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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tw treated wastewater" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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1

Treated wastewater discharged from municipal wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) contains  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Treated wastewater discharged from municipal wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) contains to provide rapid, field-ready, inexpen- sive testing of these chemicals in wastewater is also needed estrogenic chemicals, and 2) develop sensor technology for the rapid measure- ment in wastewater of two key

Fay, Noah

2

Treated Wastewater Effluent Reduces Sperm Motility Along an Osmolality Gradient  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Treated Wastewater Effluent Reduces Sperm Motility Along an Osmolality Gradient H. L. Schoenfuss Ã? 2008 Ã? Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2008 Abstract Many toxic effects of treated wastewater environment of treated wastewater effluent frequently differs consider- ably from that of its receiving waters

Julius, Matthew L.

3

Use advanced methods to treat wastewater  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Common sense guidelines offer plausible, progressive techniques to treat wastewater. Because current and pending local, state and federal regulations are ratcheting lower effluent discharge limits, familiar treatment methods, such as biological, don't meet new restrictions. Now operating facilities must combine traditional methods with advanced remedial options such as thermal, physical, electro and chemical treatments. these new techniques remove organics, metals, nonhazardous dissolved salts, etc., but carry higher operating and installation costs. Due to tighter effluent restrictions and pending zero-discharge initiatives, managers of operating facilities must know and understand the complexity, composition and contaminant concentration of their wastewaters. No one-size-fits-all solution exists. However, guidelines can simplify decision making and help operators nominate the most effective and economical strategy to handle their waste situation. The paper describes the common treatment and the importance of alternatives, then describes biological, electro, physical, thermal, and chemical treatments.

Davis, M. (Litwin Engineers and Constructors, Inc., Houston, TX (United States))

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

'Bugs' used to treat FGD wastewater  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Tough regulation of heavy metals may justify a bioreactor approach in addition to chemical treatment of FGD wastewater. Two of Duke Energy' coal-fired plants, Belews Creek and Allen (in North Carolina) have installed new biological reactor systems to increase selenium removal to levels not achievable by existing scrubber waste water systems. The ABMet system removes nitrate and selenium in a single step. Progress Energy has installed the system at Roxboro and Mayo Stations, also in North Carolina. 1 fig., 2 photos.

Blankinship, S.

2009-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

5

Characterization of metabolic performance of methanogenic granules treating brewery wastewater: role of sulfate-reducing bacteria.  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...treating brewery wastewater containing...sugar beet wastewater at the sugar...the La Crosse treatment plant (26). The...influent brewery wastewater and effluent...min to reduce mass transfer resistance...analysis. Mass balance experiments...

W M Wu; R F Hickey; J G Zeikus

1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Reducing effluent discharge and recovering bioenergy in an osmotic microbial fuel cell treating domestic wastewater  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

domestic wastewater Zheng Ge, Qingyun Ping, Li Xiao, Zhen He Department of Civil Engineering and Mechanics cell is developed to treat domestic wastewater. Wastewater effluent can be greatly reduced due to osmotic water extraction. Bioenergy recovered from wastewater can potentially support pumping system

7

Treating refinery wastewaters in microbial fuel cells using separator electrode assembly or spaced electrode configurations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Treating refinery wastewaters in microbial fuel cells using separator electrode assembly or spaced 2013 Available online 5 November 2013 Keywords: Microbial fuel cells Refinery wastewater Biodegradability Separator electrode assembly a b s t r a c t The effectiveness of refinery wastewater (RW

8

Analysis of Ammonia Loss Mechanisms in Microbial Fuel Cells Treating Animal Wastewater  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ARTICLE Analysis of Ammonia Loss Mechanisms in Microbial Fuel Cells Treating Animal Wastewater Jung.interscience.wiley.com). DOI 10.1002/bit.21687 ABSTRACT: Ammonia losses during swine wastewater treatment were examined using manure; electricity; power generation Introduction Wastewater treatment using microbial fuel cells (MFCs

9

Wastewater Effluent Polishing Systems of Anaerobic Baffled Reactor Treating Black-water from Households  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Wastewater Effluent Polishing Systems of Anaerobic Baffled Reactor Treating Black-water from of different integrated low-cost wastewater treatment systems, comprising one ABR as first treatment step filter and a vertical flow constructed wetland. A mixture of septage and domestic wastewater was used

Richner, Heinz

10

Reciprocating Constructed Wetlands for Treating Industrial, Municipal, and Agricultural Wastewater  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

For many rural communities, treating domestic wastewater efficiently and cost-effectively is a challenging task. Environmental issues, financing of construction costs, and the bottom-line cost to the consumer complicate this effort. Increasingly stringent discharge standards have resulted in a growing number of permit violations from small, “conventional ” treatment systems. Many rural communities have discovered that their existing systems (e.g., facultative lagoons) provided excellent service in the past but have become obsolete due to new discharge standards. These communities simply cannot afford to own and operate the highly sophisticated tertiary treatment facilities these new regulations require. As a result, funding agencies have looked more favorably to “regional” solutions that can achieve consistent, high-quality discharge. In most cases, the regional solution is a centralized treatment facility to which surrounding communities pump their sewage. In many instances, communities must pump extremely long distances to reach the regional treatment facility. This means that communities, and, therefore, funding agencies, are putting most of their money into pumps and piping instead of treatment. What small rural communities need is a decentralized wastewater treatment system that is inexpensive to construct, simple to operate, and achieves consistently high levels of discharge quality, even with small flows. Having such a system would allow a paradigm shift whereby funding agencies could support decentralized treatment and regional management of numerous decentralized treatment systems.

Go~tiscs~!d P S I; Chuck Donnell; H. Alton Pnvette; Leslie L. Behrends

11

Treating process wastewater employing vacuum distillation using mechanical vapor recompression  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Process wastewater has been successfully treated using an enhanced variable vacuum distillation system (VVDS). The removal of contaminants is achieved initially by degassing the liquid under an intense vacuum which removes the volatile organic compounds. The resulting liquid is then distilled under a vacuum using mechanical vapor recompression. The system was invented by Derald McCabe. This innovative treatment system removes virtually all of the contaminants, such as TSS, TDS, BOD{sub 5}, COD, heavy metals and mineral compounds. The resultant aqueous portion normally returns to a neutral pH. Due to the unique system operation, scaling problems (often encountered in conventional distillation) have not been detected in this system. The VVDS is extremely energy efficiency because the heat for distillation is generated and recycled mechanically. Using electricity as the energy source, the approximate operating cost, based on $0.05 KWH, may vary from $0.005 to $0.01 per gallon depending on the size and capacity of the equipment. Based on applications in waste streams performed to-date, the VVDS process has yielded a distilled water stream and the concentrated solids have been used as a byproduct or as a concentrated non-dischargeable waste for disposal.

McCabe, D.L. [Brandt, Houston, TX (United States)] [Brandt, Houston, TX (United States); Vivona, M.A. [ICF Kaiser Engineers, Inc., Houston, TX (United States). Water and Wastewater Dept.] [ICF Kaiser Engineers, Inc., Houston, TX (United States). Water and Wastewater Dept.

1999-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Biomethane Production in an AnSBBR Treating Wastewater from Biohydrogen Process  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

An anaerobic sequencing batch reactor containing immobilized biomass (AnSBBR) was used to produce biomethane by treating the effluent from another AnSBBR ... based (AR-EPHS) wastewater. In addition, biomethane wa...

T. G. Lullio; L. P. Souza; S. M. Ratusznei…

2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Using treated municipal wastewater in a linerboard mill -- legal, political, and technical issues  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

When plans to expand production at an antiquated mill were jeopardized by an inadequate source of process water, the mill explored the possibility of producing first-quality linerboard using treated municipal wastewater. This paper outlines the legal, technical, and political issues encountered in developing a plan that would allow the mill to use effluent from a municipal wastewater treatment system. The technology is available to make reuse of municipal wastewater feasible, as evidence by the closed-loop delivery and discharge system describe in this report. Nevertheless, legal and political concerns make the implementation process arduous and time consuming.

Bowen, W. (Montville Water Pollution Control Authority, Montville, CT (United States)); Scogin, R. (Rand-Whitney Containerboard, L.P., Montville, CT (United States)); Cobery, J.E. (Bingham, Dana and Gould, Boston, MA (United States))

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Performances evaluation of phosphorus removal by apatite in constructed wetlands treating domestic wastewater: Column and pilot experiments  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

wastewater: Column and pilot experiments Najatte Harouiyaa , Stéphanie Prost-Bouclea , Catherine Morlayb.MARTIN@suez-env.com) Abstract In constructed wetlands (CWs) treating domestic wastewater, good treatment performances to improve P removal from wastewater with a low specific filter surface per people equivalent (p. e

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

15

Plants in constructed wetlands help to treat agricultural processing wastewater  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Plants in constructed wetlands help to treat agriculturalhas been available to help guide that selection. We

Grismer, Mark E; Shepherd, Heather L

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Recycling of domestic wastewater treated by vertical-flow wetlands for irrigating Chillies and Sweet Peppers  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Due to water scarcity in many arid countries, there is considerable interest in recycling various wastewater streams such as treated urban wastewater for irrigation in the agricultural sector. The aim was therefore to assess if domestic wastewater treated by different wetlands can be successfully recycled to water commercially grown crops. The objectives were to assess variables and boundary conditions impacting on the growth of two different types of peppers fed by domestic wastewater pre-treated by diverse mature constructed treatment wetlands. The growth of both Sweet Pepper (California Wonder; cultivar of Capsicum annuum Linnaeus Grossum Group) and Chilli (De Cayenne; C. annuum (Linnaeus) Longum Group ‘De Cayenne’) fed with different treated and untreated wastewater types were assessed. A few plants suffered from either a shortage and/or excess of some nutrients and trace minerals. The overall growth development of Sweet Peppers was poor due to the high concentrations of nutrients and trace minerals. In contrast, Chilies did reasonably well, but the growth of foliage was excessive and the harvest was delayed. High yields were associated with tap water and an organic growth medium, and a wetland with a high aggregate size, leaving sufficient space for biomass. Low fruit numbers correlated well with inorganic growth media and irrigation water contaminated by hydrocarbons. Findings indicate that nutrient concentrations supplied to the Chillies by a combination of compost and treated waste water are usually too high to produce a good harvest. However, as the compost is depleted of nutrients after about eight months, the harvest increased for pots that received pre-treated wastewater. The project contributes to ecological sanitation understanding by closing the loop in the food and water chain. Findings will lead to a better understanding of the effects of different wetland treatment processes on the recycling potential of their outflow waters.

S.A.A.A.N. Almuktar; M. Scholz; R.H.K. Al-Isawi; A. Sani

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Preozonation of primary-treated municipal wastewater for reuse in biofuel feedstock generation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The results of a laboratory scale investigation on ozone pretreatment of primary-treated municipal wastewater for potential reuse in fermentation processes for the production of biofuels and bio-based feedstock chemicals were presented. Semi-batch preozonation with 3.0% (w/w) ozone at 1 L min -1 resulted into a considerable inactivation of the indigenous heterotrophic bacteria in the wastewater with less than 0.0002% comprising the ozone-resistant fraction of the microbial population. The disinfection process was modeled using first-order inactivation kinetics with a rate constant of 4.39 Ã?Â?Ã?Â? 10 -3 s -1. Chemical oxygen demand (COD) levels were reduced by 30% in 1-h experiments. COD depletion was also modeled using a pseudo-first-order kinetics at a rate constant of 9.50 Ã?Â?Ã?Â? 10 -5 s -1. Biological oxygen demand (BOD 5) values were reduced by 60% up to 20 min of ozonation followed by a plateau and some slight increases attributed to partial oxidation of recalcitrant materials. Ozone also had no substantial effect on the concentration of ammonium and phosphate ions, which are essential for microbial growth and metabolism. Preliminary tests indicated that oleaginous microorganisms could be cultivated in the ozonated wastewater, resulting in relatively higher cell densities than in raw wastewater and comparable results with autoclave-sterilized wastewater. This process could potentially produce significant quantities of oil for biofuel production from municipal wastewater streams.

Mondala, Andro H.; Hernandez, Rafael; French, William Todd; Estevez, L. Antonio; Meckes, Mark; Trillo, Marlene; Hall, Jacqueline

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Dissolved organic carbon transformations during laboratory-scale groundwater recharge using lagoon-treated wastewater  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Reuse of treated wastewater through groundwater recharge has emerged as an integral part of water and wastewater management in arid regions of the world. Aerated-lagoon wastewater treatment followed by surface infiltration offers a simple low-tech, low-cost treatment option for developing countries. This study investigated the fate of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) through laboratory-scale soil aquifer treatment (SAT) soil columns over a 64-week period. Aerated-lagoon wastewater (average DOE = 17 mg/l) and two soils were collected near the USA/Mexico border near Nogales, AZ. Laboratory-scale SAT columns exhibited three phases of aging where infiltration rates and DOC removals were delineated. DOC removal ranged from 39% to greater than 70% during the study, with DOC levels averaging 3.7 and 5.8 mg/l for the SAT columns packed with different soils. Soil with a higher fraction of organic carbon content had higher effluent DOC levels, presumably due to leaching of soil organic matter. UV absorbance data indicated preferential biodegradation removal of low molecular weight, low aromatic DOC. Overall, SAT reduced the potential towards forming trihalomethanes (THMs) during disinfection, although the reactivity ({mu}g THM/mg DOC) increased. SAT and groundwater recharge would provide a high degree of DOC removal in an integrated low-tech wastewater reuse management strategy, especially for developing countries in arid regions of the world.

Westerhoff, P.; Pinney, M.

2000-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Treated domestic wastewater traditionally has been discharged offshore in coastal areas via ocean outfalls. In response to environmental concerns associated with ocean outfalls, deep  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Abstract Treated domestic wastewater traditionally has been discharged offshore in coastal areas injection of treated wastewater into non-potable aquifers has become increasingly used as an alternative. These deep aquifers tend to be saline, and the discharge of fresh wastewater into them raises concerns

Sukop, Mike

20

Escalating Water Demand for Energy Production and the Potential for Use of Treated Municipal Wastewater  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

For instance, abandoned coal mine drainage is abundant in Pennsylvania and West Virginia, while the most severe water constraints for cooling are more likely to occur in the western U.S.(10) Among various alternatives, treated municipal wastewater (MWW), or reclaimed water, is very promising owing to its ubiquitous availability and relatively uniform quality. ... With respect to corrosion control, NH2Cl has been found to be a more appropriate biocide than free chlorine for use in cooling systems using MWW. ... Monochloramine, an alternative to free chlorine, was found to be less reactive with PMA than free chlorine. ...

Heng Li; Shih-Hsiang Chien; Ming-Kai Hsieh; David A. Dzombak; Radisav D. Vidic

2011-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tw treated wastewater" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

A novel recycling process using the treated citric acid wastewater as ingredients water for citric acid production  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract In this study, an integrated process coupling citric acid and methane fermentations was proposed to solve severe wastewater pollution problem in cassava-based citric acid production. The accumulation patterns of the potential and major inhibitors in this process, including organic compounds, volatile fatty acids (VFAs), total ions and pigments were investigated. Both simulation and experimental results indicated that these inhibitors could reach their equilibrium levels after 3–7 fermentation runs when reutilizing the treated citric acid wastewater. As a result, the proposed citric acid fermentation process by recycling the wastewater treated in methane fermentation could be stably operated for more than 15 runs, which could save a large amount of fresh water and relieve the severe wastewater pollution in citric acid production potentially.

Hong-Jian Zhang; Jian-Hua Zhang; Jian Xu; Lei Tang; Zhong-Gui Mao

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Using Membrane Sets Incorporated into a Crossflow Electrofiltration/Electrodialysis Treatment Module to Treat CMP Wastewater and Simultaneously Generate Electrolytic Ionized Water.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??In this work, membrane set(s) had been incorporated into different crossflow electrofiltration (CEF) /electrodialysis (ED) treatment modules for treating various CMP wastewaters and simultaneously generating… (more)

Yang, Tsung-Yin

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Protecting Lake Ontario - Treating Wastewater from the Remediated Low-Level Radioactive Waste Management Facility - 13227  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Port Granby Project is part of the larger Port Hope Area Initiative, a community-based program for the development and implementation of a safe, local, long-term management solution for historic low level radioactive waste (LLRW) and marginally contaminated soils (MCS). The Port Granby Project involves the relocation and remediation of up to 0.45 million cubic metres of such waste from the current Port Granby Waste Management Facility located in the Municipality of Clarington, Ontario, adjacent to the shoreline of Lake Ontario. The waste material will be transferred to a new suitably engineered Long-Term Waste Management Facility (LTWMF) to be located inland approximately 700 m from the existing site. The development of the LTWMF will include construction and commissioning of a new Wastewater Treatment Plant (WWTP) designed to treat wastewater consisting of contaminated surface run off and leachate generated during the site remediation process at the Port Granby Waste Management Facility as well as long-term leachate generated at the new LTWMF. Numerous factors will influence the variable wastewater flow rates and influent loads to the new WWTP during remediation. The treatment processes will be comprised of equalization to minimize impacts from hydraulic peaks, fine screening, membrane bioreactor technology, and reverse osmosis. The residuals treatment will comprise of lime precipitation, thickening, dewatering, evaporation and drying. The distribution of the concentration of uranium and radium - 226 over the various process streams in the WWTP was estimated. This information was used to assess potential worker exposure to radioactivity in the various process areas. A mass balance approach was used to assess the distribution of uranium and radium - 226, by applying individual contaminant removal rates for each process element of the WTP, based on pilot scale results and experience-based assumptions. The mass balance calculations were repeated for various flow and load scenarios. (authors)

Freihammer, Till; Chaput, Barb [AECOM, 99 Commerce Drive, Winnipeg, Manitoba, R3P 0Y7 (Canada)] [AECOM, 99 Commerce Drive, Winnipeg, Manitoba, R3P 0Y7 (Canada); Vandergaast, Gary [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Port Hope, Ontario (Canada)] [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Port Hope, Ontario (Canada); Arey, Jimi [Public Works and Government Services Canada, Ontario (Canada)] [Public Works and Government Services Canada, Ontario (Canada)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Phylogenetic Analysis of Bacterial Communities in Mesophilic and Thermophilic Bioreactors Treating Pharmaceutical Wastewater  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...a full-scale industrial wastewater treatment facility consisting...AND METHODS Study site. The wastewater treatment facility consists...exceeding 45C without cell recycling, due to poor bacterial flocculation...oxygen demand of the untreated wastewater has historically varied between...

Timothy M. LaPara; Cindy H. Nakatsu; Lisa Pantea; James E. Alleman

2000-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Reuse of Treated Internal or External Wastewaters in the Cooling Systems of Coal-Based Thermoelectric Power Plants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study evaluated the feasibility of using three impaired waters - secondary treated municipal wastewater, passively treated abandoned mine drainage (AMD), and effluent from ash sedimentation ponds at power plants - for use as makeup water in recirculating cooling water systems at thermoelectric power plants. The evaluation included assessment of water availability based on proximity and relevant regulations as well as feasibility of managing cooling water quality with traditional chemical management schemes. Options for chemical treatment to prevent corrosion, scaling, and biofouling were identified through review of current practices, and were tested at bench and pilot-scale. Secondary treated wastewater is the most widely available impaired water that can serve as a reliable source of cooling water makeup. There are no federal regulations specifically related to impaired water reuse but a number of states have introduced regulations with primary focus on water aerosol 'drift' emitted from cooling towers, which has the potential to contain elevated concentrations of chemicals and microorganisms and may pose health risk to the public. It was determined that corrosion, scaling, and biofouling can be controlled adequately in cooling systems using secondary treated municipal wastewater at 4-6 cycles of concentration. The high concentration of dissolved solids in treated AMD rendered difficulties in scaling inhibition and requires more comprehensive pretreatment and scaling controls. Addition of appropriate chemicals can adequately control corrosion, scaling and biological growth in ash transport water, which typically has the best water quality among the three waters evaluated in this study. The high TDS in the blowdown from pilot-scale testing units with both passively treated mine drainage and secondary treated municipal wastewater and the high sulfate concentration in the mine drainage blowdown water were identified as the main challenges for blowdown disposal. Membrane treatment (nanofiltration or reverse osmosis) can be employed to reduce TDS and sulfate concentrations to acceptable levels for reuse of the blowdown in the cooling systems as makeup water.

Radisav Vidic; David Dzombak; Ming-Kai Hsieh; Heng Li; Shih-Hsiang Chien; Yinghua Feng; Indranil Chowdhury; Jason Monnell

2009-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

26

TW0076.book  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

TW-0076 TW-0076 03 May 2002 Published by Business Development Technical Writing NEXT GENERATION TURBINE PROGRAM TECHNICAL PROGRESS REPORT FINAL REPORT PERIOD OF PERFORMANCE: 16 AUGUST 2000 TO 14 JUNE 2002 Prepared for National Energy Technology Center U.S. Department of Energy AAD Document Control M/S 921-107 P.O. Box 10940 Pittsburgh, PA 15236 Prepared under Contract DE-AC26-00NT40847 Prepared by Pratt & Whitney Advanced Engine Programs 400 Main Street East Hartford, CT 06108 DISCLAMER NOTICE THIS REPORT WAS PREPARED AS AN ACCOUNT OF WORK SPONSORED BY AN AGENCY OF THE U.S. GOVERNMENT. NEITHER THE U.S GOVERNMENT NOR ANY AGENCY THEREOF, NOR ANY OF THEIR EMPLOYEES, MAKES ANY WARRANTY, EXPRESS OF IMPLIED, OR ASSUMES ANY LEGAL LIABILITY OR RESPONSIBILITY FOR THE ACCURACY, COMPLETENESS, OR USEFULNESS OF ANY INFORMATION, APPARATUS, PRODUCT, OR PROCESS DISCLOSED, OR REPRESENTS THAT

27

Giardia Cysts in Wastewater Treatment Plants in Italy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...global level. The recycling of treated wastewaters...investigation in four wastewater treatment plants in...Giardia cysts in wastewater treatment plants in...global level. The recycling of treated wastewaters...investigation in four wastewater treatment plants in...

Simone M. Cacciò; Marzia De Giacomo; Francesca A. Aulicino; Edoardo Pozio

2003-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Use of Treated Municipal Wastewater as Power Plant Cooling System Makeup Water: Tertiary Treatment versus Expanded Chemical Regimen for Recirculating Water Quality Management  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Treated municipal wastewater is a common, widely available alternative source of cooling water for thermoelectric power plants across the U.S. However, the biodegradable organic matter, ammonia-nitrogen, carbonate and phosphates in the treated wastewater pose challenges with respect to enhanced biofouling, corrosion, and scaling, respectively. The overall objective of this study was to evaluate the benefits and life cycle costs of implementing tertiary treatment of secondary treated municipal wastewater prior to use in recirculating cooling systems. The study comprised bench- and pilot-scale experimental studies with three different tertiary treated municipal wastewaters, and life cycle costing and environmental analyses of various tertiary treatment schemes. Sustainability factors and metrics for reuse of treated wastewater in power plant cooling systems were also evaluated. The three tertiary treated wastewaters studied were: secondary treated municipal wastewater subjected to acid addition for pH control (MWW_pH); secondary treated municipal wastewater subjected to nitrification and sand filtration (MWW_NF); and secondary treated municipal wastewater subjected nitrification, sand filtration, and GAC adsorption (MWW_NFG). Tertiary treatment was determined to be essential to achieve appropriate corrosion, scaling, and biofouling control for use of secondary treated municipal wastewater in power plant cooling systems. The ability to control scaling, in particular, was found to be significantly enhanced with tertiary treated wastewater compared to secondary treated wastewater. MWW_pH treated water (adjustment to pH 7.8) was effective in reducing scale formation, but increased corrosion and the amount of biocide required to achieve appropriate biofouling control. Corrosion could be adequately controlled with tolytriazole addition (4-5 ppm TTA), however, which was the case for all of the tertiary treated waters. For MWW_NF treated water, the removal of ammonia by nitrification helped to reduce the corrosivity and biocide demand. Also, the lower pH and alkalinity resulting from nitrification reduced the scaling to an acceptable level, without the addition of anti-scalant chemicals. Additional GAC adsorption treatment, MWW_NFG, yielded no net benefit. Removal of organic matter resulted in pitting corrosion in copper and cupronickel alloys. Negligible improvement was observed in scaling control and biofouling control. For all of the tertiary treatments, biofouling control was achievable, and most effectively with pre-formed monochloramine (2-3 ppm) in comparison with NaOCl and ClO2. Life cycle cost (LCC) analyses were performed for the tertiary treatment systems studied experimentally and for several other treatment options. A public domain conceptual costing tool (LC3 model) was developed for this purpose. MWW_SF (lime softening and sand filtration) and MWW_NF were the most cost-effective treatment options among the tertiary treatment alternatives considered because of the higher effluent quality with moderate infrastructure costs and the relatively low doses of conditioning chemicals required. Life cycle inventory (LCI) analysis along with integration of external costs of emissions with direct costs was performed to evaluate relative emissions to the environment and external costs associated with construction and operation of tertiary treatment alternatives. Integrated LCI and LCC analysis indicated that three-tiered treatment alternatives such as MWW_NSF and MWW_NFG, with regular chemical addition for treatment and conditioning and/or regeneration, tend to increase the impact costs and in turn the overall costs of tertiary treatment. River water supply and MWW_F alternatives with a single step of tertiary treatment were associated with lower impact costs, but the contribution of impact costs to overall annual costs was higher than all other treatment alternatives. MWW_NF and MWW_SF alternatives exhibited moderate external impact costs with moderate infrastructure and chemical conditioner dosing, which makes them (especially

David Dzombak; Radisav Vidic; Amy Landis

2012-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

29

Temporal variation in methanogen communities of four different full-scale anaerobic digesters treating food waste-recycling wastewater  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Methanogen communities were investigated using 454 pyrosequencing in four different full-scale anaerobic digesters treating food waste-recycling wastewater. Seasonal samples were collected for 2 years, and 24 samples were available for microbial analysis from a plug flow thermophilic (PT) digester, a continuously-stirred tank thermophilic (CT) digester, an upflow anerobic sludge blanket mesophilic (UM) digester, and a continuously-stirred tank mesophilic (CM) digester. Methanoculleus, Methanobacterium, Methanothermobacter, and Methanosaeta were revealed to be key methanogens in full-scale anaerobic digestion process treating food waste-recycling wastewater. In the PT digester, Methanoculleus was dominant (96.8%). In the CT digester, Methanoculleus was dominant (95.4%) during the first year of operation, but the dominant genus was shifted to Methanothermobacter (98.5%) due to pH increase. In the UM digester, Methanosaeta was dominant (87.2%). In the CM digester, Methanoculleus was constantly dominant (74.8%) except during CM5 when Methanosaeta was dominant (62.6%) due to the low residual acetate concentration (0.1 g/L).

Joonyeob Lee; Byungchul Hwang; Taewoan Koo; Seung Gu Shin; Woong Kim; Seokhwan Hwang

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Acid dye removal from industrial wastewater by adsorption on treated sewage sludge  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This study investigated the suitability of sewage sludge for the removal of Acid Blue 93 industrial wastewater. Washed sewage sludge (WS) and sludge activated carbon (AS) were used as adsorbents. The effect of pH, contact time, adsorbent dose and adsorption temperature was studied. Equilibrium isotherms for the adsorption were analysed by Freundlich and Langmuir isotherm models. The pseudo-first-order, pseudo-second order, intra-particle diffusion and Bangham models were used to describe the adsorption kinetics. The results reveal that adsorption using AS show better results (removal 96.57%) than WS, while both adsorptions depended on pH, contact time and adsorbent dose.

M.N. Rashed

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Identification and Isolation of Anaerobic, Syntrophic Phthalate Isomer-Degrading Microbes from Methanogenic Sludges Treating Wastewater from Terephthalate Manufacturing  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Electron balance was calculated...Anaerobic pre-treatment of petrochemical...terephthalic acid wastewater. Water Sci...treatment of wastewater at low temperatures...Anaerobic treatment of a petrochemical wastewater from a terephthalic acid plant. Water Sci...Sunderland, Mass. 34 Tasaki...

Yan-Ling Qiu; Yuji Sekiguchi; Hiroyuki Imachi; Yoichi Kamagata; I-Cheng Tseng; Sheng-Shung Cheng; Akiyoshi Ohashi; Hideki Harada

2004-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Novel electrodialysis–electrochlorination integrated process for the reclamation of treated wastewaters  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This work presents a novel integrated process for the reclamation of wastewaters. This process combines, in the same cell, the reduction in the effluent conductivity and TOC by electrodialysis together with the production of a value added stream, which can be used for disinfection purposes. In the diluate compartment, the solution is desalted whereas hypochlorite is electrochemically synthesized in the anolyte. The treatment of actual effluents from the Waste Water Treatment Plant (WWTP) of Ciudad Real (Spain) was confronted. It was observed that the concentration of hypochlorite synthesized in the anolyte increased when anolyte and catholyte are separated into different circuits, avoiding the reduction of hypochlorite on the cathode surface. Furthermore, a higher voltage to cell pair ratio also enhances the production of hypochlorite. Finally, it was checked the disinfectant potential of the final anolyte, being possible to produce a desalted and disinfected final stream with a total electrical consumption of 1.03 W h dm?3 and dosing a volumetric ratio anolyte:diluate of 4:96.

J. Llanos; S. Cotillas; P. Cañizares; M.A. Rodrigo

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Final purification of synthetic olive oil mill wastewater treated by chemical oxidation using ion exchange: Study of operating parameters  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract In this research work, ion exchange (IE) is presented as a suitable option for purification of olive oil mill wastewater (OMW) previously treated by means of a secondary treatment (OMWST). This pretreatment consisted in Fenton-like oxidation process, followed by coagulation–flocculation and filtration through olive stones. The parametric requirements for drinking water production or at least for public waterways discharge were achieved using a combination of two IE columns working in series at bench scale. The IE resins used in this study were Dowex Marathon C and Amberlite IRA-67. The effect of contact time, operating temperature and flow rate on simultaneous removal of sodium, total iron, chloride and phenols (the major pollutant species in OMWST) were investigated. Removal percentages of sodium, chloride and total iron increased with incrementing the contact time. Equilibrium was obtained in about 30 min for all ions and ion concentrations values determined were lower than the maximum levels for drinking water standards. On the other hand, adsorption efficiencies of sodium, total iron and chloride ions were found to be not considerably affected by the operating temperature. The highest phenols removal percentage (around 100%) was obtained in the first minutes for 298 K and 10 L/h.

M.D. Víctor-Ortega; J.M. Ochando-Pulido; G. Hodaifa; A. Martinez-Ferez

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Effects of sludge pretreatment on sludge reduction in a lab-scale anaerobic/anoxic/oxic system treating domestic wastewater  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Excess sludge disposal is one of the serious challenges in biological wastewater treatment. Reduction of sludge production would be an ideal way to solve sludge-associated problems rather than the post-treatment ...

D. K. Uan; I. T. Yeom; P. Arulazhagan…

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

forestking@cmlab.csie.ntu.edu.tw apfelpuff@cmlab.csie.ntu.edu.tw  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

forestking@cmlab.csie.ntu.edu.tw apfelpuff@cmlab.csie.ntu.edu.tw / weichao.chen@gmail.com robin@ntu.edu.tw ABSTRACT shot detection color histogram difference saliency region, deletion, and rearrange- ment while using the screen real-estate effectively. Second, we wish to reduce

Ouhyoung, Ming

36

Electrocoagulation: A Technology for Water Recycle and Wastewater Treatment in Semiconductor Manufacturing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Electrocoagulation: A Technology for Water Recycle and Wastewater Treatment in Semiconductor of treating wastewater streams in the semiconductor manufacturing industry. Electrocoagulation involves wastewater is increasing greatly. The objective is that by using EC to treat wastewater streams, this water

Fay, Noah

37

Wastewater Reuse — a Worldwide Issue  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Water resource shortages are a problem that are plaguing the world. Wastewater recycling and reuse may be the solution to this worldwide problem. Recycled and properly treated wastewater is a safe alternative sou...

Thomas G. Sanders; Lisa M. Dunn; Vujica Yevjevich

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

1.85 Water and Wastewater Treatment Engineering, Spring 2005  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Theory and design of systems for treating industrial and municipal wastewater and potable water supplies. Methods for characterizing wastewater properties. Physical, chemical, and biological processes, including primary ...

Shanahan, Peter

39

Performance and fate of organics in a pilot MBR–NF for treating antibiotic production wastewater with recycling NF concentrate  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract A double membrane system comprising a membrane bioreactor (MBR) combined with a nanofiltration (NF) membrane was investigated on a pilot scale for the treatment of antibiotic production wastewater over a three-month period at a pharmaceutical company in Wuxi, China. By recycling the NF concentrate, the combined MBR–NF process was shown to be effective for the treatment of antibiotic production wastewater, resulting in excellent water quality and a high water yield of 92 ± 5.6%. The water quality of the pilot-scale MBR–NF process was excellent; e.g., the concentrations of TOC, NH4+-N, TP were stable at 5.52, 0.68, 0.34 mg L?1, respectively, and the values of turbidity and conductivity of the NF permeate were 0.15 NTU and 2.5 mS cm?1, respectively; these values meet China’s water quality standard requirements for industrial use (GB21903-2008). Not only were the antibiotic removal rates of spiramycin (SPM) and new spiramycin (NSPM) over 95%, the acute toxicity was also drastically reduced by the MBR–NF pilot system. The main organics in the MBR effluent were proteins, polysaccharides, and humic-like substances; they were almost completely retained by the NF membrane and further biodegraded in the MBR because the NF concentrate was recycled. The microbial community of the MBR did not significantly change with the recycling of the NF concentrate.

Jianxing Wang; Kun Li; Yuansong Wei; Yutao Cheng; Dongbin Wei; Mingyue Li

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

AEROBIC BIOTRANSFORMATION OF TOXIC ORGANICS IN WASTEWATER  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

#12;AEROBIC BIOTRANSFORMATION OF TOXIC ORGANICS IN WASTEWATER DOE FRAP 1997-15 Prepared for in both domestic and industrial wastewater. The release of these compounds during wastewater treatment to predict the mass of the VOCs in the wastewater treated by biotransformation and the mass stripped

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tw treated wastewater" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

HIRICH et al. Wastewater reuse in the Mediterranean region: Case  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

HIRICH et al. Wastewater reuse in the Mediterranean region: Case of Morocco Abdelaziz HIRICH expedient. The extended reuse of reclaimed (treated) wastewater could contribute considerably Water Resources Management (IWRM) approach, focusing on the component wastewater reuse for irrigation

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

42

Wastewater Reuse  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Wastewater reuse has a long history throughout the world. Indications of reuse of wastewater go back in time at least 5, ... :1–14, 1996; Vignesnaran and Sundaravadivel, Recycle and reuse of domestic wastewater, ...

Robert Maliva; Thomas Missimer

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Onsite Wastewater Treatment Systems: Spray Distribution System  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Spray distribution systems for wastewater are much like lawn sprinkler systems, in that they spray treated wastewater over the surface of a yard. This publication explains how spray distribution systems work, what their design requirements are...

Lesikar, Bruce J.

2008-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

44

Wastewater Construction and Operation Permits (Iowa)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

These regulations describe permit requirements for the construction and operation of facilities treating wastewater, and provide separation distances from other water sources.

45

M TW T F_ SM TWTF 5  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Julyi 27," 2001 Julyi 27," 2001 Julhy 2001 August2001 M TW T F_ SM TWTF 5 1 2 34 567 1 2 3 4- .rnday 8 91011121314 5 6 7 8 91011 -15 16 17 18 19 20 21 . 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 29 30 31- 26 27 28 29 30 31 TaSk ad '_ .__________________ 0 _Getthe most out of Outook 98 - 800 900 1000_ _ 10:47am-11:02am Welcome to Calendar! - . 1100 _ 2 100 Notes 200 30o 4 oo 500 6 o Kipo i, 6 Knpowicz, Robert 1 DE039.Q136 2 F g52 68 July 30, 20 1 u ly 2001 0 Aug ust 20 01 |JUBly ^30U 2U 1 c M T W T F C M TW T F 1 2 3 4 5 6 - 12 34. 4londay 8 91011 121314 5 6 7 8 91011 -15 16 17 18 19 20 21 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 - 2223 24 25 26 27 28 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 2930 31 26 27 28 29 30 31 TaskPad 7 ~~~~~~am 7 "~'~~ 0_ 3 TO Q Taskdad 7___________________________ the mosoutof Outlook98

46

Treatment of Wood Preserving Wastewater  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The wastewater produced by the wood preserving industry presents a difficult problem to treat economically. A review of the literature indicates the size of the industry has limited the pursuit of an orderly and economic solution. Atmospheric...

Reynolds, T. D.; Shack, P. A.

47

Involvement of Rhodocyclus-Related Organisms in Phosphorus Removal in Full-Scale Wastewater Treatment Plants  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...removal of phosphorus from the wastewater. Although this process...successfully in full-scale wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs...process plant without nitrate recycling, represented a traditional...the plants treated municipal wastewater with phosphorus concentrations...

Julie L. Zilles; Jordan Peccia; Myeong-Woon Kim; Chun-Hsiung Hung; Daniel R. Noguera

2002-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

$2001 SM TW T F S SM TW T F S  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

IBBJ^ry~~ ^(ft0,~~~~~ '^fi~ ~July IBBJ^ry~~ ^(ft0,~~~~~ '^fi~ ~July 2001 August 2001 JUly 20, $2001 SM TW T F S SM TW T F S .Friday ~1 2 1234567 1234 Friday 8 91011121314 5 6 7 8 91011 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 12 13141516 17 18 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 19 20 2122 23 24 25 29 30 31 26 27 28 29 30 31 -- _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ T a sk P a d 7 am1 D 1 lTaskPad .8 00 9 00 _ I 100, 12 pm6 Notes 2 00 3 00 4 00 I - 5 00 Kelliler, Joseph 5 3/23/2002 26326 Jll~ I 7~ 23~ 200uy J uly 2001 August 2001 July 23,, 2001$ S M T W T F S SM TW T F S Mnl~ondawy 8 ~ 23 4 s 6 1 345 7 1234 Nionday 8 91011121314 5 6 7 8 91011 15 16 1718 19 20 21 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 19 20 21 22 23 24 25

49

Most modern wastewater treatment systems rely on microbial processes to remove contaminants. This makes wastewater  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Most modern wastewater treatment systems rely on microbial processes to remove contaminants. This makes wastewater treatment one of the largest biotechnology industries in the world. In New Zealand alone, about 1.5 billion litres of treated domestic wastewater is discharged each day

Auckland, University of

50

Spatial Distribution of Total, Ammonia-Oxidizing, and Denitrifying Bacteria in Biological Wastewater Treatment Reactors for Bioregenerative Life Support  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...bacteria perform recycling of various elements...fixed-film biological wastewater treatment reactors...The high recycling rate provided...distribution of wastewater throughout the...treating and recycling wastewater for consumption...

Yuko Sakano; Karen D. Pickering; Peter F. Strom; Lee J. Kerkhof

2002-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Trace Analysis of Polar Pharmaceuticals in Wastewater by LC-MS-MS: Comparison of Membrane Bioreactor and Activated Sludge Systems  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......Analysis of Polar Pharmaceuticals in Wastewater by LC-MS-MS: Comparison...compounds in three different wastewater recycling schemes in Australia. Chemosphere...fields irrigated with treated wastewater. J. Agric. Food. Chem. 53......

