulation of the diffuse-flow concept is known as Richards' equation, which when coupled to a solute transport equation, such as the advection-dispersion equation, provides a framework to simulate contaminant migration in the unsaturated zone. In recent decades awareness has increased that much fluid flow and contaminant transport within the unsaturated zone takes place as preferential flow, faster than would be predicted by the coupled Richards' and advection-dispersion equations with hydraulic properties estimated by traditional means. At present the hydrologic community has not achieved consensus as to whether a modification of Richards' equation, or a fundamentally different formulation, would best quantify preferential flow. Where the fastest contaminant transport speed is what needs to be estimated, there is the possibility of simplification of the evaluation process. One way of doing so is by a two-step process in which the first step is to evaluate whether significant preferential flow and solute transport is possible for the media and conditions of concern. The second step is to carry out (a) a basic Richards' and advection-dispersion equation analysis if it is concluded that preferential flow is not possible or (b) an analysis that considers only the fastest possible preferential-flow processes, if preferential flow is possible. For the preferential-flow situation, a recently published model describable as a Source-Responsive Preferential-Flow (SRPF) model is an easily applied option. This report documents the application of this two-step process to flow through the thick unsaturated zones of Rainier Mesa and Shoshone Mountain in the Nevada Test Site. Application of the SRPF model involves distinguishing between continuous and intermittent water supply to preferential flow paths. At Rainier Mesa and Shoshone Mountain this issue is complicated by the fact that contaminant travel begins at a location deep in the subsurface, where there may be perched water that may or may not act like a continuous supply, depending on such features as the connectedness of fractures and the nature of impeding layers. We have treated this situation by hypothesizing both continuous and intermittent scenarios for contaminant transport to the carbonate aquifer and reporting estimation of the fastest speed for both of these end members.

  13. Comparative study of GaN mesa etch characteristics in Cl{sub 2} based inductively coupled plasma with Ar and BCl{sub 3} as additive gases

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rawal, Dipendra Singh, E-mail: dsrawal15@gmail.com; Arora, Henika; Sehgal, Bhupender Kumar; Muralidharan, Rangarajan [Solid State Physics Laboratory, Lucknow Road, Timarpur, Delhi-110054 (India)

    2014-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    GaN thin film etching is investigated and compared for mesa formation in inductively coupled plasma (ICP) of Cl{sub 2} with Ar and BCl{sub 3} gas additives using photoresist mask. Etch characteristics are studied as a function of ICP process parameters, viz., ICP power, radio frequency (RF) power, and chamber pressure at fixed total flow rate. The etch rate at each ICP/RF power is 0.1–0.2??m/min higher for Cl{sub 2}/Ar mixture mainly due to higher Cl dissociation efficiency of Ar additive that readily provides Cl ion/radical for reaction in comparison to Cl{sub 2}/BCl{sub 3} mixture. Cl{sub 2}/Ar mixture also leads to better photoresist mask selectivity. The etch-induced roughness is investigated using atomic force microscopy. Cl{sub 2}/Ar etching has resulted in lower root-mean-square roughness of GaN etched surface in comparison to Cl{sub 2}/BCl{sub 3} etching due to increased Ar ion energy and flux with ICP/RF power that enhances the sputter removal of etch product. The GaN surface damage after etching is also evaluated using room temperature photoluminescence and found to be increasing with ICP/RF power for both the etch chemistries with higher degree of damage in Cl{sub 2}/BCl{sub 3} etching under same condition.

  14. Radiological survey and evaluation of the fallout area from the Trinity test: Chupadera Mesa and White Sands Missile Range, New Mexico

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hansen, W.R.; Rodgers, J.C.

    1985-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Current radiological conditions were evaluated for the site of the first nuclear weapons test, the Trinity test, and the associated fallout zone. The test, located on White Sands Missile Range, was conducted as part of the research with nuclear materials for the World War II Manhattan Engineer District atomic bomb project. Some residual radioactivity attributable to the test was found in the soils of Ground Zero on White Sands Missile Range and the areas that received fallout from the test. The study considered relevant information including historical records, environmental data extending back to the 1940s, and new data acquired by field sampling and measurements. Potential exposures to radiation were evaluated for current land uses. Maximum estimated doses on Chupadera Mesa and other uncontrolled areas are less than 3% of the DOE Radiation Protection Standards (RPSs). Radiation exposures during visits to the US Army-controlled Ground Zero area are less than 1 mrem per annual visit or less than 0.2% of the RPS for a member of the public. Detailed data and interpretations are provided in appendixes. 14 figs., 45 tabs.

  15. Remedial actions at the former Climax Uranium Company, Uranium Mill site, Grand Junction, Mesa County, Colorado. Volume 1, Text: Final environmental impact statement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    1986-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This statement evaluates and compares the environmental impacts associated with the remedial actions of the residual radioactive materials remaining at the inactive uranium processing site and associated vicinity properties at Grand Junction, Mesa County, Colorado. This statement is also intended to aid the BLM in amending their management framework plans and final resource management plan, as well as assisting in compliance with the withdrawal application as appropriate. The site is a 114-acre tract of private and state owned land which contains approximately 3.1 million cubic yards of tailings and associated contaminated soils. The vicinity properties are homes, businesses, public buildings, and vacant lots which may have been contaminated during construction by the use of tailings as building material. An estimated 3465 vicinity properties would be cleaned up during remedial action of the tailings pile. The tailings were produced by the former Climax Uranium Company which processed uranium ore, which it sold to the US Atomic Energy Commission from 1951 to 1966 and to private sources from 1966 to 1970. This statement evaluates six alternatives for stabilization and disposal of the tailings and other contaminated materials: (1) No action. (2) Stabilization at the Grand Junction site. (3) Disposal at the Cheney Reservoir site with truck transport. (4) Disposal at the Cheney Reservoir site with train and truck transport. (5) Disposal at the Two Road site with truck transport. (6) Disposal at the Two Road site with train and truck transport. All of the alternatives except no action include remedial action at an estimated 3465 vicinity properties. Alternative 3 is DOE`s preferred alternative.

  16. Mesa Energy formerly called Mesa Environmental Sciences | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: Energy Resources Jump to:46 -Energieprojekte GmbH Jump to: navigation, search306455°,Mertens,

  17. MESA Other GFP.xlsx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    HEADSET PLANTRONICS PLANTRONICSCS50 BK144660 169.03 1 258 17-Jul-13 0000037304 METER SOUND LEVEL EXTECH 407730 9708219 116.10 B19 WHRS 812013 0000037299 METER LIGHT...

  18. MESA PUBLICATIONS YEARS 1995 2000

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilbes, Fernando

    ". J. Appl. Phys. 80, 477 (1996). E. Ching-Prado, W. Perez, S. Sen, R. S. Katiyar, M. H. Frey, and D. A Conference on Raman Spectroscopy (Edited by S.A. Asher and P.B. Stein), John Wiley & Sons (1996) p 856

  19. Microsystems & Engineering Sciences Applications (MESA)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    the scientific, engineering, and computational disciplines necessary to produce functional, robust, integrated and microfabrication techniques to produce solar cells as small as 3-20 microns thick and 100- 1000 microns wide are two packaged microresonator die next to a US dime. Exceptional ser v ice in the national interest #12

  20. Red Mesa | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revisionEnvReviewNonInvasiveExplorationUT-g Grant of Access Permit5-ID-aRECRaton,RFPs Home NameRecurrentRedRed

  1. MESA Makes It Real The

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: VegetationEquipment Surfaces and InterfacesAdministration -Lowell L. Wood,3,March 26,MEMS

  2. MESA Other GFP.xlsx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: VegetationEquipment Surfaces and InterfacesAdministration -Lowell L. Wood,3,March 26,MEMSMESA Other GFP

  3. MESA Sensitive Property.xlsx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: VegetationEquipment Surfaces and InterfacesAdministration -Lowell L. Wood,3,March 26,MEMSMESA Other

  4. Managing Complexity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chassin, David P.; Posse, Christian; Malard, Joel M.

    2004-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Physical analogs have shown considerable promise for understanding the behavior of complex adaptive systems, including macroeconomics, biological systems, social networks, and electric power markets. Many of today’s most challenging technical and policy questions can be reduced to a distributed economic control problem. Indeed, economically-based control of large-scale systems is founded on the conjecture that the price-based regulation (e.g., auctions, markets) results in an optimal allocation of resources and emergent optimal system control. This paper explores the state of the art in the use physical analogs for understanding the behavior of some econophysical systems and to deriving stable and robust control strategies for them. In particular we review and discussion applications of some analytic methods based on the thermodynamic metaphor according to which the interplay between system entropy and conservation laws gives rise to intuitive and governing global properties of complex systems that cannot be otherwise understood.

  5. The Age and The Mass of The \\alpha Herculis Triple-Star System From A MESA Grid of rotating stars with 1.3 <= M/Msun <= 8.0

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moravveji, Ehsan; Khosroshahi, Habib G; Wasatonic, Rick

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    \\alpha^1 Her is the second closest Asymptotic Giant Branch (AGB) star to the Sun, and the variable luminous M5 Ib-II member of a triple stellar system containing G8 III and A9 IV-V components. However, the mass of this important star was previously uncertain with published values ranging from ~2 - 15 Msun. As shown by this study, its fortuitous membership in a nearby resolved triple star system, makes it possible to determine its fundamental properties including its mass and age. We present over twenty years of VRI photometry of \\alpha^1 Her as well as Wing intermediate-band near-IR TiO and NIR continuum photometry. We introduce a new photometry-based calibration technique, and extract the effective temperature and luminosity of \\alpha^1 Her, in agreement with recent interferometric measures. We find, Teff=3280 +/- 87 K and log(L/Lsun)=3.92 +/- 0.14. With the MESA code, we calculate a dense grid of evolutionary tracks for Galactic low- to intermediate-mass (1.3 to 8 Msun) rotating stars from the pre-main sequ...

  6. Phase II Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Units 101 and 102: Central and Western Pahute Mesa, Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada, Revision 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jeff Wurtz

    2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Phase II CAIP describes new work needed to potentially reduce uncertainty and achieve increased confidence in modeling results. This work includes data collection and data analysis to refine model assumptions, improve conceptual models of flow and transport in a complex hydrogeologic setting, and reduce parametric and structural uncertainty. The work was prioritized based on the potential to reduce model uncertainty and achieve an acceptable level of confidence in the model predictions for flow and transport, leading to model acceptance by NDEP and completion of the Phase II CAI stage of the UGTA strategy.

  7. Complexity in Big History

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Spier, Fred

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Spier, Fred. “How Big History Works: Energy Flows and RiseSmil, Vaclav. Energy in World History. Boulder, CO: Westviewkg) Energy and complexity Spier: Complexity in Big History.

  8. Hyper Space Complex Number

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shanguang Tan

    2007-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

    A new kind of numbers called Hyper Space Complex Numbers and its algebras are defined and proved. It is with good properties as the classic Complex Numbers, such as expressed in coordinates, triangular and exponent forms and following the associative and commutative laws of addition and multiplication. So the classic Complex Number is developed from in complex plane with two dimensions to in complex space with N dimensions and the number system is enlarged also.

  9. Quantum Complex Minkowski Space

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grzegorz Jakimowicz; Anatol Odzijewicz

    2005-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The complex Minkowski phase space has the physical interpretation of the phase space of the scalar massive conformal particle. The aim of the paper is the construction and investigation of the quantum complex Minkowski space.

  10. Complexity, Ecology, Finance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Morris Worm Complexity, Ecology, Finance The Pre-HistorySystemic Risk Complexity, Ecology, Finance Andrew Haldane,has called for more ecology in the study of finance ( read

  11. Complexity of Counting CSP with Complex Weights

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cai, Jin-Yi

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We give a complexity dichotomy theorem for the counting Constraint Satisfaction Problem (#CSP in short) with complex weights. To this end, we give three conditions for its tractability. Let F be any finite set of complex-valued functions, then we prove that #CSP(F) is solvable in polynomial time if all three conditions are satisfied; and is #P-hard otherwise. Our complexity dichotomy generalizes a long series of important results on counting problems: (a) the problem of counting graph homomorphisms is the special case when there is a single symmetric binary function in F; (b) the problem of counting directed graph homomorphisms is the special case when there is a single not-necessarily-symmetric binary function in F; and (c) the standard form of #CSP is when all functions in F take values in {0,1}.

  12. Stability and Complexity in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Landweber, Laura

    and complexity of a commu- nity of interacting plants and animals, following the food web as a clue. Contrary in power. Stability and Complexity in Model Ecosystems played a key role in introducing nonlinear thinking, and current threats to biodiversity have made questions about the role of ecosystem complexity

  13. U1A Complex

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2014-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Some of the most sophisticated experiments in the stockpile stewardship program are conducted in an environmentally safe manner, nearly 1000 feet below the ground at the site. The U1a complex a sprawling underground laboratory and tunnel complex is home to a number of unique capabilities.

  14. U1A Complex

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2015-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Some of the most sophisticated experiments in the stockpile stewardship program are conducted in an environmentally safe manner, nearly 1000 feet below the ground at the site. The U1a complex a sprawling underground laboratory and tunnel complex is home to a number of unique capabilities.

  15. Exponential Random Simplicial Complexes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zuev, Konstantin; Krioukov, Dmitri

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Exponential random graph models have attracted significant research attention over the past decades. These models are maximum-entropy ensembles under the constraints that the expected values of a set of graph observables are equal to given values. Here we extend these maximum-entropy ensembles to random simplicial complexes, which are more adequate and versatile constructions to model complex systems in many applications. We show that many random simplicial complex models considered in the literature can be casted as maximum-entropy ensembles under certain constraints. We introduce and analyze the most general random simplicial complex ensemble $\\mathbf{\\Delta}$ with statistically independent simplices. Our analysis is simplified by the observation that any distribution $\\mathbb{P}(O)$ on any collection of objects $\\mathcal{O}=\\{O\\}$, including graphs and simplicial complexes, is maximum-entropy under the constraint that the expected value of $-\\ln \\mathbb{P}(O)$ is equal to the entropy of the distribution. W...

  16. MESA REDONDA Fuentes orales e historia contempornea

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Escolano, Francisco

    ". Este proyecto recupera las emisiones radiofónicas de las emisoras, que de forma abierta desde el exilio

  17. Syracuse University San Diego Mesa College

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Segraves, Kari A.

    , 200, 200L, 201, 201L, 231, 231L, 233, 233L, 251(w/lab); GEOG 101,101L; GEOL 100, 101(lab), 104; MATH

  18. Syracuse University San Diego Mesa College

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Segraves, Kari A.

    , 231L, 233, 233L, 251(w/lab); GEOG 101,101L; GEOL 100, 101(lab), 104; MATH 116, 119, 121, 122, 141, 150

  19. Syracuse University San Diego Mesa College

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Segraves, Kari A.

    , 251(w/lab); GEOG 101,101L; GEOL 100, 101(lab), 104; MATH 116, 119, 121, 122, 141, 150, 151, 245, 252

  20. Syracuse University San Diego Mesa College

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Segraves, Kari A.

    L, 111, 111L, 130, 130L, 152, 152L, 200, 200L, 201, 201L, 231, 231L, 233, 233L, 251(w/lab); GEOG 101

  1. Syracuse University San Diego Mesa College

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Segraves, Kari A.

    , 201L, 231, 231L, 233, 233L, 251(w/lab); GEOG 101,101L; GEOL 100, 101(lab), 104; MATH 116, 119, 121

  2. Syracuse University San Diego Mesa College

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Segraves, Kari A.

    /lab); CHEM 100, 100L, 111, 111L, 130, 130L, 152, 152L, 200, 200L, 201, 201L, 231, 231L, 233, 233L, 251(w

  3. East Mesa Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address:011-DNA Jump37. It is classified asThis article isMcKeesport is a borough inGeothermal

  4. Trent Mesa Wind Farm | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revisionEnvReviewNonInvasiveExplorationUT-gTaguspark JumpDetective:Toyo AluminiumCity Light & PowerTreesTrent

  5. Mesa, Arizona: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revision hasInformation Earth's Heat JumpIncMAKGalwayHydrothermalMcFarlandSurvey Professionaland Co

  6. Southwest Mesa Wind Farm | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revisionEnvReviewNonInvasiveExplorationUT-g GrantAtlas (PACA Region -SonelgazSunbelt Wind Farm

  7. Chupadera Mesa, New Mexico, Site Fact Sheet

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarlyEnergyDepartment ofDepartment ofof EnergyYou$0.C. 20545 OCTTO:March_BayoRECORD OF^_. . _?

  8. Complex System Classification

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Magee, Christopher

    2004-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

    The use of terms such as “Engineering Systems”, “System of systems” and others have been coming into greater use over the past decade to denote systems of importance but with implied higher complexity than for the term ...

  9. Hydridomethyl iridium complex

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bergman, Robert G. (P.O. Box 7141, San Francisco, CA 94120-7141); Buchanan, J. Michael (P.O. Box 7141, San Francisco, CA 94120-7141); Stryker, Jeffrey M. (P.O. Box 7141, San Francisco, CA 94120-7141); Wax, Michael J. (P.O. Box 7141, San Francisco, CA 94120-7141)

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A process for functionalizing methane comprising: (a) reacting methane with a hydridoalkyl metal complex of the formula: CpIr[P(R.sub.1).sub.3 ]H(R.sub.2) wherein Cp represents a cyclopentadienyl or alkylcyclopentadienyl radical having from 1 to 5 carbon atoms; Ir represents an iridium atom; P represents a phosphorus atom; R.sub.1 represents an alkyl group; R.sub.2 represents an alkyl group having at least two carbon atoms; and H represents a hydrogen atom, in the presence of a liquid alkane R.sub.3 H having at least three carbon atoms to form a hydridomethyl complex of the formula: CpIr[P(R.sub.1).sub.3 ]HMe where Me represents a methyl radical. (b) reacting said hydridomethyl complex with an organic halogenating agent such as a tetrahalomethane or a haloform of the formulas: CX'X"X'"X"" or CHX'X"X'"; wherein X', X", X"', and X"" represent halogens selected from bromine, iodine and chlorine, to halomethyl complex of step (a) having the formula: CpIr[P(R.sub.1).sub.3 ]MeX: (c) reacting said halomethyl complex with a mercuric halide of the formula HgX.sub.2 to form a methyl mercuric halide of the formula HgMeX; and (d) reacting said methyl mercuric halide with a molecular halogen of the formula X.sub.2 to form methyl halide.

  10. Synchronization in complex networks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arenas, A.; Diaz-Guilera, A.; Moreno, Y.; Zhou, C.; Kurths, J.

    2007-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Synchronization processes in populations of locally interacting elements are in the focus of intense research in physical, biological, chemical, technological and social systems. The many efforts devoted to understand synchronization phenomena in natural systems take now advantage of the recent theory of complex networks. In this review, we report the advances in the comprehension of synchronization phenomena when oscillating elements are constrained to interact in a complex network topology. We also overview the new emergent features coming out from the interplay between the structure and the function of the underlying pattern of connections. Extensive numerical work as well as analytical approaches to the problem are presented. Finally, we review several applications of synchronization in complex networks to different disciplines: biological systems and neuroscience, engineering and computer science, and economy and social sciences.

  11. Luminescent macrocyclic lanthanide complexes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Raymond, Kenneth N; Corneillie, Todd M; Xu, Jide

    2014-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention provides a novel class of macrocyclic compounds as well as complexes formed between a metal (e.g., lanthanide) ion and the compounds of the invention. Preferred complexes exhibit high stability as well as high quantum yields of lanthanide ion luminescence in aqueous media without the need for secondary activating agents. Preferred compounds incorporate hydroxy-isophthalamide moieties within their macrocyclic structure and are characterized by surprisingly low, non-specific binding to a variety of polypeptides such as antibodies and proteins as well as high kinetic stability. These characteristics distinguish them from known, open-structured ligands.

  12. Complex Systems and Brain Sciences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fernandez, Eduardo

    Center for Complex Systems and Brain Sciences Charles E. Schmidt College of Science www.ccs.fau.edu #12;Center for Complex Systems and Brain Sciences Our Mission The mission of the Center for Complex Systems and Brain Sciences is to understand the principles and mechanisms underlying complex behavior

  13. MSU MESA-Updated 7.8.2013 Montana State University MESA Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dyer, Bill

    .irs.gov Source: Federal Register, Vol. 78, No. 16, January 24, 2013, pp. 5182-5183 PERSONAL INFORMATION Name

  14. APPENDIX F. TRANSFORMS, COMPLEX ANALYSIS 1 Transforms, Complex

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Callen, James D.

    APPENDIX F. TRANSFORMS, COMPLEX ANALYSIS 1 Appendix F Transforms, Complex Analysis This appendix discusses Fourier and Laplace transforms as they are used in plasma physics and this book. Also, key properties of complex variable theory that are needed for understanding and inverting these transforms

  15. Nuclear Weapons Complex reconfiguration study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Shortly after assuming duties as Secretary of Energy, I reviewed the Nuclear Weapons Complex Modernization Report'' submitted to the Congress in January 1989 as required by the National Defense Authorization Act of 1988 and 1989. My review showed that several of the report's assumptions needed to be re-evaluated. During this eighteen-month review, dramatic world changes forced further reassessments of the future Nuclear Weapons Complex. These changes are reflected in the new report. The new report presents a plan to achieve a reconfigured complex, called Complex-21. Complex-21 would be smaller, less diverse, and less expensive to operated than the Complex of today. Complex-21 would be able to safely and reliability support nuclear deterrent stockpile objectives set forth by the President and funded by the Congress. It would be consistent with realities of the emerging international security environment and flexible enough to accommodate the likely range of deterrent contingencies. In addition, Complex-21 would be constructed and operated to comply with all applicable federal, state, and local laws, regulations, and orders. Achieving Complex-21 will require significant resources. This report provides and organized approach toward selecting the most appropriate configuration for Complex-21, satisfying environmental requirements, and minimizing costs. The alternative -- to continue to use piecemeal fixes to run an antiquated complex -- will be more expensive and provide a less reliable Nuclear Weapons Complex. As a consequence, implementation of the Complex-21 plan is considered necessary to ensure continued viability of our nuclear deterrent.

  16. Complexity Science for Simpletons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Craig Alan Feinstein

    2012-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

    In this article, we shall describe some of the most interesting topics in the subject of Complexity Science for a general audience. Anyone with a solid foundation in high school mathematics (with some calculus) and an elementary understanding of computer programming will be able to follow this article. First, we shall explain the significance of the P versus NP problem and solve it. Next, we shall describe two other famous mathematics problems, the Collatz 3n+1 Conjecture and the Riemann Hypothesis, and show how both Chaitin's incompleteness theorem and Wolfram's notion of "computational irreducibility" are important for understanding why no one has, as of yet, solved these two problems.

  17. Autonomicity vs. Complexity Stefan Schmid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stavrakakis, Ioannis

    ­ and hopefully not that many · Autonomicity introduces complexity (and hence CAPEX ­ but only initially for the 1

  18. Complex pendulum biomass sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hoskinson, Reed L. (Rigby, ID); Kenney, Kevin L. (Idaho Falls, ID); Perrenoud, Ben C. (Rigby, ID)

    2007-12-25T23:59:59.000Z

    A complex pendulum system biomass sensor having a plurality of pendulums. The plurality of pendulums allow the system to detect a biomass height and density. Each pendulum has an angular deflection sensor and a deflector at a unique height. The pendulums are passed through the biomass and readings from the angular deflection sensors are fed into a control system. The control system determines whether adjustment of machine settings is appropriate and either displays an output to the operator, or adjusts automatically adjusts the machine settings, such as the speed, at which the pendulums are passed through the biomass. In an alternate embodiment, an entanglement sensor is also passed through the biomass to determine the amount of biomass entanglement. This measure of entanglement is also fed into the control system.

  19. Fault Block Kinematics at a Releasing Stepover of the Eastern...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Area and Nascent Metamorphic Core Complex Abstract Pliocene lavas and sediments of Wild Horse Mesa in the Coso Range, CA exhibit clockwise vertical-axis rotation of...

  20. Fault block kinematics at a releasing stepover of the Eastern...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    area and nascent metamorphic core complex Abstract Pliocene lavas and sediments of Wild Horse Mesa in the Coso Range, CA exhibit clockwise vertical-axis rotation of...

  1. Phase II Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Units 101 and 102: Central and Western Pahute Mesa, Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada, Revision 2 with ROTC 1 and 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marutzky, Sam

    2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Phase II CAIP describes new work needed to potentially reduce uncertainty and achieve increased confidence in modeling results. This work includes data collection and data analysis to refine model assumptions, improve conceptual models of flow and transport in a complex hydrogeologic setting, and reduce parametric and structural uncertainty. The work was prioritized based on the potential to reduce model uncertainty and achieve an acceptable level of confidence in the model predictions for flow and transport, leading to model acceptance by NDEP and completion of the Phase II CAI stage of the UGTA strategy.

  2. COMPLEX BIOLOGICAL MECHANISMS: CYCLIC, OSCILLATORY,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bechtel, William

    COMPLEX BIOLOGICAL MECHANISMS: CYCLIC, OSCILLATORY, AND AUTONOMOUS William Bechtel and Adele- nomological framework and its focus on laws as the primary explanatory vehicle; for them, a scientific

  3. Quantum Certificate Complexity Scott Aaronson #

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aaronson, Scott

    , that Q 0 (f) # R 0 (f), and that Q E (f) # D (f). If f is partial (i.e. Dom (f) #= {0, 1} n ), then Q 2Quantum Certificate Complexity Scott Aaronson # Computer Science Division University of California . Then the deterministic query complexity D (f) is the minimum number of queries to the y i 's needed to evaluate f , if Y

  4. electronic properties of complex systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Giraud, Olivier

    ;Towards electronic properties of complex systems C. Giorgetti Interest in Photovoltaic Conductance within ab initio framework size of the systems limited but predicative can include many-body effectsTowards electronic properties of complex systems C. Giorgetti Towards electronic properties

  5. Kinetics of actinide complexation reactions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nash, K.L.; Sullivan, J.C.

