Powered by Deep Web Technologies
Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tw mw phase" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Brigantine OffshoreMW Phase 1 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Brigantine OffshoreMW Phase 1 Brigantine OffshoreMW Phase 1 Jump to: navigation, search Name Brigantine OffshoreMW Phase 1 Facility Brigantine OffshoreMW Phase 1 Sector Wind energy Facility Type Offshore Wind Facility Status Proposed Owner OffshoreMW Developer Offshore MW Location Atlantic Ocean NJ Coordinates 39.584°, -73.77° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":39.584,"lon":-73.77,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

2

Brigantine OffshoreMW Phase 2 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Brigantine OffshoreMW Phase 2 Brigantine OffshoreMW Phase 2 Facility Brigantine OffshoreMW Phase 2 Sector Wind energy Facility Type Offshore Wind Facility Status Proposed Owner OffshoreMW Developer OffshoreMW Location Atlantic Ocean NJ Coordinates 39.348°, -73.969° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":39.348,"lon":-73.969,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

3

TW0076.book  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

TW-0076 TW-0076 03 May 2002 Published by Business Development Technical Writing NEXT GENERATION TURBINE PROGRAM TECHNICAL PROGRESS REPORT FINAL REPORT PERIOD OF PERFORMANCE: 16 AUGUST 2000 TO 14 JUNE 2002 Prepared for National Energy Technology Center U.S. Department of Energy AAD Document Control M/S 921-107 P.O. Box 10940 Pittsburgh, PA 15236 Prepared under Contract DE-AC26-00NT40847 Prepared by Pratt & Whitney Advanced Engine Programs 400 Main Street East Hartford, CT 06108 DISCLAMER NOTICE THIS REPORT WAS PREPARED AS AN ACCOUNT OF WORK SPONSORED BY AN AGENCY OF THE U.S. GOVERNMENT. NEITHER THE U.S GOVERNMENT NOR ANY AGENCY THEREOF, NOR ANY OF THEIR EMPLOYEES, MAKES ANY WARRANTY, EXPRESS OF IMPLIED, OR ASSUMES ANY LEGAL LIABILITY OR RESPONSIBILITY FOR THE ACCURACY, COMPLETENESS, OR USEFULNESS OF ANY INFORMATION, APPARATUS, PRODUCT, OR PROCESS DISCLOSED, OR REPRESENTS THAT

4

forestking@cmlab.csie.ntu.edu.tw apfelpuff@cmlab.csie.ntu.edu.tw  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

forestking@cmlab.csie.ntu.edu.tw apfelpuff@cmlab.csie.ntu.edu.tw / weichao.chen@gmail.com robin@ntu.edu.tw ABSTRACT shot detection color histogram difference saliency region, deletion, and rearrange- ment while using the screen real-estate effectively. Second, we wish to reduce

Ouhyoung, Ming

5

Collection and conversion of silicon furnace waste gas into higher value products: Phase 3, 6 MW pilot plant dc closed furnace technology. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The construction and operation of a 6 MW, closed dc furnace for smelting silicon was the primary focus of Phase 3. A 6 MW, dc closed furnace pilot plant was built in East Selkirk, Manitoba, Canada. The furnace is equipped with world`s most modern automatic control system used to control and monitor the process variables and operational data. This control system is suitable for commercial applications and could be used with either closed or open dc furnaces for smelting silicon or ferrosilicon. The construction was started in September 1990, and the facility was operational within 18 months. Following successful commissioning of the pilot plant in June 1992, twelve smelting test campaigns were conducted through November 1994.

Dosaj, V.D.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Economics of a 75-MW(e) hot-dry-rock geothermal power station based upon the design of the Phase II reservoir at Fenton Hill  

SciTech Connect

Based upon EE-2 and EE-3 drilling costs and the proposed Fenton Hill Phase II reservoir conditions the break-even cost of producing electricity is 4.4 cents per kWh at the bus bar. This cost is based upon a 9-well, 12-reservoir hot dry rock (HDR) system producing 75 MW(e) for 10 yr with only 20% drawdown, and an assumed annual finance charge of 17%. Only one-third of the total, potentially available heat was utilized; potential reuse of wells as well as thermal stress cracking and augmentation of heat transfer was ignored. Nearly half the bus bar cost is due to drilling expenses, which prompted a review of past costs for wells GT-2, EE-1, EE-2, and EE-3. Based on comparable depth and completion times it is shown that significant cost improvements have been accomplished in the last seven years. Despite these improvements it was assumed for this study that no further advancements in drilling technology would occur, and that even in commercially mature HDR systems, drilling problems would continue nearly unabated.

Murphy, H.; Drake, R.; Tester, J.; Zyvoloski, G.

1982-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

M TW T F_ SM TWTF 5  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Julyi 27," 2001 Julyi 27," 2001 Julhy 2001 August2001 M TW T F_ SM TWTF 5 1 2 34 567 1 2 3 4- .rnday 8 91011121314 5 6 7 8 91011 -15 16 17 18 19 20 21 . 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 29 30 31- 26 27 28 29 30 31 TaSk ad '_ .__________________ 0 _Getthe most out of Outook 98 - 800 900 1000_ _ 10:47am-11:02am Welcome to Calendar! - . 1100 _ 2 100 Notes 200 30o 4 oo 500 6 o Kipo i, 6 Knpowicz, Robert 1 DE039.Q136 2 F g52 68 July 30, 20 1 u ly 2001 0 Aug ust 20 01 |JUBly ^30U 2U 1 c M T W T F C M TW T F 1 2 3 4 5 6 - 12 34. 4londay 8 91011 121314 5 6 7 8 91011 -15 16 17 18 19 20 21 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 - 2223 24 25 26 27 28 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 2930 31 26 27 28 29 30 31 TaskPad 7 ~~~~~~am 7 "~'~~ 0_ 3 TO Q Taskdad 7___________________________ the mosoutof Outlook98

8

$2001 SM TW T F S SM TW T F S  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

IBBJ^ry~~ ^(ft0,~~~~~ '^fi~ ~July IBBJ^ry~~ ^(ft0,~~~~~ '^fi~ ~July 2001 August 2001 JUly 20, $2001 SM TW T F S SM TW T F S .Friday ~1 2 1234567 1234 Friday 8 91011121314 5 6 7 8 91011 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 12 13141516 17 18 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 19 20 2122 23 24 25 29 30 31 26 27 28 29 30 31 -- _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ T a sk P a d 7 am1 D 1 lTaskPad .8 00 9 00 _ I 100, 12 pm6 Notes 2 00 3 00 4 00 I - 5 00 Kelliler, Joseph 5 3/23/2002 26326 Jll~ I 7~ 23~ 200uy J uly 2001 August 2001 July 23,, 2001$ S M T W T F S SM TW T F S Mnl~ondawy 8 ~ 23 4 s 6 1 345 7 1234 Nionday 8 91011121314 5 6 7 8 91011 15 16 1718 19 20 21 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 19 20 21 22 23 24 25

9

S M TW T F S SM TWT F S  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

' - ' - S M TW T F S SM TWT F S 12 3 4 567 1 2345 ,May@°^i«^f 0Gi^ °"8 91011121314 6 78 9101112 M aB ynw WW 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 M ay 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 29 30 27 28 29 30 31 Monday. Apt 3C _- Thursday, May 03 Tuesday, May 01i_ Fnday, May ___ Wednesday. ay 021 oSatluay, May o Sunday, May O Hutto, Chase 1 2o6 4 DOE034-0018 hllag f -^ *May 2001 June2001 IMSa' y 07 - s M TW T F S S M TW T F S 1234 5 12 6 7 8 910 11 12 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 et-ayB W :~L.t~a3^ ~13 14 1516 17 18 19 10111213141516 filay .13 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 27 28 29 30 31 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 Monday, May 07 Thursday, May 1 , ___ Tuesday, May 0 ______ Friday, May 11 Weanesday, May 0o Saturday, May 1 ,_ _ __ Sunday, May 3 Huno, aase 1 2alw°5 DOE034-0019

10

CC --3.0 CC https://isp.moe.edu.tw/ccedu/service.php  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

#12;#12; CC -- 3.0 CC https://isp.moe.edu.tw/ccedu/service.php #12 -- 3.0 CC https://isp.moe.edu.tw/ccedu/service.php x/rp=-1,y/rp=0 II ( )© Phil Armitage #12/JPL/Space Science Institute #12; A B Cassini Division C A CC -- 3.0 CC https://isp.moe.edu.tw/ccedu/service.php

Wang, Ming-Jye

11

High spatial resolution mid-infrared observations of the low-mass young star TW Hya  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We want to improve knowledge of the structure of the inner few AU of the circumstellar disk around the nearby T Tauri star TW Hya. Earlier studies have suggested the existence of a large inner hole, possibly caused by interactions with a growing protoplanet. We used interferometric observations in the N-band obtained with the MIDI instrument on the Very Large Telescope Interferometer, together with 10 micron spectra recorded by the infrared satellite Spitzer. The fact that we were able to determine N-band correlated fluxes and visibilities for this comparatively faint source shows that MIR interferometry can be applied to a large number of low-mass young stellar objects. The MIR spectra obtained with Spitzer reveal emission lines from HI (6-5), HI (7-6), and [Ne II] and show that over 90% of the dust we see in this wavelength regime is amorphous. According to the correlated flux measured with MIDI, most of the crystalline material is in the inner, unresolved part of the disk, about 1 AU in radius. The visibilities exclude the existence of a very large (3-4 AU radius) inner hole in the circumstellar disk of TW Hya, which was required in earlier models. We propose instead a geometry of the inner disk where an inner hole still exists, but at a much reduced radius, with the transition from zero to full disk height between 0.5 and 0.8 AU, and with an optically thin distribution of dust inside. Such a model can comply with SED and MIR visibilities, as well as with visibility and extended emission observed in the NIR at 2 micron. If a massive planet was the reason for this inner hole, as has been speculated, its orbit would have to be closer to the star than 0.3 AU. Alternatively, we may be witnessing the end of the accretion phase and an early phase of an inward-out dispersal of the circumstellar disk.

Th. Ratzka; Ch. Leinert; Th. Henning; J. Bouwman; C. P. Dullemond; W. Jaffe

2007-07-02T23:59:59.000Z

12

Ormat's North Brawley plant with 17MW short of its 50MW potential | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Ormat's North Brawley plant with 17MW short of its 50MW potential Ormat's North Brawley plant with 17MW short of its 50MW potential Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: Ormat's North Brawley plant with 17MW short of its 50MW potential Author Think Geoenergy Published Publisher Not Provided, Date Not Provided DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http://crossref.org Online Internet link for Ormat's North Brawley plant with 17MW short of its 50MW potential Citation Think Geoenergy. Ormat's North Brawley plant with 17MW short of its 50MW potential [Internet]. [updated 40219;cited 2010]. Available from: http://thinkgeoenergy.com/archives/3654 Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Ormat%27s_North_Brawley_plant_with_17MW_short_of_its_50MW_potential&oldid=682479"

13

Auslegung eines 1-MW-Brennstoffzellen-Heizkraftwerks  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Aufbauend auf den Ergebnissen der Machbarkeitsstudie 1,5-MW-PAFC-Heizkraftwerk, beabsichtigt die GEW, eine 1-MW-Brennstoffzellenanlage zur kombinierten Strom- und Wrmeerzeugung (Kraft-Wrme-Kopplung ... KWK...

U. Langnickel

1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

DISTANCE AND KINEMATICS OF THE TW HYDRAE ASSOCIATION FROM PARALLAXES  

SciTech Connect

From common proper motion and signatures of youth, researchers have identified about 30 members of a putative TW Hydrae Association. Only four of these had parallactic distances from Hipparcos. We have measured parallaxes and proper motions for 14 primary members. We combine these with literature values of radial velocities to show that the Galactic space motions of the stars, with the exception of TWA 9 and 22, are parallel and do not indicate convergence at a common formation point sometime in the last few million years. The space motions of TWA 9 and 22 do not agree with the others and indicate that they are not TWA members. The median parallax is 18 mas or 56 pc. We further analyze the stars' absolute magnitudes on pre-main-sequence evolutionary tracks and find a range of ages with a median of 10.1 Myr and no correlation between age and Galactic location. The TWA stars may have formed from an extended and filamentary molecular cloud but are not necessarily precisely coeval.

Weinberger, Alycia J.; Boss, Alan P. [Department of Terrestrial Magnetism, Carnegie Institution of Washington, 5241 Broad Branch Road NW, Washington, DC 20015 (United States)] [Department of Terrestrial Magnetism, Carnegie Institution of Washington, 5241 Broad Branch Road NW, Washington, DC 20015 (United States); Anglada-Escude, Guillem, E-mail: weinberger@dtm.ciw.edu [Institut fuer Astrophysik, Universitaet Goettingen, Friedrich-Hund-Platz 1, 37077 Goettingen (Germany)] [Institut fuer Astrophysik, Universitaet Goettingen, Friedrich-Hund-Platz 1, 37077 Goettingen (Germany)

2013-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

15

Neutron generation induced by laser fusion by using a 10TW femtosecond Ti:Sapphire laser  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A 10TW Ti:Sapphire laser is used to generate DD fusion neutrons and the characteristics of plasma has been investigated. Neutrons are generated from deuterium clusters which are formed...

Nam, Sungmo; Han, Jaemin; Rhee, Yongjoo; Lee, Yongwoo; Cha, Yong-Ho; Cha, Hyung Ki

16

bectso-10mw | netl.doe.gov  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3 Industrial Carbon Capture and Storage Clean Coal Power Initiative Power Plant Improvement Initiative Clean Coal Technology Demonstration Program FutureGen 10-MW Demonstration of...

17

Hohlraum energetics scaling to 520 TW on the National Ignition Facility  

SciTech Connect

Indirect drive experiments have now been carried out with laser powers and energies up to 520 TW and 1.9 MJ. These experiments show that the energy coupling to the target is nearly constant at 84% 3% over a wide range of laser parameters from 350 to 520 TW and 1.2 to 1.9 MJ. Experiments at 520 TW with depleted uranium hohlraums achieve radiation temperatures of ?330 4 eV, enough to drive capsules 20 ?m thicker than the ignition point design to velocities near the ignition goal of 370 km/s. A series of three symcap implosion experiments with nearly identical target, laser, and diagnostics configurations show the symmetry and drive are reproducible at the level of 8.5% absolute and 2% relative, respectively.

Kline, J. L.; Grim, G.; Kyrala, G. A.; Batha, S. H. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States)] [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); Callahan, D. A.; Glenzer, S. H.; Meezan, N. B.; Moody, J. D.; Hinkel, D. E.; Jones, O. S.; MacKinnon, A. J.; Bennedetti, R.; Berger, R. L.; Bradley, D.; Dewald, E. L.; Bass, I.; Bennett, C.; Bowers, M.; Brunton, G.; Bude, J. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States)] [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); and others

2013-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

18

Crossroads (3 MW) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

MW) MW) Jump to: navigation, search Name Crossroads (3 MW) Facility Crossroads (3 MW) Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Oklahoma Gas & Electric Developer Renewable Energy Systems Ltd Energy Purchaser Oklahoma Gas & Electric Location Near Canton OK Coordinates 36.019889°, -98.669894° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":36.019889,"lon":-98.669894,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

19

TW Chapter 3 -Roush This chapter is meant to deepen and broaden an argument that goes something like this  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

by something local (due to something like a classical causal picture) and that's both why mental states can1 TW Chapter 3 - Roush This chapter is meant to deepen and broaden an argument that goes something is broad, TW argued that knowledge can add something mental to belief or rational belief or... whatever

Fitelson, Branden

20

NEW EVIDENCE SUPPORTING MEMBERSHIP FOR TW NOR IN LYNGA 6 AND THE CENTAURUS SPIRAL ARM  

SciTech Connect

The putative association between the 10{sub .}{sup d}8 classical Cepheid TW Nor and the open cluster Lynga 6 has generated considerable debate in the literature. New JHK{sub s} photometry in tandem with existing radial velocities for Lynga 6 stars implies cluster membership for TW Nor and establishes the variable as a high-weight calibrator for classical Cepheid relations. Fundamental mean parameters determined for Lynga 6 are: d = 1.91 {+-} 0.10 kpc, E(J - H) = 0.38 {+-} 0.02, and log {tau} = 7.9 {+-} 0.1. The Benedict et al./Turner Galactic VI{sub c} Wesenheit function was revised using TW Nor's new parameters: W{sub VI,0} (- 3.37 {+-} 0.08)log P{sub 0} - 2.48 {+-} 0.08. TW Nor/Lynga 6 lie beyond the Sagittarius-Carina spiral arm and occupy the Centaurus arm, along with innumerable young Cepheids and clusters (e.g., VW Cen and VVV CL070).

Majaess, Daniel; Turner, David [Department of Astronomy and Physics, Saint Mary's University, Halifax, Nova Scotia (Canada); Moni Bidin, Christian; Mauro, Francesco; Geisler, Douglas; Gieren, Wolfgang; Chene, Andre-Nicolas [Departamento de Astronomia, Universidad de Concepcion, Concepcion (Chile); Minniti, Dante; Saito, Roberto K. [Departamento Astronomia y Astrofisica, Pontificia Universidad Catolica de Chile, Santiago (Chile); Lucas, Philip [Centre for Astrophysics Research, University of Hertfordshire, Hatfield (United Kingdom); Borissova, Jura; Kurtev, Radostn [Departamento de Fisica y Astronomia, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Valparaiso, Valparaiso (Chile); Dekany, Istvan, E-mail: dmajaess@ap.smu.ca [Konkoly Observatory, Budapest (Hungary)

2011-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tw mw phase" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

,,,,,"Capacity MW",,,,,"Number of Meters",,,,,"Energy Sold Back...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Other",,,"All Technologies" ,,,,,"Capacity MW",,,,,"Number of Meters",,,,,"Energy Sold Back MWh",,,,,"Capacity MW",,,,,"Number of Meters",,,,,"Energy Sold Back...

22

Low Beam Voltage, 10 MW, L-Band Cluster Klystron  

SciTech Connect

Conceptual design of a multi-beam klystron (MBK) for possible ILC and Project X applications is presented. The chief distinction between this MBK design and existing 10-MW MBK's is the low operating voltage of 60 kV. There are at least four compelling reasons that justify development at this time of a low-voltage MBK, namely (1) no pulse transformer; (2) no oil tank for high-voltage components and for the tube socket; (3) no high-voltage cables; and (4) modulator would be a compact 60-kV IGBT switching circuit. The proposed klystron consists of four clusters containing six beams each. The tube has common input and output cavities for all 24 beams, and individual gain cavities for each cluster. A closely related optional configuration, also for a 10 MW tube, would involve four totally independent cavity clusters with four independent input cavities and four 2.5 MW output ports, all within a common magnetic circuit. This option has appeal because the output waveguides would not require a controlled atmosphere, and because it would be easier to achieve phase and amplitude stability as required in individual SC accelerator cavities.

Teryaev, V.; /Novosibirsk, IYF; Yakovlev, V.P.; /Fermilab; Kazakov, S.; /KEK, Tsukuba; Hirshfield, J.L.; /Yale U. /Omega-P, New Haven

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Ris-R-Report 12MW: final report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the scientific basis relevant for the next generation of huge 12 MW wind turbines operating offshore. The project relevant for the next generation of huge 12 MW wind turbines operating offshore. The project started 1st char.): `12MW: final report' is for the project with the full title `12 MW wind turbines

24

SM TW T F S S M T W T F  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Mardh 2001 Mardh 2001 February 09, 2001 SM TW T F S S M T W T F C^^-n'~~~.da.d 1 23 1 23 Friday 45 6 7 8910 4 S 6 7 8 910 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 226272829 30 31 800 __s^ ^ __,, _ _____ _ _ Noti Mee w/Gal Mars & Bob ipp - 5A10. 900 :Meet w/Coates, Gutteridge, N. Hebron, Knipp, sbjStategies for NE, 5A110. _00 500 .~ __ 300 6-00 _ -- Magwood, Wlliam 9 3/28/02 26812 DOE035-0040 February 2001 Marct 2001 February 10, 2001 5 M TW T F S SM TW T Sat a I ' 123 123 ~~~~Saturday~~ ~4 5 6 7 8 910 4 5 6 7 8 910 SaturdaIy , 11 12 1314 15 16 17 11 12 13 14 15 1617 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 Notes 7am 800 900 100 12n I00 20 0 300 400 5oo, 600 Magwood, William 10 3/28/02 26813DO

25

Property:Device Nameplate Capacity (MW) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Nameplate Capacity (MW) Nameplate Capacity (MW) Jump to: navigation, search Property Name Device Nameplate Capacity (MW) Property Type String Pages using the property "Device Nameplate Capacity (MW)" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) M MHK Projects/40MW Lewis project + 0 8MW 1MW Farms of multiple machines will be deployed with installed capacity of circa 20MW + MHK Projects/Algiers Light Project + 40 kW + MHK Projects/Anconia Point Project + 40 kW + MHK Projects/Ashley Point Project + 40 kW + MHK Projects/Avondale Bend Project + 40 kW + MHK Projects/Bar Field Bend + 40 kW + MHK Projects/Barfield Point + 40 kW + MHK Projects/Bayou Latenache + 40 kW + MHK Projects/BioSTREAM Pilot Plant + 250kW pilot 1MW commercial scale + MHK Projects/Bondurant Chute + 40 kW +

26

Economic Analysis of a 3MW Biomass Gasification Power Plant  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Collaborative, Biomass gasification / power generationANALYSIS OF A 3MW BIOMASS GASIFICATION POWER PLANT R obert Cas a feedstock for gasification for a 3 MW power plant was

Cattolica, Robert; Lin, Kathy

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Startup, Commissioning and Operation of Fenyi 100MW CFB Boiler  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The first 100MW CFB boiler, designed by the Thermal Power Research ... burn out are used in the 100 MW CFB boiler. The results of the 100MW CFB boiler shows that the CFB boiler can run in 30% MCR and ... got afte...