Mary Dawn Celiz; Sandra Pérez; Damià Barceló; Diana S. Aga

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Optimized Control Structure for a Wastewater Treatment Benchmark  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Optimized Control Structure for a Wastewater Treatment Benchmark Michela Mulas , Antonio Carlos wastewater treat- ment, give rise to both technical and economical challenges since most of the existing structure design the efficiency of a wastewater treatment plant can be improved, minimizing operational

Skogestad, Sigurd

53

Wastewater Recycle- A Sustainable Approach Towards Desalination  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Strictly Confidential WASTEWATER RECYCLE ? A SUSTAINABLE APPROACH TOWARDS DESALINATION Presented at Industrial Energy Technology Conference 35th IETC ? 2013 New Orleans May 22, 2013 Arun Mittal Aquatech International Corporation, USA... ? Background ? Wastewater Recycle Drivers ? Technologies for Recycle ? Examples ? Cooling Tower Blowdown Recycle ? Refinery Treated Effluent Recycle ? Petrochemical Effluent Recycle ESL-IE-13-05-07 Proceedings of the Thrity-Fifth Industrial Energy...

Mittal, A.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

LANL achieves milestone on path to zero wastewater discharge  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

LANL achieves milestone on wastewater discharge LANL achieves milestone on wastewater discharge LANL achieves milestone on path to zero wastewater discharge Industrial wastewater will be recycled as the result of a long-term strategy to treat wastewater rather than discharging it into the environment. January 20, 2012 Aerial view of Los Alamos National Laboratory Aerial view of Los Alamos National Laboratory. Contact Colleen Curran Communications Office (505) 664-0344 Email Improved compliance while recycling millions of gallons of industrial wastewater LOS ALAMOS, New Mexico, January 20, 2012-Millions of gallons of industrial wastewater will be recycled at Los Alamos National Laboratory as the result of a long-term strategy to treat wastewater rather than discharging it into the environment. The U. S. Environmental Protection Agency, which issues permits for

55

Treatment of Wastewater from Mineral Processing by using Algae.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Nowadays, the utilisation of algae in industrial processes to produce useful compounds or to treat waste streams is of great interest. Industrial wastewaters such as… (more)

Sprock, Stefan

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Attached growth fungal system for corn wet milling wastewater treatment.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??High organic strength food-processing wastewaters are typically treated with conventional aerobic systems such as an activated sludge process that produces substantial quantities of low value… (more)

Jasti, Nagapadma

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Waste minimization necessary for solving wastewater problems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Developing and implementing waste minimization procedures to correct the wastewater treatment problem are not as simple as identifying the problem. People cannot solve today's problems with the same kind of thinking that caused the problems. Nonetheless, industry primarily is using traditional treatment technologies to reduce wastewater. most companies are upgrading their wastewater treatment plants and installing treatment equipment in process areas whenever technically and economically feasible. The solution to ensuring wastewater compliance is recycling, waste minimization and moving toward zero discharge. Treating wastewater to the best possible quality still creates residual waste that must be disposed. In addition, regulatory limits continue to increase. Although some facilities can close and have closed the loop in certain processes, industry is pursuing waste minimization and the goal of zero discharge, given existing technology and economics. This, companies must taken an innovative approach to reducing wastewater volume and toxicity at the source.

Melody, M.

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Onsite Wastewater Treatment Systems: Sand Filters  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Sand filters are beds of granular material, or sand, drained from underneath so that pretreated wastewater can be treated, collected and distributed to a land application system. This publication explains the treatment, design, operation...

Lesikar, Bruce J.

2008-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

59

Monitoring Estrogen Compounds in Wastewater Recycling Systems  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The presence of pharmaceuticals and personal care products (PPCPs) and endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) in treated wastewater is gaining attention due to their potential ... quantify estrogen compounds in sa...

Deborah M. Kvanli; Sreelatha Marisetty; Todd A. Anderson…

2008-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

DECENTRALIZED WASTEWATER MANAGEMENT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 DECENTRALIZED WASTEWATER MANAGEMENT: A GUIDEBOOK FOR GEORGIA COMMUNITIES Katie Sheehan wastewater treatment technologies. www.njunsystems.com Version 1.0, April 2013 #12; 2 DECENTRALIZED WASTEWATER MANAGEMENT: A GUIDEBOOK FOR GEORGIA COMMUNITIES PART ONE: BACKGROUND, ISSUES, AND PROGRAM

Rosemond, Amy Daum

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tw treated wastewater" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Design and study of a risk management criterion for an unstable anaerobic wastewater  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Design and study of a risk management criterion for an unstable anaerobic wastewater treatment an unstable biological process used for wastewater treat- ment. This anaerobic digestion ecosystem can have popular bioprocess (Angelidaki et al., 2003) that treats wastewater and at the same time produces energy

Bernard, Olivier

62

S M TW T F S SM TWT F S  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

' - ' - S M TW T F S SM TWT F S 12 3 4 567 1 2345 ,May@°^i«^f 0Gi^ °"8 91011121314 6 78 9101112 M aB ynw WW 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 M ay 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 29 30 27 28 29 30 31 Monday. Apt 3C _- Thursday, May 03 Tuesday, May 01i_ Fnday, May ___ Wednesday. ay 021 oSatluay, May o Sunday, May O Hutto, Chase 1 2o6 4 DOE034-0018 hllag f -^ *May 2001 June2001 IMSa' y 07 - s M TW T F S S M TW T F S 1234 5 12 6 7 8 910 11 12 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 et-ayB W :~L.t~a3^ ~13 14 1516 17 18 19 10111213141516 filay .13 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 27 28 29 30 31 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 Monday, May 07 Thursday, May 1 , ___ Tuesday, May 0 ______ Friday, May 11 Weanesday, May 0o Saturday, May 1 ,_ _ __ Sunday, May 3 Huno, aase 1 2alw°5 DOE034-0019

63

WASTEWATER SYSTEMS Henrik Bechmann  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MODELLING OF WASTEWATER SYSTEMS Henrik Bechmann Lyngby 1999 ATV Erhvervsforskerprojekt EF 623 IMM, N. K. (1998). Control of sewer systems and wastewater treatment plants using pollutant concentration., and Nielsen, M. K. (1999). Grey box modelling of first flush and incoming wastewater at a wastewater treatment

64

Organic removal from domestic wastewater by activated alumina adsorption  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the major groups of pollutants in wastewaters. Adsorption by granular activated carbon, a non-polar adsorbent, is now the primary treatment process for removal of residual organics from biologically treated wastewater. The ability of activated alumina..., which is a polar adsorbent, to remove total organic carbon (TOC) and some trace organics from domestic wastewater has been evaluated. Batch adsorption experiments were used to investigate the effect of pH and total dissolved solids on activated...

Yang, Pe-Der

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

65

On-Site Wastewater Treatment Systems: Mound System  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Septic tank Pump tank Distribution pipe Sand Gravel Geotextile fabric On-site wastewater treatment systems Mound system Bruce Lesikar and Vance Weynand Associate Professor and Extension Agricultural Engineering Specialist, Extension Assistant... The Texas A&M University System L-5414 4-02 Figure 1: A mound system for distributing treated wastewater to the soil. A mound system for wastewater is a soil absorption system placed above the natural surface of the ground. Mound systems are used...

Lesikar, B.; Waynard, V.

66

CC --3.0 CC https://isp.moe.edu.tw/ccedu/service.php  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

#12;#12; CC -- 3.0 CC https://isp.moe.edu.tw/ccedu/service.php #12 -- 3.0 CC https://isp.moe.edu.tw/ccedu/service.php x/rp=-1,y/rp=0 II ( )© Phil Armitage #12/JPL/Space Science Institute #12; A B Cassini Division C A CC -- 3.0 CC https://isp.moe.edu.tw/ccedu/service.php

Wang, Ming-Jye

67

Inorganic Nitrogen Removal from Wastewater: Effect on Phytoplankton Growth in Coastal Marine Waters  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...secondarily treated wastewater and controlling eutrophication...PRODUCTION FROM SEA BY RECYCLING HUMAN WASTES, BIOSCIENCE...nitrogen removal from wastewater: effect on phytoplankton...depending on the type of wastewater used, there may be...re-moval and waste recycling. JOEL C. GOLDMAN...

Joel C. Goldman; Kenneth R. Tenore; Helen I. Stanley

1973-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Reducing the Anaerobic Digestion Model N1 for its application to an industrial wastewater treatment plant  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the Anaerobic Digestion Model N°1 for its application to an industrial wastewater treatment plant treating winery effluent wastewater Carlos García-Diéguez 1 , Olivier Bernard 2 , Enrique Roca 1, * 1 USC ­ PRODES for winery effluent wastewater. A new reduced stoichiometric matrix was identified and the kinetic parameters

Boyer, Edmond

69

Water Research 39 (2005) 49614968 Electricity generation from swine wastewater using microbial  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Water Research 39 (2005) 4961­4968 Electricity generation from swine wastewater using microbial September 2005 Abstract Microbial fuel cells (MFCs) represent a new method for treating animal wastewaters indicated that electricity could be generated from swine wastewater containing 83207190 mg/L of soluble

70

Pharmaceuticals in wastewater: Behavior, preferences, and willingness to pay for a disposal program  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Pharmaceuticals in wastewater: Behavior, preferences, and willingness to pay for a disposal program Contingent valuation Willingness to pay Wastewater a b s t r a c t The presence of pharmaceutical compounds in treated wastewater and in surface waters is a growing environmental concern. This paper provides

Kotchen, Matthew J.

71

Journal of Membrane Science 257 (2005) 8598 Membrane contactor processes for wastewater reclamation in space  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Journal of Membrane Science 257 (2005) 85­98 Membrane contactor processes for wastewater membrane processes for reclamation and reuse of wastewater in future space missions was evaluated and used in estimating the specific energy cost of treating the wastewater generated in space. The weight

72

Accepted Manuscript High occurrence of Hepatitis E virus in samples from wastewater treatment plants in  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Accepted Manuscript High occurrence of Hepatitis E virus in samples from wastewater treatment-Bianchi, D., Oppliger, A., High occurrence of Hepatitis E virus in samples from wastewater treatment plants MANUSCRIPT Highlights Hepatitis E virus (HEV) was searched in raw and treated wastewater in Switzerland

Alvarez, Nadir

73

Interrelated Effects of Aeration and Mixed Liquor Fractions on Membrane Fouling for Submerged Membrane Bioreactor Processes in Wastewater Treatment  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Interrelated Effects of Aeration and Mixed Liquor Fractions on Membrane Fouling for Submerged Membrane Bioreactor Processes in Wastewater Treatment ... using hollow fibers was applied to wastewater treated by the activated-sludge process. ...

Fengshen Fan; Hongde Zhou

2007-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

74

WASTEWATER SYSTEMS Henrik Bechmann  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MODELLING OF WASTEWATER SYSTEMS Henrik Bechmann Lyngby 1999 ATV Erhvervsforskerprojekt EF 623 IMM., and Poulsen, N. K. (1998). Control of sewer systems and wastewater treatment plants using pollutant, N. K., and Nielsen, M. K. (1999). Grey box modelling of first flush and incoming wastewater

75

Separation of Tritium from Wastewater  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A proprietary tritium loading bed developed by Molecular Separations, Inc (MSI) has been shown to selectively load tritiated water as waters of hydration at near ambient temperatures. Tests conducted with a 126 {micro}C{sub 1} tritium/liter water standard mixture showed reductions to 25 {micro}C{sub 1}/L utilizing two, 2-meter long columns in series. Demonstration tests with Hanford Site wastewater samples indicate an approximate tritium concentration reduction from 0.3 {micro}C{sub 1}/L to 0.07 {micro}C{sub 1}/L for a series of two, 2-meter long stationary column beds Further reduction to less than 0.02 {micro}C{sub 1}/L, the current drinking water maximum contaminant level (MCL), is projected with additional bed media in series. Tritium can be removed from the loaded beds with a modest temperature increase and the beds can be reused Results of initial tests are presented and a moving bed process for treating large quantities of wastewaters is proposed. The moving bed separation process appears promising to treat existing large quantities of wastewater at various US Department of Energy (DOE) sites. The enriched tritium stream can be grouted for waste disposition. The separations system has also been shown to reduce tritium concentrations in nuclear reactor cooling water to levels that allow reuse. Energy requirements to reconstitute the loading beds and waste disposal costs for this process appear modest.

JEPPSON, D.W.

2000-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

76

Development of a Fatty Acid and RNA Stable Isotope Probing-Based Method for Tracking Protist Grazing on Bacteria in Wastewater  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...which enables mass balances of the carbon...Treated wastewater will be of...wastewater treatment in such systems...municipal sewage plant (for details...bacteria in wastewater. | Removal...during wastewater treatment, is effected...which enables mass balances of the carbon...

Steffen Kuppardt; Antonis Chatzinotas; Matthias Kästner

2010-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

77

On-Site Wastewater Treatment Systems: Leaching Chambers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Leaching chambers distribute treated wastewater into the soil. This publication lists the advantages and disadvantages of leaching chamber systems, explains how to maintain them and gives estimates of costs....

Lesikar, Bruce J.

2000-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

78

On-Site Wastewater Treatment Systems: Gravel-less Pipe  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Gravel-less pipe systems distribute treated wastewater into the soil. This publication lists the advantages and disadvantages of gravel-less pipe systems, explains how to maintain them and gives estimates of costs....

Lesikar, Bruce J.

2000-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

79

DISTANCE AND KINEMATICS OF THE TW HYDRAE ASSOCIATION FROM PARALLAXES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

From common proper motion and signatures of youth, researchers have identified about 30 members of a putative TW Hydrae Association. Only four of these had parallactic distances from Hipparcos. We have measured parallaxes and proper motions for 14 primary members. We combine these with literature values of radial velocities to show that the Galactic space motions of the stars, with the exception of TWA 9 and 22, are parallel and do not indicate convergence at a common formation point sometime in the last few million years. The space motions of TWA 9 and 22 do not agree with the others and indicate that they are not TWA members. The median parallax is 18 mas or 56 pc. We further analyze the stars' absolute magnitudes on pre-main-sequence evolutionary tracks and find a range of ages with a median of 10.1 Myr and no correlation between age and Galactic location. The TWA stars may have formed from an extended and filamentary molecular cloud but are not necessarily precisely coeval.

Weinberger, Alycia J.; Boss, Alan P. [Department of Terrestrial Magnetism, Carnegie Institution of Washington, 5241 Broad Branch Road NW, Washington, DC 20015 (United States)] [Department of Terrestrial Magnetism, Carnegie Institution of Washington, 5241 Broad Branch Road NW, Washington, DC 20015 (United States); Anglada-Escude, Guillem, E-mail: weinberger@dtm.ciw.edu [Institut fuer Astrophysik, Universitaet Goettingen, Friedrich-Hund-Platz 1, 37077 Goettingen (Germany)] [Institut fuer Astrophysik, Universitaet Goettingen, Friedrich-Hund-Platz 1, 37077 Goettingen (Germany)

2013-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

80

RECOMMENDED GUIDELINES FOR WASTEWATER CHARACTERIZATION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

#12;RECOMMENDED GUIDELINES FOR WASTEWATER CHARACTERIZATION IN THE FRASER RIVER BASIN VOLUME II Ont. June 1993 Amended April 1994 #12;GUIDELINES FOR WASTEWATER CHARACTERIZATION PREFACE Ltd., Calgary, Alberta. #12;GUIDELINES FOR WASTEWATER CHARACTERIZATION EXECUTIVE SUMMARY The Fraser

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tw treated wastewater" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Neutron generation induced by laser fusion by using a 10TW femtosecond Ti:Sapphire laser  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A 10TW Ti:Sapphire laser is used to generate DD fusion neutrons and the characteristics of plasma has been investigated. Neutrons are generated from deuterium clusters which are formed...

Nam, Sungmo; Han, Jaemin; Rhee, Yongjoo; Lee, Yongwoo; Cha, Yong-Ho; Cha, Hyung Ki

82

Treatment of wastewater effluents from paper-recycling plants by coagulation process and optimization of treatment conditions with response surface methodology  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In the present study, a coagulation process was used to treat paper-recycling wastewater with alum coupled with poly aluminum chloride ... optimum conditions for high treatment efficiency of paper-recycling wastewater

Noushin Birjandi; Habibollah Younesi; Nader Bahramifar

2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Decentralized wastewater management  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Decentralized wastewater management systems maintain both the solid and liquid fractions of the wastewater near their point of origin. In the future, as long-term strategies are developed to optimize the use of water resources and to protect the environment, it is clear that decentralized systems will become an important element of those strategies.

Tchobanoglous, G.

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Presence and Distribution of Organic Wastewater Compounds in Wastewater,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Presence and Distribution of Organic Wastewater Compounds in Wastewater, Surface, Ground.W., Meyer, M.T., and Zaugg, S.D., 2004, Presence and distri- bution of organic wastewater compounds in wastewater, surface, ground, and drinking waters, Minnesota, 2000-02: U.S. Geological Survey Scientific

85

Water Treatment System Cleans Marcellus Shale Wastewater | Department of  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Water Treatment System Cleans Marcellus Shale Wastewater Water Treatment System Cleans Marcellus Shale Wastewater Water Treatment System Cleans Marcellus Shale Wastewater April 13, 2011 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - A water treatment system that can turn wastewater into clean water has been shown to reduce potential environmental impacts associated with producing natural gas from shale formations in the Appalachian basin. Altela Inc.'s AltelaRain® 4000 water desalination system was tested at BLX, Inc.'s Sleppy well site in Indiana County, Pa. as part of a National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL)-sponsored demonstration. During nine continuous months of operation, the unit successfully treated 77 percent of the water stream onsite, providing distilled water as the product. The average treated water cost per barrel over the demonstration period was

86

Water Treatment System Cleans Marcellus Shale Wastewater | Department of  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Water Treatment System Cleans Marcellus Shale Wastewater Water Treatment System Cleans Marcellus Shale Wastewater Water Treatment System Cleans Marcellus Shale Wastewater April 13, 2011 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - A water treatment system that can turn wastewater into clean water has been shown to reduce potential environmental impacts associated with producing natural gas from shale formations in the Appalachian basin. Altela Inc.'s AltelaRain® 4000 water desalination system was tested at BLX, Inc.'s Sleppy well site in Indiana County, Pa. as part of a National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL)-sponsored demonstration. During nine continuous months of operation, the unit successfully treated 77 percent of the water stream onsite, providing distilled water as the product. The average treated water cost per barrel over the demonstration period was

87

Small Community Wastewater Cluster Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Small Community Wastewater Cluster Systems Don Jones, Jacqui Bauer, Richard Wise, and Alan Dunn* ID-265 #12;Small Community Wastewater Cluster Systems ID-265 2 It is the policy of the Purdue University Community Wastewater Cluster Systems ID-265 3 Small Community Wastewater Cluster Systems Table of Contents

Holland, Jeffrey

88

Removal of Chloride from Wastewater by Advanced Softening Process Using Electrochemically Generated Aluminum Hydroxide  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, several processes have been employed in removing chloride from water and wastewater. 3 Among these processes are reverse osmosis and electrodialysis [8]. However these technologies are nonselective and expensive. They also produce brine, which has... and other dissolved solids is an important step before reuse of treated wastewater. Furthermore, chloride removal from industrial wastewater can facilitate water reuse and recycle. Reverse osmosis (RO) is widely used for chloride and other dissolved...

Mustafa, Syed Faisal

2014-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

89

Wastewater reclamation and reuse  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Municipal wastewater reclamation and reuse has been practiced for ... are emphasized with several examples of successful water recycling on a worldwide basis given. The discussion ... This is to be distinguishedf...

R. D. Heaton

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Hohlraum energetics scaling to 520 TW on the National Ignition Facility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Indirect drive experiments have now been carried out with laser powers and energies up to 520 TW and 1.9 MJ. These experiments show that the energy coupling to the target is nearly constant at 84% ± 3% over a wide range of laser parameters from 350 to 520 TW and 1.2 to 1.9 MJ. Experiments at 520 TW with depleted uranium hohlraums achieve radiation temperatures of ?330 ± 4 eV, enough to drive capsules 20 ?m thicker than the ignition point design to velocities near the ignition goal of 370 km/s. A series of three symcap implosion experiments with nearly identical target, laser, and diagnostics configurations show the symmetry and drive are reproducible at the level of ±8.5% absolute and ±2% relative, respectively.

Kline, J. L.; Grim, G.; Kyrala, G. A.; Batha, S. H. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States)] [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); Callahan, D. A.; Glenzer, S. H.; Meezan, N. B.; Moody, J. D.; Hinkel, D. E.; Jones, O. S.; MacKinnon, A. J.; Bennedetti, R.; Berger, R. L.; Bradley, D.; Dewald, E. L.; Bass, I.; Bennett, C.; Bowers, M.; Brunton, G.; Bude, J. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States)] [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); and others

2013-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

91

Wastewater heat recovery apparatus  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A heat recovery system is described with a heat exchanger and a mixing valve. A drain trap includes a heat exchanger with an inner coiled tube, baffle plate, wastewater inlet, wastewater outlet, cold water inlet, and preheated water outlet. Wastewater enters the drain trap through the wastewater inlet, is slowed and spread by the baffle plate, and passes downward to the wastewater outlet. Cold water enters the inner tube through the cold water inlet and flows generally upward, taking on heat from the wastewater. This preheated water is fed to the mixing valve, which includes a flexible yoke to which are attached an adjustable steel rod, two stationary zinc rods, and a pivoting arm. The free end of the arm forms a pad which rests against a valve seat. The rods and pivoting arm expand or contract as the temperature of the incoming preheated water changes. The zinc rods expand more than the steel rod, flexing the yoke and rotating the pivoting arm. The pad moves towards the valve seat as the temperature of the preheated water rises, and away as the temperature falls, admitting a variable amount of hot water to maintain a nearly constant average process water temperature. 6 figs.

Kronberg, J.W.

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Wastewater heat recovery apparatus  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A heat recovery system with a heat exchanger and a mixing valve. A drain trap includes a heat exchanger with an inner coiled tube, baffle plate, wastewater inlet, wastewater outlet, cold water inlet, and preheated water outlet. Wastewater enters the drain trap through the wastewater inlet, is slowed and spread by the baffle plate, and passes downward to the wastewater outlet. Cold water enters the inner tube through the cold water inlet and flows generally upward, taking on heat from the wastewater. This preheated water is fed to the mixing valve, which includes a flexible yoke to which are attached an adjustable steel rod, two stationary zinc rods, and a pivoting arm. The free end of the arm forms a pad which rests against a valve seat. The rods and pivoting arm expand or contract as the temperature of the incoming preheated water changes. The zinc rods expand more than the steel rod, flexing the yoke and rotating the pivoting arm. The pad moves towards the valve seat as the temperature of the preheated water rises, and away as the temperature falls, admitting a variable amount of hot water to maintain a nearly constant average process water temperature.

Kronberg, James W. (108 Independent Blvd., Aiken, SC 29801)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Rates of Microbial Transformation of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons in Water and Sediments in the Vicinity of a Coal-Coking Wastewater Discharge  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Sediments in the Vicinity of a Coal-Coking Wastewater Discharge Stephen E...collected in the vicinity of a coal-coking treated wastewater discharge from...sediments in the vicinity of a coal-coking wastewater discharge. | To facilitate...

Stephen E. Herbes

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Biological treatment of a seafood processing wastewater  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The seafood industry in Tampa is a multi-million dollar-per-year industry which heavily impacts the environment with large volumes of wastewater containing high concentrations of suspended solids and nitrogen. A 10 liter per day, bench-scale, wastewater treatment facility was designed, constructed, and operated for approximately eight (8) months to collect treat ability data on a seafood-processing wastewater. The bench-scale reactor consisted of a single-sludge, extended aeration, modified Ludzack-Ettinger (MLE) process for biologically removing carbon, nitrogen, and phosphorus from the wastewater. Influent and effluent data collected on the system included: chemical oxygen demand (COD), total suspended solids (TSS), total Kjeldahl nitrogen (TKN), ammonia nitrogen, nitrite nitrogen, nitrate nitrogen, total nitrogen (TN), pH, total phosphorus (TP), dissolved oxygen (DO), alkalinity, and temperature. All analyses were performed in accordance with Standard Methods (1992). Typical influent characteristics were: 900--4,000 mg/L COD, 45--110 mg/L TKN, 150--2,000 mg/L TSS, and 40--80 mg/L TP. Solids residence time (SRT) served as the primary control parameter with average STR's of 4.5, 6.4, 8.5, and 30.9 days observed during the study. The following biokinetic constants were determined from the data: a yield coefficient (Y) of 0.49 mg TSS/mg COD and an endogenous decay coefficient (k{sub e}) of 0.11 days{sup {minus}1}.

Mines, R.O. Jr.; Robertson, R.R. II

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

In search of some R and R: Industries, cities gravitate toward wastewater recycling, reuse  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Although its advantages are touted highly by experts, wastewater recycling is still a relatively new and complex issue for environmental managers. Industries increasingly are seeking cost-effective, efficient ways to recycle their wastewater rather than merely treat it, and, as such, are beginning to realize some long-term benefits because of improved production processes and conservation of limited resources.

Nichele, V.B.

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Removal of indicator bacteria from municipal wastewater in an experimental two-stage vertical flow constructed  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Removal of indicator bacteria from municipal wastewater in an experimental two-stage vertical flow, but no measurements were done during summer. Recycling of treated effluent back to the sedimentation tank did reasons for wastewater treatment. Constructed wetland systems remove pathogens by factors such as natural

Brix, Hans

97

SOME TCD LICENSEES 2011-12 27. Waste-Water Distribution Device  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Development Stage: Licensed Company Contact: Molloy Precast In rural areas wastewater from houses is treatedSOME TCD LICENSEES 2011-12 27. Waste-Water Distribution Device Researcher: Laurence Gill and disposed on-site through a process of septic tank treatment followed by discharge to the subsoil. An even

O'Mahony, Donal E.

98

TW Chapter 3 -Roush This chapter is meant to deepen and broaden an argument that goes something like this  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

by something local (due to something like a classical causal picture) and that's both why mental states can1 TW Chapter 3 - Roush This chapter is meant to deepen and broaden an argument that goes something is broad, TW argued that knowledge can add something mental to belief or rational belief or... whatever

Fitelson, Branden

99

Domestic wastewater treatment with membrane filtration—two years experience  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This study tested domestic wastewater treatment membrane filtration without external cleaning in sustained long term operation. Domestic wastewater treatment plant monitoring was performed at the municipal wastewater treatment plant Devínska Nová Ves, Bratislava between February 2005 and July 2007. Two membrane modules were tested by immersion in the domestic wastewater treatment plant. The flat sheet membrane module was operated without external cleaning at a flux of 20–60 L/m2 h for 6 months. The hollow fiber membrane module was operated for 4 months without external cleaning with a flux of 20–45 L/m2 h. Parallel operation of flat sheet and hollow fiber membrane modules showed similar results in effluent water quality. Both membrane modules were able to effectively remove organic matter (as much as 91%) and more than 97% of NH4+?N. Nitrogen removal via denitrification was observed during the short periods with low oxygen concentration. Treated water contained suspended solids under measurable limits.

A. Blšt’áková; I. Bodík; L. Dan?ová; Z. Jakub?ová

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

NEW EVIDENCE SUPPORTING MEMBERSHIP FOR TW NOR IN LYNGA 6 AND THE CENTAURUS SPIRAL ARM  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The putative association between the 10{sub .}{sup d}8 classical Cepheid TW Nor and the open cluster Lynga 6 has generated considerable debate in the literature. New JHK{sub s} photometry in tandem with existing radial velocities for Lynga 6 stars implies cluster membership for TW Nor and establishes the variable as a high-weight calibrator for classical Cepheid relations. Fundamental mean parameters determined for Lynga 6 are: d = 1.91 {+-} 0.10 kpc, E(J - H) = 0.38 {+-} 0.02, and log {tau} = 7.9 {+-} 0.1. The Benedict et al./Turner Galactic VI{sub c} Wesenheit function was revised using TW Nor's new parameters: W{sub VI,0} (- 3.37 {+-} 0.08)log P{sub 0} - 2.48 {+-} 0.08. TW Nor/Lynga 6 lie beyond the Sagittarius-Carina spiral arm and occupy the Centaurus arm, along with innumerable young Cepheids and clusters (e.g., VW Cen and VVV CL070).

Majaess, Daniel; Turner, David [Department of Astronomy and Physics, Saint Mary's University, Halifax, Nova Scotia (Canada); Moni Bidin, Christian; Mauro, Francesco; Geisler, Douglas; Gieren, Wolfgang; Chene, Andre-Nicolas [Departamento de Astronomia, Universidad de Concepcion, Concepcion (Chile); Minniti, Dante; Saito, Roberto K. [Departamento Astronomia y Astrofisica, Pontificia Universidad Catolica de Chile, Santiago (Chile); Lucas, Philip [Centre for Astrophysics Research, University of Hertfordshire, Hatfield (United Kingdom); Borissova, Jura; Kurtev, Radostn [Departamento de Fisica y Astronomia, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Valparaiso, Valparaiso (Chile); Dekany, Istvan, E-mail: dmajaess@ap.smu.ca [Konkoly Observatory, Budapest (Hungary)

2011-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tw treated wastewater" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Assessing the feasibility of wastewater recycling and treatment efficiency of wastewater treatment units  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Wastewater reuse can significantly reduce environmental pollution and ... in southern Taiwan to discuss the feasibility of wastewater recycling and treatment efficiency of wastewater treatment units. The treatmen...

Jie-Chung Lou; Yung-Chang Lin

2008-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Doctoral Defense "Sustainable Wastewater Management  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Doctoral Defense "Sustainable Wastewater Management: Modeling and Decision Strategies for Unused Medications and Wastewater Solids" Sherri Cook Date: May 22, 2014 Time: 11:00 AM Location: 2355 GGB Chair to help decision-makers evaluate new practices for sustainable wastewater management. To this end

Kamat, Vineet R.

103

WASTEWATER TREATMENT OVER SAND COLUMNS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

93/0096 WASTEWATER TREATMENT OVER SAND COLUMNS TREATMENT YIELDS, LOCALISATION OF THE BIOMASS Domestic wastewater treatment by infiltration-percolation is a process that becomming common in France, a greater depth for desinfection purposes. KEYWORDS Wastewater treatment, Infiltration-percolation. Sand

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

104

GRR/Section 18-ID-c - Wastewater Pretreatment Permit | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

8-ID-c - Wastewater Pretreatment Permit 8-ID-c - Wastewater Pretreatment Permit < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 18-ID-c - Wastewater Pretreatment Permit 18IDCWastewaterPretreatmentPermit.pdf Click to View Fullscreen Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 18IDCWastewaterPretreatmentPermit.pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Flowchart Narrative Industrial wastewater permits are issued at the local level. If wastewater is not discharged into a municipal sewer system, the nonpoint source and NPDES permit inquiries are sufficient. A common approach to wastewater treatment is to treat on-site. See Idaho's

105

Estimation of E. coli Concentrations from Failing On-Site Wastewater Treatment Facilities (OWTS) Using GIS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Failing Onsite Wastewater Treatment Systems (OWTSs) have been identified as a significant threat to water quality, discharging significant amounts of inadequately treated sewage effluents. When developing a Watershed Protection Plan (WPP), OWTS has...

Virani, Afreen Shiraz

2014-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

106

On-Site Wastewater Treatment Systems: Conventional Septic Tank/Drain Field (Spanish)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Conventional septic tanks have been the most commonly used technology for treating wastewater. This publication explains the advantages, disadvantages, maintenance steps and estimated costs of septic tank/drain field systems....

Lesikar, Bruce J.

1999-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

107

On-Site Wastewater Treatment Systems: Conventional Septic Tank/Drain Field  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Conventional septic systems have traditionally been the most commonly used technology for treating wastewater. This publication explains the advantages and disadvantages of conventional septic tank/drain fields, as well as estimated costs...

Lesikar, Bruce J.

1999-09-06T23:59:59.000Z

108

On-Site Wastewater Treatment Systems: Low-Pressure Dosing System  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A low-pressure dosing system treats wastewater and then pumps it into the soil several times daily. This publication explains the advantages and disadvantages of low-pressure dosing systems as well as estimated costs and maintenance requirements....

Lesikar, Bruce J.

1999-09-06T23:59:59.000Z

109

Electricity generation and treatment of paper recycling wastewater using a microbial fuel cell  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Increased interest in sustainable agriculture and bio-based industries requires that we find more energy-efficient methods for treating cellulose-containing wastewaters. We examined the effectiveness of simultane...

Liping Huang; Bruce E. Logan

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Modeling of recycling oxic and anoxic treatment system for swine wastewater using neural networks  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A recycling reactor system operated under sequential anoxic and oxic conditions for the treatment of swine wastewater has been developed, in which piggery slurry ... treated and then part of the effluent is recycled

Jung-Hye Choi; Jun-Il Sohn; Hyun-Sook Yang…

2000-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Reactive Transport Modeling of Natural Attenuation in Stormwater Bioretention Cells and Under Land Application of Wastewater  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Natural attenuation is a cost effective method to treat wastewater applied into soil. The natural attenuation process includes diffusion, dispersion, microbial activity, oxidation, mineral precipitation, sorption, and ion exchange to mitigate...

Zhang, Jingqiu

2014-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

112

Falmouth Wastewater | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Wastewater Wastewater Jump to: navigation, search Name Falmouth Wastewater Facility Falmouth Wastewater Sector Wind energy Facility Type Community Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Falmouth Wastewater Developer Falmouth Wastewater Energy Purchaser Falmouth Wastewater Location Falmouth MA Coordinates 41.566789°, -70.608791° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.566789,"lon":-70.608791,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

113

Energy and air emission implications of a decentralized wastewater system  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

and air emission implications of a decentralized wastewater system and air emission implications of a decentralized wastewater system Title Energy and air emission implications of a decentralized wastewater system Publication Type Journal Article Year of Publication 2012 Authors Shehabi, Arman, Jennifer R. Stokes, and Arpad Horvath Journal Environmental Research Letters Volume 7 Issue 2 Abstract Both centralized and decentralized wastewater systems have distinct engineering, financial and societal benefits. This paper presents a framework for analyzing the environmental effects of decentralized wastewater systems and an evaluation of the environmental impacts associated with two currently operating systems in California, one centralized and one decentralized. A comparison of energy use, greenhouse gas emissions and criteria air pollutants from the systems shows that the scale economies of the centralized plant help lower the environmental burden to less than a fifth of that of the decentralized utility for the same volume treated. The energy and emission burdens of the decentralized plant are reduced when accounting for high-yield wastewater reuse if it supplants an energy-intensive water supply like a desalination one. The centralized facility also reduces greenhouse gases by flaring methane generated during the treatment process, while methane is directly emitted from the decentralized system. The results are compelling enough to indicate that the life-cycle environmental impacts of decentralized designs should be carefully evaluated as part of the design process.

114

Introduction to Wastewater Bruce J. Lesikar  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Introduction to Wastewater Treatment Bruce J. Lesikar Professor Texas AgriLife Extension Service Overview What is wastewater? Why are we concerned about wastewater? The big picture. Goals for wastewater treatment are evolving How do we implement our infrastructure? Wastewater Treatment Processes ­ The end

115

EIS-0224: Southeast Regional Wastewater Treatment Plant Facilities Improvements  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

"This EIS analyzes the Lake County Sanitation District joint venture with the geothermal industry, specifically the Northern California Power Agency, Calpine Corporation (Calpine), and Pacific Gas and Electric Company, to develop a plan for disposal of secondary-treated effluent from the Southeast Regional Wastewater Treatment Plant near the City of Clearlake, California, in the Southeast Geysers Geothermal Steam Field."

116

SM TW T F S S M T W T F  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Mardh 2001 Mardh 2001 February 09, 2001 SM TW T F S S M T W T F C^^-n'~~~.da.d 1 23 1 23 Friday 45 6 7 8910 4 S 6 7 8 910 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 226272829 30 31 800 __s^ ^ __,, _ _____ _ _ Noti Mee w/Gal Mars & Bob ipp - 5A10. 900 :Meet w/Coates, Gutteridge, N. Hebron, Knipp, sbjStategies for NE, 5A110. _00 500 .~ __ 300 6-00 _ -- Magwood, Wlliam 9 3/28/02 26812 DOE035-0040 February 2001 Marct 2001 February 10, 2001 5 M TW T F S SM TW T Sat a I ' 123 123 ~~~~Saturday~~ ~4 5 6 7 8 910 4 5 6 7 8 910 SaturdaIy , 11 12 1314 15 16 17 11 12 13 14 15 1617 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 Notes 7am 800 900 100 12n I00 20 0 300 400 5oo, 600 Magwood, William 10 3/28/02 26813DO

117

Emerging chemical contaminants in water and wastewater  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...contaminants in water and wastewater' compiled and edited by Michael...contaminants in water and wastewater Michael R. Templeton 1...activated sludge process in wastewater treatment, whereby the pollutants...the impact on agricultural recycling. Disinfection by-products...

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Integrating farming and wastewater management.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Source separating wastewater systems are often motivated by their integration with farming. It is thus important to scrutinise the critical factors associated with such integration.… (more)

Tidåker, Pernilla

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Field's Point Wastewater Treatment Facility (Narragansett Bay...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Field's Point Wastewater Treatment Facility (Narragansett Bay Commission) Jump to: navigation, search Name Field's Point Wastewater Treatment Facility (Narragansett Bay Commission)...

120

Portable wastewater flow meter  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A portable wastewater flow meter particularly adapted for temporary use at a single location in measuring the rate of liquid flow in a circular entrance conduit of a sewer manhole both under free flow and submerged, open channel conditions and under fill pipe, surcharged conditions, comprising an apparatus having a cylindrical external surface and an inner surface that constricts the flow through the apparatus in such a manner that a relationship exists between (1) the difference between the static pressure head of liquid flowing through the entrance of the apparatus and the static pressure head of liquid flowing through the constriction, and (2) the rate of liquid flow through the apparatus.

Hunter, Robert M. (320 S. Wilson Ave., Bozeman, MT 59715)

1999-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tw treated wastewater" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Portable wastewater flow meter  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A portable wastewater flow meter particularly adapted for temporary use at a single location in measuring the rate of liquid flow in a circular entrance conduit of a sewer manhole both under free flow and submerged, open channel conditions and under full pipe, surcharged conditions, comprising an apparatus having a cylindrical external surface and an inner surface that constricts the flow through the apparatus in such a manner that a relationship exists between (1) the difference between the static pressure head of liquid flowing through the entrance of the apparatus and the static pressure head of liquid flowing through the constriction, and (2) the rate of liquid flow through the apparatus.

Hunter, Robert M. (320 S. Wilson Ave., Bozeman, MT 59715)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Annual productivity of Spirulina (Arthrospira) and nutrient removal in a pig wastewater recycling process under tropical conditions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

An evaluation was made of the annual productivity of Spirulina (Arthrospira) and its ability to remove nutrients in outdoor raceways treating anaerobic effluents from pig wastewater under tropical conditions. The...