    1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Though the literature records extensive compilations of the thermodynamics of actinide complexation reactions, the kinetics of complex formation and dissociation reactions of actinide ions in aqueous solutions have not been extensively investigated. In light of the central role played by such reactions in actinide process and environmental chemistry, this situation is somewhat surprising. The authors report herein a summary of what is known about actinide complexation kinetics. The systems include actinide ions in the four principal oxidation states (III, IV, V, and VI) and complex formation and dissociation rates with both simple and complex ligands. Most of the work reported was conducted in acidic media, but a few address reactions in neutral and alkaline solutions. Complex formation reactions tend in general to be rapid, accessible only to rapid-scan and equilibrium perturbation techniques. Complex dissociation reactions exhibit a wider range of rates and are generally more accessible using standard analytical methods. Literature results are described and correlated with the known properties of the individual ions.

  6. Competing complexity metrics and adults' production of complex sentences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kemper, Susan; Cheng, Hintat

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The adequacy of 11 metrics for measuring linguistic complexity was evaluated by applying each metric to language samples obtained from 30 different adult speakers, aged 60-90 years. The analysis then determined how well ...

  7. Architecting complex systems for robustness

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Slagle, Jason C

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Robust design methodologies are frequently utilized by organizations to develop robust and reliable complex systems. The intent of robust design is to create systems that are insensitive to variations from production, the ...

  8. Complex Hydrides for Hydrogen Storage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Slattery, Darlene; Hampton, Michael

    2003-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes research into the use of complex hydrides for hydrogen storage. The synthesis of a number of alanates, (AIH4) compounds, was investigated. Both wet chemical and mechano-chemical methods were studied.

  9. Quantum Certificate Complexity Scott Aaronson #

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aaronson, Scott

    (f) # D (f ), and that Q 0 (f) # R 0 (f). 1 If f is partial (i.e. S #= {0, 1} n ), then Q 2 (f) canQuantum Certificate Complexity Scott Aaronson # Abstract Given a Boolean function f , we study two . Then the deterministic query complexity D (f) is the minimum number of queries to the y i 's needed to evaluate f , if Y

  10. Restricted Complexity Framework for Nonlinear Adaptive Control in Complex Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Williams, Rube B. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, P.O. Box 1663, MS K575, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States)

    2004-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Control law adaptation that includes implicit or explicit adaptive state estimation, can be a fundamental underpinning for the success of intelligent control in complex systems, particularly during subsystem failures, where vital system states and parameters can be impractical or impossible to measure directly. A practical algorithm is proposed for adaptive state filtering and control in nonlinear dynamic systems when the state equations are unknown or are too complex to model analytically. The state equations and inverse plant model are approximated by using neural networks. A framework for a neural network based nonlinear dynamic inversion control law is proposed, as an extrapolation of prior developed restricted complexity methodology used to formulate the adaptive state filter. Examples of adaptive filter performance are presented for an SSME simulation with high pressure turbine failure to support extrapolations to adaptive control problems.

  11. Mechanical Computation: its Computational Complexity and Technologies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reif, John H.

    Mechanical Computation: its Computational Complexity and Technologies Chapter, Encyclopedia Importance II. Introduction to Computational Complexity III. Computational Complexity of Mechanical Devices and their Movement Problems IV. Concrete Mechanical Computing Devices V. Future Directions VI. Bibliography Glossary

  12. Increasing Kolmogorov Complexity Harry Buhrman

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fortnow, Lance

    Increasing Kolmogorov Complexity Harry Buhrman Lance Fortnow Ilan Newman Nikolai Vereshchagin b(n, l) denote the binomial sum: b(n, l) = n 0 + n 1 + · · · + n l . Theorem 2 (Harper). Let J 2n . Take all the strings with less than l ones and take J - l first strings with l ones

  13. Aromatic triamide-lanthanide complexes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    2013-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention provides luminescent lanthanide metal chelates comprising a metal ion of the lanthanide series and a complexing agent comprising at least one phthalamidyl moiety. Also provided are probes incorporating the phthalamidyl ligands of the invention and methods utilizing the ligands of the invention and probes comprising the ligands of the invention.

  14. Quantum Certificate Complexity Scott Aaronson

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aaronson, Scott

    (f) R0 (f), and that QE (f) D (f). If f is partial (i.e. Dom (f) = {0, 1}n ), then Q2 (f) canQuantum Certificate Complexity Scott Aaronson Computer Science Division University of California for all i S then f (Y ) = f (X). Then CX (f) is the mini- mum size of a certificate for X, and C (f

  15. Complex Forces Affect China's Biodiversity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    global efforts have been put into biodiversity conservation, but biodiversity loss continues rapidly in biodiversity conservation to the global level and help protect biodiversity in other developing countries Wiley & Sons, Ltd. #12;208 ConservationBiology COMPLEXITY OF INTERACTING FORCES AFFECTING BIODIVERSITY

  16. Quantum Certificate Complexity Scott Aaronson

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aaronson, Scott

    2 (f) R 2 (f) R 0 (f) D (f) n, that QE (f) D (f), and that Q0 (f) R0 (f).1 If f is partial (i.eQuantum Certificate Complexity Scott Aaronson Abstract Given a Boolean function f, we study two/2, and otherwise outputs "I don't know" (it can never output an incorrect value). If we require the algorithm

  17. Materials and Fuels Complex Tour

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Miley, Don

    2013-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The Materials and Fuels Complex at Idaho National Laboratory is home to several facilities used for the research and development of nuclear fuels. Stops include the Fuel Conditioning Facility, the Hot Fuel Examination Facility (post-irradiation examination), and the Space and Security Power System Facility, where radioisotope thermoelectric generators (RTGs) are assembled for deep space missions. You can learn more about INL research programs at http://www.facebook.com/idahonationallaboratory.

  18. Rainier Mesa CAU Infiltration Model using INFILv3

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Levitt, Daniel G. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Kwicklis, Edward M. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

    The outline of this presentation are: (1) Model Inputs - DEM, Precipitation, Air temp, Soil props, Surface geology, Vegetation; (2) Model Pre-processing - Runoff Routing and sinks, Slope and Azimuth, Soil Ksat reduction with slope (to mitigate bathtub ring), Soil-Bedrock Interface permeabilities; (3) Model Calibration - ET using PEST, Chloride mass balance data, Streamflow using PEST; (4) Model Validation - Streamflow data not used for calibration; (5) Uncertainty Analysis; and (6) Results. Conclusions are: (1) Average annual infiltration rates =11 to 18 mm/year for RM domain; (2) Average annual infiltration rates = 7 to 11 mm/year for SM domain; (3) ET = 70% of precipitation for both domains; (4) Runoff = 8-9% for RM; and 22-24% for SM - Apparently high average runoff is caused by the truncation of the lowerelevation portions of watersheds where much of the infiltration of runoff waters would otherwise occur; (5) Model results are calibrated to measured ET, CMB data, and streamflow observations; (6) Model results are validated using streamflow observations discovered after model calibration was complete; (7) Use of soil Ksat reduction with slope to mitigate bathtub ring was successful (based on calibration results); and (8) Soil-bedrock K{_}interface is innovative approach.

  19. Mesa Top Photovoltaic Array SyStem SpecificationS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    electricity that array will provide: 7% environmental impact Annual carbon offset: 2.4 million pounds of CO2 Annual NOx offset: >3,700 pounds Annual SOx offset: >2,400 pounds TEAM Initiative & Executive Order 13423

  20. DOE and Colorado Mesa University Education Agreement Expands...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    in 1994; the rest of the cell remains open until it is filled to capacity with Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act radioactive waste or until 2023, whichever comes first....

  1. Sandia National Laboratories: Mesa del Sol Project Is Finalist...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    for International Smart Grid Action Network 2014 Award of Excellence Sandia, NREL Release Wave Energy Converter Modeling and Simulation Code: WEC-Sim Sandia Student Wins Best Paper...

  2. La Mesa, California: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: Energy Resources Jump to:46 - 429 ThrottledInformationparticipants < LEDSGP‎Hoying,Jolla,Marque,

  3. Otay Mesa, CA Liquefied Natural Gas Exports (Million Cubic Feet)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2007 10,998 9,933 10,998 10,643 10,998through 1996)Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2Feet)Thousand

  4. Costa Mesa, California: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address: 160Benin:EnergyWisconsin:2003) |Cordova Electric Coop,Cosmo Powertech Pvt

  5. DOE and Colorado Mesa University Education Agreement Expands LM's Site

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarly Career Scientists'Montana. DOCUMENTSof EnergyAllianceDepartment of Energy

  6. Battlement Mesa, Colorado: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address: 160 EastMaine:Barbers Point Housing,Illinois:County is a countyVentures Jump

  7. Enchanted Mesa is not quite off thebeaten track

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mojzsis, Stephen J.

    Design Computer Applications and Computer Graphics Management Development learning For learning's Sake;use ofcomputers and electronic information systems. Computer Graphics ..................................................................35 The Meeker Getaway, graduate courses in botany, ecology, energy, fine arts and geology

  8. Tracer Testing At East Mesa Geothermal Area (1983) | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revisionEnvReviewNonInvasiveExplorationUT-gTaguspark JumpDetective:Toyo Aluminium KK Jump to:Springs) Jump

  9. Tracer Testing At East Mesa Geothermal Area (1984) | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revisionEnvReviewNonInvasiveExplorationUT-gTaguspark JumpDetective:Toyo Aluminium KK Jump to:Springs)

  10. Mesa County Valley Wind Project | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revision hasInformation Earth's Heat JumpIncMAKGalwayHydrothermalMcFarlandSurvey Professionaland Co Place:

  11. Mountain Mesa, California: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revision hasInformation Earth's HeatMexico: EnergyMithun Jump to:Moe WindMontMoraineAbbey JumpWind

  12. NREL Mesa Top PV System | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revision hasInformation Earth's HeatMexico: EnergyMithun JumpMuscoy, California:New York) Name:

  13. San Juan Mesa Wind Farm | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revisionEnvReviewNonInvasiveExplorationUT-g Grant ofRichardton Abbey WindSamsungFarms Sector WindJoaquinowns

  14. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- EFB White Mesa Site - 033

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarlyEnergyDepartment ofDepartment ofof EnergyYou are here Home »HillNY 28DorrE B Badger - MA-EFB

  15. Mesa County, Colorado: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: Energy Resources Jump to:46 -Energieprojekte GmbH Jump to: navigation, search306455°,Mertens, Texas:County,

  16. Otay Mesa, CA Natural Gas Exports to Mexico

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines About U.S.30Natural Gas,095,3628,527 9,029 8,794Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr 0 86

  17. Otay Mesa, CA Natural Gas Imports by Pipeline from Mexico

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines About U.S.30Natural Gas,095,3628,527 9,029 8,794Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr 0

  18. Alta Mesa I Wind Farm | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of InspectorConcentrating SolarElectricEnergy InformationTuriAlexandriaAlstom Energy SystemsAlta IIIAlta IVI

  19. Alta Mesa II Wind Farm | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of InspectorConcentrating SolarElectricEnergy InformationTuriAlexandriaAlstom Energy SystemsAlta IIIAlta

  20. Mesa Verde's New Museum Showcases Sustainable Building Technologies |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: AlternativeEnvironment, SafetyWaterMary Landrieu About Us Mary LandrieuEnergy |Services

  1. Red Mesa, Arizona: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia:FAQ < RAPID Jump to: navigation, search RAPIDColoradosourceRausWyoming: Energy Resources

  2. Sandia National Laboratories: Mesa del Sol Project Is Finalist for

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas ConchasPassive SolarEducationStation TechnologyWindInternational Smart Grid Action

  3. City of Mesa, Arizona (Utility Company) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of Inspector GeneralDepartmentAUDITOhio (UtilityHolyrood,Martinsville, Virginia

  4. Ogilby Mesa, CA Natural Gas Exports to Mexico

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelinesProved ReservesFeet) Year JanProduction 4 12 7311,925Count) DataEnergySep-1495,394

  5. Indian Mesa Wind Farm I | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revision hasInformation Earth's Heat JumpInc Place: Eden Prairie, Minnesota Zip: 55344ESMAP LowChange

  6. Indian Mesa Wind Farm II | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revision hasInformation Earth's Heat JumpInc Place: Eden Prairie, Minnesota Zip: 55344ESMAP LowChangeVestas

  7. GREEN FUNCTIONS ASSOCIATED TO COMPLEX REFLECTION GROUPS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shoj, Toshiaki

    GREEN FUNCTIONS ASSOCIATED TO COMPLEX REFLECTION GROUPS University of Tokyo Noda, Chiba 278-8510, Japan Abstract. Green functions called symbols. Generali* *zing this, we define Green functions associated to complex reflection

  8. Complex oxides useful for thermoelectric energy conversion

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Majumdar, Arunava (Orinda, CA); Ramesh, Ramamoorthy (Moraga, CA); Yu, Choongho (College Station, TX); Scullin, Matthew L. (Berkeley, CA); Huijben, Mark (Enschede, NL)

    2012-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

    The invention provides for a thermoelectric system comprising a substrate comprising a first complex oxide, wherein the substrate is optionally embedded with a second complex oxide. The thermoelectric system can be used for thermoelectric power generation or thermoelectric cooling.

  9. Partitioning Complexity in Air Traffic Management Task

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cummings, M. L.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Cognitive complexity is a term that appears frequently in air traffic control (ATC) research literature, yet there is little principled investigation of the potential sources of cognitive complexity. Three distinctly ...

  10. NNSA conference showcases complex science, engineering | National...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    conference showcases complex science, engineering | National Nuclear Security Administration Facebook Twitter Youtube Flickr RSS People Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing...

  11. Challenges and Complexity of Aerodynamic Wing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jameson, Antony

    Chapter 1 Challenges and Complexity of Aerodynamic Wing Design Kasidit Leoviriyakit and Antony@stanford.edu and jameson@baboon.stanford.edu This paper focuses on aerodynamic design methodology. It discusses challenges and complexity of aerodynamic wing design for a transonic aircraft, which arise from the complex nature of flow

  12. Integration of Biomass processes in an existing Petrochemical ComplexPetrochemical Complex

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pike, Ralph W.

    Integration of Biomass processes in an existing Petrochemical ComplexPetrochemical Complex Debalina · Biomass conversion processes · Integration in existing plant complex l i· Conclusions #12;Sustainability;Overview · Biomass based processes integrated into a chemical production complex. Utili b di id f i th l

  13. DOE outlines complex cleanup options

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lobsenz, G.

    1994-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

    The Energy Department said last week it will consider four different strategies for cleanup of its nuclear weapons complex in a draft programmatic environmental impact statement due for release this summer. In an implementation plan released for public comment February 17, DOE also said the EIS would look at centralized, decentralized and regional approaches to management of six types of radioactive and hazardous wastes. Other issues to be addressed in the EIS are development of innovative cleanup technology, budgeting and prioritization, job cutbacks and worker retraining, waste minimization and community involvement in cleanup decisions. However, DOE said it had decided not to address spent nuclear fuel storage in the EIS, as had been previously planned. Instead, spent fuel storage options will be reviewed in another environmental study being done under court order for DOE's Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. Findings from the INEL study will be incorporated in the department-wide EIS for environmental restoration and waste management.

  14. ICDF Complex Remedial Action Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    W. M. Heileson

    2007-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

    This Idaho CERCLA Disposal Facility (ICDF) Remedial Action Report has been prepared in accordance with the requirements of Section 6.2 of the INEEL CERCLA Disposal Facility Remedial Action Work Plan. The agency prefinal inspection of the ICDF Staging, Storage, Sizing, and Treatment Facility (SSSTF) was completed in June of 2005. Accordingly, this report has been developed to describe the construction activities completed at the ICDF along with a description of any modifications to the design originally approved for the facility. In addition, this report provides a summary of the major documents prepared for the design and construction of the ICDF, a discussion of relevant requirements and remedial action objectives, the total costs associated with the development and operation of the facility to date, and identification of necessary changes to the Agency-approved INEEL CERCLA Disposal Facility Remedial Action Work Plan and the ICDF Complex Operations and Maintenance Plan.

  15. Heat Transfer in Complex Fluids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mehrdad Massoudi

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Amongst the most important constitutive relations in Mechanics, when characterizing the behavior of complex materials, one can identify the stress tensor T, the heat flux vector q (related to heat conduction) and the radiant heating (related to the radiation term in the energy equation). Of course, the expression 'complex materials' is not new. In fact, at least since the publication of the paper by Rivlin & Ericksen (1955), who discussed fluids of complexity (Truesdell & Noll, 1992), to the recently published books (Deshpande et al., 2010), the term complex fluids refers in general to fluid-like materials whose response, namely the stress tensor, is 'non-linear' in some fashion. This non-linearity can manifest itself in variety of forms such as memory effects, yield stress, creep or relaxation, normal-stress differences, etc. The emphasis in this chapter, while focusing on the constitutive modeling of complex fluids, is on granular materials (such as coal) and non-linear fluids (such as coal-slurries). One of the main areas of interest in energy related processes, such as power plants, atomization, alternative fuels, etc., is the use of slurries, specifically coal-water or coal-oil slurries, as the primary fuel. Some studies indicate that the viscosity of coal-water mixtures depends not only on the volume fraction of solids, and the mean size and the size distribution of the coal, but also on the shear rate, since the slurry behaves as shear-rate dependent fluid. There are also studies which indicate that preheating the fuel results in better performance, and as a result of such heating, the viscosity changes. Constitutive modeling of these non-linear fluids, commonly referred to as non-Newtonian fluids, has received much attention. Most of the naturally occurring and synthetic fluids are non-linear fluids, for example, polymer melts, suspensions, blood, coal-water slurries, drilling fluids, mud, etc. It should be noted that sometimes these fluids show Newtonian (linear) behavior for a given range of parameters or geometries; there are many empirical or semi-empirical constitutive equations suggested for these fluids. There have also been many non-linear constitutive relations which have been derived based on the techniques of continuum mechanics. The non-linearities oftentimes appear due to higher gradient terms or time derivatives. When thermal and or chemical effects are also important, the (coupled) momentum and energy equations can give rise to a variety of interesting problems, such as instability, for example the phenomenon of double-diffusive convection in a fluid layer. In Conclusion, we have studied the flow of a compressible (density gradient type) non-linear fluid down an inclined plane, subject to radiation boundary condition. The heat transfer is also considered where a source term, similar to the Arrhenius type reaction, is included. The non-dimensional forms of the equations are solved numerically and the competing effects of conduction, dissipation, heat generation and radiation are discussed. It is observed that the velocity increases rapidly in the region near the inclined surface and is slower in the region near the free surface. Since R{sub 7} is a measure of the heat generation due to chemical reaction, when the reaction is frozen (R{sub 7}=0.0) the temperature distributions would depend only on R{sub 1}, and R{sub 2}, representing the effects of the pressure force developed in the material due to the distribution, R{sub 3} and R{sub 4} viscous dissipation, R{sub 5} the normal stress coefficient, R{sub 6} the measure of the emissivity of the particles to the thermal conductivity, etc. When the flow is not frozen (RP{sub 7} > 0) the temperature inside the flow domain is much higher than those at the inclined and free surfaces. As a result, heat is transferred away from the flow toward both the inclined surface and the free surface with a rate that increases as R{sub 7} increases. For a given temperature, an increase in {zeta} implies that the activation energy is smaller and thus, the reaction ra

  16. Physical mapping of complex genomes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Evans, Glen A. (Encinitas, CA)

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Method for simultaneous identification of overlapping cosmid clones among multiple cosmid clones and the use of the method for mapping complex genomes are provided. A library of cosmid clones that contains the DNA to be mapped is constructed and arranged in a manner such that individual clones can be identified and replicas of the arranged clones prepared. In preferred embodiments, the clones are arranged in a two dimensional matrix. In such embodiments, the cosmid clones in a row are pooled, mixed probes complementary to the ends of the DNA inserts int he pooled clones are synthesized, hybridized to a first replica of the library. Hybridizing clones, which include the pooled row, are identified. A second portion of clones is prepared by pooling cosmid clones that correspond to a column in the matrix. The second pool thereby includes one clone from the first portion pooled clones. This common clone is located on the replica at the intersection of the column and row. Mixed probes complementary to the ends of the DNA inserts in the second pooled portion of clones are prepared and hybridized to a second replica of the library. The hybridization pattern on the first and second replicas of the library are compared and cross-hybridizing clones, other than the clones in the pooled column and row, that hybridize to identical clones in the first and second replicas are identified. These clones necessarily include DNA inserts that overlap with the DNA insert int he common clone located at the intersection of the pooled row and pooled column. The DNA in the entire library may be mapped by pooling the clones in each of the rows and columns of the matrix, preparing mixed end-specific probes and hybridizing the probes from each row or column to a replica of the library. Since all clones in the library are located at the intersection of a column and a row, the overlapping clones for all clones in the library may be identified and a physical map constructed. In other preferred embodiments, the cosmid clones are arranged in a three dimensional matrix, pooled and compared in threes according to intersecting planes of the three dimensional matrix. Arrangements corresponding to geometries of higher dimensions may also be prepared and used to simultaneously identify overlapping clones in highly complex libraries with relatively few hybridization reactions.

  17. Advanced nuclear plant control complex

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Scarola, Kenneth (Windsor, CT); Jamison, David S. (Windsor, CT); Manazir, Richard M. (North Canton, CT); Rescorl, Robert L. (Vernon, CT); Harmon, Daryl L. (Enfield, CT)

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An advanced control room complex for a nuclear power plant, including a discrete indicator and alarm system (72) which is nuclear qualified for rapid response to changes in plant parameters and a component control system (64) which together provide a discrete monitoring and control capability at a panel (14-22, 26, 28) in the control room (10). A separate data processing system (70), which need not be nuclear qualified, provides integrated and overview information to the control room and to each panel, through CRTs (84) and a large, overhead integrated process status overview board (24). The discrete indicator and alarm system (72) and the data processing system (70) receive inputs from common plant sensors and validate the sensor outputs to arrive at a representative value of the parameter for use by the operator during both normal and accident conditions, thereby avoiding the need for him to assimilate data from each sensor individually. The integrated process status board (24) is at the apex of an information hierarchy that extends through four levels and provides access at each panel to the full display hierarchy. The control room panels are preferably of a modular construction, permitting the definition of inputs and outputs, the man machine interface, and the plant specific algorithms, to proceed in parallel with the fabrication of the panels, the installation of the equipment and the generic testing thereof.

  18. Comproportionation of Cationic and Anionic Tungsten Complexes...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Comproportionation of Cationic and Anionic Tungsten Complexes Having an N-Heterocyclic Carbene Ligand to Give the Isolable 17 Comproportionation of Cationic and Anionic Tungsten...

  19. Models of organometallic complexes for optoelectronic applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. C. Jacko; Ross H. McKenzie; B. J. Powell

    2010-07-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Organometallic complexes have potential applications as the optically active components of organic light emitting diodes (OLEDs) and organic photovoltaics (OPV). Development of more effective complexes may be aided by understanding their excited state properties. Here we discuss two key theoretical approaches to investigate these complexes: first principles atomistic models and effective Hamiltonian models. We review applications of these methods, such as, determining the nature of the emitting state, predicting the fraction of injected charges that form triplet excitations, and explaining the sensitivity of device performance to small changes in the molecular structure of the organometallic complexes.

  20. CORRELATION PROFILES AND MOTIFS IN COMPLEX NETWORKS.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    MASLOV,S.SNEPPEN,K.ALON,U.

    2004-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Networks have recently emerged as a unifying theme in complex systems research [1]. It is in fact no coincidence that networks and complexity are so heavily intertwined. Any future definition of a complex system should reflect the fact that such systems consist of many mutually interacting components. These components are far from being identical as say electrons in systems studied by condensed matter physics. In a truly complex system each of them has a unique identity allowing one to separate it from the others. The very first question one may ask about such a system is which other components a given component interacts with? This information system wide can be visualized as a graph, whose nodes correspond to individual components of the complex system in question and edges to their mutual interactions. Such a network can be thought of as a backbone of the complex system. Of course, system's dynamics depends not only on the topology of an underlying network but also on the exact form of interaction of components with each other, which can be very different in various complex systems. However, the underlying network may contain clues about the basic design principles and/or evolutionary history of the complex system in question. The goal of this article is to provide readers with a set of useful tools that would help to decide which features of a complex network are there by pure chance alone, and which of them were possibly designed or evolved to their present state.

  1. Localized domain patterns in complex polymers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Localized domain patterns in complex polymers abstract. Block copolymers are macromolecules that can form variety of microstructures as a result of incomplete

  2. Draft Complex Transformation Supplemental Programmatic Environmental...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    which analyzed programmatic alternatives for the weapons complex in the absence of nuclear testing. NNSA maintains the safety, security, and reliability of nuclear weapons...

  3. A COMPLEXITY THEORY OF CONSTRUCTIBLE FUNCTIONS AND ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Jun 1, 2014 ... very naturally in the algebraic geometry over real and complex .... construction of a sequence of parametrized polynomial systems with a ...

  4. Controlling Complex Systems and Developing Dynamic Technology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Avizienis, Audrius Victor

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the highly complex interconnectivity found in biologicalnon-trivial effects of interconnectivity [Sim62, Str01] thatas a result of interconnectivity. The simulation was also

  5. Addressing Complexity In Laboratory Experiments- The Scaling...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    systems because they explicitly take into account the complexity caused by the feedback between particles (crystal, bubble, or pyroclast) and the continuous phase (liquid or...

  6. Fire hazards analysis of central waste complex

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Irwin, R.M.

    1996-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This document analyzes the fire hazards associated with operational the Central Waste Complex. It provides the analysis and recommendations necessary to ensure compliance with applicable fire codes.

  7. Characterization of the bovine major histocompatibility complex

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McArthur, Monica

    2013-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Genes within the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) are involved in immune response to infectious agents, tumor metastasis, stress response, gametogenesis, and development, including embryogenesis. Therefore, characterization...