Zhiwei Wang; Wugao Yu; Shi Bo

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Low frequency noise from MW wind turbines --mechanisms of generation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Low frequency noise from MW wind turbines -- mechanisms of generation and its modeling Helge MW wind turbines -- mechanisms of generation and its modeling Department: Department of Wind Energy 3.6MW turbine 12 3.2 Noise as function of wind speed 12 3.3 Noise as function of rotor

29

Ris-R-Report The DAN-AERO MW Experiments  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ull scale MW size rotor s as well as o n airfoils for MW size turbine s in wind tun nels. Shear ew insight into a number of fu ndamental aerodynamic and aero-acoustic issues, important and turbulence inflow characteristics were measured on a Si emens 3.6 MW turbine with a five hole pitot tube

30

Property:Technology Nameplate Capacity (MW) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Nameplate Capacity (MW) Nameplate Capacity (MW) Jump to: navigation, search Property Name Technology Nameplate Capacity (MW) Property Type String Pages using the property "Technology Nameplate Capacity (MW)" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) M MHK Technologies/Aegir Dynamo + 100kW built and tested with 45kW 200kW and 1 4MW designs in development + MHK Technologies/AirWEC + 5kW + MHK Technologies/Aquantis + Proprietary + MHK Technologies/Atlantis AN 150 + 0 15 + MHK Technologies/Atlantis AR 1000 + 1 + MHK Technologies/Atlantis AS 400 + 0 4 + MHK Technologies/Bluetec + 1 + MHK Technologies/Current Power + from 10 kW and up + MHK Technologies/CurrentStar + 1 + MHK Technologies/Deep Green + 500 kW + MHK Technologies/Deep water capable hydrokinetic turbine + 30MW +

31

Siemens introduces 50 Hz 190 MW gas turbine  

SciTech Connect

According to market data for high power gas turbines compiled by Erlangen, Germany-based Siemens KWU, referring to machines above 50 MW, market demand will average approximately 22 GW per year from now to 2005, of which roughly 15 GW will be for combined-cycle plants and nearly half (11 GW) will be placed in the intermediate capacity class (M Class). Looking at the Siemens line of advanced machines for 50 Hz grids; from the V64.3A rated 70 MW one jumps to the V94.3A rated 240 MW leaving a gap of 170 MW uncovered aside from the existing model V94.2 at 159 MW. This article describes the design and specifications of Siemens new 50 Hz 190 MW gas turbines that hope to cater to this gap. 2 refs.

Chellini, R.

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

PG&E Plans for 500 MW of PV  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

PG&E has developed a plan to install 500 MW of PV by the year 2015. The plan calls for 250 MW to be acquired through Power Purchase Agreements (PPA) and the other 250 MW to be purchased and owned by the utility. PG&E presented the plan at a public forum on April 27, 2009. A copy of the power point presentation is attached.

33

5-MW Dynamometer Ground Breaking | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Energy Laboratory in Golden, Colorado, broke ground for a new 5-MW dynamometer test facility. When complete, the new facility will more than double the wind turbine...

34

50 MW X-BAND RF SYSTEM FOR A PHOTOINJECTOR TEST STATION AT LLNL  

SciTech Connect

In support of X-band photoinjector development efforts at LLNL, a 50 MW test station is being constructed to investigate structure and photocathode optimization for future upgrades. A SLAC XL-4 klystron capable of generating 50 MW, 1.5 microsecond pulses will be the high power RF source for the system. Timing of the laser pulse on the photocathode with the applied RF field places very stringent requirements on phase jitter and drift. To achieve these requirements, the klystron will be powered by a state of the art, solid-state, high voltage modulator. The 50 MW will be divided between the photoinjector and a traveling wave accelerator section. A high power phase shifter is located between the photoinjector and accelerator section to adjust the phasing of the electron bunches with respect to the accelerating field. A variable attenuator is included on the input of the photoinjector. The distribution system including the various x-band components is being designed and constructed. In this paper, we will present the design, layout, and status of the RF system.

Marsh, R A; Anderson, S G; Barty, C J; Beer, G K; Cross, R R; Ebbers, C A; Gibson, D J; Hartemann, F V; Houck, T L; Adolphsen, C; Candel, A; Chu, T S; Jongewaard, E N; Li, Z; Raubenheimer, T; Tantawi, S G; Vlieks, A; Wang, F; Wang, J W; Zhou, F; Deis, G A

2011-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

35

Property:Project Installed Capacity (MW) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Installed Capacity (MW) Installed Capacity (MW) Jump to: navigation, search Property Name Project Installed Capacity (MW) Property Type String Pages using the property "Project Installed Capacity (MW)" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) M MHK Projects/40MW Lewis project + 0 + MHK Projects/ADM 5 + 1 + MHK Projects/AWS II + 1 + MHK Projects/Admirality Inlet Tidal Energy Project + 22 + MHK Projects/Agucadoura + 2 + MHK Projects/Alaska 18 + 10 + MHK Projects/Alaska 36 + 10 + MHK Projects/Algiers Cutoff Project + 16 + MHK Projects/Algiers Light Project + 0 + MHK Projects/Anconia Point Project + 0 + MHK Projects/Ashley Point Project + 0 + MHK Projects/Astoria Tidal Energy + 300 + MHK Projects/Avondale Bend Project + 0 + MHK Projects/Bar Field Bend + 0 +

36

Puna Geothermal Venture 8MW Expantion | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Venture 8MW Expantion Venture 8MW Expantion Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: Puna Geothermal Venture 8MW Expantion Abstract Adding to its existing generating capacity of 27 MW, Ormat's Puna Geothermal Venture (PGV) geothermal power plant recently completed a successful 8MW expansion project bringing more renewable, low-cost electricity to the people of Hawaii. The project presented several technical challenges including use of high scale potential brine in a state-of-the-art binary plant, development of highly reliable brine pH monitoring and control system, and brine injection management in a high energy resource. Each of the project challenges were overcome with unique engineering solutions. Authors Mike Kaleikini, Paul Spielman, Tom Buchanan, Ormat Technologies

37

Property:Permit/License Buildout (MW) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Permit/License Buildout (MW) Permit/License Buildout (MW) Jump to: navigation, search Property Name Permit/License Buildout (MW) Property Type String Pages using the property "Permit/License Buildout (MW)" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) M MHK Projects/40MW Lewis project + 40 + MHK Projects/Algiers Light Project + 20 + MHK Projects/Anconia Point Project + 15 + MHK Projects/Ashley Point Project + 148 + MHK Projects/Avalon Tidal + 30 + MHK Projects/Avondale Bend Project + 18 + MHK Projects/BW2 Tidal + 3 + MHK Projects/Bar Field Bend + 94 + MHK Projects/Barfield Point + 114 + MHK Projects/Bayou Latenache + 50 + MHK Projects/Bondurant Chute + 152 + MHK Projects/Breeze Point + 198 + MHK Projects/Brilliant Point Project + 56 + MHK Projects/Brough Head Wave Farm + 200 +

38

Will 10 MW Wind Turbines Bring Down the Operation and Maintenance Cost of Offshore Wind Farms?  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Larger wind turbines are believed to be advantageous from an investment and installation perspective, since costs for installation and inner cabling are dependent mainly on the number of wind turbines and not their size. Analogously, scaling up the turbines may also be argued to be advantageous from an operation and maintenance (O&M) perspective. For a given total power production of the wind farm, larger wind turbines give a smaller number of individual machines that needs to be maintained and could therefore give smaller O&M costs. However, the O&M costs are directly dependent on how failure rates, spare part costs, and time needed by technicians to perform each maintenance task and will develop for larger wind turbines. A simulation study is carried out with a discrete-event simulation model for the operational phase of an offshore wind farm, comparing the O&M costs of a wind farm consisting of 5 MW turbines with a wind farm consisting of 10 MW turbines. Simulation results confirm that O&M costs decrease when replacing two 5 MW turbines by one 10 MW turbine, if the total production capacity and all other parameters are kept equal. However, whether larger wind turbines can contribute to a reduction of cost of energy from an O&M perspective is first and foremost dependent on how the failure rates and maintenance durations for such wind turbines will develop compared to 5 MW wind turbines. Based on the results of this analysis, it is concluded that higher failure rates and maintenance durations rapidly are counterbalancing the benefits of larger wind turbines.

Matthias Hofmann; Iver Bakken Sperstad

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Measuring the Magnetic Field on the Classical T Tauri Star TW Hydrae  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present infrared (IR) and optical echelle spectra of the Classical T Tauri star TW Hydrae. Using the optical data, we perform detailed spectrum synthesis to fit atomic and molecular absorption lines and determine key stellar parameters: Teff = 4126 \\pm 24 K, log g = 4.84 \\pm 0.16, [M/H] = -0.10 \\pm 0.12, vsini = 5.8 \\pm 0.6 km/s. The IR spectrum is used to look for Zeeman broadening of photospheric absorption lines. We fit four Zeeman sensitive Ti I lines near 2.2 microns and find the average value of the magnetic field over the entire surface is 2.61 \\pm 0.23 kG. In addition, several nearby magnetically insensitive CO lines show no excess broadening above that produced by stellar rotation and instrumental broadening, reinforcing the magnetic interpretation for the width of the Ti I lines. We carry out extensive tests to quantify systematic errors in our analysis technique which may result from inaccurate knowledge of the effective temperature or gravity, finding that reasonable errors in these quantities produce a 10% uncertainty in the mean field measurement.

H. Yang; C. M. Johns-Krull; J. A. Valenti

2005-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

40

MAGNETICALLY CONTROLLED ACCRETION ON THE CLASSICAL T TAURI STARS GQ LUPI AND TW HYDRAE  

SciTech Connect

We present high spectral resolution (R Almost-Equal-To 108, 000) Stokes V polarimetry of the classical T Tauri stars (CTTSs) GQ Lup and TW Hya obtained with the polarimetric upgrade to the HARPS spectrometer on the ESO 3.6 m telescope. We present data on both photospheric lines and emission lines, concentrating our discussion on the polarization properties of the He I emission lines at 5876 A and 6678 A. The He I lines in these CTTSs contain both narrow emission cores, believed to come from near the accretion shock region on these stars, and broad emission components which may come from either a wind or the large-scale magnetospheric accretion flow. We detect strong polarization in the narrow component of the two He I emission lines in both stars. We observe a maximum implied field strength of 6.05 {+-} 0.24 kG in the 5876 A line of GQ Lup, making it the star with the highest field strength measured in this line for a CTTS. We find field strengths in the two He I lines that are consistent with each other, in contrast to what has been reported in the literature on at least one star. We do not detect any polarization in the broad component of the He I lines on these stars, strengthening the conclusion that they form over a substantially different volume relative to the formation region of the narrow component of the He I lines.

Johns-Krull, Christopher M.; Chen, Wei [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Rice University, 6100 Main Street, MS-108, Houston, TX 77005 (United States)] [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Rice University, 6100 Main Street, MS-108, Houston, TX 77005 (United States); Valenti, Jeff A., E-mail: cmj@rice.edu, E-mail: wc2@rice.edu, E-mail: valenti@stsci.edu [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21210 (United States); and others

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tw mw phase" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Aspects of the electrical system design of the colmi 660 mw coal-fired power plant  

SciTech Connect

The conceptual design of the electrical systems for Mexico's Commission Federal de Electricidad (CFE) COLMI 660-MW coal-fired power plant builds on Bechtel's experience with nuclear, gas and coal-fired generating plants. The COLMI conceptual design incorporates a combination of new equipment applications and design considerations that make it more economical when compared to traditional alternatives. Also it provides a reliable state-of-the-art distribution system that is flexible enough for any unit in the 400-900 MW range. Alternative approaches were studied for the system design and equipment arrangement. This paper reviews the approach taken to arrive at the conceptual design and describes the equipment selected and the advantages they provide. Exact sizing and determination of characteristics of the equipment are not given because these were not determined during the conceptual design. These will be determined during the detailed design phase of the project.

Aguilar, J. (Bechtel Corp., Norwalk, CA (US)); Fernandez, J.H. (Comision Federal de Electricidad, Mexico, D.F. (MX))

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

10 MW Supercritical CO2 Turbine Test  

SciTech Connect

The Supercritical CO2 Turbine Test project was to demonstrate the inherent efficiencies of a supercritical carbon dioxide (s-CO2) power turbine and associated turbomachinery under conditions and at a scale relevant to commercial concentrating solar power (CSP) projects, thereby accelerating the commercial deployment of this new power generation technology. The project involved eight partnering organizations: NREL, Sandia National Laboratories, Echogen Power Systems, Abengoa Solar, University of Wisconsin at Madison, Electric Power Research Institute, Barber-Nichols, and the CSP Program of the U.S. Department of Energy. The multi-year project planned to design, fabricate, and validate an s-CO2 power turbine of nominally 10 MWe that is capable of operation at up to 700C and operates in a dry-cooled test loop. The project plan consisted of three phases: (1) system design and modeling, (2) fabrication, and (3) testing. The major accomplishments of Phase 1 included: Design of a multistage, axial-flow, s-CO2 power turbine; Design modifications to an existing turbocompressor to provide s-CO2 flow for the test system; Updated equipment and installation costs for the turbomachinery and associated support infrastructure; Development of simulation tools for the test loop itself and for more efficient cycle designs that are of greater commercial interest; Simulation of s-CO2 power cycle integration into molten-nitrate-salt CSP systems indicating a cost benefit of up to 8% in levelized cost of energy; Identification of recuperator cost as a key economic parameter; Corrosion data for multiple alloys at temperatures up to 650C in high-pressure CO2 and recommendations for materials-of-construction; and Revised test plan and preliminary operating conditions based on the ongoing tests of related equipment. Phase 1 established that the cost of the facility needed to test the power turbine at its full power and temperature would exceed the planned funding for Phases 2 and 3. Late in Phase 1 an opportunity arose to collaborate with another turbine-development team to construct a shared s-CO2 test facility. The synergy of the combined effort would result in greater facility capabilities than either separate project could produce and would allow for testing of both turbine designs within the combined budgets of the two projects. The project team requested a no-cost extension to Phase 1 to modify the subsequent work based on this collaborative approach. DOE authorized a brief extension, but ultimately opted not to pursue the collaborative facility and terminated the project.

Turchi, Craig

2014-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

43

Gamesa Installs 2-MW Wind Turbine at NWTC  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

In October, the Department of Energy (DOE) National Renewable Laboratory (NREL) worked with Gamesa Wind US to complete the installation of Gamesa's G97-2 MW Class IIIA turbine at NREL's National Wind Technology Center.

44

Update on the Southwest 1000 MW CSP Initiative  

SciTech Connect

The 1000 MW CSP project was initiated in FY02 based on a Congressional request of the DOE to investigate the feasibility of 1000 MW of Concentrating Solar Power in the Southwest by 2006. The original charge has grown and involved a number of activities including: outreach to the SW states, support of state-level activities in NM, CA, and CO, and analysis in support of the Western Governors' Association (WGA) 30 GW Clean Energy Initiative.

Mancini, T.; Mehos, M.; Wilkins, F.; Morse, F.

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Latest Results in SLAC 75-MW PPM Klystrons  

SciTech Connect

75 MW X-band klystrons utilizing Periodic Permanent Magnet (PPM) focusing have been undergoing design, fabrication and testing at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) for almost nine years. The klystron development has been geared toward realizing the necessary components for the construction of the Next Linear Collider (NLC). The PPM devices built to date which fit this class of operation consist of a variety of 50 MW and 75 MW devices constructed by SLAC, KEK (Tsukuba, Japan) and industry. All these tubes follow from the successful SLAC design of a 50 MW PPM klystron in 1996. In 2004 the latest two klystrons were constructed and tested with preliminary results reported at EPAC2004. The first of these two devices was tested to the full NLC specifications of 75 MW, 1.6 microseconds pulse length, and 120 Hz. This 14.4 kW average power operation came with a tube efficiency >50%. The most recent testing of these last two devices will be presented here. Design and manufacturing issues of the latest klystron, due to be tested by the Fall of 2005, are also discussed.

Sprehn, D.; Caryotakis, G.; Haase, A.; Jongewaard, E.; Laurent, L.; Pearson, C.; Phillips, R.; /SLAC

2006-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

46

Navy Estimated Average Hourly Load Profile by Month (in MW)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Navy Estimated Average Hourly Load Profile by Month (in MW) MONTH HE1 HE2 HE3 HE4 HE5 HE6 HE7 HE8 HE9 HE10 HE11 HE12 HE13 HE14 HE15 HE16 HE17 HE18 HE19 HE20 HE21 HE22 HE23 HE24...

47

Activation of 200 MW refusegenerated CHP upward regulation effect (Smart  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Activation of 200 MW refusegenerated CHP upward regulation effect Activation of 200 MW refusegenerated CHP upward regulation effect Country Denmark Headquarters Location Sønderborg, Denmark Coordinates 54.913811°, 9.792178° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":54.913811,"lon":9.792178,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

48

MHK Projects/40MW Lewis project | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

40MW Lewis project 40MW Lewis project < MHK Projects Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":5,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"File:Aquamarine-marker.png","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":58.791595089019,"lon":-6.7286683246493,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"http:\/\/prod-http-80-800498448.us-east-1.elb.amazonaws.com\/w\/images\/7\/74\/Aquamarine-marker.png","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

49

UPGRADING THE AGS TO 1 MW PROTON BEAM POWER.  

SciTech Connect

The Brookhaven Alternating Gradient Synchrotron (AGS) is a strong focusing accelerator that is used to accelerate protons and various heavy ion species to an equivalent proton energy of 29 GeV. At this energy the maximum intensity achieved is around 7 x 10{sup 13} protons per pulse. This corresponds to an average beam power of about 0.2 MW. Future programs in high-energy physics, as for instance a neutrino factory with the AGS as the proton driver [l], may require an upgrade of the AGS to an average beam power of 1 MW, at the energy of 24 GeV. This can be achieved with an increase of the beam intensity to 1 x 1014 protons per pulse, a 1.2-GeV superconducting linac as a new injector, and by upgrading the power supply and rf systems to allow cycling at 2.5 beam pulses per second.

BRENNAN,M.J.; MARNERIS,I.; ROSER,T.; RUGGIERO,A.G.; TRBOJEVIC,D.; ZHANG,S.Y.

2001-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

50

Latest developments on the Dutch 1MW free electron maser  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The FOM Institute (Rijnhuizen Netherlands) as part of their fusion technology program has undertaken the development of a Free Electron Maser with the goal of producing 1MW long pulse to CW microwave output in the range 130 GHz250GHz with wall plug efficiencies of 60%. This project has been carried out as a collaborative effort with Institute of Applied Physics Nizhny Novgorod Russia Kurchatov Institute Moscow Russia Lawrence Livermore Laboratory U.S.A and CPI U.S.A. The key design features of this FEM consists first of a conventional DC acceleration system at high voltage (2MV) which supplies only the unwanted beam interception current and a depressed collector system at 250kV which provides the main beam power. Low body current interception (usec) testing in an inverted mode with the depressed collector absent. Results to date have demonstrated 98.8% beam transmission (over 5 Meters) at currents as high as 8.4 Amps with 200GHz microwave output at 700kW. There has been good agreement between theory and experiment at the beam current levels tested so far. Details of the most recent experimental results will be presented in particular the output frequency characteristics with detailed comparisons to theory. The immediate future plans are to operate the system at the design value of 12 Amps with at least 1MW output. The system will then be reconfigured with a 3 stage depressed collector to demonstrate in the next year long pulse operation (100 msec) and high wall plug efficiency. Long term future plans call for upgrading the FEM to 2MW and extrapolations up to 5MW are shown to be theoretically possible.