Eugenia J. Olguín; Sonia Galicia; Gabriel Mercado…

2003-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

STATE ESTIMATION FOR WASTEWATER TREATMENT PROCESSES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CHAPTER 1 STATE ESTIMATION FOR WASTEWATER TREATMENT PROCESSES O. Bernard1 , B. Chachuat2 , and J sensors (also called observers) for wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs). We give an overview in "Wastewater Quality Monitoring and Wastewater Quality Monitoring and Treatment, Philippe Quevauviller (Ed

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

124

Simultaneous wastewater treatment and biological electricity generation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Simultaneous wastewater treatment and biological electricity generation B.E. Logan Department accomplishing wastewater treatment in processes based on microbial fuel cell technologies. When bacteria oxidize.4 £ 106 L of wastewater, a wastewater treatment plant has the potential to become a 2.3 MW power plant

125

nr 1/2012 tom 66 7 One more function for microbial fuel cells in treating  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

science nr 1/2012 · tom 66 · 7 One more function for microbial fuel cells in treating wastewater production, and water recovery. Microbial fuel cells (MFCs) have gained significant attention because of their integrated wastewater treatment and bioenergy production. MFCs are bio-electrochemical reactors in which

126

Engineered nanoparticles in wastewater and wastewater sludge - Evidence and impacts  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Nanotechnology has widespread application in agricultural, environmental and industrial sectors ranging from fabrication of molecular assemblies to microbial array chips. Despite the booming application of nanotechnology, there have been serious implications which are coming into light in the recent years within different environmental compartments, namely air, water and soil and its likely impact on the human health. Health and environmental effects of common metals and materials are well-known, however, when the metals and materials take the form of nanoparticles - consequential hazards based on shape and size are yet to be explored. The nanoparticles released from different nanomaterials used in our household and industrial commodities find their way through waste disposal routes into the wastewater treatment facilities and end up in wastewater sludge. Further escape of these nanoparticles into the effluent will contaminate the aquatic and soil environment. Hence, an understanding of the presence, behavior and impact of these nanoparticles in wastewater and wastewater sludge is necessary and timely. Despite the lack of sufficient literature, the present review attempts to link various compartmentalization aspects of the nanoparticles, their physical properties and toxicity in wastewater and wastewater sludge through simile drawn from other environmental streams.

Brar, Satinder K., E-mail: satinder.brar@ete.inrs.c [INRS-ETE, Universite du Quebec, 490, Rue de la Couronne, Quebec, G1K 9A9 (Canada); Verma, Mausam [Department of Biological Engineering, Sexton Campus, Dalhousie University, Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada B3J 2X4 (Canada); Tyagi, R.D. [INRS-ETE, Universite du Quebec, 490, Rue de la Couronne, Quebec, G1K 9A9 (Canada); Surampalli, R.Y. [US Environmental Protection Agency, P.O. Box 17-2141, Kansas City, KS 66117 (United States)

2010-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

127

Using CO2 & Algae to Treat Wastewater and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

,000 million gallons per day 24,000 million liters per day 1.5 MWh/MG additional Nutrient Removal 2016 2 with CO2 Addition · N Removal vs. Bioflocculation · Cell Recycle Rate vs. Bioflocculation & Effluent removal 80 - 95% Natural Disinfection 1 - 2 log removal per pond N removal 20% - 70% P removal 10% - 50

Keller, Arturo A.

128

Evaluation of treated wastewater for the production of Syngonium podophyllum  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ?, 83 83 LIST OF FIGURES FIGURE Page Height of plants irrigated with various percentages of RO and RW. 58 Width of plants irrigated with various percentages of RO and RW. 59 Growth index of plants irrigated with various percentages of RO and RW.... 60 Quality of plants irrigated with various percentages of RO and RW. . 61 Fresh weight of plants irrigated with various percentages of RO and RW. 62 Dry weight of plants irrigated with various percentages of RO and RW. 63 EC for various...

Garza Morton, Jose Antonio

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

129

Electrodialysis Treatment of Nickel Wastewater  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The galvanic processes are one of the main activities contributing to metal discharges into the environment. A large volume of wastewater is generated that contains a high load of salts and metals and it must be ...

Tatiane Benvenuti; Marco Antônio Siqueira Rodrigues…

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Textile Wastewater Treatment and Recycling  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Textile industry consumes huge quantities of fresh water (100–150 l/kg of cotton for direct dye). During various stages of textile processing, wastewater is charged with substantial amounts of chemical polluta...

Raja Ben Amar; Gazza Masmoudi

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Fischer-Tropsch Wastewater Utilization  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention is generally directed to handling the wastewater, or condensate, from a hydrocarbon synthesis reactor. More particularly, the present invention provides a process wherein the wastewater of a hydrocarbon synthesis reactor, such as a Fischer-Tropsch reactor, is sent to a gasifier and subsequently reacted with steam and oxygen at high temperatures and pressures so as to produce synthesis gas. The wastewater may also be recycled back to a slurry preparation stage, where solid combustible organic materials are pulverized and mixed with process water and the wastewater to form a slurry, after which the slurry fed to a gasifier where it is reacted with steam and oxygen at high temperatures and pressures so as to produce synthesis gas.

Shah, Lalit S. (Sugar Land, TX)

2003-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

132

Ceramic membrane treatment of petrochemical wastewater  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Ceramic alumina microfiltration membranes were evaluated for treatment of 3 aqueous streams containing heavy metals, oils, and solids at petrochemical manufacturing facilities. To the best of the author's knowledge, this is the first reported use of ceramic alumina membranes for process water and wastewater treatment in a US petrochemical plant. In a pilot test at a vinyl chloride monomer (VCM) plant, precipitated heavy metal solids were filtered with the membranes. On another stream at that site, the ceramic membrane pilot system successfully treated emulsions of 1,2-dichloroethane (EDC), water, and solids. Membrane filtration of a linear alkyl benzene (LAB) oily wastewater stream produced water with less than 5 ppmw oil and grease, after pretreatment with HCl and ferric chloride. A preliminary financial analysis shows that the installed system cost for a ceramic membrane unit is comparable to other membrane technologies, while operating costs are anticipated to be lower. Specific process conditions that are particularly amenable to treatment by ceramic membrane microfiltration are also given in the paper. 10 refs., 11 figs., 7 tabs.

Lahiere, R.J. (Vista Chemical Co., Houston, TX (United States)); Goodboy, K.P.

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

High spatial resolution mid-infrared observations of the low-mass young star TW Hya  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We want to improve knowledge of the structure of the inner few AU of the circumstellar disk around the nearby T Tauri star TW Hya. Earlier studies have suggested the existence of a large inner hole, possibly caused by interactions with a growing protoplanet. We used interferometric observations in the N-band obtained with the MIDI instrument on the Very Large Telescope Interferometer, together with 10 micron spectra recorded by the infrared satellite Spitzer. The fact that we were able to determine N-band correlated fluxes and visibilities for this comparatively faint source shows that MIR interferometry can be applied to a large number of low-mass young stellar objects. The MIR spectra obtained with Spitzer reveal emission lines from HI (6-5), HI (7-6), and [Ne II] and show that over 90% of the dust we see in this wavelength regime is amorphous. According to the correlated flux measured with MIDI, most of the crystalline material is in the inner, unresolved part of the disk, about 1 AU in radius. The visibilities exclude the existence of a very large (3-4 AU radius) inner hole in the circumstellar disk of TW Hya, which was required in earlier models. We propose instead a geometry of the inner disk where an inner hole still exists, but at a much reduced radius, with the transition from zero to full disk height between 0.5 and 0.8 AU, and with an optically thin distribution of dust inside. Such a model can comply with SED and MIR visibilities, as well as with visibility and extended emission observed in the NIR at 2 micron. If a massive planet was the reason for this inner hole, as has been speculated, its orbit would have to be closer to the star than 0.3 AU. Alternatively, we may be witnessing the end of the accretion phase and an early phase of an inward-out dispersal of the circumstellar disk.

Th. Ratzka; Ch. Leinert; Th. Henning; J. Bouwman; C. P. Dullemond; W. Jaffe

2007-07-02T23:59:59.000Z

134

Health and Treatment Requirements for Wastewater Irrigation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Recycling and reuse of wastewater in agriculture can be a highly effective ... irrigation techniques, and the treatment of the wastewater to an appropriate degree so as to ... consumers of crops from pathogenic m...

Hillel Shuval; Badri Fattal

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Hawaii Wastewater Branch Webpage | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Webpage Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: Hawaii Wastewater Branch Webpage Abstract This is the webpage of the Wastewater Branch of the...

136

Making Refinery Wastewater Clean | GE Global Research  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Making Refinery Wastewater Clean Making Refinery Wastewater Clean Lei Wang 2014.09.23 About four years ago, I visited Ordos, Inner Mongolia, to work on a project. When I arrived,...

137

Onsite Wastewater Treatment Systems: Tablet Chlorination  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Wastewater that is sprayed onto lawns must first be disinfected to prevent odors and remove disease-causing organisms. This publication explains how tablet chlorinators disinfect wastewater and gives tips on how to maintain them....

Lesikar, Bruce J.

2008-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

138

Onsite Wastewater Treatment Systems: Ultraviolet Light Disinfection  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Some onsite wastewater treatment systems include a disinfection component. This publication explains how homeowners can disinfect wastewater with ultraviolet light, what the components of such a system are, what factors affect the performance of a...

Lesikar, Bruce J.

2008-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

139

Onsite Wastewater Treatment Systems: Aerobic Treatment Unit  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

wastewater treatment systems use. They remove 85 to 98 percent of the organic matter and solids from the wastewater, producing effluent as clean as that from munici- pal wastewater treatment plants, and cleaner than that from conventional septic tanks.... Onsite wastewater treatment systems Single-compartment trash tank Chlorinator Aerobic treatment unit Spray heads Pump tank Bruce Lesikar Professor and Extension Agricultural Engineer The Texas A&M System Aerobic treatment units, which are certified...

Lesikar, Bruce J.

2008-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

140

Onsite Wastewater Treatment Systems: Graywater Safety  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

irrigation and decr,ease the amount of wastewater entering sewers or onsite wastewater treatment systems. Onsite wastewater treatment systems However, homeowners who irrigate their lawns with graywater need to understand the risks and safety issues.... Residential wastewater can be classified as either blackwater (sew- age containing fecal matter or food wastes) or graywater. If graywater is collected separately from blackwater, it can be dispersed as irrigation water with less treatment than...

Melton, Rebecca; Lesikar, Bruce J.

2008-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tw treated wastewater" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Making wastewater environmentally sustainable: Innovative technology offers new possibilities for wastewater treatment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Story by Katie Heinrich 16 tx H2O Summer 2013 Making wastewater environmentally sustainable Innovative technology o#30;ers new possibilities for wastewater treatment Municipal wastewater treatment plants may soon become more sustainable... in their treatment of wastewater by pursuing new electron beam (e-beam) technology being researched at a Texas A&M AgriLife Research center in College Station. To help these plants in their move to increased sustainability in wastewater treatment, the National...

Heinrich, Katie

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

WASTEWATER CHARACTERIZATION OF' FISH PROCESSING PLANT EFFLUENTS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

#12;WASTEWATER CHARACTERIZATION OF' FISH PROCESSING PLANT EFFLUENTS TECHNICAL REPORT SERIES FREMP in Publication Data Main entry under title Wastewater characterization of fish processing plant effluents (Canada)); DOE FRAP 1993-39. TD899.F5W37 1994 363.73'942'0971133 C94-960159-4 #12;WASTEWATER

143

CDC Looks at Links Between Wastewater  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CDC Looks at Links Between Wastewater and Disease NESC STAFF WRITER Caigan McKenzie Drinking water in food safety, onsite wastewater systems, drinking water safety, recreational water safety, vector con about the public health issues involved in onsite wastewater," Gelting said. "We didn't have much

144

Wastewater management in Kunming, China: a stakeholder  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Wastewater management in Kunming, China: a stakeholder perspective on measures at the source EDI systems with central wastewater treatment plants were long considered a successful model that could the feasibility of introducing measures at the source for the different urban wastewater contributions in the city

Richner, Heinz

145

STATE ESTIMATION FOR WASTEWATER TREATMENT PROCESSES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CHAPTER 1 STATE ESTIMATION FOR WASTEWATER TREATMENT PROCESSES O. Bernard1 , B. Chachuat2 , and J sensors (also called observers) for wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs). We give an overview model description (e.g., the 1 #12;2 STATE ESTIMATION FOR WASTEWATER TREATMENT PROCESSES extended Kalman

Bernard, Olivier

146

Environmental Assessment for the High Explosives Wastewater Treatment Facility, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Department of Energy (DOE) has identified a need to improve the management of wastewater resulting from high explosives (HE) research and development work at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). LANL`s current methods off managing HE-contaminated wastewater cannot ensure that discharged HE wastewater would consistently meet the Environmental Protection Agency`s (EPA`s) standards for wastewater discharge. The DOE needs to enhance He wastewater management to e able to meet both present and future regulatory standards for wastewater discharge. The DOE also proposes to incorporate major pollution prevention and waste reduction features into LANL`s existing HE production facilities. Currently, wastewater from HE processing buildings at four Technical Areas (TAs) accumulates in sumps where particulate HE settles out and barium is precipitated. Wastewater is then released from the sumps to the environment at 15 permitted outfalls without treatment. The released water may contain suspended and dissolved contaminants, such as HE and solvents. This Environmental Assessment (EA) analyzes two alternatives, the Proposed Action and the Alternative Action, that would meet the purpose and need for agency action. Both alternatives would treat all HE process wastewater using sand filters to remove HE particulates and activated carbon to adsorb organic solvents and dissolved HE. Under either alternative, LANL would burn solvents and flash dried HE particulates and spent carbon following well-established procedures. Burning would produce secondary waste that would be stored, treated, and disposed of at TA-54, Area J. This report contains the Environmental Assessment, as well as the Finding of No Significant Impact and Floodplain Statement of Findings for the High Explosives Wastewater Treatment Facility.

NONE

1995-08-03T23:59:59.000Z

147

Applicability of a Septic Tank/Engineered Wetland Coupled System in the Treatment and Recycling of Wastewater from a Small Community  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A septic tank (ST)/engineered wetland coupled system used to treat and recycle wastewater from a small community in Dar es...Phragmites (reeds) and the smaller-sized medium bed was downstream and was planted with...

Stephen E. Mbuligwe

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Wastewater Discharge Program (Maine) | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Wastewater Discharge Program (Maine) Wastewater Discharge Program (Maine) Wastewater Discharge Program (Maine) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Buying & Making Electricity Program Info State Maine Program Type Siting and Permitting Provider Department of Environmental Protection The wastewater discharge regulations require that a license be obtained for the discharge of wastewater to a stream, river, wetland, or lake of the

149

J. Microbiol. Biotechnol. (2006), 16(2), 232239 Bacterial Community Structure in Activated Sludge Reactors Treating Free  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the formation of complexes with metal ions, which function as enzyme cofactors [2]. Because of the high toxicity from wastewater effluent before discharge [3]. Cyanide in these wastewater creates heavy-metal Reactors Treating Free or Metal-Complexed Cyanides QUAN, ZHE-XUE1,2,3 , SUNG-KEUN RHEE2,4 , JIN-WOO BAE2

Bae, Jin-Woo

150

Measuring the Magnetic Field on the Classical T Tauri Star TW Hydrae  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present infrared (IR) and optical echelle spectra of the Classical T Tauri star TW Hydrae. Using the optical data, we perform detailed spectrum synthesis to fit atomic and molecular absorption lines and determine key stellar parameters: Teff = 4126 \\pm 24 K, log g = 4.84 \\pm 0.16, [M/H] = -0.10 \\pm 0.12, vsini = 5.8 \\pm 0.6 km/s. The IR spectrum is used to look for Zeeman broadening of photospheric absorption lines. We fit four Zeeman sensitive Ti I lines near 2.2 microns and find the average value of the magnetic field over the entire surface is 2.61 \\pm 0.23 kG. In addition, several nearby magnetically insensitive CO lines show no excess broadening above that produced by stellar rotation and instrumental broadening, reinforcing the magnetic interpretation for the width of the Ti I lines. We carry out extensive tests to quantify systematic errors in our analysis technique which may result from inaccurate knowledge of the effective temperature or gravity, finding that reasonable errors in these quantities produce a 10% uncertainty in the mean field measurement.

H. Yang; C. M. Johns-Krull; J. A. Valenti

2005-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

151

MAGNETICALLY CONTROLLED ACCRETION ON THE CLASSICAL T TAURI STARS GQ LUPI AND TW HYDRAE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present high spectral resolution (R Almost-Equal-To 108, 000) Stokes V polarimetry of the classical T Tauri stars (CTTSs) GQ Lup and TW Hya obtained with the polarimetric upgrade to the HARPS spectrometer on the ESO 3.6 m telescope. We present data on both photospheric lines and emission lines, concentrating our discussion on the polarization properties of the He I emission lines at 5876 A and 6678 A. The He I lines in these CTTSs contain both narrow emission cores, believed to come from near the accretion shock region on these stars, and broad emission components which may come from either a wind or the large-scale magnetospheric accretion flow. We detect strong polarization in the narrow component of the two He I emission lines in both stars. We observe a maximum implied field strength of 6.05 {+-} 0.24 kG in the 5876 A line of GQ Lup, making it the star with the highest field strength measured in this line for a CTTS. We find field strengths in the two He I lines that are consistent with each other, in contrast to what has been reported in the literature on at least one star. We do not detect any polarization in the broad component of the He I lines on these stars, strengthening the conclusion that they form over a substantially different volume relative to the formation region of the narrow component of the He I lines.

Johns-Krull, Christopher M.; Chen, Wei [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Rice University, 6100 Main Street, MS-108, Houston, TX 77005 (United States)] [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Rice University, 6100 Main Street, MS-108, Houston, TX 77005 (United States); Valenti, Jeff A., E-mail: cmj@rice.edu, E-mail: wc2@rice.edu, E-mail: valenti@stsci.edu [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21210 (United States); and others

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Wastewater Ozonation Catalyzed by Iron  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Another attempt to improve ozonation removal efficiency is the use of metals or their oxides to catalyze ozonation. ... The waveforms were generated by a potentiostat BAS model Epsilon-2. ... Sreethawong, T.; Chavadej, S.Color removal of distillery wastewater by ozonation in the absence and presence of immobilized iron oxide catalyst J. Hazard. ...

Anaid Cano Quiroz; Carlos Barrera-Di?az; Gabriela Roa-Morales; Patricia Balderas Herna?ndez; Rubi? Romero; Reyna Natividad

2010-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

153

Wastewater effects on montmorillonite suspensions and hydraulic properties of sandy soils  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Recycled wastewater effluent is an important source of irrigation water in arid and semiarid regions. In these regions, however, irrigation water quality is one of the main factors limiting plant growth. Wastewater effluents generally contain high concentrations of suspended and dissolved solids, both organic and inorganic. Inorganic dissolved solids are only minimally removed from the effluent during conventional sewage treatment. As a result, most of the salts added during domestic and industrial usage remain in the irrigation water and may eventually reach the soil. A number of researchers have reported reduced hydraulic conductivity for soils to which treated wastewater has been applied. In this research, the influence of dissolved organic matter (DOM) contained in reclaimed wastewater effluents on the flocculation of montmorillonite and on the hydraulic properties of soils was studied. Flocculation values (FVs) for Na-montmorillonite increased with increasing concentrations of DOM at all pH levels analyzed. Maximum FV levels were exhibited for Na-montmorillonite at the highest DOM concentrations. The effect of DOM on FV can be explained by the mechanisms of edge-charge reversal and mutual flocculation. The hydraulic conductivity (HC) of a sandy soil was determined in the laboratory by leaching columns with an electrolyte solution chemically similar to that of the wastewater effluent (but without DOM). In columns treated with wastewater effluent, the HC exhibited a sharp decrease to only 20% of its initial value. The adverse effect of DOM on HC was evident for this soil despite a relatively low exchangeable sodium percentage (ESP). The reduction in HC is likely to be the result of decreases soil pore-size, which reflects two processes: (1) retention of part of the DOM during water percolation; and (2) a change in pore-size distribution due to swelling and dispersion of clay particles. The latter may result from a higher percentage of adsorbed sodium combined with the presence of humic substances from the wastewater effluent.

Tarchitzky, J.; Golobati, Y.; Keren, R.; Chen, Y.

1999-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Operating experience with constructed wetlands for wastewater treatment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Constructed wetlands are treating a variety of municipal, industrial, and runoff wastewaters. The growing interest in this technology is based on 20 years of research demonstrating the beneficial effects of wetlands on water quality, particularly their ability to assimilate carbonaceous and nitrogenous wastes. Constructed wetlands are an attractive option for applications where a land-intensive, natural' treatment technology is desired and where ancillary wildlife benefits will enhance a project's overall environmental balance sheet. This paper summarizes design and operating experience from constructed wetlands representing a variety of applications, including pilot systems in place at several US pulp mills.

Knight, R. (CH2M Hill, Gainesville, FL (United States))

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Onsite Wastewater Treatment Systems: Constructed Wetlands  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Two-compartment septic tank Soil absorption field Constructed wetland Onsite wastewater treatment systems Constructed wetlands Natural wetlands generally have visible water in the system. However, for those at homes, the water flows beneath... the media surface, which limits contact between residents and wastewater. The constructed wetland waste- water treatment system has three main components that work together to purify wastewater: ? A septic tank, which is an en- closed watertight...

Lesikar, Bruce J.

2008-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

156

On-Site Wastewater Treatment Systems: Graywater  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-6176 3-08 Figure 1: A diagram of separate blackwater and graywater plumbing systems. W ith water reuse gaining popularity, people increasingly consider graywater from their residences as a resource to be separated from the wastewater stream... and reused in their landscapes. Such reuse of graywater reduces the amount of wastewater entering sewers or onsite wastewater treatment systems, reduces demands to use potable water for other residential uses like irrigation and helps preserve limited...

Melton, Rebecca; Lesikar, Bruce J.; Smith, David; O'Neill, Courtney

2008-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

157

Recycling Wastewater After Hemodialysis: An Environmental Analysis for Alternative Water Sources in Arid Regions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Water is a vital aspect of hemodialysis. During the procedure, large volumes of water are used to prepare dialysate and clean and reprocess machines. This report evaluates the technical and economic feasibility of recycling hemodialysis wastewater for irrigation uses, such as watering gardens and landscape plantings. Water characteristics, possible recycling methods, and production costs of treated water are discussed in terms of the quality of the generated wastewater. A cost-benefit analysis is also performed through comparison of intended cost with that of seawater desalination, which is widely used in irrigation.

Faissal Tarrass; Meryem Benjelloun; Omar Benjelloun

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Wastewater treatment using ferrous sulfate  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Treatment of industrial wastewater with coagulants is used extensively in the thorough removal of emulsified tars and oils. The central plant laboratory at the Zhdanov Coke Works conducted investigations of the treatment of wastewater, subsequently used for quenching coke, with ferrous sulfate. Laboratory tests and subsequent industrial tests demonstrated the efficiency of the method. In order to further intensify the wastewater treatment process we conducted laboratory tests with the addition of certain quantities of other coagulation reagents, for example polyacrylamide (PAA) and caustic soda, in addition to the ferrous sulfate. The combined use of polyacrylamide and ferrous sulfate permits instant coagulation of the sludge and very rapid (5 to 10 min) clarification of the water. In addition, in this case the degree of purification of the water is less dependent on the initial concentration of impurities. The purification is also improved when caustic soda is added, raising the pH. From the data it is apparent that an identical degree of purification of the water may be achieved either by increasing the consumption of ferrous sulfate, or by adding PAA or NaOH. During industrial tests of the purification of wastewater with ferrous sulfate, we also investigated the resulting sludge. The use of ferrous sulfate causes a significant increase in its quantity (by a factor of 1.5 to 1.8) and in its oil content (by a factor of 2 to 2.5). The water content in the sludge decreases. The sludge (in the quantity of 0.6% of the charge) may be added to the coking charge.

Boetskaya, K.P.; Ioffe, E.M.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

CDPHE Industrial Individual Wastewater Discharge Permit Application...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Legal Document- Permit ApplicationPermit Application: CDPHE Industrial Individual Wastewater Discharge Permit ApplicationLegal Abstract Application provided by the Colorado...

160

Onsite Wastewater Treatment Systems: Liquid Chlorination  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This publication explains the process, components, legal requirements, factors affecting performance, and maintenance needs of liquid chlorination systems for onsite wastewater treatment....

Weaver, Richard; Lesikar, Bruce J.; Richter, Amanda; O'Neill, Courtney

2008-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tw treated wastewater" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Hawaii Individual Wastewater Management Permit Packet | Open...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

to library PermittingRegulatory Guidance - Supplemental Material: Hawaii Individual Wastewater Management Permit PacketPermittingRegulatory GuidanceSupplemental Material Author...

162

The performance of electrochemical peroxidation process for COD reduction and biodegradability improvement of the wastewater from a paper recycling plant  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This study investigated pretreatment and biodegradability of wastewater from a paper recycling plant using the electrochemical peroxidation process in a bench scale reactor. The influence of wastewater pH, H2O2 concentration, current density, and reaction time was evaluated for the removal of COD from the wastewater. The COD of wastewater from paper recycling decreased from the initial level of 4300 mg/L in raw wastewater to 106 mg/L (95.7% removal) in wastewater treated by the electrochemical peroxidation process at optimum pH, H2O2 concentration, current densities of 4, 15 and 5 mA/cm2, and a reaction time of 30 min. The optimum ratio of H2O2 (mM) to Fe2+ (mM) was found to be 2. The biodegradability of wastewater increased from an initial level of 0.12 to 0.43 after treatment by the electrochemical peroxidation process under optimum experimental conditions at a reaction time of 30 min. Overall, the electrochemical peroxidation process proved to be an efficient and appropriate technique for COD reduction and enhancement of biodegradability of the industrial effluents containing high concentrations of recalcitrant organic compounds.

Gholamreza Moussavi; Mohammad Aghanejad

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Iowa Water and Wastewater Operators Seek SEP Certification in...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Iowa Water and Wastewater Operators Seek SEP Certification in New Pilot Program Iowa Water and Wastewater Operators Seek SEP Certification in New Pilot Program September 18, 2014 -...

164

EPA ENERGY STAR Webcast: Benchmarking Water/Wastewater Treatment...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Benchmarking WaterWastewater Treatment Facilities in Portfolio Manager EPA ENERGY STAR Webcast: Benchmarking WaterWastewater Treatment Facilities in Portfolio Manager November...

165

WSDE Report: Wastewater Discharge Permits in Washington State...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Wastewater Discharge Permits in Washington State Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Report: WSDE Report: Wastewater Discharge Permits in Washington...

166

CHP and Bioenergy Systems for Landfills and Wastewater Treatment...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Systems for Landfills and Wastewater Treatment Plants CHP and Bioenergy Systems for Landfills and Wastewater Treatment Plants There are important issues to consider when selecting...

167

File:CDPHE Industrial Individual Wastewater Discharge Permit...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Industrial Individual Wastewater Discharge Permit Application.pdf Jump to: navigation, search File File history File usage Metadata File:CDPHE Industrial Individual Wastewater...

168

CHP and Bioenergy for Landfills and Wastewater Treatment Plants...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

for Landfills and Wastewater Treatment Plants: Market Opportunities CHP and Bioenergy for Landfills and Wastewater Treatment Plants: Market Opportunities This document explores...

169

Anticipating the next century of wastewater treatment  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Anticipating the next century of wastewater treatment 10.1126/science...sewage. The settling and recycling of sludge inside treatment...and the contribution to the recycling of resources (2, 3). The...impact of human activities. Wastewater treatment is in itself a relatively...

Mark C. M. van Loosdrecht; Damir Brdjanovic

2014-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

170

Energy and Air Emission Implications of a Decentralized Wastewater System  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Opportunities for Combined Heat and Power at WastewaterProtection Agency Combined Heat and Power Partnership,

Shehabi, Arman

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Harvesting Energy from Wastewater in a 2-Chamber  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Harvesting Energy from Wastewater in a 2-Chamber Microbial Fuel Cell Sikandar Present day wastewater treatment plants utilize high amounts of energy and are costly to operate. These conventional wastewater treatment plants utilize aerobic bacteria. Organic material in wastewater contains energy that can

172

Computing the Resilience of a Wastewater Treatment Bioreactor Nabil Mabrouk  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Computing the Resilience of a Wastewater Treatment Bioreactor Nabil Mabrouk Laboratory guillaume.deffuant@cemagref.fr Abstract--Biological wastewater treatment reactor are de- signed to reduce the pollutant content of a wastewater to an acceptable level often fixed by wastewater discharge regula- tions

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

173

Production of Electricity during Wastewater Treatment Using a  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Production of Electricity during Wastewater Treatment Using a Single Chamber Microbial Fuel Cell H wastewater, while at the same time accomplishing biological wastewater treatment (removal of chemical oxygen of the wastewater. Power output was proportional to the hydraulic retention time over a range of 3-33 h

174

Safe use of wastewater in agriculture and aquaculture  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Safe use of wastewater in agriculture and aquaculture Agriculture and aquaculture in Vietnam often use wastewater, particularly in urban or peri-urban areas. Wastewater provides both moisture and nutrients for crops and fish, and its use generates employment for poor communities. But using wastewater

Richner, Heinz

175

Wastewater management utilizing land application for the Boston Harbor-Eastern Massachusetts Metropolitan Area. Technical data. Volume 5  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, NED, in cooperation with several agencies under the administration of the Technical Subcommittee on Boston Harbor, is directing a segment of the Wastewater Management Study for Eastern Massachusetts which proposed the utilization of land application methods to further treat and make use of conventionally treated wastewaters. The entire wastewater management study for Eastern Massachusetts consisted of five alternatives. Four of the conceptual alternatives are being prepared under the direction of the Metropolitan District Commission (MDC). The land application alternative is labeled Concept 5 and provides land application treatment for effluents from five of the regional waste treatment plant locations described in Concept 4. The report presented herein constitutes the land-oriented treatment system known as Concept 5.

NONE

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

California Food Processing Industry Wastewater Demonstration Project: Phase I Final Report  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

R.J. 1997. "Wastewater Reduction and Recycling in Foodof wastewater streams, reuse of washing water, and recyclingof wastewater streams, reuse of washing water, recycling of

Lewis, Glen

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

ENERGY STAR Score for Wastewater Treatment Plants  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

!! !! July 2013 ENERGY STAR Score for Wastewater Treatment Plants in the United States Page 1 ENERGY STAR Score for Wastewater Treatment Plants in the United States Technical Reference OVERVIEW ! The ENERGY STAR Score for Wastewater Treatment Plants applies to primary, secondary, and advanced treatment facilities with or without nutrient removal capacity. The objective of the ENERGY STAR score is to provide a fair assessment of the energy performance of a property relative to its peers, taking into account the climate, weather, and business activities at the property. To identify the aspects of building activity that are significant drivers of energy

178

Reusing rinse wastewater at a semiconductor plant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Two pilot rinse wastewater reuse projects were developed as part of a long-term water conservation program for a Motorola semiconductor manufacturing site in Phoenix, Ariz. The conceptual designs for the projects grew out of a detailed wastewater reuse study that characterized wastewater streams at their generation points. Both treatment techniques were specifically researched, bench-tested, and adapted to further water conservation efforts while ensuring 100 percent compliance with appropriate effluent regulations and industrial discharge permit conditions. Together, the pilot projects save the city of Phoenix approximately 45 mil gal (17 {times} 10{sup 4} m{sup 3}) of water annually.

Shah, A.R. [Motorola SCG, McDowell, MD (United States). Environmental, Safety, and Industrial Hygiene Dept.; Ploeser, J.H. [Phoenix Water Services Dept., AZ (United States). Water Conservation Office

1999-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Treatment of an agrochemical wastewater by integration of heterogeneous catalytic wet hydrogen peroxide oxidation and rotating biological contactors  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The treatment of a non-biodegradable agrochemical wastewater has been studied by coupling of heterogeneous catalytic wet hydrogen peroxide oxidation (CWHPO) and rotating biological contactors (RBCs). The influence of the hydrogen peroxide dosage and the organic content of the wastewater (dilution degree) were studied. The CWHPO of the raw wastewater at 80 °C and using a moderate amount of oxidant (0.23 gH2O2/gTOC) reduced significantly its total organic carbon content and increased its biodegradability. Likewise, the iron leaching of the heterogeneous catalyst (Fe2O3/SBA-15) was less than 2 mg/L in the treated effluent. Under the best operating conditions, the resultant CWHPO effluent was successfully co-treated by rotating biological contactors (RBCs) using a simulated municipal wastewater with different percentages of the CWHPO effluent (2.5, 5 and 10% v/v). The \\{RBCs\\} showed high stability for the treatment of the highest percentage of the CWHPO effluent, achieving total organic carbon (TOC) and total nitrogen (TN) reductions of ca. 78% and 50%, respectively. The integration of both processes on a continuous mode has been successfully accomplished for the treatment of the as-received agrochemical wastewater.

M.I. Pariente; J.A. Siles; R. Molina; J.A. Botas; J.A. Melero; F. Martinez

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Sandusky Wastewater Treatment | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Treatment Treatment Jump to: navigation, search Name Sandusky Wastewater Treatment Facility Sandusky Wastewater Treatment Sector Wind energy Facility Type Community Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Sandusky Wastewater Treatment Energy Purchaser Sandusky Wastewater Treatment Location Sandusky OH Coordinates 41.452091°, -82.723523° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.452091,"lon":-82.723523,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tw treated wastewater" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Catalytic Wastewater Treatment Using Pillared Clays  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

After introduction on the use of solid catalysts in wastewater treatment technologies, particularly advanced oxidation processes (AOPs), this review discussed the use of pillared clay (PILC) materials in three ap...

Siglinda Perathoner; Gabriele Centi

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Optimization of wastewater stabilization ponds in Honduras  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

During the academic year of 2008-2009, three Master of Engineering students from the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) conducted a study of wastewater ...

Kullen, Lisa

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Wastewater sludge management options for Honduras  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Sludge management is a fundamental area of concern across wastewater treatment systems in Honduras. The lack of timely sludge removal has led to declining plant performance in many facilities throughout the country. In ...

Bhattacharya, Mahua, M. Eng. Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Taking the “Waste” Out of “Wastewater” for Human Water Security and Ecosystem Sustainability  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...than one way; for example, wastewater recycling with wastewater stabilization...Finally, lessons from wastewater recycling systems indicate that the...processes, provided that recycling wastewater neither substantially increases...

Stanley B. Grant; Jean-Daniel Saphores; David L. Feldman; Andrew J. Hamilton; Tim D. Fletcher; Perran L. M. Cook; Michael Stewardson; Brett F. Sanders; Lisa A. Levin; Richard F. Ambrose; Ana Deletic; Rebekah Brown; Sunny C. Jiang; Diego Rosso; William J. Cooper; Ivan Marusic

2012-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

185

Analyses of Spatial Distributions of Sulfate-Reducing Bacteria and Their Activity in Aerobic Wastewater Biofilms  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...aerobic wastewater treatment systems...their activity in wastewater biofilms is of...biofilms. Since mass balance of sulfide or...sulfur cycle in wastewater biofilm systems...municipal wastewater treatment plant in Sapporo...

Satoshi Okabe; Tsukasa Itoh; Hisashi Satoh; Yoshimasa Watanabe

1999-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

RECOVERY OF LACTIC ACID FROM AMERICAN CRYSTAL SUGAR COMPANY WASTEWATER  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project has shown that the recovery of several valuable lactic acid products is both technically feasible and economically viable. One of the original objectives of this project was to recover lactic acid. However, the presence of a variety of indigenous bacteria in the wastewater stream and technical issues related to recovery and purification have resulted in the production of lactic acid esters. These esters could by hydrolyzed to lactic acid, but only with unacceptable product losses that would be economically prohibitive. The developed process is projected to produce approximately 200,000 lb per day of lactate esters from wastewater at a single factory at costs that compete with conventional solvents. The lactate esters are good solvents for polymers and resins and could replace acetone, methyl ethyl ketone, MIBK, and other polar solvents used in the polymer industry. Because of their low volatility and viscosity-lowering properties, they will be especially useful for inks for jet printers, alkyl resins, and high-solid paints. Owing to their efficiency in dissolving salts and flux as well as oils and sealants, lactate esters can be used in cleaning circuit boards and machine and engine parts. Unlike conventional solvents, lactate esters exhibit low toxicity, are biodegradable, and are not hazardous air pollutants. Another application for lactate esters is in the production of plasticizers. Severe health problems have been attributed to widely used phthalate ester plasticizers. The U.S. Department of Agriculture showed that replacement of these with inexpensive lactate esters is feasible, owing to their superior polymer compatibility properties. A very large market is projected for polymers prepared from lactic acid. These are called polylactides and are a type of polyester. Thermoplastics of this type have a variety of uses, including moldings, fibers, films, and packaging of both manufactured goods and food products. Polylactides form tough, orientable, self-supporting thin films and have, therefore, been used for adhesives, safety glass, and finishes. If the bacterial culture produces the L-lactic acid enanatiomer form exclusively, the L-lactide prepared from this form can be used for making polymers with good fiber-forming properties. We have not currently achieved the exclusive production of L-lactate in our efforts. However, markets in films and structural shapes are available for polymers and copolymers prepared from the mixed D,L-lactide forms that result from processing the D,L-lactic acid obtained from fermentation such as that occurring naturally in sugar beet wastewater. These materials are slowly biodegraded to harmless compounds in the environment, and they burn with a clean blue flame when incinerated. These materials represent excellent opportunities for utilization of the D,L-lactic mixture produced from natural fermentation of the ACS flume water. Esters can be converted into a lactide, and the alcohol released from the ester can be recycled with no net consumption of the alcohol. Lactide intermediates could be produced locally and shipped to polymer producers elsewhere. The polymer and copolymer markets are extremely large, and the role of lactides in these markets is continuously expanding. The overall process can be readily integrated into existing factory wastewater operations. There are several environmental benefits that would be realized at the factories with incorporation of the lactate recovery process. The process reduces the organic loading to the existing wastewater treatment system that should result in enhanced operability with respect to both solids handling and treated-water quality. A higher-quality treated water will also help reduce odor levels from holding ponds. Several water reuse opportunities are probable, depending on the quality of treated water from the FT process.

Daniel J. Stepan; Edwin S. Olson; Richard E. Shockey; Bradley G. Stevens; John R. Gallagher

2001-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

187

Wastewater heat recovery method and apparatus  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

This invention is comprised of a heat recovery system with a heat exchanger and a mixing valve. A drain trap includes a heat exchanger with an inner coiled tube, baffle plate, wastewater inlet, wastewater outlet, cold water inlet, and preheated water outlet. Wastewater enters the drain trap through the wastewater inlet, is slowed and spread by the baffle plate, and passes downward to the wastewater outlet. Cold water enters the inner tube through the cold water inlet and flows generally upward, taking on heat from the wastewater. This preheated water is fed to the mixing valve, which includes a flexible yoke to which are attached an adjustable steel rod, two stationary zinc rods, and a pivoting arm. The free end of the arm forms a pad which rests against a valve seat. The rods and pivoting arm expand or contract as the temperature of the incoming preheated water changes. The zinc rods expand more than the steel rod, flexing the yoke and rotating the pivoting arm. The pad moves towards the valve seat as the temperature of the preheated water rises, and away as the temperature falls, admitting a variable amount of hot water to maintain a nearly constant average process water temperature.

Kronberg, J.W.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

E-Print Network 3.0 - anaerobic wastewater treatment Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Summary: ENVIRONMENTAL BIOTECHNOLOGY Electricity generation and treatment of paper recycling wastewater... production and treatment of a paper recycling plant wastewater...

189

Treatment of concentrated industrial wastewaters originating from oil shale and the like by electrolysis polyurethane foam interaction  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Highly concentrated and toxic petroleum-based and synthetic fuels wastewaters such as oil shale retort water are treated in a unit treatment process by electrolysis in a reactor containing oleophilic, ionized, open-celled polyurethane foams and subjected to mixing and laminar flow conditions at an average detention time of six hours. Both the polyurethane foams and the foam regenerate solution are re-used. The treatment is a cost-effective process for waste-waters which are not treatable, or are not cost-effectively treatable, by conventional process series.