  8. GREEN FUNCTIONS ASSOCIATED TO COMPLEX REFLECTION GROUPS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shoj, Toshiaki

    GREEN FUNCTIONS ASSOCIATED TO COMPLEX REFLECTION GROUPS TOSHIAKI SHOJI Department of Mathematics Science University of Tokyo Noda, Chiba 278­8510, Japan Abstract. Green functions of classical groups this, we define Green functions associated to complex reflection groups G(e, 1, n), and study

  9. ICD Complex Operations and Maintenance Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gibson, P. L.

    2007-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

    This Operations and Maintenance (O&M) Plan describes how the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) conducts operations, winterization, and startup of the Idaho CERCLA Disposal Facility (ICDF) Complex. The ICDF Complex is the centralized INL facility responsible for the receipt, storage, treatment (as necessary), and disposal of INL Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA) remediation waste.

  10. Ligand effects on bioinspired iron complexes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mejia Rodriguez, Ma. del Rosario

    2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    - phosphaadamantane, PTA, coordinates to the Fe centers forming the disubstituted complex (m-pdt)[Fe(CO)2PTA]2, which presents one PTA in each iron in a transoid arrangement. Substitution of one CO ligand in the (m-pdt)[Fe(CO)3]2 parent complex forms the asymmetric (m-pdt)[Fe...

  11. Persistence of complex food webs in metacommunities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Persistence of complex food webs in metacommunities Gesa A. B¨ohme 1 and Thilo Gross 2 1 Max of Engineering Mathematics, Bristol, UK Keywords: metacommunities, food webs, predator-prey interactions, geo diversity and food web complexity. Recently Pillai et al. proposed a simple modeling framework

  12. Preparation of cerium halide solvate complexes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vasudevan, Kalyan V; Smith, Nickolaus A; Gordon, John C; McKigney, Edward A; Muenchaussen, Ross E

    2013-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Crystals of a solvated cerium(III) halide solvate complex resulted from a process of forming a paste of a cerium(III) halide in an ionic liquid, adding a solvent to the paste, removing any undissolved solid, and then cooling the liquid phase. Diffusing a solvent vapor into the liquid phase also resulted in crystals of a solvated cerium(III) halide complex.

  13. Engineering Insights 2006 Complex Fluids Design Consortium

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Santa Barbara, University of

    Engineering Insights 2006 Complex Fluids Design Consortium (CFDC) www.mrl.ucsb.edu/cfdc Overview;Engineering Insights 2006 Objectives -- continued · Create a world-class center for complex fluid and soft and Research Highlights Glenn Fredrickson October 18, 2006 #12;Engineering Insights 2006 What is the CFDC

  14. Complexity Boundaries for Generalized Guarded Existential Rules

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    of the conjunctive query entail- ment problem for classes of existential rules (also called Tuple-Generating, namely (weakly) frontier- guarded rules. We provide a generic algorithm for query entailment with gbts complexity. Secondly, we classify several gbts classes, whose complexity was unknown, namely frontier

  15. Physical mapping of complex genomes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Evans, G.A.

    1993-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for the simultaneous identification of overlapping cosmid clones among multiple cosmid clones and the use of the method for mapping complex genomes are provided. A library of cosmid clones that contains the DNA to be mapped is constructed and arranged in a manner such that individual clones can be identified and replicas of the arranged clones prepared. In preferred embodiments, the clones are arranged in a two dimensional matrix. In such embodiments, the cosmid clones in a row are pooled, mixed probes complementary to the ends of the DNA inserts in the pooled clones are synthesized, hybridized to a first replica of the library. Hybridizing clones, which include the pooled row, are identified. A second portion of clones is prepared by pooling cosmid clones that correspond to a column in the matrix. The second pool thereby includes one clone from the first portion pooled clones. This common clone is located on the replica at the intersection of the column and row. Mixed probes complementary to the ends of the DNA inserts in the second pooled portion of clones are prepared and hybridized to a second replica of the library. The hybridization pattern on the first and second replicas of the library are compared and cross-hybridizing clones, other than the clones in the pooled column and row, that hybridize to identical clones in the first and second replicas are identified. These clones necessarily include DNA inserts that overlap with the DNA insert in the common clone located at the intersection of the pooled row and pooled column. The DNA in the entire library may be mapped by pooling the clones in each of the rows and columns of the matrix, preparing mixed end-specific probes and hybridizing the probes from each row or column to a replica of the library. Since all clones in the library are located at the intersection of a column and a row, the overlapping clones for all clones in the library may be identified and a physical map constructed.

  16. Predictive Complex Event Processing: A conceptual framework for combining Complex Event Processing and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beszedes, Árpád

    beszedes@inf.u- szeged.hu Hunor Demeter Nokia Siemens Network Hungary hunor.demeter@nsn.com Lóránt Farkas Nokia Siemens Network Hungary lorant.farkas@nsn.com ABSTRACT Complex Event Processing deals, transforming, cor- relating and aggregating them into complex events. Examples of complex events are: the 2009

  17. Multiple systems or task complexity 1 Running head: Multiple systems or task complexity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stoiciu, Mihai

    Multiple systems or task complexity 1 Running head: Multiple systems or task complexity Procedural memory effects in categorization: evidence for multiple systems or task complexity? Safa R. Zaki and Dave College Williamstown, MA 10267 413-597-4594 Email: szaki@williams.edu #12;Multiple systems or task

  18. ICDF Complex Operations Waste Management Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    W.M. Heileson

    2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Waste Management Plan functions as a management and planning tool for managing waste streams generated as a result of operations at the Idaho CERCLA Disposal Facility (ICDF) Complex. The waste management activities described in this plan support the selected remedy presented in the Waste Area Group 3, Operable Unit 3-13 Final Record of Decision for the operation of the Idaho CERCLA Disposal Facility Complex. This plan identifies the types of waste that are anticipated during operations at the Idaho CERCLA Disposal Facility Complex. In addition, this plan presents management strategies and disposition for these anticipated waste streams.

  19. Optimization in Geometric Graphs: Complexity and Approximation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kahruman-Anderoglu, Sera

    2011-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider several related problems arising in geometric graphs. In particular, we investigate the computational complexity and approximability properties of several optimization problems in unit ball graphs and develop algorithms to find exact...

  20. MACDONALD FUNCTIONS ASSOCIATED TO COMPLEX REFLECTION GROUPS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shoj, Toshiaki

    MACDONALD FUNCTIONS ASSOCIATED TO COMPLEX REFLECTION GROUPS. A generalization of Macdonald o* *perators is also constructed, and we characterize such functions by making use of * *Macdonald operators, assuming a certain conjecture

  1. MACDONALD FUNCTIONS ASSOCIATED TO COMPLEX REFLECTION GROUPS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shoj, Toshiaki

    MACDONALD FUNCTIONS ASSOCIATED TO COMPLEX REFLECTION GROUPS TOSHIAKI SHOJI Department version of the above Hall-Littlewood functions, as a generalization of Macdonald functions associated to symmetric groups. A generalization of Macdonald operators is also constructed, and we characterize

  2. Modeling the impact of complexity on transportation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fernandez, Jose A. (Jose Antonio Fernandez Chavira)

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis aimed to understand the drivers of total transportation costs during supply chain complexity events, in particular new product launches, in a fast moving consumer goods company in the United States. The research ...

  3. Complexity and Systems Biology of Microbial Biofuels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rand, David

    Complexity and Systems Biology of Microbial Biofuels 20-24 June 2011 (All and issues Theme: Biofuel systems and issues (Chair: Nigel Burroughs) 13 (Bielefeld) Biofuels from algae- challenges for industrial levels

  4. The Complexity of Agreement Scott Aaronson #

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aaronson, Scott

    The Complexity of Agreement Scott Aaronson # Abstract A celebrated 1976 theorem of Aumann asserts the computations needed for that conversation be performed e#ciently? This paper answers both questions in the a

  5. The Complexity of Agreement # Scott Aaronson +

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aaronson, Scott

    The Complexity of Agreement # Scott Aaronson + ABSTRACT A celebrated 1976 theorem of Aumann asserts his information and e#ort. Yet according to well­ known theory, such honest disagreement is im

  6. Symptoms of complexity in a tourism system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baggio, R

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Tourism destinations behave as dynamic evolving complex systems, encompassing numerous factors and activities which are interdependent and whose relationships might be highly nonlinear. Traditional research in this field has looked after a linear approach: variables and relationships are monitored in order to forecast future outcomes with simplified models and to derive implications for management organizations. The limitations of this approach have become apparent in many cases, and several authors claim for a new and different attitude. While complex systems ideas are amongst the most promising interdisciplinary research themes emerged in the last few decades, very little has been done so far in the field of tourism. This paper presents a brief overview of the complexity framework as a means to understand structures, characteristics, relationships and explores the implications and contributions of the complexity literature on tourism systems. The objective is to allow the reader to gain a deeper appreciatio...

  7. Triamine chelants, their derivatives, complexes and conjugates

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Troutner, D.E.; John, C.S.; Pillai, M.R.A.

    1995-03-07T23:59:59.000Z

    A group of functionalized triamine chelants and their derivatives that form complexes with radioactive metal ions are disclosed. The complexes can be covalently attached to a protein or an antibody or antibody fragment and used for therapeutic and/or diagnostic purposes. The chelants are of the formula, as shown in the accompanying diagrams, wherein n, m, R, R{sup 1}, R{sup 2} and L are defined in the specification.

  8. Triamine chelants, their derivatives, complexes and conjugates

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Troutner, David E. (Phoenixville, PA); John, Christy S. (Gaithersburg, MD); Pillai, Maroor R. A. (Vashi, IN)

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A group of functionalized triamine chelants and their derivatives that form complexes with radioactive metal ions are disclosed. The complexes can be covalently attached to a protein or an antibody or antibody fragment and used for therapeutic and/or diagnostic purposes. The chelants are of the formula: ##STR1## wherein n, m, R, R.sup.1, R.sup.2 and L are defined in the specification.

  9. Bravo Araby Navy Base Holtville

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Plaster City No Man's Land Imperial Valley East Mesa No. 3 East Mesa No. 2 East Mesa No. 1 Dixieland

  10. Simulating the Daylight Performance of Complex Fenestration Systems Using

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    LBNL-4414E Simulating the Daylight Performance of Complex Fenestration Systems Using Bidirectional, January 21, 2011. 1 Simulating the Daylight Performance of Complex Fenestration Systems Using (BSDFs) to model the daylighting performance of complex fenestration systems (CFS), enabling greater

  11. Towards Applying Computational Complexity to Foundations of Physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ward, Karen

    Towards Applying Computational Complexity to Foundations of Physics Vladik Kreinovich 1 and Andrei early papers, D. Grigoriev analyzed the decidability and computational complexity of different physical attempt to analyze the relation between computational complexity and foundations of physics

  12. Towards Applying Computational Complexity to Foundations of Physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ward, Karen

    Towards Applying Computational Complexity to Foundations of Physics Vladik Kreinovich 1 and Andrei early papers, D. Grigoriev analyzed the decidability and computational complexity of different physical first serious attempt to analyze the rela­ tion between computational complexity and foundations

  13. Towards Applying Computational Complexity to Foundations of Physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ward, Karen

    Towards Applying Computational Complexity to Foundations of Physics Vladik Kreinovich1 and Andrei M. Grigoriev analyzed the decidability and computational complexity of different physical theories serious attempt to analyze the rela- tion between computational complexity and foundations of physics

  14. ICDF Complex Remedial Action Work Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    W. M. Heileson

    2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Remedial Action Work Plan provides the framework for operation of the Idaho Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) Disposal Facility Complex (ICDF). This facility includes (a) an engineered landfill that meets the substantial requirements of DOE Order 435.1, Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Subtitle C, Idaho Hazardous Waste Management Act, and Toxic Substances Control Act polychlorinated biphenyl landfill requirements; (b) centralized receiving, inspections, administration, storage/staging, and treatment facilities necessary for CERCLA investigation-derived, remedial, and removal waste at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) prior to final disposition in the disposal facility or shipment off-Site; and (c) an evaporation pond that has been designated as a corrective action management unit. The ICDF Complex, including a buffer zone, will cover approximately 40 acres, with a landfill disposal capacity of approximately 510,000 yd3. The ICDF Complex is designed and authorized to accept INL CERCLA-generated wastes, and includes the necessary subsystems and support facilities to provide a complete waste management system. This Remedial Action Work Plan presents the operational approach and requirements for the various components that are part of the ICDF Complex. Summaries of the remedial action work elements are presented herein, with supporting information and documents provided as appendixes to this work plan that contain specific detail about the operation of the ICDF Complex. This document presents the planned operational process based upon an evaluation of the remedial action requirements set forth in the Operable Unit 3-13 Final Record of Decision.

  15. Surveying Diffusion in Complex Geometries. An Essay

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Denis Grebenkov

    2009-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The surrounding world surprises us by the beauty and variety of complex shapes that emerge from nanometric to macroscopic scales. Natural or manufactured materials (sandstones, sedimentary rocks and cement), colloidal solutions (proteins and DNA), biological cells, tissues and organs (lungs, kidneys and placenta), they all present irregularly shaped "scenes" for a fundamental transport "performance", that is, diffusion. Here, the geometrical complexity, entangled with the stochastic character of diffusive motion, results in numerous fascinating and sometimes unexpected effects like diffusion screening or localization. These effects control many diffusion-mediated processes that play an important role in heterogeneous catalysis, biochemical mechanisms, electrochemistry, growth phenomena, oil recovery, or building industry. In spite of a long and rich history of academic and industrial research in this field, it is striking to see how little we know about diffusion in complex geometries, especially the one which occurs in three dimensions. We present our recent results on restricted diffusion. We look into the role of geometrical complexity at different levels, from boundary microroughness to hierarchical structure and connectivity of the whole diffusion-confining domain. We develop a new approach which consists in combining fast random walk algorithms with spectral tools. The main focus is on studying diffusion in model complex geometries (von Koch boundaries, Kitaoka acinus, etc.), as well as on developing and testing spectral methods. We aim at extending this knowledge and at applying the accomplished arsenal of theoretical and numerical tools to structures found in nature and industry.

  16. antigen-antibody complex: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    explore all the paths at the same time 12;Complexity classes Nondeterministic Turing Machine Example 12 For nondeterministic Turing machine the time complexity is denoted...

  17. anopheles punctulatus complex: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    explore all the paths at the same time 12;Complexity classes Nondeterministic Turing Machine Example 12 For nondeterministic Turing machine the time complexity is denoted...

  18. acute complex type: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    time complexity Physics Websites Summary: computational complexity in terms of Turing Machine. Second, it shows that this natural class can be easilyInterpretation of...

  19. auricomus polyploid complex: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    explore all the paths at the same time 12;Complexity classes Nondeterministic Turing Machine Example 12 For nondeterministic Turing machine the time complexity is denoted...

  20. atherosclerotic lesion complexity: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    explore all the paths at the same time 12;Complexity classes Nondeterministic Turing Machine Example 12 For nondeterministic Turing machine the time complexity is denoted...

  1. anopheles dirus complex: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    explore all the paths at the same time 12;Complexity classes Nondeterministic Turing Machine Example 12 For nondeterministic Turing machine the time complexity is denoted...

  2. auricomus complex ranunculaceae: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    explore all the paths at the same time 12;Complexity classes Nondeterministic Turing Machine Example 12 For nondeterministic Turing machine the time complexity is denoted...

  3. antibody m18 complexed: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    explore all the paths at the same time 12;Complexity classes Nondeterministic Turing Machine Example 12 For nondeterministic Turing machine the time complexity is denoted...

  4. aids-related complex: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    explore all the paths at the same time 12;Complexity classes Nondeterministic Turing Machine Example 12 For nondeterministic Turing machine the time complexity is denoted...

  5. argonaute-containing ribonucleoprotein complexes: Topics by E...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    explore all the paths at the same time 12;Complexity classes Nondeterministic Turing Machine Example 12 For nondeterministic Turing machine the time complexity is denoted...

  6. Formation of iron complexs from trifluoroacetic acid based liquid...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of iron complexs from trifluoroacetic acid based liquid chromatography mobile phases as interference ions in liquid Formation of iron complexs from trifluoroacetic acid based...

  7. Independent Oversight Assessment, Y-12 National Security Complex...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Y-12 National Security Complex - June 2012 Independent Oversight Assessment, Y-12 National Security Complex - June 2012 June 2012 Assessment of Nuclear Safety Culture at the Y-12...

  8. Enterprise Assessments Review of the Y-12 National Security Complex...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Enterprise Assessments Review of the Y-12 National Security Complex 2014 Site-Level Exercise - January 2015 Enterprise Assessments Review of the Y-12 National Security Complex 2014...

  9. Independent Oversight Appraisal, Y-12 National Security Complex...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Appraisal, Y-12 National Security Complex - May 2013 Independent Oversight Appraisal, Y-12 National Security Complex - May 2013 May 2013 Appraisal of the Uranium Processing...

  10. Independent Oversight Review, Y-12 National Security Complex...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Review, Y-12 National Security Complex - March 2014 Independent Oversight Review, Y-12 National Security Complex - March 2014 March 2014 Review of the Uranium Processing Facility...

  11. Observation of Entropic Effect on Conformation Changes of Complex...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Entropic Effect on Conformation Changes of Complex Systems Under Well-Controlled Temperature Condition. Observation of Entropic Effect on Conformation Changes of Complex Systems...

  12. Lesson Learned by Environmental Management Complex-wide Activity...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Environmental Management Complex-wide Activity-level Work Planning and Control Lesson Learned by Environmental Management Complex-wide Activity-level Work Planning and Control...

  13. Structural and Operational Complexity of the Geobacter Sulfurreducens...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and Operational Complexity of the Geobacter Sulfurreducens Genome. Structural and Operational Complexity of the Geobacter Sulfurreducens Genome. Abstract: Prokaryotic genomes can...

  14. Redox Chemistry in Thin Layers of Organometallic Complexes Prepared...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Redox Chemistry in Thin Layers of Organometallic Complexes Prepared Using Ion Soft Landing. Redox Chemistry in Thin Layers of Organometallic Complexes Prepared Using Ion Soft...

  15. Oversight Reports - Y-12 National Security Complex | Department...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Oversight Assessment, Y-12 National Security Complex - June 2012 Assessment of Nuclear Safety Culture at the Y-12 National Security Complex Uranium Processing Facility Project...

  16. active complex lesions: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1. INTRODUCTION In magnetic resonance imaging, after Fourier or non- Fourier Rowe, Daniel B. 44 Complexity CERN Preprints Summary: The term complexity derives etymologically...

  17. Complex systems influence melting of Greenland ice sheet

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Complex systems influence melting of Greenland ice sheet Complex systems influence melting of Greenland ice sheet International research team's field work shows that, well, things...

  18. Portsmouth Proposed Plan for the Process Buildings and Complex...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Proposed Plan for the Process Buildings and Complex Facilities Decontamination and Decommissioning Evaluation Project Portsmouth Proposed Plan for the Process Buildings and Complex...

  19. Pinning impulsive control algorithms for complex network

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sun, Wen [School of Information and Mathematics, Yangtze University, Jingzhou 434023 (China)] [School of Information and Mathematics, Yangtze University, Jingzhou 434023 (China); Lü, Jinhu [Academy of Mathematics and Systems Science, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China)] [Academy of Mathematics and Systems Science, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); Chen, Shihua [College of Mathematics and Statistics, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430072 (China)] [College of Mathematics and Statistics, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430072 (China); Yu, Xinghuo [School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, RMIT University, Melbourne VIC 3001 (Australia)] [School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, RMIT University, Melbourne VIC 3001 (Australia)

    2014-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper, we further investigate the synchronization of complex dynamical network via pinning control in which a selection of nodes are controlled at discrete times. Different from most existing work, the pinning control algorithms utilize only the impulsive signals at discrete time instants, which may greatly improve the communication channel efficiency and reduce control cost. Two classes of algorithms are designed, one for strongly connected complex network and another for non-strongly connected complex network. It is suggested that in the strongly connected network with suitable coupling strength, a single controller at any one of the network's nodes can always pin the network to its homogeneous solution. In the non-strongly connected case, the location and minimum number of nodes needed to pin the network are determined by the Frobenius normal form of the coupling matrix. In addition, the coupling matrix is not necessarily symmetric or irreducible. Illustrative examples are then given to validate the proposed pinning impulsive control algorithms.

  20. Design tools for complex dynamic security systems.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Byrne, Raymond Harry; Rigdon, James Brian; Rohrer, Brandon Robinson; Laguna, Glenn A.; Robinett, Rush D. III (.; ); Groom, Kenneth Neal; Wilson, David Gerald; Bickerstaff, Robert J.; Harrington, John J.

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The development of tools for complex dynamic security systems is not a straight forward engineering task but, rather, a scientific task where discovery of new scientific principles and math is necessary. For years, scientists have observed complex behavior but have had difficulty understanding it. Prominent examples include: insect colony organization, the stock market, molecular interactions, fractals, and emergent behavior. Engineering such systems will be an even greater challenge. This report explores four tools for engineered complex dynamic security systems: Partially Observable Markov Decision Process, Percolation Theory, Graph Theory, and Exergy/Entropy Theory. Additionally, enabling hardware technology for next generation security systems are described: a 100 node wireless sensor network, unmanned ground vehicle and unmanned aerial vehicle.

  1. Quantum entanglement in photosynthetic light harvesting complexes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohan Sarovar; Akihito Ishizaki; Graham R. Fleming; K. Birgitta Whaley

    2010-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Light harvesting components of photosynthetic organisms are complex, coupled, many-body quantum systems, in which electronic coherence has recently been shown to survive for relatively long time scales despite the decohering effects of their environments. Within this context, we analyze entanglement in multi-chromophoric light harvesting complexes, and establish methods for quantification of entanglement by presenting necessary and sufficient conditions for entanglement and by deriving a measure of global entanglement. These methods are then applied to the Fenna-Matthews-Olson (FMO) protein to extract the initial state and temperature dependencies of entanglement. We show that while FMO in natural conditions largely contains bipartite entanglement between dimerized chromophores, a small amount of long-range and multipartite entanglement exists even at physiological temperatures. This constitutes the first rigorous quantification of entanglement in a biological system. Finally, we discuss the practical utilization of entanglement in densely packed molecular aggregates such as light harvesting complexes.

  2. Surveying Diffusion in Complex Geometries. An Essay

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grebenkov, Denis

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The surrounding world surprises us by the beauty and variety of complex shapes that emerge from nanometric to macroscopic scales. Natural or manufactured materials (sandstones, sedimentary rocks and cement), colloidal solutions (proteins and DNA), biological cells, tissues and organs (lungs, kidneys and placenta), they all present irregularly shaped "scenes" for a fundamental transport "performance", that is, diffusion. Here, the geometrical complexity, entangled with the stochastic character of diffusive motion, results in numerous fascinating and sometimes unexpected effects like diffusion screening or localization. These effects control many diffusion-mediated processes that play an important role in heterogeneous catalysis, biochemical mechanisms, electrochemistry, growth phenomena, oil recovery, or building industry. In spite of a long and rich history of academic and industrial research in this field, it is striking to see how little we know about diffusion in complex geometries, especially the one whic...

  3. Complex geometry and pre-metric electromagnetism

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. H. Delphenich

    2004-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The intimate link between complex geometry and the problem of the pre-metric formulation of electromagnetism is explored. In particular, the relationship between 3+1 decompositions of R4 and the decompositions of the vector space of bivectors over R4 into real and imaginary subspaces relative to a choice of complex structure is emphasized. The role of the various scalar products on the space of bivectors that are defined in terms of a volume element on R4 and a complex structure on the space of bivectors that makes it C-linear isomorphic to C3 is discussed in the context of formulation of a theory of electromagnetism in which the Lorentzian metric on spacetime follows as a consequence of the existence of electromagnetic waves, not a prior assumption.

  4. Locomotion in complex fluids: Integral theorems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eric Lauga

    2014-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The biological fluids encountered by self-propelled cells display complex microstructures and rheology. We consider here the general problem of low-Reynolds number locomotion in a complex fluid. {Building on classical work on the transport of particles in viscoelastic fluids,} we demonstrate how to mathematically derive three integral theorems relating the arbitrary motion of an isolated organism to its swimming kinematics {in a non-Newtonian fluid}. These theorems correspond to three situations of interest, namely (1) squirming motion in a linear viscoelastic fluid, (2) arbitrary surface deformation in a weakly non-Newtonian fluid, and (3) small-amplitude deformation in an arbitrarily non-Newtonian fluid. Our final results, valid for a wide-class of {swimmer geometry,} surface kinematics and constitutive models, at most require mathematical knowledge of a series of Newtonian flow problems, and will be useful to quantity the locomotion of biological and synthetic swimmers in complex environments.

  5. LEARNING COMPLEX DOMAINS AND COMPLEX TASKS, THE PROMISE OF SIMULATION BASED TRAINING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    LEARNING COMPLEX DOMAINS AND COMPLEX TASKS, THE PROMISE OF SIMULATION BASED TRAINING Ton de Jong in the sense that they have just emerged, but simulation learning environments help to realize these approaches in new type of contexts. The design of such simulation learning environments is a multifaceted endeavour

  6. Does network complexity help organize Babel's library?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cárdenas, Juan Pablo; Benito, Rosa María; Losada, Juan Carlos

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this work, we study properties of texts from the perspective of complex network theory. Words in given texts are linked by co-occurrence and transformed into networks, and we observe that these display topological properties common to other complex systems. However, there are some properties that seem to be exclusive to texts; many of these properties depend on the frequency of words in the text, while others seem to be strictly determined by the grammar. Precisely, these properties allow for a categorization of texts as either with a sense and others encoded or senseless.

  7. DOE complex buried waste characterization assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kaae, P.S.; Holter, G.M.; Garrett, S.M.K.