M. Caplan; A. G. A. Verhoeven; W. Urbanus

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

MHK Technologies/14 MW OTECPOWER | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

MW OTECPOWER MW OTECPOWER < MHK Technologies Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Technology Profile Technology Type Click here OTEC - Closed Cycle Technology Readiness Level Click here TRL 5 6 System Integration and Technology Laboratory Demonstration Technology Description MINIMIZE SURFACE ACTIVITIES TO REDUCE THE CAPITAL COST AND TO IMPROVE EFFICIENCY ALTERNATE WORKING FLUIDS ARE USED FOR ENHANCED POWER EFFICIENCY IN OPTEC POWER HYBRID CYCLES ARE USED TO IMPROVE POWER AND NEED WITH SUBSEA HEAT EXCHANGERS ADVANCED SUPPORTING VESSEL CONCEPT AND FREE STANDING RISER TECHNOLOGIES TO WITH STAND HARSH OCEAN ENVIRONMENT IN DEEPWATER HAD BEEN DEVELOPED FOR THIS OPTEC POWER IT IS THE ONLY RELIABLE AND PROFITABLE RENEWABLE ENERGY SOURCE FOR THE NEED OF WORLD ENERGY FOR THE NEXT DECADE DESALINATION AND HDROGEN PRODUCTION ARE LINKED TO THE POWER GENERATION OF THE OTEC POWER FOR SEVERAL BY PRODUCTS COST EFFECTIVE PRODUCTION CLEAN ENERGY AND CLEAN WATER IS THE GOAL OF OTECPOWER INC OUR 14 MW OTEC POWER COSTS 50 MILLION USD ALL EQUIPMENT HAD BEEN DESINGED AND A FEW OF THEM ARE TESTED FOR OIL AND GAS INDUSTRY APPLICATION WHICHA RE BEING USED FOR OTECPOWER A RELIABLE AND FEASIBLE OTECPOWER IS PROPOSED

52

DeepWind-from Idea to 5 MW Concept  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The DeepWind concept has been described previously on challenges and potentials, this new offshore floating technology can offer to the wind industry [1]. The paper describes state of the art design improvements, new simulation results of the DeepWind floating vertical axis wind turbine concept, which implies a high potential for cost saving. The most critical aspects of the concept are addressed in proving feasibility, and if it can be scaled up to 20 MW. Applying structural mechanics, generator, floater & mooring system, control system design, and rotor design using detailed integrated models, results have evolved to a 5 MW baseline design. This important outcome will be used as a reference for further improvements. Emphasis in this paper is made on the interplay between different components and some trade-offs. One such example is the rotational speed which largely influences the design of both the generator and the aerodynamic rotor. Another example is aerofoil design affecting energy capture, stall behaviour, structural dynamics and control design. Finally, the potential for up-scaling to 20 MW is discussed.

Uwe S. Paulsen; Helge A. Madsen; Knud A. Kragh; Per H. Nielsen; Ismet Baran; Jesper Hattel; Ewen Ritchie; Krisztina Leban; Harald Svendsen; Petter A. Berthelsen

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Microwave (MW) and Radio Frequency (RF) as Enabling Technologies for Advanced Manufacturing  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Purpose, Context, Meeting Process, and Agenda for MW and RF as Enabling Technologies for Advanced Manufacturing on July 25, 2012

54

Seismic activity in the SumatraJava region prior to the December 26, 2004 (Mw =9.09.3) and March 28, 2005 (Mw =8.7) earthquakes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Seismic activity in the Sumatra­Java region prior to the December 26, 2004 (Mw =9.0­9.3) and March

Dmowska, Renata

55

Latest developments on the Dutch 1MW free electron maser  

SciTech Connect

The FOM Institute (Rijnhuizen, Netherlands), as part of their fusion technology program, has undertaken the development of a Free Electron Maser with the goal of producing 1MW long pulse to CW microwave output in the range 130 GHz{endash}250GHz with wall plug efficiencies of 60{percent}. This project has been carried out as a collaborative effort with Institute of Applied Physics, Nizhny Novgorod Russia, Kurchatov Institute, Moscow Russia, Lawrence Livermore Laboratory, U.S.A and CPI, U.S.A. The key design features of this FEM consists first of a conventional DC acceleration system at high voltage (2MV) which supplies only the unwanted beam interception current and a depressed collector system at 250kV which provides the main beam power. Low body current interception ({lt}25mA) is ensured by using robust inline beam focussing, a low emittance electron gun with halo suppression and periodic magnet side array focussing in the wiggler. The second key feature is use of a low-loss step corrugated waveguide circuit for broad band CW power handling and beam/RF separation. Finally, the required interaction efficiency and mode control is provided by a two stage stepped wiggler. The FEM has been constructed and recently undergone initial short pulse ({lt}10 usec) testing in an inverted mode with the depressed collector absent. Results to date have demonstrated 98.8{percent} beam transmission (over 5 Meters) at currents as high as 8.4 Amps, with 200GHz microwave output at 700kW. There has been good agreement between theory and experiment at the beam current levels tested so far. Details of the most recent experimental results will be presented, in particular the output frequency characteristics with detailed comparisons to theory. The immediate future plans are to operate the system at the design value of 12 Amps with at least 1MW output. The system will then be reconfigured with a 3 stage depressed collector to demonstrate, in the next year, long pulse operation (100 msec) and high wall plug efficiency. Long term future plans call for upgrading the FEM to 2MW and extrapolations up to 5MW are shown to be theoretically possible. {copyright} {ital 1999 American Institute of Physics.}

Caplan, M. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, 7000 East Ave, L-637 Livermore California, 94551 (United States); Verhoeven, A.G.; Urbanus, W. [FOM Instituut voor Plasma Fysica, Rijnhuizen, P.O. Box 1207, 3430 BE Nieuwegein (The Netherlands)

1999-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Property:Project Phase | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Phase Phase Jump to: navigation, search Property Name Project Phase Property Type Text This is a property of type String. Pages using the property "Project Phase" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) M MHK Projects/40MW Lewis project + Phase 2 + MHK Projects/ADM 3 + Phase ? + MHK Projects/ADM 4 + Phase ? + MHK Projects/ADM 5 + Phase 2 + MHK Projects/AW Energy EMEC + Phase 3 + MHK Projects/AWS II + Phase 1 + MHK Projects/Admirality Inlet Tidal Energy Project + Phase 1 + MHK Projects/Agucadoura + Phase 3 + MHK Projects/Alaska 1 + Phase 0 + MHK Projects/Alaska 13 + Phase ? + MHK Projects/Alaska 17 + Phase 0 + MHK Projects/Alaska 18 + Phase 0 + MHK Projects/Alaska 24 + Phase 0 + MHK Projects/Alaska 25 + Phase 0 + MHK Projects/Alaska 28 + Phase 0 +

57

Activation of 200 MW refusegenerated CHP upward regulation effect (Smart  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

effect (Smart effect (Smart Grid Project) (Thisted, Denmark) Jump to: navigation, search Project Name Activation of 200 MW refusegenerated CHP upward regulation effect Country Denmark Headquarters Location Thisted, Denmark Coordinates 56.959167°, 8.703492° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":56.959167,"lon":8.703492,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

58

2 MW upgrade of the Fermilab Main Injector  

SciTech Connect

In January 2002, the Fermilab Director initiated a design study for a high average power, modest energy proton facility. An intensity upgrade to Fermilab's 120-GeV Main Injector (MI) represents an attractive concept for such a facility, which would leverage existing beam lines and experimental areas and would greatly enhance physics opportunities at Fermilab and in the U.S. With a Proton Driver replacing the present Booster, the beam intensity of the MI is expected to be increased by a factor of five. Accompanied by a shorter cycle, the beam power would reach 2 MW. This would make the MI a more powerful machine than the SNS or the J-PARC. Moreover, the high beam energy (120 GeV) and tunable energy range (8-120 GeV) would make it a unique high power proton facility. The upgrade study has been completed and published. This paper gives a summary report.

Weiren Chou

2003-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

59

5 MW pulsed spallation neutron source, Preconceptual design study  

SciTech Connect

This report describes a self-consistent base line design for a 5 MW Pulsed Spallation Neutron Source (PSNS). It is intended to establish feasibility of design and as a basis for further expanded and detailed studies. It may also serve as a basis for establishing project cost (30% accuracy) in order to intercompare competing designs for a PSNS not only on the basis of technical feasibility and technical merit but also on the basis of projected total cost. The accelerator design considered here is based on the objective of a pulsed neutron source obtained by means of a pulsed proton beam with average beam power of 5 MW, in {approx} 1 {mu}sec pulses, operating at a repetition rate of 60 Hz. Two target stations are incorporated in the basic facility: one for operation at 10 Hz for long-wavelength instruments, and one operating at 50 Hz for instruments utilizing thermal neutrons. The design approach for the proton accelerator is to use a low energy linear accelerator (at 0.6 GeV), operating at 60 Hz, in tandem with two fast cycling booster synchrotrons (at 3.6 GeV), operating at 30 Hz. It is assumed here that considerations of cost and overall system reliability may favor the present design approach over the alternative approach pursued elsewhere, whereby use is made of a high energy linear accelerator in conjunction with a dc accumulation ring. With the knowledge that this alternative design is under active development, it was deliberately decided to favor here the low energy linac-fast cycling booster approach. Clearly, the present design, as developed here, must be carried to the full conceptual design stage in order to facilitate a meaningful technology and cost comparison with alternative designs.

Not Available

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Design and operating experience of a 40 MW, highly-stabilized power supply  

SciTech Connect

Four 10 MW, highly-stabilized power supply modules have been installed at the National High Magnetic Field Laboratory in Tallahassee, FL, to energize water-cooled, resistive, high-field research magnets. The power supply modules achieve a long term current stability if 10 ppM over a 12 h period with a short term ripple and noise variation of <10 ppM over a time period of one cycle. The power supply modules can operate independently, feeding four separate magnets, or two, three or four modules can operate in parallel. Each power supply module consists of a 12.5 kV vacuum circuit breaker, two three-winding, step-down transformers, a 24-pulse rectifier with interphase reactors, and a passive and an active filter. Two different transformer tap settings allow rated dc supply output voltages of 400 and 500 V. The rated current of a supply module is 17 kA and each supply module has a one-hour overload capability of 20 kA. The isolated output terminals of each power supply module are connected to a reversing switch. An extensive high-current bus system allows the modules to be connected to 16 magnet cells. This paper presents the detailed design of the power supply components. Various test results taken during the commissioning phase with a 10 MW resistive load and results taken with the research magnets are shown. The effects of the modules on the electrical supply system and the operational behavior of the power factor correction/harmonic filters are described. Included also are results of a power supply module feeding a superconducting magnet during quench propagation tests. Problems with the power supply design and solutions are presented. Some suggestions on how to improve the performance of these supplies are outlined.

Boenig, H.J. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Ferner, J.A. [Florida State Univ., Tallahassee, FL (United States). Nationa High Magnetic Field Laboratory; Bogdan, F.; Morris, G.C. [ABB Industrial Systems, New Berlin, WI (United States); Rumrill, R.S. [Alpha Scientific Electronics Inc., Hayward, CA (United States)

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tw mw phase" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

A 200 MHz 35 MW Multiple Beam Klystron for Accelerator Applications Final Report  

SciTech Connect

Calabazas Creek Research, Inc. (CCR) performed initial development of a compact and reliable 35 MW, multiple beam klystron (MBK) at 200 MHz with a pulse length of 0.125 ms and a 30 Hz repetition rate. The device was targeted for acceleration and ionization cooling of a muon collider, but there are several other potential applications in this frequency range. The klystron uses multiple beams propagating in individual beam tunnels to reduce space charge and allow reduction in the accelerating voltage. This allows a significant reduction in length over a single beam source. More importantly this allows more efficient and less expensive power supplies. At 200 MHz, the interaction circuit for a single beam klystron would be more than six meters long to obtain 50% efficiency and 50 dB gain. This would require a beam voltage of approximately 400 kV and current of 251 A for a microperveance of 1.0. For an eight beam MBK with the same beam perveance, a three meter long interaction circuit achieves the same power and gain. Each beam operates at 142 kV and 70A. The Phase I demonstrated that this device could be fabricated with funding available in a Phase II program and could achieve the program specifications.

R. Lawrence Ives; Michael Read; Patrick Ferguson; David Marsden

2011-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

62

Model Validation at the 204-MW New Mexico Wind Energy Center  

SciTech Connect

Poster for WindPower 2006 held June 4-7, 2006, in Pittsburgh, PA, describing model validation at the 204-MW New Mexico Wind Energy Center.

Muljadi, E.; Butterfield, C. P.; Ellis, A.; Mechenbier, J.; Hochheimer, J.; Young, R.; Miller, N.; Delmerico, R.; Zavadil, R.; Smith, J. C.

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Experimental Study on Coal Feeding Property of 600MW CFB Boiler  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In the CFB boiler technology, improving the steam parameters can ... , based on the structure of commercial 600MW CFB boiler unit and similarity principle, the experiment...

H. P. Chen; L. N. Tian; Q. Du; H. P. Yang

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

10MW Class Direct Drive HTS Wind Turbine, CRADA Number CRD-08...  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

10MW Class Direct Drive HTS Wind Turbine Cooperative Research and Development Final Report CRADA Number: CRD-08-00312 NREL Technical Contact: Walter Musial CRADA Report NREL...

65

br Owner br Facility br Type br Capacity br MW br Commercial...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Area Pauzhetskaya Geothermal Power Plant Kamchatskburgeotermiya Single Flash MW Rye Patch Geothermal Area Pianacce Geothermal Power Station Travale Radicondoli Geothermal Area...

66

A Multi-MW Proton/Electron Linac at KEK  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

It is proposed that a multi-MW superconducting proton/electron linac (SCL) and a proton injector (PI) be built at KEK. The 3 GeV PI would serve both as an injector to the SCL and a source of proton beams that could be used to copiously produce neutrons and muons. Protons accelerated by the SCL to 20 GeV would be transferred through the KEK Tristan ring in order to create neutrino, kaon and muon beams for fixed-target experiments. At a later stage, a 60 GeV proton synchrotron could be installed inside the Tristan ring. The SCL, comprising 1.3 GHZ superconducting ILC-type rf cavities, could also accelerate polarized or unpolarized electron beams. After acceleration, electrons may traverse an XFEL undulator, or could be used to produce polarized positrons. An SCL-based synchrotron light source for applications in materials science and medicine is also envisaged. The proposed facility would be constructed using the existing KEK accelerator infrastructure.

Belusevic, Radoje

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Ris-R-Report Multi-MW wind turbine power curve  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Risø-R-Report Multi-MW wind turbine power curve measurements using remote sensing instruments Wagner, Michael Courtney Title: Multi-MW wind turbine power curve measurements using remote sensing (max. 2000 char.): Power curve measurement for large wind turbines requires taking into account more

68

North Brawley Power Plant Placed in Service; Currently Generating 17 MW;  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

North Brawley Power Plant Placed in Service; Currently Generating 17 MW; North Brawley Power Plant Placed in Service; Currently Generating 17 MW; Additional Operations Update Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: North Brawley Power Plant Placed in Service; Currently Generating 17 MW; Additional Operations Update Author Electric Energy Publications Inc. Published Publisher Not Provided, Date Not Provided DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http://crossref.org Online Internet link for North Brawley Power Plant Placed in Service; Currently Generating 17 MW; Additional Operations Update Citation Electric Energy Publications Inc.. North Brawley Power Plant Placed in Service; Currently Generating 17 MW; Additional Operations Update [Internet]. [updated 2010;cited 2010]. Available from:

69

Nevada/Geothermal | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Nevada/Geothermal Nevada/Geothermal < Nevada Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Print PDF Nevada Geothermal General Regulatory Roadmap Geothermal Power Projects Under Development in Nevada Developer Location Estimated Capacity (MW) Development Phase Geothermal Area Geothermal Region Alligator Geothermal Geothermal Project Oski Energy LLC Ely, Nevada 20 MW20,000 kW 20,000,000 W 20,000,000,000 mW 0.02 GW 2.0e-5 TW Phase I - Resource Procurement and Identification Alum Geothermal Project Ram Power Silver Peak, Nevada 64 MW64,000 kW 64,000,000 W 64,000,000,000 mW 0.064 GW 6.4e-5 TW Phase II - Resource Exploration and Confirmation Alum Geothermal Area Walker-Lane Transition Zone Geothermal Region Aurora Geothermal Project Gradient Resources Hawthorne, Nevada 190 MW190,000 kW

70

Arizona College 5 MW System Will be "Solar with a Purpose" | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Arizona College 5 MW System Will be "Solar with a Purpose" Arizona College 5 MW System Will be "Solar with a Purpose" Arizona College 5 MW System Will be "Solar with a Purpose" May 28, 2010 - 2:19pm Addthis Arizona Western College (AWC) wants to be the go-to for solar, says Bill Smith, director of facilities management. AWC is based in Yuma, Ariz., and that, according to the Guinness Book of World Records, is the sunniest place on Earth. Now, a group of private companies, researchers and AWC educators will tap the solar potential by building a 4.995 MW solar array at the college. When the solar energy system is completed, it will be the largest solar array on any U.S. college campus. "We are strategically placed geographically. Now that we have this company that has approached us with this awesome opportunity, we want ...

71

Ultra Clean 1.1 MW High Efficiency Natural Gas Engine Powered...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Ultra Clean 1.1 MW High Efficiency Natural Gas Engine Powered CHP System Contract: DE-EE0004016 GE Energy, Dresser Inc. 102010 - 92014 Jim Zurlo, Principal Investigator...

72

Study and Design of Platen Superheater of 300 MW CFB Boiler  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In order to avoid overtemperature tube explosion of the platen superheater, the measurements of metal temperatures and the heat transfer coefficients of the platen superheater in a commercial 300 MW Circulating F...

Zhang Man; Lv Qinggang; Jiang Xiaoguo

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Mercury Emission and Removal of a 135MW CFB Utility Boiler  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

To evaluate characteristic of the mercury emission and removal from a circulating fluidized bed (CFB) boiler, a representative 135 MW CFB utility boiler was selected to take the ... is of majority in flue gas of ...

Y. F. Duan; Y. Q. Zhuo; Y. J. Wang; L. Zhang

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Development of a full-scale training simulator for an 800-MW power unit  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Stages of work involving preparation of requirements specification, development, and subsequent implementation of a project for constructing a full-scale training simulator of an 800-MW power unit are consider...

S. K. Zhuravlev; A. M. Andreev

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Arizona College 5 MW System Will be "Solar with a Purpose" | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Arizona College 5 MW System Will be "Solar with a Purpose" Arizona College 5 MW System Will be "Solar with a Purpose" Arizona College 5 MW System Will be "Solar with a Purpose" May 28, 2010 - 2:19pm Addthis Arizona Western College (AWC) wants to be the go-to for solar, says Bill Smith, director of facilities management. AWC is based in Yuma, Ariz., and that, according to the Guinness Book of World Records, is the sunniest place on Earth. Now, a group of private companies, researchers and AWC educators will tap the solar potential by building a 4.995 MW solar array at the college. When the solar energy system is completed, it will be the largest solar array on any U.S. college campus. "We are strategically placed geographically. Now that we have this company that has approached us with this awesome opportunity, we want ...

76

EURISOL-DS MULTI-MW TARGET ISSUES: BEAM WINDOW AND TRANSVERSE FILM TARGET  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The analysis of the EURISOL-DS Multi_MW target precise geometry (Fig.1) has proved that large fission yields can be achieved with a 4 MW, providing a technically feasible design to evacuate the power deposited in the liquid mercury. Different designs for the mercury flow have been proposed, which maintain its temperature below the boiling point with moderate flow speeds (maximum 4 m/s).

Adonai Herrera-Martnez, Yacine Kadi

77

New two element steam turbine for 150 to 27 MW applications  

SciTech Connect

A modern high efficiency two element steam turbine for application in the 150 MW to 270 MW range is discussed. Innovations utilized and the experience base from which they are derived are presented. Benefits to the power producer resulting from this innovative approach are highlighted.They include reliability and efficiency improvement, delivery time reduction, and the application of design features, microprocessor control systems, and A. I. diagnostic techniques to reduce maintenance requirements, increase life, and enhance overall power plant productivity.