Tiernan, Joan E. (Novato, CA)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Applications of Energy Efficiency Technologies in Wastewater Treatment Facilities  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

"Depending on the level and type of treatment, municipal wastewater treatment (WWT) can be an energy intensive process, constituting a major cost for the municipal governments. According to a 1993 study wastewater treatment plants consume close to 1...

Chow, S.; Werner, L.; Wu, Y. Y.; Ganji, A. R.

191

On-Site Wastewater Treatment Systems: Tablet Chlorination (Spanish)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Wastewater that is sprayed onto lawns must first be disinfected to prevent odors and remove disease-causing organisms. This publication explains how tablet chlorinators disinfect wastewater and gives tips on how to maintain them....

Weaver, Richard; Lesikar, Bruce J.; Enciso, Juan

2006-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

192

Gypsum and Polyacrylamide Soil Amendments Used With High Sodium Wastewater  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Using wastewater for irrigation of crops represents an attractive alternative to disposal. Typically, municipal wastewaters are high in sodium, and the resulting high sodium absorption ratio (SAR) alters the soil structure making it more impermeable...

Gardiner, Duane

193

The Speciation and reactivity of wastewater-derived organic nitrogen  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Aquatic toxicity of triclosan. Environ. Toxicol. Chem. , 21(wastewater origin, such as triclosan (Orvos et al. 2002) or

Sedlak, David L; Pehlivanoglu, Elif

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Automated Demand Response Opportunities in Wastewater Treatment Facilities  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Interoperable Automated Demand Response Infrastructure,study of automated demand response in wastewater treatmentopportunities for demand response control strategies in

Thompson, Lisa

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Chapter 1 - Industrial Wastewater Treatment, Recycling, and Reuse: An Overview  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Water availability; usage, treatment, and discharge of used water; and possible ways of recycling and reusing this used water are briefly discussed here. Issues pertaining to industrial wastewaters, sources of generation, characterization of wastewaters, and various methodologies of wastewater treatment have been reviewed along with economic perspectives of water management. Recent developments in the area of industrial wastewater treatment, recycling, and reuse are also briefly outlined here.

Vivek V. Ranade; Vinay M. Bhandari

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

On-Site Wastewater Treatment Systems: Selecting and Permitting (Spanish)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This publication explains how to select and obtain a permit for an on-site wastewater treatment system in Texas....

Lesikar, Bruce J.

2005-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

197

Automated Demand Response Opportunities in Wastewater Treatment Facilities  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

05CH11231. References EPRI, Energy Audit Manual for Water/Research Institute, Energy Audit Manual for Water/Wastewater

Thompson, Lisa

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Wastewater treatment and energy : an analysis on the feasibility of using renewable energy to power wastewater treatment plants in Singapore  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Wastewater treatment is a very energy intensive industry. Singapore has a state-of-the-art wastewater treatment system that uses a number of sustainable techniques that greatly improve its overall efficiency. The centralized ...

Foley, Kevin John

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Fuzzy predictive control for nitrogen removal in biological wastewater treatment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Fuzzy predictive control for nitrogen removal in biological wastewater treatment S. Marsili wastewater is too low, full denitrification is difficult to obtain and an additional source of organic carbon predictive control; wastewater treatment plant Introduction The problem of improving the nitrogen removal

200

Shaping the Future of Water and Wastewater Services  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Shaping the Future of Water and Wastewater Services Jim Conlin Acting GM Long Term Asset Strategy works · 1400 Service reservoirs · >600 Pumping stations · 47,000kms Water pipes Wastewater Assets at an individual or a group of assets #12;Vision AM Strategy Wastewater Pan Scotland Strategy Bathing Waters

Painter, Kevin

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tw treated wastewater" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Applications of nanotechnology in water and wastewater treatment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Applications of nanotechnology in water and wastewater treatment Xiaolei Qu, Pedro J.J. Alvarez and wastewater treatment Water reuse Sorption Membrane processes Photocatalysis Disinfection Microbial control. Nanotechnology holds great potential in advancing water and wastewater treatment to improve treatment efficiency

Alvarez, Pedro J.

202

Modeling of Immobilized Cell Columns for Bioconversion and Wastewater Treatment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Modeling of Immobilized Cell Columns for Bioconversion and Wastewater Treatment Tingyue Gu* and Mei used in bioconversions to produce biological products as well as in wastewater treatment such as solvent removal from wastewater streams. In this work, a rate model is proposed to simulate this kind

Gu, Tingyue

203

Selective hydrolysis of wastewater sludge Part 1, September 2007  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Report Selective hydrolysis of wastewater sludge Part 1, September 2007 Model calculations and cost "Selective hydrolysis of wastewater sludge" is supported by EnergiNet.DK under the PSO-F&U projects having National Laboratory, Rambøll, the Estate of Overgaard and SamRas. The wastewater treatment plant Esbjerg

204

ADAPTIVE MODEL BASED CONTROL FOR WASTEWATER TREATMENT PLANTS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ADAPTIVE MODEL BASED CONTROL FOR WASTEWATER TREATMENT PLANTS Arie de Niet1 , Maartje van de Vrugt2.j.boucherie@utwente.nl Abstract In biological wastewater treatment, nitrogen and phosphorous are removed by activated sludge considerably to the increase of energy-efficiency in wastewater treatment. To this end, we introduce

Boucherie, Richard J.

205

Removal of Natural Steroid Hormones from Wastewater Using  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Removal of Natural Steroid Hormones from Wastewater Using Membrane Contactor Processes J O S H U water resources and increased interest in wastewater reclamation for potable reuse. This interest has in the study of wastewater reuse in advanced life support systems (e.g., space missions) because

206

August 6, 2009 Wastewater Produces Electricity and Desalinates Water  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

August 6, 2009 Wastewater Produces Electricity and Desalinates Water University Park, Pa. -- A process that cleans wastewater and generates electricity can also remove 90 percent of salt from brackish organic material from wastewater," said Bruce Logan, Kappe Professor of Environmental Engineering, Penn

207

Selective hydrolysis of wastewater sludge Part 1, December 2008  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Report Selective hydrolysis of wastewater sludge Part 1, December 2008 Revised Model calculations and cost benefit analysis for Esbjerg Vest wastewater treatment plant, Denmark PSO-F&U project nr. 2006 This project "Selective hydrolysis of wastewater sludge" is supported by EnergiNet .DK under the PSO

208

Original article Impact of spreading olive mill wastewater on soil  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Original article Impact of spreading olive mill wastewater on soil characteristics: laboratory 2001) Abstract ­ A dynamic of soil pollution with olive mill wastewater (OMW) was investigated process forms an olive mill wastewater (OMW). The amount of this waste depends on the process used for oil

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

209

Factors that affect the degradation of naphthenic acids in oil sands wastewater by indigenous microbial communities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The acute toxicity of wastewater generated during the extraction of bitumen from oil sands is believed to be due to naphthenic acids (NAs). To determine the factors that affect the rate of degradation of representative NAs in microcosms containing wastewater and the acute toxicity of treated and untreated wastewater, the effects of temperature, dissolved oxygen concentration, and phosphate addition on the rate of {sup 14}CO{sub 2} release form two representative naphthenic acid substrates, (linear) U-{sup 14}C-palmitic acid (PA) and (bicyclic) decahydro-2-naphthoic acid-8-{sup 14}C (DHNA), were monitored. Tailings pond water (TPW) contained microorganisms well adapted to mineralizing both PA and DHNA:PA was degraded more quickly (10--15% in 4 weeks) compared to DHNA (2--4% in 8 weeks). On addition of phosphate, the rate of NA degradation increased up to twofold in the first 4 weeks, with a concurrent increase in the rate of oxygen consumption by oil sands TPW. The degradation rate then declined to levels equivalent to those measured in flasks without phosphate. The observed plateau was not due to phosphate limitation. Decreases in either the dissolved oxygen concentration or the temperature reduced the rate. Phosphate addition also significantly decreased the acute toxicity of TPW to fathead minnows. In contrast, Microtox{reg_sign} analyses showed no reduction in the toxicity of treated or untreated TPW after incubation for up to 8 weeks at 15 C.

Lai, J.W.S.; Pinto, L.J.; Kiehlmann, E.; Bendell-Young, L.I.; Moore, M.M. [Simon Fraser Univ., Burnaby, British Columbia (Canada)

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Environmental Assessment and Finding of No Significant Impact: Wastewater Treatment Capability Upgrade, Project NO. 96-D-122 Pantex Plant Amarillo, Texas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Environmental Assessment (EA) addresses the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) proposed action regarding an upgrade of the Pantex Plant Wastewater Treatment Facility (WWTF). Potential environmental consequences associated with the proposed action and alternative actions are provided. DOE proposes to design, build, and operate a new WWTF, consistent with the requirements of Title 30 of the Texas Administrative Code (TAC), Chapter 317, ''Design Criteria for Sewage Systems,'' capable of supporting current and future wastewater treatment requirements of the Plant. Wastewater treatment at Pantex must provide sufficient operational flexibility to meet Pantex Plant's anticipated future needs, including potential Plant mission changes, alternative effluent uses, and wastewater discharge permit requirements. Treated wastewater effluent and non-regulated water maybe used for irrigation on DOE-owned agricultural land. Five factors support the need for DOE action: (1) The current WWTF operation has the potential for inconsistent permit compliance. (2) The existing WWTF lies completely within the 100-year floodplain. (3) The Pantex Plant mission has the potential to change, requiring infrastructure changes to the facility. (4) The life expectancy of the existing facility would be nearing its end by the time a new facility is constructed. (5) The treated wastewater effluent and non-regulated water would have a beneficial agricultural use through irrigation. Evaluation during the internal scoping led to the conclusion that the following factors are present and of concern at the proposed action site on Pantex Plant: (1) Periodic wastewater effluent permit exceedances; (2) Wetlands protection and floodplain management; (3) Capability of the existing facility to meet anticipated future needs of Pantex (4) Existing facility design life; and (5) Use of treated wastewater effluent and non-regulated water for irrigation. Evaluation during the internal scoping led to the conclusion that the following conditions are not present, nor of concern at the proposed site on Pantex Plant, and no further analysis was conducted: (1) State or national parks, forests, or other conservation areas; (2) Wild and scenic rivers; (3) Natural resources, such as timber, range, soils, minerals; (4) Properties of historic, archeological, or architectural significance; (5) Native American concerns; (6) Minority and low-income populations; and (7) Prime or unique farmland. In this document, DOE describes the proposed action and a reasonable range of alternatives to the proposed action, including the ''No-Action'' alternative. The proposed action cited in the ''U.S. Department of Energy Application for a Texas Pollutant Discharge Elimination System Permit Modifying Permit to Dispose of Waste, No. 02296,'' December 1998, included the construction of a new wastewater treatment facility, a new irrigation storage pond, and the conversion of the current wastewater treatment facility into an irrigation storage pond. Although a permit modification application has been filed, if a decision on this EA necessitates it, an amendment to the permit application would be made. The permit application would be required for any of the alternatives and the filing does not preclude or predetermine selection of an alternative considered by this EA. This permit change would allow Pantex to land-dispose treated wastewater by irrigating agricultural land. This construction for the proposed action would include designing two new lagoons for wastewater treatment. One of the lagoons could function as a facultative lagoon for treatment of wastewater. The second lagoon would serve as an irrigation storage impoundment (storage pond), with the alternative use as a facultative lagoon if the first lagoon is out of service for any reason. The new facultative lagoon and irrigation water storage pond would be sited outside of the 100-year flood plain. The existing WWTF lagoon would be used as a storage pond for treated wastewater effluent for irrigation water, as needed. The two new lagoons would be li

N /A

1999-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

211

Environmental transport and fate of endocrine disruptors from non-potable reuse of municipal wastewater  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project was designed to investigate the important but virtually unstudied topic of the subsurface transport and fate of Endocrine Disrupting Compounds (EDCs) when treated wastewater is used for landscape irrigation (non-potable water reuse). Although potable water reuse was outside the scope of this project, the investigation clearly has relevance to such water recycling practices. The target compounds, which are discussed in the following section and include EDCs such as 4-nonylphenol (NP) and 17{beta}-estradiol, were studied not only because of their potential estrogenic effects on receptors but also because they can be useful as tracers of wastewater residue in groundwater. Since the compounds were expected to occur at very low (part per trillion) concentrations in groundwater, highly selective and sensitive analytical techniques had to be developed for their analysis. This project assessed the distributions of these compounds in wastewater effluents and groundwater, and examined their fate in laboratory soil columns simulating the infiltration of treated wastewater into an aquifer (e.g., as could occur during irrigation of a golf course or park with nonpotable treated water). Bioassays were used to determine the estrogenic activity present in effluents and groundwater, and the results were correlated with those from chemical analysis. In vitro assays for estrogenic activity were employed to provide an integrated measure of estrogenic potency of environmental samples without requiring knowledge or measurement of all bioactive compounds in the samples. For this project, the Las Positas Golf Course (LPGC) in the City of Livermore provided an ideal setting. Since 1978, irrigation of this area with treated wastewater has dominated the overall water budget. For a variety of reasons, a group of 10 monitoring wells were installed to evaluate wastewater impacts on the local groundwater. Additionally, these wells were regularly monitored for tritium ({sup 3}H). Overall volumes of irrigation water have been recorded along with total flows through the Livermore Water Reclamation Plant (LWRP). The Environmental Protection Department at LLNL has carefully monitored {sup 3}H effluent leaving the laboratory for many years. For two years preceding the initiation of this project, Grayson and Hudson, working with LWRP staff, had demonstrated that these data could be used to accurately calculate the {sup 3}H concentration in the applied irrigation water as a function of time. This was accomplished by performing two carefully monitored tritium releases from LLNL and following the {sup 3}H through the LWRP. Combining these data with our ability to age-date groundwater using the {sup 3}H-{sup 3}He age-dating technique, it was possible determine both the age and the degree of dilution from other water sources. This information was critical in the evaluation of observed concentrations of trace organic compounds from wastewater. The project included the following tasks: (1) Develop a conceptual model for Las Positas Golf Course (LPGC) irrigation that integrates existing meteorological, hydrologic, and environmental monitoring data. (2) Develop analytical methods (involving solid-phase extraction and isotope dilution LC/MS/MS) for the specific and sensitive measurement of target EDCs. (3) Develop a bioassay for estrogenic activity for application to effluent and groundwater samples. (4) Perform detailed hydrological evaluation of groundwater taken from LPGC. (5) Characterize the source term for target EDCs in wastewater. (6) Evaluate the utility of EDCs as source tracers for groundwater contamination.

Hudson, B; Beller, H; Bartel, C M; Kane, S; Campbell, C; Grayson, A; Liu, N; Burastero, S

2005-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

212

A mass balance method for assessing the potential of artificial wetlands for wastewater treatment  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Artificial wetlands have been shown to have potential for treating wastewaters. An experimental artificial wetland is described together with a mass balance method for quantifying system performance, major nutrient storage components and nutrient removal mechanisms. The experimental systems were capable of a high level of performance. Percentage load removals for chemical oxygen demand, total nitrogen and total phosphorus were 86, 95 and 99%, respectively. Plant biomass was found to be the major nutrient storage compartment with plant nutrient uptake being the major removal mechanism. It was found that overall system performance could be described by a simple first order, steady state model. System design and hydrology were considered important factors in determining treatment performance. Designs must maximize wastewater-rootzone contact. The experimental systems used an upflow hydraulic format to achieve this design objective.

Peter F. Breen

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

K-1435 Wastewater Treatment System for the Toxic Substances Control Act Incinerator Wastewater at the East Tennessee Technology Park, Oak Ridge, TN  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper discusses the design and performance of a wastewater treatment system installed to support the operation of a hazardous waste incinerator. The Oak Ridge Toxic Substances Control Act Incinerator (TSCAI), located at the East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP), is designed and permitted to treat Resource ConservatioN and Recovery Act (RCRA) wastes including characteristic and listed wastes and polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB)-contaminated mixed waste. the incinerator process generates acidic gases and particulates which consist of salts, metals, and radionuclides. These off-gases from the incinerator are treated with a wet off-gas scrubber system. The recirculated water is continuously purged (below down), resulting in a wastewater to be treated. Additional water sources are also collected on the site for treatment, including storm water that infiltrates into diked areas and fire water from the incinerator's suppression system. To meet regulatory requirements for discharge, a wastewater treatment system (WWTS) was designed, constructed, and operated to treat these water sources. The WWTS was designed to provide for periodic fluctuation of contaminant concentrations due to various feed streams to the incinverator. Blow down consists of total suspended solids (TSS) and total dissolved solids (TDS), encompassing metals, radionuclide contamination and trace organics. The system design flow rate range is 35 to 75 gallons per minute (gpm). The system is designed with redundancy to minimize time off-line and to reduce impacts to the TSCAI operations. A novel treatment system uses several unit operations, including chemical feed systems, two-stage chemical reaction treatment, microfiltration, sludge storage and dewatering, neutralization, granular activated carbon, effluent neutralization, and a complete programmable logic controller (PLC) and human-machine interface (HMI) control system. To meet the space requirements and to provide portability of the WWTS to other applications, the system was installed in three, over-the-road semi trailers, and interconnected with piping and power. Trailers were oriented on a small site footprint to facilitate ease of installation. A remote sump pump skid was provided to convey water from two holding sumps adjacent to the treatment process. An accumulation tank and pump were also provided to receive miscellaneous wastewaters for treatment if they meet the waste acceptance criteria. The paper includes details of the technology used in the design, the requirements for compliance, and the initial performance demonstration and jar testing results. The WWTS successfully allowed for highly efficient, high-volume treatment with compliant discharge to off-site surface water.

Swientoniewski M.D.

2008-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

214

Environmental impact of recycling nutrients in human excreta to agriculture compared with enhanced wastewater treatment  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Human excreta are potential sources of plant nutrients, but are today usually considered a waste to be disposed of. The requirements on wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) to remove nitrogen and phosphorus are increasing and to meet these requirements, more energy and chemicals are needed by WWTPs. Separating the nutrient-rich wastewater fractions at source and recycling them to agriculture as fertiliser is an alternative to removing them at the WWTP. This study used life cycle assessment methodology to compare the environmental impact of different scenarios for recycling the nutrients in the human excreta as fertiliser to arable land or removing them in an advanced WWTP. Three scenarios were assessed. In blackwater scenario, blackwater was source-separated and used as fertiliser. In urine scenario, the urine fraction was source-separated and used as fertiliser and the faecal water treated in an advanced WWTP. In NP scenario, chemical fertiliser was used as fertiliser and the toilet water treated in an advanced WWTP. The emissions from the WWTP were the same for all scenarios. This was fulfilled by the enhanced reduction in the WWTP fully removing the nutrients from the excreta that were not source-separated in the NP and urine scenarios. Recycling source-separated wastewater fractions as fertilisers in agriculture proved efficient for conserving energy and decreasing global warming potential (GWP). However, the blackwater and urine scenarios had a higher impact on potential eutrophication and potential acidification than the WWTP-chemical fertiliser scenario, due to large impacts by the ammonia emitted from storage and after spreading of the fertilisers. The cadmium input to the arable soil was very small with urine fertiliser. Source separation and recycling of excreta fractions as fertiliser thus has potential for saving energy and decreasing GWP emissions associated with wastewater management. However, for improved sustainability, the emissions from storage and after spreading of these fertilisers must decrease.

J. Spångberg; P. Tidåker; H. Jönsson

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Opportunities for Energy Efficiency and Open Automated Demand Response in Wastewater Treatment Facilities in California -- Phase I Report  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Embaby, and M. Rao (2006). Refinery Wastewater Treatment: Aand Assessment of Al Ruwais Refinery Wastewater." Journal ofThe Effects of Petroleum Refinery Wastewater on the Rate of

Lekov, Alex

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Opportunities for Energy Efficiency and Open Automated Demand Response in Wastewater Treatment Facilities in California -- Phase I Report  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

R. J. (1997). Wastewater Reduction and Recycling in Foodreclaiming and recycling wastewater, or subsidizing theis done through recycling the wastewater to reduce energy

Lekov, Alex

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Onsite Wastewater Treatment Systems: Pump Tank  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Pump tanks are concrete, fiberglass or polyethylene containers that collect wastewater to be dosed into the soil at intervals. This publication explains the design and maintenance of pump tanks, and it offers advice on what to do if a pump tank...

Lesikar, Bruce J.

2008-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

218

Heat inactivation of poliovirus in wastewater sludge.  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Heat inactivation of poliovirus in wastewater sludge. R L Ward C S Ashley R H Moseley The effect of raw and anaerobically digested sludge on heat inactivation of poliovirus was investigated. Raw sludge was found to be very protective of poliovirus...

R L Ward; C S Ashley; R H Moseley

1976-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Mass balance for wastewater nitrogen in the Central Arizona–Phoenix ecosystem  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A complete nitrogen mass balance for all wastewater generated in the Central Arizona–Phoenix ecosystem was developed using data from the 18 largest wastewater treatment plants (99% of flow). Components included total N in raw wastewater, denitrification in wastewater treatment plants, biosolids production, and effluent (reuse, recharge, and discharge). Denitrification and biosolids production remove 81% of wastewater N. Nearly all biosolids are recycled to cotton fields within the ecosystem. Most effluent is recycled within the ecosystem. As the result of wastewater management practices developed to reuse wastewater, wastewater N is either deliberately volatilized or accumulates within the system; only 4% of the original wastewater N is exported via the Gila River.

Lisa Lauver; Lawrence A Baker

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

REMOVAL OF ORGANIC CHEMICALS FROM WASTEWATER BY SURFACTANT SEPARATION  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This research presents a novel hybrid process for removing organic chemicals from contaminated water. The process uses surfactant to carry out two unit operations (1) Extraction; (2) Foam flotation. In the first step, surfactant is used to extract most of the amounts of organic contaminants in the stream. In the second step, foam flotation is used to further reduce organic contaminants and recover surfactant from the stream. The process combines the advantages of extraction and foam flotation, which allows the process not only to handle a wide range of organic contaminants, but also to effectively treat a wide range of the concentration of organic contaminants in the stream and reduce it to a very low level. Surfactant regeneration can be done by conventional methods. This process is simple and low cost. The wastes are recoverable. The objective of this research is to develop an environmentally innocuous process for the wastewater or reclaimed water treatment with the ability to handle a wide range of organic contaminants, also to effectively treat a wide range of the concentration of organic contaminants in contaminated water and reduce it to a very low level, finally, provides simpler, less energy cost and economically-practical process design. Another purpose is to promote the environmental concern in minority students and encourage minority students to become more involved in environmental engineering research.

Unknown

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tw treated wastewater" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Impacts of Shale Gas Wastewater Disposal on Water Quality in Western Pennsylvania  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

States, oil and gas wastewater is managed through recycling of the wastewater for shale gas operations of the wastewater.7 However, options for the proper disposal and management of the wastewater that is not recycledImpacts of Shale Gas Wastewater Disposal on Water Quality in Western Pennsylvania Nathaniel R

Jackson, Robert B.

222

The accumulation of nonylphenol in a wastewater recycling process  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A mathematical model was developed in this paper to describe the nonylphenol (NP) accumulation in the effluent of a wastewater recycling system. The model quantitatively presented the relationships among the NP concentrations in the raw wastewater and the system effluent, the number of wastewater recycling cycles, the water recycling ratio, the system NP removal efficiency, and the NP accumulation factor. The mathematical model was then verified through experimental modeling of a wastewater recycling process, and it was indicated that the Pearson correlation coefficient between mathematical simulation and experimental modeling results was 0.652. The study results indicated that the NP accumulation factor of a wastewater recycling system would approach a constant for large number of wastewater recycling cycles given the wastewater recycling ratio and system NP removal efficiency. The results also revealed that the NP concentration in the effluent increased with the wastewater recycling ratio given the system NP removal efficiency, and the increase of NP removal efficiency would decrease the NP accumulation in the system effluent under a given wastewater recycling ratio condition. The model was then applied to compute the maximum wastewater recycling ratio, predict reclaimed water quality and direct the design and management of sewage recycling systems in China.

Rui-Xia Hao; Yu-Wen Zhou; Shui-Yuan Cheng; Jian-Bing Li; Man Zhao; Xi Chen; Ning Yao

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Treatment of concentrated industrial wastewaters originating from oil shale and the like by electrolysis polyurethane foam interaction  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Highly concentrated and toxic petroleum-based and synthetic fuels wastewaters such as oil shale retort water are treated in a unit treatment process by electrolysis in a reactor containing oleophilic, ionized, open-celled polyurethane foams and subjected to mixing and l BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION The invention described herein arose in the course of, or under, Contract No. DE-AC03-76SF00098 between the U.S. Department of Energy and the University of California.

Tiernan, Joan E. (38 Clay Ct., Novato, CA 94947)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Successional Development of Sulfate-Reducing Bacterial Populations and Their Activities in a Wastewater Biofilm Growing under Microaerophilic Conditions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...in wastewater treatment systems, the...genus level in wastewater biofilms in relation...the biofilm. Mass balance of sulfide and...anoxic zones in wastewater treatment biofilms (36...wastewater treatment plant in Sapporo...

Tsukasa Ito; Satoshi Okabe; Hisashi Satoh; Yoshimasa Watanabe

2002-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

The behaviors and fate of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in a coking wastewater treatment plant  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The occurrence, behaviors and fate of 18 \\{PAHs\\} were investigated in a coking wastewater treatment plant in Songshan coking plant, located in Shaoguan, Guangdong Province of China. It was found that the target compounds occurred widely in raw coking wastewater, treated effluent, sludge and gas samples. In raw coking wastewater, high molecular weight (MW) \\{PAHs\\} were the dominant compounds, while 3–6 ring \\{PAHs\\} predominated in the final effluent. The dominant compounds in gas samples were phenathrene, fluoranthene and pyrene, while they were fluoranthene, pyrene, chrysene and benzo[k]fluoranthene for sludge. The process achieved over 97% removal for all the PAHs, 47–92% of eliminations of these target compounds in liquid phase were achieved in biological stage. Different behaviors of \\{PAHs\\} were observed in the primary tank, anaerobic tank, aerobic tank, hydrolytic tank and coagulation tank units, while heavier and lower ones were mainly removed in anaerobic tank and aerobic tanks, respectively. Regarding the fate of PAHs, calculated fractions of mass losses for low MW \\{PAHs\\} due to transformation and adsorption to sludge accounted for 15–50% and 24–49%, respectively, while the rest was less than 1%. For high MW PAHs, the mass losses were mainly due to adsorption to sludge and separation with tar (contributing 56–76% and 22–39%, respectively), and the removal through transformation was less.

Wanhui Zhang; Chaohai Wei; Xinsheng Chai; Jingying He; Ying Cai; Man Ren; Bo Yan; Pingan Peng; Jiamo Fu

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Achieving very low mercury levels in refinery wastewater by membrane filtration.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Microfiltration (MF), ultrafiltration (UF), nanofiltration (NF) and reverse osmosis (RO) membranes were evaluated for their ability to achieve the world's most stringent Hg discharge criterion (<1.3 ng/L) in an oil refinery's wastewater. The membrane processes were operated at three different pressures to demonstrate the potential for each membrane technology to achieve the targeted effluent mercury concentrations. The presence of mercury in the particulate form in the refinery wastewater makes the use of MF and UF membrane technologies more attractive in achieving very low mercury levels in the treated wastewater. Both NF and RO were also able to meet the target mercury concentration at lower operating pressures (20.7 bar). However, higher operating pressures ({ge}34.5 bar) had a significant effect on NF and RO flux and fouling rates, as well as on permeate quality. SEM images of the membranes showed that pore blockage and narrowing were the dominant fouling mechanisms for the MF membrane while surface coverage was the dominant fouling mechanism for the other membranes. The correlation between mercury concentration and particle size distribution was also investigated to understand mercury removal mechanisms by membrane filtration. The mean particle diameter decreased with filtration from 1.1 {+-} 0.0 {micro}m to 0.74 {+-} 0.2 {micro}m after UF.

Urgun Demirtas, M.; Benda, P.; Gillenwater, P. S.; Negri, M. C.; Xiong, H.; Snyder, S. W. (Center for Nanoscale Materials); ( ES)

2012-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

227

Use of Chemical Oxygen Demand Values of Bacterial Cells in Waste-Water Purification  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Bacterial Cells in Waste-Water Purification A. F. Gaudy Jr. M. N...Bacterial Cells in Waste-Water Purification A. F. GAUDY, JR., M...bacterial cells in waste-water purification. Appl. Microbiol. 12:254-260...

A. F. Gaudy Jr.; M. N. Bhatla; E. T. Gaudy

1964-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Modification of Norfloxacin by a Microbacterium sp. Strain Isolated from a Wastewater Treatment Plant  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Microbacterium sp. Strain Isolated from a Wastewater Treatment Plant Dae-Wi Kim 1 Thomas...antibiotics in conventional and advanced wastewater treatment: implications for environmental discharge and wastewater recycling. Water Res. 41 :4164-4176...

Dae-Wi Kim; Thomas M. Heinze; Bong-Soo Kim; Laura K. Schnackenberg; Kellie A. Woodling; John B. Sutherland

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Involvement of Rhodocyclus-Related Organisms in Phosphorus Removal in Full-Scale Wastewater Treatment Plants  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Removal in Full-Scale Wastewater Treatment Plants Julie L. Zilles Jordan...organisms in two full-scale wastewater treatment plants were estimated to represent...successfully in full-scale wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs), identification...

Julie L. Zilles; Jordan Peccia; Myeong-Woon Kim; Chun-Hsiung Hung; Daniel R. Noguera

2002-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Succession of Internal Sulfur Cycles and Sulfur-Oxidizing Bacterial Communities in Microaerophilic Wastewater Biofilms  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...cycle that occurs in wastewater biofilms. One of...activity in developing wastewater biofilms was analyzed...In addition, the mass balance for SO4 2, S0, and...effluent from a domestic wastewater treatment plant (Sapporo, Japan...

Satoshi Okabe; Tsukasa Ito; Kenichi Sugita; Hisashi Satoh

2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Recent worldwide reviews of wastewater irrigation have demonstrated the contribution this widespread, and often  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Recent worldwide reviews of wastewater irrigation have demonstrated the contribution. Policymakers and planners can maintain or increase the benefits of wastewater irrigation, while minimizing negative health and environmental impacts, by developing a realistic strategy for managing wastewater use

Scott, Christopher

232

Polishing of synthetic electroplating wastewater in microcosm upflow constructed wetlands: Effect of operating conditions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Polishing of synthetic electroplating wastewater in microcosm upflow constructed wetlands: Effect of polishing electroplating wastewater in subsurface vertical flow constructed wetland. Electroplating wastewater treatment or polishing in constructed wetlands (CWs) was studied to a very limited degree. Four

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

233

Characterization of anion diffusion in polymer hydrogels used for wastewater remediation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Characterization of anion diffusion in polymer hydrogels used for wastewater remediation Dimitri R pollutants, even at extremely low concentrations, from wastewater effluents are a major environmental need of reactive phosphorus, nitrogen, and sulfur anions from aquaculture production wastewater effluents

Rubloff, Gary W.

234

Local Board of Health Guide to On-Site Wastewater Treatment Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Local Board of Health Guide to On-Site Wastewater Treatment Systems ©2006 National Association Side of Cover and is Blank #12;Local Board of Health Guide to On-Site Wastewater Treatment Systems............................................................................................................. 9 WHAT IS WASTEWATER

235

The Attainable Set for a Nonlinear Control Model of Wastewater Biotreatment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Attainable Set for a Nonlinear Control Model of Wastewater Biotreatment Ellina Grigorieva;Biotreatment of Wastewater Treatment of wastewater is needed to eliminate pathogens and reduce organic matter

Grigorieva, Ellina V.

236

On-Site Wastewater Treatment Systems: Trickling Filter  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Soil absorption field Septic tank Clarifier/Dosing tank Trickling filter On-site wastewater treatment systems Trickling filter Bruce Lesikar and Russell Persyn Extension Agricultural Engineering Specialist, Extension Assistant-Water Conservation... municipal wastewater before cities began using activated sludge aeration systems. Now, homes and businesses use trickling filters in on-site wastewater treatment systems. Each trickling filter system has several components: 3 A septic tank, which removes...

Lesikar, Bruce J.

2000-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

237

On-Site Wastewater Treatment Systems: Mound System  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

oxygen demand (BOD 5 ), which is the amount of oxygen used by microorganisms to break down waste material. The maximum BOD 5 of pretreate waste- The On-Site Wastewater Treatment Systems series of publications is a result of collaborative efforts... Extension Service Texas Natural Resource Conservation Commission Texas Agricultural Experiment Station USDA Water Quality Demonstration Projects Texas On-Site Wastewater Association Consortium of Institutes for Decentralized Wastewater Treatment USDA Natural...

Lesikar, Bruce J.

2002-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

238

Onsite Wastewater Treatment Systems: Graywater Use and Water Quality  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

their homes in their landscapes. This reuse of graywater can reduce the amount of wastewater entering sewers or treatment systems, reduce the amount of fresh water used on landscapes and help preserve limited fresh water supplies. Onsite wastewater...-washing machines ? The code excludes water that has washed materials soiled with human waste, such as diapers, and water that has been in contact with toilet waste. This water, known as blackwater, includes flush water from toilets and urinals and wastewater...

Lesikar, Bruce J.; Mechell, Justin; Alexander, Rachel

2008-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

239

Rules Governing Water and Wastewater Operator Certification (Tennessee) |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Rules Governing Water and Wastewater Operator Certification Rules Governing Water and Wastewater Operator Certification (Tennessee) Rules Governing Water and Wastewater Operator Certification (Tennessee) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Developer Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Tennessee Program Type Environmental Regulations Siting and Permitting Provider Tennessee Department Of Environment and Conservation The Rules Governing Water and Wastewater Operator Certification are

240

Solid-Liquid Separation of Animal Manure and Wastewater  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Solid-liquid separation is an alternative treatment for animal manure and process-generated wastewater. This publication explains the techniques, equipment, performance and economics of separators....

Mukhtar, Saqib; Sweeten, John M.; Auvermann, Brent W.

1999-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tw treated wastewater" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Source Apportionment of Wastewater Using Bayesian Analysis of Fluorescence Spectroscopy.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??This research uses Bayesian analysis of fluorescence spectroscopy results to determine if wastewater from the Heber Valley Special Service District (HVSSD) lagoons in Midway, UT… (more)

Blake, Daniel B.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Phosphorus Removal and Recovery from Wastewater using Magnetite.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

?? The aim of this work was to study the possibilities of using magnetite for phosphorus removal and recovery from wastewater. It was also aimed… (more)

Panasiuk, Oleksander

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

LANL achieves milestone on path to zero wastewater discharge  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Colleen Curran Communications Office (505) 664-0344 Email Improved compliance while recycling millions of gallons of industrial wastewater LOS ALAMOS, New Mexico, January 20,...

244

Hawaii Wastewater Branch Online Application Webpage | Open Energy...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Application Webpage Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: Hawaii Wastewater Branch Online Application Webpage Author State of Hawaii...

245

Formation of aerobic granular sludge biofilms for sustainable wastewater treatment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ENAC/ Formation of aerobic granular sludge biofilms for sustainable wastewater treatment David G Research, Microbiology of Interfaces, Magdeburg (Germany) EDCE 2011 / From activated sludge flocs

246

EA-1190: Wastewater Treatment Capability Upgrade, Amarillo, Texas  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This EA evaluates the environmental impacts for the proposed upgrade of the U.S. Department of Energy Pantex Plant Wastewater Treatment Plant in Amarillo, Texas.

247

WAC - 173 - 221A - Wastewater Discharge Standards and Effluent...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Wastewater Discharge Standards and Effluent Limitations Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document- RegulationRegulation: WAC - 173 - 221A -...

248

On-Site Wastewater Treatment Systems: Constructed Wetland Media  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This publication explains the functions, characteristics, choices, configurations and maintenance needs for constructed wetland media in on-site wastewater treatment systems....

Lesikar, Bruce J.; Weaver, Richard; Richter, Amanda; O'Neill, Courtney

2005-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

249

Unique process combination decontaminates mixed wastewater at Rocky Flats  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper describes the Sitewide Water Treatment Facility (SWTF) used to process environmental remediation wastewaters found at the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site.

Kelso, William J.; Cirillo, J. Russ

1999-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Analysis and Characterization of Halogenated Transformation Products of Pharmaceuticals and Personal Care Products in Wastewater Effluent  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Immunosorbent assay for triclosan. Application to wastewaterR. ; Letcher, R. J. , Triclosan in waste and surface watersformation of chlorinated triclosan derivatives in wastewater

Bulloch, Daryl Neil

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

E-Print Network 3.0 - area industrial wastewater Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Sciences and Ecology 3 Harvesting Energy from Wastewater Treatment Summary: Biogas: - 60% H2 - 40% CO2 12;H2 from industrial wastewaters such as food processing...

252

Activated sludge studies of selected contaminants of PFH wastewater  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Acetone, propionitrile, pyrrole, and thiocyanate were selected as representative compounds of wastewater expected from pressurized, fluidized-bed hydroretorting (PFH) of Eastern oil shales. The PFH process has been the subject of investigation by the Institute of Gas Technology, under contract with the United States Department of Energy, for the purpose of obtaining higher oil yields from Eastern shales than has been possible using conventional retorting methods. Preliminary batch experiments illustrated that acetone, propionitrile, pyrrole, and thiocyanate are aerobically biodegradable by heterogeneous microbiological cultures. Three continuous flow activated sludge reactors were used to further evaluate the biological treatability of the synthetic waste. The studies revealed that the compounds could be removed at hydraulic residence times of as low as one day. Three one-day experiments demonstrated that biological system's capability to accept organic shock loadings without a change in effluent quality. A no-recycle reactor illustrated that the flocculent microbiological population had a high resistance to solids washout. Because a supplementary nitrogen source was not included in synthetic waste treated by the no-recycle unit, it was shown that propionitrile, pyrrole, and/or thiocyanate supplied the nitrogen necessary for biological activity.

Dudley, S.K. (Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., Oak Ridge, TN (United States)); Bustamante, R.B.; Bonner, W.P. (Tennessee Technological Univ., Cookeville, TN (United States))

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Activated sludge studies of selected contaminants of PFH wastewater  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Acetone, propionitrile, pyrrole, and thiocyanate were selected as representative compounds of wastewater expected from pressurized, fluidized-bed hydroretorting (PFH) of Eastern oil shales. The PFH process has been the subject of investigation by the Institute of Gas Technology, under contract with the United States Department of Energy, for the purpose of obtaining higher oil yields from Eastern shales than has been possible using conventional retorting methods. Preliminary batch experiments illustrated that acetone, propionitrile, pyrrole, and thiocyanate are aerobically biodegradable by heterogeneous microbiological cultures. Three continuous flow activated sludge reactors were used to further evaluate the biological treatability of the synthetic waste. The studies revealed that the compounds could be removed at hydraulic residence times of as low as one day. Three one-day experiments demonstrated that biological system`s capability to accept organic shock loadings without a change in effluent quality. A no-recycle reactor illustrated that the flocculent microbiological population had a high resistance to solids washout. Because a supplementary nitrogen source was not included in synthetic waste treated by the no-recycle unit, it was shown that propionitrile, pyrrole, and/or thiocyanate supplied the nitrogen necessary for biological activity.