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The work described in this report was conducted by Pacific Northwest Laboratory to provide information to the Buried Waste Integrated Demonstration (BWID) program. The information in this report is intended to provide a complex-wide planning base for th.e BWID to ensure that BWID activities are appropriately focused to address the range of remediation problems existing across the US Department of Energy (DOE) complex. This report contains information characterizing the 2.1 million m[sup 3] of buried and stored wastes and their associated sites at six major DOE facilities. Approximately 85% of this waste is low-level waste, with about 12% TRU or TRU mixed waste; the remaining 3% is low-level mixed waste. In addition, the report describes soil contamination sites across the complex. Some of the details that would be useful in further characterizing the buried wastes and contaminated soil sites across the DOE complex are either unavailable or difficult to locate. Several options for accessing this information and/or improving the information that is available are identified in the report. This document is a companion to Technology Needs for Remediation: Hanford and Other DOE Sites, PNL-8328 (Stapp 1993).

  8. Energy Complexity of Optical Computations Akhilesh Tyagi

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reif, John H.

    Energy Complexity of Optical Computations Akhilesh Tyagi and John H. Reif Abstract This paper provides lower bounds on the energy consumption and demonstrates an energy-time trade-off in optical ­ shifting. Since the energy consumption in an optical transmission is a non-linear function of the distance

  9. Sequencing the Black Aspergilli species complex

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kuo, Alan; Salamov, Asaf; Zhou, Kemin; Otillar, Robert; Baker, Scott; Grigoriev, Igor

    2011-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

    The ~15 members of the Aspergillus section Nigri species complex (the "Black Aspergilli") are significant as platforms for bioenergy and bioindustrial technology, as members of soil microbial communities and players in the global carbon cycle, and as food processing and spoilage agents and agricultural toxigens. Despite their utility and ubiquity, the morphological and metabolic distinctiveness of the complex's members, and thus their taxonomy, is poorly defined. We are using short read pyrosequencing technology (Roche/454 and Illumina/Solexa) to rapidly scale up genomic and transcriptomic analysis of this species complex. To date we predict 11197 genes in Aspergillus niger, 11624 genes in A. carbonarius, and 10845 genes in A. aculeatus. A. aculeatus is our most recent genome, and was assembled primarily from 454-sequenced reads and annotated with the aid of >2 million 454 ESTs and >300 million Solexa ESTs. To most effectively deploy these very large numbers of ESTs we developed 2 novel methods for clustering the ESTs into assemblies. We have also developed a pipeline to propose orthologies and paralogies among genes in the species complex. In the near future we will apply these methods to additional species of Black Aspergilli that are currently in our sequencing pipeline.

  10. Hydrogen Storage in Ammonia and Aminoborane Complexes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hydrogen Storage in Ammonia and Aminoborane Complexes Ali Raissi Florida Solar Energy Center;Advantages of Ammonia Costs about $150 per short ton or less than $6.25 per million BTU of H2 contained and utilization Stores 30% more energy by liquid volume than LH2 Easily reformed using 16% of the energy

  11. Nonproliferation Test and Evaluation Complex - NPTEC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2014-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The Nonproliferation Test and Evaluation Complex, or NPTEC, is the world's largest facility for open air testing of hazardous toxic materials and biological simulants. NPTEC is used for testing, experimentation, and training for technologies that require the release of toxic chemicals or biological simulants into the environment.

  12. Nonproliferation Test and Evaluation Complex - NPTEC

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2015-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

    The Nonproliferation Test and Evaluation Complex, or NPTEC, is the world's largest facility for open air testing of hazardous toxic materials and biological simulants. NPTEC is used for testing, experimentation, and training for technologies that require the release of toxic chemicals or biological simulants into the environment.

  13. Gravity in Complex Hermitian Space-Time

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ali H. Chamseddine

    2006-10-09T23:59:59.000Z

    A generalized theory unifying gravity with electromagnetism was proposed by Einstein in 1945. He considered a Hermitian metric on a real space-time. In this work we review Einstein's idea and generalize it further to consider gravity in a complex Hermitian space-time.

  14. Understanding complexity in the human brain

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gazzaniga, Michael

    Understanding complexity in the human brain Danielle S. Bassett1 and Michael S. Gazzaniga2 1 the ultimate aim of neuroscientific enquiry is to gain an understanding of the brain and how its work- ings of mind­brain mechanisms if the cumulative findings from these neu- roscientific studies are coupled

  15. Validating Complex Agent Behavior Scott A. Wallace

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wallace, Scott

    Behavior by Scott A. Wallace Chair: John E. Laird Developing software agents that replicate human behaviorValidating Complex Agent Behavior by Scott A. Wallace A dissertation submitted in partial) in The University of Michigan 2003 Doctoral Committee: Professor John E. Laird, Chair Associate Professor William P

  16. Construction of the noncommutative complex ball

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Zhituo, E-mail: zhituo@mat.uniroma3.it [Dipartimento di Matematica, Università di Roma Tre Largo S. L. Murialdo 1, 00146 Roma (Italy)

    2014-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We describe the construction of the noncommutative complex ball whose commutative analog is the Hermitian symmetric space D = SU(m, 1)/U(m), with the method of coherent state quantization. In the commutative limit, we obtain the standard manifold. We also consider a quantum field theory model on the noncommutative manifold.

  17. New Laboratory Complex Department of Global Ecology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , and associated facilities to house its new Department of Global Ecology. The buildings, located on the campus1 New Laboratory Complex Department of Global Ecology Carnegie Institution of Washington Stanford Ecology will conduct basic research and training on large-scale interactions between ecological systems

  18. Kernel methods for phenotyping complex plant architecture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Kernel methods for phenotyping complex plant architecture Koji KAWAMURA1,2 ,Laurence HIBRAND´e, FRANCE , 2. Department of Environmental Engineering, Osaka Institute of Technology, 5-16-1 Ohmiya, Asahi architecture is a crit- ical step for understanding the genetic determinism of plant architecture. Previous

  19. CHAPLIN - Complex Harmonic Polylogarithms in Fortran

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stephan Buehler; Claude Duhr

    2011-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a new Fortran library to evaluate all harmonic polylogarithms up to weight four numerically for any complex argument. The algorithm is based on a reduction of harmonic polylogarithms up to weight four to a minimal set of basis functions that are computed numerically using series expansions allowing for fast and reliable numerical results.

  20. A Multifaceted Mathematical Approach for Complex Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alexander, F.; Anitescu, M.; Bell, J.; Brown, D.; Ferris, M.; Luskin, M.; Mehrotra, S.; Moser, B.; Pinar, A.; Tartakovsky, A.; Willcox, K.; Wright, S.; Zavala, V.

    2012-03-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Applied mathematics has an important role to play in developing the tools needed for the analysis, simulation, and optimization of complex problems. These efforts require the development of the mathematical foundations for scientific discovery, engineering design, and risk analysis based on a sound integrated approach for the understanding of complex systems. However, maximizing the impact of applied mathematics on these challenges requires a novel perspective on approaching the mathematical enterprise. Previous reports that have surveyed the DOE's research needs in applied mathematics have played a key role in defining research directions with the community. Although these reports have had significant impact, accurately assessing current research needs requires an evaluation of today's challenges against the backdrop of recent advances in applied mathematics and computing. To address these needs, the DOE Applied Mathematics Program sponsored a Workshop for Mathematics for the Analysis, Simulation and Optimization of Complex Systems on September 13-14, 2011. The workshop had approximately 50 participants from both the national labs and academia. The goal of the workshop was to identify new research areas in applied mathematics that will complement and enhance the existing DOE ASCR Applied Mathematics Program efforts that are needed to address problems associated with complex systems. This report describes recommendations from the workshop and subsequent analysis of the workshop findings by the organizing committee.

  1. Complex Plasma Research Under Extreme Conditions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ishihara, Osamu [Faculty of Engineering, Yokohama National University 79-5 Tokiwadai, Hodogaya-ku, Yokohama 240-8501 (Japan)

    2008-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Complex plasma research under extreme conditions is described. The extreme conditions include low-dimensionality for self-organized structures of dust particles, dust magnetization in high magnetic field, criticality in phase transition, and cryogenic environment for Coulomb crystals and dust dynamics.

  2. February 22, 1998 Clustering ECG Complexes Using

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lunds Universitet,

    LU TP 98­1 February 22, 1998 Clustering ECG Complexes Using Hermite Functions and Self Transactions on Biomedical Engineering Abstract: An integrated method for identifying and classifying ECG for analysis and interpretation of ECGs have been subject to intense research for nearly four decades

  3. 1) Introduction 1 1. 1) Complexity Theory 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Atkinson, Katie

    Contents Preface i 1) Introduction 1 1. 1) Complexity Theory 1 1. 2) Boolean functions and Boolean algebra 7 1. 3) Boolean networks 18 Bibliographic notes 25 2) Combinational Network Complexity 27 2. 1 on combinational complexity 100 Bibliographic notes 115 3) Monotone Network Complexity 117 #12;3. 1) Bounds

  4. Nonlinear Dynamics and Structure Formation in Complex Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zonca, Fulvio

    Nonlinear Dynamics and Structure Formation in Complex Systems F. Zonca - Complex behaviors ENEA, Frascati, Italy #12;Nonlinear Dynamics and Structure Formation in Complex Systems F. Zonca-heating) of charged fusion products balances power losses #12;Nonlinear Dynamics and Structure Formation in Complex

  5. Group 4 Metalloporphyrin diolato Complexes and Catalytic Application of Metalloporphyrins and Related Transition Metal Complexes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guodong Du

    2004-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

    In this work, the first examples of group 4 metalloporphyrin 1,2-diolato complexes were synthesized through a number of strategies. In general, treatment of imido metalloporphyrin complexes, (TTP)M=NR, (M = Ti, Zr, Hf), with vicinal diols led to the formation of a series of diolato complexes. Alternatively, the chelating pinacolate complexes could be prepared by metathesis of (TTP)MCl{sub 2} (M = Ti, Hf) with disodium pinacolate. These complexes were found to undergo C-C cleavage reactions to produce organic carbonyl compounds. For titanium porphyrins, treatment of a titanium(II) alkyne adduct, (TTP)Ti({eta}{sup 2}-PhC{triple_bond}CPh), with aromatic aldehydes or aryl ketones resulted in reductive coupling of the carbonyl groups to produce the corresponding diolato complexes. Aliphatic aldehydes or ketones were not reactive towards (TTP)Ti({eta}{sup 2}-PhC{triple_bond}CPh). However, these carbonyl compounds could be incorporated into a diolato complex on reaction with a reactive precursor, (TTP)Ti[O(Ph){sub 2}C(Ph){sub 2}O] to provide unsymmetrical diolato complexes via cross coupling reactions. In addition, an enediolato complex (TTP)Ti(OCPhCPhO) was obtained from the reaction of (TTP)Ti({eta}{sup 2}-PhC{triple_bond}CPh) with benzoin. Titanium porphyrin diolato complexes were found to be intermediates in the (TTP)Ti=O-catalyzed cleavage reactions of vicinal diols, in which atmospheric oxygen was the oxidant. Furthermore, (TTP)Ti=O was capable of catalyzing the oxidation of benzyl alcohol and {alpha}-hydroxy ketones to benzaldehyde and {alpha}-diketones, respectively. Other high valent metalloporphyrin complexes also can catalyze the oxidative diol cleavage and the benzyl alcohol oxidation reactions with dioxygen. A comparison of Ti(IV) and Sn(IV) porphyrin chemistry was undertaken. While chelated diolato complexes were invariably obtained for titanium porphyrins on treatment with 1,2-diols, the reaction of vicinal diols with tin porphyrins gave a number of products, including mono-, bis-alkoxo, and chelating diolato complexes, depending on the identity of diols and the stoichiometry employed. It was also found that tin porphyrin complexes promoted the oxidative cleavage of vicinal diols and the oxidation of {alpha}-ketols to {alpha}-diketones with dioxygen. In extending the chemistry of metalloporphyrins and analogous complexes, a series of chiral tetraaza macrocyclic ligands and metal complexes were designed and synthesized. Examination of iron(II) complexes showed that they were efficient catalysts for the cyclopropanation of styrene by diazo reagents. Good yields and high diastereoselectivity were obtained with modest enantioselectivity. A rationalization of the stereoselectivity was presented on the basis of structural factors in a carbene intermediate.

  6. The Second Quantized Quantum Turing Machine and Kolmogorov Complexity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Caroline Rogers; Vlatko Vedral

    2008-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

    The Kolmogorov complexity of a physical state is the minimal physical resources required to reproduce that state. We define a second quantized quantum Turing machine and use it to define second quantized Kolmogorov complexity. There are two advantages to our approach - our measure of second quantized Kolmogorov complexity is closer to physical reality and unlike other quantum Kolmogorov complexities it is continuous. We give examples where second quantized and quantum Kolmogorov complexity differ.

  7. Mesoscale convective complex vs. non-mesoscale convective complex thunderstorms: a comparison of selected meteorological variables

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hoofard, Michael Eugene

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    MESOSCALE CONVECTIVE CCMPLLX VS. NON-MESOSCALE CONVECTIVE COMPLEX THUNDERSTORMS: A COMPARISON OF SELECTED METEOROLOGICAL VARIABLES A Thesis MICHAkL EUGENE JJOOFARD Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas AJkM University in partial... by MICHAEL EUGENE HOOFARD Approved as to style and content by: a ter . enry (Chairman of Committee) %~5 44 c5 c usan gur c (Member) ona . oc ing (Member) ames . cogg (Head of Department) August 1986 ABSTRACT Nesoscale Convective Complex vs. Non...

  8. The Complexity of the Local Hamiltonian Problem

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Julia Kempe; Alexei Kitaev; Oded Regev

    2005-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

    The k-local Hamiltonian problem is a natural complete problem for the complexity class QMA, the quantum analog of NP. It is similar in spirit to MAX-k-SAT, which is NP-complete for k<=2. It was known that the problem is QMA-complete for any k <= 3. On the other hand 1-local Hamiltonian is in P, and hence not believed to be QMA-complete. The complexity of the 2-local Hamiltonian problem has long been outstanding. Here we settle the question and show that it is QMA-complete. We provide two independent proofs; our first proof uses only elementary linear algebra. Our second proof uses a powerful technique for analyzing the sum of two Hamiltonians; this technique is based on perturbation theory and we believe that it might prove useful elsewhere. Using our techniques we also show that adiabatic computation with two-local interactions on qubits is equivalent to standard quantum computation.

  9. SEARCH, blackbox optimization, and sample complexity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kargupta, H. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States). Computational Science Methods Div.; Goldberg, D.E. [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana, IL (United States). Dept. of General Engineering

    1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The SEARCH (Search Envisioned As Relation and Class Hierarchizing) framework developed elsewhere (Kargupta, 1995; Kargupta and Goldberg, 1995) offered an alternate perspective toward blackbox optimization -- optimization in presence of little domain knowledge. The SEARCH framework investigates the conditions essential for transcending the limits of random enumerative search using a framework developed in terms of relations, classes and partial ordering. This paper presents a summary of some of the main results of that work. A closed form bound on the sample complexity in terms of the cardinality of the relation space, class space, desired quality of the solution and the reliability is presented. This also leads to the identification of the class of order-k delineable problems that can be solved in polynomial sample complexity. These results are applicable to any blackbox search algorithms, including evolutionary optimization techniques.

  10. Refiners Switch to RFG Complex Model

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    On January 1, 1998, domestic and foreign refineries and importers must stop using the "simple" model and begin using the "complex" model to calculate emissions of volatile organic compounds (VOC), toxic air pollutants (TAP), and nitrogen oxides (NOx) from motor gasoline. The primary differences between application of the two models is that some refineries may have to meet stricter standards for the sulfur and olefin content of the reformulated gasoline (RFG) they produce and all refineries will now be held accountable for NOx emissions. Requirements for calculating emissions from conventional gasoline under the anti-dumping rule similarly change for exhaust TAP and NOx. However, the change to the complex model is not expected to result in an increase in the price premium for RFG or constrain supplies.

  11. SRS Burial Ground Complex: Remediation in Progress

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Griffin, M. [Westinghouse Savannah River Company, AIKEN, SC (United States); Crapse, B.; Cowan, S.

    1998-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Closure of the various areas in the Burial Ground Complex (BGC) represents a major step in the reduction of risk at the Savannah River Site (SRS) and a significant investment of resources. The Burial Ground Complex occupies approximately 195 acres in the central section of the SRS. Approximately 160 acres of the BGC consists of hazardous and radioactive waste disposal sites that require remediation. Of these source acres, one-third have been remediated while two-thirds are undergoing interim or final action. These restoration activities have been carried out in a safe and cost effective manner while minimizing impact to operating facilities. Successful completion of these activities is in large part due to the teamwork demonstrated by the Department of Energy, contractor/subcontractor personnel, and the regulatory agencies. The experience and knowledge gained from the closure of these large disposal facilities can be used to expedite closure of similar facilities.

  12. Biologic response to complex blast waves

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Richmond, D.R.; Yelverton, J.T.; Fletcher, E.R.; Phillips, Y.Y.

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Small, bare charges were detonated inside an M59 armored personnel carrier (APC) in an attempt to simulate the complex blast waves generated by the jets from shaped-charge warheads penetrating into armored vehicles. Anesthetized sheep were placed inside the APC at 92- and 122-cm ranges from 57- or 113-g pentolite charges. Pressure-time was measured by pressure transducers either mounted on the animals or free standing at comparable ranges on the opposite side of the vehicle. In general, the waveforms were characterized by an initial shock wave of less than 1-msec duration followed by repeated reflections of decreasing magnitude. No deaths nor lung hemorrhages were observed, but all the animals sustained severe ear injury. Animals subjected to peak overpressures of 1.2 to 2.3 bar from the 113-g explosions also received slight non-auditory blast injuries to the upper respiratory and gastrointestinal tracts; those exposed to peak overpressures of just under 1 bar from the 57-g charges did not. The non-auditory blast injuries inside the APC were more severe than those sustained by sheep at comparable distances from 113-g charges in the open. The results suggested that the biological consequences of a complex wave of the type encountered in this study can be equated approximately to a Friedlander wave with a peak overpressure equal to that of the complex wave and with a total impulse equal to the impulse over the first 2 to 3 msec of the complex wave. 9 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  13. Superluminal transformations in complex Minkowski spaces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ramon, C.; Rauscher, E.A.

    1980-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We calculate the mixing of real and imaginary components of space and time under the influence of superluminal boots in the x direction. A unique mixing is determined for this superluminal Lorentz transformation when we consider the symmetry properties afforded by the inclusion of three temporal directions. Superluminal transformations in complex six-dimensional space exhibit unique tachyonic connections which have both remote and local space--time event connections.

  14. Travel and tourism: Into a complex network

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miguens, J I L

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    It is discussed how the worldwide tourist arrivals, about 10% of world's domestic product, form a largely heterogeneous and directed complex network. Remarkably the random network of connectivity is converted into a scale-free network of intensities. The importance of weights on network connections is brought into discussion. It is also shown how strategic positioning particularly benefit from market diversity and that interactions among countries prevail on a technological and economic pattern, questioning the backbones of traveling driving forces.

  15. Trends in modeling Biomedical Complex Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2009-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    contributed to the understand- ing of specific aspects of the disease process and to the development of diagnostic and prognostic clinical applications. Cardiovascular obesity, diabetes, autoim- mune diseases, and neurodegenerative disorders are some... intelligence, are inherently multifactor- ial, and also many common diseases, such as type-2 diabetes, obesity, asthma, cancers, mental retardation aging related diseases, cardiovascular diseases and obesity, tend to be multifactorial. As an example of complex...

  16. Controlling Complex Networks with Compensatory Perturbations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sean P. Cornelius; William L. Kath; Adilson E. Motter

    2011-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

    The response of complex networks to perturbations is of utmost importance in areas as diverse as ecosystem management, emergency response, and cell reprogramming. A fundamental property of networks is that the perturbation of one node can affect other nodes, in a process that may cause the entire or substantial part of the system to change behavior and possibly collapse. Recent research in metabolic and food-web networks has demonstrated the concept that network damage caused by external perturbations can often be mitigated or reversed by the application of compensatory perturbations. Compensatory perturbations are constrained to be physically admissible and amenable to implementation on the network. However, the systematic identification of compensatory perturbations that conform to these constraints remains an open problem. Here, we present a method to construct compensatory perturbations that can control the fate of general networks under such constraints. Our approach accounts for the full nonlinear behavior of real complex networks and can bring the system to a desirable target state even when this state is not directly accessible. Applications to genetic networks show that compensatory perturbations are effective even when limited to a small fraction of all nodes in the network and that they are far more effective when limited to the highest-degree nodes. The approach is conceptually simple and computationally efficient, making it suitable for the rescue, control, and reprogramming of large complex networks in various domains.

  17. Analysis of complex networks using aggressive abstraction.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Colbaugh, Richard; Glass, Kristin. [New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology, Socorro, NM; Willard, Gerald [Department of Defense, Ft. Meade, MD

    2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents a new methodology for analyzing complex networks in which the network of interest is first abstracted to a much simpler (but equivalent) representation, the required analysis is performed using the abstraction, and analytic conclusions are then mapped back to the original network and interpreted there. We begin by identifying a broad and important class of complex networks which admit abstractions that are simultaneously dramatically simplifying and property preserving - we call these aggressive abstractions -- and which can therefore be analyzed using the proposed approach. We then introduce and develop two forms of aggressive abstraction: 1.) finite state abstraction, in which dynamical networks with uncountable state spaces are modeled using finite state systems, and 2.) onedimensional abstraction, whereby high dimensional network dynamics are captured in a meaningful way using a single scalar variable. In each case, the property preserving nature of the abstraction process is rigorously established and efficient algorithms are presented for computing the abstraction. The considerable potential of the proposed approach to complex networks analysis is illustrated through case studies involving vulnerability analysis of technological networks and predictive analysis for social processes.

  18. Multivariable controller increased MTBE complex capacity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robertson, D.; Peterson, T.J.; O`Connor, D. [DMC Corp., Houston, TX (United States); Payne, D.; Adams, V. [Valero Refining Co., Corpus Christi, TX (United States)

    1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Capacity increased by more than 4.6% when one dynamic matrix multivariable controller began operating in Valero Refining Company`s MTBE production complex in Corpus Christi, Texas. This was on a plant that was already running well above design capacity due to previously made process changes. A single controller was developed to cover an isobutane dehydrogenation (ID) unit and an MTBE reaction and fractionation plant with the intermediate isobutylene surge drum. The overall benefit is realized by a comprehensive constrained multivariable predictive controller that properly handles all sets of limits experienced by the complex, whether limited by the front-end ID or back-end MTBE units. The controller has 20 manipulated, 6 disturbance and 44 controlled variables, and covers widely varying dynamics with settling times ranging from twenty minutes to six hours. The controller executes each minute with a six hour time horizon. A unique achievement is intelligent surge drum level handling by the controller for higher average daily complex capacity as a whole. The ID unit often operates at simultaneous limits on reactor effluent compressor capacity, cold box temperature and hydrogen/hydrocarbon ratio, and the MTBE unit at impurity in butene column overhead as well as impurity in MTBE product. The paper discusses ether production, isobutane dehydrogenation, maximizing production, controller design, and controller performance.

  19. Infrared Spectroscopy of Discrete Uranyl Anion Complexes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gary S. Groenewold; Anita K. Gianotto; Michael E. McIlwain; Michael J. Van Stipdonk; Michael Kullman; Travis J. Cooper; David T. Moore; Nick Polfer; Jos Oomens; Ivan Infante; Lucas Visscher; Bertrand Siboulet; Wibe A. de Jong

    2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Free-Electron Laser for Infrared Experiments, FELIX, was used to study the wavelength-resolved multiphoton dissociation of discrete, gas phase uranyl (UO22+) complexes containing a single anionic ligand (A), with or without ligated solvent molecules (S). The apparent uranyl antisymmetric and symmetric stretching frequencies were measured for complexes with general formula [UO2A(S)n]+, where A was either hydroxide, methoxide or acetate, S was water, ammonia, acetone or acetonitrile, and n = 0-2. The values for the antisymmetric stretching frequency for uranyl ligated with only an anion ([UO2A]+) were as low or lower than measurements for [UO2]2+ ligated with as many as five strong neutral donor ligands, and are comparable to solution phase values. This result was surprising because initial DFT calculations using B3LYP predicted values that were 30 – 40 cm-1 higher, consistent with intuition but not with the data. Modification of the basis set and use of alternative functionals improved computational accuracy for the methoxide and acetate complexes, but calculated values for the hydroxide were greater than the measurement regardless of the computational method used. Attachment of a neutral donor ligand S to [UO2A]+ produced [UO2AS]+, which resulted only very modest changes to the uranyl frequency, and did not universally shift values lower. DFT calculations for [UO2AS]+ were in accord with trends in the data, and showed that attachment of the solvent was accommodated by weakening of the U-anion bond as well as the uranyl. When uranyl frequencies were compared for [UO2AS]+ species having different solvent neutrals, values decreased with increasing neutral nucleophilicity.

  20. Infared Spectroscopy of Discrete Uranyl Anion Complexes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Groenewold, G. S.; Gianotto, Anita K.; McIIwain, Michael E.; Van Stipdonk, Michael J.; Kullman, Michael; Moore, David T.; Polfer, Nick; Oomens, Jos; Infante, Ivan A.; Visscher, Lucas; Siboulet, Bertrand; De Jong, Wibe A.