Martin, H.F.; Vaccarro, F.R.; Conrad, J.D. (Westinghouse Electric Corp., Orlando, FL (USA))

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

500 MW X-Band RF System of a 0.25 GeV Electron LINAC for Advanced Compton Scattering Source Application  

SciTech Connect

A Mono-Energetic Gamma-Ray (MEGa-Ray) Compton scattering light source is being developed at LLNL in collaboration with the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory. The electron beam for the Compton scattering interaction will be generated by a X-band RF gun and a X-band LINAC at the frequency of 11.424 GHz. High power RF in excess of 500 MW is needed to accelerate the electrons to energy of 250 MeV or greater for the interaction. Two high power klystron amplifiers, each capable of generating 50 MW, 1.5 msec pulses, will be the main high power RF sources for the system. These klystrons will be powered by state of the art solid-state high voltage modulators. A RF pulse compressor, similar to the SLED II pulse compressor, will compress the klystron output pulse with a power gain factor of five. For compactness consideration, we are looking at a folded waveguide setup. This will give us 500 MW at output of the compressor. The compressed pulse will then be distributed to the RF gun and to six traveling wave accelerator sections. Phase and amplitude control are located at the RF gun input and additional control points along the LINAC to allow for parameter control during operation. This high power RF system is being designed and constructed. In this paper, we will present the design, layout, and status of this RF system.

Chu, Tak Sum; /LLNL, Livermore; Anderson, Scott; /LLNL, Livermore; Barty, Christopher; /LLNL, Livermore; Gibson, David; /LLNL, Livermore; Hartemann, Fred; /LLNL, Livermore; Marsh, Roark; /LLNL, Livermore; Siders, Craig; /LLNL, Livermore; Adolphsen, Chris; /SLAC; Jongewaard, Erik; /SLAC; Raubenheimer, Tor; /SLAC; Tantawi, Sami; /SLAC; Vlieks, Arnold; /SLAC; Wang, Juwen; /SLAC

2012-07-03T23:59:59.000Z

79

Seismic fragility analysis of 5MW offshore wind turbine  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Considering nonlinear soilpile interaction, seismic fragility analysis of offshore wind turbine was performed. Interface between ground soils and piles were modeled as nonlinear spring elements. Ground excitation time histories were applied to spring boundaries. Two methods of applying ground motion were compared. Different time histories from free field analysis were applied to each boundary in the first loading plan (A). They were compared with the second loading plan (B) in which the same ground motion is applied to all boundaries. Critical displacement for wind turbine was proposed by using push-over analysis. Both the stress based and the displacement based fragility curves were obtained using dynamic responses for different peak ground accelerations (PGAs). In numerical example, it was shown that seismic responses from loading plan A are bigger than from plan B. It seems that the bigger ground motion at surface can cause less response at wind turbine due to phase difference between ground motions at various soil layers. Finally, it can be concluded that layer by layer ground motions from free field analysis should be used in seismic design of offshore wind turbine.

Dong Hyawn Kim; Sang Geun Lee; Il Keun Lee

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Development of a 2 MW CW Waterload for Electron Cyclotron Heating Systems  

SciTech Connect

Calabazas Creek Research, Inc. developed a load capable of continuously dissipating 2 MW of RF power from gyrotrons. The input uses HE11 corrugated waveguide and a rotating launcher to uniformly disperse the power over the lossy surfaces in the load. This builds on experience with a previous load designed to dissipate 1 MW of continuous RF power. The 2 MW load uses more advanced RF dispersion to double the capability in the same size device as the 1 MW load. The new load reduces reflected power from the load to significantly less than 1 %. This eliminates requirements for a preload to capture reflected power. The program updated control electronics that provides all required interlocks for operation and measurement of peak and average power. The program developed two version of the load. The initial version used primarily anodized aluminum to reduce weight and cost. The second version used copper and stainless steel to meet specifications for the ITER reactor currently under construction in France. Tests of the new load at the Japanese Atomic Energy Agency confirmed operation of the load to a power level of 1 MW, which is the highest power currently available for testing the load. Additional tests will be performed at General Atomics in spring 2013. The U.S. ITER organization will test the copper/stainless steel version of the load in December 2012 or early in 2013. Both loads are currently being marketed worldwide.

R. Lawrence,Ives; Maxwell Mizuhara; George Collins; Jeffrey Neilson; Philipp Borchard

2012-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tw mw phase" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Status of KSTAR 170 GHz, 1 MW Electron Cyclotron Heating and Current Drive System  

SciTech Connect

A 170 GHz Electron Cyclotron Heating and Current Drive (ECH/CD) system on KSTAR is designed to launch total 2.4 MW of power for up to 300 sec into the plasma. At present the first 1 MW ECH/CD system is under installation and commissioning for 2011 KSTAR campaign. The 170 GHz, 1 MW, 300 sec gyrotron and the matching optics unit (MOU) will be provided from JAEA under collaboration between NFRI and JAEA. The transmission line consists of MOU and 70 m long 63.5 mm ID corrugated waveguides with the eight miter bends. The 1 MW, 10 sec launcher is developed based on the existing two-mirror front-end launcher in collaboration with Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory and Pohang University of Science and Technology, and is installed on the low field side in the KSTAR equatorial plane. The mirror pivot is located at 30 cm below from the equatorial plane. 3.6 MVA power supply system is manufactured and now is under commissioning to meet the triode gun operation of JAEA gyrotron. The power supply consists of 66 kV/55 A cathode power supply, mode-anode system, and 50 kV/160 mA body power supply. In this paper, the current status of KSTAR 170 GHz, 1 MW ECH/CD system will be presented as well as the experimental plan utilizing 170 GHz new ECH/CD system.

Joung, M.; Bae, Y. S.; Jeong, J. H.; Park, S.; Kim, H. J.; Yang, H. L. [National Fusion Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Park, H.; Cho, M. H.; Namkung, W. [Pohang University of Science and Technology, Pohang (Korea, Republic of); Hosea, J.; Ellis, R. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton (United States); Sakamoto, K.; Kajiwara, K. [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Ibaraki (Japan); Doane, J. [General Atomics, San Diego (United States)

2011-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

82

Idaho/Geothermal | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Idaho/Geothermal Idaho/Geothermal < Idaho Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Print PDF Idaho Geothermal General Regulatory Roadmap Geothermal Power Projects Under Development in Idaho Developer Location Estimated Capacity (MW) Development Phase Geothermal Area Geothermal Region Raft River II Geothermal Project U.S. Geothermal Raft River, AK 114 MW114,000 kW 114,000,000 W 114,000,000,000 mW 0.114 GW 1.14e-4 TW Phase III - Permitting and Initial Development Raft River Geothermal Area Northern Basin and Range Geothermal Region Raft River III Geothermal Project U.S. Geothermal Raft River, ID 114 MW114,000 kW 114,000,000 W 114,000,000,000 mW 0.114 GW 1.14e-4 TW Phase I - Resource Procurement and Identification Raft River Geothermal Area Northern Basin and Range Geothermal Region

83

Alaska/Geothermal | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Alaska/Geothermal Alaska/Geothermal < Alaska Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Print PDF Alaska Geothermal General Regulatory Roadmap Geothermal Power Projects Under Development in Alaska Developer Location Estimated Capacity (MW) Development Phase Geothermal Area Geothermal Region Akutan Geothermal Project City Of Akutan Akutan, Alaska 10 MW10,000 kW 10,000,000 W 10,000,000,000 mW 0.01 GW 1.0e-5 TW Phase II - Resource Exploration and Confirmation Akutan Fumaroles Geothermal Area Alaska Geothermal Region Pilgrim Hot Springs Geothermal Project Unaatuq (Near Nome), OR 10 MW10,000 kW 10,000,000 W 10,000,000,000 mW 0.01 GW 1.0e-5 TW Phase I - Resource Procurement and Identification Pilgrim Hot Springs Geothermal Area Alaska Geothermal Region Add a geothermal project.

84

TOXECON RETROFIT FOR MERCURY AND MULTI-POLLUTANT CONTROL ON THREE 90 MW COAL FIRED BOILERS  

SciTech Connect

With the Nation's coal-burning utilities facing tighter controls on mercury pollutants, the U.S. Department of Energy is supporting projects that could offer power plant operators better ways to reduce these emissions at much lower costs. Sorbent injection technology represents one of the simplest and most mature approaches to controlling mercury emissions from coal-fired boilers. It involves injecting a solid material such as powdered activated carbon into the flue gas. The gas-phase mercury in the flue gas contacts the sorbent and attaches to its surface. The sorbent with the mercury attached is then collected by a particle control device along with the other solid material, primarily fly ash. WE Energies has over 3,700 MW of coal-fired generating capacity and supports an integrated multi-emission control strategy for SO{sub 2}, NO{sub x} and mercury emissions while maintaining a varied fuel mix for electric supply. The primary goal of this project is to reduce mercury emissions from three 90 MW units that burn Powder River Basin coal at the WE Energies Presque Isle Power Plant. Additional goals are to reduce nitrogen oxide (NO{sub x}), sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}), and particulate matter (PM) emissions, allow for reuse and sale of fly ash, demonstrate a reliable mercury continuous emission monitor (CEM) suitable for use in the power plant environment, and demonstrate a process to recover mercury captured in the sorbent. To achieve these goals, WE Energies (the Participant) will design, install, and operate a TOXECON{trademark} (TOXECON) system designed to clean the combined flue gases of units 7, 8, and 9 at the Presque Isle Power Plant. TOXECON is a patented process in which a fabric filter system (baghouse) installed down stream of an existing particle control device is used in conjunction with sorbent injection for removal of pollutants from combustion flue gas. For this project, the flue gas emissions will be controlled from the three units using a single baghouse. Mercury will be controlled by injection of activated carbon or other novel sorbents, while NO{sub x} and SO{sub 2} will be controlled by injection of sodium based or other novel sorbents. Addition of the TOXECON baghouse will provide enhanced particulate control. Sorbents will be injected downstream of the existing particle collection device to allow for continued sale and reuse of captured fly ash from the existing particulate control device, uncontaminated by activated carbon or sodium sorbents. Methods for sorbent regeneration, i.e. mercury recovery from the sorbent, will be explored and evaluated. For mercury concentration monitoring in the flue gas streams, components available for use will be evaluated and the best available will be integrated into a mercury CEM suitable for use in the power plant environment. This project will provide for the use of a novel multi-pollutant control system to reduce emissions of mercury and other air pollutants, while minimizing waste, from a coal-fired power generation system.

Richard E. Johnson

2004-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

85

Ecosystem Solar Electric Corp aka Solar MW Energy Inc | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Solar Electric Corp aka Solar MW Energy Inc Solar Electric Corp aka Solar MW Energy Inc Jump to: navigation, search Name Ecosystem Solar Electric Corp, aka Solar MW Energy Inc Place Ontario, California Zip 91761 Product Plans to develop STEG plants in the Mojave desert. Coordinates 34.06457°, -117.647809° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":34.06457,"lon":-117.647809,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

86

Calculational criticality analyses of 10- and 20-MW UF{sub 6} freezer/sublimer vessels  

SciTech Connect

Calculational criticality analyses have been performed for 10- and 20-MW UF{sub 6} freezer/sublimer vessels. The freezer/sublimers have been analyzed over a range of conditions that encompass normal operation and abnormal conditions. The effects of HF moderation of the UF{sub 6} in each vessel have been considered for uranium enriched between 2 and 5 wt % {sup 235}U. The results indicate that the nuclearly safe enrichments originally established for the operation of a 10-MW freezer/sublimer, based on a hydrogen-to-uranium moderation ratio of 0.33, are acceptable. If strict moderation control can be demonstrated for hydrogen-to-uranium moderation ratios that are less than 0.33, then the enrichment limits for the 10-MW freezer/sublimer may be increased slightly. The calculations performed also allow safe enrichment limits to be established for a 20-NM freezer/sublimer under moderation control.

Jordan, W.C.

1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Calculational criticality analyses of 10- and 20-MW UF[sub 6] freezer/sublimer vessels  

SciTech Connect

Calculational criticality analyses have been performed for 10- and 20-MW UF[sub 6] freezer/sublimer vessels. The freezer/sublimers have been analyzed over a range of conditions that encompass normal operation and abnormal conditions. The effects of HF moderation of the UF[sub 6] in each vessel have been considered for uranium enriched between 2 and 5 wt % [sup 235]U. The results indicate that the nuclearly safe enrichments originally established for the operation of a 10-MW freezer/sublimer, based on a hydrogen-to-uranium moderation ratio of 0.33, are acceptable. If strict moderation control can be demonstrated for hydrogen-to-uranium moderation ratios that are less than 0.33, then the enrichment limits for the 10-MW freezer/sublimer may be increased slightly. The calculations performed also allow safe enrichment limits to be established for a 20-NM freezer/sublimer under moderation control.

Jordan, W.C.

1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Tucson Request for Proposal for 1-5 MW PV PPA  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The mission of Tucson Water, a Department of the City of Tucson (the City), is to ensure that its customers receive high quality water and excellent service in a cost efficient, safe and environmentally responsible manner. In the interest of furthering Tucson Waters mission, the City is seeking a Contractor to finance, design, build, commission, own, operate and maintain up to a 1 megawatt (MW) DCSTC hotovoltaic (PV) system. The City also seeks an option for expanding the PV system up to a total of 5 MW DCSTC PV.

89

Genesee Phase 3, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada  

SciTech Connect

Genesee Phase 3 is Canada's first supercritical power plant and, at 450 MW, is significant not only for its low levels of greenhouse gas emissions, made possible by the use of supercritical technology and emissions off-sets. It also marks the North American debut of a boiler, derived from a proven 500-MW-class Hitachi reference plant, that operates at sliding pressure. The key benefits of operating in this mode are high efficiency, operating flexibility, and reliability. This boiler design may well migrate to the US in the very near future. 6 figs.

Peltier, R.

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Model Validation at the 204 MW New Mexico Wind Energy Center: Preprint  

SciTech Connect

In this paper, we describe methods to derive and validate equivalent models for a large wind farm. FPL Energy's 204-MW New Mexico Wind Energy Center, which is interconnected to the Public Service Company of New Mexico (PNM) transmission system, was used as a case study. The methods described are applicable to any large wind power plant.

Muljadi, E.; Butterfield, C. P.; Ellis, A.; Mechenbier, J.; Hochheimer, J.; Young, R.; Miller, N.; Delmerico, R.; Zavadil, R.; Smith, J. C.

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Type II Transformation -Regeneration 2 Media -1 Liter Solution Substance []stock/MW Final Add ( )  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Type II Transformation - Regeneration 2 Media - 1 Liter Solution Substance []stock/MW Final Add. bialaphos stock 10mg/ml 1mg/L 100ul/L Pour into 100x25mm Petri dishes in hood. 1L=30 plates. Dry plates lids

Raizada, Manish N.

92

DESIGN FOR A 1.3 MW, 13 MEV BEAM DUMP FOR AN ENERGY RECOVERY LINAC*  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

DESIGN FOR A 1.3 MW, 13 MEV BEAM DUMP FOR AN ENERGY RECOVERY LINAC* Colin H. Smith+ , Yun He an Energy Recovery Linac (ERL) is dumped at an energy close to the injection energy. This energy is chosen to be as low as possible consistent with meeting the beam quality specifications. ERLs operate with high

93

Seismic reversal pattern for the 1999 Chi-Chi, Taiwan, MW 7.6 earthquake  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Seismic reversal pattern for the 1999 Chi-Chi, Taiwan, MW 7.6 earthquake Yih-Min Wu a , Chien the variations in seismicity patterns in the Taiwan region before and after the Chi-Chi earthquake. We have found that the areas with relatively high seismicity in the eastern Taiwan became abnormally quiet before the Chi

Wu, Yih-Min

94

Sculpting on polymers using focused ion beam M.-W. Moon a  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Sculpting on polymers using focused ion beam M.-W. Moon a , E.-K. Her b , K.H. Oh b , K.-R. Lee and Engineering, Seoul National University, San 56-1 Shillim, Kwanak, Seoul, 151-744, Republic of Korea c Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering, Northeastern University, Boston, MA 02115, USA A B S T R

Vaziri, Ashkan

95

Management and Organizational Behavior Section 301-08 @ 2:00 3:15 MW  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

MGMT 301 Management and Organizational Behavior Fall 2013 Section 301-08 @ 2:00 ­ 3:15 MW Beatty organizational goals by working with, and through, people and other resources. Organizations are treated factors. International as well as domestic situations are examined. Course Learning Objectives: 1

Young, Paul Thomas

96

EK 131/132 module: Introduction to Wind Energy MW 3-5  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

EK 131/132 module: Introduction to Wind Energy MW 3-5 Course. This course provides an overview of wind turbine technology and energy concepts. The question of whether wind. Students will measure personal energy use and analyze wind turbine data from the Museum of Science's wind

97

Baseline System Costs for 50.0 MW Enhanced Geothermal System -- A Function  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Baseline System Costs for 50.0 MW Enhanced Geothermal System -- A Function Baseline System Costs for 50.0 MW Enhanced Geothermal System -- A Function of: Working Fluid, Technology, and Location Geothermal Project Jump to: navigation, search Last modified on July 22, 2011. Project Title Baseline System Costs for 50.0 MW Enhanced Geothermal System -- A Function of: Working Fluid, Technology, and Location Project Type / Topic 1 Recovery Act: Enhanced Geothermal Systems Component Research and Development/Analysis Project Type / Topic 2 Geothermal Analysis Project Description This effort will support the expansion of Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS), supporting DOE Strategic Themes of "energy security" and sub goal of "energy diversity"; reducing the Nation's dependence on foreign oil while improving our environment. A 50 MW has been chosen as a design point, so that the project may also assess how different machinery approaches will change the costing - it is a mid point in size where multiple solutions exist that will allow the team to effectively explore the options in the design space and understand the cost.

98

Active thrust faulting offshore Boumerdes, Algeria, and its relations to the 2003 Mw 6.9 earthquake  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Active thrust faulting offshore Boumerdes, Algeria, and its relations to the 2003 Mw 6.9 earthquake offshore Boumerdes, Algeria, and its relations to the 2003 Mw 6.9 earthquake, Geophys. Res. Lett., 32, L that strain is distributed over a broad area, from the Atlas front to the offshore margin [Buforn et al., 1995

Déverchère, Jacques

99

NREL: Wind Research - The Denver Post Highlights the NWTC's New 5-MW  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The Denver Post Highlights the NWTC's New 5-MW Dynamometer The Denver Post Highlights the NWTC's New 5-MW Dynamometer January 2, 2014 On January 2, a reporter from The Denver Post toured the new 5-megawatt dynamometer test facility at the National Wind Technology Center (NWTC). Denver Post Writer Mark Jaffe spoke with NWTC Center Director Fort Felker to learn more about how these innovative research capabilities can impact the wind industry as a whole. Read the full story . Officially dedicated in December, the new facility houses one of the largest dynamometers in the world, which offers advanced capabilities to test the mechanical and electrical power-producing systems of multimegawatt wind turbines in a controlled environment. The new dynamometer can also be directly connected to the electric grid or through a controllable grid

100

MHK Projects/NJBPU 1 5 MW Demonstration Program | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

NJBPU 1 5 MW Demonstration Program NJBPU 1 5 MW Demonstration Program < MHK Projects Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":5,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"File:Aquamarine-marker.png","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":39.6032,"lon":-74.3401,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"http:\/\/prod-http-80-800498448.us-east-1.elb.amazonaws.com\/w\/images\/7\/74\/Aquamarine-marker.png","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tw mw phase" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Total Cost Per MwH for all common large scale power generation sources |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Total Cost Per MwH for all common large scale power generation sources Total Cost Per MwH for all common large scale power generation sources Home > Groups > DOE Wind Vision Community In the US DOEnergy, are there calcuations for real cost of energy considering the negative, socialized costs of all commercial large scale power generation soruces ? I am talking about the cost of mountain top removal for coal mined that way, the trip to the power plant, the sludge pond or ash heap, the cost of the gas out of the stack, toxificaiton of the lakes and streams, plant decommision costs. For nuclear yiou are talking about managing the waste in perpetuity. The plant decomission costs and so on. What I am tring to get at is the 'real cost' per MWh or KWh for the various sources ? I suspect that the costs commonly quoted for fossil fuels and nucelar are

102

Heat transfer characteristics of fluidized bed heat exchanger in a 300MW CFB boiler  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In order to investigate the heat transfer characteristics of fluidized bed heat exchanger (FBHE), a series of experiments was carried out in a commercial 300MW circulating fluidized bed (CFB) boiler with FBHE. The parameters of steam, solids and air in FBHE were measured at different boiler loads, based on which the absorbed heat and heat transfer coefficient were calculated. Further study indicates that when the calculated results are applied to the design of large-scale CFB boilers, the bed side heat transfer coefficient in FBHE can be simplified as the function of solids temperature and flow. Therefore, the empirical model of heat transfer coefficient at bed side is put forward. The deviation between calculated results and measured values is acceptable in engineering application. This model provides strong support for the FBHE design in 600MW supercritical CFB boilers.