Dudley, S.K. [Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Bustamante, R.B.; Bonner, W.P. [Tennessee Technological Univ., Cookeville, TN (United States)

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

254

Cost-Benefit Analysis of the Swiss National Policy on Reducing Micropollutants in Treated Wastewater  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

To assess public demand for the reduction of the environmental and health risks of MPs, we conducted a choice experiment in a national online survey. ... The results indicate that the average willingness to pay per household is CHF 100 (US$ 73) annually for reducing the potential environmental risk of MPs to a low level. ... Hence, a cost-benefit analysis justifies the investment decision from an economic point of view and supports the implementation of the national policy in the ongoing political discussion. ...

Ivana Logar; Roy Brouwer; Max Maurer; Christoph Ort

2014-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

255

Potential of Wastewater-Treating Anaerobic Granules for Biomethanation of Synthesis Gas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This includes the water-gas shift (WGS) reaction for increasing the H2/CO ratio followed by nickel-catalyzed methanation of CO and CO2 into methane and water (reactions of Fischer?Tropsch (nCO + (2n+1)H2 ? CnH(2n+2) + nH2O) and Sabatier (CO2 + 4H2 ? CH4 + 2H2O)). ... Such higher specific conversion potential may have allowed for a higher volumetric conversion potential as well, which may have resulted in a faster depletion of the dissolved CO, and in turn improved the gas?liquid mass transfer rate. ... Results are reported of mixed-culture studies employing the photosynthetic bacterium Rhodospirillum rubrum for converting CO to CO2 and H2 by the water gas shift reaction and 2 methanogens, Methanobacterium formicicum and Methanosarcina barkeri, for converting CO2 and H2 to CH4. Results are presented for triculture operation in 2 types of reactors, the packed bubble column and the trickle-bed reactor. ...

Serge R. Guiot; Ruxandra Cimpoia; Gaël Carayon

2011-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

256

-Supporting information-Treating Refinery Wastewaters in Microbial Fuel Cells Using Separator  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

) the spaced electrode (SPA), (B) the separator electrode assembly (SEA) configurations. An equivalent circuit was constructed with a resistance and two time constants (RQ components) (Fig. S2) to obtain the solution (or solution/separator) resistance Rs and the reaction resistance Rrxn. This circuit was used to roughly

257

CCA-Treated Wood  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Chromated copper arsenate (CCA) is a chemical preservative that protects wood from rotting due to insects and microbial agents. It has been used to pressure-treated lumber since the 1930s. Since the 1970s, the majority of the wood used in residential settings was CCA-treated wood. It is a registered chemical pesticide that is subject to US Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA's) regulation. The pesticide registration for CCA was modified as a result of a voluntary agreement reached in February 2002 between the registrants and EPA, in order to transition to a new generation of preservatives for most nonindustrial applications. That agreement permitted the use of CCA for all existing registered uses until December 2003 and the continued sale and distribution of CCA-treated wood treated in accordance with the label. After 1 January 2004, following label amendment, CCA was permitted and continues to be sold to treat wood for many uses. This article is a revision of the previous edition article by C. Charles Barton and Thomas T. Newton, volume 1, pp 489–490, © 2005, Elsevier Inc.

C. Barton

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

CHP and Bioenergy for Landfills and Wastewater Treatment Plants: Market Opportunities  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Overview of market opportunities for CHP and bioenergy for landfills and wastewater treatment plants

259

STATUS REPORT: Onsite Wastewater Treatment Systems in California jointly presented by:  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, “adequately managed decentralized (onsite) wastewater treatment systems can be a cost effective and long

California Wastewater

260

Winery waste makes fuel Electricity, bacteria break organics in wastewater into hydrogen gas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MSNBC.com Winery waste makes fuel Electricity, bacteria break organics in wastewater into hydrogen method for generating hydrogen fuel from wastewater is now operating at a California winery material in the wastewater into hydrogen gas. There is a lot more energy locked in the wastewater than

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tw treated wastewater" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

ED-WAVE: an Educational Software for Training on Wastewater Technologies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ED-WAVE: an Educational Software for Training on Wastewater Technologies Using Virtual Application database and case base reasoning in the field of wastewater treatment and water reclamation. ED-WAVE aims education; wastewater technolo- gies; wastewater treatment animations INTRODUCTION SUSTAINABILITY

Gutierrez, Diego

262

Bingen wastewater treatment facility energy evaluation. A reconnaissance level technical assistance study for the city of Bingen  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the fall of 1983, the city of Bingen was selected as a target community for the Local Government Technical Assistance (LGTA) Program. They requested the LGTA team to assist them in identifying cost-effective energy conservation opportunities at their wastewater treatment facility. A description of the wastewater treatment process, monthly energy cost and consumption data, and process in-flow data were collected and analyzed by the LGTA team. An onsite treatment facility evaluation was performed in March of 1984. The purpose of this report is to present the results of the LGTA energy inventory and to recommend directions for further study. The city of Bingen operates a small treatment plant which averages 9.6 million gallons per month (an average of 0.31 million gallons per day). The treatment process consists of passing wastewater through a comminutor, grit chamber, aeration basin, clarifier, and a chlorination contact chamber prior to releasing the treated water into the Columbia River. The solids portion of the waste stream is biologically treated by aerobic digesters before the sludge is trucked to a land disposal site. Annual electrical consumption at the facility averages about 80,000 kWh. As estimated by the LGTA equipment inventory, the largest electrical consuming process component is the operation of the brush aerators (approx.65% of the total process electrical consumption). An Energy Utilization Index (EUI) was determined on a bimonthly basis. Over the last 18 months, the EUI has averaged a very respectable 2.67 million Btus per million gallons of processed wastewater.

James, J.W.

1985-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Wastewater Regulations for National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Wastewater Regulations for National Pollutant Discharge Elimination Wastewater Regulations for National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) Permits, Underground Injection Control (UIC) Permits, State Permits, Water Quality Based Effluent Limitations and Water Quality Certification (Mississippi) Wastewater Regulations for National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) Permits, Underground Injection Control (UIC) Permits, State Permits, Water Quality Based Effluent Limitations and Water Quality Certification (Mississippi) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Developer Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential

264

Anaerobic Digestion of Food Waste?recycling Wastewater  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Food waste?recycling (FWR) wastewater was evaluated as feedstock for two?stage anaerobic digestion at different hydraulic retention times (HRTs). The FWR wastewater tested contained high concentrations of organic materials and had chemical oxygen demand (COD) >130 g/L and volatile solids (VS) >55 g/L. Two identical two?stage anaerobic digesters were operated to investigate the performance at six HRTs ranging from 10–25 days. In the acidogenic reactor the total carbohydrate reduction efficiency and volatile fatty acid production dramatically decreased when acidogenic HRT was wastewater as feedstock.

Gyuseong Han; Seung Gu Shin; Juntaek Lim; Minho Jo; Seokhwan Hwang

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Fluidized bed heat treating system  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Systems for heat treating materials are presented. The systems typically involve a fluidized bed that contains granulated heat treating material. In some embodiments a fluid, such as an inert gas, is flowed through the granulated heat treating medium, which homogenizes the temperature of the heat treating medium. In some embodiments the fluid may be heated in a heating vessel and flowed into the process chamber where the fluid is then flowed through the granulated heat treating medium. In some embodiments the heat treating material may be liquid or granulated heat treating material and the heat treating material may be circulated through a heating vessel into a process chamber where the heat treating material contacts the material to be heat treated. Microwave energy may be used to provide the source of heat for heat treating systems.

Ripley, Edward B; Pfennigwerth, Glenn L

2014-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

266

Determining the ecological viability of constructed wetlands for the treatment of oil sands wastewater  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To determine the conditions for optimal degradation of naphthenic acids (C{sub n}H{sub 2n+z}O{sub 2}), the most toxic component of oil sands wastewater, the authors have monitored the mineralization of 2 representative naphthenic acids (NA), U-{sup 14}C-palmitic acid (linear, Z = 0) and 8-{sup 14}C-decahydro-2-naphthoic acid (bicyclic, Z = {minus}4) under varying conditions of temperature, phosphate and oxygen. The radiolabeled NA was added to biometer flasks containing wastewater {+-} amendments and evolved {sup 14}C-CO{sub 2} was trapped in a side arm and counted by LSC. The results indicate that low temperature (5 C) and anaerobiasis greatly inhibited NA degradation over the four week incubation period. Addition of phosphate (as buffered KP{sub i}) significantly increased {sup 14}C-CO{sub 2} production for both Z = 0 and Z = {minus}4 compounds; however, the subsequent high microbial growth rates also decreased PO{sub 2} which limited NA mineralization. Effluent toxicity was monitored at week 0 and week 4 using Microtox and fathead minnow tests. Although there was increased survival of fathead minnows in the phosphate-amended effluent, the IC{sub 20} values of the Microtox assay showed no improvement in either the phosphate-treated or untreated effluents. These results show that naphthenic acid analogues are readily degraded by indigenous microorganisms in oil sands wastewater and that phosphate addition accelerated the mineralization of these compounds if PO{sub 2} remained high.

Lai, J.; Kiehlmann, E.; Pinto, L.; Bendell-Young, L.; Moore, M. [Simon Fraser Univ., Burnaby, British Columbia (Canada); Nix, P. [EVS Environment Consultants, North Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

267

Chapter 7 - Urban Wastewater Treatment for Recycling and Reuse in Industrial Applications: Indian Scenario  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Urban wastewater management has become a challenge in many countries because infrastructure development and regulations have not kept pace with population growth and urbanization. This chapter focuses on urban wastewater management and the possible use of treated water for industrial applications in India. The figures on India’s annual urban population are rising and expected to reach about 600 million by 2030, making India more peri-urban than rural. It is realised that Indian industry has not taken a neutral stance on the required quality and quantity of water. The current national water share for Indian industry is only about 8%, which is far lower than in developed countries with respect to higher reuse and recycling applications. However, the water share of Indian industry will be growing along with the growing GDP. According to a recent Industry/Commerce & Government assessment, the water requirement for industrial use will increase from the current 30 billion m3 to-120 billion m3 by 2025. India is already an almost water-stressed country. The huge water demand of industry can be balanced by recycling and reusing urban wastewater, which would also provide an opportunity for the growth of Indian industry should this type of program be adopted. It would be possible to reuse 40–50% of secondary sewage for industrial and indirect potable use. If the sustainability of resources was maintained in light of increasing industrial water demand, the present reuse of less than 8% would be increased to 30–40% toward the projected water demand of 2030. Industrial water production from secondary sewage of urban and semi-urban areas can increase the water availability to Indian industrial sectors by establishing a joint municipal–industrial collaboration.

R. Saravanane; Vivek V. Ranade; Vinay M. Bhandari; A. Seshagiri Rao

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Utilization of municipal wastewater for cooling in thermoelectric power plants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A process simulation model has been developed using Aspen Plus(R) with the OLI (OLI System, Inc.) water chemistry model to predict water quality in the recirculating cooling loop utilizing secondary- and tertiary-treated municipal wastewater as the source of makeup water. Simulation results were compared with pilot-scale experimental data on makeup water alkalinity, loop pH, and ammonia evaporation. The effects of various parameters including makeup water quality, salt formation, NH{sub 3} and CO{sub 2} evaporation mass transfer coefficients, heat load, and operating temperatures were investigated. The results indicate that, although the simulation model can capture the general trends in the loop pH, experimental data on the rates of salt precipitation in the system are needed for more accurate prediction of the loop pH. It was also found that stripping of ammonia and carbon dioxide in the cooling tower can influence the cooling loop pH significantly. The effects of the NH{sub 3} mass transfer coefficient on cooling loop pH appear to be more significant at lower values (e.g., k{sub NH3}< 4×10{sup -3} m/s) when the makeup water alkalinity is low (e.g., <90 mg/L as CaCO{sub 3}). The effect of the CO{sub 2} mass transfer coefficient was found to be significant only at lower alkalinity values (e.g., k{sub CO2}<4×10{{sup -6} m/s).

Safari, Iman; Walker, Michael E.; Hsieh, Ming-Kai; Dzombak, David A.; Liu, Wenshi; Vidic, Radisav D.; Miller, David C.; Abbasian, Javad

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Water Distribution and Wastewater Systems Operators (North Dakota) |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Water Distribution and Wastewater Systems Operators (North Dakota) Water Distribution and Wastewater Systems Operators (North Dakota) Water Distribution and Wastewater Systems Operators (North Dakota) < Back Eligibility Utility Fed. Government Commercial Agricultural Investor-Owned Utility State/Provincial Govt Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Residential Installer/Contractor Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Low-Income Residential Schools Retail Supplier Institutional Multi-Family Residential Systems Integrator Fuel Distributor Nonprofit General Public/Consumer Transportation Program Info State North Dakota Program Type Siting and Permitting All public water supply and wastewater disposal systems are subject to classification and regulation by the State of North Dakota, and must obtain certification from the State Department of Health

270

Vehicle Use of Recycled Natural Gas Derived from Wastewater Biosolids  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

PE Brown and Caldwell Project Design Manager St. Petersburg, FL: Vehicle Use of Recycled Natural Gas Derived from Wastewater Biosolids U.S Department of Energy - Biomass 2014 John...

271

Waste-Water Treatment: The Tide Is Turning  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...combine to form water. The resins...by waste-water treatment standards. In electrodialysis, an electric...human use. Electrodialysis and reverse...brackish waste water, and these...problem in sewage treatment. The cost...

Robert W. Holcomb

1970-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

272

Wastewater treatment of phosphate ions by the electrodialysis method  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The chemical composition of wastewater at the Turkmenabad chemical enterprise and the possibility of its treatment has been studied. The transfer of phosphate-ions through standard ion-permeable membranes was ...

Sh. Ch. Akyeva; L. K. Berkelieva…

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Chemically enhanced primary treatment of wastewater in Honduran Imhoff tanks  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Imhoff tanks represent approximately 40% of the wastewater treatment infrastructure in Honduras. This thesis evaluates the usage of solid aluminum sulfate as a means to achieving national effluent regulations in Imhoff ...

Mikelonis, Anne M. (Anne Marie)

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Life Cycle Environmental Impacts of Wastewater-Based Algal Biofuels  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Life Cycle Environmental Impacts of Wastewater-Based Algal Biofuels ... The potential for large-scale implementation of centrate-based algal biofuel, however, is limited by availability of centrate. ...

Dongyan Mu; Min Min; Brian Krohn; Kimberley A. Mullins; Roger Ruan; Jason Hill

2014-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

275

Production of Biogas from Wastewaters of Food Processing Industries  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

An Upflow Anaerobic Sludge Blanket Process used in converting biodegradable, soluble, organic pollutants in industrial wastewaters to a directly-burnable biogas composed mainly of methane has been developed, tested, and commercially applied...

Sax, R. I.; Holtz, M.; Pette, K. C.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Energy Recovery Potential from Wastewater Utilities through Innovation  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Recovery Potential from Wastewater Utilities through Innovation Conversion Technologies III: Energy from Our Waste-Will we Be Rich in Fuel or Knee Deep in Trash by 2025? July 30,...

277

Ion Exchange for the Recycling of Wastewater Constituents  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Recycling or the constituents of wastewater requires efficient and cheap separation methods. Pollutants ... removed in a concentrated form to facilitate their recycling. Similarly, the raw water must be ... has a...

Brian Bolto; Lucjan Pawlowski

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Phosphorous Recycling from Pre-Coagulated Wastewater Sludge  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The amount of rock phosphorous remained in the world is limited. Therefore, it is important to develop the technology and construct the social system for use of recycled phosphorous. Municipal wastewater contains...

Y. Watanabe; T. Tadano; T. Hasegawa…

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Idaho On-Site Wastewater Systems Webpage | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Systems Webpage Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: Idaho On-Site Wastewater Systems Webpage Abstract This webpage provides an...

280

Life-cycle assessment of wastewater treatment plants  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This thesis presents a general model for the carbon footprints analysis of wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs), using a life cycle assessment (LCA) approach. In previous research, the issue of global warming is often related ...

Dong, Bo, M. Eng. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tw treated wastewater" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Calicivirus Removal in a Membrane Bioreactor Wastewater Treatment Plant  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Membrane Bioreactor Wastewater Treatment Plant Laura C. Sima...capacity of the plant, as the NoV...to calculate a mass balance, which would...activated sludge treatment alone can be...November, when plant operators reported...

Laura C. Sima; Julien Schaeffer; Jean-Claude Le Saux; Sylvain Parnaudeau; Menachem Elimelech; Françoise S. Le Guyader

2011-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

282

On-Site Wastewater Treatment Systems: Alternative Collection Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Rural Texas communities have new options for wastewater management infrastructure that are cost effective but still protect human health and environmental quality. Such communities now can combine different kinds of systems in a new approach called...

Lesikar, Bruce J.

2000-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

283

Montana Facilities Which Do Not Discharge Process Wastewater...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Which Do Not Discharge Process Wastewater (MDEQ Form 2E) Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Form: Montana Facilities Which Do Not Discharge Process...

284

Implementing Energy Efficiency in Wastewater to Reduce Costs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In the industrial world creating a quality product at minimum cost is the goal. In this environment all expenses are scrutinized, when they are part of the manufacturing process. However, even at the most conscientious facility the wastewater system...

Cantwell, J. C.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

On-Site Wastewater Treatment Systems: Selecting and Permitting  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This publication explains factors to consider when choosing an on-site wastewater treatment system and lists the nine steps required to obtain a permit for one. It includes addresses and phone numbers of Texas Natural Resource Conservation...

Lesikar, Bruce J.

2005-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

286

Membrane Based intensification of ammonia removal from wastewater  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The aim of this research was to study a novel membrane based oxygen intensification system to enhance a biological wastewater treatment process for ammonia removal. Specifically, this work is concerned with the biological nitrification process which...

Almutairi, Azel

2011-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

287

Onsite Wastewater Treatment Systems: Homeowner's Guide to Evaluating Service Contracts  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This guide helps homeowners who are seeking maintenance services for their onsite wastewater treatment systems (such as septic systems). Included are definitions of common terms used in service contracts, types of service contracts available...

Lesikar, Bruce J.; O'Neill, Courtney; Deal, Nancy; Loomis, George; Gustafson, David; Lindbo, David

2008-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

288

Metro Wastewater Reclamation District Biomass Facility | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Wastewater Reclamation District Biomass Facility Wastewater Reclamation District Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Metro Wastewater Reclamation District Biomass Facility Facility Metro Wastewater Reclamation District Sector Biomass Facility Type Non-Fossil Waste Location Adams County, Colorado Coordinates 39.8398269°, -104.1930918° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":39.8398269,"lon":-104.1930918,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

289

Fourche Creek Wastewater Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Fourche Creek Wastewater Biomass Facility Fourche Creek Wastewater Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Fourche Creek Wastewater Biomass Facility Facility Fourche Creek Wastewater Sector Biomass Facility Type Non-Fossil Waste Location Pulaski County, Arkansas Coordinates 34.7538615°, -92.2236667° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":34.7538615,"lon":-92.2236667,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

290

Economic Analysis of Wastewater Treatment Alternatives in Rural Texas Communities.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of size across capital. operation. and maintenance costs. Keywords: wastewater, rural communities, costs. treatment plants. 1 INTRODUCTION Public concern for the quality of water discharged into the nation's waterways contributed to the passage..., 1968. United States Environmental Protection Agency. Construction Costs for Municipal Waste Treatment Plants: 1973-1977. Washington, D.C .? January 1978. ___ . Needs Survey (1980): Cost Estimates for Construction of Publicly Owned Wastewater...

Victurine, Raymond F.; Goodwin, H.L. Jr; Lacewell, Ronald D.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

On-Site Wastewater Treatment Systems: Evapotranspiration Bed  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Two-compartment septic tank Loam soil Crushed stone Evapotranspiration bed Wick On-site wastewater treatment systems Evapotranspiration bed Bruce Lesikar Extension Agricultural Engineering Specialist The Texas A&M University System ET systems..., synthetic or concrete liner. A liner is required if the surrounding soil is very permeable, such as in sandy gravel or karst limestone. Unlined systems can be used in highly impermeable soils such as heavy clays. In unlined systems, wastewater is disposed...

Lesikar, Bruce J.

1999-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Treatment of Organic-Contaminated Wastewater by Pervaporation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

TREATMENT OF ORGANIC-CONTAMINATED WASTEWATER BY PERVAPORATION J.G. WIJMANS J. KASCHEMEKAT R.W. BAKER V.L. SIMMONS Research Director Design Engineer President Marketing Director Membrane Technology and Research, Inc., Menlo Park, CA ABSTRACT...-CONTAMINATED WASTEWATER BY PERVAPORATION J.G. WIJMANS Research Director J. KASCHEMEKAT R.W. BAKER V.L. SIMMONS Design Engineer President Marketing Director Membrane Technology and Research, Inc., Menlo Park, CA ABSTRACT The removal and recovery of organic contaminants...

Wijmans, J. G.; Kaschemekat, J.; Baker, R. W.; Simmons, V. L.

293

Conneaut Wastewater Facility Wind Turbine | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Wastewater Facility Wind Turbine Wastewater Facility Wind Turbine Jump to: navigation, search Name Conneaut Wastewater Facility Wind Turbine Facility Conneaut Wastewater Facility Wind Turbine Sector Wind energy Facility Type Community Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Conneaut Wastewater Facility Developer NexGen Energy Partners Energy Purchaser Conneaut Wastewater Facility Location Conneaut OH Coordinates 41.968223°, -80.552268° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.968223,"lon":-80.552268,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

294

Innovative wastewater treatment using reversing anaerobic upflow system (RAUS)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Anaerobic processes are widely popular in the treatment of a variety of industrial wastewaters since the development of such high rate treatment processes like upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB), anaerobic filter, and the fluidized-bed process. In order to devise a low cost/high technology system so that it would provide an economical solution to environmentally sound pollution control, the Reversing Anaerobic Upflow System (RAUS) was developed. The system consists of two anaerobic reactors connected to each other. At the beginning, one reactor is fed upwards with wastewater while the other acts as a settling tank. After a set interval of time, the flow is reversed such that the second reactor is fed with wastewater and the first one acts as the settler. This particular feeding pattern had shown improved settling characteristics and granulation of methanogenic biomass from research carried out at the Hannover University with different wastewaters. The biological reaction vessels to which wastewater is introduced intermittently functions basically as a sludge blanket type reactor although the costly integrated settling devices present in a typical UASB system are avoided. The RAUS combines three principle reactor configurations: (1) conventional with sludge recycling; (2) fill and draw or sequential batch, inflow maintained constant during feeding; (3) upflow anaerobic sludge blanket. A pilot scale RAUS was operated for 400 days using distillery wastewater consisting of molasses slop and bottle washing water mixed in the ratio 1:1. This paper discusses the results of pilot scale experiments.

Basu, S.K. [Univ. of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba (Canada). Environmental Engineering Div.

1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

A feasibility study of municipal wastewater desalination using electrodialysis reversal to provide recycled water for horticultural irrigation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract A membrane desalination system based on electrodialysis reversal (EDR) has been evaluated for its capacity to remove salt from treated municipal wastewater to provide a source of recycled water for horticultural applications. Economic and technical feasibility was determined using data collected from a pilot scale plant, from which the following parameters were calculated: salt removal, water recovery and overall process economics. The pilot plant consisted of a pre-treatment multimedia filtration unit (MMF) and an EDR system with a capacity of approximately 144 kL/day. Treated effluent from a wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) was used as feed water for the desalination pilot plant. Water quality guidelines for horticulture specify an upper limit for total dissolved solids (TDS) of 375 mg/L. The EDR process reduced the TDS from 1104 mg/L to 328 mg/L. Additionally, the process reduced the conductivity of recycled water by 72%, including the removal of 84% calcium, 76% chloride, 59% fluoride, 64% alkalinity and 60% phosphate, demonstrating that the EDR treated water is a viable alternative supply. The power consumption of the EDR plant was found to be 0.6 kW h/kL and the media filtration 0.4 kW/kL. The total operating cost was estimated to be 18 cents/kL to deliver 82% water recovery.

Nigel B. Goodman; Russell J. Taylor; Zongli Xie; Yesim Gozukara; Allan Clements

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

Fate and removal of pharmaceuticals and illicit drugs in conventional and membrane bioreactor wastewater treatment plants and by riverbank filtration  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...chemical contaminants in water and wastewater' compiled and edited by Michael...antibiotics in conventional and advanced wastewater treatment: implications for environmental discharge and wastewater recycling. Water Res. 41, 4164-4176...

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Monitoring Precursor 16S rRNAs ofAcinetobacter spp. in Activated Sludge Wastewater Treatment Systems  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Sanitary District, Northeast Wastewater Treatment Plant (UCSD, NEWWTP), and...gallons/day) of municipal wastewater. The treatment plant reduces the average influent...community structure of wastewater treatment plants: a comparison of old...

Daniel B. Oerther; Jakob Pernthaler; Andreas Schramm; Rudolf Amann; Lutgarde Raskin

2000-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Ecology of the Microbial Community Removing Phosphate from Wastewater under Continuously Aerobic Conditions in a Sequencing Batch Reactor  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...with synthetic wastewater eventually containing...the clarified plant effluent (Fig...Using synthetic wastewater. A typical profile...A carbon mass balance based on existing...phosphorus removal in wastewater treatment plants. Antonie Leeuwenhoek...

Johwan Ahn; Sarah Schroeder; Michael Beer; Simon McIlroy; Ronald C. Bayly; John W. May; George Vasiliadis; Robert J. Seviour

2007-02-09T23:59:59.000Z

299

Recycling of oleochemical wastewater for boiler feed water using reverse osmosis membranes — A case study  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Currently, awareness of water conservation has increased worldwide due to water scarcity. Wastewater recycling appears to be attractive for water conservation. This paper addresses a case study of oleochemical wastewater treatment using an advanced process that comprises ultrafiltration (UF) and reverse osmosis (RO) membranes. Prior to the membrane process, the oleochemical effluent was first treated using a biological treatment system that was installed by the factory owner. The quantity and quality of the permeate stream of the membrane system were then periodically monitored over 43 days. The results showed that the system functioned effectively in reducing the chemical oxygen demand (COD), hardness content and the amount of total dissolved solids (TDS). However, the system started to deteriorate after 15 days of operation. Membrane biofouling was suspected to have occurred in the RO membrane. Nevertheless, the fouling problem could be resolved by chemically cleaning the RO membrane using a sodium hydroxide (NaOH) solution every 3–5 days. Despite of the fact that data set for a longer period is needed to provide a more comprehensive study on the biofouling mechanism of membrane, this study somehow reflects a real-life problem of the application of RO membrane in the water recycling industry in Malaysia.

Chai Hoon Koo; Abdul Wahab Mohammad; Fatihah Suja'

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Copper-pillared clays (Cu-PILC) for agro-food wastewater purification with H2O2  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Copper-pillared clays (Cu-PILC) are effective and stable catalysts for the wet hydrogen peroxide catalytic oxidation (WHPCO) of waste in water. They are studied both in the conversion of model molecules (p-coumaric acid, p-hydroxybenzoic acid) and in the treatment of various real wastewaters from agro-food production: (i) deriving from citrus juice production, (ii) extracted concentrated polyphenolics fraction from olive oil milling (OMW) and (iii) OMW derived from three different sources. In the latter cases, tests were made both in a lab-scale reactor and in a larger volume (about 10 l) reactor. The results showed that Cu-PILC layered materials might be used to treat real wastewater from agro-food production, and not only simple model chemicals as typically made in the literature. In all cases, using a semi-batch slurry-type reactor with a continuous feed of H2O2, the behaviour both in TOC (total organic carbon) and in polyphenols abatement may be described using pseudo-first-order reaction rates. Using real wastewater the rate constants are one–two-orders of magnitude lower than using model molecules, and a decrease in the ratio between rate constant of phenols conversion and rate constant of TOC abatement is observed. However, this ratio maintains over one in all cases. A typical value is around two, but the composition of wastewater and reaction conditions influences this ratio. Scaling-up to a larger volume semi-continuous slurry-type reactor causes a further lowering of one-order of magnitude in the rate constants of TOC and polyphenols depletion, due to fouling of the catalyst related to the preferential coupling of the organic radicals and deposition over the catalyst with respect to their further degradation by hydroxyl radicals generated from H2O2 activation on the copper ions of the catalyst. The use of a different reactor to overcome this problem is suggested.

Simona Caudo; Chiara Genovese; Siglinda Perathoner; Gabriele Centi

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tw treated wastewater" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Biodegradation of triclosan as a representative of Pharmaceuticals and Personal Care Products (PPCPs) in the wastewater environment.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Mechanisms involved in triclosan removal in conventional wastewater treatment processes include sorption and biodegradation. Achieving efficient biodegradation of triclosan through wastewater treatment processes is critical… (more)

Qiu, Xiaoxia

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Heat Treating Apparatus  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Apparatus for heat treating a heat treatable material including a housing having an upper opening for receiving a heat treatable material at a first temperature, a lower opening, and a chamber therebetween for heating the heat treatable material to a second temperature higher than the first temperature as the heat treatable material moves through the chamber from the upper to the lower opening. A gas supply assembly is operatively engaged to the housing at the lower opening, and includes a source of gas, a gas delivery assembly for delivering the gas through a plurality of pathways into the housing in countercurrent flow to movement of the heat treatable material, whereby the heat treatable material passes through the lower opening at the second temperature, and a control assembly for controlling conditions within the chamber to enable the heat treatable material to reach the second temperature and pass through the lower opening at the second temperature as a heated material.

De Saro, Robert (Annandale, NJ); Bateman, Willis (Sutton Colfield, GB)

2002-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

303

Radiological Instrumentation Assessment for King County Wastewater Treatment Division  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The King County Wastewater Treatment Division (WTD) have concern about the aftermath of a radiological dispersion event (RDE) leading to the introduction of significant quantities of radioactive material into its combined sanitary and storm sewer system. Radioactive material could come from the use of a radiological dispersion device (RDD). RDDs include "dirty bombs" that are not nuclear detonations but are explosives designed to spread radioactive material. Radioactive material also could come from deliberate introduction or dispersion of radioactive material into the environment, including waterways and water supply systems. Volume 2 of PNNL-15163 assesses the radiological instrumentation needs for detection of radiological or nuclear terrorism, in support of decisions to treat contaminated wastewater or to bypass the West Point Treatment Plant (WPTP), and in support of radiation protection of the workforce, the public, and the infrastructure of the WPTP. Fixed radiation detection instrumentation should be deployed in a defense-in-depth system that provides 1) early warning of significant radioactive material on the way to the WPTP, including identification of the radionuclide(s) and estimates of the soluble concentrations, with a floating detector located in the wet well at the Interbay Pump Station and telemetered via the internet to all authorized locations; 2) monitoring at strategic locations within the plant, including 2a) the pipe beyond the hydraulic ram in the bar screen room; 2b) above the collection funnels in the fine grit facility; 2c) in the sampling tank in the raw sewage pump room; and 2d) downstream of the concentration facilities that produce 6% blended and concentrated biosolids. Engineering challenges exist for these applications. It is necessary to deploy both ultra-sensitive detectors to provide early warning and identification and detectors capable of functioning in high-dose rate environments that are likely under some scenarios, capable of functioning from 10 microrems per hour (background) up to 1000 rems per hour. Software supporting fixed spectroscopic detectors is needed to provide prompt, reliable, and simple interpretations of spectroscopic outputs that are of use to operators and decision-makers. Software to provide scientists and homeland security personnel with sufficient technical detail for identification, quantification, waste management decisions, and for the inevitable forensic and attribution needs must be developed. Computational modeling using MCNP software has demonstrated that useful detection capabilities can be deployed. In particular, any of the isotopes examined can be detected at levels between 0.01 and 0.1 ?Ci per gallon. General purpose instruments that can be used to determine the nature and extent of radioactive contamination and measure radiation levels for purposes of protecting personnel and members of the public should be available. One or more portable radioisotope identifiers (RIIDs) should be available to WTD personnel. Small, portable battery-powered personal radiation monitors should be widely available WTD personnel. The personal monitors can be used for personal and group radiation protection decisions, and to alert management to the need to get expert backup. All considerations of radiological instrumentation require considerations of training and periodic retraining of personnel, as well as periodic calibration and maintenance of instruments. Routine “innocent” alarms will occur due to medical radionuclides that are legally discharged into sanitary sewers on a daily basis.

Strom, Daniel J.; McConn, Ronald J.; Brodzinski, Ronald L.

2005-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

304

Bacteriological quality of crops irrigated with wastewater in the Xochimilco plots, Mexico City, Mexico.  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...MICROBIOL. BACTERIOLOGICAL QUALITY OF WASTEWATER-IRRIGATED CROPS...L. 1976. Bacteriological quality assessment offresh marketed...wastewater. U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, CRREL, Hanover, N.H...Administration. 1968. Water Quality Criteria Report of the National...

I Rosas; A Báez; M Coutiño

1984-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

California Food Processing Industry Wastewater Demonstration Project: Phase I Final Report  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

EE), water quality environmental management, and carbonEnvironmental Protection Agency, Office of Water, Office of Wastewater Management.and Water program by providing a strategic, holistic approach to wastewater energy and environmental management

Lewis, Glen

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Control of Sludge Recycle Flow in Wastewater Treatment Plants Using Fuzzy Logic Controller  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Sludge recycling system is an important part of wastewater treatment plants, because the lack of control ... almost all of the sludge return system with wastewater treatment plants is simply the ratio by ... appl...

Wangyani

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Recycling Rare Earth Elements from Industrial Wastewater with Flowerlike Nano-Mg(OH)2  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Recycling Rare Earth Elements from Industrial Wastewater with Flowerlike Nano-Mg(OH)2 ... The pilot-scale experiment indicated that the self-supported flowerlike nano-Mg(OH)2 had great potential to recycle REEs from industrial wastewater. ...

Chaoran Li; Zanyong Zhuang; Feng Huang; Zhicheng Wu; Yangping Hong; Zhang Lin

2013-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

308

Risk of communicable disease infection associated with wastewater irrigation in agricultural settlements  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Strong wastewater treatment measures, including...AEROSOLS EMITTED BY SEWAGE TREATMENT PLANTS, SCIENCE 169 : 1218...MICROORGANISMS FROM WASTEWATER TREATMENT PROCESSES .1. SUMMARY...of the major water masses that affect this region...

E Katzenelson; I Buium; HI Shuval

1976-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

309

H.A.R. 11-62 - Wastewater Systems | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Wastewater Systems Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document- RegulationRegulation: H.A.R. 11-62 - Wastewater SystemsLegal Abstract The...

310

Pilot Scale Study of Excess Sludge Production Reduction in Wastewater Treatment by Ozone  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Pilot Scale Study of Excess Sludge Production Reduction in Wastewater Treatment by Ozone Yuan Ma-scale reactors were operated at the LaPrairie Wastewater Treatment plant (one control and one ozonated

Barthelat, Francois

311

Multidimensional Modeling of the Hydrogen-Based, Membrane Biofilm Reactor for Denitrification of Potable and Wastewater  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Potable and Wastewater Kelly Martin, Ph.D. Candidate, University of Notre Dame Monday, February 24, 2013 4 oxidized contaminants from drinking water and wastewater. A promising option, the membrane biofilm reactor

Kamat, Vineet R.

312

EECBG Success Story: Saving Energy at 24/7 Wastewater Treatment...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Saving Energy at 247 Wastewater Treatment Plant EECBG Success Story: Saving Energy at 247 Wastewater Treatment Plant July 29, 2010 - 4:11pm Addthis In the city of Longview,...

313

Environmental Impacts of Treated Wood  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Environmental Impacts of Treated Wood 6495_C000.fm Page iii Wednesday, February 1, 2006 5:48 PM #12 associated with treated wood. Bill Hinkley died on September 12, 2005, shortly before the completion received contributions from many of the world's leading scientists on the subject of treated wood, and we

Florida, University of

314

Opportunities for Automated Demand Response in Wastewater Treatment  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Opportunities for Automated Demand Response in Wastewater Treatment Opportunities for Automated Demand Response in Wastewater Treatment Facilities in California - Southeast Water Pollution Control Plant Case Study Title Opportunities for Automated Demand Response in Wastewater Treatment Facilities in California - Southeast Water Pollution Control Plant Case Study Publication Type Report LBNL Report Number LBNL-6056E Year of Publication 2012 Authors Olsen, Daniel, Sasank Goli, David Faulkner, and Aimee T. McKane Date Published 12/2012 Publisher CEC/LBNL Keywords market sectors, technologies Abstract This report details a study into the demand response potential of a large wastewater treatment facility in San Francisco. Previous research had identified wastewater treatment facilities as good candidates for demand response and automated demand response, and this study was conducted to investigate facility attributes that are conducive to demand response or which hinder its implementation. One years' worth of operational data were collected from the facility's control system, submetered process equipment, utility electricity demand records, and governmental weather stations. These data were analyzed to determine factors which affected facility power demand and demand response capabilities.

315

California Food Processing Industry Wastewater Demonstration Project: Phase I Final Report  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Energy Efficiency and Automated Demand Response in Wastewater Treatment Facilities in California: Phase I Report, summarizes the status and potential

Lewis, Glen

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

TEX-A-SYST: Reducing the Risk of Ground Water Contamination by Improving Household Wastewater Treatment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. This publication covers the following topics: 1. Septic tanks/soil absorption systems 2. Quantity of wastewater 3. Quality of wastewater 4. Collection of wastewater 5. Treatment systems 6. Disposal system 7. Assistance with failing systems or new designs 8.... Evaluation table Septic Tanks/Soil Absorption Systems The most common form of on-site waste- water treatment is a septic tank/soil absorption system. In this system, wastewater flows from the household sewage lines into an under- ground septic tank...

Harris, Bill L.; Hoffman, D.; Mazac Jr., F. J.