    2008-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

    The Free-Electron Laser for Infrared Experiments (FELIX) w 1 as used to study the wavelength-resolved multiple photon photodissociation of discrete, gas phase uranyl (UO2 2 2+) complexes containing a single anionic ligand (A), with or without ligated solvent molecules (S). The uranyl antisymmetric and symmetric stretching frequencies were measured for complexes with general formula [UO2A(S)n]+, where A was either hydroxide, methoxide, or acetate; S was water, ammonia, acetone, or acetonitrile; and n = 0-3. The values for the antisymmetric stretching frequency for uranyl ligated with only an anion ([UO2A]+) were as low or lower than measurements for [UO2]2+ ligated with as many as five strong neutral donor ligands, and are comparable to solution phase values. This result was surprising because initial DFT calculations predicted values that were 30–40 cm-1 higher, consistent with intuition but not with the data. Modification of the basis sets and use of alternative functionals improved computational accuracy for the methoxide and acetate complexes, but calculated values for the hydroxide were greater than the measurement regardless of the computational method used. Attachment of a neutral donor ligand S to [UO2A]+ produced [UO2AS]+, which produced only very modest changes to the uranyl antisymmetric stretch frequency, and did not universally shift the frequency to lower values. DFT calculations for [UO2AS]+ were in accord with trends in the data, and showed that attachment of the solvent was accommodated by weakening of the U-anion bond as well as the uranyl. When uranyl frequencies were compared for [UO2AS]+ species having different solvent neutrals, values decreased with increasing neutral nucleophilicity.

  1. Alkyne metathesis by molybdenum and tungsten alkylidyne complexes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schrock, Richard Royce

    Alkyne metathesis by molybdenum and tungsten alkylidyne complexes is now ~45 years old. Progress in the practical aspects of alkyne metathesis reactions with well-defined complexes, as well as applications, in the last ...

  2. Assessing and reducing product portfolio complexity in the pharmaceutical industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leiter, Kevin M. (Kevin Michael)

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Overly complex product portfolios lead to inefficient use of resources and limit an organization's ability to react quickly to changing market dynamics. The challenges of reducing portfolio complexity are defining excess ...

  3. Managing Attack Graph Complexity Through Visual Hierarchical Aggregation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Noel, Steven

    Managing Attack Graph Complexity Through Visual Hierarchical Aggregation Steven Noel Center a framework for managing network attack graph complexity through interactive visualization, which includes hierarchical aggregation of graph elements. Aggregation collapses non-overlapping subgraphs of the attack graph

  4. Complex Modulus Prediction of Asphalt Concrete Pavement Cores

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ling, Meng

    2013-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Complex modulus is one of the key parameters in the Mechanistic-Empirical Pavement Design Guide (MEPDG). The purpose of this study is to implement an accurate and high-efficiency mechanical method to measure and calculate the complex modulus...

  5. A Spectroscopic Study of the effect of Ligand Complexation on...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Spectroscopic Study of the effect of Ligand Complexation on the Reduction of Uranium(VI) by Anthraquinone-2,6-disulfonate A Spectroscopic Study of the effect of Ligand Complexation...

  6. Use of partner agents in training systems for complex tasks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sims, Joseph Michael

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Complex tasks are an important part of the world today, but training people to perform complex tasks is difficult. These kinds of tasks usually have variable cognitive loads on the trainee, and, once trained, different people have different...

  7. High Fidelity Simulation of Complex Suspension Flow for Practical...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    A visualization of the flow of concrete, a complex suspension A visualization of the flow of concrete, a complex suspension. In this snapshot of the simulation, the stress on each...

  8. A Note on Fuzzy Real and Complex Field

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. K. Samanta

    2008-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Using the concept of fuzzy field, we have considered the fuzzy field of real and complex numbers and thereafter we have established a few standard results of real and complex numbers with respect to a membership function.

  9. A Spectroscopic Study of the effect of Ligand Complexation on...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Study of the effect of Ligand Complexation on the Reduction of Uranium(VI) by Anthraquinone-2,6-disulfonate A Spectroscopic Study of the effect of Ligand Complexation on the...

  10. acid dehydrogenase complexes: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ternary terbium p-aminobenzoic acid complexes Gao, Song 23 The distribution of boron and boric acid complexes in the sea Texas A&M University - TxSpace Summary: LIBRARY A a m...

  11. acid dehydrogenase complex: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ternary terbium p-aminobenzoic acid complexes Gao, Song 23 The distribution of boron and boric acid complexes in the sea Texas A&M University - TxSpace Summary: LIBRARY A a m...

  12. Baton Rouge Complex Steam Real Time Optimization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Iyun, T.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Baton Rouge Complex Steam Real Time Optimization IETC 2014 New Orleans, Louisiana Tope Iyun ExxonMobil Chemical Company May 22, 2014 ESL-IE-14-05-32 Proceedings of the Thrity-Sixth Industrial Energy Technology Conference New Orleans, LA. May 20... were generated by or on behalf of ExxonMobil Chemical Company. Legal Disclosures ©2014 ExxonMobil. To the extent the user is entitled to disclose and distribute this document, the user may forward, distribute, and/or photocopy this copyrighted...

  13. Central Waste Complex (CWC) Waste Analysis Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    ELLEFSON, M.D.

    1999-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this waste analysis plan (WAP) is to document the waste acceptance process, sampling methodologies, analytical techniques, and overall processes that are undertaken for waste accepted for storage at the Central Waste Complex (CWC), which is located in the 200 West Area of the Hanford Facility, Richland, Washington. Because dangerous waste does not include the source, special nuclear, and by-product material components of mixed waste, radionuclides are not within the scope of this documentation. The information on radionuclides is provided only for general knowledge.

  14. The Geometric Structure of Complex Fluids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    François Gay-Balmaz; Tudor S. Ratiu

    2009-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper develops the theory of affine Euler-Poincar\\'e and affine Lie-Poisson reductions and applies these processes to various examples of complex fluids, including Yang-Mills and Hall magnetohydrodynamics for fluids and superfluids, spin glasses, microfluids, and liquid crystals. As a consequence of the Lagrangian approach, the variational formulation of the equations is determined. On the Hamiltonian side, the associated Poisson brackets are obtained by reduction of a canonical cotangent bundle. A Kelvin-Noether circulation theorem is presented and is applied to these examples.

  15. Nuclear Advances | Y-12 National Security Complex

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas Conchas recoveryLaboratory | NationalJohnSecurity ComplexNormanNovemberAdvances Nuclear

  16. An investigation of bentonite-organic complexes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seymour, Keith Goldin

    1954-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    DTA curves are shown in Figure 7- Using a slowly flowing atmosphere, an exothermic reaction was observed starting at about 560*C and reaching a maximum around VfO*. With a more rapid nitrogen flow, the exothermic peak was decreased by still apparent.... Even with a rate of gas flow so rapid that a considerable drift in base line resulted, the exothermic reaction may not have been completely suppressed although in this case the DTA curve was too complex for reliable interpretation. Analyses...

  17. EM Corporate Performance Metrics, Complex Level

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of Energy Power SystemsResources DOE ZeroThreeEnergyDepartment0: DOE512: Alaska EM| DepartmentComplex

  18. Modeling Complex Organic Molecules in dense regions: Eley-Rideal and complex induced reaction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ruaud, M; Hickson, K M; Gratier, P; Hersant, F; Wakelam, V

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent observations have revealed the existence of Complex Organic Molecules (COMs) in cold dense cores and prestellar cores. The presence of these molecules in such cold conditions is not well understood and remains a matter of debate since the previously proposed "warm- up" scenario cannot explain these observations. In this article, we study the effect of Eley- Rideal and complex induced reaction mechanisms of gas-phase carbon atoms with the main ice components of dust grains on the formation of COMs in cold and dense regions. Based on recent experiments we use a low value for the chemical desorption efficiency (which was previously invoked to explain the observed COM abundances). We show that our introduced mechanisms are efficient enough to produce a large amount of complex organic molecules in the gas-phase at temperatures as low as 10K.

  19. Pseudofunctorial behavior of Cousin complexes on formal schemes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2007-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Contemporary Mathematics. Pseudofunctorial behavior of Cousin complexes on formal schemes. Joseph Lipman, Suresh Nayak, and Pramathanath Sastry.

  20. adamantine-dicarboxylate coordination complexes: Topics by E...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Multiagent systems, Coordination, Planning, Resource Kropf, Peter 25 Optical Design of Reflectionless Complex Media by Finite Embedded Coordinate Transformations...

  1. The chemical properties and biological significance of gossypol protein complexes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baliga, Bantval Prabhakara

    1956-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ................................. 2 III. REVIEW OF LITERATURE ......................... 4 1. Cottonseed Proteins ....................... 4 2. Evaluation of Proteins ................... 5 5. The Pigments of Cottonseed.............. 11 4. The Physiological Significance of Free...-Protein Complexes . 59 5. Chemical Analysis of Cottonseed Meal and Gossypol-Protein Complexes .......... 59 4. Biological Evaluation ..................... 44 5. Enzymatic Hydrolysis of Gossypol-Protein Complexes............................. 46 6. Bibliography...

  2. Content-Based Document Image Retrieval in Complex Document Collections

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Content-Based Document Image Retrieval in Complex Document Collections G. Agama, S. Argamona, O address the problem of content-based image retrieval in the context of complex document images. Complex document are documents that typically start out on paper and are then electronically scanned. These docu

  3. Interactive Control of Nonlinear Projection for Complex Animated Scenes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Toronto, University of

    . This thesis presents techniques for creating interactive nonlinear projections of complex scene geometryInteractive Control of Nonlinear Projection for Complex Animated Scenes by Patrick Coleman A thesis of Nonlinear Projection for Complex Animated Scenes Patrick Coleman Master of Science Graduate Department

  4. Towards Applying Computational Complexity to Foundations of Physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ward, Karen

    Towards Applying Computational Complexity to Foundations of Physics Vladik Kreinovich1 and Andrei M. Grigoriev analyzed the decidability and computational complexity of different physical theories the relation between computational complexity and foundations of physics was in the early 1970s, when both Dima

  5. Constructing Simplicial Complexes over Topological Spaces Milka Doktorova

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zomorodian, Afra

    complex to model relationships between entities. Graphs and hyper- graphs have been used traditionally complexes, in turn, may be used as a model of recursive relation- ships that extend down to subsets. WeConstructing Simplicial Complexes over Topological Spaces Milka Doktorova Afra Zomorodian

  6. Towards Applying Computational Complexity to Foundations of Vladik Kreinovich1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ward, Karen

    Towards Applying Computational Complexity to Foundations of Physics Vladik Kreinovich1 and Andrei M. Grigoriev analyzed the decidability and computational complexity of different physical theories the relation between computational complexity and foundations of physics was in the early 1970s, when both Dima

  7. Interactive Visualization of Complex Plant Ecosystems Oliver Deussen1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reiterer, Harald

    a method for interactive rendering of large outdoor scenes. Complex polygonal plant models and whole plant most of the geometry drastically. With our system, we are able to interactively render very complex naturally. The importance of interactive yet realistic rendering of these very complex ecosystem models

  8. Interactive Distributed Ray Tracing of Highly Complex Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wald, Ingo

    projects dealing with entire cars, ships, buildings, and processing plants. The complexity of such modelsInteractive Distributed Ray Tracing of Highly Complex Models Ingo Wald, Philipp Slusallek, Carsten- ulation of huge and complex 3D environments. Examples include large structural and mechanical engineering

  9. Filing Holes in Complex Surfaces Using Volumetric Diffusion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kazhdan, Michael

    Method for Building Complex Models From range Images, '96) ­ Applies line of sight constraints based components ­ Complex hole geometry Construction of an arbitrary mesh can result in non-manifold surfaceFiling Holes in Complex Surfaces Using Volumetric Diffusion J. Davis, S. Marschner, M. Garr and M

  10. Manifold Homotopy via the Flow Complex Bardia Sadri

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Toronto, University of

    modeling though much of the mathematical foundations behind the flow complex were well-explored priorManifold Homotopy via the Flow Complex Bardia Sadri Abstract It is known that the critical points versus those of deep critical points, in a filtration of the flow complex based on the distance

  11. Traffic flow models and service rules for complex production systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ringhofer, Christian

    Traffic flow models and service rules for complex production systems C. Ringhofer Abstract We emphasis is given to the implementation of service rules for complex systems, involving multiple product flow type models for complex production systems. Traffic flow models represent, in some sense

  12. An Energy Complexity Model for Algorithms Swapnoneel Roy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rudra,, Atri

    An Energy Complexity Model for Algorithms Swapnoneel Roy Department of CSE University at Buffalo by the importance of energy and algorithmic complexity models do not capture the energy consumed by an algorithm. In this paper, we propose a new complexity model to ac- count for the energy used by an algorithm. Based

  13. The Complexity of Weighted Boolean #CSP , Sangxia Huang2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    The Complexity of Weighted Boolean #CSP Modulo k Heng Guo1 , Sangxia Huang2 , Pinyan Lu3@gmail.com Abstract We prove a complexity dichotomy theorem for counting weighted Boolean CSP modulo k for any similar to the one for the complex weighted Boolean #CSP, found by [Cai, Lu and Xia, STOC 2009]. Then we

  14. Biosorption of anionic metal complexes Hui Niu and Bohumil Volesky*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Volesky, Bohumil

    containing toxic heavy metals, often in anionic complex forms such as anionic chromate (CrO4 2- ), vanadate1 Biosorption of anionic metal complexes Hui Niu and Bohumil Volesky* http Street, MONTREAL, Canada H3A 2B2 *corresponding author Anionic metal complexes, are very effectively

  15. Original article Lignin-carbohydrate complexes in forages

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Original article Lignin-carbohydrate complexes in forages: structure and consequences) Summary ― Lignin-carbohydrate complexes (LCCS) are recognised as key structures in forage microorganisms are discussed. lignin-carbohydrate complexes I cell wall I forage I digestibility Résumé

  16. Complex Systems: A Survey M. E. J. Newman

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Newman, Mark

    Complex Systems: A Survey M. E. J. Newman Department of Physics, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 and Center for the Study of Complex Systems, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 A complex system is a system composed of many interacting parts, often called agents, which displays

  17. A New Route to Azadithiolato Complexes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Angamuthu, R.; Carroll, M.E.; Ramesh, M.; Rauchfuss, Thomas B.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The reaction of [(MeC{sub 5}H{sub 4}){sub 2}Ti(SH){sub 2}] with cyclic imines with the formula (CH{sub 2}NR){sub 3} gives 2-aza-1,3-dithiolato chelate complexes [(MeC{sub 5}H{sub 4}){sub 2}Ti{(SCH{sub 2}){sub 2}NR}] (1, R = Ph; 2, R = Me; 3, R = CH{sub 2}Ph). These compounds demonstrate that azadithiolate ligands can exist on mononuclear metal centers. The complexes were characterized by {sup 1}H NMR spectroscopy, ESI-mass spectrometry, and X-ray crystallography. Variable-temperature {sup 1}H NMR studies reveal that the dithiolate ligands undergo ring inversion like other dithiatitanacyclohexanes. Treatment of [(MeC{sub 5}H{sub 4}){sub 2}Ti{(SCH{sub 2}){sub 2}NPh}] (1) with [Fe(benzylideneacetone)(CO){sub 3}] afforded [Fe{sub 2}{(SCH{sub 2}){sub 2}NPh}(CO){sub 6}] in good yield.

  18. Statistical Complexity of Sampled Chaotic Attractors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Luciana De Micco; Juana Graciela Fernández; Hilda Angela Larrondo; Angelo Plastino; Osvaldo Anibal Rosso

    2011-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

    We analyze the statistical complexity vs. entropy plane-representation of sampled chaotic attractors as a function of the sampling period {\\tau}. It is shown that if the Bandt and Pompe procedure is used to assign a probability distribution function (PDF) to the pertinent time series, the statistical complexity measure (SCM) attains a definite maximum for a specific sampling period tM. If the usual histogram approach is used instead in order to assign the PDF to the time series, the SCM remains almost constant at any sampling period {\\tau}. The significance of tM is further investigated by comparing it with typical times given in the literature for the two main reconstruction processes: the Takens' one in a delay-time embedding, and the exact Nyquist-Shannon reconstruction. It is shown that tM is compatible with those times recommended as adequate delay ones in Takens' reconstruction. The reported results correspond to three representative chaotic systems having correlation dimension 2 < D2 < 3. One recent experiment confirms the analysis presented here.

  19. Inferring Network Topology from Complex Dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Srinivas Gorur Shandilya; Marc Timme

    2010-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Inferring network topology from dynamical observations is a fundamental problem pervading research on complex systems. Here, we present a simple, direct method to infer the structural connection topology of a network, given an observation of one collective dynamical trajectory. The general theoretical framework is applicable to arbitrary network dynamical systems described by ordinary differential equations. No interference (external driving) is required and the type of dynamics is not restricted in any way. In particular, the observed dynamics may be arbitrarily complex; stationary, invariant or transient; synchronous or asynchronous and chaotic or periodic. Presupposing a knowledge of the functional form of the dynamical units and of the coupling functions between them, we present an analytical solution to the inverse problem of finding the network topology. Robust reconstruction is achieved in any sufficiently long generic observation of the system. We extend our method to simultaneously reconstruct both the entire network topology and all parameters appearing linear in the system's equations of motion. Reconstruction of network topology and system parameters is viable even in the presence of substantial external noise.

  20. Salvo: Seismic imaging software for complex geologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    OBER,CURTIS C.; GJERTSEN,ROB; WOMBLE,DAVID E.

    2000-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes Salvo, a three-dimensional seismic-imaging software for complex geologies. Regions of complex geology, such as overthrusts and salt structures, can cause difficulties for many seismic-imaging algorithms used in production today. The paraxial wave equation and finite-difference methods used within Salvo can produce high-quality seismic images in these difficult regions. However this approach comes with higher computational costs which have been too expensive for standard production. Salvo uses improved numerical algorithms and methods, along with parallel computing, to produce high-quality images and to reduce the computational and the data input/output (I/O) costs. This report documents the numerical algorithms implemented for the paraxial wave equation, including absorbing boundary conditions, phase corrections, imaging conditions, phase encoding, and reduced-source migration. This report also describes I/O algorithms for large seismic data sets and images and parallelization methods used to obtain high efficiencies for both the computations and the I/O of seismic data sets. Finally, this report describes the required steps to compile, port and optimize the Salvo software, and describes the validation data sets used to help verify a working copy of Salvo.

  1. Hybrid function projective synchronization in complex dynamical networks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wei, Qiang; Wang, Xing-yuan, E-mail: wangxy@dlut.edu.cn; Hu, Xiao-peng [Faculty of Electronic Information and Electrical Engineering, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian, 116024 (China)] [Faculty of Electronic Information and Electrical Engineering, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian, 116024 (China)

    2014-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper investigates hybrid function projective synchronization in complex dynamical networks. When the complex dynamical networks could be synchronized up to an equilibrium or periodic orbit, a hybrid feedback controller is designed to realize the different component of vector of node could be synchronized up to different desired scaling function in complex dynamical networks with time delay. Hybrid function projective synchronization (HFPS) in complex dynamical networks with constant delay and HFPS in complex dynamical networks with time-varying coupling delay are researched, respectively. Finally, the numerical simulations show the effectiveness of theoretical analysis.

  2. Assessing complexity by means of maximum entropy models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chliamovitch, Gregor; Velasquez, Lino

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We discuss a characterization of complexity based on successive approximations of the probability density describing a system by means of maximum entropy methods, thereby quantifying the respective role played by different orders of interaction. This characterization is applied on simple cellular automata in order to put it in perspective with the usual notion of complexity for such systems based on Wolfram classes. The overlap is shown to be good, but not perfect. This suggests that complexity in the sense of Wolfram emerges as an intermediate regime of maximum entropy-based complexity, but also gives insights regarding the role of initial conditions in complexity-related issues.

  3. Natural Conjugate Gradient on Complex Flag Manifolds for Complex Independent Subspace

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Plumbley, Mark

    conjugate gradient method yields better convergence compared to the natural gradient geodesic search method is the natural gradient geodesic search method (NGS), and the other is the natural conjugate gradient method (NCG the natural gradient or the Newton's method on complex manifolds, however, the behavior of the conjugate

  4. The Y-12 National Security Complex 4-1 4. The Y-12 National Security Complex

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pennycook, Steve

    of the Nuclear Detection and Sensor Testing Center and the Nuclear Materials Information Program Library, a premier manufacturing facility operated by B&W Y-12 for NNSA, plays a vital role in DOE's Nuclear Security a safe and reliable US nuclear weapons deterrent. The complex also retrieves and stores nuclear materials

  5. Alan Turing and the Origins of Complexity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miguel-Angel Martin-Delgado

    2011-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

    The 75th anniversary of Turing's seminal paper and his centennial year anniversary occur in 2011 and 2012, respectively. It is natural to review and assess Turing's contributions in diverse fields in the light of new developments that his thoughts has triggered in many scientific communities. Here, the main idea is to discuss how the work of Turing allows us to change our views on the foundations of Mathematics, much like quantum mechanics changed our conception of the world of Physics. Basic notions like computability and universality are discussed in a broad context, making special emphasis on how the notion of complexity can be given a precise meaning after Turing, i.e., not just qualitative but also quantitative. Turing's work is given some historical perspective with respect to some of his precursors, contemporaries and mathematicians who took up his ideas farther.

  6. Alan Turing and the Origins of Complexity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martin-Delgado, Miguel-Angel

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The 75th anniversary of Turing's seminal paper and his centennial year anniversary occur in 2011 and 2012, respectively. It is natural to review and assess Turing's contributions in diverse fields in the light of new developments that his thoughts has triggered in many scientific communities. Here, the main idea is to discuss how the work of Turing allows us to change our views on the foundations of Mathematics, much like quantum mechanics changed our conception of the world of Physics. Basic notions like computability and universality are discussed in a broad context, making special emphasis on how the notion of complexity can be given a precise meaning after Turing, i.e., not just qualitative but also quantitative. Turing's work is given some historical perspective with respect to some of his precursors, contemporaries and mathematicians who took up his ideas farther.

  7. Organic complexant topical report. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meacham, J.E.; and others

    1997-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

    This document reviews the current understanding of hazards associated with the storage of organic complexant salts in Hanford Site high-level waste tanks. Two distinct hazards were evaluated: spontaneous self- accelerating decomposition reactions in the bulk material (bulk runaway) and ignition followed by condensed phase propagation (point source ignition). Results from the bulk runaway assessment showed that bulk runaway is not credible for all tanks except C-106. However, speciation of the organic in C-106 shows that it is almost all in the form of low energy oxalate, and there is little potential for a bulk runaway. Additional testing and evaluation would be necessary to definitely conclude that there is no potential for bulk runaway; therefore, controls are currently required for his tank. Temperature monitoring and controls (water addition and active ventilation) are adequate to prevent bulk runaway in C-106.

  8. Complexity of Groundwater Contaminants at DOE Sites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hazen, T.C.; Faybishenko, B.; Jordan, P.

    2010-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is responsible for the remediation and long-term stewardship of one of the world's largest groundwater contamination portfolios, with a significant number of plumes containing various contaminants, and considerable total mass and activity. As of 1999, the DOE's Office of Environmental Management was responsible for remediation, waste management, or nuclear materials and facility stabilization at 144 sites in 31 states and one U.S. territory, out of which 109 sites were expected to require long-term stewardship. Currently, 19 DOE sites are on the National Priority List. The total number of contaminated plumes on DOE lands is estimated to be 10,000. However, a significant number of DOE sites have not yet been fully characterized. The most prevalent contaminated media are groundwater and soil, although contaminated sediment, sludge, and surface water also are present. Groundwater, soil, and sediment contamination are present at 72% of all DOE sites. A proper characterization of the contaminant inventory at DOE sites is critical for accomplishing one of the primary DOE missions -- planning basic research to understand the complex physical, chemical, and biological properties of contaminated sites. Note that the definitions of the terms 'site' and 'facility' may differ from one publication to another. In this report, the terms 'site,' 'facility' or 'installation' are used to identify a contiguous land area within the borders of a property, which may contain more than one plume. The term 'plume' is used here to indicate an individual area of contamination, which can be small or large. Even though several publications and databases contain information on groundwater contamination and remediation technologies, no statistical analyses of the contaminant inventory at DOE sites has been prepared since the 1992 report by Riley and Zachara. The DOE Groundwater Data Base (GWD) presents data as of 2003 for 221 groundwater plumes at 60 DOE sites and facilities. Note that Riley and Zachara analyzed the data from only 18 sites/facilities including 91 plumes. In this paper, we present the results of statistical analyses of the data in the GWD as guidance for planning future basic and applied research of groundwater contaminants within the DOE complex. Our analyses include the evaluation of a frequency and ranking of specific contaminants and contaminant groups, contaminant concentrations/activities and total contaminant masses and activities. We also compared the results from analyses of the GWD with those from the 1992 report by Riley and Zachara. The difference between our results and those summarized in the 1992 report by Riley and Zachara could be caused by not only additional releases, but also by the use of modern site characterization methods, which more accurately reveal the extent of groundwater contamination. Contaminated sites within the DOE complex are located in all major geographic regions of the United States, with highly variable geologic, hydrogeologic, soil, and climatic conditions. We assume that the information from the 60 DOE sites included in the GWD are representative for the whole DOE complex. These 60 sites include the major DOE sites and facilities, such as Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site, Colorado; Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho; Savannah River Site, South Carolina; Oak Ridge Reservation, Tennessee; and Hanford Reservation, Washington. These five sites alone ccount for 71% of the value of the remediation work.

  9. Collective dynamics of active filament complexes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nogucci, Hironobu

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Networks of biofilaments are essential for the formation of cellular structures and they support various biological functions. Previous studies have largely investigated the collective dynamics of rod-like biofilaments; however, the shapes of actual subcelluar componensts are often more elaborate. In this study, we investigated an active object composed of two active filaments, which represents a progression from rod-like biofilaments to complex-shaped biofilaments. Specifically, we numerically assessed the collective behaviors of these active objects and observed several types of dynamics depending on the density and the angle of the two filaments as shape parameters of the object. Among the observed collective dynamics, moving density bands that we named 'moving smectic' are reported here for the first time. By using statistical analyses of the orbits of individual objects and the interactions among them, the mechanisms underlying the rise of these dynamics patterns in the system were determined. This study...