Man Zhang; Haibo Wu; Qinggang Lu; Yunkai Sun; Guoliang Song

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Spontaneous evolution of self-assembled phases from anisotropic colloidal dispersions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We investigate the spontaneous evolution of various self-assembled phase states from a homogeneous aqueous dispersion of high-aspect ratio Montmorillonite (Na Cloisite) nanoclay platelets grounded on the observations made over a period of 3.5 years. We have established the tw-c phase diagram for this system for the first time in salt-free suspensions under normal pH conditions using rheology experiments and have detected that these suspensions do undergo nontrivial phase evolution and aging dynamics. Distinctive phase separation, equilibrium fluid and equilibrium gels in the tw-c phase space are discovered. Cole-Cole plots derived from rheology measurements suggested the presence of inter connected network-like structures for c > cg, cg being the gelation concentration. All dispersions formed stable sols during the initial time, and with aging network-like structures were found to form via two routes: one for c cg, through equilibrium gelation. This has invoked and called for a revisit of the phase diagram of aging MMT dispersions.

Ravi Kumar Pujala; Nidhi Joshi; H. B. Bohidar

2013-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

104

Preise in CHF inkl. 8.0 % MwSt. Zrichsee AOC  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Weissweine Preise in CHF inkl. 8.0 % MwSt. Schweiz Zürich Zürichsee AOC Riesling-Sylvaner Staatskellerei, Werner Kuster, Rheinau 2010 75 cl 46.00 Staatsschreiber Cuvée blanc Préstige AOC Pinot noir.00 Schiterberger AOC Sauvignon blanc Landolt Weine, Zürich 2010 75 cl 49.00 Teufener AOC Pinot Gris Landolt Weine

Zürich, Universität

105

THE 0.5-2.22 {mu}m SCATTERED LIGHT SPECTRUM OF THE DISK AROUND TW Hya: DETECTION OF A PARTIALLY FILLED DISK GAP AT 80 AU  

SciTech Connect

We present a 0.5-2.2 {mu}m scattered light spectrum of the circumstellar disk around TW Hya from a combination of spatially resolved Hubble Space Telescope STIS spectroscopy and NICMOS coronagraphic images of the disk. We investigate the morphology of the disk at distances >40 AU over this wide range of wavelengths, and identify the presence of a depression in surface brightness at {approx}80 AU that could be caused by a gap in the disk. Additionally, we quantify the surface brightness, azimuthal symmetry, and spectral character of the disk as a function of radius. Our analysis shows that the scattering efficiency of the dust is largely neutral to blue over the observed wavelengths. We model the disk as a steady {alpha}-disk with an ad hoc gap structure. The thermal properties of the disk are self-consistently calculated using a three-dimensional radiative transfer code that uses ray tracing to model the heating of the disk interior and scattered light images. We find a good fit to the data over a wide range of distances from the star if we use a model disk with a partially filled gap of 30% depth at 80 AU and with a self-similar truncation knee at 100 AU. The origin of the gap is unclear, but it could arise from a transition in the nature of the disk's dust composition or the presence of a planetary companion. Based on scalings to previous hydrodynamic simulations of gap-opening criteria for embedded proto-planets, we estimate that a planetary companion forming the gap could have a mass between 6 and 28 M{sub Circled-Plus }.

Debes, John H. [Space Telescope Science Institute, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Jang-Condell, Hannah [University of Wyoming, Laramie, WY 82071 (United States); Weinberger, Alycia J. [Department of Terrestrial Magnetism, Carnegie Institution of Washington, Washington, DC 20015 (United States); Roberge, Aki [Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Schneider, Glenn [Steward Observatory, University of Arizona, Tuscon, AZ 85721 (United States)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Experience of Implementing a PGU-200 MW Two-Boiler One-Turbine Unit at the South-West CHP  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The engineering solutions for PGU-200 MW unit, the electrical distribution system layout, and the results of implementing the SPPA-T3000 control system are presented. The results of performance adjustment conf...

A. V. Chugin; M. S. Tsvetkov; R. I. Kostyuk

2014-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Holocene versus modern catchment erosion rates at 300 MW Baspa II hydroelectric power plant (India, NW Himalaya)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Holocene versus modern catchment erosion rates at 300 MW Baspa II hydroelectric power plant (India private hydroelectric facility, located at the Baspa River which is an important left-hand tributary

Bookhagen, Bodo

108

Experience operating a thermal configuration without a deaerator at the 330 MW unit 3 of the Kashira GRS  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The operating experience gained during introduction of a configuration without a deaerator at the 330 MW unit No. 3 of the Kashira GRS is analyzed. The basic advantages of this configuration are pointed out, ...

G. D. Avrutsky; V. D. Nikanorov; I. R. Kalinowskiy

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

--H.U. Lemke, M.W. Vannier, Inamura, A.G. Farman, & J.H.C. Reiber (Editors)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CARS -- H.U. Lemke, M.W. Vannier, Inamura, A.G. Farman, & J.H.C. Reiber (Editors) CARS.W. Vannier, Inamura, A.G. Farman, Doi & J.H.C. Reiber (Editors) #1; CARS/Springer. rights reserved. Snapshot and the compositionCARS -- H.U. Lemke, M.W. Vannier, Inamura, A.G. Farman, & J.H.C. Reiber (Editors) CARS

Wahle, Andreas

110

Global wind energy market report. Wind energy industry grows at steady pace, adds over 8,000 MW in 2003  

SciTech Connect

Cumulative global wind energy generating capacity topped 39,000 megawatts (MW) by the end of 2003. New equipment totally over 8,000 MW in capacity was installed worldwide during the year. The report, updated annually, provides information on the status of the wind energy market throughout the world and gives details on various regions. A listing of new and cumulative installed capacity by country and by region is included as an appendix.

anon.

2004-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Xenon-induced axial power oscillations in the 400MW PBMR  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The redistribution of the spatial xenon concentration in the 400MW Pebble Bed Modular Reactor (PBMR) core has a non-linear, time-dependent feedback effect on the spatial power density during several types of operational transient events. Due to the inherent weak coupling that exists between the iodine and xenon formation and destruction rates, as well as the complicating effect of spatial variance in the thermal flux field, reactor cores have been analyzed for a number of decades for the occurrence and severity of xenon-induced axial power oscillations. Of specific importance is the degree of oscillation damping exhibited by the core during transients, which involves axial variations in the local power density. In this paper the TINTE reactor dynamics code is used to assess the stability of the current 400MW PBMR core design with regard to axial xenon oscillations. The focus is mainly on the determination of the inherent xenon and power oscillation damping properties by utilizing a set of hypothetical control rod insertion transients at various power levels. The oscillation damping properties of two 100%50%100% load-follow transients, one of which includes the de-stabilizing axial effects of moving control rods, are also discussed in some detail. The study shows that, although first axial mode oscillations do occur in the 400MW PBMR core, the inherent damping of these oscillations is high, and that none of the investigated load-follow transients resulted in diverging oscillations. It is also shown that the PBMR core exhibits no radial oscillation components for these xenon-induced axial power oscillations.

Gerhard Strydom

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Fundamental investigation of Duct/ESP phenomena: 1. 7 MW pilot parametric testing results  

SciTech Connect

Radian Corporation was contracted to investigate duct injection and electrostatic precipitator phenomena in a 1.7-MW pilot plant constructed for this test program. This study was an attempt to resolve previous problems and to answer remaining questions with the technology using an approach which concentrated on the fundamental mechanisms of the process. The goal of the study was to obtain a better understanding of the basic physical and chemical phenomena that control: (1) the desulfurization of flue gas by calcium-based reagent, and (2) the coupling of the duct injection process to an existing ESP particulate collection device. (VC)

McGuire, L.M.; Brown, C.A.

1991-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

113

Fluidized bed combustor 50 MW thermal power plant, Krabi, Thailand. Feasibility study. Export trade information  

SciTech Connect

The report presents the results of a study prepared by Burns and Roe for the Electricity Generating Authority of Thailand to examine the technical feasibility and economic attractiveness for building a 50 MW Atmospheric Fluidized Bed Combustion lignite fired power plant at Krabi, southern Thailand. The study is divided into seven main sections, plus an executive summary and appendices: (1) Introduction; (2) Atmospheric Fluidized Bed Combustion Technology Overview; (3) Fuel and Limestone Tests; (4) Site Evaluation; (5) Station Design and Arrangements; (6) Environmental Considerations; (7) Economic Analysis.

Not Available

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

A new Main Injector radio frequency system for 2.3 MW Project X operations  

SciTech Connect

For Project X Fermilab Main Injector will be required to provide up to 2.3 MW to a neutrino production target at energies between 60 and 120 GeV. To accomplish the above power levels 3 times the current beam intensity will need to be accelerated. In addition the injection energy of Main Injector will need to be as low as 6 GeV. The current 30 year old Main Injector radio frequency system will not be able to provide the required power and a new system will be required. The specifications of the new system will be described.

Dey, J.; Kourbanis, I.; /Fermilab

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

MW-class hybrid power system based on planar solid oxide stack technology  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Scale-Up of Planar SOFC Stack Scale-Up of Planar SOFC Stack Technology for MW-Level Combined Cycle System Final Report TIAX LLC Acorn Park Cambridge, Massachusetts 02140-2390 Reference: D0136 Submitted to NETL October 3, 2003 1 NETL-Hybrid Scale-UP/D0136/SS/V1 1 Executive Summary 2 Background, Objectives & Approach 3 SOFC Cell Geometry and Modeling 4 SOFC Power Scale-up 5 System Design and Costs 6 Conclusions & Recommendations A Appendix 2 NETL-Hybrid Scale-UP/D0136/SS/V1 Executive Summary SECA Strategy NETL wanted to understand if and how SECA-style anode-supported SOFC stacks could be scaled-up for use in MW-level combined cycle plants. * SECA strategy relies on the use of modular, mass produced, SOFC stacks in the 3 - 10 kW capacity range for a wide range of applications. * Technical feasibility small-scale applications has been evaluated by SECA:

116

Internal Technical Report, Safety Analysis Report 5 MW(e) Raft River Research and Development Plant  

SciTech Connect

The Raft River Geothermal Site is located in Southern Idaho's Raft River Valley, southwest of Malta, Idaho, in Cassia County. EG and G idaho, Inc., is the DOE's prime contractor for development of the Raft River geothermal field. Contract work has been progressing for several years towards creating a fully integrated utilization of geothermal water. Developmental progress has resulted in the drilling of seven major DOE wells. Four are producing geothermal water from reservoir temperatures measured to approximately 149 C (approximately 300 F). Closed-in well head pressures range from 69 to 102 kPa (100 to 175 psi). Two wells are scheduled for geothermal cold 60 C (140 F) water reinjection. The prime development effort is for a power plant designed to generate electricity using the heat from the geothermal hot water. The plant is designated as the ''5 MW(e) Raft River Research and Development Plant'' project. General site management assigned to EG and G has resulted in planning and development of many parts of the 5 MW program. Support and development activities have included: (1) engineering design, procurement, and construction support; (2) fluid supply and injection facilities, their study, and control; (3) development and installation of transfer piping systems for geothermal water collection and disposal by injection; and (4) heat exchanger fouling tests.

Brown, E.S.; Homer, G.B.; Shaber, C.R.; Thurow, T.L.

1981-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

117

Experimental Study Of A 1.5-mw, 110-ghz Gyrotron Oscillator  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis reports the design, construction and testing of a 1.5 MW, 110 GHz gyrotron oscillator. This high power microwave tube has been proposed as the next evolutionary step for gyrotrons used to provide electron cyclotron heating required in fusion devices. A short pulse gyrotron based on the industrial tube design was built at MIT for experimental studies. The experiments are the first demonstration of such high powers at 110 GHz. Using a 96 kV, 40 A electron beam, over 1.4 MW was axially extracted in the design (TE22,6) mode in 3 ?s pulses, corresponding to a microwave efficiency of 37%. The beam alpha, the ratio of transverse to axial velocity in the electron beam, was measured with a probe. At the high efficiency operating point the beam alpha was measured as 1.33. This value of alpha is less than the design value of 1.4, possibly accounting for the slightly reduced experimental efficiency. The output power and efficiency, as a function of magnetic field, beam voltage, and beam current, are in...

Anderson, J P

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Progress towards a 200 MW electron beam accelerator for the RDHWT/Mariah II Program.  

SciTech Connect

The Radiatively Driven Hypersonic Wind Tunnel (RDHWT) program requires an unprecedented 2-3 MeV electron beam energy source at an average beam power of approximately 200MW. This system injects energy downstream of a conventional supersonic air nozzle to minimize plenum temperature requirements for duplicating flight conditions above Mach 8 for long run-times. Direct-current electron accelerator technology is being developed to meet the objectives of a radiatively driven Mach 12 wind tunnel with a free stream dynamic pressure q=2000 psf. Due to the nature of research and industrial applications, there has never been a requirement for a single accelerator module with an output power exceeding approximately 500 kW. Although a 200MW module is a two-order of magnitude extrapolation from demonstrated power levels, the scaling of accelerator components to this level appears feasible. Accelerator system concepts are rapidly maturing and a clear technology development path has been established. Additionally, energy addition experiments have been conducted up to 800 kW into a supersonic airflow. This paper will discuss progress in the development of electron beam accelerator technology as an energy addition source for the RDHWT program and results of electron beam energy addition experiments conducted at Sandia National Laboratories.

Lockner, Thomas Ramsbeck; Reed, Kim Warren; Pena, Gary Edward; Schneider, Larry X.; Lipinski, Ronald J.; Glover, Steven Frank

2004-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Development of 1 MW-class HTS motor for podded ship propulsion system  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

To reduce fuel consumption and lead to a major reduction of pollution from NOx, SOx and CO2, the electric ship propulsion system is one of the most prospective substitutes for conventional ship propulsion systems. In order to spread it, innovative technologies for the improvement of the power transmission are required. The high temperature superconducting technology has the possibility for a drastic reduction of power transmission loss. Recently, electric podded propulsions have become popular for large cruise vessels, icebreakers and chemical tankers because of the flexibility of the equipment arrangement and the stern hull design, and better maneuverability in harbour, etc. In this paper, a 1 MW-class High temperature superconducting (HTS) motor with high efficiency, smaller size and simple structure, which is designed and manufactured for podded propulsion, is reported. For the case of a coastal ship driven by the optimized podded propulsion in which the 1MW HTS motor is equipped, the reductions of fluid dynamic resistance and power transmission losses are demonstrated. The present research & development has been supported by the New Energy and Industrial Technology Development Organization (NEDO).

K Umemoto; K Aizawa; M Yokoyama; K Yoshikawa; Y Kimura; M Izumi; K Ohashi; M Numano; K Okumura; M Yamaguchi; Y Gocho; E Kosuge

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Initial operating experience of the 12-MW La Ola photovoltaic system.  

SciTech Connect

The 1.2-MW La Ola photovoltaic (PV) power plant in Lanai, Hawaii, has been in operation since December 2009. The host system is a small island microgrid with peak load of 5 MW. Simulations conducted as part of the interconnection study concluded that unmitigated PV output ramps had the potential to negatively affect system frequency. Based on that study, the PV system was initially allowed to operate with output power limited to 50% of nameplate to reduce the potential for frequency instability due to PV variability. Based on the analysis of historical voltage, frequency, and power output data at 50% output level, the PV system has not significantly affected grid performance. However, it should be noted that the impact of PV variability on active and reactive power output of the nearby diesel generators was not evaluated. In summer 2011, an energy storage system was installed to counteract high ramp rates and allow the PV system to operate at rated output. The energy storage system was not fully operational at the time this report was written; therefore, analysis results do not address system performance with the battery system in place.

Ellis, Abraham; Lenox, Carl (SunPower Corporation, Richmond, CA); Johnson, Jay; Quiroz, Jimmy Edward; Schenkman, Benjamin L.

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tw mw phase" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

TOXECON RETROFIT FOR MERCURY AND MULTI-POLLUTANT CONTROL ON THREE 90-MW COAL-FIRED BOILERS  

SciTech Connect

With the Nation's coal-burning utilities facing tighter controls on mercury pollutants, the U.S. Department of Energy is supporting projects that could offer power plant operators better ways to reduce these emissions at much lower costs. Sorbent injection technology represents one of the simplest and most mature approaches to controlling mercury emissions from coal-fired boilers. It involves injecting a solid material such as powdered activated carbon into the flue gas. The gas-phase mercury in the flue gas contacts the sorbent and attaches to its surface. The sorbent with the mercury attached is then collected by a particulate control device along with the other solid material, primarily fly ash. We Energies has over 3,200 MW of coal-fired generating capacity and supports an integrated multi-emission control strategy for SO{sub 2}, NO{sub x}, and mercury emissions while maintaining a varied fuel mix for electric supply. The primary goal of this project is to reduce mercury emissions from three 90-MW units that burn Powder River Basin coal at the We Energies Presque Isle Power Plant. Additional goals are to reduce nitrogen oxide (NO{sub x}), sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}), and particulate matter (PM) emissions, allow for reuse and sale of fly ash, demonstrate a reliable mercury continuous emission monitor (CEM) suitable for use in the power plant environment, and demonstrate a process to recover mercury captured in the sorbent. To achieve these goals, We Energies (the Participant) will design, install, and operate a TOXECON{trademark} system designed to clean the combined flue gases of Units 7, 8, and 9 at the Presque Isle Power Plant. TOXECON{trademark} is a patented process in which a fabric filter system (baghouse) installed downstream of an existing particle control device is used in conjunction with sorbent injection for removal of pollutants from combustion flue gas. For this project, the flue gas emissions will be controlled from the three units using a single baghouse. Mercury will be controlled by injection of activated carbon or other novel sorbents, while NO{sub x} and SO{sub 2} will be controlled by injection of sodium-based or other novel sorbents. Addition of the TOXECON{trademark} baghouse will provide enhanced particulate control. Sorbents will be injected downstream of the existing particle collection device to allow for continued sale and reuse of captured fly ash from the existing particulate control device, uncontaminated by activated carbon or sodium sorbents. Methods for sorbent regeneration, i.e., mercury recovery from the sorbent, will be explored and evaluated. For mercury concentration monitoring in the flue gas streams, components available for use will be evaluated and the best available will be integrated into a mercury CEM suitable for use in the power plant environment. This project will provide for the use of a control system to reduce emissions of mercury while minimizing waste from a coal-fired power generation system.

Steven T. Derenne

2006-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

122

TOXECON RETROFIT FOR MERCURY AND MULTI-POLLUTANT CONTROL-ON THREE 90 MW COAL FIRED BOILERS  

SciTech Connect

With the Nation's coal-burning utilities facing tighter controls on mercury pollutants, the U.S. Department of Energy is supporting projects that could offer power plant operators better ways to reduce these emissions at much lower costs. Sorbent injection technology represents one of the simplest and most mature approaches to controlling mercury emissions from coal-fired boilers. It involves injecting a solid material such as powdered activated carbon into the flue gas. The gas-phase mercury in the flue gas contacts the sorbent and attaches to its surface. The sorbent with the mercury attached is then collected by a particle control device along with the other solid material, primarily fly ash. We Energies has over 3,200 MW of coal-fired generating capacity and supports an integrated multi-emission control strategy for SO{sub 2}, NO{sub x} and mercury emissions while maintaining a varied fuel mix for electric supply. The primary goal of this project is to reduce mercury emissions from three 90 MW units that burn Powder River Basin coal at the We Energies Presque Isle Power Plant. Additional goals are to reduce nitrogen oxide (NO{sub x}), sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}), and particulate matter (PM) emissions, allow for reuse and sale of fly ash, demonstrate a reliable mercury continuous emission monitor (CEM) suitable for use in the power plant environment, and demonstrate a process to recover mercury captured in the sorbent. To achieve these goals, We Energies (the Participant) will design, install, and operate a TOXECON{trademark} (TOXECON) system designed to clean the combined flue gases of units 7, 8, and 9 at the Presque Isle Power Plant. TOXECON is a patented process in which a fabric filter system (baghouse) installed down stream of an existing particle control device is used in conjunction with sorbent injection for removal of pollutants from combustion flue gas. For this project, the flue gas emissions will be controlled from the three units using a single baghouse. Mercury will be controlled by injection of activated carbon or other novel sorbents, while NO{sub x} and SO{sub 2} will be controlled by injection of sodium based or other novel sorbents. Addition of the TOXECON baghouse will provide enhanced particulate control. Sorbents will be injected downstream of the existing particle collection device to allow for continued sale and reuse of captured fly ash from the existing particulate control device, uncontaminated by activated carbon or sodium sorbents. Methods for sorbent regeneration, i.e. mercury recovery from the sorbent, will be explored and evaluated. For mercury concentration monitoring in the flue gas streams, components available for use will be evaluated and the best available will be integrated into a mercury CEM suitable for use in the power plant environment. This project will provide for the use of a novel multi-pollutant control system to reduce emissions of mercury while minimizing waste, from a coal-fired power generation system.

Richard E. Johnson

2004-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

123

Definition of a 5MW/61.5m wind turbine blade reference model.  