1997-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

317

Treatability studies on different refinery wastewater samples using high-throughput microbial electrolysis cells (MECs)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, 2005), brewery (Feng et al., 2008), animal (Min et al., 2005) and paper recycling wastewaters (HuangTreatability studies on different refinery wastewater samples using high-throughput microbial, University Park, PA 16802, USA h i g h l i g h t s Refinery wastewaters were tested as fuels in MECs

318

03/0924 1 st INTERNATIONAL SEMINAR ON THE USE OF AQUATIC MACROPKYTES FOR WASTEWATER  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Filters (RBF). "Rustic" and rather simple wastewater treatment systems for such small communities in rural03/0924 1 st INTERNATIONAL SEMINAR ON THE USE OF AQUATIC MACROPKYTES FOR WASTEWATER TREATMENT IN CONSTRUCTED WETLANDS £-10 CONSTRUCTED WETLANDS FOR WASTEWATER TREATMENT : THE FRENCH EXPERIENCE Catherine

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

319

A consistent modelling methodology for secondary settling tanks in wastewater treatment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A consistent modelling methodology for secondary settling tanks in wastewater treatment Stefan on a consistent modelling methodology (CMM) of complex real processes in wastewater treatment by utilizing both as a case since this is one of the most complex processes in a wastewater treatment plant and the simulation

Bürger, Raimund

320

Anaerobic Migrating Blanket Reactor Treatment of Low-Strength Wastewater at  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Anaerobic Migrating Blanket Reactor Treatment of Low-Strength Wastewater at Low Temperatures Largus anaerobic migrating blanket reactor (AMBR) was studied for the treatment of low- strength soluble wastewater milk substrate as a synthetic wastewater at low temperatures (15 and 20 °C). The concentration

Angenent, Lars T.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tw treated wastewater" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Endocrine Active Chemicals, Pharmaceuticals, and Other Chemicals of Concern in Surface Water, Wastewater-  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, Wastewater- Treatment Plant Effluent, and Bed Sediment, and Biological Characteristics in Selected Streams Chemicals, Pharmaceuticals, and Other Chemicals of Concern in Surface Water, Wastewater- Treatment Plant, and Data, 2009 #12;Front cover. Industrial wastewater-treatment plant outflow in Worthington, Minnesota

322

A nonlinear observer design for an activated sludge wastewater treatment process  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A nonlinear observer design for an activated sludge wastewater treatment process B. Boulkrounea , M : Activated sludge, wastewater treatment process, Lyapunov function, Lips- chitz singular discrete the recent results of [2] and [5]. In the last decades, the modeling of the activated sludge wastewater

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

323

MATERIAL FLUX ANALYSIS (MFA) FOR PLANNING OF DOMESTIC WASTES AND WASTEWATER MANAGEMENT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

i MATERIAL FLUX ANALYSIS (MFA) FOR PLANNING OF DOMESTIC WASTES AND WASTEWATER MANAGEMENT: CASE nutrient management, organic waste, wastewater and septage that contained high concentration of nutrients area. The nitrogen fluxes in relation to organic waste and wastewater were chosen as indicators

Richner, Heinz

324

Application of a moving bed biofilm reactor for tertiary ammonia treatment in high temperature industrial wastewater  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

industrial wastewater Jennifer L. Shore a,b , William S. M'Coy b , Claudia K. Gunsch a , Marc A. Deshusses a 2012 Available online 17 February 2012 Keywords: Moving bed biofilm reactor Industrial wastewater and industrial wastewater. No biotreatment was observed at 45 °C, although effective nitrification was rapidly

325

BIOENERGY AND BIOFUELS Domestic wastewater treatment using multi-electrode continuous  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

BIOENERGY AND BIOFUELS Domestic wastewater treatment using multi-electrode continuous flow MFCs Heidelberg 2012 Abstract Treatment of domestic wastewater using microbial fuel cells (MFCs) will require to large changes in the chemical oxygen demand (COD) concentration within the reactor. Domestic wastewater

326

Coastal pollution hazards in southern California observed by SAR imagery: stormwater plumes, wastewater plumes,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, wastewater plumes, and natural hydrocarbon seeps Paul M. DiGiacomo a,*, Libe Washburn b , Benjamin Holt Abstract Stormwater runoff plumes, municipal wastewater plumes, and natural hydrocarbon seeps are important; Slicks; Southern California; Synthetic aperture radar; Wastewater, plumes 1. Introduction The rapidly

Washburn, Libe

327

Characterization of network morphology in anion binding hydrogels used for wastewater remediation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Characterization of network morphology in anion binding hydrogels used for wastewater remediation wastewater effluents. The sorbent used was crosslinked polyamine (PAA$HCl) polymeric hydrogels. The surface of crosslinking. q 2005 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. Keywords: Hydrogel; Atomic force microscopy; Wastewater

Rubloff, Gary W.

328

Effectiveness of Mechanical Aerationin Floating Aquatic Macrophyte-Based Wastewater Treatment Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Effectiveness of Mechanical Aerationin Floating Aquatic Macrophyte-Based Wastewater Treatment to evaluate its effect on wastewater treatment effi- ciency andplantgrowth. Light aeration (0.003 and0.021Lnr2 tanks. Heavy aeration (1.03 and 3.53 L nr2 min-1 ) raised wastewater dissolved oxygen(DO) concentrations

Florida, University of

329

Spatial differences and temporal changes in illicit drug use in Europe quantified by wastewater analysis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Spatial differences and temporal changes in illicit drug use in Europe quantified by wastewater of Chemistry, University of Athens, Athens, Greece21 *Co-first authors. ABSTRACT Aims To perform wastewater population. Design Analyses of raw wastewater over a 1-week period in 2012 and 2013. Setting and Participants

Wehrli, Bernhard

330

Physical and chemical parameters in wastewater and at the water-sediment interface in sewer network  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Physical and chemical parameters in wastewater and at the water- sediment interface in sewer parameters and concentrations of major ions, trace metals and sulphur species in wastewater but also, to the biogeochemical transformation of inorganic and organic compounds present in the wastewater (Ashley et al., 2004

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

331

Detection of Wastewater Plumes from the 15 N Isotopic Composition of  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Detection of Wastewater Plumes from the 15 N Isotopic Composition of Groundwater, Algae that a main source of nutrient loading is due to wastewater contamination of groundwater within the watershed via septic systems and wastewater treatment facilities. 5 Mya arenaria were collected at each

Vallino, Joseph J.

332

To appear in Proceedings of ECSCW99 Dynamics in Wastewater Treatment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

To appear in Proceedings of ECSCW99 Dynamics in Wastewater Treatment: A Framework for Understanding on the study of unskilled work in a Danish wastewater treatment plant, the problem of formalisation of work at the expense of the other tend to fail. Wastewater treatment plants are highly-distributed technical settings

Bertelsen, Olav W.

333

Fecal coliform accumulation within a river subject to seasonally-disinfected wastewater discharges  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Fecal coliform accumulation within a river subject to seasonally-disinfected wastewater discharges in the implications of seasonal disinfection practices of wastewater effluents for meeting water quality goals from municipal wastewater outfalls along the river, as well as upstream and downstream of each outfall

Mitch, William A.

334

A Hybrid Microbial Fuel Cell Membrane Bioreactor with a Conductive Ultrafiltration Membrane Biocathode for Wastewater Treatment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Biocathode for Wastewater Treatment Lilian Malaeb,,§ Krishna P. Katuri,,§ Bruce E. Logan, Husnul Maab, S. P-biocathode microbial fuel cell- membrane bioreactor (MFC-MBR) system was developed to achieve simultaneous wastewater and the membrane for wastewater filtration. The MFC-MBR used an air-biocathode, and it was shown to have good

335

Dynamic estimation of specific growth rates of bacteria for a wastewater treatment process  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Dynamic estimation of specific growth rates of bacteria for a wastewater treatment process S. Diop1 for specific growth rates for a wastewater treatment process. A 2-stage model of 6 dynamic states is assumed. Steyer, Dynamic model develop- ment and parameter identification for an anaerobic wastewater treatment

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

336

A consistent modelling methodology for secondary settling tanks in wastewater treatment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A consistent modelling methodology for secondary settling tanks in wastewater treatment Raimund Bu in wastewater treatment by combining classical concepts with results from applied mathematics, and partly was chosen as a case since this is one of the most complex processes in a wastewater treatment plant

Bürger, Raimund

337

Journal of Membrane Science 257 (2005) 111119 Membrane contactor processes for wastewater reclamation in space  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Journal of Membrane Science 257 (2005) 111­119 Membrane contactor processes for wastewater for treatment of metabolic wastewater Tzahi Y. Cath, Dean Adams, Amy E. Childress University of Nevada of an innovative dual membrane contactor process for treatment of combined hygiene and metabolic wastewater

338

Models for Optimization of Energy Consumption of Pumps in a Wastewater Processing Plant  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Models for Optimization of Energy Consumption of Pumps in a Wastewater Processing Plant Zijun Zhang in the wastewater preliminary treatment process is discussed. Data- mining algorithms are utilized to develop pump performance models based on industrial data collected at a municipal wastewater processing plant

Kusiak, Andrew

339

wastewater_sink_disposal_guidance.docx Revision Date: 10/26/2012 Page 1 of 3  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

wastewater_sink_disposal_guidance.docx Revision Date: 10/26/2012 Page 1 of 3 LABORATORY & BUILDING limitations and prohibitions established by the local wastewater treatment authority, the Massachusetts Water for wastewater disposal purposes is strictly prohibited. Hazardous Wastes: Hazardous wastes are prohibited from

Heller, Eric

340

Environmental Impact of Wastewater Disposal in the Florida Keys, Monroe County Tom Higginbotham  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Environmental Impact of Wastewater Disposal in the Florida Keys, Monroe County Tom Higginbotham University of Florida Soil and Water Science #12;Environmental Impact of Wastewater Disposal in the Florida affecting the normally oligotrophic marine waters. Typical methods of wastewater disposal include large

Ma, Lena

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tw treated wastewater" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

A dynamic estimation scheme of specific growth rates of bacteria for an anaerobic wastewater treatment process  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A dynamic estimation scheme of specific growth rates of bacteria for an anaerobic wastewater anal- ysis and estimation schemes for specific growth rates for an anaerobic wastewater treatment the organic and inorganic materials) of municipal or industrial wastewater often needs to be highly reduced

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

342

Performance of a mixing entropy battery alternately flushed with wastewater effluent and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Performance of a mixing entropy battery alternately flushed with wastewater effluent and seawater. Coastal wastewater treatment plants discharge a continuous stream of low salinity effluent to the ocean cell, the net energy recovery was 0.11 kW h per m3 of wastewater effluent. When twelve cells were

Cui, Yi

343

Polishing of synthetic electroplating wastewater in microcosm upflow constructed wetlands: Metals removal mechanisms  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Polishing of synthetic electroplating wastewater in microcosm upflow constructed wetlands: Metals in microcosm upflow constructed wetlands used for polishing of synthetic electroplating wastewater. Four types (2014) 53-42" DOI : 10.1016/j.cej.2013.12.075 #12;Keywords electroplating wastewater, metals, cyanides

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

344

Impact of Onsite Wastewater Treatment Systems on Nitrogen and Baseflow in Urban Watersheds of Metropolitan Atlanta  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Impact of Onsite Wastewater Treatment Systems on Nitrogen and Baseflow in Urban Watersheds 2401, Miller Plant Sciences Building Onsite wastewater treatment systems (OWTS) are widely used Septic Wastewater-Treatment Systems on Base Flow in Selected Watersheds in Gwinnett County, Georgia

Arnold, Jonathan

345

Flexible hybrid membrane treatment systems for tailored nutrient management: A new paradigm in urban wastewater treatment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in urban wastewater treatment D. Vuono a , J. Henkel a , J. Benecke a , T.Y. Cath a , T. Reid b , L: Sequencing batch reactor Membrane bioreactor Water reclamation Distributed wastewater treatment Tailored, decentralized, and satellite wastewater treatment systems into existing urban water infrastructure

346

Effects of wastewater from an oil-sand-refining operation on survival, hematology, gill histology,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Effects of wastewater from an oil-sand-refining operation on survival, hematology, gill histology the effects of various types of wastewater produced in oil-sand-refining on the survival, hematology, gill. In con- trast, all fish did not survive a 28-day period in any of the wastewaters tested and, in some

Farrell, Anthony P.

347

Optimization of low-cost phosphorus removal from wastewater using co-treatments with constructed  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

treatment residual; iron; lime sludge; municipal wastewater Introduction The US-EPA has identified for removing P from wastewater (US-EPA, 1993). However, questions of mechanisms, predictabilityOptimization of low-cost phosphorus removal from wastewater using co-treatments with constructed

Florida, University of

348

Wastewater minimization in industrial applications: Challenges and solutions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The impetus for waste minimization and water recycle in the metal processing industry comes from increasingly stringent environmental regulations and dwindling water supplies. Tougher discharge permits often dictate additional wastewater treatments, which can make water recycle and waste minimization an attractive option. The most challenging part in the design of a water recycle system is to minimize the capital and operating costs while meeting the water quality requirements of the process. Computer simulation of water recycle alternatives provides: (1) ``expected`` water chemistry, (2) steady-state mass and energy balance for the plant water system, (3) performance of the water treatments considered in the water recycle scheme, and (4) relative economics based on capital and operating costs. The computer simulation study recommends the best wastewater recycle scheme based on economics and technical merits. Benefits of a computer simulation study in the design of water recycle and wastewater minimization processes are illustrated by a case study in the metal processing industry.

Dave, B.B. [Nalco Chemical Co., Naperville, IL (United States)

1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

349

Review on electrical discharge plasma technology for wastewater remediation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract As wastewater remediation becomes a global concern, the development of innovative advanced oxidation processes for wastewater treatment is still a major challenge. With regard to its fast removal rate and environmental compatibility, plasma technology is considered as a promising remediation technology for water remediation. The principles of electrical plasma with liquids for pollutant removal and the reactors of various electrical discharge types are outlined in this review. To improve energy efficiency, combination of plasma technology with catalysts has attracted significant attention. The present review is concerned about present understanding of the mechanisms involved in these combined processes. Further on, detailed discussions are given of the effects of various factors on the performance of pulsed electrical plasma technology in water treatment processes. Finally, special attention is paid to the future challenges of plasma technology utilized for industrial wastewater treatment.

Bo Jiang; Jingtang Zheng; Shi Qiu; Mingbo Wu; Qinhui Zhang; Zifeng Yan; Qingzhong Xue

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Synthesis of an optimal wastewater reuse network Y.H. Yang, H.H. Lou, Y.L. Huang*  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Synthesis of an optimal wastewater reuse network Y.H. Yang, H.H. Lou, Y.L. Huang* Department regulated. An eective way to minimize wastewater is to design a wastewater reuse network (WWRN Wastewater minimization has been a primary concern for pollution prevention in the process and manu

Huang, Yinlun

351

GRR/Section 14-OR-f - Onsite Wastewater Management | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GRR/Section 14-OR-f - Onsite Wastewater Management GRR/Section 14-OR-f - Onsite Wastewater Management < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 14-OR-f - Onsite Wastewater Management 14ORFOnsiteWastewaterManagementSepticSystems.pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Oregon Department of Environmental Quality Regulations & Policies OAR 340-071: Onsite Wastewater Treatment Systems OAR 340-073: DEQ Construction Standards Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 14ORFOnsiteWastewaterManagementSepticSystems.pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Flowchart Narrative Over 30% of Oregonians dispose of wastewater from their homes and

352

GRR/Section 18-HI-c - Wastewater Treatment | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GRR/Section 18-HI-c - Wastewater Treatment GRR/Section 18-HI-c - Wastewater Treatment < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 18-HI-c - Wastewater Treatment 18HIC - WastewaterTreatment (1).pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Hawaii Department of Health Clean Water Branch Regulations & Policies HRS 11-62 HRS 342D Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 18HIC - WastewaterTreatment (1).pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Flowchart Narrative Wastewater Treatment Permit The Wastewater Branch administers the statewide engineering and financial functions relating to water pollution control,

353

Research on Performance of Wastewater Purification Unit and Recycling of Wastewater and sludge Dewatering of In-Site in Feng Shan Wate Treatment Plant.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??During the water treatment process, each processing unit releases the sludge from the sedimentation process, and the wastewater from the rapid sand wash and filtration… (more)

Chen, Hsin-hung

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

THE 0.5-2.22 {mu}m SCATTERED LIGHT SPECTRUM OF THE DISK AROUND TW Hya: DETECTION OF A PARTIALLY FILLED DISK GAP AT 80 AU  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present a 0.5-2.2 {mu}m scattered light spectrum of the circumstellar disk around TW Hya from a combination of spatially resolved Hubble Space Telescope STIS spectroscopy and NICMOS coronagraphic images of the disk. We investigate the morphology of the disk at distances >40 AU over this wide range of wavelengths, and identify the presence of a depression in surface brightness at {approx}80 AU that could be caused by a gap in the disk. Additionally, we quantify the surface brightness, azimuthal symmetry, and spectral character of the disk as a function of radius. Our analysis shows that the scattering efficiency of the dust is largely neutral to blue over the observed wavelengths. We model the disk as a steady {alpha}-disk with an ad hoc gap structure. The thermal properties of the disk are self-consistently calculated using a three-dimensional radiative transfer code that uses ray tracing to model the heating of the disk interior and scattered light images. We find a good fit to the data over a wide range of distances from the star if we use a model disk with a partially filled gap of 30% depth at 80 AU and with a self-similar truncation knee at 100 AU. The origin of the gap is unclear, but it could arise from a transition in the nature of the disk's dust composition or the presence of a planetary companion. Based on scalings to previous hydrodynamic simulations of gap-opening criteria for embedded proto-planets, we estimate that a planetary companion forming the gap could have a mass between 6 and 28 M{sub Circled-Plus }.

Debes, John H. [Space Telescope Science Institute, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Jang-Condell, Hannah [University of Wyoming, Laramie, WY 82071 (United States); Weinberger, Alycia J. [Department of Terrestrial Magnetism, Carnegie Institution of Washington, Washington, DC 20015 (United States); Roberge, Aki [Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Schneider, Glenn [Steward Observatory, University of Arizona, Tuscon, AZ 85721 (United States)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

Supporting Information Removal of Natural Steroid Hormones from Wastewater  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

curves produced by the kits. An extraction efficiency test was performed to ensure that a high percentage E. Childress Materials and Methods Solution Chemistry ­ Wastewater Ersatz The humidity condensate) Concentrate 3 (10x): Humidity Condensate Acetic acid CH3CO2H 60.05 - 0.441 Benzoic acid C6H5CO2H 122.20 0

356

Treatment of wool scouring wastewater for grease removal  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Most of the wool scouring wastewater treatment systems in Australia consist of open anaerobic and facultative ponds which require large open areas. Apart from being unsightly and emitting odours, the plants are usually located in environmentally sensitive areas thereby causing environmental problems. There is a great need to look at alternative treatment systems which are more efficient and more environmentally acceptable. This study set out to investigate ways of reducing the grease content of the wastewater so that the pretreated wastewater can be fed to some high rate anaerobic digester. Various combinations of additions of coagulants, flocculants as well as using sulphuric acid for pH adjustment of the wastewater were attempted for assessing the extent of grease and COD removals. The study was also conducted at temperatures of 20 to 45°C. It was found that up to 98% of grease and 79% of COD could be removed by just using sulphuric acid at a pH of between 2 and 3 and at a temperature of 20°C. This work was first done on a batch basis. The work was extended into a continuous laboratory scale mixer-settler assembly which produced comparable results to those obtained batchwise.

H.M. Ang; F. Himawan

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Energy Recovery Potential from Wastewater Utilities through Innovation  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Breakout Session 3A—Conversion Technologies III: Energy from Our Waste—Will we Be Rich in Fuel or Knee Deep in Trash by 2025? Energy Recovery Potential from Wastewater Utilities through Innovation Lauren Fillmore, Senior Program Director, Water Environment Research Foundation

358

Exergy Optimized Wastewater Heat Recovery: Minimizing Losses and Maximizing Performance  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the heat using a batch process with an insulated tank containing a heat exchanger. The analysis is based on statistical annual hot water usage profiles. The system shows that the exergy available in warm wastewater can be optimized with specific tank size...

Meggers, F.

359

Industries vary approaches to preventing pollution in wastewater  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In wastewater management, various efforts considered to be pollution prevention activities technically fall under EPA's definition of waste minimization, which is one step below source reduction in the agency's pollution prevention hierarchy. EPA defines waste minimization as an umbrella term that includes the first two categories--source reduction and recycling--of its preferred hazardous waste management strategy. Because industrial processes vary, no particular technology can be used across the board to reduce the amount of wastewater generated or hazardous materials present in wastewater. Companies tend to implement the easiest and most cost-effective pollution-prevention processes first, according to Nellor. They then evolve to source-reduction activities, in response to other dynamics, such as product bans. True pollution prevention strategies are being required in some cases. The Clean Air Act Amendments mandate a unilateral production phase-out of ozone-depleting compounds by 1995. To beat this deadline, companies are phasing in use of environmentally-sound cleaning solutions to reduce volatile organic compounds in wastewater effluent.

Kratch, K.

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Uniformity of wastewater dispersal using subsurface drip emitters  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

An on-site wastewater treatment project site with two separate drip fields produced data on emitter flow rates and uniformity after 6 years of operation. The site served a two-bedroom residence in Weslaco, Texas, with treatment through a septic...

Persyn, Russell Alan

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tw treated wastewater" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Automated Demand Response Opportunities in Wastewater Treatment Facilities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Wastewater treatment is an energy intensive process which, together with water treatment, comprises about three percent of U.S. annual energy use. Yet, since wastewater treatment facilities are often peripheral to major electricity-using industries, they are frequently an overlooked area for automated demand response opportunities. Demand response is a set of actions taken to reduce electric loads when contingencies, such as emergencies or congestion, occur that threaten supply-demand balance, and/or market conditions occur that raise electric supply costs. Demand response programs are designed to improve the reliability of the electric grid and to lower the use of electricity during peak times to reduce the total system costs. Open automated demand response is a set of continuous, open communication signals and systems provided over the Internet to allow facilities to automate their demand response activities without the need for manual actions. Automated demand response strategies can be implemented as an enhanced use of upgraded equipment and facility control strategies installed as energy efficiency measures. Conversely, installation of controls to support automated demand response may result in improved energy efficiency through real-time access to operational data. This paper argues that the implementation of energy efficiency opportunities in wastewater treatment facilities creates a base for achieving successful demand reductions. This paper characterizes energy use and the state of demand response readiness in wastewater treatment facilities and outlines automated demand response opportunities.

Thompson, Lisa; Song, Katherine; Lekov, Alex; McKane, Aimee

2008-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

362

On-Site Wastewater Treatment Systems: Soil Particle Analysis Procedure  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Soil is an important component of an on-site wastewater treatment system. This publication explains the composition of soils, the sizing of soil particles, and the ways soil particles are analyzed to determine whether a site is suitable for a...

Lesikar, Bruce J.

2005-08-18T23:59:59.000Z

363

Onsite Wastewater Treatment Systems: Responding to Power Outages and Floods  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

People and the environment can be harmed if a home's onsite wastewater treatment system does not work properly after a flood or power outage. This publication explains the steps to take after such an event to get the system back into service. 4 pp...

Lesikar, Bruce J.; Mechell, Justin; Alexander, Rachel

2008-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

364

Field's Point Wastewater Treatment Facility (Narragansett Bay Commission) |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Field's Point Wastewater Treatment Facility (Narragansett Bay Commission) Field's Point Wastewater Treatment Facility (Narragansett Bay Commission) Jump to: navigation, search Name Field's Point Wastewater Treatment Facility (Narragansett Bay Commission) Facility Field's Point Wastewater Treatment Facility (Narragansett Bay Commission) Sector Wind energy Facility Type Community Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Gilbane Building Company Developer Narragansett Bay Commission Energy Purchaser Field's Point Location Providence RI Coordinates 41.79260859°, -71.3896966° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.79260859,"lon":-71.3896966,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

365

Nutrient removal by grasses irrigated with wastewater and nitrogen balance for reed canarygrass  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To develop complementary wastewater treatment systems that increase nutrient reduction and recycling, an experiment was conducted to evaluate the efficiency of three grass species as catch crops for N, P, and K at Aurahammar wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) in the southern part of Sweden. Another objective was also to assess soil accumulation of N, P, and K and the risk of N leaching by drainage. Three grasses--reed canarygrass (Phalaris arundinacea L.), meadow foxtail (Alopecurus pratensis L.), and smooth bromegrass (Bromus inermis Leyss.)--were irrigated with a mixture of treated effluent and supernatant at two levels of intensity [optimum level (equal to evapotranspiration) and over-optimal level] and at two nutrient levels, approximately 150 and 300 kg N ha{sup {minus}1}. There were small differences in dry matter (DM) yield between grass species and no difference in N removal among species. The amount of N removed in harvested biomass to N applied was 0.58 in 1995 and 0.63 in 1996. The amount of N removed increased with increased nutrient load. Applied amounts of P were the same as P in harvested biomass. All species removed K amounts several times greater than applied amounts. Increased nutrient load increased overall K removal. The low amount of mineral N and especially NO{sub 3}{sup {minus}}-N in the soil profile in autumn samplings indicate the risk for leaching is small. Soil water NO{sub 3}{sup {minus}} contents were also low, <2.5 mg NO{sub 3}{sup {minus}}-N L{sup {minus}1} during the growing season, with a mean value of <1 mg NO{sub 3}{sup {minus}}-N L{sup {minus}1}.

Geber, U.

2000-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

Wastewater recycling and heat reclamation project: Red Lion Central Laundry, Portland, Oregon  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report discusses water, energy, and cost savings that can be achieved in a commercial laundry through the use of a wastewater recycling and heat recovery system. Cost savings are achieved through reductions in water use, reduction in sewage charges (typically based on water use), reductions in water heating energy, and potential reductions in water treatment chemicals because the recycled water has already been treated with soaps and conditioners. A recovery system saves water by recycling wash water that would normally be dumped into the city sewage system. Recycling the wash water produces considerable energy savings because the recycled water has a higher temperature than fresh water. As a result, a hot water heater consumes less energy to heat the recycled water. The demonstration project discussed in this report was based in a large commercial laundry in Portland, Oregon. The laundry serves a large hotel/motel chain and processes an average of 25,000 pounds of laundry per day. A wastewater recovery system using a membrane microfiltration unit (MFU) was installed in the laundry in September 1995. Time series data of the water and energy consumption of the laundry were taken before and after installation of the MFU. Energy savings were measured by performing a thermal energy balance around the washing machines. Water savings were calculated by metering volumetric flow rates. After a period of approximately five months, the MFU has achieved final results of 52 percent savings in water consumption and 44 percent savings in energy to heat water. This five-month period represents a learning curve during which several small technical improvements were made to the MFU and laundry staff adjusted laundry operations to maximize the benefits of the MFU. An economic analysis discusses the impact of capital investment, daily consumption, and local utility rates on the payback period.

Garlick, T.F.; Halverson, M.A.; Ledbetter, M.R.

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

Extension of the evaluation of reverse osmosis for SRC-I wastewater. Final technical report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Reverse osmosis (R.O.) is an integral part of the zero discharge option for the proposed SRC-I Demonstration Plant. The original laboratory treatability testing program for reverse osmosis failed to demonstrate the technical feasibility of this process, due to problems with membrane fouling and deterioration. In that study (1), a high pressure (800 psi) polyether urea membrane for sea water and a low pressure (400 psi) cellulose diacetate membrane for brackish water failed to maintain reasonable TDS rejection rates during flat cell tests. The problem was particularly severe for the high pressure membrane. At the end of the original study, testing was continued on two additional low pressure membranes. One of these was a cellulose diacetate triacetate blend. The other was a new polyaramid membrane, which had only recently become commercially available. This report documents the results of all of the reverse osmosis laboratory tests. The wastewaters used in this study were effluents from bench scale, two-stage bioreactors, followed by tertiary treatment consisting of coagulation, softening, filtration, and granular activated carbon. The investigative program consisted of both immersion and flat cell tests. The results show tht the SRC-I wastewaters are difficult to treat by reverse osmosis with polyether urea or cellulose acetate membranes, and membrane failure was common. However, the new polyaramid membrane was found to be satisfactory when tested with a dephenolated feed stream. After over 1500 hours of continuous flat cell testing, it exhibited a TDS rejection rate of 95%. Based on these preliminary results, reverse osmosis does appear to be a technically feasible approach to achieve zero discharge, assuming the feed stream is dephenolated.

Not Available

1984-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

Evaluation of improved techniques for the removal of fission products from process wastewater and groundwater: FY 1997 status  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The primary goals of this effort in FY 1997 were to survey local end users of wastewater treatment technology and then to evaluate recently available treatment processes in light of user needs. Survey results indicate that local sites are confronted with a limited, and shrinking, budget for treating aqueous waste streams. Therefore, a process will be selected primarily on the basis of sorbent costs, use of existing equipment, and disposal costs for spent processing materials. Current laboratory testing and economic studies have been directed toward addressing the technical issues specific to the removal of {sup 90}Sr and {sup 137}Cs from groundwater and process wastewater. This year`s efforts have concentrated on evaluating the engineered form of crystalline silicotitanates (CSTs) for near neutral pH applications. Both powder and pellet forms of CST can be obtained through UOP; this task evaluated only the engineered form of the sorbent for wastewater remediation. Preliminary experimental efforts included measuring the average particle size, surface water content, total sodium content, ion exchange capacity, and equilibration mixing time. The as received material contains approximately 10% fines, which adhere to the CST pellet. The cesium and strontium ion-exchange capacities, based on multiple contacts with 50 ppm of the metal, are 0.8 meq/g and 1.1 meq/g, respectively. Batch tests indicated that an equilibrium mixing time of 100 h was required for cesium sorption. Group 2 cations (Sr, Ca, and Mg) required greater than 500 h. Particle diffusion coefficients were estimated for each of these cations from the batch studies.

Bostick, D.T.; DePaoli, S.M.; Guo, B.

1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

Radiological Risk Assessment for King County Wastewater Treatment Division  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Staff of the King County Wastewater Treatment Division (WTD) have concern about the aftermath of a radiological dispersion event (RDE) leading to the introduction of significant quantities of radioactive material into the combined sanitary and storm sewer system in King County, Washington. Radioactive material could come from the use of a radiological dispersion device (RDD). RDDs include "dirty bombs" that are not nuclear detonations but are explosives designed to spread radioactive material (National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements (NCRP) 2001). Radioactive material also could come from deliberate introduction or dispersion of radioactive material into the environment, including waterways and water supply systems. This document develops plausible and/or likely scenarios, including the identification of likely radioactive materials and quantities of those radioactive materials to be involved. These include 60Co, 90Sr, 137Cs, 192Ir, 226Ra, plutonium, and 241Am. Two broad categories of scenarios are considered. The first category includes events that may be suspected from the outset, such as an explosion of a "dirty bomb" in downtown Seattle. The explosion would most likely be heard, but the type of explosion (e.g., sewer methane gas or RDD) may not be immediately known. Emergency first responders must be able to quickly detect the radioisotopes previously listed, assess the situation, and deploy a response to contain and mitigate (if possible) detrimental effects resulting from the incident. In such scenarios, advance notice of about an hour or two might be available before any contaminated wastewater reaches a treatment plant. The second category includes events that could go initially undetected by emergency personnel. Examples of such a scenario would be the inadvertent or surreptitious introduction of radioactive material into the sewer system. Intact rogue radioactive sources from industrial radiography devices, well-logging apparatus, or moisture density gages may get into wastewater and be carried to a treatment plant. Other scenarios might include a terrorist deliberately putting a dispersible radioactive material into wastewater. Alternatively, a botched terrorism preparation of an RDD may result in radioactive material entering wastewater without anyone's knowledge. Drinking water supplies may also be contaminated, with the result that some or most of the radioactivity ends up in wastewater.

Strom, Daniel J.

2005-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

370

Effect of Wastewater Treatment Plant Effluent on Microbial Function and Community Structure in the Sediment of a Freshwater Stream with Variable Seasonal Flow  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...effects on the oxygen balance. J. Water Pollut...influence of untreated wastewater to aquatic communities...2006. Effects of wastewater treatment plant discharge on ecosystem...bacteria in a municipal wastewater treatment plant. Environ. Sci...

Steven A. Wakelin; Matt J. Colloff; Rai S. Kookana

2008-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

371

Optimizing a Modular Expansion of a Wastewater Treatment Plant Using Option Theory and Moment Matching Approximation Abstract  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We consider a municipality faced with the question of how big to make their new wastewater treatment facility to meet the demand of 10 % expected growth in the number of new connections. Previously, we developed a real options framework for determining optimal plant size and showed that the model takes on the form of an Asian option. Furthermore, it was shown that if the connection rate growths are closely correlated with the market growth, then the penalty costs associated with having insufficient capacity to treat the wastewater can be effectively hedged, significantly reducing overall expected costs. In this study, we introduce an approximate analytical solution and optimize the plant size of a staged / modular expansion. Based on the given construction cost estimates, we show that a staged expansion has a minimal (expected) savings when connection growth rates are closely correlated to the market growth rates. However, as the correlation decreases to zero, or, alternatively, no attempt is made to hedge the penalty costs, a staged expansion has an expected savings of 20%.

Yuri Lawryshyn; Sebastian Jaimungal

372

MHK Projects/Bonnybrook Wastewater Facility Project 1 | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Bonnybrook Wastewater Facility Project 1 Bonnybrook Wastewater Facility Project 1 < MHK Projects Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":5,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"File:Aquamarine-marker.png","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":51.0097,"lon":-114.02,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"http:\/\/prod-http-80-800498448.us-east-1.elb.amazonaws.com\/w\/images\/7\/74\/Aquamarine-marker.png","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

373

MHK Projects/Bonnybrook Wastewater Facility Project 2 | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Bonnybrook Wastewater Facility Project 2 Bonnybrook Wastewater Facility Project 2 < MHK Projects Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":5,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"File:Aquamarine-marker.png","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":51.0097,"lon":-114.02,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"http:\/\/prod-http-80-800498448.us-east-1.elb.amazonaws.com\/w\/images\/7\/74\/Aquamarine-marker.png","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

374

Wastewater reclamation and reuse in a petrochemical plant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A large petrochemical plant located in a water-limited area is a major water user. The plant is facing a critical water problem because of several factors: (1) the raw water total dissolved solids (TDS) content has been increasing, (2) water rationing, which limits plant production, occurs during drought periods, (3) the plant is planning for a major expansion that requires major additional water supply, and (4) there is persistent community pressure for wastewater discharge reduction. A water resource management and planning study was conducted for this plant to resolve the water problem. This chapter describes the results of the study and the design of a pilot plant program for the testing of a wastewater treatment and recycling system.

Wong, J.M. [Brown and Caldwell, Pleasant Hill, CA (United States)

1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

Land treatment of contaminated sludge with wastewater irrigation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A large-scale field experiment was conducted to test the feasibility of land application of sludge from industrial and domestic wastewater treatment to determine the fate and environmental impact of the contaminants. The sludge contained 13 organic priority pollutants, 16 additional environmentally significant organic compounds, and high concentrations of several metals (zinc, copper, lead, nickel, and cadmium). Each compound was monitored as the irrigation water percolated through the soil and the groundwater over time. Most of the organic compounds diminished to non-detectable levels by the end of the study, and the metals proved harmless to the environment. The effectiveness of land application of sludge with wastewater irrigation was clearly demonstrated. 1 figure, 11 tables.

Demirjian, Y.A.; Westman, T.R.; Joshi, A.M.; Rop, D.J.; Buhl, R.V.; Clark, W.R.

1984-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

Technical analysis of advanced wastewater-treatment systems for coal-gasification plants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This analysis of advanced wastewater treatment systems for coal gasification plants highlights the three coal gasification demonstration plants proposed by the US Department of Energy: The Memphis Light, Gas and Water Division Industrial Fuel Gas Demonstration Plant, the Illinois Coal Gasification Group Pipeline Gas Demonstration Plant, and the CONOCO Pipeline Gas Demonstration Plant. Technical risks exist for coal gasification wastewater treatment systems, in general, and for the three DOE demonstration plants (as designed), in particular, because of key data gaps. The quantities and compositions of coal gasification wastewaters are not well known; the treatability of coal gasification wastewaters by various technologies has not been adequately studied; the dynamic interactions of sequential wastewater treatment processes and upstream wastewater sources has not been tested at demonstration scale. This report identifies key data gaps and recommends that demonstration-size and commercial-size plants be used for coal gasification wastewater treatment data base development. While certain advanced treatment technologies can benefit from additional bench-scale studies, bench-scale and pilot plant scale operations are not representative of commercial-size facility operation. It is recommended that coal gasification demonstration plants, and other commercial-size facilities that generate similar wastewaters, be used to test advanced wastewater treatment technologies during operation by using sidestreams or collected wastewater samples in addition to the plant's own primary treatment system. Advanced wastewater treatment processes are needed to degrade refractory organics and to concentrate and remove dissolved solids to allow for wastewater reuse. Further study of reverse osmosis, evaporation, electrodialysis, ozonation, activated carbon, and ultrafiltration should take place at bench-scale.

Not Available

1981-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

377

2001 Wastewater Land Application Site Performance Reports for the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The 2001 Wastewater Land Application Site Performance Reports for the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory describe site conditions for the facilities with State of Idaho Wastewater Land Application Permits. Permit-required monitoring data are summarized, and any permit exceedences or environmental impacts relating to the operation of any of the facilities during the 2001 permit year are discussed. Additionally, any special studies performed at the facilities, which related to the operation of the facility or application of the wastewater, are discussed.

Meachum, T.R.; Lewis, M.G.

2002-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

378

2001 Wastewater Land Application Site Performance Reports for the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The 2001 Wastewater Land Application Site Performance Reports for the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory describe site conditions for the facilities with State of Idaho Wastewater Land Application Permits. Permit-required monitoring data are summarized, and any permit exceedences or environmental impacts relating to the operation of any of the facilities during the 2001 permit year are discussed. Additionally, any special studies performed at the facilities, which related to the operation of the facility or application of the wastewater, are discussed.

Meachum, Teresa Ray; Lewis, Michael George

2002-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

A New Approach to Wastewater Remediation Based on Bifunctional Electrodes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A New Approach to Wastewater Remediation Based on Bifunctional Electrodes ... To illustrate this innovative technique, TiO2/Ti/Ta2O5?IrO2 bifunctional electrodes were prepared using a facile thermal decomposition technique and employed in this study. ... The establishment and enforcement of limits for the discharge and/or disposal of toxic and hazardous materials has required the development of new technologies to effectively remediate a variety of gaseous and liquid effluents, solid waste and sludge. ...

Robert Matthew Asmussen; Min Tian; Aicheng Chen

2009-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

380

Enhancing harvestable algal biomass production in wastewater treatment high rate algal ponds by recycling.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??High Rate Algal Ponds (HRAPs) are an efficient and cost-effective system for wastewater treatment and produce algal biomass which could be converted to biofuels. However,… (more)

Park, Byung Kwan

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tw treated wastewater" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

A Framework for Determining and Establishing the Factors that affect Wastewater Treatment and Recycling.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??In this study an assessment of the factors that influence the degree to which a city or community would undertake wastewater treatment and use the… (more)

Mekala, Gayathri Devi

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Chapter 14 - Industrial Wastewater Treatment, Recycling, and Reuse—Past, Present and Future  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The concept of wastewater treatment is not new, but the current definitions of wastewaters and treatments have a relatively recent origin. Industrialization has played a major role in this area and has been the driving force for many treatment methodologies that are being practiced today. There is a better understanding of the importance of protecting the environment and enhancing overall sustainability today. This chapter considers the past and present states of industrial wastewater treatment. It also outlines future challenges and likely developments in industrial wastewater treatment, recycling, and reuse.

Vivek V. Ranade; Vinay M. Bhandari

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

Marcellus Shale Natural Gas Drilling Operators' Choice of Wastewater Disposal Method.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??As natural gas drilling in the Marcellus Shale region moves forward, the issue of wastewater disposal has risen to the forefront. In 2010, the Pennsylvania… (more)

Edmundson, Caitlyn

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

E-Print Network 3.0 - attack wastewater utilities Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

the contribution... . Policymakers and planners can maintain or increase the benefits of wastewater irrigation, while minimizing Source: Scott, Christopher - School Geography and...

385

Phosphorus Fate and Transport in Wastewater Applied to Rapid Infiltration Basins.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Water reuse is one answer to the problem of water scarcity that present and future generations will face. Wastewater applied to land can intentionally recharge… (more)

Moura, Daniel

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

Removal of nitrogen and phosphorus from reject water of municipal wastewater treatment plant.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Reject water, the liquid fraction produced after dewatering of anaerobically digested activated sludge on a municipal wastewater treatment plant (MWWTP), contains from 750 to 1500… (more)

Guo, Chenghong

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

A STELLA Model for Integrated Algal Biofuel Production and Wastewater Treatment.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Based on a municipal wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) in Tampa, FL, a dynamic multiple-systems model was developed on the STELLA software platform to explore algae… (more)

Cormier, Ivy

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Assessing nutrient and pharmaceutical removal efficiency from wastewater using shallow wetland treatment mesocosms.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Wastewaters from rural sewage lagoons in Manitoba contain pharmaceuticals that are potentially harmful to non-target organisms and reduce overall water quality when released. An option… (more)

Cardinal, Pascal

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

E-Print Network 3.0 - aerobic wastewater biofilms Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Membrane... biofilm reactor Introduction One of the major challenges in wastewater treatment is achieving effective... et al. 2004). Nitrifying bacteria grow in the deep,...