  10. Simulating Complex Window Systems using BSDF Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Konstantoglou, Maria; Jonsson, Jacob; Lee, Eleanor

    2009-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Nowadays, virtual models are commonly used to evaluate the performance of conventional window systems. Complex fenestration systems can be difficult to simulate accurately not only because of their geometry but also because of their optical properties that scatter light in an unpredictable manner. Bi-directional Scattering Distribution Functions (BSDF) have recently been developed based on a mixture of measurements and modelling to characterize the optics of such systems. This paper describes the workflow needed to create then use these BSDF datasets in the Radiance lighting simulation software. Limited comparisons are made between visualizations produced using the standard ray-tracing method, the BSDF method, and that taken in a full-scale outdoor mockup.

  11. Central Waste Complex (CWC) Waste Analysis Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    ELLEFSON, M.D.

    2000-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this waste analysis plan (WAP) is to document the waste acceptance process, sampling methodologies, analytical techniques, and overall processes that are undertaken for waste accepted for storage at the Central Waste Complex (CWC), which is located in the 200 West Area of the Hanford Facility, Richland, Washington. Because dangerous waste does not include the source special nuclear and by-product material components of mixed waste, radionuclides are not within the scope of this document. The information on radionuclides is provided only for general knowledge. This document has been revised to meet the interim status waste analysis plan requirements of Washington Administrative Code (WAC) 173 303-300(5). When the final status permit is issued, permit conditions will be incorporated and this document will be revised accordingly.

  12. Exploratory study of complexant concentrate waste processing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lumetta, G.J.; Bray, L.A.; Kurath, D.E.; Morrey, J.R.; Swanson, J.L.; Wester, D.W.

    1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this exploratory study, conducted by Pacific Northwest Laboratory for Westinghouse Hanford Company, was to determine the effect of applying advanced chemical separations technologies to the processing and disposal of high-level wastes (HLW) stored in underground tanks. The major goals of this study were to determine (1) if the wastes can be partitioned into a small volume of HLW plus a large volume of low-level waste (LLW), and (2) if the activity in the LLW can be lowered enough to meet NRC Class LLW criteria. This report presents the results obtained in a brief scouting study of various processes for separating radionuclides from Hanford complexant concentrate (CC) waste.

  13. Y-12 National Security Complex Water Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elam, Shana E.; Bassett, P.; McMordie Stoughton, Kate

    2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Department of Energy's Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) sponsored a water assessment at the Y 12 National Security Complex (Y 12) located in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Driven by mandated water reduction goals of Executive Orders 13423 and 13514, the objective of the water assessment is to develop a comprehensive understanding of the current water-consuming applications and equipment at Y 12 and to identify key areas for water efficiency improvements that could be applied not only at Y-12 but at other Federal facilities as well. FEMP selected Pacific Northwest National Laboratory to coordinate and manage the water assessment. PNNL contracted Water Savers, LLC to lead the technical aspects of the water assessment. Water Savers provided key technical expertise in water auditing, metering, and cooling systems. This is the report of that effort, which concluded that the Y-12 facility could realize considerable water savings by implementing the recommended water efficiency opportunities.

  14. Kinetics of wet sodium vapor complex plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mishra, S. K., E-mail: nishfeb@rediffmail.com [Institute for Plasma Research (IPR), Gandhinagar 382428 (India); Sodha, M. S. [Centre of Energy Studies, Indian Institute of Technology Delhi (IITD), New Delhi 110016 (India)] [Centre of Energy Studies, Indian Institute of Technology Delhi (IITD), New Delhi 110016 (India)

    2014-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper, we have investigated the kinetics of wet (partially condensed) Sodium vapor, which comprises of electrons, ions, neutral atoms, and Sodium droplets (i) in thermal equilibrium and (ii) when irradiated by light. The formulation includes the balance of charge over the droplets, number balance of the plasma constituents, and energy balance of the electrons. In order to evaluate the droplet charge, a phenomenon for de-charging of the droplets, viz., evaporation of positive Sodium ions from the surface has been considered in addition to electron emission and electron/ion accretion. The analysis has been utilized to evaluate the steady state parameters of such complex plasmas (i) in thermal equilibrium and (ii) when irradiated; the results have been graphically illustrated. As a significant outcome irradiated, Sodium droplets are seen to acquire large positive potential, with consequent enhancement in the electron density.

  15. Radioactive Waste Management Complex performance assessment: Draft

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Case, M.J.; Maheras, S.J.; McKenzie-Carter, M.A.; Sussman, M.E.; Voilleque, P.

    1990-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A radiological performance assessment of the Radioactive Waste Management Complex at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory was conducted to demonstrate compliance with appropriate radiological criteria of the US Department of Energy and the US Environmental Protection Agency for protection of the general public. The calculations involved modeling the transport of radionuclides from buried waste, to surface soil and subsurface media, and eventually to members of the general public via air, ground water, and food chain pathways. Projections of doses were made for both offsite receptors and individuals intruding onto the site after closure. In addition, uncertainty analyses were performed. Results of calculations made using nominal data indicate that the radiological doses will be below appropriate radiological criteria throughout operations and after closure of the facility. Recommendations were made for future performance assessment calculations.

  16. B Plant Complex preclosure work plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    ADLER, J.G.

    1999-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

    This preclosure work plan describes the condition of the dangerous waste treatment storage, and/or disposal (TSD) unit after completion of the B Plant Complex decommissioning Transition Phase preclosure activities. This description includes waste characteristics, waste types, locations, and associated hazards. The goal to be met by the Transition Phase preclosure activities is to place the TSD unit into a safe and environmentally secure condition for the long-term Surveillance and Maintenance (S&M) Phase of the facility decommissioning process. This preclosure work plan has been prepared in accordance with Section 8.0 of the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (Tri-Party Agreement) (Ecology et al. 1996). The preclosure work plan is one of three critical Transition Phase documents, the other two being: B Plant End Points Document (WHC-SD-WM-TPP-054) and B Plant S&M plan. These documents are prepared by the U.S. Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office (DOE-RL) and its contractors with the involvement of Washington State Department of Ecology (Ecology). The tanks and vessels addressed by this preclosure work plan are limited to those tanks end vessels included on the B Plant Complex Part A, Form 3, Permit Application (DOE/RL-88-21). The criteria for determining which tanks or vessels are in the Part A, Form 3, are discussed in the following. The closure plan for the TSD unit will not be prepared until the Disposition Phase of the facility decommissioning process is initiated, which follows the long-term S&M Phase. Final closure will occur during the Disposition Phase of the facility decommissioning process. The Waste Encapsulation Storage Facility (WESF) is excluded from the scope of this preclosure work plan.

  17. Intrinsic Uncertainties in Modeling Complex Systems.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cooper, Curtis S; Bramson, Aaron L.; Ames, Arlo L.

    2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Models are built to understand and predict the behaviors of both natural and artificial systems. Because it is always necessary to abstract away aspects of any non-trivial system being modeled, we know models can potentially leave out important, even critical elements. This reality of the modeling enterprise forces us to consider the prospective impacts of those effects completely left out of a model - either intentionally or unconsidered. Insensitivity to new structure is an indication of diminishing returns. In this work, we represent a hypothetical unknown effect on a validated model as a finite perturba- tion whose amplitude is constrained within a control region. We find robustly that without further constraints, no meaningful bounds can be placed on the amplitude of a perturbation outside of the control region. Thus, forecasting into unsampled regions is a very risky proposition. We also present inherent difficulties with proper time discretization of models and representing in- herently discrete quantities. We point out potentially worrisome uncertainties, arising from math- ematical formulation alone, which modelers can inadvertently introduce into models of complex systems. Acknowledgements This work has been funded under early-career LDRD project %23170979, entitled %22Quantify- ing Confidence in Complex Systems Models Having Structural Uncertainties%22, which ran from 04/2013 to 09/2014. We wish to express our gratitude to the many researchers at Sandia who con- tributed ideas to this work, as well as feedback on the manuscript. In particular, we would like to mention George Barr, Alexander Outkin, Walt Beyeler, Eric Vugrin, and Laura Swiler for provid- ing invaluable advice and guidance through the course of the project. We would also like to thank Steven Kleban, Amanda Gonzales, Trevor Manzanares, and Sarah Burwell for their assistance in managing project tasks and resources.

  18. E-Print Network 3.0 - actinocene complexes ann8-c8h82 Sample...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Power Plant (NPP) control rooms and their Summary: Mapping Complexity Sources in Nuclear Power Plant Domains Understanding the sources of complexity... of complexity in the NPP...

  19. Mathematical approaches for complexity/predictivity trade-offs in complex system models : LDRD final report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goldsby, Michael E.; Mayo, Jackson R.; Bhattacharyya, Arnab (Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA); Armstrong, Robert C.; Vanderveen, Keith

    2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The goal of this research was to examine foundational methods, both computational and theoretical, that can improve the veracity of entity-based complex system models and increase confidence in their predictions for emergent behavior. The strategy was to seek insight and guidance from simplified yet realistic models, such as cellular automata and Boolean networks, whose properties can be generalized to production entity-based simulations. We have explored the usefulness of renormalization-group methods for finding reduced models of such idealized complex systems. We have prototyped representative models that are both tractable and relevant to Sandia mission applications, and quantified the effect of computational renormalization on the predictive accuracy of these models, finding good predictivity from renormalized versions of cellular automata and Boolean networks. Furthermore, we have theoretically analyzed the robustness properties of certain Boolean networks, relevant for characterizing organic behavior, and obtained precise mathematical constraints on systems that are robust to failures. In combination, our results provide important guidance for more rigorous construction of entity-based models, which currently are often devised in an ad-hoc manner. Our results can also help in designing complex systems with the goal of predictable behavior, e.g., for cybersecurity.

  20. Random complex dynamics and devil's coliseums

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sumi, Hiroki

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate the random dynamics of polynomial maps on the Riemann sphere and the dynamics of semigroups of polynomial maps on the Riemann sphere. In particular, the dynamics of a semigroup $G$ of polynomials whose planar postcritical set is bounded and the associated random dynamics are studied. In general, the Julia set of such a $G$ may be disconnected. We show that if $G$ is such a semigroup, then regarding the associated random dynamics, the chaos of the averaged system disappears in the $C^{0}$ sense, and the function $T_{\\infty}$ of probability of tending to $\\infty$ is continuous on the Riemann sphere and varies only on the Julia set of $G$. Moreover, the function $T_{\\infty}$ has a kind of monotonicity. It turns out that $T_{\\infty}$ is a complex analogue of the devil's staircase, and we call $T_{\\infty}$ a "devil's coliseum." We investigate the details of $T_{\\infty}$ when $G$ is generated by two polynomials. In this case, $T_{\\infty}$ varies precisely on the Julia set of $G$, which is a thin frac...

  1. Time Centrality in Dynamic Complex Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Costa, Eduardo Chinelate; Wehmuth, Klaus; Ziviani, Artur; da Silva, Ana Paula Couto

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    There is an ever-increasing interest in investigating dynamics in time-varying graphs (TVGs). So far, however, the notion of centrality in TVG scenarios usually refers to metrics that assess the relative importance of nodes along the temporal evolution of the network. Nevertheless, for some TVG scenarios, more important than identifying the central nodes under a given definition is identifying the \\emph{key time instants} for taking certain actions. In this paper, we introduce the notion of \\emph{time centrality} in TVGs. Analogously to node centrality, time centrality evaluates the relative importance of time instants in dynamic complex networks. We present two time centrality metrics related to diffusion processes. We evaluate the two defined metrics using a real-world dataset representing a in-person contact dynamic network. We validate the concept of time centrality showing that diffusion starting at the best classified time instants (i.e. the most central ones), according to our metrics, can perform a fa...

  2. Alarm system for a nuclear control complex

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Scarola, Kenneth (Windsor, CT); Jamison, David S. (Windsor, CT); Manazir, Richard M. (North Canton, CT); Rescorl, Robert L. (Vernon, CT); Harmon, Daryl L. (Enfield, CT)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An advanced control room complex for a nuclear power plant, including a discrete indicator and alarm system (72) which is nuclear qualified for rapid response to changes in plant parameters and a component control system (64) which together provide a discrete monitoring and control capability at a panel (14-22, 26, 28) in the control room (10). A separate data processing system (70), which need not be nuclear qualified, provides integrated and overview information to the control room and to each panel, through CRTs (84) and a large, overhead integrated process status overview board (24). The discrete indicator and alarm system (72) and the data processing system (70) receive inputs from common plant sensors and validate the sensor outputs to arrive at a representative value of the parameter for use by the operator during both normal and accident conditions, thereby avoiding the need for him to assimilate data from each sensor individually. The integrated process status board (24) is at the apex of an information hierarchy that extends through four levels and provides access at each panel to the full display hierarchy. The control room panels are preferably of a modular construction, permitting the definition of inputs and outputs, the man machine interface, and the plant specific algorithms, to proceed in parallel with the fabrication of the panels, the installation of the equipment and the generic testing thereof.

  3. Advanced nuclear plant control room complex

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Scarola, Kenneth (Windsor, CT); Jamison, David S. (Windsor, CT); Manazir, Richard M. (North Canton, CT); Rescorl, Robert L. (Vernon, CT); Harmon, Daryl L. (Enfield, CT)

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An advanced control room complex for a nuclear power plant, including a discrete indicator and alarm system (72) which is nuclear qualified for rapid response to changes in plant parameters and a component control system (64) which together provide a discrete monitoring and control capability at a panel (14-22, 26, 28) in the control room (10). A separate data processing system (70), which need not be nuclear qualified, provides integrated and overview information to the control room and to each panel, through CRTs (84) and a large, overhead integrated process status overview board (24). The discrete indicator and alarm system (72) and the data processing system (70) receive inputs from common plant sensors and validate the sensor outputs to arrive at a representative value of the parameter for use by the operator during both normal and accident conditions, thereby avoiding the need for him to assimilate data from each sensor individually. The integrated process status board (24) is at the apex of an information hierarchy that extends through four levels and provides access at each panel to the full display hierarchy. The control room panels are preferably of a modular construction, permitting the definition of inputs and outputs, the man machine interface, and the plant specific algorithms, to proceed in parallel with the fabrication of the panels, the installation of the equipment and the generic testing thereof.

  4. Console for a nuclear control complex

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Scarola, Kenneth (Windsor, CT); Jamison, David S. (Windsor, CT); Manazir, Richard M. (North Canton, CT); Rescorl, Robert L. (Vernon, CT); Harmon, Daryl L. (Enfield, CT)

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An advanced control room complex for a nuclear power plant, including a discrete indicator and alarm system (72) which is nuclear qualified for rapid response to changes in plant parameters and a component control system (64) which together provide a discrete monitoring and control capability at a panel (14-22, 26, 28) in the control room (10). A separate data processing system (70), which need not be nuclear qualified, provides integrated and overview information to the control room and to each panel, through CRTs (84) and a large, overhead integrated process status overview board (24). The discrete indicator and alarm system (72) and the data processing system (70) receive inputs from common plant sensors and validate the sensor outputs to arrive at a representative value of the parameter for use by the operator during both normal and accident conditions, thereby avoiding the need for him to assimilate data from each sensor individually. The integrated process status board (24) is at the apex of an information hierarchy that extends through four levels and provides access at each panel to the full display hierarchy. The control room panels are preferably of a modular construction, permitting the definition of inputs and outputs, the man machine interface, and the plant specific algorithms, to proceed in parallel with the fabrication of the panels, the installation of the equipment and the generic testing thereof.

  5. Complex network synchronization of chaotic systems with delay coupling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Theesar, S. Jeeva Sathya, E-mail: sjstheesar@gmail.com; Ratnavelu, K., E-mail: sjstheesar@gmail.com [Network Science Research Group, Institute of Mathematical Sciences, University of Malaya, 50603, Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia)

    2014-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

    The study of complex networks enables us to understand the collective behavior of the interconnected elements and provides vast real time applications from biology to laser dynamics. In this paper, synchronization of complex network of chaotic systems has been studied. Every identical node in the complex network is assumed to be in Lur’e system form. In particular, delayed coupling has been assumed along with identical sector bounded nonlinear systems which are interconnected over network topology.

  6. SciTech Connect: Anticipatory Monitoring and Control of Complex...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Anticipatory Monitoring and Control of Complex Systems using a Fuzzy based Fusion of Support Vector Regressors Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Anticipatory Monitoring...

  7. Gordon Assesses Security At Nuclear Weapons Complex News.....

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Anson Franklin, 202586-7371 September 21, 2001 NNSA Administrator Gordon Assesses Security Of the Nuclear Weapons Complex John Gordon, Administrator of the Department of Energy's...

  8. High-Fidelity Simulation of Complex Suspension Flow for Practical...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    to develop a fundamental framework to understand important physical mechanisms that control the flow of such complex fluid systems. Results from this study will advance the...

  9. Identifying Attributes of  Perception of Project Complexity.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rakhman, Eries

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ?? There is a common belief amongst those who are involved in projects that as project complexity increases the difficulty to manage a project increases… (more)

  10. Eco-Friendly Complex Blends into Desert | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    on Nov. 13. Rooftop solar panels provide 27 percent of the facility's energy. Maricopa County officials estimate the complex is 42 percent more energy efficient than many modern...

  11. Understanding Free and Complexed Enzyme Mechanisms and Factors...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Understanding Free and Complexed Enzyme Mechanisms and Factors Contributing to Cell Wall Recalcitrance (Presentation) Re-direct Destination: Fungal free enzymes and bacterial...

  12. The Social Complexity of Renewable Energy Production in the Countryside

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kunze, Conrad; Busch, Henner

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Complexity of Renewable Energy Production in the Countrysidea shift to renewable energy production. Even if politicaldifficulties. Renewable energy production as a new economic

  13. Dynamics of nuclear envelope and nuclear pore complex formation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anderson, Daniel J.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Limited expression of nuclear pore membrane glycoprotein 210suggests cell-type specific nuclear pores in metazoans. Expand Dultz, E. (2008). Nuclear pore complex assembly through

  14. NREL's System Advisor Model Simplifies Complex Energy Analysis...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    NREL's System Advisor Model Simplifies Complex Energy Analysis (Fact Sheet) Re-direct Destination: NREL has developed a tool -- the System Advisor Model (SAM) -- that can help...

  15. acid complexation behavior: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Elicit Complex Attachments Judith Donath To appear in The Encyclopedia of Animal Behavior, edited by Marc Bekoff. Greenwood Press. Artificial pets are robotic toys with...

  16. Optimization Online - On the evaluation complexity of composite ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C Cartis

    2011-02-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Feb 8, 2011 ... On the evaluation complexity of composite function minimization with applications to nonconvex nonlinear programming. C Cartis (coralia.cartis ...

  17. Dynamic Complexity Theory Revisited Volker Weber Thomas Schwentick

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schwentick, Thomas

    Dynamic Complexity Theory Revisited Volker Weber Thomas Schwentick Fachbereich Informatik, Universit¨at Dortmund D-44227 Dortmund, Germany {Volker.Weber,Thomas.Schwentick}@udo.edu Abstract Dynamic

  18. Random complex dynamics and semigroups of holomorphic maps

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sumi, Hiroki

    of polynomials. Under certain conditions these functions T are complex analogues of the devil's staircase, Markov process, rational semigroups, polynomial semigroups, Julia sets, fractal geometry, cooperation

  19. Molybdenum alkylidene complexes : syntheses and applications to olefin metathesis reactions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pilyugina, Tatiana

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Chapter 1. Alkylimido Molybdenum Complexes: Synthesis, Characterization and Activity as Chiral Olefin Metathesis Catalysts. Molybdenum olefin metathesis catalysts that contain previously unexplored aliphatic 1- ...

  20. ICYMI: Y-12 National Security Complex earns national Best Workplaces...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Complex have in common? They (and other local businesses) recently were recognized by Smart Trips, Knox County Mayor Tim Burchett and City of Knoxville Deputy Mayor Eddie...

  1. A note on complexity of multistage stochastic programs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marcus de Mendes C. R. Reaiche

    2014-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Nov 20, 2014 ... A note on complexity of multistage stochastic programs. Marcus de Mendes C. R. Reaiche(mmcr ***at*** impa.br). Abstract: In Shapiro [2006], ...

  2. analysis reveals complexity: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Ancient mitochondrial DNA analysis reveals complexity of indigenous North American turkey) Although the cultural and nutritive importance of the turkey (Meleagris gallopavo) to...

  3. The Social Complexity of Renewable Energy Production in the Countryside

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kunze, Conrad; Busch, Henner

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    development of local renewable energy strategies: The casesin Germany to support renewable energies. Published masterThe Social Complexity of Renewable Energy Production in the

  4. The nascent Coso metamorphic core complex, east-central California...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    complex, east-central California, brittle upper plate structure revealed by reflection seismic data Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal...

  5. Making biomimetic complexes to produce hydrogen fuel | Center...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    biomimetic complexes to produce hydrogen fuel 4 Nov 2012 Souvik Roy, graduate student (Subtask 3, laboratory of Anne Jones). "I am involved mostly in mimicking Fe-hydrogenases,...

  6. 18.112 Functions of a Complex Variable, Fall 2005

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Helgason, Sigurdur, 1927-

    The basic properties of functions of one complex variable. Cauchy's theorem, holomorphic and meromorphic functions, residues, contour integrals, conformal mapping. Infinite series and products, the gamma function, the ...

  7. 18.112 Functions of a Complex Variable, Fall 2006

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Helgason, Sigurdur, 1927-

    The basic properties of functions of one complex variable. Cauchy's theorem, holomorphic and meromorphic functions, residues, contour integrals, conformal mapping. Infinite series and products, the gamma function, the ...

  8. NREL's System Advisor Model Simplifies Complex Energy Analysis...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    diversifying. In addition to fossil fuel- based power, decision makers can choose among solar, wind, and geothermal technologies as well. Each of these technologies has complex...

  9. activated prothrombin complex: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Information Sciences Websites Summary: A COMPLEX DATA METHOD TO COMPUTE FMRI ACTIVATION Daniel B. Rowe Department of Biophysics Medical. Nearly all fMRI studies derive functional...

  10. A framework for quantifying complexity and understanding its sources : application to tow large-scale systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martin, Pierre-Alain J. Y

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The motivation for this work is to quantify the complexity of complex systems and to understand its sources. To study complexity, we develop a theoretical framework where the complex system of interest is embedded in a ...

  11. Deactivation of the EBR-II complex

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michelbacher, J.A.; Earle, O.K.; Henslee, S.P. [and others

    1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    In January of 1994, the Department of Energy mandated the termination of the Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) Program, effective October 1, 1994. To comply with this decision, Argonne National Laboratory-West (ANL-W) prepared a plan providing detailed requirements to place the Experimental Breeder Reactor-II (EBR-II) in a radiologically and industrially safe condition, including removal of all irradiated fuel assemblies from the reactor plant, and removal and stabilization of the primary and secondary sodium, a liquid metal used to transfer heat within the reactor plant. The ultimate goal of the deactivation process is to place the EBR-II complex in a stable condition until a decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) plan can be prepared, thereby minimizing requirements for maintenance and surveillance and maximizing the amount of time for radioactive decay. The final closure state will be achieved in full compliance with federal, state and local environmental, safety, and health regulations and requirements. The decision to delay the development of a detailed D&D plan has necessitated this current action. The EBR-II is a pool-type reactor. The primary system contains approximately 87,000 gallons of sodium, while the secondary system has 13,000 gallons. In order to properly dispose of the sodium in compliance with the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA), a facility has been built to react the sodium to a dry carbonate powder in a two stage process. Deactivation of a liquid metal fast breeder reactor (LMFBR) presents unique concerns. Residual amounts of sodium remaining in the primary and secondary systems must be either reacted or inerted to preclude future concerns with sodium-air reactions that generate explosive mixtures of hydrogen and leave corrosive compounds. Residual amounts of sodium on components will effectively {open_quotes}solder{close_quotes} components in place, making future operation or removal unfeasible.

  12. Low-complexity Video Encoding for UAV Reconnaissance and Surveillance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liebling, Michael

    Low-complexity Video Encoding for UAV Reconnaissance and Surveillance Malavika Bhaskaranand-complexity decoder. However, applications such as unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) reconnaissance and surveillance in the video sequences is due to the movement of the UAV and the camera mounts which is known. Motivated

  13. RANDOMNESS IN PROOF COMPLEXITY Joshua Buresh-Oppenheim

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Penn, Gerald

    RANDOMNESS IN PROOF COMPLEXITY by Joshua Buresh-Oppenheim A thesis submitted in conformity of Toronto Copyright c 2005 by Joshua Buresh-Oppenheim #12;Abstract Randomness in Proof Complexity Joshua Buresh-Oppenheim Doctor of Philosophy Graduate Department of Computer Science University of Toronto 2005

  14. Diagnosis and prognosis for the maintenance of complex systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pencolé, Yannick

    --Diagnosis, prognosis, preventive maintenance, complex systems. I. INTRODUCTION Nowadays, system maintenance is a key to decrease the maintenance cost, it is necessary to perform preventive maintenance [3], [4], [5] which alsoDiagnosis and prognosis for the maintenance of complex systems Pauline Ribot1,2 , Yannick Pencol´e1

  15. Technology Infusion for Complex Systems: A Framework and Case Study*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Weck, Olivier L.