SciTech Connect

A basic structural concept of the blade design that is associated with the frequently utilized %E2%80%9CNREL offshore 5-MW baseline wind turbine%E2%80%9D is needed for studies involving blade structural design and blade structural design tools. The blade structural design documented in this report represents a concept that meets basic design criteria set forth by IEC standards for the onshore turbine. The design documented in this report is not a fully vetted blade design which is ready for manufacture. The intent of the structural concept described by this report is to provide a good starting point for more detailed and targeted investigations such as blade design optimization, blade design tool verification, blade materials and structures investigations, and blade design standards evaluation. This report documents the information used to create the current model as well as the analyses used to verify that the blade structural performance meets reasonable blade design criteria.

Resor, Brian Ray

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Investigation of the part-load performance of two 1. 12 MW regenerative marine gas turbines  

SciTech Connect

Regenerative and intercooled-regenerative gas turbine engines with low pressure ratio have significant efficiency advantages over traditional aero-derivative engines of higher pressure ratios, and can compete with modern diesel engines for marine propulsion. Their performance is extremely sensitive to thermodynamic-cycle parameter choices and the type of components. The performance of two 1.12 MW (1,500 hp) regenerative gas turbines are predicted with computer simulations. One engine has a single-shaft configuration, and the other has a gas-generator/power-turbine combination. The latter arrangement is essential for wide off-design operating regime. The performance of each engine driving fixed-pitch and controllable-pitch propellers, or an AC electric bus (for electric-motor-driven propellers) is investigated. For commercial applications the controllable-pitch propeller may have efficiency advantages (depending on engine type and shaft arrangements). For military applications the electric drive provides better operational flexibility.

Korakianitis, T.; Beier, K.J. (Washington Univ., St. Louis, MO (United States). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering)

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Final Report, Validation of Novel Planar Cell Design for MW-Scale SOFC Power Systems  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the work completed by NexTech Materials, Ltd. during a three-year project to validate an electrolyte-supported planar solid oxide fuel cell design, termed the FlexCell, for coal-based, megawatt-scale power generation systems. This project was focused on the fabrication and testing of electrolyte-supported FlexCells with yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) as the electrolyte material. YSZ based FlexCells were made with sizes ranging from 100 to 500 cm2. Single-cell testing was performed to confirm high electrochemical performance, both with diluted hydrogen and simulated coal gas as fuels. Finite element analysis modeling was performed at The Ohio State University was performed to establish FlexCell architectures with optimum mechanical robustness. A manufacturing cost analysis was completed, which confirmed that manufacturing costs of less than $50/kW are achievable at high volumes (500 MW/year).

Swartz, Dr Scott L.; Thrun, Dr Lora B.; Arkenberg, Mr Gene B.; Chenault, Ms Kellie M.

2012-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

126

Validation of Novel Planar Cell Design for MW-Scale SOFC Power Systems  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the work completed by NexTech Materials, Ltd. during a three-year project to validate an electrolyte-supported planar solid oxide fuel cell design, termed the FlexCell, for coal-based, megawatt-scale power generation systems. This project was focused on the fabrication and testing of electrolyte-supported FlexCells with yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) as the electrolyte material. YSZ based FlexCells were made with sizes ranging from 100 to 500 cm{sup 2}. Single-cell testing was performed to confirm high electrochemical performance, both with diluted hydrogen and simulated coal gas as fuels. Finite element analysis modeling was performed at The Ohio State University was performed to establish FlexCell architectures with optimum mechanical robustness. A manufacturing cost analysis was completed, which confirmed that manufacturing costs of less than $50/kW are achievable at high volumes (500 MW/year). DISCLAIMER

Scott Swartz; Lora Thrun; Gene Arkenberg; Kellie Chenault

2011-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

127

Model Validation at the 204-MW New Mexico Wind Energy Center (Poster)  

SciTech Connect

The objectives of this report are: (1) to investigate the impact of aggregation on a large wind farm; and (2) to explore the dynamic behaviors of the power system and the wind turbine. The methods used are: (1) use equivalencing method previously developed to simplify Taiban Mesa wind power plant; (2) use PSLF dynamic analysis to simulate the wind power plant with AWEA-proposed low voltage ride through (LVRT) used to test the systems; and (3) represent a 204-MW wind plant two ways, treat the entire wind farm feeding a large power system network as a single generator and treat each wind turbine within the wind farm as an individual generator (136 generators) feeding the large power system network.

Muljadi, E.; Butterfield, C. P.; Miller, N.; Delmerico, R.; Ellis, A.; Mechenbier, J.; Zavadil, R.; Smith, J. C.; Hochheimer, J.; Young, R.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Detailed design of the 2MW Demonstration Plant. Topical report, Task 2  

SciTech Connect

This document provides a summary of the design of the 2MW carbonate fuel cell power plant which will be built and tested under DOE cooperative agreement DE-FC2l-92MC29237. The report is divided into sections which describe the process and stack module design, and Appendices which provide additional design detail. Section 2.0 provides an overview of the program, including the project objectives, site location, and schedule. A description of the overall process is presented in Section 3.0. The design of the fuel cell stack Modules is described in Section 5.0, which discusses the design of the fuel cell stacks, multi-stack enclosures, and Stack Modules. Additional detail is provided in a report Appendix, the Final Design Criteria Summary. This is an abstract of the design criteria used in the design of the Submodules and Modules.

Not Available

1993-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

129

Conceptual Design of a 50--100 MW Electron Beam Accelerator System for the National Hypersonic Wind Tunnel Program  

SciTech Connect

The National Hypersonic Wind Tunnel program requires an unprecedented electron beam source capable of 1--2 MeV at a beam power level of 50--100 MW. Direct-current electron accelerator technology can readily generate high average power beams to approximately 5 MeV at output efficiencies greater than 90%. However, due to the nature of research and industrial applications, there has never been a requirement for a single module with an output power exceeding approximately 500 kW. Although a 50--100 MW module is a two-order extrapolation from demonstrated power levels, the scaling of accelerator components appears reasonable. This paper presents an evaluation of component and system issues involved in the design of a 50--100 MW electron beam accelerator system with precision beam transport into a high pressure flowing air environment.

SCHNEIDER,LARRY X.

2000-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Phase five  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Phase five Phase five 1663 Los Alamos science and technology magazine Latest Issue:November 2013 All Issues » submit Phase five Los Alamos physicists have conclusively demonstrated the existence of a new phase of matter. November 25, 2013 Phase five Scientists still have more to learn about the exotic physics of specialty materials. What makes the cuprates special? How about a new phase of matter. Ceramic metals known as cuprates have mystified physicists for decades. They exhibit a variety of distinct phases of matter, each with its own specific properties, including a phase bearing an exotic type of magnetism, a high-temperature superconducting phase, an ordinary metal phase, a poorly understood and weird metallic phase simply called a strange metal, and an equally poorly understood metallic phase known as the pseudogap. The

131

Feasible experimental study on the utilization of a 300 MW CFB boiler desulfurizating bottom ash for construction applications  

SciTech Connect

CFB boiler ash cannot be used as a cement replacement in concrete due to its unacceptably high sulfur content. The disposal in landfills has been the most common means of handling ash in circulating fluidized bed boiler power plants. However for a 300 MW CFB boiler power plant, there will be 600,000 tons of ash discharged per year and will result in great volumes and disposal cost of ash byproduct. It was very necessary to solve the utilization of CFB ash and to decrease the disposal cost of CFB ash. The feasible experimental study results on the utilization of the bottom ashes of a 300 MW CFB boiler in Baima power plant in China were reported in this paper. The bottom ashes used for test came from the discharged bottom ashes in a 100 MW CFB boiler in which the anthracite and limestone designed for the 300 MW CFB project was burned. The results of this study showed that the bottom ash could be used for cementitious material, road concrete, and road base material. The masonry cements, road concrete with 30 MPa compressive strength and 4.0 MPa flexural strength, and the road base material used for base courses of the expressway, the main road and the minor lane were all prepared with milled CFB bottom ashes in the lab. The better methods of utilization of the bottom ashes were discussed in this paper.

Lu, X.F.; Amano, R.S. [University of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI (United States). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering

2006-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

132

Surface deformation in the region of the 1905 Kangra Mw=7.8 earthquake in the period 1846-2001  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

accumulated since a great earthquake in the 15th century. The Kangra rupture could fail again today in a Mw=7 uplift in the Dehra Dun region, and this supposed signal has been incorporated into a large number and the original seismograms suggest that the Kangra earthquake triggered a deep earthquake near Dehra Dun a few

Bilham, Roger

133

ATS 680 A6: Applied Numerical Weather Prediction MW, 1:00-1:50 PM, ACRC Room 212B  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

experiments using a state-of-the-art numerical weather prediction model · Discuss the strengths and weaknesses, Parameterization Schemes: Keys to Understanding Numerical Weather Prediction Models, Cambridge University PressATS 680 A6: Applied Numerical Weather Prediction Fall 2013 MW, 1:00-1:50 PM, ACRC Room 212B Course

134

Gas Spring Losses in Linear Clearance Seal Compressors P.B. Bailey, M.W. Dadd, J.S. Reed*  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Gas Spring Losses in Linear Clearance Seal Compressors P.B. Bailey, M.W. Dadd, J.S. Reed* , C. Stevenage, U.K. Thomas M. Davis Air Force Research Laboratory Kirtland AFB, New Mexico, U.S.A ABSTRACT investigations on conventional crank driven reciprocating compressors, where the use of normal sliding seals

135

Mathematical Modeling and Experimental Study of Biomass Combustion in a Thermal 108 MW Grate-Fired Boiler  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Mathematical Modeling and Experimental Study of Biomass Combustion in a Thermal 108 MW Grate, the noncontinuous biomass feeding and grate movement, the combustion instabilities inside the fuel bed used to fire biomass for heat and power production. However, grate-firing systems are often reported

Rosendahl, Lasse

136

Operating results of the advanced ceramic tube filter (ACTF) at Wakamatus 71 MW PFBC demonstration plant  

SciTech Connect

The ACTF installed at the 71 MWe pressurized fluidized bed combustion (PFBC) demonstration plant at Wakamatsu Power Station of Electric Power Development Co., Ltd. is featured by inside to outside gas flow configuration with vertically arranged tubes in three compartments. This unique configuration offers advantages in the gas cleaning system for high-temperature and high-pressure applications of commercial scale. During Phase-1 demonstration program in Wakamatsu completed in December 1997, the ACTF showed the outstanding performance in terms of dust removal efficiency, pressure drop stability and reliability. The accumulated operating time of the ACTF in Phase-1 reached more than 6,000 hours and the continuous operating time record for 785 hours has been established. The successful results of ACTF and PFBC in Phase-1 lead to a two-year extension of the demonstration program (Phase-2). In Phase-2, it is aimed to demonstrate the further reliability and the possibility of cost reduction of the ACTF. The modified configuration of the boiler in Phase-2 (elimination of the existing pre-cleaning cyclones, etc.) magnifies the inlet dust loading at the ACTF and it calls for modifications in the ACTF to make it feasible with inlet gas with much higher dust loading. The modification works are under way and will continue until July 1998. The test operation is planned to resume in August 1998. This paper reviews the operating results of the ACTF during Wakamatsu demonstration test Phase-1 and gives brief description of the Phase-2 program.

Toriyama, Akira; Higashi, Katsumi; Maeno, Hiroshi; Saito, Tsunehiro; Mori, Mineo; Hori, Junji; Tsuji, Yasujiro

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

System Modeling of ORNL s 20 MW(t) Wood-fired Gasifying Boiler  

SciTech Connect

We present an overview of the new 20 MW(t) wood-fired steam plant currently under construction by Johnson Controls, Inc. at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory in Tennessee. The new plant will utilize a low-temperature air-blown gasifier system developed by the Nexterra Systems Corporation to generate low-heating value syngas (producer gas), which will then be burned in a staged combustion chamber to produce heat for the boiler. This is considered a showcase project for demonstrating the benefits of clean, bio-based energy, and thus there is considerable interest in monitoring and modeling the energy efficiency and environmental footprint of this technology relative to conventional steam generation with petroleum-based fuels. In preparation for system startup in 2012, we are developing steady-state and dynamic models of the major process components, including the gasifiers and combustor. These tools are intended to assist in tracking and optimizing system performance and for carrying out future conceptual studies of process changes that might improve the overall energy efficiency and sustainability. In this paper we describe the status of our steady-state gasifier and combustor models and illustrate preliminary results from limited parametric studies.

Daw, C Stuart [ORNL; FINNEY, Charles E A [ORNL; Wiggins, Gavin [ORNL; Hao, Ye [ORNL

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Modelling of NO{sub x} reduction strategies applied to 350 MW(e) utility boilers  

SciTech Connect

A computational fluid dynamics model has been combined with a NO{sub x} chemistry post-processor to predict the formation and destruction of nitric oxide in three-dimensional furnaces burning pulverized fuel. The model considers the complex interaction of turbulent flow, heat transfer, combustion, and NO{sub x} reaction chemistry. Lagrangian particle dynamics are used to track burning pulverized coal particles through the computational cells. Fuel nitrogen is released in proportion to the burnout of the particle. A range of combustion NO{sub x} reduction strategies has been applied to two 350 MW(e) utility boilers burning different coals. A medium volatile bituminous coal is fired using low NO{sub x} burners in one furnace and a sub-bituminous coal is burnt using conventional swirl burners in a different furnace. The strategies include: burner out of service, overfire air, reduction in excess air, change in particle size, and fuel reburn. In general NO{sub x} predictions are better for the sub-bituminous coal than for the medium volatile bituminous coal. Typical NO{sub x} prediction errors are {+-} 10 percent.

Visona, S.P.; Singh, B. [AUSTA Electric, Brisbane (Australia); Stanmore, B.R. [Dept. of Chemical Engineering, Brisbane (Australia)

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Experimental investigation and model validation of the heat flux profile in a 300MW CFB boiler  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract In this paper, systematic experimental investigation on the heat flux distribution inside the furnace of a 300MW CFB boiler was presented. Detailed experimental setup and measurement techniques were presented and a finite element method approach was applied to determine the heat flux. The heat flux profile on the rear wall along the horizontal direction shows a significant imbalance at different boiler loads. As a result of the non-uniform layout of the heating surfaces, which is the essential reason, as well as the imbalance and deviation of the temperature field, solid suspension density and solid flow rate, the central section of the furnace possesses higher heat flux distribution compared to the side sections. The heat flux is also found to increase with the increasing boiler load and decrease as the height increases. Heat flux near the roof, where the solid suspension density is rather small, is found to decrease remarkably revealing less heat absorption in this area. In addition, an empirical model of heat transfer coefficient is revised using the average data at different boiler loads. A mechanism heat transfer model based on the membrane water-wall configuration is proposed and validated with the heat flux profile obtained from the measurement. The model provides good accuracy for correlating 85% of the data within 10%.

Ruiqing Zhang; Hairui Yang; Nan Hu; Junfu Lu; Yuxin Wu

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Diagnosis of a turbocharging system of 1MW internal combustion engine  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A diagnostic procedure is presented purposely for the turbocharging system of 1MW internal combustion engine (I.C.E.) and specifically, for the filters and compressor modules. This study is part of a wider research activity, concerning the development of a diagnosis system dedicated to the cogenerative I.C.E. installed at the Engineering Faculty in Perugia. Firstly a 1-D thermodynamic model of the CHP engine working fluid was developed to simulate failure conditions of the turbocharging groups, which are not directly replicable on the I.C.E. to avoid plant stoppage. This model is able to simulate the degradation in performance of the engine components. It also takes into account the effect of compensation which the regulation system activates in case of efficiency loss or failure relative to filters or compressors. In order to identify and assess such failures, the fuzzy logic was chosen as the tool for the diagnosis system design. The developed diagnosis system displayed a good reliability degree with the 1-D thermodynamic model results, for operating conditions in correspondence of bad performance either on behalf of the filters or the compressor. Moreover, the procedure can be implemented in the plant monitoring system and provides in real-time diagnosis results about the status of the components and the need of maintenance, on the basis of few parameters already measured on the I.C.E.

L. Barelli; G. Bidini; F. Bonucci

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tw mw phase" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Neutronic analysis of the conversion of HEU to LEU fuel for a 5-MW MTR core  

SciTech Connect

In recent years, due to cessation of highly enriched uranium (HEU) fuel supply, practical steps have been taken to substitute HEU fuel in almost all research reactors by medium-enriched uranium or low-enriched uranium (LEU) fuels. In this study, a neutronic calculation of a 5-MW research reactor core fueled with HEU (93% /sup 235/U) is presented. In order to assess the performance of the core with the LEU (< 20%) fuel replacement, while keeping fuel element geometry nearly unchanged, several different /sup 235/U loadings were examined. The core consists of 22 standard fuel elements (SFEs) and 6 control fuel elements (CFEs). Each fuel elements has 18 curved plates of which two end plates are dummies. Initial /sup 235/U content is 195 g /sup 235/U/SFE and 9.7 g /sup 235/U/CFE or /PFE. In all calculations the permitted changes to the fuel elements are (a) 18 active plates per SFE, (b) fuel plates assumed to be flat, and (c) 8 or 9 active plates per CFE.

Pazirandeh, A.; Bartsch, G.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Low NOx burner retrofits and enhancements for a 518 MW oil and gas fired boiler  

SciTech Connect

Low NOx oil/gas burners originally supplied to Jacksonville Electric Authority, Northside No. 3 .500 MW unit, were based on a duplex air register design with lobed spray oil atomizers providing additional fuel staging. Although the burners could meet the targeted NOx levels of 0.3 and 0.2 lbs/10{sup 6} BTU on oil and gas respectively. There was insufficient margin on these NOx levels to enable continuous low NOx operation to be achieved. Further burner development was undertaken based on improved aerodynamic control within the burner design to give an approximate 25% improvement in NOx emission reduction thus providing an adequate operating margin. This `RoBTAS` (Round Burner with Tilted Air Supply) burner design based on techniques developed successfully for front wall coal firing applications achieved the required NOx reductions in full scale firing demonstrations on both heavy fuel oil and natural gas firing. The paper describes the development work and the subsequent application of the `RoBTAS` burners to the Northside No. 3 boiler. The burner will also be test fired on Orimulsion fuel and thus the comparison between heavy fuel oil firing and Orimulsion firing under ultra low NOx conditions will be made.

King, J.J. [Jacksonville Electric Authority, FL (United States); Allen, J.W.; Beal, P.R. [International Combustion Ltd., Derby (United Kingdom). Rolls-Royce Industrial Power Group

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

143

CFD-based design load analysis of 5MW offshore wind turbine  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The structure and aerodynamic loads acting on NREL 5MW reference wind turbine blade are calculated and analyzed based on advanced Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) and unsteady Blade Element Momentum (BEM). A detailed examination of the six force components has been carried out (three force components and three moment components). Structure load (gravity and inertia load) and aerodynamic load have been obtained by additional structural calculations (CFD or BEM respectively ). In CFD method the Reynolds Average Navier-Stokes approach was applied to solve the continuity equation of mass conservation and momentum balance so that the complex flow around wind turbines was modeled. Written in C programming language a User Defined Function (UDF) code which defines transient velocity profile according to the Extreme Operating Gust condition was compiled into commercial FLUENT package. Furthermore the unsteady BEM with 3D stall model has also adopted to investigate load components on wind turbine rotor. The present study introduces a comparison between advanced CFD and unsteady BEM for determining load on wind turbine rotor. Results indicate that there are good agreements between both present methods. It is importantly shown that six load components on wind turbine rotor is significant effect under Extreme Operating Gust (EOG) condition. Using advanced CFD and additional structural calculations this study has succeeded to construct accuracy numerical methodology to estimate total load of wind turbine that compose of aerodynamic load and structure load.

T. T. Tran; G. J. Ryu; Y. H. Kim; D. H. Kim

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

phase coherence  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The state in which two signals, such as electronic or optical signals, maintain (a) a fixed phase relationship with each other or (b) a fixed phase relationship with a third signal that can serve as a referenc...