390

Reusing wastewater of madder natural dye for wool dyeing  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Natural dye is environment-friendly which is usually extracted from vegetative material. In this work, the wastewater of madder dyebath is reused for wool dyeing. Initially, the madder absorption behavior on wool fiber is determined by new methods based on spectroscopic information of dye solution. The absorbance spectra change is explained in terms of absorbability of chemical components of madder on wool by using several techniques such as principal component analysis, colorimetry, statistical and derivative spectroscopy techniques. The obtained results indicate that the chemical components of the initial dye solution are different from those remaining in the exhausted dye solution. In reusing wastewater of wool dyeing with madder, the exhausted dyebath is reconstructed by adding madder and water. The analyzing color parameter and fastness properties of samples indicate that the quality of samples dyed in reconstructed dyebath is the same as initial wool dyeing. The economic analysis shows that the reusing wastewater caused 19.91% cost saving in wool dyeing with madder.

Ali Shams-Nateri

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Microbial ecology of denitrification in biological wastewater treatment  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Globally, denitrification is commonly employed in biological nitrogen removal processes to enhance water quality. However, substantial knowledge gaps remain concerning the overall community structure, population dynamics and metabolism of different organic carbon sources. This systematic review provides a summary of current findings pertaining to the microbial ecology of denitrification in biological wastewater treatment processes. DNA fingerprinting-based analysis has revealed a high level of microbial diversity in denitrification reactors and highlighted the impacts of carbon sources in determining overall denitrifying community composition. Stable isotope probing, fluorescence in situ hybridization, microarrays and meta-omics further link community structure with function by identifying the functional populations and their gene regulatory patterns at the transcriptional and translational levels. This review stresses the need to integrate microbial ecology information into conventional denitrification design and operation at full-scale. Some emerging questions, from physiological mechanisms to practical solutions, for example, eliminating nitrous oxide emissions and supplementing more sustainable carbon sources than methanol, are also discussed. A combination of high-throughput approaches is next in line for thorough assessment of wastewater denitrifying community structure and function. Though denitrification is used as an example here, this synergy between microbial ecology and process engineering is applicable to other biological wastewater treatment processes.

Huijie Lu; Kartik Chandran; David Stensel

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

Degradation of Estrogens by Rhodococcus zopfii and Rhodococcus equi Isolates from Activated Sludge in Wastewater Treatment Plants  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...chromatography-mass spectrometry...flows into wastewater treatment plants. As some...treatment plants, and loss of ecological balance is causing...disruptors at 47 wastewater treatment plants in 13 districts...chromatography-mass spectrometry...

Takeshi Yoshimoto; Fumiko Nagai; Junji Fujimoto; Koichi Watanabe; Harumi Mizukoshi; Takashi Makino; Kazumasa Kimura; Hideyuki Saino; Haruji Sawada; Hiroshi Omura

2004-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Emergence of Competitive Dominant Ammonia-Oxidizing Bacterial Populations in a Full-Scale Industrial Wastewater Treatment Plant  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) to...industrial WWTPs to balance the high organic...under normal plant operating conditions...may lead to treatment performance...gallons of wastewater daily, containing...Waltham, Mass.) under the...

Alice C. Layton; Hebe Dionisi; H.-W. Kuo; Kevin G. Robinson; Victoria M. Garrett; Arthur Meyers; Gary S. Sayler

2005-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

Journal of Materials Education Vol. 31 (3-4): 157 -166 (2009) POLYMERIC FLOCCULANTS FOR WASTEWATER AND  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Journal of Materials Education Vol. 31 (3-4): 157 - 166 (2009) POLYMERIC FLOCCULANTS FOR WASTEWATER important material used by mankind defines the importance of water purification. Wastewater and industrial

North Texas, University of

395

Opportunities for CHP at Wastewater Treatment Facilities: Market Analysis and Lessons from the Field, U.S. EPA, October 2011  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Opportunities for Combined Heat and Power at Wastewater Treatment Facilities: Market Analysis and Lessons from the Field

396

A New ACS Audio Course to help you understand and solve industrial and municipal waste-water problems ....  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A New ACS Audio Course to help you understand and solve industrial and municipal waste-water problems .... ...

1982-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Anaerobic digestion of wool scouring wastewater in a digester operated semi-continuously for biomass retention  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

An anaerobic digester, operated semi-continuously in order to retain high concentrations of biomass in the digester, was used to treat wool scouring wastewater. At a space load of 9·9 kg COD m?3 day ?1 (hydraulic retention time, 2·8 days) >56% of the COD and >47% of the grease were removed. At these efficiencies, this rate was estimated to be at least 2·5·3· times greater than that which would be achieved in a continuously stirred digester. Preliminary studies of enzymatic pretreatment of the scouring effluent showed that significantly improved treatment rates and/or efficiencies could be achieved—i.e. >70% removal of both the COD and grease at a space load of 12 kg COD m?3 day?1. It is unlikely that any substancial levels of flocculation would develop in this system and it is expected that the moderate use of polyelectrolytes would be required to help maintain the VSS concentration in the reactor.

R.G. Cail; J.P. Barford; R. Lichacz

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

Recovery of nickel and water from nickel electroplating wastewater by electrodialysis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Galvanic processes are one of the main activities contributing to metal discharges into the environment. The wastewater generated contains a high load of salts and metals that should be treated. In this work, the electrodialysis (ED) treatment was studied in order to concentrate and extract nickel (Ni) and its salts of effluents from the bright nickel electroplating process, aiming at water and concentrated solution recovery for reuse, and saving industrial and environmental resources. A laboratory-scale ED system was applied in the treatment of a synthetic effluent based on industrial bath composition. Properties of recovered water and nickel-concentrated solution have also been analyzed to verify their quality: Both solutions were used in the nickel-plating process in order to analyze their effects on the properties of electroplated pieces. It was found that ED treatment generates a very low conductivity solution, enabling its reuse as rinsewater, and a concentrated solution, which can be fed to the bath to recover volumes lost by evaporation and drag out during the nickel-electroplating process. The reuse does not cause any harm to the quality of plated pieces with regard to the visual aspects and corrosion resistance.

T. Benvenuti; R.S. Krapf; M.A.S. Rodrigues; A.M. Bernardes; J. Zoppas-Ferreira

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Development Of Chemical Reduction And Air Stripping Processes To Remove Mercury From Wastewater  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study evaluates the removal of mercury from wastewater using chemical reduction and air stripping using a full-scale treatment system at the Savannah River Site. The existing water treatment system utilizes air stripping as the unit operation to remove organic compounds from groundwater that also contains mercury (C ~ 250 ng/L). The baseline air stripping process was ineffective in removing mercury and the water exceeded a proposed limit of 51 ng/L. To test an enhancement to the existing treatment modality a continuous dose of reducing agent was injected for 6-hours at the inlet of the air stripper. This action resulted in the chemical reduction of mercury to Hg(0), a species that is removable with the existing unit operation. During the injection period a 94% decrease in concentration was observed and the effluent satisfied proposed limits. The process was optimized over a 2-day period by sequentially evaluating dose rates ranging from 0.64X to 297X stoichiometry. A minimum dose of 16X stoichiometry was necessary to initiate the reduction reaction that facilitated the mercury removal. Competing electron acceptors likely inhibited the reaction at the lower 1 doses, which prevented removal by air stripping. These results indicate that chemical reduction coupled with air stripping can effectively treat large-volumes of water to emerging part per trillion regulatory standards for mercury.

Jackson, Dennis G.; Looney, Brian B.; Craig, Robert R.; Thompson, Martha C.; Kmetz, Thomas F.

2013-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

400

A comprehensive microbial insight into two-stage anaerobic digestion of food waste-recycling wastewater  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Microbial community structures were assessed in a two-stage anaerobic digestion system treating food waste-recycling wastewater. The reactors were operated for 390 d at 10 different hydraulic retention times (HRTs) ranging from 25 to 4 d. Stable operation was achieved with the overall chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal efficiency of 73.0–85.9% at organic loading rate of up to 35.6 g COD/L·d. Performance of the acidogenic reactors, however, changed significantly during operation. This change coincided with transition of the bacterial community from one dominated by Aeriscardovia- and Lactobacillus amylovorus-related species to one dominated by Lactobacillus acetotolerans- and Lactobacillus kefiri-like organisms. In methanogenic reactors, the microbial community structures also changed at this stage along with the shift from Methanoculleus- to Methanosarcina-like organisms. This trend was confirmed by the non-metric multidimensional scaling joint plot of microbial shifts along with performance parameters. These results indicated that the overall process performance was relatively stable compared to the dynamic changes in the microbial structures and the acidogenic performance.

Seung Gu Shin; Gyuseong Han; Juntaek Lim; Changsoo Lee; Seokhwan Hwang

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tw treated wastewater" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Chapter 11 - 3D TRASAR™ Technologies for Reliable Wastewater Recycling and Reuse  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The chapter describes two unique technologies—3D TRASAR Technology for Sugar, and 3D TRASAR Technology for Membranes—which are aimed at maximizing water conservation through reduction of wastewater discharge and raw water consumption. 3D TRASAR Technology for Sugar is designed to help sugar mills repurpose the good-quality vapor condensate by detecting whether the vapor condensate is contaminated with sugar. With this technology, sugar mills can reuse the good vapor condensate as boiler makeup or cooling tower makeup without putting those assets at risk. 3D TRASAR Technology for Membranes is an integrated solution designed to achieve optimal performance from a reverse osmosis system, which is increasingly used to treat various effluents. The program continuously monitors membrane system performance using normalization trends, accurately controls the dosage of chemicals, and provides an appropriate cleaning program. These methods extend membrane life and time between cleanings and maximize capital utilization while producing water of just the right quality from the existing system.

Manish Singh; Ling Liang; Atanu Basu; Michael A. Belsan; G. Anders Hallsby; William H. Tripp Morris

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Ecology of the Microbial Community Removing Phosphate from Wastewater under Continuously Aerobic Conditions in a Sequencing Batch Reactor  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Community Removing Phosphate from Wastewater under Continuously Aerobic...chemical oxygen demand. One wastewater was synthetic, and the other...operation. Only after repeated recycling are poly(P)-accumulating...reactors (SBRs) fed synthetic wastewater with acetate as the sole carbon...

Johwan Ahn; Sarah Schroeder; Michael Beer; Simon McIlroy; Ronald C. Bayly; John W. May; George Vasiliadis; Robert J. Seviour

2007-02-09T23:59:59.000Z

403

2005 Borchardt Conference: A Seminar on Advances in Water and Wastewater Treatment February 23-25, Ann Arbor, MI  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-25, Ann Arbor, MI Conference Proceedings 1 Membrane Biofilm Reactors for Water and Wastewater Treatment and Wastewater Treatment February 23-25, Ann Arbor, MI Conference Proceedings 2 (sparging) to replenish oxygen: A Seminar on Advances in Water and Wastewater Treatment February 23-25, Ann Arbor, MI Conference Proceedings

Nerenberg, Robert

404

Designing Sustainable Wastewater Systems: Generating Design Alternatives Chamberlain, B., Zarei, A., Taheri, H., Poole, D., Carenini, G. and berg, G.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

alternative wastewater treatment systems, and 3) a preference-elicitation method for guiding decision of a rural wastewater system for use in developing regions. Figure 1 depicts a simplified version of oneDesigning Sustainable Wastewater Systems: Generating Design Alternatives Chamberlain, B., Zarei, A

Carenini, Giuseppe

405

In situ investigation of tubular microbial fuel cells deployed in an aeration tank at a municipal wastewater treatment plant  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

wastewater treatment plant Fei Zhang a , Zheng Ge a , Julien Grimaud b , Jim Hurst b , Zhen He a: Microbial fuel cells Wastewater treatment Organic removal Aeration Activated sludge a b s t r a c of wastewater quality, and other operating conditions. Unlike prior lab stud- ies by others, the results

406

Cey. J. Sci. (Bio. Sci.) 37 (1): 49-59, 2008 SALINITY IMPLICATIONS OF WASTEWATER IRRIGATION IN  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Cey. J. Sci. (Bio. Sci.) 37 (1): 49-59, 2008 SALINITY IMPLICATIONS OF WASTEWATER IRRIGATION and shortage of good quality water, wastewater irrigation is a growing phenomenon in many arid and semi-arid countries. A common characteristic of wastewater is high salinity, with cities typically adding 200 ­ 500 mg

Scott, Christopher

407

Ahmet H. Aydilek, 1 Tuncer B. Edil, 1 Patrick J. Fox2 Consolidation Characteristics of Wastewater Sludge  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ahmet H. Aydilek, 1 Tuncer B. Edil, 1 Patrick J. Fox2 Consolidation Characteristics of Wastewater., Edil, T. B., and Fox, P. J., "Consolidation Characteristics of Wastewater Sludge", Geotechnics of High wastewater sludge. Small and large-scale laboratory consolidation tests were conducted and field observations

Aydilek, Ahmet

408

Designing Sustainable Wastewater Systems: Visual, Interactive Preference Elicitation Chamberlain, B., Taheri, H., Carenini, G., Poole, D., and berg, G.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Designing Sustainable Wastewater Systems: Visual, Interactive Preference Elicitation Chamberlain, B., Taheri, H., Carenini, G., Poole, D., and Ã?berg, G. Introduction The majority of water and wastewater and trade-offs made [4-7]. Our work aims to create computational tools for wastewater infrastructure design

Carenini, Giuseppe

409

Physical-chemical characterization of sludge and granular materials from a vertical flow constructed wetland for municipal wastewater treatment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

constructed wetland for municipal wastewater treatment B. Kim1,2 , M. Gautier*1 , P. Michel2 and R. Gourdon1 1, Society of design and production engineering for wastewater purification, 5 Allée Alban Vistel, F-69110 Wetlands (VFCW) is well developed in France and other countries for the treatment of wastewaters from small

Boyer, Edmond

410

PhD thesis `Triclosan removal in wastewater treatment processes' Xijuan Chen Preface and acknowledgements  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PhD thesis ­ `Triclosan removal in wastewater treatment processes' ­ Xijuan Chen 1 Preface scientific inputs in the triclosan ozonation study. I acknowledge my colleagues in xenobiotic group of #12;PhD thesis ­ `Triclosan removal in wastewater treatment processes' ­ Xijuan Chen 2 University Duisburg

Kolaei, Alireza Rezania

411

1997 evaluation of tritium removal and mitigation technologies for Hanford Site wastewaters  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report contains results of a biennial assessment of tritium separation technology and tritium nitration techniques for control of tritium bearing wastewaters at the Hanford Site. Tritium in wastewaters at Hanford have resulted from plutonium production, fuel reprocessing, and waste handling operations since 1944. this assessment was conducted in response to the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order.

Jeppson, D.W.; Biyani, R.K.; Duncan, J.B.; Flyckt, D.L.; Mohondro, P.C.; Sinton, G.L.

1997-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

412

ACCEPTED BY WATER ENVIRONMENT RESEARCH ODOR AND VOC REMOVAL FROM WASTEWATER TREATMENT PLANT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of their high rates of chemical consumption. Additionally, chemical scrubbers are ineffective for the removalACCEPTED BY WATER ENVIRONMENT RESEARCH _______ ODOR AND VOC REMOVAL FROM WASTEWATER TREATMENT PLANT of biofilters for sequential removal of H2S and VOCs from wastewater treatment plant waste air. The biofilter

413

Determination of Anions in Cooling Tower Wastewater from Coal Gasification by Ion Chromatography  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......oxygen-blown slagging fixed-bed gasifier utilizing lignite in the United...Dakota. During this research, gasifier wastewater was prepared as...reaction of the ion in an acid medium to form a colored complex...data interpretation. Sample Gasifier wastewater was produced from......

Michael E. Potts; Todd A. Potas

1985-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

Integrated Fault Detection and Isolation: Application to a Winery's Wastewater Treatment Plant  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this paper, an integrated object-oriented fuzzy logic fault detection and isolation (FDI) module for a biological wastewater treatment process is presented. The defined FDI strategy and the software implementation are detailed. Using experimental ... Keywords: anaerobic digestion, fuzzy logic, object-oriented programming, on-line fault detection and isolation (FDI), wastewater treatment

Antoine Genovesi; Jérôme Harmand; Jean-Philippe Steyer

2000-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

Water balance analysis and wastewater recycling investigation in electrolytic manganese industry of China — A case study  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract A water balance investigation was performed for a representative electrolytic manganese metal (EMM) enterprise to study the details of water consumption and generation in the production process. A new integrated wastewater treatment approach was put forward to recover useful chemicals from the process wastewater, which contained high concentrations of Mn2 +, Cr(VI), Cr3 +, and NH4+. Cr(VI) was recovered from the wastewater by ion exchange techniques and reused as EMM passivant. The remaining wastewater containing Mn2 + and NH4+ was returned to the leaching section before the impurity removal procedure to prepare electrolytes. Complete wastewater recycling was achieved after water balance regulation and optimization. Final demonstration line results proved that the proposed process is feasible and exhibits significant advantages of better treatment effects, lower costs and lower environmental impact compared to the traditional reduction–neutralization–sedimentation treatment method. With the adoption of the proposed approach, solid waste disposal cost and the required area for the landfill yard were decreased by 80%. Operating costs for wastewater treatment were lowered by 85%. Around 4.8 kg/t EMM of Mn2 +, 5.2 kg/t EMM of NH4+ and 0.24 kg/t EMM of Cr(VI) were recovered. The recycled wastewater proportion was increased from 6.2% to 100.0%. 1.168 m3/t EMM of fresh water was saved and the equivalent amount of discharging wastewater was reduced to the environment.

Fuyuan Xu; Linhua Jiang; Zhigang Dan; Xiaojuan Gao; Ning Duan; Guimei Han; Hong Zhu

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

A Property-Based Optimization of Direct Recycle Networks and Wastewater  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A Property-Based Optimization of Direct Recycle Networks and Wastewater Treatment Processes Jose a mathematical programming approach to optimize direct recycle-reuse networks together with wastewater treatment formulation is developed to optimize the recycle/reuse of process streams to units and the perform- ance

Grossmann, Ignacio E.

417

Study on Further Treatment of Coal Coking Wastewater by Ultrasound Wave, Fenton's Reagent and Coagulation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The study on further treatment of coal coking wastewater by ultrasound wave, Fenton's reagent and coagulation was carried out in this paper at the first time, Furthermore, this paper discussed the optimum cooperative reaction condition of their combined ... Keywords: ultrasound wave, coke plant wastewater, Fenton reagent, coagulation

Jun Shi; Liangbo Zhang

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

2002 Wastewater Land Application Site Performance Reports for the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The 2002 Wastewater Land Application site Performance Reports for the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory describe site conditions for the facilities with State of Idaho Wastewater Land Application Permits. Permit-required monitoring data are summarized, and permit exceedences or environmental impacts relating to the operation of the facilities during the 2002 permit year are discussed.

Meachum, T.R.; Lewis, M.G.

2003-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

419

2003 Wastewater Land Application Site Performance Reports for the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The 2003 Wastewater Land Application Site Performance Reports for the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory describe the conditions for the facilities with State of Idaho Wastewater Land Application Permits. Permit-required monitoring data are summarized, and permit exceedences or environmental impacts relating to the operations of the facilities during the 2003 permit year are discussed.

Teresa R. Meachum

2004-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

Occurrence and Implication of dissolved organic phosphorus (DOP) in tertiary wastewater Effluents Page 1 of 6  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

GU, APRIL Occurrence and Implication of dissolved organic phosphorus (DOP) in tertiary wastewater wastewater effluents L. Liu1 , D. S. Smith2 , M. Bracken3 , J.B. Neethling4 , H.D. Stensel5 and S. Murthy6 levels (e.g. TPwastewater treatment plants. A few previous studies (Benisch et al., 2007

Brody, James P.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tw treated wastewater" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Cost?Based Optimization of a Papermaking Wastewater Regeneration Recycling System  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Wastewater can be regenerated for recycling in an industrial process to reduce freshwater consumption and wastewater discharge. Such an environment friendly approach will also lead to cost savings that accrue due to reduced freshwater usage and wastewater discharge. However the resulting cost savings are offset to varying degrees by the costs incurred for the regeneration of wastewater for recycling. Therefore systematic procedures should be used to determine the true economic benefits for any water?using system involving wastewater regeneration recycling. In this paper a total cost accounting procedure is employed to construct a comprehensive cost model for a paper mill. The resulting cost model is optimized by means of mathematical programming to determine the optimal regeneration flowrate and regeneration efficiency that will yield the minimum total cost.

Long Huang; Xiao Feng; Khim H. Chu

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

Stripping of organic compounds from wastewater as an auxiliary fuel of regenerative thermal oxidizer  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Organic solvents with different volatilities are widely used in various processes and generate air and water pollution problems. In the cleaning processes of electronics industries, most volatile organic compounds (VOCs) are vented to air pollution control devices while most non-volatile organic solvents dissolve in the cleaning water and become the major sources of COD in wastewater. Discharging a high-COD wastewater stream to wastewater treatment facility often disturbs the treatment performance. A pretreatment of the high-COD wastewater is therefore highly desirable. This study used a packed-bed stripping tower in combination with a regenerative thermal oxidizer to remove the COD in the wastewater from a printed circuit board manufacturing process and to utilize the stripped organic compounds as the auxiliary fuel of the RTO. The experimental results showed that up to 45% of the COD could be removed and 66% of the RTO fuel could be saved by the combined treatment system.

Meng-Wen Chang; Jia-Ming Chern

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

Fate of As, Se, and Hg in a Passive Integrated System for Treatment of Fossil Plant Wastewater  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

TVA is collaborating with EPRI and DOE to demonstrate a passive treatment system for removing SCR-derived ammonia and trace elements from a coal-fired power plant wastewater stream. The components of the integrated system consist of trickling filters for ammonia oxidation, reaction cells containing zero-valent iron (ZVI) for trace contaminant removal, a settling basin for storage of iron hydroxide floc, and anaerobic vertical-flow wetlands for biological denitrification. The passive integrated treatment system will treat up to 0.25 million gallons per day (gpd) of flue gas desulfurization (FGD) pond effluent, with a configuration requiring only gravity flow to obviate the need for pumps. The design of the system will enable a comparative evaluation of two parallel treatment trains, with and without the ZVI extraction trench and settling/oxidation basin components. One of the main objectives is to gain a better understanding of the chemical transformations that species of trace elements such as arsenic, selenium, and mercury undergo as they are treated in passive treatment system components with differing environmental conditions. This progress report details the design criteria for the passive integrated system for treating fossil power plant wastewater as well as performance results from the first several months of operation. Engineering work on the project has been completed, and construction took place during the summer of 2005. Monitoring of the passive treatment system was initiated in October 2005 and continued until May 18 2006. The results to date indicate that the treatment system is effective in reducing levels of nitrogen compounds and trace metals. Concentrations of both ammonia and trace metals were lower than expected in the influent FGD water, and additions to increase these concentrations will be done in the future to further test the removal efficiency of the treatment system. In May 2006, the wetland cells were drained of FGD water, refilled with less toxic ash pond water, and replanted due to low survival rates from the first planting the previous summer. The goals of the TVA-EPRI-DOE collaboration include building a better understanding of the chemical transformations that trace elements such as arsenic, selenium, and mercury undergo as they are treated in a passive treatment system, and to evaluate the performance of a large-scale replicated passive treatment system to provide additional design criteria and economic factors.

Terry Yost; Paul Pier; Gregory Brodie

2007-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

424

Hierarchical predictive control of integrated wastewater treatment systems  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The paper proposes an approach to designing the control structure and algorithms for optimising control of integrated wastewater treatment plant-sewer systems (IWWTS) under a full range of disturbance inputs. The optimised control of IWWTS allows for significant cost savings, fulfilling the effluent discharge limits over a long period and maintaining the system in sustainable operation. Due to the specific features of a wastewater system a hierarchical control structure is applied. The functional decomposition leads to three control layers: supervisory, optimising and follow-up. A temporal decomposition that is applied in order to efficiently accommodate the system's multiple time scales leads to further decomposition of the optimising control layer into three control sublayers: slow, medium, and fast. An extended Kalman Filter is used to carry out an estimation of needed but not measured plant states in real time. The robustly feasible model predictive controller produces manipulated variable trajectories based on a dedicated grey box (GB) model of the biological processes and drawing its physical reality from the well known \\{ASM2d\\} model. The GB model parameters are dependant on the plant operating point and therefore are continuously estimated. As it is impossible to efficiently control the plant under all influent conditions that may occur by using one universal control strategy, different control strategies are designed. Recently developed mechanisms for soft switching between the MPC control strategies are applied in order to smooth the state and control transient processes during the switching. The methodologies and algorithms proposed in the paper are validated by simulation based on real data records from a wastewater system located in Kartuzy, northern Poland. The control system was implemented at the case-study site to generate in real time the control actions that were assessed by the plant operators and verified by simulation based on a calibrated plant model.

M.A. Brdys; M. Grochowski; T. Gminski; K. Konarczak; M. Drewa

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

Forward osmosis niches in seawater desalination and wastewater reuse  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This review focuses on the present status of forward osmosis (FO) niches in two main areas: seawater desalination and wastewater reuse. Specific applications for desalination and impaired-quality water treatment and reuse are described, as well as the benefits, advantages, challenges, costs and knowledge gaps on FO hybrid systems are discussed. FO can play a role as a bridge to integrate upstream and downstream water treatment processes, to reduce the energy consumption of the entire desalination or water recovery and reuse processes, thus achieving a sustainable solution for the water-energy nexus. FO hybrid membrane systems showed to have advantages over traditional membrane process like high pressure reverse osmosis and nanofiltration for desalination and wastewater treatment: (i) chemical storage and feed water systems may be reduced for capital, operational and maintenance cost, (ii) water quality is improved, (iii) reduced process piping costs, (iv) more flexible treatment units, and (v) higher overall sustainability of the desalination and wastewater treatment process. Nevertheless, major challenges make FO systems not yet a commercially viable technology, the most critical being the development of a high flux membrane, capable of maintaining an elevated salt rejection and a reduced internal concentration polarization effect, and the availability of appropriate draw solutions (cost effective and non-toxic), which can be recirculated via an efficient recovery process. This review article highlights the features of hybrid FO systems and specifically provides the state-of-the-art applications in the water industry in a novel classification and based on the latest developments toward scaling up these systems.

R. Valladares Linares; Z. Li; S. Sarp; Sz.S. Bucs; G. Amy; J.S. Vrouwenvelder

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

SEPARATION OF HEAVY METALS: REMOVAL FROM INDUSTRIAL WASTEWATERS  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

SEPARATION SEPARATION OF HEAVY METALS: REMOVAL FROM INDUSTRIAL WASTEWATERS AND CONTAMINATED SOIL* Robert W. Peters + and Linda Shem Energy Systems Division Argonne National Laboratory 9700 South Cass Avenue Argonne, Illinois 60439 Abstract This paper reviews the applicable separation technologies relating to removal of heavy metals from solution and from soils in order to present the state-of-the-art in the field. Each technology is briefly described and typical operating conditions and technology performance are presented. Technologies described include chemical precipitation (including hydroxide, carbonate, or sulfide reagents), coagulation/flocculation, ion exchange, solvent extraction, extraction with chelating agents, complexation, electrochemical operation, cementation, membrane operations, evaporation, adsorption, solidification/stabilization, and

427

Beneficial reuse of treated media from remediation at an industrial site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Remediation at an active PVC resin manufacturing plant in southeastern Pennsylvania has involved closure of lagoons under a RCRA plan and design of a groundwater pump and treat program under CERCLA. Both the CERCLA and RCRA programs involve beneficial reuse of the treated media, which in effect has offset some costs of the remediation. The lagoons were used to settle the PVC residual material from wastewater generated by the facility. Analysis of the residual material showed that the polymer content would allow it to be used as a low-grade PVC resin after drying. The treatment process selected for the RCRA lagoon closure involved indirect steam stripping and filter pressing which produced a filter cake that was both nonhazardous and marketable. Approximately 6,000 tons of product was sent to market from the lagoons. The groundwater, which will be remediated at the site, contains trichlorethylene (TCE), vinyl chloride monomer (VCM), and other volatile organic compounds. An average 400 gpm of groundwater will be extracted and treated by carbon absorbents and an air stripper. The groundwater will be used by the plant in the production process after it is treated by the CERCLA remediation system.

Erdman, D.E. [Smith Environmental Technologies, Plymouth Meeting, PA (United States); Weston, A.F. [Occidental Chemical Corp., Niagara Falls, NY (United States); Morrissey, B.J. [Occidental Chemical Corp., Houston, TX (United States)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

428

Energy efficiency in municipal wastewater treatment plants: Technology assessment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The New York State Energy Research and Development Authority (NYSERDA) estimates that municipal wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) in New York State consume about 1.5 billion kWh of electricity each year for sewage treatment and sludge management based on the predominant types of treatment plants, the results of an energy use survey, and recent trends in the amounts of electricity WWTPs use nationwide. Electric utilities in New York State have encouraged demand-side management (DSM) to help control or lower energy costs and make energy available for new customers without constructing additional facilities. This report describes DSM opportunities for WWTPs in New York State; discusses the costs and benefits of several DSM measures; projects energy impact statewide of the DSM technologies; identifies the barrier to implementing DSM at WWTPs; and outlines one possible incentive that could stimulate widespread adoption of DSM by WWTP operators. The DSM technologies discussed are outfall hydropower, on-site generation, aeration efficiency, time-of-day electricity pricing, and storing wastewater.

NONE

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

Innovative Treatment Technologies for Natural Waters and Wastewaters  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The research described in this report focused on the development of novel membrane contactor processes (in particular, forward osmosis (FO), pressure retarded osmosis (PRO), and membrane distillation (MD)) in low energy desalination and wastewater treatment applications and in renewable energy generation. FO and MD are recently gaining national and international attention as viable, economic alternatives for removal of both established and emerging contaminants from natural and process waters; PRO is gaining worldwide attention as a viable source of renewable energy. The interrelationship of energy and water are at the core of this study. Energy and water are inextricably bound; energy usage and production must be considered when evaluating any water treatment process for practical application. Both FO and MD offer the potential for substantial energy and resource savings over conventional treatment processes and PRO offers the potential for renewable energy or energy offsets in desalination. Combination of these novel technologies with each other, with existing technologies (e.g., reverse osmosis (RO)), and with existing renewable energy sources (e.g., salinity gradient solar ponds) may enable much less expensive water production and also potable water production in remote or distributed locations. Two inter-related projects were carried out in this investigation. One focused on membrane bioreactors for wastewater treatment and PRO for renewable energy generation; the other focused on MD driven by a salinity gradient solar pond.

Childress, Amy E.

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

A key review of wastewater source heat pump (WWSHP) systems  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Heat pumps (HPs) are part of the environmentally friendly technologies using renewable energy and have been utilized in the developed countries for years. Wastewater is seen as a renewable heat source for HPs. At the beginning of the 1980s, waste (sewage) water source heat pumps (WWSHPs) were widely applied in North European countries like Sweden and Norway and partially applied in China. In the past two decades, the WWSHP has become increasingly popular due to its advantages of relatively higher energy utilization efficiency and environmental protection. The present study comprehensively reviews WWSHP systems in terms of applications and performance assessments including energetic, exergetic, environmental and economic aspects for the first time to the best of the authors’ knowledge. In this context, a historical development of \\{WWSHPs\\} was briefly given first. Next, wastewater potential and its characteristics were presented while a WWSHP system was introduced. The previously conducted studies on \\{WWSHPs\\} were then reviewed and classified in a tabulated form. Finally, some concluding remarks were listed. The COP values of the reviewed studies ranged from 1.77 to 10.63 for heating and 2.23 to 5.35 for cooling based on the experimental and simulated values. The performance assessments are mostly made using energy analysis methods while the number of exergetic evaluations is very low and has not been comprehensively performed. It is expected that the comprehensive review here will be very beneficial to those dealing with the design, analysis, simulation and performance assessment of WWSHP systems.

Arif Hepbasli; Emrah Biyik; Orhan Ekren; Huseyin Gunerhan; Mustafa Araz

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

Tritiated wastewater treatment and disposal evaluation for 1994  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report discusses and analyzes information and issues regarding tritium and tritium management. It was prepared in response to the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (Tri-Party Agreement) Milestone M-26-05A for the evaluation of tritiated wastewater treatment and disposal. The key elements of the report are summarized as follows: Discharge of tritiated water is regulated worldwide. Differences exist in discharge limits and in regulatory philosophy from country to country and from state to state in the United States. Tritium from manmade sources is emitted into the atmosphere and discharged into the ground or directly to the oceans and to waterways that empty into the oceans. In 1989, reported worldwide emissions of tritium from nuclear power generating plants totaled almost 1,000,000 Curies (Ci).

Not Available

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

Prediction of wastewater treatment plant performance using artificial neural networks  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Artificial neural networks (ANN) models were developed to predict the performance of a wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) based on past information. The data used in this work were obtained from a major conventional treatment plant in the Greater Cairo district, Egypt, with an average flow rate of 1 million m3/day. Daily records of biochemical oxygen demand (BOD) and suspended solids (SS) concentrations through various stages of the treatment process over 10 months were obtained from the plant laboratory. Exploratory data analysis was used to detect relationships in the data and evaluate data dependence. Two ANN-based models for prediction of BOD and SS concentrations in plant effluent are presented. The appropriate architecture of the neural network models was determined through several steps of training and testing of the models. The ANN-based models were found to provide an efficient and a robust tool in predicting WWTP performance.

Maged M Hamed; Mona G Khalafallah; Ezzat A Hassanien

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

Saving Energy at 24/7 Wastewater Treatment Plant | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Energy at 24/7 Wastewater Treatment Plant Energy at 24/7 Wastewater Treatment Plant Saving Energy at 24/7 Wastewater Treatment Plant July 29, 2010 - 4:11pm Addthis How does it work? Longview, Texas received $781,900 in Recovery Act funding. Co-generation power plant to save 16,571 kWh annually. Local utility to provide the city $150 rebate for every kW of peak demand reduced. In the city of Longview, Texas, the wastewater treatment facility uses more electricity than any other public building. Making investments to permanently cut energy costs at the plant is important for this East Texas city of approximately 77,000. "Our city has felt the effects of the recession. Several companies have laid 100-200 folks off and many are still waiting to be hired back," said Shawn Raney, a safety specialist with the Longview city government. "The

434

Effectiveness of wind-blown sands on treatment of wastewater from coal-fired power plants  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Untreated disposal of wastewater from coal-fired power plants has environmental and public health concerns in ... situ experiment was conducted in the easily accessible wind-blown sands to study their efficiency ...

Yunfeng Li; Weifeng Wan; Wanfang Zhou; Juan Xie; Yaoguo Wu…

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

The Energy-Water Nexus: State and Local Roles in Efficiency & Water and Wastewater Treatment Plants  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This presentation, given through the DOE's Technical Assitance Program (TAP), provides information on the Energy-Water Nexus: State and Local Roles in Efficiency & Water and Wastewater Treatment Plants.

436

Photovoltaic Small-Scale Wastewater Treatment Project for Rural and New-Cultivated Areas in  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Abstract—The problem of wastewater treatment in Egypt is a two-fold problem; the first part concerning the existing rural areas, the second one dealing with new industrial/domestic areas. In Egypt several agricultural projects have been initiated by the government and the private sector as well, in order to change its infrastructure. As a reliable energy source, photovoltaic pumping systems have contributed to supply water for local rural communities worldwide; they can also be implemented to solve the problem “wastewater environment pollution”. The solution of this problem can be categorised as recycle process. In addition, because of regional conditions past technologies are being reexamined to select a smallscale treatment system requiring low construction and maintenance costs. This paper gives the design guidelines of a Photovoltaic Small-Scale Wastewater Treatment Plant (PVSSWTP) based on technologies that can be transferred. Keywords—Renewable energy sources, Photovoltaic, small-scale projects, wastewater treatment. I.

Fadia M. A. Ghali

437

The role of SCADA in developing a lean enterprise for municipal wastewater operations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Central to optimizing a wastewater system's operations is the collection of alarm and operational data from various remote locations throughout a municipality, hence the basic need for supervisory control and data acquisition ...

Prutz, Stanley J

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

Chlorella minutissima—A Promising Fuel Alga for Cultivation in Municipal Wastewaters  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

It is imperative to slash the cost of algal oil to less than $50 bbl?1 for successful algal biofuel production. Use of municipal wastewater for algal cultivation could obviate the need for freshwater and the nutr...

Ashish Bhatnagar; Monica Bhatnagar…

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

Incorporation of wastewater harvested algae into three-phase compression ignition emulsion fuels.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??The purpose of this study was to assess the technical feasibility of incorporating wastewater harvested algae into three-phase, oil-in-water-in-oil compression ignition emulsion fuels for use… (more)

Wiley, Patrick E.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

E-Print Network 3.0 - aquatic plant wastewater Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Environmental Sciences and Ecology 29 CAB International 2004. Wastewater Use in Irrigated Agriculture (eds C.A. Scott, N.I. Faruqui and L. Raschid-Sally) 1 Summary: , milk,...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tw treated wastewater" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Hydrogen-Based Membrane Biofilm Reactor for Wastewater Treatment Bruce E. Rittmann, Robert Nerenberg  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Hydrogen-Based Membrane Biofilm Reactor for Wastewater Treatment Bruce E. Rittmann, RobertCarty 2001). If soluble organic nitrogen can be held to a few tenths of a mg/L, the total N can

Nerenberg, Robert

442

INTEGRATED CONCEPTS FOR REUSE OF UPGRADED WASTEWATER – ROLE OF MEMBRANES IN WATER RECYCLING  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The AQUAREC project on “Integrated Concepts for Reuse of Upgraded Wastewater” is funded by the European Commission within the 5th Framework Programme as well as in Australia by the Commonwealth Department of E...

THOMAS WINTGENS; THOMAS MELIN; DAVIDE BIXIO…

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

Cost-effective wastewater treatment and recycling in mini-plants using mass integration  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This work illustrates the use of a mass integration approach to cost-effectively reduce wastewater treatment and discharge in mini-industrial plants. The approach focuses on the use of functional analysis, gr...

Ahmad Hamad; Ahmed Aidan; Muataz Douboni

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

A resource recycling technique of hydrogen production from the catalytic degradation of organics in wastewater  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A resource recycling technique of hydrogen production from the catalytic degradation of organics in wastewater by aqueous phase reforming (APR) has...N,N-dimethylformamide (DMF) and cyclohexanol) in water could b...

XiaoNian Li; LingNiao Kong; YiZhi Xiang; YaoMing Ju…

2008-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

Application of Radial Basis Function Neural Network in Modeling Wastewater Sludge Recycle System  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Sludge recycle system is an important part of wastewater treatment plants(WWTP), which can ensure ... Neural Network model for prediction of the Sludge recycling flowrate, which ultimately affect the Sludge recycling

Long Luo; Liyou Zhou

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

Treatment of shale gas wastewater in the Marcellus : a comparative analysis.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??This analysis focused primarily on three main treatment methods which were re-use, recycle, and disposal wells. The re-use treatment option is when wastewater is mixed… (more)

Yisa, Junaid Ololade

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

Zero liquid discharge industrial wastewater treatment: Case studies from 1976-1996  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As wastewater discharge regulations become more stringent, power plants, manufacturing plants and other industrial sites are looking for ways to reduce makeup water requirements and to recycle and reuse as much wastewater as possible. In some cases, environmental regulations require zero liquid discharge, meaning all wastewater must either be retained on site or reduced to solids for disposal off site. Zero liquid discharge or {open_quotes}closed-loop{close_quotes} wastewater treatment systems using evaporators and other process equipment have been well-accepted in recent years. Often overlooked is the fact that zero discharge is not just the latest fashion--many commercial zero liquid discharge systems have been in operation since the mid-70`s. This paper will give specific examples of zero liquid discharge operations from 1974 to the present, showing how evaporation equipment and processes have changed to meet the requirements of industry and environmental regulations. 5 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs.