    Technology Infusion for Complex Systems: A Framework and Case Study* Eun Suk Suh,1, Michael R Avenue, Cambridge, MA 02139TECHNOLOGY INFUSION FOR COMPLEX SYSTEMS: CASE STUDY Received 1 July 2008 in today's competitive environment constantly need to develop new technolo- gies and infuse them

  16. Bayesian Networks and Evidence Theory to Model Complex Systems Reliability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Bayesian Networks and Evidence Theory to Model Complex Systems Reliability Ch. SIMON, Ph. WEBER, E.levrat}@cran.uhp-nancy.fr Abstract-- This paper deals with the use of Bayesian Net- works to compute system reliability of complex systems un- der epistemic uncertainty. In the context of incompleteness of reliability data

  17. Complex Embedded Automotive Control Systems DaimlerChrysler

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Duffy, Ken

    Complex Embedded Automotive Control Systems CEMACS DaimlerChrysler SINTEF Glasgow University Description The high level of complexity in automotive systems requires a new approach to design. Moreover, to achieve higher performance and increased safety a coordination of different automotive control systems

  18. The Structure of Complex Networks Sune Lehmann Jrgensen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The Structure of Complex Networks Sune Lehmann Jørgensen Kgs. Lyngby February 2007 IMM-PHD-2007-176 #12;ii The Structure of Complex Networks Version: June 19, 2007 22:27 Sune Lehmann Jørgensen 2007 #12, 2007 22:27 Sune Lehmann Jørgensen 2007 #12;List of Figures 1.1 A network of 300 nodes

  19. An Innovative Framework Supporting SME Networks for Complex Product Manufacturing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    An Innovative Framework Supporting SME Networks for Complex Product Manufacturing Luis Maia.kankaanpaa@uwasa.fi, ahsh@uwasa.fi Abstract. Current market dynamics require European SME's to focus on complex products collaboration processes and supporting ICT tools. This paper presents a framework to support SME

  20. On the Complexity of Umbra and Penumbra O. Devillers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    On the Complexity of Umbra and Penumbra J. Demouth O. Devillers H. Everett M. Glisse ¶ S of non-point light sources. A point is in the umbra if it does not see any part of any light source of the umbra. In this paper we prove various bounds on the complexity of the umbra and the penumbra cast

  1. Complexity, Capacity, and Capture Nolan McCarty

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    financial markets and products are so complex that outgunned agencies lack the capacity to detect systemicComplexity, Capacity, and Capture Nolan McCarty July 13, 2011 Susan Dod Brown Professor: nmccarty@princeton.edu #12;1 Introduction In the debates on financial market reform that followed

  2. CONDENSING COMPUTABLE SCENES USING VISUAL COMPLEXITY AND FILM SYNTAX ANALYSIS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chang, Shih-Fu

    CONDENSING COMPUTABLE SCENES USING VISUAL COMPLEXITY AND FILM SYNTAX ANALYSIS Hari Sundaram Shih, sfchang}@ctr.columbia.edu ABSTRACT In this paper, we present a novel algorithm to condense computable, lighting and sound. We attempt to condense such scenes in two ways. First, we define visual complexity

  3. Visual Design of Service Deployment in Complex Physical Environments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Celentano, Augusto

    Visual Design of Service Deployment in Complex Physical Environments Augusto Celentano and Fabio for in- teractive services in complex physical environments using a knowl- edge based approach to define the relations between the environ- ment and the services, and a visual interface to check the associated

  4. Rigorous Synthesis and Simulation of Complex Distillation Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Linninger, Andreas A.

    energy-efficient distillation net- works. Complex column networks have substantial potential for energy- thesizing such complex energy-efficient networks. A robust feasibility criterion drives the selection foundations of se st in exploring energy-efficient distillatin exploring energy-efficient distillat ave

  5. Management of the Department of Energy Nuclear Weapons Complex

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2005-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The Order defines and affirms the authorities and responsibilities of the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) for the management of the Department of Energy Nuclear Weapons Complex and emphasizes that the management of the United States nuclear weapons stockpile is the DOE's highest priority for the NNSA and the DOE Nuclear Weapons Complex. Cancels DOE O 5600.1.

  6. Representing Topological Relationships between Complex Regions by F-Histograms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Matsakis, Pascal

    Representing Topological Relationships between Complex Regions by F-Histograms Lukasz Wawrzyniak between two regions in terms of the thirteen Allen relations. An index to measure the complexity Work in the modeling of topological relationships often relies on an extension into the spatial domain

  7. Interactive Visibility Culling in Complex Environments using Occlusion-Switches

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    North Carolina at Chapel Hill, University of

    Categories and Subject Descriptors: I.3.5 [Com- puter Graphics]: Computational Geometry and Object ModelingInteractive Visibility Culling in Complex Environments using Occlusion-Switches Naga K. Govindaraju culling in complex 3D environments. An occlusion- switch consists of two GPUs (graphics processing units

  8. Within architectural design a large variety of complex shaped

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Langendoen, Koen

    architecture with complex geometry brings along new challenges for manufacturers of building componentsWithin architectural design a large variety of complex shaped buildings can be found. Free form nowadays allows for modelling of almost any possible shape. With these tools designers can structures

  9. Large-eddy simulation of multiphase flows in complex combustors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mahesh, Krishnan

    Large-eddy simulation of multiphase flows in complex combustors S. V. Apte1 , K. Mahesh2 , F. Ham1 to accurately predict reacting multi-phase flows in practical combustors involving complex physical phenomena-turbine combustor geometries to evaluate the predictions made for multiphase, turbulent flow. 1 Introduction

  10. Rendering Optical Effects Based on Spectra Representation in Complex Scenes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Rendering Optical Effects Based on Spectra Representation in Complex Scenes Weiming Dong Project ALICE, INRIA Lorraine/Loria, France Weiming.Dong@loria.fr Abstract. Rendering the structural color sensitive phenomena. Achieving the rendering of complex scenes with both the full spectra and RGB light

  11. IT Complexity Revolution: Intelligent Tools for the Globalised World Development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    IT Complexity Revolution: Intelligent Tools for the Globalised World Development Andrei Kirilyuk be used as a basis for the latter, in the form of "complexity revolution" in information systems-driven IT to various aspects of post-industrial civilisation dynamics, including intelligent communication, context

  12. The Standard Parts Problem and the Complexity of Control Communication

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baillieul, John

    1 The Standard Parts Problem and the Complexity of Control Communication J. Baillieul & W.S. Wong Abstract The objective of the standard parts optimal control problem is to find a number, m, of control on control communication complexity. In what follows a general formulation of the standard parts optimization

  13. Hengill geothermal volcanic complex (Iceland) characterized by integrated geophysical observations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Hengill geothermal volcanic complex (Iceland) characterized by integrated geophysical observations be used to infer the location of magma chambers or productive geothermal areas. The Hengill volcanic triple-junction complex has a well-developed geothermal system, which is being exploited to extract hot

  14. Lost in the Bermuda Triangle: Energy, Complexity, and Performance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Albonesi, David H.

    · Exotic cooling techniques · e.g. spray-evaporative cooling · Packaging cost and cooling requirements · Verification · Risk · Static vs. Dynamic logic · Verification time · Cooling requirements · Competitiveness... to reduce complexity? #12;Design Complexity Aggressive implementation techniques (speculation, O-o-O, etc

  15. FIRST PRINCIPLES MODELING FOR LIDAR SENSING OF COMPLEX ICE SURFACES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kerekes, John

    FIRST PRINCIPLES MODELING FOR LIDAR SENSING OF COMPLEX ICE SURFACES J. Kerekes, A. Goodenough, S of monitoring the dynamics and mass balance of glaciers, ice caps, and ice sheets. However, it is also known that ice surfaces can have complex 3-dimensional structure, which can challenge their accurate retrieval

  16. On the Complexity of Finding Second-Best Abductive Explanations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liberatore, Paolo

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    While looking for abductive explanations of a given set of manifestations, an ordering between possible solutions is often assumed. The complexity of finding/verifying optimal solutions is already known. In this paper we consider the computational complexity of finding second-best solutions. We consider different orderings, and consider also different possible definitions of what a second-best solution is.

  17. Metal complexes of substituted Gable porphyrins as oxidation catalysts

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lyons, James E. (Wallingford, PA); Ellis, Jr., Paul E. (Downingtown, PA); Wagner, Richard W. (Murrysville, PA)

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Transition metal complexes of Gable porphyrins having two porphyrin rings connected through a linking group, and having on the porphyrin rings electron-withdrawing groups, such as halogen, nitro or cyano. These complexes are useful as catalysts for the oxidation of organic compounds, e.g. alkanes.

  18. Metal complexes of substituted Gable porphyrins as oxidation catalysts

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lyons, J.E.; Ellis, P.E. Jr.; Wagner, R.W.

    1996-01-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Transition metal complexes of Gable porphyrins are disclosed having two porphyrin rings connected through a linking group, and having on the porphyrin rings electron-withdrawing groups, such as halogen, nitro or cyano. These complexes are useful as catalysts for the oxidation of organic compounds, e.g. alkanes.

  19. On the benefits of an integrated nuclear complex for Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blink, J.A. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Las Vegas, NV (United States); Halsey, W.G. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An integrated nuclear complex is proposed for location at the Nevada Test Site. In addition to solving the nuclear waste disposal problem, this complex would tremendously enhance the southern Nevada economy, and it would provide low cost electricity to each resident and business in the affected counties. Nuclear industry and the national economy would benefit because the complex would demonstrate the new generation of safer nuclear power plants and revitalize the industry. Many spin-offs of the complex would be possible, including research into nuclear fusion and a world class medical facility for southern Nevada. For such a complex to become a reality, the cycle of distrust between the federal government and the State of Nevada must be broken. The paper concludes with a discussion of implementation through a public process led by state officials and culminating in a voter referendum.

  20. A QUALITATIVE METHOD TO ESTIMATE HSI DISPLAY COMPLEXITY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jacques Hugo; David Gertman

    2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    There is mounting evidence that complex computer system displays in control rooms contribute to cognitive complexity and, thus, to the probability of human error. Research shows that reaction time increases and response accuracy decreases as the number of elements in the display screen increase. However, in terms of supporting the control room operator, approaches focusing on addressing display complexity solely in terms of information density and its location and patterning, will fall short of delivering a properly designed interface. This paper argues that information complexity and semantic complexity are mandatory components when considering display complexity and that the addition of these concepts assists in understanding and resolving differences between designers and the preferences and performance of operators. This paper concludes that a number of simplified methods, when combined, can be used to estimate the impact that a particular display may have on the operator's ability to perform a function accurately and effectively. We present a mixed qualitative and quantitative approach and a method for complexity estimation.

  1. Calorimetric studies of curium complexation. 2. Amino carboxylates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Choppin, G.R.; Rizkalla, E.N.; Sullivan, J.C.

    1987-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Calorimetric titrations using the long-lived isotope of curium (curium-248) have been conducted with nitrilotriacetate, trans-1,2-cyclohexanedinitrilotetraacetate, and trimethylenedinitrilotetraacetate. The data plus the stability constants measured previously allowed calculations of the thermodynamic parameters of the 1:1 complexation. Similar titrations were conducted with europium to provide comparison of the lanthanide and actinide trivalent ion behaviors. The enthalpy values for the amino polycarboxylate complexing of Cm(III) are greater than those for Eu(III). However, the entropy values for the complexing of both cations are similar. These results are comparable to the previously reported data for EDTA. 13 references, 2 figures, 3 tables.

  2. Complexity measures applied to an applications case study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brice, L.; Connell, J.L.

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Maintenance of large applications programs has become the most costly function of many Management Information Systems. As a result, recent research has attempted to objectively determine the qualities of low maintenance software. Related research has been directed toward quantifying the complexity, or unmaintainability of existing software. This paper will reference a case study of a large MIS software application and will discuss current maintenance problems and associated costs. A mathematical model will then be presented which correlates quantifiable complexity measures with actual maintenance costs. Finally, a method for projecting cost savings from the reduced complexity of software will be suggested.

  3. Quantum communication complexity advantage implies violation of a Bell inequality

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harry Buhrman; Lukasz Czekaj; Andrzej Grudka; Michal Horodecki; Pawel Horodecki; Marcin Markiewicz; Florian Speelman; Sergii Strelchuk

    2015-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

    We obtain a general connection between a quantum advantage in communication complexity and non-locality. We show that given any protocol offering a (sufficiently large) quantum advantage in communication complexity, there exists a way of obtaining measurement statistics which violate some Bell inequality. Our main tool is port-based teleportation. If the gap between quantum and classical communication complexity can grow arbitrarily large, the ratio of the quantum value to the classical value of the Bell quantity becomes unbounded with the increase in the number of inputs and outputs.

  4. Luminescent cyclometallated iridium(III) complexes having acetylide ligands

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Thompson, Mark E.; Bossi, Alberto; Djurovich, Peter Ivan

    2014-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention relates to phosphorescent (triplet-emitting) organometallic materials. The phosphorescent materials of the present invention comprise Ir(III)cyclometallated alkynyl complexes for use as triplet light-emitting materials. The Ir(III)cyclometallated alkynyl complexes comprise at least one cyclometallating ligand and at least one alkynyl ligand bonded to the iridium. Also provided is an organic light emitting device comprising an anode, a cathode and an emissive layer between the anode and the cathode, wherein the emissive layer comprises a Ir(III)cyclometallated alkynyl complex as a triplet emitting material.

  5. Thermally unstable complexants: Stability of lanthanide/actinide complexes, thermal instability of the ligands, and applications in actinide separations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nash, K.L.; Rickert, P.G.

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Water soluble complexing agents are commonly used in separations to enhance the selectivity of both ion exchange and solvent extraction processes. Applications of this type in the treatment of nuclear wastes using conventional complexing agents have found mixed success due to the nature of the complexants. In addition, the residual solutions containing these species have led to potentially serious complications in waste storage. To overcome some of the limitations of carboxylic acid and aminopolycarboxylate ligands, we have initiated a program to investigate the complexing ability, thermal/oxidative instability, and separation potential of a group of water soluble organophosphorus compounds which we call Thermally Unstable Complexants, or simply TUCS. Complexants of this type appear to be superior to conventional analogues in a number of respects. In this report, we will summarize our research to date on the actinide/lanthanide complexes with a series of substituted methanediphosphonic acids, the kinetics of their oxidative decomposition, and a few applications which have been developed for their use. 17 refs., 5 figs., 3 tab.

  6. 27 de Octubre de 2010 U N I V E R S I D A D

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bernabé García, Gregorio

    MERCED (DERECHO Y LETRAS) MESA ELECTORAL N 2: FACULTAD DE QUIMICA MESA ELECTORAL N 8: ECONOMIA Y EMPRESA E INFORMATICA MESA ELECTORAL N 2: FACULTAD DE QUIMICA MESA ELECTORAL N 3: AULARIO MERCED (DERECHO Y MESA ELECTORAL N 2: FACULTAD DE QUIMICA MESA ELECTORAL N 3: AULARIO MERCED (DERECHO Y LETRAS) MESA

  7. MESA 2007MESA 2007MESA 2007MESA 2007 Panel :Before Nationalism: Land and Loyalty in the Middle EastPanel :Before Nationalism: Land and Loyalty in the Middle EastPanel :Before Nationalism: Land and Loyalty in the Middle EastPanel :Before Nationalism: Land

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Nationalism". The title of Baki Tezcan's article is "The developpement of the use of Kurdistan to the attribution of the name Kurdistan to a region of eastern Anatolia under relative ottoman domination. For instance Tezcan argues "that the geographical name Kurdistan, or the land of the Kurds (literally the place

  8. EIS-0472: Uranium Leasing Program, Mesa, Montrose, and San Miguel Counties, Colorado

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EIS evaluated the potential environmental impacts of management alternatives for DOE’s Uranium Leasing Program, under which DOE administers tracts of land in western Colorado for exploration, development, and the extraction of uranium and vanadium ores.

  9. Mesa Verde Pueblo IIIMesa Verde Pueblo III AD 1150 to 1300

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wolverton, Steve

    move to defensive locations · Sunk costs? www nps govwww.nps.gov #12;Material CultureMaterial Culture www.crowcanyon.org #12;Sunk Costs? gambling beyond reasonSunk Costs? gambling beyond reason #12;The Sunk Cost DilemmaThe Sunk Cost Dilemma · Having to choose between g 1) continuing a project

  10. Analysis of 2009 International Energy Conservation Code Requirements for Residential Buildings in Mesa, Arizona

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lucas, Robert G.

    2011-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The 2009 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) contains several major improvements in energy efficiency over the 2006 IECC and the 2003 IECC. The notable changes are: (1) Improved duct sealing verified by testing the duct system; (2) Increased duct insulation; (3) Improvement of window U-factors from 0.40 to 0.35; and (4) Efficient lighting requirements. An analysis of these changes resulted in estimated annual energy cost savings of $145 a year for an average new house compared to the 2003 IECC. This energy cost saving decreases to $125 a year for the 2009 IECC compared to the 2006 IECC. Construction cost increases (per home) for complying with the 2009 IECC are estimated at $1256 relative to the 2003 IECC and $800 for 2006 IECC. Home owners will experience an annual cost savings of about $80 a year by complying with the 2009 IECC because reduction to energy bills will more than compensate for increased mortgage payments and other costs.

  11. The Hopi and the Black Mesa: An Argument for Protection of Sacred Water Sites

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grimes, Tamisha

    2008-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Numerous studies have documented the dropping water levels in Hopi sacred springs. From 1966 to 2005, Peabody Coal Mining Company has continually used the water located directly under the Hopi reservation. The use of water for religious and cultural...

  12. Deep gas plays are persuading companies like Getty and Mesa petroleum to invest in lease acquisitions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mickey, V.

    1981-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Much of the big money being spent in the Permian Basin may be going to elaborate tertiary projects for improved oil recovery, but the deep natural gas reserves in the Delaware Basin continue to draw the big drilling and leasing dollars. According to the petroleum information's Rotary Report of late April 1981, Texas Railroad Commission district No. 8 in west Texas had 148 rigs running. Of those, 60 were in a 4-county area of Loving, Pecos, Ward, and Reeves Counties. Thirty-four of those rigs in that area were drilling to objectives below 15,000 ft. In the March University Lands Lease Auction, high dollars were directed to portions of west Texas that include the Delaware Basin.

  13. AN OVERVIEW OF CULTURAL RESOURCES ON PAHUTE AND RAINIER MESAS ON THE

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarlyEnergyDepartmentNationalRestart of the Review of theOFFICEACME | National Nuclear

  14. Ogilby Mesa, CA Natural Gas Pipeline Imports From Mexico (Dollars per

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2007 10,998 9,933 10,998 10,643 10,998through 1996) inDecadeDecade Year-0Year Jan Feb MarThousand Cubic

  15. Ogilby Mesa, CA Natural Gas Pipeline Imports From Mexico (Dollars per

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2007 10,998 9,933 10,998 10,643 10,998through 1996) inDecadeDecade Year-0Year Jan Feb MarThousand

  16. Ogilby Mesa, CA Natural Gas Pipeline Imports From Mexico (Million Cubic

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2007 10,998 9,933 10,998 10,643 10,998through 1996) inDecadeDecade Year-0Year Jan Feb MarThousandFeet)

  17. Ogilby Mesa, CA Natural Gas Pipeline Imports From Mexico (Million Cubic

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2007 10,998 9,933 10,998 10,643 10,998through 1996) inDecadeDecade Year-0Year Jan Feb

  18. Otay Mesa, CA Liquefied Natural Gas Exports Price (Dollars per Thousand

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2007 10,998 9,933 10,998 10,643 10,998through 1996)Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2Feet)ThousandCubic

  19. Otay Mesa, CA Liquefied Natural Gas Exports Price (Dollars per Thousand

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2007 10,998 9,933 10,998 10,643 10,998through 1996)Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2Feet)ThousandCubicCubic

  20. Otay Mesa, CA Liquefied Natural Gas Exports to Mexico (Dollars per Thousand

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2007 10,998 9,933 10,998 10,643 10,998through 1996)Decade Year-0 Year-1

  1. Otay Mesa, CA Liquefied Natural Gas Exports to Mexico (Dollars per Thousand

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2007 10,998 9,933 10,998 10,643 10,998through 1996)Decade Year-0 Year-1Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr

  2. Otay Mesa, CA Liquefied Natural Gas Exports to Mexico (Million Cubic Feet)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2007 10,998 9,933 10,998 10,643 10,998through 1996)Decade Year-0 Year-1Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar

  3. Otay Mesa, CA Natural Gas Pipeline Exports to Mexico (Dollars per Thousand

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2007 10,998 9,933 10,998 10,643 10,998through 1996)Decade Year-0 Year-1Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb

  4. Otay Mesa, CA Natural Gas Pipeline Exports to Mexico (Dollars per Thousand

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2007 10,998 9,933 10,998 10,643 10,998through 1996)Decade Year-0 Year-1Cubic Feet) Year Jan FebCubic

  5. Otay Mesa, CA Natural Gas Pipeline Exports to Mexico (Million Cubic Feet)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2007 10,998 9,933 10,998 10,643 10,998through 1996)Decade Year-0 Year-1Cubic Feet) Year Jan

  6. Otay Mesa, CA Natural Gas Pipeline Exports to Mexico (Million Cubic Feet)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2007 10,998 9,933 10,998 10,643 10,998through 1996)Decade Year-0 Year-1Cubic Feet) Year JanYear Jan Feb

  7. Otay Mesa, CA Natural Gas Pipeline Imports Price from Mexico (Dollars per

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2007 10,998 9,933 10,998 10,643 10,998through 1996)Decade Year-0 Year-1Cubic Feet) Year JanYear Jan

  8. Otay Mesa, CA Natural Gas Pipeline Imports Price from Mexico (Dollars per

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2007 10,998 9,933 10,998 10,643 10,998through 1996)Decade Year-0 Year-1Cubic Feet) Year JanYear

  9. Otay Mesa, CA Natural Gas Pipeline Imports from Mexico (Million Cubic Feet)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2007 10,998 9,933 10,998 10,643 10,998through 1996)Decade Year-0 Year-1Cubic Feet) Year JanYearDecade

  10. Otay Mesa, CA Natural Gas Pipeline Imports from Mexico (Million Cubic Feet)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2007 10,998 9,933 10,998 10,643 10,998through 1996)Decade Year-0 Year-1Cubic Feet) Year

  11. NE-23 Elimination of the Chupadera Mesa and Los Alamos County Industrial Waste

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarlyEnergyDepartment ofDepartment ofof EnergyYou$0.C. 20545*.MSE Cores TubaySite,N"I. L-S-hiAM?

  12. SUMMARY REPORT For MONITORTNG AND MITIGATlON OF MESA VERDE CACTUS

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarlyEnergyDepartment ofDepartment ofof EnergyYou$0.C. 20545*.MSE&.17-August 20030SUMMARY REPORT

  13. E-Print Network 3.0 - analysis mesa decision Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Engineering 24 Interaction of hot spots and terahertz waves in Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8 intrinsic Josephson junction stacks of various geometry Summary: is monitored by small detector...

  14. A Geomorphological Assessment of Armored Deposits Along the Southern Flanks of Grand Mesa, CO, USA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brunk, Timothy J.

    2011-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

    ................................................................................................. 89 REFERENCES .......................................................................................................... 95 APPENDIX A: ANALYSIS OF GRAIN-SIZE DATA ............................................ 101 VITA... annual precipitation of 34.01 cm (13.39 in.). The highest average temperatures occur between June to August with a maximum of 31.3o C (88.3o F) in July. The lowest average temperatures occur between December to February with a minimum of -9.5o C (14...

  15. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Chupadera Mesa NM Site - NM 04

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarlyEnergyDepartment ofDepartment ofof EnergyYou areDowntown Site -MiamiYVEBurris ParkAlaskaSouth

  16. Otay Mesa, CA Natural Gas Pipeline Exports to Mexico (Million Cubic Feet)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines About U.S.30Natural Gas,095,3628,527 9,029 8,794Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar

  17. Otay Mesa, CA Natural Gas Pipeline Imports from Mexico (Million Cubic Feet)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines About U.S.30Natural Gas,095,3628,527 9,029 8,794Cubic Feet) Year Jan FebYear Jan Feb

  18. Earth Tidal Analysis At East Mesa Geothermal Area (1984) | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revision has beenFfe2fb55-352f-473b-a2dd-50ae8b27f0a6 No revision hasESE Alcohol Jump to:EXARGeothermal

  19. Ogilby Mesa, CA Natural Gas Pipeline Imports From Mexico (Million Cubic

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelinesProved ReservesFeet) Year JanProduction 4 12 7311,925Count)Thousand CubicFeet)

  20. GREEN FUNCTIONS ASSOCIATED TO COMPLEX REFLECTION GROUPS, II

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shoj, Toshiaki

    GREEN FUNCTIONS ASSOCIATED TO COMPLEX REFLECTION GROUPS, II University of Tokyo Noda, Chiba 278-8510, Japan Abstract. Green functions and Hall-Littlewoo* *d functions associated to W are introduced, and Green functions are described

  1. accrued complex gamma: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Sie, da? g p n Gamma Grassl, Markus 8 A Complexity-Brightness Correlation in Gamma Ray Bursts Astrophysics (arXiv) Summary: We observe strong correlations between the...

  2. Synthesis, Characterization, and Cytotoxicity of Platinum(IV) Carbamate Complexes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wilson, Justin Jeff

    The synthesis, characterization, and cytotoxicity of eight new platinum(IV) complexes having the general formula cis,cis,trans-[Pt(NH[subscript 3)[subscript 2]Cl[subscript 2](O[subscript 2]CNHR)[subscript 2

  3. Machine perception and learning of complex social systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eagle, Nathan Norfleet

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The study of complex social systems has traditionally been an arduous process, involving extensive surveys, interviews, ethnographic studies, or analysis of online behavior. Today, however, it is possible to use the ...

  4. Tuning the photophysical properties of amidophosphine complexes of copper

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mickenberg, Seth F. (Seth Fox)

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A series of monomeric copper complexes that allow for the tuning of the emission properties is reported. Luminescence lifetimes up to 150 [mu]s are observed in benzene solution at ambient temperature, which are comparable ...

  5. Photochemical reductive elimination of halogen from transition metal complexes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cook, Timothy R. (Timothy Raymond), 1982-

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis is focused on the synthesis and study of transition metal complexes that undergo halogen elimination when irradiated with UV and visible light. This chemistry is relevant for solar energy storage schemes in ...

  6. Identification of simultaneous U(VI) sorption complexes and U...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    conditions under which U (VI)-CO3-Ca complexes inhibit U reduction. Citation: Singer DM, SME Chatman, ES Ilton, KM Rosso, JF Banfield, and G Waychunas.2012."Identification of...