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

REL-1001/6-001 FW MW 14:30-15:45 Religion & Identity in Contemporary Canada Colorado REL-1002/6-050 FW MW 17:30-18:45 Exploring Religion: The World s Religions Janzen  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Colorado REL-3/4940/3-001 W TH 14:30-17:15 Topics in Modern Western Culture Colorado ( &( &( &( & REL-2703REL-1001/6-001 FW MW 14:30-15:45 Religion & Identity in Contemporary Canada Colorado REL-1002:30-11:20 Religion & Pop Culture Colorado REL-2402/3-001 F MWF 10:30-11:20 Fundamentalisms in Global Perspective

Martin, Jeff

146

Life cycle assessment of 50MW wind firms and strategies for impact reduction  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The world today is continuously striving toward a carbon neutral clean energy technology. Hence, renewable wind power systems are increasingly receiving the attention of mankind. Energy production with structurally more promising and economically more competitive design is no more the sole criterion while installing new megawatt (MW) range of turbines. Rather important life cycle analysis (LCA) issues like climate change, ozone layer depletion, effect on surrounding environments e.g. eco-system quality, natural resources and human health emerge as dominant factors from green energy point of view. Hence, the study covers life cycle impact analysis (LCIA) of three wind farms: one onshore horizontal, one offshore horizontal, another vertical axis. It appears that vertical axis wind farm generates per unit electricity with lowest impact followed by horizontal offshore and horizontal onshore farms. The study, henceforward, discovers most adverse impact contributing materials in today's multi megawatt wind turbines and subsequently substitutes copper, the topmost impact contributor, with more eco-friendly aluminum alloys and its corresponding process routes. In this process, it reduces overall life cycle impacts up to 30% for future greener wind farms. In later stages, it compares all major electricity production technologies, viz., oil, diesel, coal, natural gas, wind, solar, biomass, nuclear, hydro plant in a common platform which demonstrates the wind farms performing the best except the hydro-kinetic ones. However, as the study suggests, offshore VAWT farm may even perform better than hydro-kinetic farms because of higher capacity factors in the high sea. Findings from the study can be deployed to harness massive scale green electricity from environmentally more clean and green turbines.

A. Rashedi; I. Sridhar; K.J. Tseng

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Listening to Customers: How Deliberative Polling Helped Build 1,000 MW of New Renewable Energy Projects in Texas  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3 * NREL/TP-620-33177 3 * NREL/TP-620-33177 Listening to Customers: How Deliberative Polling Helped Build 1,000 MW of New Renewable Energy Projects in Texas R.L. Lehr Attorney W. Guild, Ph.D. The Guild Group, Inc. D.L. Thomas, Ph.D. Dennis Thomas and Associates B.G. Swezey National Renewable Energy Laboratory National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole Boulevard Golden, Colorado 80401-3393 NREL is a U.S. Department of Energy Laboratory Operated by Midwest Research Institute * Battelle * Bechtel Contract No. DE-AC36-99-GO10337 June 2003 * NREL/TP-620-33177 Listening to Customers: How Deliberative Polling Helped Build 1,000 MW of New Renewable Energy Projects in Texas R.L. Lehr Attorney W. Guild, Ph.D. The Guild Group, Inc. D.L. Thomas, Ph.D. Dennis Thomas and Associates

148

10MW Class Direct Drive HTS Wind Turbine: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-08-00312  

SciTech Connect

This paper summarizes the work completed under the CRADA between NREL and American Superconductor (AMSC). The CRADA combined NREL and AMSC resources to benchmark high temperature superconducting direct drive (HTSDD) generator technology by integrating the technologies into a conceptual wind turbine design, and comparing the design to geared drive and permanent magnet direct drive (PMDD) wind turbine configurations. Analysis was accomplished by upgrading the NREL Wind Turbine Design Cost and Scaling Model to represent geared and PMDD turbines at machine ratings up to 10 MW and then comparing cost and mass figures of AMSC's HTSDD wind turbine designs to theoretical geared and PMDD turbine designs at 3.1, 6, and 10 MW sizes.

Musial, W.

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Study on the Portable and Integrated Type Pore Plate Flow Measureing Device for Condensate Water of 300MW Steam Turbine  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In order to insure the accuracy of steam turbine thermal test in power plant, the flowrate measurement accuracy of condensate water should be insured. In this paper, the portable and integrated type flow measuring device for condensate water of 300MW steam turbine flow is designed, which is based on the condensate water parameters and the specific pipeline conditions at the exit of the No. 5 low pressure heater for 300MW unit. A integration of non standard differential pressure orifice flow meter is designed in this paper Through calibration in standard experimental system, the reason of the large error is that the flow field is disturbed by the origin plate type downward welding connecting flanges. Then the welding neck flanges is designed for the connecting flanges. The distribution of connecting flanges of flow field is weaken, and the measurement accuracy can meet the demand of steam turbine thermal test.

Yong Li; Jia-yong Wang

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Expansion of Michigan EOR Operations Using Advanced Amine Technology at a 600 MW Project Wolverine Carbon Capture and Storage Project  

SciTech Connect

Wolverine Power Supply Cooperative Inc, a member owned cooperative utility based in Cadillac Michigan, proposes to demonstrate the capture, beneficial utilization and storage of CO{sub 2} in the expansion of existing Enhanced Oil Recovery operations. This project is being proposed in response to the US Department of Energy Solicitation DE-FOA-0000015 Section III D, 'Large Scale Industrial CCS projects from Industrial Sources' Technology Area 1. The project will remove 1,000 metric tons per day of CO{sub 2} from the Wolverine Clean Energy Venture 600 MW CFB power plant owned and operated by WPC. CO{sub 2} from the flue gas will be captured using Hitachi's CO{sub 2} capture system and advanced amine technology. The capture system with the advanced amine-based solvent supplied by Hitachi is expected to significantly reduce the cost and energy requirements of CO{sub 2} capture compared to current technologies. The captured CO{sub 2} will be compressed and transported for Enhanced Oil Recovery and CO{sub 2} storage purposes. Enhanced Oil Recovery is a proven concept, widely used to recover otherwise inaccessible petroleum reserves. While post-combustion CO{sub 2} capture technologies have been tested at the pilot scale on coal power plant flue gas, they have not yet been demonstrated at a commercial scale and integrated with EOR and storage operations. Amine-based CO{sub 2} capture is the leading technology expected to be available commercially within this decade to enable CCS for utility and industrial facilities firing coal and waste fuels such as petroleum coke. However, traditional CO{sub 2} capture process utilizing commercial amine solvents is very energy intensive for regeneration and is also susceptible to solvent degradation by oxygen as well as SOx and NO{sub 2} in the flue gas, resulting in large operating costs. The large volume of combustion flue gas with its low CO{sub 2} concentration requires large equipment sizes, which together with the highly corrosive nature of the typical amine-based separation process leads to high plant capital investment. According to recent DOE-NETL studies, MEA-based CCS will increase the cost of electricity of a new pulverized coal plant by 80-85% and reduce the net plant efficiency by about 30%. Non-power industrial facilities will incur similar production output and efficiency penalties when implementing conventional carbon capture systems. The proposed large scale demonstration project combining advanced amine CO{sub 2} capture integrated with commercial EOR operations significantly advances post-combustion technology development toward the DOE objectives of reducing the cost of energy production and improving the efficiency of CO{sub 2} Capture technologies. WPC has assembled a strong multidisciplinary team to meet the objectives of this project. WPC will provide the host site and Hitachi will provide the carbon capture technology and advanced solvent. Burns and Roe bring expertise in overall engineering integration and plant design to the team. Core Energy, an active EOR producer/operator in the State of Michigan, is committed to support the detailed design, construction and operation of the CO{sub 2} pipeline and storage component of the project. This team has developed a Front End Engineering Design and Cost Estimate as part of Phase 1 of DOE Award DE-FE0002477.

H Hoffman; Y kishinevsky; S. Wu; R. Pardini; E. Tripp; D. Barnes

2010-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

151

Retrofit Project of 2100 MW Units in Yushe Power Plant, Shanxi Province Using Two Boilers-One CFB FGD  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper takes the example of the retrofit of 2100 MW units of Yushe Power Plant in Shanxi Province, and summarizes the applications of circulation fluid bed flue gas desulphurization (CFB-FGD) adopted two bo...

Lin Fulin; Lian Egui

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

RSP-MW UNIVERSITY OF HAWAII RADIOACTIVE MIXED WASTE PICKUP REQUEST FORM Revision, 4/04 (WASTE CONTAINING BOTH RADIOISOTOPES AND HAZARDOUS CHEMICALS)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

RSP-MW UNIVERSITY OF HAWAII RADIOACTIVE MIXED WASTE PICKUP REQUEST FORM Revision, 4/04 (WASTE AND UNDERSTAND ALL CONDITIONS ON THIS FORM. GENERATOR CERTIFICATION: I certify the above waste contains

Browder, Tom

153

1352 IEEE JOURNAL OF SOLID-STATE CIRCUITS, VOL. 37, NO. 10, OCTOBER 2002 A 120-mW 3-D Rendering Engine With 6-Mb Embedded DRAM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1352 IEEE JOURNAL OF SOLID-STATE CIRCUITS, VOL. 37, NO. 10, OCTOBER 2002 A 120-mW 3-D Rendering digital assistant (PDA) in which the power has to be supplied by batteries. Since the lithium battery

Yoo, Hoi-Jun

154

An integrated computer-based training simulator for the operative personnel of the 800-MW power-generating unit at the Perm District Power Station  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The integrated computer-based training simulator for an 800-MW power-generating unit is described. Its capacities for training the personnel of the boiler-turbine and chemical departments are shown.

N. Yu. Pevneva; V. N. Piskov; A. N. Zenkov

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Dynamometer Testing of Samsung 2.5MW Drivetrain: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-08-311  

SciTech Connect

SHI's prototype 2.5 MW wind turbine drivetrain was tested at the NWTC 2.5 MW dynamometer test facility over the course of 4 months between December 2009 and March 2010. This successful testing campaign allowed SHI to validate performance, safety, control tuning, and reliability in a controlled environment before moving to full-scale testing and subsequent introduction of a commercial product into the American market.

Wallen, R.

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

IEEE JOURNAL OF SOLID-STATE CIRCUITS, VOL. 42, NO. 9, SEPTEMBER 2007 2021 A 0.2-mW 2-Mb/s Digital Transceiver Based  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

IEEE JOURNAL OF SOLID-STATE CIRCUITS, VOL. 42, NO. 9, SEPTEMBER 2007 2021 A 0.2-mW 2-Mb/s Digital rate of 1.1 10 7, dissipating only 0.2 mW from a 1-V supply generated by a 1.5-V battery. Index Terms body, corresponding to 1­2 m. Moreover, it should be powered by a very small battery in order

Yoo, Hoi-Jun

157

Project Eagle Phase 1 Direct Wafer/Cell Solar Facility  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Project Eagle Phase 1 Direct Wafer/Cell Solar Facility Project Eagle Phase 1 Direct Wafer/Cell Solar Facility 1366 Technologies Description of Proposed Action: The Department of Energy (DOE) proposed action is for the use of a federal loan guarantee by 1366 Technologies (1366) to support the renovation of an existing building, located at 159 Wells Avenue, Newton, Massachusetts, into a solar wafer production facility. The new facility would constitute Phase 1 of Project Eagle and accommodate 20 megawatts (MW) of multi crystalline silicon wafer production, laboratory areas, offices, and ancillary spaces. Phase 2 of Proje~y an existing DOE Categorical Exclusion and would occur at a site in _ _ _ _ . The Phase 1 facility in Newton, MA is an existing building of 50,600 square feet on a site approximately 4.7 acres. 1366 would renovate the interior of the facility to provide office

158

"YEAR","MONTH","STATE","UTILITY CODE","UTILITY NAME","RESIDENTIAL PHOTOVOLTAIC ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","COMMERCIAL PHOTOVOLTAIC ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","INDUSTRIAL PHOTOVOLTAIC ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","TRANSPORTATION PHOTOVOLTAIC ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","TOTAL PHOTOVOLTAIC ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","RESIDENTIAL PHOTOVOLTAIC INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","COMMERCIAL PHOTOVOLTAIC INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","INDUSTRIAL PHOTOVOLTAIC INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","TRANSPORTATION PHOTOVOLTAIC INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","TOTAL PHOTOVOLTAIC INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","RESIDENTIAL PHOTOVOLTAIC NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","COMMERCIAL PHOTOVOLTAIC NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","INDUSTRIAL PHOTOVOLTAIC NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","TRANSPORTATION PHOTOVOLTAIC NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","TOTAL PHOTOVOLTAIC NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","RESIDENTIAL WIND ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","COMMERCIAL WIND ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","INDUSTRIAL WIND ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","TRANSPORTATION WIND ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","TOTAL WIND ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","RESIDENTIAL WIND INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","COMMERCIAL WIND INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","INDUSTRIAL WIND INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","TRANSPORTATION WIND INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","TOTAL WIND INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","RESIDENTIAL WIND NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","COMMERCIAL WIND NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","INDUSTRIAL WIND NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","TRANSPORTATION WIND NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","TOTAL WIND NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","RESIDENTIAL OTHER ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","COMMERCIAL OTHER ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","INDUSTRIAL OTHER ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","TRANSPORTATION OTHER ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","TOTAL OTHER ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","RESIDENTIAL OTHER INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","COMMERCIAL OTHER INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","INDUSTRIAL OTHER INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","TRANSPORTATION OTHER INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","TOTAL OTHER INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","RESIDENTIAL OTHER NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","COMMERCIAL OTHER NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","INDUSTRIAL OTHER NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","TRANSPORTATION OTHER NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","TOTAL OTHER NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","RESIDENTIAL TOTAL ENERGY SOLD BACK TO THE UTILITY (MWh)","COMMERCIAL TOTAL ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","INDUSTRIAL TOTAL ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","TRANSPORTATION TOTAL ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","TOTAL ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","RESIDENTIAL TOTAL INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","COMMERCIAL TOTAL INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","INDUSTRIAL TOTAL INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","TRANSPORTATION TOTAL INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","TOTAL INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","RESIDENTIAL TOTAL NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","COMMERCIAL TOTAL NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","INDUSTRIAL TOTAL NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","TRANSPORTATION TOTAL NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","TOTAL NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","RESIDENTIAL ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK TO THE UTILITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MWh)","COMMERCIAL ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK TO THE UTILITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MWh)","INDUSTRIAL ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK TO THE UTILITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MWh)","TRANSPORTATION ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK TO THE UTILITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MWh)","TOTAL ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK TO THE UTILITYFOR ALL STATES SERVED(MWh)","RESIDENTIAL INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MW)","COMMERCIAL INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MW)","INDUSTRIAL INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MW)","TRANSPORTATION INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MW)","INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MW)","RESIDENTIAL NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT FOR ALL STATES SERVED","COMMERCIAL NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT FOR ALL STATES SERVED","INDUSTRIAL NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT FOR ALL STATES SERVED","TRANSPORTATION NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT FOR ALL STATES SERVED","NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT FOR ALL STATES SERVED"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

UTILITYFOR ALL STATES SERVED(MWh)","RESIDENTIAL INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MW)","COMMERCIAL INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MW)","INDUSTRIAL INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MW)","TRANSPORTATION INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MW)","INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MW)","RESIDENTIAL NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT FOR ALL STATES SERVED","COMMERCIAL NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT FOR ALL STATES SERVED","INDUSTRIAL NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT FOR ALL STATES SERVED","TRANSPORTATION NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT FOR ALL STATES SERVED","NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT FOR ALL STATES SERVED"

159

"YEAR","MONTH","STATE","UTILITY CODE","UTILITY NAME","RESIDENTIAL PHOTOVOLTAIC ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","COMMERCIAL PHOTOVOLTAIC ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","INDUSTRIAL PHOTOVOLTAIC ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","TRANSPORTATION PHOTOVOLTAIC ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","TOTAL PHOTOVOLTAIC ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","RESIDENTIAL PHOTOVOLTAIC INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","COMMERCIAL PHOTOVOLTAIC INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","INDUSTRIAL PHOTOVOLTAIC INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","TRANSPORTATION PHOTOVOLTAIC INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","TOTAL PHOTOVOLTAIC INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","RESIDENTIAL PHOTOVOLTAIC NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","COMMERCIAL PHOTOVOLTAIC NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","INDUSTRIAL PHOTOVOLTAIC NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","TRANSPORTATION PHOTOVOLTAIC NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","TOTAL PHOTOVOLTAIC NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","RESIDENTIAL WIND ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","COMMERCIAL WIND ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","INDUSTRIAL WIND ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","TRANSPORTATION WIND ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","TOTAL WIND ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","RESIDENTIAL WIND INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","COMMERCIAL WIND INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","INDUSTRIAL WIND INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","TRANSPORTATION WIND INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","TOTAL WIND INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","RESIDENTIAL WIND NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","COMMERCIAL WIND NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","INDUSTRIAL WIND NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","TRANSPORTATION WIND NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","TOTAL WIND NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","RESIDENTIAL OTHER ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","COMMERCIAL OTHER ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","INDUSTRIAL OTHER ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","TRANSPORTATION OTHER ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","TOTAL OTHER ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","RESIDENTIAL OTHER INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","COMMERCIAL OTHER INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","INDUSTRIAL OTHER INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","TRANSPORTATION OTHER INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","TOTAL OTHER INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","RESIDENTIAL OTHER NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","COMMERCIAL OTHER NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","INDUSTRIAL OTHER NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","TRANSPORTATION OTHER NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","TOTAL OTHER NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","RESIDENTIAL TOTAL ENERGY SOLD BACK TO THE UTILITY (MWh)","COMMERCIAL TOTAL ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","INDUSTRIAL TOTAL ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","TRANSPORTATION TOTAL ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","TOTAL ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","RESIDENTIAL TOTAL INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","COMMERCIAL TOTAL INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","INDUSTRIAL TOTAL INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","TRANSPORTATION TOTAL INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","TOTAL INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","RESIDENTIAL TOTAL NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","COMMERCIAL TOTAL NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","INDUSTRIAL TOTAL NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","TRANSPORTATION TOTAL NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","TOTAL NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","RESIDENTIAL ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK TO THE UTILITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MWh)","COMMERCIAL ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK TO THE UTILITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MWh)","INDUSTRIAL ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK TO THE UTILITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MWh)","TRANSPORTATION ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK TO THE UTILITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MWh)","TOTAL ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK TO THE UTILITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MWh)","RESIDENTIAL INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MW)","COMMERCIAL INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MW)","INDUSTRIAL INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MW)","TRANSPORTATION INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MW)","INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MW)","RESIDENTIAL NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT FOR ALL STATES SERVED","COMMERCIAL NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT FOR ALL STATES SERVED","INDUSTRIAL NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT FOR ALL STATES SERVED","TRANSPORTATION NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT FOR ALL STATES SERVED","NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT FOR ALL STATES SERVED"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

UTILITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MWh)","RESIDENTIAL INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MW)","COMMERCIAL INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MW)","INDUSTRIAL INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MW)","TRANSPORTATION INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MW)","INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MW)","RESIDENTIAL NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT FOR ALL STATES SERVED","COMMERCIAL NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT FOR ALL STATES SERVED","INDUSTRIAL NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT FOR ALL STATES SERVED","TRANSPORTATION NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT FOR ALL STATES SERVED","NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT FOR ALL STATES SERVED"

160

California/Geothermal | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

California/Geothermal California/Geothermal < California Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Print PDF California Geothermal General Regulatory Roadmap Geothermal Power Projects Under Development in California Developer Location Estimated Capacity (MW) Development Phase Geothermal Area Geothermal Region Alum Geothermal Project Ram Power Silver Peak, Nevada 64 MW64,000 kW 64,000,000 W 64,000,000,000 mW 0.064 GW 6.4e-5 TW Phase II - Resource Exploration and Confirmation Alum Geothermal Area Walker-Lane Transition Zone Geothermal Region Bald Mountain Geothermal Project Oski Energy LLC Susanville, California 20 MW20,000 kW 20,000,000 W 20,000,000,000 mW 0.02 GW 2.0e-5 TW Phase II - Resource Exploration and Confirmation Black Rock I Geothermal Project CalEnergy Generation Phase III - Permitting and Initial Development North Shore Mono Lake Geothermal Area Walker-Lane Transition Zone Geothermal Region

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tw mw phase" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Puna Geothermal Project | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Puna Geothermal Project Puna Geothermal Project Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Development Project: Puna Geothermal Project Project Location Information Location Puna, Hawaii County Hawaii County, Hawaii Geothermal Area Hawaii Geothermal Region Geothermal Project Profile Developer Puna Geothermal Venture Project Type Hybrid Flash/Binary GEA Development Phase Operational"Operational" is not in the list of possible values (Phase I - Resource Procurement and Identification, Phase II - Resource Exploration and Confirmation, Phase III - Permitting and Initial Development, Phase IV - Resource Production and Power Plant Construction) for this property. Planned Capacity (MW) 38 MW38,000 kW 38,000,000 W 38,000,000,000 mW 0.038 GW 3.8e-5 TW GEA Report Date

162

Design and development of a 6 MW peak, 24 kW average power S-band klystron  

SciTech Connect

A 6 MW peak, 24 kW average power S-band Klystron is under development at CEERI, Pilani under an MoU between BARC and CEERI. The design of the klystron has been completed. The electron gun has been designed using TRAK and MAGIC codes. RF cavities have been designed using HFSS and CST Microwave Studio while the complete beam wave interaction simulation has been done using MAGIC code. The thermal design of collector and RF window has been done using ANSYS code. A Gun Collector Test Module (GCTM) was developed before making actual klystron to validate gun perveance and thermal design of collector. A high voltage solid state pulsed modulator has been installed for performance valuation of the tube. The paper will cover the design aspects of the tube and experimental test results of GCTM and klystron. (author)

Joshi, L.M.; Meena, Rakesh; Nangru, Subhash; Kant, Deepender; Pal, Debashis; Lamba, O.S.; Jindal, Vishnu; Jangid, Sushil Kumar, E-mail: joslm@rediffmail.com [Central Electronics Engineering Research Institute, Council of Scientific and Industrial Research, Pilani (India); Chakravarthy, D.P.; Dixit, Kavita [Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai (India)

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Evaluation of component performance in the TVA 20 MW FBC after 12,000 hours of operation  

SciTech Connect

During its first three years of operation (July, 1982 through July, 1985), the 20 MW AFBC boiler has been involved in four major campaigns of testing. The fuel used during all of these tests has been Kentucky No. 9, an eastern subbituminous coal with a sulfur content of approximately 4.1%. Two different sulfur sorbents have been used: Reed limestone (from July, 1982 through May, 1984) and Fredonia limestone. The superficial gas velocity through the bed has been 2.4 m/s for more than 90% of the operating time; the velocities used in the tests have ranged from 1.2 to 3.0 m/sec. Results of periodic inspections and measurements of the various boiler components, along with the evaluation of coupon materials exposed in the boiler, are discussed.