Bostjancic, J.; Ludlum, R. [Ionics RCC, Bellevue, WA (United States)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

448

Recovering and recycling Hg from chlor-alkali plant wastewater sludge  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Montana Tech of the University of Montana and Universal Dynamics of British Columbia have developed a hydrometallurgical process for recovering and recycling mercury from chlorine plant wastewater sludge material...

L. G. Twidwell; R. J. Thompson

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

Adsorption of Fluoroquinolone Antibiotics by Wastewater Sludge Biochar: Role of the Sludge Source  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Adsorption of fluoroquinolone antibiotics using sludge-derived biochar made of various wastewater sludges was investigated. The sludge-derived biochar had relatively large Brunauer–Emmet–...2?g?1 except the bioch...

Hong Yao; Jian Lu; Jun Wu; Zeyu Lu; P. Chris Wilson…

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

Utilization of a saltwater-marsh ecosystem for the management of seafood-processing wastewater  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The report presents the results of a cooperative study that examined the potential for using a saltwater wetland to manage seafood-processing wastewater. An irregularly flooded black needlerush (Juncus roemerianus) marsh located at Point aux Pins in coastal Alabama was selected for the study. The study determined that the application of seafood-processing wastewater to the marsh affected a number of the marsh's water-quality characteristics in direct relation to the wastewater loading rate. However, monitoring of the marsh flora and fauna showed virtually no impact at any of the experimental loading rates. As a result of the study a number of design and loading criteria are suggested for any future projects involving wastewater discharges to saltwater wetlands.

Not Available

1986-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

EPA ENERGY STAR Webcast: Benchmarking Water/Wastewater Treatment Facilities in Portfolio Manager  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Learn how to track the progress of energy efficiency efforts and compare the energy use of wastewater treatment plants to other peer facilities across the country. Attendees will learn how to...

452

Wastewater treatment and flow patterns in an onsite subsurface flow constructed wetland  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Subsurface flow constructed wetlands (SFCWs) are becoming increasingly common as a secondary treatment of onsite domestic wastewater. Even though SFCWs are being used widely, sufficient data has not been collected to determine how parameters...

Stecher, Matthew C

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

453

Source Characterization and Pretreatment Evaluation of Pharmaceuticals and Personal Care Products in Healthcare Facility Wastewater  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Healthcare facility wastewaters are a potentially important and under characterized source of pharmaceuticals and personal care products to the environment. In this study the composition and magnitude of pharmaceuticals and personal care products...

Nagarnaik, Pranav Mukund

2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

454

Determination of Baselines for Evaluation and Promotion of Energy Efficiency in Wastewater Treatment Facilities  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Wastewater treatment plants are one of the largest energy consumers managed by the public sector. As plants expand in the future to accommodate population growth, energy requirements will substantially increase. Thus, implementation of energy...

Chow, S. A.; Ganji, A. R.; Fok, S.

455

Water/Wastewater Treatment Plant Field Device Wiring Method Decision Analysis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The choice of field device wiring method for water and wastewater treatment plant design is extremely complex and contains many variables. The choice not only affects short-term startup and equipment costs, but also long-term operations...

Dicus, Scott C.

2011-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

456

Water/Wastewater Engineering Report (Storm Sewer/Infiltration Sanitary Sewage Separation-M1 Model)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In some cities, the municipal sewer system collects both storm water and sanitary sewage in the same pipes. During dry weather these sewers carry all the sanitary sewage to the wastewater treatment plant for treatment. However, when rainstorms...

Liu, Z.; Brumbelow, K.; Haberl, J. S.

2006-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

457

Experimental evaluation of anaerobic digestion for coffee wastewater treatment and its biomethane recovery potential  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The objective of this study was to evaluate the performance of anaerobic digestion (AD) as an eco-friendly technology for coffee wastewater (CWW) management. First, we have characterized the CWW and found that...

A. Beyene; D. Yemane; T. Addis…

2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

458

An evaluation of atmospheric evaporation for treating wood preserving wastes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

seasoned . ;tock reduces the amount of si. earning necessary. Barometric condensers produce a large volume of wastewater if the cooling water is not recycled. Recycling increases the phenol content of the water, but greatly reduces the volume. Another a... seasoned . ;tock reduces the amount of si. earning necessary. Barometric condensers produce a large volume of wastewater if the cooling water is not recycled. Recycling increases the phenol content of the water, but greatly reduces the volume. Another a...

Shack, Pete A

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

459

Printing ink and paper recycling sources of TMDD in wastewater and rivers  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract 2,4,7,9-Tetramethyl-5-decyne-4,7-diol (TMDD) is a non-ionic surfactant which is preferentially used as defoamer in paints and printing ink and for the treatment of surfaces. Effluents of wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) have been identified as the domination point sources for TMDD in rivers since the removal rate of the compound in the \\{WWTPs\\} is in general less than 70%. However, the dominating entry pathways of TMDD into the sewage were unknown so far. In this study effluents from both, municipal \\{WWTPs\\} with and without treatment of indirect industrial dischargers and from industrial \\{WWTPs\\} with direct discharge of wastewater into receiving rivers were analyzed for the first time to identify the proportions of TMDD coming from domestic wastewater and from various industrial sources. Moreover, rivers were samples before and after the influent of sewage water from WWTPs. The TMDD concentrations in the water samples were measured using solid phase extraction (SPE) followed by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS). High TMDD concentrations were found in rivers (up to 63.5 ?g/L), and in effluents of \\{WWTPs\\} (up to 310 ?g/L) affected by wastewater from paper recycling industry and factories producing paint and printing ink. Concentrations of TMDD revealed to be far higher in wastewater from factories processing recycled paper (up to 113 ?g/L) compared to wastewater from factories not processing recycled paper (0.066 ?g/L). The results indicate that the use of recycling paper in the paper production process is the dominating reason for increased TMDD concentrations in wastewaters and receiving rivers due to the wash out of TMDD from the paper impregnated with printing ink. Very high TMDD concentrations (up to 3300 ?g/L) were also detected in wastewater from a printing ink factory and a paint factory.

Arlen A. Guedez; Wilhelm Püttmann

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

460

Treatment of domestic wastewater for reuse with activated silica and magnesia  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

an incentive for reuse of wastewater. The Federal Water Pollution Control Act Amendments of 1972 includes a provision requiring grants made from authorized funds to include consideration of alternative technologies, and that recycling or elimination... an incentive for reuse of wastewater. The Federal Water Pollution Control Act Amendments of 1972 includes a provision requiring grants made from authorized funds to include consideration of alternative technologies, and that recycling or elimination...

Lindner, John Howard

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tw treated wastewater" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Perceived Risk and the Siting of a Controversial Wastewater Treatment Plant in Central Texas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PERCEIVED RISK AND THE SITING OF A CONTROVERSIAL WASTEWATER TREATMENT PLANT IN CENTRAL TEXAS A Thesis by PAT MORRISON KULTGEN Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment... and guidance during times of confusion and stress. Finally, I am very thankful for the technical help and patient explanations I received from Dr. Li regarding wastewater and watershed management; he always greeted me with a friendly hello that calmed my self...

Kultgen, Pat Morrison

2013-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

462

Demonstration of Advanced Technologies for Multi-Load Washers in Hospitality and Healthcare – Wastewater Recycling Technology  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this demonstration project was to evaluate market-ready retrofit technologies for reducing the energy and water use of multi-load washers in healthcare and hospitality facilities. Specifically, this project evaluated laundry wastewater recycling technology in the hospitality sector and ozone laundry technology in both the healthcare and hospitality sectors. This report documents the demonstration of a wastewater recycling system installed in the Grand Hyatt Seattle.

Boyd, Brian K.; Parker, Graham B.; Petersen, Joseph M.; Sullivan, Greg; Goetzler, W.; Foley, K. J.; Sutherland, T. A.

2014-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

463

Supercritical Water Biomass Gasification Process As a Successful Solution to Valorize Wine Distillery Wastewaters  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

There are many gasification technologies that could potentially be part of the future energy industry. ... scale continuous-flow system with 2 different industrial wastewaters that contain a high concn. of orgs., with both wastes having a high energy potential: cutting oil wastes, oleaginous wastewater from metalworking industries, and vinasses, alc. ... Biomass feedstocks, including lignocellulosic materials (cotton stalk and corncob) and the tannery waste, were gasified in supercrit. ...

Anne Loppinet-Serani; Cédric Reverte; François Cansell; Cyril Aymonier

2012-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

464

Effects of UV Light Disinfection on Tetracycline Resistant Bacteria in Wastewater Effluents  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

EFFECTS OF UV LIGHT DISINFECTION ON TETRACYCLINE RESISTANT BACTERIA IN WASTEWATER EFFLUENTS A Thesis by HANNAH CHILDRESS Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment... of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 2010 Major Subject: Biological and Agricultural Engineering EFFECTS OF UV LIGHT DISINFECTION ON TETRACYCLINE RESISTANT BACTERIA IN WASTEWATER EFFLUENTS A Thesis by HANNAH...

Childress, Hannah

2011-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

465

Method of treating waste water  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process of treating water to remove metal ion contaminants contained therein, said metal ion contaminants selected from the group consisting of metals in Groups 8, 1b, 2b, 4a, 5a, or 6a of the periodic table, lanthanide metals, and actinide metals including transuranic element metals, by adjusting the pH of a metal ion contaminant-containing water source to within the range of about 6.5 to about 14.0, admixing the water source with a mixture of an alkali or alkaline earth ferrate and a water soluble salt, e.g., a zirconium salt, in an amount sufficient to form a precipitate within the water source, the amount the mixture of ferrate and water soluble salt effective to reduce the metal ion contaminant concentration in the water source, permitting the precipitate in the admixture to separate and thereby yield a supernatant liquid having a reduced metal ion contaminant concentration, and separating the supernatant liquid having the reduced metal ion contaminant concentration from the admixture is provided. A composition of matter including an alkali or alkaline earth ferrate and a water soluble salt, e.g., a zirconium salt, is also provided.

Deininger, James P. (Colorado Springs, CO); Chatfield, Linda K. (Colorado Springs, CO)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

466

Method of treating waste water  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process of treating water to remove transuranic elements contained therein by adjusting the pH of a transuranic element-containing water source to within the range of about 6.5 to about 14.0, admixing the water source with an alkali or alkaline earth ferrate in an amount sufficient to form a precipitate within the water source, the amount of ferrate effective to reduce the transuranic element concentration in the water source, permitting the precipitate in the admixture to separate and thereby yield a supernatant liquid having a reduced transuranic element concentration, and separating the supernatant liquid having the reduced transuranic element concentration from the admixture is provided. Additionally, a water soluble salt, e.g., a zirconium salt, can be added with the alkali or alkaline earth ferrate in the process to provide greater removal efficiencies. A composition of matter including an alkali or alkaline earth ferrate and a water soluble salt, e.g., a zirconium salt, is also provided.

Deininger, J. Paul (Colorado Springs, CO); Chatfield, Linda K. (Colorado Springs, CO)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

467

Feasibility study on production of biodegradable polymer and wastewater treatment using Aeromonas strains for materials recycling  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract With consideration of wastewater treatment and materials recycling for cradle-to-cradle (C2C) sustainable development, this treatability study analyzed the capability of poly 3-hydroxybutyrate (PHB) production in wastewater-laden media using indigenous dye-decolorizing Aeromonas hydrophila NIU01, KB23, Aeromonas salmonicida 741. Compared to paper-container, frozen food, wine manufacturing wastewater, wastewater generated from printing and dyeing industry was found to be more appropriate to efficiently produce PHB for materials recycling. Due to lack of sufficient essential inorganic nutrients provided for cell propagation, dye-decolorized wastewater with augmented MR media in different ratios was used to explore toxicity potency of mixed media and to present PHB-producing capability of cells. In particular, when MR media were completely replaced by decolorized culture broth, significant stimulating effect on PHA-production was shown (ca. 52.5% PHB content). This study clearly revealed the promising feasibility of simultaneous wastewater treatment and biopolymer production for cradle-to-cradle sustainable development.

Bor-Yann Chen; Tz-Jau Shiau; Jhao-Yin Hung; Yu-Hong Wei; Chi-Wei Lan

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

468

Wastewater recycling in laundries—From pilot to large-scale plant  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A new, innovative wastewater recycling process for industrial laundries has been developed through cooperation between Textil-Service Klingelmeyer (a medium-size laundry in Darmstadt, Germany) and the University of Applied Sciences in Karlsruhe, Germany. The project “Laundry Innovative Wastewater Recycling Technology—LIWATEC” was sponsored by the European Community in its LIFE-Environment programme. The purpose of the LIWATEC project was to design and start up a new, innovative, integrated process using membrane technology for wastewater reuse on a large scale in the Klingelmeyer laundry. The large scale plant was designed for wastewater treatment capacity of 200 m3/day. This integrated process has been successfully tested for 5 years in the form of two pilot plants at the laundry in Darmstadt and at the University of Karlsruhe (capacities: 10 m3/day and wastewater can be reused. Moreover, it is an easy-handling and cost-efficient wastewater recycling process that could be adapted to different types of laundries due to its modular structure.

Jan Hoinkis; Volker Panten

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

469

A design-for-environment study for plating processes -- Evaluations of wastewater precipitation and separation technologies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A wastewater pollution prevention study was performed for two plating processes. This study included wastewater precipitation process analysis, and evaluation of separation and recycling alternatives. The pollution prevention opportunity assessment goals are: to reduce and reuse wastewater, to develop a design-for-environment plating process, and to conduct a material life-cycle analysis (LCA) for selected materials and with well-defined boundary. From an analysis of coordination chemistry and a series of precipitation process tests, it was found that treatment with optimized pH and mixing rate, proper coprecipitants (such as iron salts), and chemical dosages were needed to dissociate metal ions from the chelated complexes (Cu-EDTA) in the wastewater. In this study, reverse osmosis and ion exchange, separation/recycling technologies were also evaluated. A water reclamation project with these two technologies was implemented. The analysis indicated, that with recycling systems, 33% of the wastewater could be reclaimed and more than 90% of reduction of copper in wastewater was achieved. With the LCA, a greener approach was implemented to reduce the wasted parts disposal problems.

Chang, L.Y. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

470

Anaerobic treatment of high-sulfate wastewater and substrate interactions with isopropanol  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Modified biological methane-potential tests were used to study the treatment of wastewater with a chemical oxygen demand (COD) concentration of 40,000 mg/L and a sulfate concentration of 5,000 mg/L. The effects of wastewater concentrations on biodegradation and substrate interactions between sulfate reducers and methanogens were studied. Isopropanol (IPA) degradation was studied since isopropyl acetate was the major organic component in the wastewater. Six sets of batch tests were done, including a series of tests with varying concentrations of wastewater; wastewater and glucose; glucose and sulfate; IPA; IPA and glucose; and IPA, glucose, and sulfate. Sulfur and electron balances were used to analyze data to determine the extent of biodegradation from both methanogenesis and sulfate reduction. IPA did not appear to be inhibitory to methanogenesis or sulfate reduction. In comparison to glucose, the presence of wastewater or isopropanol stimulated greater sulfate-reduction efficiency. Evidence for IPA degradation was observed, and IPA degradation was stimulated in the presence of sulfate. Continuous feed-reactor results corroborated batch-test observations.

Fox, P.; Ketha, S. [Arizona State Univ., Tempe, AZ (United States). Dept. of Civil and Environmental Engineering

1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

471

Fossil organic carbon in wastewater and its fate in treatment plants  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This study reports the presence of fossil organic carbon in wastewater and its fate in wastewater treatment plants. The findings pinpoint the inaccuracy of current greenhouse gas accounting guidelines which defines all organic carbon in wastewater to be of biogenic origin. Stable and radiocarbon isotopes (13C and 14C) were measured throughout the process train in four municipal wastewater treatment plants equipped with secondary activated sludge treatment. Isotopic mass balance analyses indicate that 4–14% of influent total organic carbon (TOC) is of fossil origin with concentrations between 6 and 35 mg/L; 88–98% of this is removed from the wastewater. The TOC mass balance analysis suggests that 39–65% of the fossil organic carbon from the influent is incorporated into the activated sludge through adsorption or from cell assimilation while 29–50% is likely transformed to carbon dioxide (CO2) during secondary treatment. The fossil organic carbon fraction in the sludge undergoes further biodegradation during anaerobic digestion with a 12% decrease in mass. 1.4–6.3% of the influent TOC consists of both biogenic and fossil carbon is estimated to be emitted as fossil CO2 from activated sludge treatment alone. The results suggest that current greenhouse gas accounting guidelines, which assume that all CO2 emission from wastewater is biogenic may lead to underestimation of emissions.

Yingyu Law; Geraldine E. Jacobsen; Andrew M. Smith; Zhiguo Yuan; Paul Lant

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

472

Development and Application of a Model to Estimate Wastewater Treatment Plant Prescription Pharmaceutical Influent Loadings and Concentrations  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A mass balance model was developed to estimate prescription pharmaceutical loadings to municipal wastewater treatment plants via computation of influent concentrations (C IN). Model estimates of C

Karl J. Ottmar; Lisa M. Colosi…

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

473

Click here to read the five-part series. Thu April 17, 2014 Experiments in Wastewater Remediation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

;#12;#12;#12;#12;#12;#12;#12;Thu April 17, 2014 Experiments in Wastewater Remediation Thu April 17, 2014 Young scientists back

de Leon, Alex R.

474

Hanford Treats Record Amount of Groundwater  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

September 13, 2011 September 13, 2011 Hanford Treats Record Amount of Groundwater RICHLAND, Wash. - Workers have treated more than 800 million gallons of groundwater at the Hanford Site so far this year, a record annual amount. Last year, workers with DOE contractor CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company treated 600 mil- lion gallons of groundwater at the site. "It's great to know the amount of treated groundwater is increasing. We are meeting our goals, which means we are protecting the Columbia River," said Bill Barrett, CH2M HILL director of pump and treat operations and maintenance. American Recovery and Reinvestment Act work to expand Hanford's capacity for treating contami- nated groundwater led to the 2011 record amount. The Recovery Act funded the installation of more

475

Metabolic Prosthesis for Treating Ischemic Diseases - Energy...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

have developed a new approach for treating ischemic diseases that will deliver oxygen directly to affected tissues by electrolysis of body fluids. Numerous treatments...

476

Geotechnical investigation of sewage wastewater disposal sites and use of GIS land use maps to assess environmental hazards: Sohag, upper Egypt  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Land application is the only currently available technique for sewage wastewater disposal along the Nile Valley in Upper Egypt. Wastewater disposal projects have been established in the lowland desert zone ext...

Ahmed M. Youssef; Adly A. Omer; Mohamed S. Ibrahim…

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

477

A Membrane Process for Recycling Die Lube from Wastewater Solutions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An active-surface membrane technology was used to separate a die lube manufacturing wastewater stream consisting of various oils, hydrocarbons, heavy metals, and silicones. The ultrafiltration membranes reduced organics from initial oil and grease contents by 20–25X, carbon oxygen demand (COD) by 1.5 to 2X, and total organic carbon (TOC) by 0.6, while the biological oxygen demand (BOD) remained constant. The active-surface membranes were not fouled as badly as non-active-surface systems and the active-surface membrane flux levels were consistently higher and more stable than those of the non-active-surface membranes tested. Field testing demonstrated that the rotary microfilter can concentrate the die lube, i.e. remove the glycerin component, and produce a die lube suitable for recycling. The recycling system operated for six weeks with only seven cleaning cycles and no mechanical or electrical failures. Test data and quality records indicate that the die casting scrap was reduced from 8.4 to 7.8%. There is no doubt that this test yielded tremendous results. This separation process presents significant opportunities that can be evaluated further.

Eric S. Peterson; Jessica Trudeau; Bill Cleary; Michael Hackett; William A. Greene

2003-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

478

A Membrane Process for Recycling Die Lube from Wastewater Solutions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An active-surface membrane technology was used to separate a die lube manufacturing wastewater stream consisting of various oils, hydrocarbons, heavy metals, and silicones. The ultrafiltration membranes reduced organics from initial oil and grease contents by 20?25X, carbon oxygen demand (COD) by 1.5 to 2X, and total organic carbon (TOC) by 0.6, while the biological oxygen demand (BOD) remained constant. The active-surface membranes were not fouled as badly as non-active-surface systems and the active-surface membrane flux levels were consistently higher and more stable than those of the non-active-surface membranes tested. Field testing demonstrated that the rotary microfilter can concentrate the die lube, i.e. remove the glycerin component, and produce a die lube suitable for recycling. The recycling system operated for six weeks with only seven cleaning cycles and no mechanical or electrical failures. Test data and quality records indicate that the die casting scrap was reduced from 8.4 to 7.8%. There is no doubt that this test yielded tremendous results. This separation process presents significant opportunities that can be evaluated further.

Peterson, E.S.; Trudeau, J.; Cleary, B.; Hackett, M.; Greene, W.A.

2003-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

479

Utilization of municipal wastewater for cooling in thermoelectric power plants: Evaluation of the combined cost of makeup water treatment and increased condenser fouling  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A methodology is presented to calculate the total combined cost (TCC) of water sourcing, water treatment and condenser fouling in the recirculating cooling systems of thermoelectric power plants. The methodology is employed to evaluate the economic viability of using treated municipal wastewater (MWW) to replace the use of freshwater as makeup water to power plant cooling systems. Cost analyses are presented for a reference power plant and five different tertiary treatment scenarios to reduce the scaling tendencies of MWW. Results indicate that a 550 MW sub-critical coal fired power plant with a makeup water requirement of 29.3 ML/day has a TCC of $3.0 - 3.2 million/yr associated with the use of treated MWW for cooling. (All costs USD 2009). This translates to a freshwater conservation cost of $0.29/kL, which is considerably lower than that of dry air cooling technology, $1.5/kL, as well as the 2020 conservation cost target set by the U.S. Department of Energy, $0.74/kL. Results also show that if the available price of freshwater exceeds that of secondarytreated MWW by more than $0.13-0.14/kL, it can be economically advantageous to purchase secondary MWW and treat it for utilization in the recirculating cooling system of a thermoelectric power plant.

Walker, Michael E.; Theregowda, Ranjani B.; Safari, Iman; Abbasian, Javad; Arastoopour, Hamid; Dzombak, David A.; Hsieh, Ming-Kai; Miller, David C.

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

480

Demonstration of membrane aeration panels: City of Geneva Wastewater Treatment Plant. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the design, construction, and testing of membrane aeration panels at the Marsh Creek wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) in Geneva, NY. The operators at the Geneva plant have undertaken a long-term program to upgrade wastewater treatment processes and lower operating costs. The aging mechanical surface aerators at the Marsh Creek treatment plant were replaced by a state-of-the-art membrane panel system. This fine-bubble diffused air system offers higher oxygen transfer efficiency than surface aerators or other types of fine-bubble diffused-air systems. The project had four objectives: to decrease the amount of electricity used at the plant for aeration; to enable the plant`s existing aeration basins to accommodate higher organic loads and/or nitrify the wastewater should the need arise; to provide an even distribution of dissolved oxygen within the aeration basins to enhance biological wastewater treatment activity; and to provide technical data to assess the performance of the membrane panel system versus other forms of wastewater aeration.

NONE

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

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481

STATUS REPORT: Onsite Wastewater Treatment Systems in California jointly presented by:  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The regulation of onsite wastewater treatment systems will be undergoing significant changes in California in the coming years. Recent legislation has mandated that the State Water Resources Control Board develop and adopt statewide regulations by January 2004. These will be the first statewide regulations governing the use of onsite wastewater treatment in California. There are approximately 1.2 million onsite wastewater treatment systems in California, serving more than 3.5 million people, or 10 % of the state’s population. Since 1990, ten percent of new housing starts use onsite systems and this trend should continue for the foreseeable future. Onsite/decentralized systems are an integral part of the infrastructure used to support continued growth and development in the state. In April 1997, EPA published its Response to Congress on Use of Decentralized Wastewater Treatment Systems which concluded that, overall, “adequately managed decentralized (onsite) wastewater treatment systems can be a cost effective and long-term option for meeting public health and water quality goals, particularly for small, suburban, and rural areas. ” Our dependence on onsite technologies has led to renewed interest in how they work. The performance of these systems is an important consideration in protecting the public health and water quality in the state. If onsite systems are recharging California’s

California Wastewater

482

Iron oxide red wastewater treatment and recycling of iron-containing sludge  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The paper presents a wastewater treatment process and recycling of iron sludge from wastewater treatment for iron oxide red production. Results show that: (1) Sludge from wastewater treatment process under the operating parameters: 1.84 g/L of NaOH dosage, 10 mins of aeration with flow rate of 1 L/min and 150 mins of sediment time is potential for seed crystal preparation and excellent iron oxide red product can be obtained in the secondary oxidation under condition of 85 °C, 68 h of reaction time and 150 mL/min of airflow rate, (2) In practical engineering, the average removal rate of Fe2+ and SS and chroma of effluent is 99.75%, 86.7% and less than 40 times, respectively, and all items of product satisfy demands of industrial standards, (3) Compared with the original wastewater treatment, the new process can save the cost of wastewater treatment and earn extra 20.0 dollars for a ton of iron oxide red product and then both economic benefit and environmental protection can be realized by this process. It is proved that the novel method is reliable, economical and promising in iron oxide red industry and cleaner production of iron oxide red is feasible.

Zhenguo Chen; Xiaojun Wang; Qilong Ge; Guanchao Guo

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

483

California Food Processing Industry Wastewater Demonstration Project: Phase I Final Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Wastewater treatment is an energy-intensive process and electricity demand is especially high during the utilities summer peak electricity demand periods. This makes wastewater treatment facilities prime candidates for demand response programs. However, wastewater treatment is often peripheral to food processing operations and its demand response opportunities have often been overlooked. Phase I of this wastewater demonstration project monitored wastewater energy and environmental data at Bell-Carter Foods, Inc., California's largest olive processing plant. For this monitoring activity the project team used Green Energy Management System (GEMS) automated enterprise energy management (EEM) technologies. This report presents results from data collected by GEMS from September 15, 2008 through November 30, 2008, during the olive harvest season. This project established and tested a methodology for (1) gathering baseline energy and environmental data at an industrial food-processing plant and (2) using the data to analyze energy efficiency, demand response, daily peak load management, and environmental management opportunities at the plant. The Phase I goals were to demonstrate the measurement and interrelationship of electricity demand, electricity usage, and water quality metrics and to estimate the associated CO{sub 2} emissions.

Lewis, Glen; Atkinson, Barbara; Rhyne, Ivin

2009-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

484

Designing a wastewater and storm water management system for a new sealed lead acid battery facility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Design of a new lead acid battery manufacturing facility requires careful planning to ensure compliance with wastewater, storm water, air quality and hazardous waste regulations. A case history is presented describing the planning approach to development of a wastewater and storm water management system for an SLA (sealed lead acid) battery plant in Columbus, Georgia. Several pollution prevention concepts were utilized in the design of the wastewater management system, which resulted in an 80% reduction in wastewater volume, and at the same time ensured compliance with the mass-based federal categorical effluent limits. Storm water management features were focused on eliminating any outdoor areas of industrial activity by avoiding outdoor storage areas to the extent possible, containment of remaining areas, and stringent air emission control concepts. Federal effluent guidelines for the battery manufacturing point source category as well as federal regulations governing the industrial storm water discharge permitting program were the key factors in motivating the design concepts utilized. Areas affected by the design concepts included facility layout, HVAC system design, process recovery systems, chemical storage and containment, and wastewater treatment technology. The facility has been in compliance with all applicable environmental regulations since startup in August, 1992 and has been awarded the 1995 Matsushita Electric Corporation`s President`s Award for Environmental Excellence.

Nichols, C.P.; Langan, M.M.

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

485

A comprehensive substance flow analysis of a municipal wastewater and sludge treatment plant  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The fate of total organic carbon, 32 elements (Al, Ag, As, Ba, Be, Br, Ca, Cd, Cl, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Hg, K, Li, Mg, Mn, Mo, N, Na, Ni, P, Pb, S, Sb, Se, Sn, Sr, Ti, V, and Zn) and 4 groups of organic pollutants (linear alkylbenzene sulfonates, bis(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate, polychlorinated biphenyl and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons) in a conventional wastewater treatment plant were assessed. Mass balances showed reasonable closures for most of the elements. However, gaseous emissions were accompanied by large uncertainties and show the limitation of mass balance based substance flow analysis. Based on the assessment, it is evident that both inorganic and organic elements accumulated in the sewage sludge, with the exception of elements that are highly soluble or degradable by wastewater and sludge treatment processes. The majority of metals and metalloids were further accumulated in the incineration ash, while the organic pollutants were effectively destroyed by both biological and thermal processes. Side streams from the sludge treatment process (dewatering and incineration) back to the wastewater treatment represented less than 1% of the total volume entering the wastewater treatment processes, but represented significant substance flows. In contrast, the contribution by spent water from the flue gas treatment process was almost negligible. Screening of human and eco-toxicity by applying the consensus-based environmental impact assessment method \\{USEtox\\} addressing 15 inorganic constituents showed that removal of inorganic constituents by the wastewater treatment plant reduced the toxic impact potential by 87–92%.

H. Yoshida; T.H. Christensen; T. Guildal; C. Scheutz

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

486

Mercury mass balance at a wastewater treatment plant employing sludge incineration with offgas mercury control  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Efforts to reduce the deliberate use of mercury (Hg) in modern industrialized societies have been largely successful, but the minimization and control of Hg in waste streams are of continuing importance. Municipal wastewater treatment plants are collection points for domestic, commercial, and industrial wastewaters, and Hg removal during wastewater treatment is essential for protecting receiving waters. Subsequent control of the Hg removed is also necessary to preclude environmental impacts. We present here a mass balance for Hg at a large metropolitan wastewater treatment plant that has recently been upgraded to provide for greater control of the Hg entering the plant. The upgrade included a new fluidized bed sludge incineration facility equipped with activated carbon addition and baghouse carbon capture for the removal of Hg from the incinerator offgas. Our results show that Hg discharges to air and water from the plant represented less than 5% of the mass of Hg entering the plant, while the remaining Hg was captured in the ash/carbon residual stream exiting the new incineration process. Sub-optimum baghouse operation resulted in some of the Hg escaping collection there and accumulating with the ash/carbon particulate matter in the secondary treatment tanks. Overall, the treatment process is effective in removing Hg from wastewater and sequestering it in a controllable stream for secure disposal.

Steven J. Balogh; Yabing H. Nollet

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

487

Gas treating alternatives for LNG plants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper covers the various gas treating processes available for treating sour natural gas to specifications required for LNG production. The LNG product specification requires that the total sulfur level be less than 30--40 ppmv, the CO{sub 2} level be less than 50 ppmv and the water level be less than 100 ppmv to prevent freezing problems in the LNG cryogenic column. A wide variety of natural gas compositions are encountered in the various fields and the gas treating process selection is dependent on the type of impurities present in the gas, namely, levels of H{sub 2}S, CO{sub 2}, mercaptans and other organic sulfur compounds. This paper discusses the implications various components in the feed to the LNG plant can have on process selection, and the various treating processes that are available to condition the gas. Process selection criteria, design and operating philosophies are discussed. An economic comparison for two treating schemes is provided.

Clarke, D.S.; Sibal, P.W. [Mobil Technology Co., Dallas, TX (United States)

1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

488

Assessing the recycling potential of industrial wastewater to replace fresh water in concrete mixes: application of polyvinyl acetate resin wastewater  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This study presents the use of industrial wastewater released from polyvinyl acetate resin manufacturing plant to totally replace the fresh water in concrete composites. Seventy-two laboratory prepared concrete composites were tested to investigate the effect of using various PVAW/C ratios of 0.30, 0.35, 0.40, and 0.45 on the slump, compressive strength, flexural strength, and dry density of the concrete mixes. Results indicated a slight to moderate increase in compressive strength and hard density values compared to those of the control concrete made with fresh water at 7 and 28 day curing. On the contrary, a reduction in the slump values of the PVAW–concrete was observed compared to the slump of the control mixes. However, the slump values increased with increasing the PVAW/C ratios. On the other hand, the waste material leaching test revealed that none of the PVAW toxic constituents was detected. The findings of this work would form basic information for recycling PVAW in concrete mixes and indicate a potential alternative for diminution the adverse effects on the environment posed by the hazardous effluent of the polyvinyl acetate resin industry.

Zainab Z. Ismail; Enas A. Al-Hashmi

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

489

Quantification of Nitrosomonas oligotropha-Like Ammonia-Oxidizing Bacteria and Nitrospira spp. from Full-Scale Wastewater Treatment Plants by Competitive PCR  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...of these organisms from a wastewater treatment system. Chemolithotrophic...to NO3 via NO2 (6). In wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs...sludge process (with biomass recycling). The bioreactors were operated...compositions of the influent wastewater, in addition to various operational...

Hebe M. Dionisi; Alice C. Layton; Gerda Harms; Igrid R. Gregory; Kevin G. Robinson; Gary S. Sayler

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

490

CAB International 2004. Wastewater Use in Irrigated Agriculture (eds C.A. Scott, N.I. Faruqui and L. Raschid-Sally) 1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

© CAB International 2004. Wastewater Use in Irrigated Agriculture (eds C.A. Scott, N.I. Faruqui and L. Raschid-Sally) 1 1 Wastewater Use in Irrigated Agriculture: Management Challenges in Developing increasing water supply and sanitation coverage that will continue to release growing volumes of wastewater

Scott, Christopher

491

Nearshore circulation revealed by wastewater discharge from a submarine outfall,Aveiro Coast, Portugal Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 6(6), 983989 (2002) EGS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Nearshore circulation revealed by wastewater discharge from a submarine outfall,Aveiro Coast by wastewater discharge from a submarine outfall, Aveiro Coast, Portugal J. Figueiredo da Silva1 , R.W. Duck2 in a prevailing upwelling circulation over the continental shelf. A submarine outfall releases wastewater

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

492

CAB International 2004. Wastewater Use in Irrigated Agriculture (eds C.A. Scott, N.I. Faruqui and L. Raschid-Sally) 173  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

© CAB International 2004. Wastewater Use in Irrigated Agriculture (eds C.A. Scott, N.I. Faruqui and L. Raschid-Sally) 173 16 Confronting the Realities of Wastewater Use in Irrigated Agriculture: Lessons Learned and Recommendations Introduction This book set out to describe the reality of wastewater

Scott, Christopher

493

Portugaliae Electrochimica Acta (2006), 24(3), 367-376 Portuguese Electrochemical A Modified Electrodialytic Cell to Recover Heavy Metals from Wastewater  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, A Modified Electrodialytic Cell to Recover Heavy Metals from Wastewater Abo-Ghander, N. S.; Rahman, S. U electrodialysis and redn. of metal ions. The cell is able to recover metallic copper from wastewater contg. 1000 of several parameters, namely, width of wastewater compartment, applied potential and concn. of anolyte

Zaidi, S. M. Javaid

494

Proceedings ASCE EWRI World Water and Environmental Resources Congress 2005 May 15-19, 2005 Modeling and evaluating temperature dynamics in wastewater treatment plants  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Modeling and evaluating temperature dynamics in wastewater treatment plants Scott A. Wells1 , Dmitriy into receiving waters, there is much interest in providing a model of temperature dynamics in wastewater using detailed temperature data from a Washington County, Oregon, USA wastewater treatment facility

Wells, Scott A.

495

Removal of Eutrophic Nutrients from Wastewater and their UNIVERSITY OF THE DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA Bioconversion to Bacterial Single Cell Protein for Animal  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Removal of Eutrophic Nutrients from Wastewater and their UNIVERSITY OF THE DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA OF EUTROPHIC NUTRIENTS FROM WASTEWATER AND THEIR BIOCONVERSION TO BACTERIAL SINGLE CELL PROTEIN FOR ANIMAL FEED ......................................................................................................10 3. Nutritive quality of A. eutrophus biomass grown in wastewater (digester elutriate) as a protein

District of Columbia, University of the

496

1.0 GAS TRANSFER An important process used in water and wastewater treatment. Also very important when  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of H2S in septic sewers causing pipe corrosion. 2. CO2 Stripping of some ground waters, industrial1.0 GAS TRANSFER An important process used in water and wastewater treatment. Also very important wastewaters to the stream. Gas/Liquid Interface Gas Liquid Gas transfer to the liquid is absorption Gas

Stenstrom, Michael K.

497

2002 Wastewater Land Application Site Performance Reports for the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory and Associated Documentation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The 2002 Wastewater Land Application site Performance Reports for the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory describe site conditions for the facilities with State of Idaho Wastewater Land Application Permits. Permit-required monitoring data are summarized, and permit exceedences or environmental impacts relating to the operation of the facilities during the 2002 permit year are discussed.

Meachum, Teresa Ray; Michael G. Lewis

2003-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

498

Effects of Ionic Strength on Bacterial Adhesion and Stability of Flocs in a Wastewater Activated Sludge System  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...interpreted as a balance of attrac...Flocs from a wastewater treatment plant (WWTP...during the treatments to be able...Sweden. The plant receives wastewater from approximately...at a large treatment plant. Water Sci...Cambridge, Mass. 23. Marshall...

Anna Zita; Malte Hermansson

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

499

Process waste treatment system upgrades: Clarifier startup at the nonradiological wastewater treatment plant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Waste Management Operations Division at Oak Ridge National Laboratory recently modified the design of a reactor/clarifier at the Nonradiological Wastewater Treatment Plant, which is now referred to as the Process Waste Treatment Complex--Building 3608, to replace the sludge-blanket softener/clarifier at the Process Waste Treatment Plant, now referred to as the Process Waste Treatment Complex-Building 3544 (PWTC-3544). This work was conducted because periodic hydraulic overloads caused poor water-softening performance in the PWTC-3544 softener, which was detrimental to the performance and operating costs of downstream ion-exchange operations. Over a 2-month time frame, the modified reactor/clarifier was tested with nonradiological wastewater and then with radioactive wastewater to optimize softening performance. Based on performance to date, the new system has operated more effectively than the former one, with reduced employee radiological exposure, less downtime, lower costs, and improved effluent quality.

Lucero, A.J.; McTaggart, D.R.; Van Essen, D.C.; Kent, T.E.; West, G.D.; Taylor, P.A.

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

500

The Waterpinch{trademark} approach to wastewater minimization: A chemical industry case study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

For over a decade, Pinch Analysis{trademark} has been applied to the optimization of energy utilization in process industry. One of the latest applications of pinch technology is waste minimization. Pinch Analysis{trademark} has been extended to deal with mass-transfer processes, as well as energy transfer processes. The latest technology in this field focuses on water conservation and wastewater minimization. It contains an integrated strategy for reuse, regeneration, and recycling of wastewater. It has recently been applied to a number of industrial projects, in which it was proven to be a valid and valuable method for significantly reducing fresh water consumption and/or wastewater effluent from several different types of industrial processes. This paper describes the methodology as well as the results from a recent industrial case study.

Kumana, J.D.; Flen, G.J. [Linnhoff March, Inc., Houston, TX (United States)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z