  7. Method and system for producing complex-shape objects

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jeantette, Francisco P. (Albuquerque, NM); Keicher, David M. (Albuquerque, NM); Romero, Joseph A. (Albuquerque, NM); Schanwald, Lee P. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method and system are provided for producing complex, three-dimensional, net shape objects from a variety of powdered materials. The system includes unique components to ensure a uniform and continuous flow of powdered materials as well as to focus and locate the flow of powdered materials with respect to a laser beam which results in the melting of the powdered material. The system also includes a controller so that the flow of molten powdered materials can map out and form complex, three-dimensional, net-shape objects by layering the molten powdered material. Advantageously, such complex, three-dimensional net-shape objects can be produced having material densities varying from 90% of theoretical to fully dense, as well as a variety of controlled physical properties. Additionally, such complex, three-dimensional objects can be produced from two or more different materials so that the composition of the object can be transitioned from one material to another.

  8. Analysis of macromolecules, ligands and macromolecule-ligand complexes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Von Dreele, Robert B. (Los Alamos, NM)

    2008-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for determining atomic level structures of macromolecule-ligand complexes through high-resolution powder diffraction analysis and a method for providing suitable microcrystalline powder for diffraction analysis are provided. In one embodiment, powder diffraction data is collected from samples of polycrystalline macromolecule and macromolecule-ligand complex and the refined structure of the macromolecule is used as an approximate model for a combined Rietveld and stereochemical restraint refinement of the macromolecule-ligand complex. A difference Fourier map is calculated and the ligand position and points of interaction between the atoms of the macromolecule and the atoms of the ligand can be deduced and visualized. A suitable polycrystalline sample of macromolecule-ligand complex can be produced by physically agitating a mixture of lyophilized macromolecule, ligand and a solvent.

  9. Integrating Bioprocesses into Industrial Complexes for Sustainable Development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pike, Ralph W.

    Integrating Bioprocesses into Industrial Complexes for Sustainable Development Debalina Sengupta1 77710 #12;Introduc)on · Sustainable Development · Overview · Biomass conversion designs "Sustainable development is development that meets the needs of the present without

  10. Automatic testing of software with structurally complex inputs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marinov, Darko, 1976-

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Modern software pervasively uses structurally complex data such as linked data structures. The standard approach to generating test suites for such software, manual generation of the inputs in the suite, is tedious and ...

  11. Mechanistic kinetic modeling of the hydrocracking of complex feedstocks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kumar, Hans

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Two separate mechanistic kinetic models have been developed for the hydrocracking of complex feedstocks. The first model is targeted for the hydrocracking of vacuum gas oil. The second one addresses specifically the hydrocracking of long...

  12. Modelling the transition to complex, culturally transmitted communication 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ritchie, Graham R S

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Human language is undoubtedly one of the most complex and powerful communication systems to have evolved on Earth. Study of the evolution of this behaviour is made difficult by the lack of comparable communication systems ...

  13. Quantum interference within the complex quantum Hamilton-Jacobi formalism

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chou, Chia-Chun, E-mail: chiachun@mail.utexas.ed [Institute for Theoretical Chemistry and Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX 78712 (United States); Sanz, Angel S., E-mail: asanz@imaff.cfmac.csic.e [Instituto de Fisica Fundamental, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas, Serrano 123, 28006 Madrid (Spain); Miret-Artes, Salvador, E-mail: s.miret@imaff.cfmac.csic.e [Instituto de Fisica Fundamental, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas, Serrano 123, 28006 Madrid (Spain); Wyatt, Robert E., E-mail: wyattre@mail.utexas.ed [Institute for Theoretical Chemistry and Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX 78712 (United States)

    2010-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Quantum interference is investigated within the complex quantum Hamilton-Jacobi formalism. As shown in a previous work [Phys. Rev. Lett. 102 (2009) 250401], complex quantum trajectories display helical wrapping around stagnation tubes and hyperbolic deflection near vortical tubes, these structures being prominent features of quantum caves in space-time Argand plots. Here, we further analyze the divergence and vorticity of the quantum momentum function along streamlines near poles, showing the intricacy of the complex dynamics. Nevertheless, despite this behavior, we show that the appearance of the well-known interference features (on the real axis) can be easily understood in terms of the rotation of the nodal line in the complex plane. This offers a unified description of interference as well as an elegant and practical method to compute the lifetime for interference features, defined in terms of the average wrapping time, i.e., considering such features as a resonant process.

  14. Mathematics of complexity in experimental high energy physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    H. C. Eggers

    2005-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Mathematical ideas and approaches common in complexity-related fields have been fruitfully applied in experimental high energy physics also. We briefly review some of the cross-pollination that is occurring.

  15. Analysing complexity of XML Schemas in geospatial web services

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tamayo, Alain; Huerta, Joaquín

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    XML Schema is the language used to define the structure of messages exchanged between OGC-based web service clients and providers. The size of these schemas has been growing with time, reaching a state that makes its understanding and effective application a hard task. A first step to cope with this situation is to provide different ways to measure the complexity of the schemas. In this regard, we present in this paper an analysis of the complexity of XML schemas in OGC web services. We use a group of metrics found in the literature and introduce new metrics to measure size and/or complexity of these schemas. The use of adequate metrics allows us to quantify the complexity, quality and other properties of the schemas, which can be very useful in different scenarios.

  16. Mapping complexity sources in nuclear power plant domains

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sasangohar, Farzan

    Understanding the sources of complexity in advanced Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) control rooms and their effects on human reliability is critical for ensuring safe performance of both operators and the entire system. New ...

  17. An integrated strategic sourcing process for complex systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hsu, David T. (David Ta-wei)

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Aerospace firms continue to outsource increasingly complex components and systems for access to talent, lower costs, and global presence. In addition to strong competition from Airbus and other emergent companies, Boeing ...

  18. Cyclodextrin Cuprate Sandwich-Type Complexes Abdulaziz A. Bagabas,*,,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    porosity of these new complexes. Carbon dioxide (CO2) adsorption studies show that the extended structure, obtained upon crystallization of the Rb+ -based sandwich-type dimers, has the highest CO2 sequestration

  19. Efficient Complex Query Support for Multiversion XML Documents

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Donghui

    management system supporting multiple versions of the same document, while avoiding duplicate storage taken by database systems and document management systems have often been different, because complex queries, while document management systems are not, and ­ Databases assume that the order

  20. High capacity stabilized complex hydrides for hydrogen storage

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Zidan, Ragaiy; Mohtadi, Rana F; Fewox, Christopher; Sivasubramanian, Premkumar

    2014-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Complex hydrides based on Al(BH.sub.4).sub.3 are stabilized by the presence of one or more additional metal elements or organic adducts to provide high capacity hydrogen storage material.

  1. Computational design of a theater complex for Boston

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Braude, Talia, 1973-

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The design of a theater complex for Boston is used as a test case for the more integrated use of computers in the design process. In architecture digital media remain mostly tools for efficiency and productivity rather ...

  2. Probabilistic Learning Theory, with Emphasis on Sample Complexity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bielefeld, University of

    of computational complexity. This part of the paper is an adaptation of parts of the book (Anthony and Biggs (1992)) by Norman Biggs and the present author; we refer the interested reader there for a more wide

  3. Organic light-emitting diodes from homoleptic square planar complexes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Omary, Mohammad A

    2013-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Homoleptic square planar complexes [M(N.LAMBDA.N).sub.2], wherein two identical N.LAMBDA.N bidentate anionic ligands are coordinated to the M(II) metal center, including bidentate square planar complexes of triazolates, possess optical and electrical properties that make them useful for a wide variety of optical and electrical devices and applications. In particular, the complexes are useful for obtaining white or monochromatic organic light-emitting diodes ("OLEDs"). Improved white organic light emitting diode ("WOLED") designs have improved efficacy and/or color stability at high brightness in single- or two-emitter white or monochrome OLEDs that utilize homoleptic square planar complexes, including bis[3,5-bis(2-pyridyl)-1,2,4-triazolato]platinum(II) ("Pt(ptp).sub.2").

  4. On the Complexity of Matsui's Attack Pascal Junod

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    On the Complexity of Matsui's Attack Pascal Junod Security and Cryptography Laboratory Swiss at random and where depends on the key value. Given some plaintext bits Pi1 , . . . , Pir , ciphertext bits

  5. EA-1250: Proposed Strategic Computing Complex, Los Alamos, New Mexico

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EA evaluates the environmental impacts for the proposal to construct and operate the Strategic Computing Complex within the U.S. Department of Energy Los Alamos National Laboratory Technical...

  6. Aligning stakeholder interests : from complex systems to emerging markets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Austin-Breneman, Jesse

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Design often requires balancing competing objectives from a variety of stakeholders. From the design of large-scale complex engineering systems to the design of end-user products for emerging markets, managing the trade-offs ...

  7. Twisted Tales: Causal Complexity and Cognitive Scientific Explanation 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clark, Andy

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent work in biology and cognitive science depicts a variety of target phenomena as the products of a tangled web of causal influences. Such influences may include both internal and external factors, as well as complex ...

  8. ammonia borane complex: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    w x5-7 . Borane-triethylamine complex Boo, Jin-Hyo 43 Energy Savings from Floating Head Pressure in Ammonia Refrigeration Systems Texas A&M University - TxSpace Summary:...

  9. Determining Factors Influencing Nuclear Envelope and Nuclear Pore Complex Structure.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gouni, Sushanth

    2013-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

    . Secondly, we found the proteasome, a complex responsible for degrading proteins is involved in NPC assembly. In order to further investigate interactions between the NPC and the proteasome, I combined the proteasomal mutant with 3 classes of nuclear pore...

  10. Acoustic modes in combustors with complex impedances and multidimensional active

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Acoustic modes in combustors with complex impedances and multidimensional active flames F. Nicoud-acoustic modes in combustors. In the case of a non-isothermal reacting medium, the wave equation for the pressure

  11. Robust nite-di erence modelling of complex structures1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oprsal, Ivo

    with the 1Proc. of HIGH PERFORMANCE COMPUTING IN SEISMIC MODELLING, An International Sympo- sium, Zaragoza-difference modelling of complex structures Paper No. 15 in Proc. of Int. Symposium on High Performance Computing

  12. Porphyrins and metal complexes thereof having haloalkyl side chains

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wijesekera, T.; Lyons, J.E.; Ellis, P.E. Jr.; Bhinde, M.V.

    1997-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Transition metal complexes of meso-haloalkylporphyrins, wherein the haloalkyl groups contain 2 to 8 carbon atoms have been found to be highly effective catalysts for oxidation of alkanes and for the decomposition of hydroperoxides. 7 figs.

  13. Radio interferometric gain calibration as a complex optimization problem

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smirnov, Oleg

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent developments in optimization theory have extended some traditional algorithms for least-squares optimization of real-valued functions (Gauss-Newton, Levenberg-Marquardt, etc.) into the domain of complex functions of a complex variable. This employs a formalism called the Wirtinger derivative, and derives a full-complex Jacobian counterpart to the conventional real Jacobian. We apply these developments to the problem of radio interferometric gain calibration, and show how the general complex Jacobian formalism, when combined with conventional optimization approaches, yields a whole new family of calibration algorithms, including those for the polarized and direction-dependent gain regime. We further extend the Wirtinger calculus to an operator-based matrix calculus for describing the polarized calibration regime. Using approximate matrix inversion results in computationally efficient implementations; we show that some recently proposed calibration algorithms such as StefCal and peeling can be understood...

  14. Complexity and Valued Landscapes1 Michael M. McCarthy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Standiford, Richard B.

    . Identification of different study areas representing a variety of eco- systems and levels of complexity. 2. Data/visual interest of sites within the study areas. 5. Correlation and analysis of relation- ships. METHOD Study

  15. Neutron confinement cell for investigating complex fluids Tonya L. Kuhla)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kuhl, Tonya L.

    Neutron confinement cell for investigating complex fluids Tonya L. Kuhla) Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, University of California, Davis, Davis, California 95616 Gregory S. Smith Engineering, University of California, Santa Barbara, Santa Barbara, California 93106 Jaroslaw Majewski Manuel

  16. From average case complexity to improper learning [Extended Abstract

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Linial, Nathan "Nati"

    is that the standard reduc- tions from NP-hard problems do not seem to apply in this context. There is essentially only.1145/2591796.2591820. Keywords Hardness of improper learning, DNFs, Halfspaces, Average Case complexity, CSP problems, Resolution

  17. Enforcement Documents - Y-12 National Security Complex | Department...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Notice of Violation, BWXT Y-12 - EA-2003-03 Issued to BWXT Y-12, related to Welding Inspection Deficiencies at the Y-12 National Security Complex, June 4, 2003...

  18. Accurate complex scaling of three dimensional numerical potentials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cerioni, Alessandro [European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, 6 rue Horowitz, BP220 38043 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France); Genovese, Luigi; Duchemin, Ivan; Deutsch, Thierry [Laboratoire de simulation atomistique (L-Sim), SP2M, UMR-E CEA/UJF-Grenoble 1, INAC, Grenoble F-38054 (France)

    2013-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The complex scaling method, which consists in continuing spatial coordinates into the complex plane, is a well-established method that allows to compute resonant eigenfunctions of the time-independent Schroedinger operator. Whenever it is desirable to apply the complex scaling to investigate resonances in physical systems defined on numerical discrete grids, the most direct approach relies on the application of a similarity transformation to the original, unscaled Hamiltonian. We show that such an approach can be conveniently implemented in the Daubechies wavelet basis set, featuring a very promising level of generality, high accuracy, and no need for artificial convergence parameters. Complex scaling of three dimensional numerical potentials can be efficiently and accurately performed. By carrying out an illustrative resonant state computation in the case of a one-dimensional model potential, we then show that our wavelet-based approach may disclose new exciting opportunities in the field of computational non-Hermitian quantum mechanics.

  19. Active Printed Materials for Complex Self-Evolving Deformations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhao, Wei

    We propose a new design of complex self-evolving structures that vary over time due to environmental interaction. In conventional 3D printing systems, materials are meant to be stable rather than active and fabricated ...

  20. The linear and nonlinear rheology of multiscale complex fluids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jaishankar, Aditya

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The microstructures of many complex fluids are typically characterized by a broad distribution of internal length scales. Examples of such multiscale materials include physically and chemically cross-linked gels, emulsions, ...

  1. Dissection of the telomere complex CST in Arabidopsis thaliana

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leehy, Katherine

    2013-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

    , Arabidopsis CST is required for telomere length maintenance, for preventing telomere recombination and chromosome end-to-end fusions. Mutations in the CST complex result in severe genomic instability and stem cells defects. My research also shows that CST...

  2. Imitation of complex grammatical constructions by elderly adults

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kemper, Susan

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Elderly adults (70 to 89 years) and young adults (30 to 49 years) were asked to imitate complex sentences involving embedded gerunds, w/z-clauses, r/ia/-clauses, and relative clauses. The young adults were able to imitate ...

  3. Complexity cost analysis in a large product line

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Landivar Chávez, José Luis

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Hewlett-Packard's Industry Standard Servers (ISS) organization offers a large variety of server computers and accessories. The large range of options available to its customers gives way to complex processes and less than ...

  4. Kolmogorov Complexity, String Information, Panspermia and the Fermi Paradox

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. G. Gurzadyan

    2005-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Bit strings rather than byte files can be a mode of transmission both for intelligent signals and for travels of extraterrestrial life. Kolmogorov complexity, i.e. the minimal length of a binary coded string completely defining a system, can then, due to its universality, become a key concept in the strategy of the search of extraterrestrials. Evaluating, for illustration, the Kolmogorov complexity of the human genome, one comes to an unexpected conclusion that a low complexity compressed string - analog of Noah's ark - will enable the recovery of the totality of terrestrial life. The recognition of bit strings of various complexity up to incompressible Martin-L\\"{o}f random sequences, will require a different strategy for the analysis of the cosmic signals. The Fermi paradox "Where is Everybody?" can be viewed under in the light of such information panspermia, i.e. a Universe full of traveling life streams.

  5. acid nta complexes: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 21 The distribution of boron and boric acid complexes in the sea Texas A&M University - TxSpace Summary: LIBRARY A a m...

  6. Porphyrins and metal complexes thereof having haloalkyl side chains

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wijesekera, Tilak (Glen Mills, PA); Lyons, James E. (Wallingford, PA); Ellis, Jr., Paul E. (Downingtown, PA); Bhinde, Manoj V. (Boothwyn, PA)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Transition metal complexes of meso-haloalkylporphyrins, wherein the haloalkyl groups contain 2 to 8 carbon atoms have been found to be highly effective catalysts for oxidation of alkanes and for the decomposition of hydroperoxides.

  7. Origin of complex quantum amplitudes and Feynman's rules

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goyal, Philip; Knuth, Kevin H.; Skilling, John [Perimeter Institute, Waterloo (Canada); University at Albany (SUNY), New York (United States); Maximum Entropy Data Consultants Ltd., Kenmare (Ireland)

    2010-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Complex numbers are an intrinsic part of the mathematical formalism of quantum theory and are perhaps its most characteristic feature. In this article, we show that the complex nature of the quantum formalism can be derived directly from the assumption that a pair of real numbers is associated with each sequence of measurement outcomes, with the probability of this sequence being a real-valued function of this number pair. By making use of elementary symmetry conditions, and without assuming that these real number pairs have any other algebraic structure, we show that these pairs must be manipulated according to the rules of complex arithmetic. We demonstrate that these complex numbers combine according to Feynman's sum and product rules, with the modulus-squared yielding the probability of a sequence of outcomes.

  8. Relationship between classifier performance and distributional complexity for small samples

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Attoor, Sanju Nair

    2004-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Given a limited number of samples for classification, several issues arise with respect to design, performance and analysis of classifiers. This is especially so in the case of microarray-based classification. In this paper, we use a complexity...

  9. Generation of Gradients Having Complex Shapes Using Microfluidic Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prentiss, Mara

    Generation of Gradients Having Complex Shapes Using Microfluidic Networks Stephan K. W. Dertinger, Harvard University, 12 Oxford Street, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02138 This paper describes the generation each carrying different concentrations of substances laminarly and side-by-side generated step

  10. Complex muscle architecture described with diffusion weighted MRI

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gaige, Terry A. (Terry Alden), 1981-

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The complex array of fiber orientations exhibited by muscles such as the tongue, esophagus, and heart, enable function beyond basic pulling. Among other things, the presence of crossing geometry adds the ability to push ...

  11. Our world is made up of complex systems.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    system. _ #12;A river is a system. gloBal water wIthdrawal has Increased sIxfold sInce the 1900s, twTHINK #12; _ Our world is made up of complex systems. _ #12;#12;#12;#12;To extract their full. As with any complex system, you need to analyze how work flows, how people interact and how processes can

  12. A methodological approach to the complexity measurement of software designs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Williams, Clay Edwin

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A METHODOLOGICAL APPROACH TO THE COMPLEXITY MEASUREMENT OF SOFTWARE DESIGNS A Thesis by CLAY EDWIN WILLIAMS Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas AkM University in partial fulffilment of the requirements for the degree... of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1990 Major Subject: Computer Science A METHODOLOGICAL APPROACH TO THE COMPLEXITY MEASUREMENT OF SOFTWARE DESIGNS A Thesis by CLAY EDWIN WILLIAMS Approved as to style and content by: Willi m M. L' (Co-Chair of C ittee...

  13. Method of synthesis of anhydrous thorium(IV) complexes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kiplinger, Jaqueline L; Cantat, Thibault

    2013-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Method of producing anhydrous thorium(IV) tetrahalide complexes, utilizing Th(NO.sub.3).sub.4(H.sub.2O).sub.x, where x is at least 4, as a reagent; method of producing thorium-containing complexes utilizing ThCl.sub.4(DME).sub.2 as a precursor; method of producing purified ThCl.sub.4(ligand).sub.x compounds, where x is from 2 to 9; and novel compounds having the structures: ##STR00001##

  14. 2006 Nature Publishing Group A phosphatase complex that dephosphorylates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , dephosphorylation. Here we describe a three-protein complex (HTP-C, for histone H2A phosphatase complex) containingH2AX in vitro. gH2AX is lost from chromatin surrounding a DSB independently of the HTP-C, indicating that the phosphatase targets gH2AX after its displacement from DNA. The dephosphorylation of gH2AX by the HTP

  15. Correcting Aberrations in Complex Magnet Systems for Muon Cooling Channels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J.A. Maloney, B. Erdelyi, A. Afanaciev, R.P. Johnson, Y.S. Derbenev, V.S. Morozov

    2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Designing and simulating complex magnet systems needed for cooling channels in both neutrino factories and muon colliders requires innovative techniques to correct for both chromatic and spherical aberrations. Optimizing complex systems, such as helical magnets for example, is also difficult but essential. By using COSY INFINITY, a differential algebra based code, the transfer and aberration maps can be examined to discover what critical terms have the greatest influence on these aberrations.

  16. Photoinduced energy transfer in transition metal complex oligomers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The work done over the past three years has been directed toward the preparation, characterization and photophysical examination of mono- and bimetallic diimine complexes. The work is part of a broader project directed toward the development of stable, efficient, light harvesting arrays of transition metal complex chromophores. One focus has been the synthesis of rigid bis-bidentate and bis-tridentate bridging ligands. The authors have managed to make the ligand bphb in multigram quantities from inexpensive starting materials. The synthetic approach used has allowed them to prepare a variety of other ligands which may have unique applications (vide infra). They have prepared, characterized and examined the photophysical behavior of Ru(II) and Re(I) complexes of the ligands. Energy donor/acceptor complexes of bphb have been prepared which exhibit nearly activationless energy transfer. Complexes of Ru(II) and Re(I) have also been prepared with other polyunsaturated ligands in which two different long lived (> 50 ns) excited states exist; results of luminescence and transient absorbance measurements suggest the two states are metal-to-ligand charge transfer and ligand localized {pi}{r_arrow}{pi}* triplets. Finally, the authors have developed methods to prepare polymetallic complexes which are covalently bound to various surfaces. The long term objective of this work is to make light harvesting arrays for the sensitization of large band gap semiconductors. Details of this work are provided in the body of the report.

  17. Photoinduced energy transfer in transition metal complex oligomers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The work we have done over the past three years has been directed toward the preparation, characterization and photophysical examination of mono- and bimetallic diimine complexes. The work is part of a broader project directed toward the development of stable, efficient, light harvesting arrays of transition metal complex chromophores. One focus has been the synthesis of rigid bis-bidentate and bis-tridentate bridging ligands. We have managed to make the ligand bphb in multigram quantities from inexpensive starting materials. The synthetic approach used has allowed us prepare a variety of other ligands which may have unique applications (vide infra). We have prepared, characterized and examined the photophysical behavior of Ru(II) and Re(I) complexes of the ligands. Energy donor/acceptor complexes of bphb have been prepared which exhibit nearly activationless energy transfer. Complexes of Ru(II) and Re(I) have also been prepared with other polyunsaturated ligands in which two different long lived ( > 50 ns) excited states exist; results of luminescence and transient absorbance measurements suggest the two states are metal-to-ligand charge transfer and ligand localized {pi}{r_arrow}{pi}* triplets. Finally, we have developed methods to prepare polymetallic complexes which are covalently bound to various surfaces. The long term objective of this work is to make light harvesting arrays for the sensitization of large band gap semiconductors. Details of this work are provided in the body of the report.

  18. Complex Adaptive Systems of Systems (CASOS) engineering environment.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Detry, Richard Joseph; Linebarger, John Michael; Finley, Patrick D.; Maffitt, S. Louise; Glass, Robert John, Jr.; Beyeler, Walter Eugene; Ames, Arlo Leroy

    2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Complex Adaptive Systems of Systems, or CASoS, are vastly complex physical-socio-technical systems which we must understand to design a secure future for the nation. The Phoenix initiative implements CASoS Engineering principles combining the bottom up Complex Systems and Complex Adaptive Systems view with the top down Systems Engineering and System-of-Systems view. CASoS Engineering theory and practice must be conducted together to develop a discipline that is grounded in reality, extends our understanding of how CASoS behave and allows us to better control the outcomes. The pull of applications (real world problems) is critical to this effort, as is the articulation of a CASoS Engineering Framework that grounds an engineering approach in the theory of complex adaptive systems of systems. Successful application of the CASoS Engineering Framework requires modeling, simulation and analysis (MS and A) capabilities and the cultivation of a CASoS Engineering Community of Practice through knowledge sharing and facilitation. The CASoS Engineering Environment, itself a complex adaptive system of systems, constitutes the two platforms that provide these capabilities.

  19. Quantum entanglement phenomena in photosynthetic light harvesting complexes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    K. Birgitta Whaley; Mohan Sarovar; Akihito Ishizaki

    2010-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

    We review recent theoretical calculations of quantum entanglement in photosynthetic light harvesting complexes. These works establish, for the first time, a manifestation of this characteristically quantum mechanical phenomenon in biologically functional structures. We begin by summarizing calculations on model biomolecular systems that aim to reveal non-trivial characteristics of quantum entanglement in non-equilibrium biological environments. We then discuss and compare several calculations performed recently of excitonic dynamics in the Fenna-Matthews-Olson light harvesting complex and of the entanglement present in this widely studied pigment-protein structure. We point out the commonalities between the derived results and also identify and explain the differences. We also discuss recent work that examines entanglement in the structurally more intricate light harvesting complex II (LHCII). During this overview, we take the opportunity to clarify several subtle issues relating to entanglement in such biomolecular systems, including the role of entanglement in biological function, the complexity of dynamical modeling that is required to capture the salient features of entanglement in such biomolecular systems, and the relationship between entanglement and other quantum mechanical features that are observed and predicted in light harvesting complexes. Finally, we suggest possible extensions of the current work and also review the options for experimental confirmation of the predicted entanglement phenomena in light harvesting complexes.

  20. Air Traffic Complexity Resolution in Multi-Sector Planning Using CP

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Flener, Pierre

    Air Traffic Complexity Resolution in Multi-Sector Planning Using CP Pierre Flener1 Justin Pearson1 Programming for ATC & ATM, Brétigny (France), 2 December 2008 #12;Objective Air Traffic Complexity Complexity Resolution A CP Model Experiments Conclusion Outline 1 Objective 2 Air Traffic Complexity 3 Complexity