Not Available

1986-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Comparison of the combustion behavior of Orimulsion{trademark} and heavy fuel oil in 70 MW flames  

SciTech Connect

Results of an experimental study are shown in this publication to compare the combustion behavior of heavy fuel oil (HFO) and Orimulsion in 70 MW flames. The investigation was carried out with the use of the combustion test rig at the International Combustion Limited in Derby, UK. The main objective of this test work was to quantify the extent of differences in flame properties, particulate and gaseous emissions of Orimulsion and HFO. Under identical combustion conditions, axial profiles of flame temperature and radiation heat flux were determined at 70 MW thermal input and 1% O{sub 2} for both fuels. Gas compositions at flame tail and furnace exit were obtained to estimate flame length and emission of gaseous pollutants. Stack concentration, carbon content, size and chemical composition of fly ash were also measured. The effect of excess air level on exit NOx and CO concentration were studied. Results of detailed flame measurements and the parametric study have shown that orimulsion fuel can be burnt with 99.97% efficiency at 1% exit O{sub 2} with a modified burner system of Dunamenti Power Station. However, significant implications of Orimulsion firing were observed. Gas temperature data and CO concentrations at flame tail have indicated a 1.5--2 m longer flame for Orimulsion. At flame tail, gas temperature in the Orimulsion flame was higher by 100 C than that for HFO. Lower radiant heat flux was measured in the near burner region for Orimulsion. Higher SO{sub 3}, SO{sub 2} and lower NOx emission were found when firing Orimulsion. Despite the higher ash content of Orimulsion, its combustion resulted in smaller particulate emission, which might be due to fly ash deposition in the furnace.

Barta, L.E. [Inst. for Energy, Budapest (Hungary); Horvath, G. [Hungarian Power Companies, Ltd., Budapest (Hungary); Allen, J.W.; Darar, J.S.; Wright, J.A. [International Combustion Ltd., Derby (United Kingdom). Rolls Royce Industrial Power Group; Szederkenyi, S.

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

165

Geek-Up[3.4.2011]: 3,000+ MW and 2,500 Year-Old Greek Pottery | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3.4.2011]: 3,000+ MW and 2,500 Year-Old Greek Pottery 3.4.2011]: 3,000+ MW and 2,500 Year-Old Greek Pottery Geek-Up[3.4.2011]: 3,000+ MW and 2,500 Year-Old Greek Pottery March 4, 2011 - 5:03pm Addthis An Attic black-figured amphora, currently in the British Museum, of the type that will be studied at SLAC. | Photo by Marie-Lan Nguyen, Courtesy of SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory An Attic black-figured amphora, currently in the British Museum, of the type that will be studied at SLAC. | Photo by Marie-Lan Nguyen, Courtesy of SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory Elizabeth Meckes Elizabeth Meckes Director of User Experience & Digital Technologies, Office of Public Affairs Last week, Bonneville Power Administration dispatchers in the Dittmer Control Center celebrated a milestone - for the first time, wind

166

Utah/Geothermal | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Utah/Geothermal < Utah Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Print PDF Utah Geothermal General Regulatory Roadmap Geothermal Power Projects Under Development in Utah Developer Location Estimated Capacity (MW) Development Phase Geothermal Area Geothermal Region Cove Fort Geothermal Project Oski Energy LLC 50 MW50,000 kW 50,000,000 W 50,000,000,000 mW 0.05 GW 5.0e-5 TW Phase II - Resource Exploration and Confirmation Cove Fort Geothermal Area Northern Basin and Range Geothermal Region Drum Mountain Geothermal Project Raser Technologies Inc Delta, Utah 0 MW0 kW

167

Oregon/Geothermal | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Oregon/Geothermal Oregon/Geothermal < Oregon Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Print PDF Oregon Geothermal General Regulatory Roadmap Geothermal Power Projects Under Development in Oregon Developer Location Estimated Capacity (MW) Development Phase Geothermal Area Geothermal Region Crump Geyser Geothermal Project Nevada Geo Power, Ormat Utah 80 MW80,000 kW 80,000,000 W 80,000,000,000 mW 0.08 GW 8.0e-5 TW Phase II - Resource Exploration and Confirmation Crump's Hot Springs Geothermal Area Northwest Basin and Range Geothermal Region Neal Hot Springs Geothermal Project U.S. Geothermal Vale, Oregon Phase III - Permitting and Initial Development Neal Hot Springs Geothermal Area Snake River Plain Geothermal Region Neal Hot Springs II Geothermal Project U.S. Geothermal Vale, Oregon Phase I - Resource Procurement and Identification Neal Hot Springs Geothermal Area Snake River Plain Geothermal Region

168

Slip on faults in the Imperial Valley triggered by the 4 April 2010 Mw 7.2 El MayorCucapah earthquake revealed by InSAR  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Slip on faults in the Imperial Valley triggered by the 4 April 2010 Mw 7.2 El Mayor rocks [Dorsey, 2010]. Previous studies have docu- mented triggered slip on faults in the Imperial Valley of seismic waves. [3] In this study we document triggered slip on faults in the Imperial Valley associated

Fialko, Yuri

169

MAGNETIZATION ESTIMATION FROM MFM IMAGES Chi-Chun Hsu, Clayton T. Miller, R.S. Indeck, J.A. O'Sullivan, M.W. Muller  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

MAGNETIZATION ESTIMATION FROM MFM IMAGES Chi-Chun Hsu, Clayton T. Miller, R.S. Indeck, J.A. O'Sullivan, M.W. Muller Magnetics and Information Science Center, Washington University, St. Louis, MO 63130 Tel: (314) 935-4767; Fax (314) 935-7500; email: rsi@ee.wustl.edu Magnetic force microscopy (MFM

O'Sullivan, Joseph A.

170

Imaging short-period seismic radiation from the 27 February 2010 Chile (MW 8.8) earthquake by back-projection of P, PP,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Imaging short-period seismic radiation from the 27 February 2010 Chile (MW 8.8) earthquake by back projected to the source region to image locations of coherent short-period seismic wave radiation. Several in North America (P), Japan (PKIKP), and Europe (PP), as well as a global configuration of stations

Madariaga, Raúl

171

IEEE JOURNAL OF SOLID STATE CIRCUITS, VOL. 32, NO. 12, DEC 1997 1 A 12mW Wide Dynamic Range CMOS Front-End  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

IEEE JOURNAL OF SOLID STATE CIRCUITS, VOL. 32, NO. 12, DEC 1997 1 A 12mW Wide Dynamic Range CMOS into their products. For many of these hand-held devices, one of the primary concerns is battery life. Thus

Lee, Thomas H.

172

Baseline System Costs for 50.0 MW Enhanced Geothermal System--A Function of: Working Fluid, Technology, and Location, Location, Location  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Project objectives: Develop a baseline cost model of a 50.0 MW Enhanced Geothermal System, including all aspects of the project, from finding the resource through to operation, for a particularly challenging scenario: the deep, radioactively decaying granitic rock of the Pioneer Valley in Western Massachusetts.

173

Wake Turbulence of Two NREL 5-MW Wind Turbines Immersed in a Neutral Atmospheric Boundary-Layer Flow  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The fluid dynamics video considers an array of two NREL 5-MW turbines separated by seven rotor diameters in a neutral atmospheric boundary layer (ABL). The neutral atmospheric boundary-layer flow data were obtained from a precursor ABL simulation using a Large-Eddy Simulation (LES) framework within OpenFOAM. The mean wind speed at hub height is 8m/s, and the surface roughness is 0.2m. The actuator line method (ALM) is used to model the wind turbine blades by means of body forces added to the momentum equation. The fluid dynamics video shows the root and tip vortices emanating from the blades from various viewpoints. The vortices become unstable and break down into large-scale turbulent structures. As the wakes of the wind turbines advect further downstream, smaller-scale turbulence is generated. It is apparent that vortices generated by the blades of the downstream wind turbine break down faster due to increased turbulence levels generated by the wake of the upstream wind turbine.

Bashioum, Jessica L; Schmitz, Sven; Duque, Earl P N

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Process simulation of oxy-fuel combustion for a 300MW pulverized coal-fired power plant using Aspen Plus  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This work focuses on the amounts and components of flue gas for oxy-fuel combustion in a coal-fired power plant (CFPP). The combustion process of pulverized coal in a 300MW power plant is studied using Aspen Plus software. The amount of each component in flue gas in coal-fired processes with air or O2/CO2 as oxidizer is obtained. The differences between the two processes are identified, and the influences of temperature, excess oxygen ratio and molar fraction of O2/CO2 on the proportions of different components in flue gas are examined by sensitivity analysis. The process simulation results show that replacing atmospheric air by a 21%O2/79%CO2 mixture leads the decrease of the flame temperature from 1789C to 1395C. The equilibrium amount of \\{NOx\\} declines obviously but the \\{SOx\\} are still at the same level. The mass fraction of CO2 in flue gas increased from 21.3% to 81.5%. The amount of \\{NOx\\} is affected sensitively by the change of temperature and the excess oxygen ratio, but the change of O2/CO2 molar fraction has a little influence to the generation of NOx. With the increasing of O2 concentration, the flame temperature and \\{NOx\\} emission enhance rapidly. When the molar fraction of O2 increases to 30%, the flame temperature is similar and the mass fraction of \\{NOx\\} is about 1/8 of that air atmosphere.

Xiaohui Pei; Boshu He; Linbo Yan; Chaojun Wang; Weining Song; Jingge Song

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Performance characteristics of a MW-class SOFC/GT hybrid system based on a commercially available gas turbine  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The ultimate purpose of a SOFC/GT hybrid system is for distributed power generation applications. Therefore, this study investigates the possible extension of a SOFC/GT hybrid system to multi-MW power cases. Because of the matured technology of gas turbines and their commercial availability, it was reasonable to construct a hybrid system with an off-the-shelf gas turbine. Based on a commercially available gas turbine, performance analysis was conducted to find the total appropriate power for the hybrid system with consideration of the maximum allowable cell temperature. In order to maintain high performance characteristics of the hybrid system during part-load operations, it was necessary to find the optimal control strategy for the system according to the change in power required. The results of the performance analysis for part-load conditions showed that supplied fuel and air must be changed simultaneously. Furthermore, in order to prevent performance degradation, it was found that both cell temperature and turbine inlet temperature must be maintained as close as possible to design-point conditions.

Tae Won Song; Jeong Lak Sohn; Tong Seop Kim; Sung Tack Ro

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Annual progress report on the development of a 2 MW/10 second battery energy storage system for power disturbance protection  

SciTech Connect

Sandia National Laboratories (SNL), acting for the US Department of Energy (DOE), contracts for and administers programs for the purpose of promoting the development and commercialization of large scale, transportable battery energy storage systems. Under DOE Co-Op Agreement No. DE-FC04-94AL99852, SNL has contracted for the development and delivery of an initial prototype 250 kW bridge that becomes an integral subsystem of a 2 MW/10 Second System that can be used by utility customers to protect power sensitive equipment from power disturbances. Development work includes field installation and testing of the prototype unit at a participating utility site for extended product testing with subsequent relocation to an industrial or commercial participating utility customer site for additional evaluation. The program described by the referenced document calls for cost sharing with the successful bidder and eventual title transfer to the participating utility. Prototype delivery is scheduled for January of 1996, with a period of two years allowed for field testing. A final report summarizing the test data with conclusions and recommendations is part of the contract.

NONE

1996-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

177

A commercial project for private investments. Update of the 280 MW api Energia IGCC plant construction in central Italy.  

SciTech Connect

This paper has the aim to give a general overview of the api Energia IGCC project starting from the project background in 1992 and ending with the progress of construction. api Energia S.p.A., a joint VENTURE between api anonima petroli italiana S.p.A., Roma, Italy (51%), ABB Sae Sadelmi S.p.A., Milano, Italy (25%) and Texaco Development Corporation (24%), is building a 280 MW Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle plant in the api refinery at Falconara Marittima, on Italy' s Adriatic coast, using heavy oil residues. The plant is based on the modern concept of employing a highly efficient combined cycle power plant fed with a low heating value fuel gas produced by gasifying heavy refinery residues. This scheme provides consistent advantages in terms of efficiency and environmental impact over alternative applications of the refinery residues. The electric power produced will feed the national grid. The project has been financed using the ``project financing'' scheme: over 1,000 billion Lira, representing 75% of the overall capital requirement, have been provided by a pool of international banks. In November 1996 the project reached financial closure and immediately after the detailed design and procurement activities started. Engineering, Procurement and Construction activities, carried out by a Consortium of companies of the ABB group, are totally in line with the schedule. Commercial operation of the plant, is scheduled for November 1999.

Del Bravo, R.; Pinacci, P.; Trifilo, R.

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Competitive auction mechanisms for the promotion renewable energy technologies: The case of the 50MW photovoltaics projects in Cyprus  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract There are a range of policy frameworks and support mechanisms to promote the penetration of renewable energy technologies into the energy mix assembled by the governments and regulatory bodies around the world. The three dominant and most common support schemes that have also been implemented within the EU and proven successful in the past include the competitive auctions, the Feed-in Tariff scheme (FiT), and Tradable Green Certificates (TGCs). This study reviews the use of the competitive auction mechanism for the promotion of power generation from renewable energy technologies. The process of the specific policy instrument as well as its pros and cons are introduced. Successful and failed case studies from countries that have already incorporated this mechanism into their renewable energy technologies development policies are also presented. Among these cases is the Cyprus auction procurement for the licensing of 50MW of photovoltaic power plants, conducted in January 2013, which is thoroughly elaborated in this paper. The timeline of the bids is presented, and the auction winner strategy is tracked and examined. A discussion is also presented on the feasibility of the awarded projects. Eventually, the entire auction procurement procedure is evaluated to expose the defects of the mechanism and to offer some recommendations for the viability of the process.

Angeliki Kylili; Paris A. Fokaides

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Experience with the operation, maintenance and utilisation of the 3 MW TRIGA Mark-II research reactor of Bangladesh  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The 3 MW TRIGA (Training, Research, Isotope, General Atomics) Mark-II research reactor of the Bangladesh Atomic Energy Commission (BAEC) has been operating at Atomic Energy Research Establishment (AERE), Savar, Dhaka, since September 1986. Since its commissioning, the reactor has been used in various fields of research and utilisation, such as Neutron Activation Analysis (NAA), Neutron Radiography (NRG), Neutron Scattering (NS), manpower training and education, and production of radioisotopes for medical applications. The reactor facility encountered a couple of incidents, which were successfully handled by BAEC personnel. In some cases, the help of experts from various local organisations/institutions as well as from the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) was obtained. The upgrading of the Safety Analysis Report (SAR) of the reactor facility was completed in 2005 as per the format of the IAEA Safety Guide, SG-35-G1. The cooling system of the reactor as well as some parts of the instrumentations used in the reactor systems were also upgraded/modified during this period. The paper highlights the experience with the operation, maintenance and utilisation of the research reactor for the last 21 years. It also presents some of the modification and upgrading works carried out to enhance the operational safety of the research reactor.

M.A. Zulquarnain; M.M. Haque; M.A. Salam; M.S. Islam; P.K. Saha; M.A. Sarder; A. Haque; M.A.M. Soner; M.M. Uddin; M.M. Rahman; I. Kamal; M.N. Islam; S.M. Hossain

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

CARS 2002 H.U. Lemke, M.W. Vannier; K. Inamura, A.G. Farman, K. Doi & J.H.C. Reiber (Editors) CARS/Springer. All rights reserved.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CARS 2002 ­ H.U. Lemke, M.W. Vannier; K. Inamura, A.G. Farman, K. Doi & J.H.C. Reiber (Editors;CARS 2002 ­ H.U. Lemke, M.W. Vannier; K. Inamura, A.G. Farman, K. Doi & J.H.C. Reiber (Editors) © CARS

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tw mw phase" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

CARS 2002 H.U. Lemke, M.W. Vannier; K. Inamura, A.G. Farman, K. Doi & J.H.C. Reiber (Editors) CARS/Springer. All rights reserved. Segmentation of microcalcification in X-ray mammograms  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CARS 2002 ­ H.U. Lemke, M.W. Vannier; K. Inamura, A.G. Farman, K. Doi & J.H.C. Reiber (Editors, M.W. Vannier; K. Inamura, A.G. Farman, K. Doi & J.H.C. Reiber (Editors) CARS/Springer. All rights

Joskowicz, Leo

182

CARS 2002 H.U. Lemke, M.W. Vannier; K. Inamura, A.G. Farman, K. Doi & J.H.C. Reiber CARS/Springer. All rights reserved.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CARS 2002 ­ H.U. Lemke, M.W. Vannier; K. Inamura, A.G. Farman, K. Doi & J.H.C. Reiber (Editors is extracted based on the #12;CARS 2002 ­ H.U. Lemke, M.W. Vannier; K. Inamura, A.G. Farman, K. Doi & J

Louisville, University of

183

GRR/Section 4-FD-a - Exploration Permit BLM | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » GRR/Section 4-FD-a - Exploration Permit BLM < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Resource Area: Details Technical Info Geology Power Plants (70 Projects (56 Activities (1574 Geothermal Area Profile Location Exploration Region GEA Development Phase 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp Estimated Reservoir Volume Mean Capacity Power Production Profile Gross Production Capacity 300.7 MW300,700 kW 300,700,000 W 300,700,000,000 mW 0.301 GW 3.007e-4 TW Net Production Capacity 206,358 MW206,358,000 kW 206,358,000,000 W 206,358,000,000,000 mW 206.358 GW

184

Hawaii/Geothermal | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Hawaii/Geothermal Hawaii/Geothermal < Hawaii Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Print PDF Hawaii Geothermal General Regulatory Roadmap Geothermal Power Projects Under Development in Hawaii Developer Location Estimated Capacity (MW) Development Phase Geothermal Area Geothermal Region Haleakala SW Rift Zone Exploration Ormat Technologies Inc , US Department of Energy Haleakala Southwest Rift Zone Haleakala Volcano Geothermal Area Hawaii Geothermal Region Puna Geothermal Venture Ormat Technologies Inc Pahoa, Hawaii 38 MW38,000 kW 38,000,000 W 38,000,000,000 mW 0.038 GW 3.8e-5 TW Kilauea East Rift Geothermal Area Hawaii Geothermal Region Add a geothermal project. Operational Geothermal Power Plants in Hawaii Owner Facility Type Capacity (MW) Commercial Online

185

"YEAR","MONTH","STATE","UTILITY CODE","UTILITY NAME","RESIDENTIAL PHOTOVOLTAIC ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","COMMERCIAL PHOTOVOLTAIC ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","INDUSTRIAL PHOTOVOLTAIC ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","TRANSPORTATION PHOTOVOLTAIC ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","TOTAL PHOTOVOLTAIC ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","RESIDENTIAL PHOTOVOLTAIC INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","COMMERCIAL PHOTOVOLTAIC INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","INDUSTRIAL PHOTOVOLTAIC INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","TRANSPORTATION PHOTOVOLTAIC INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","TOTAL PHOTOVOLTAIC INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","RESIDENTIAL PHOTOVOLTAIC NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","COMMERCIAL PHOTOVOLTAIC NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","INDUSTRIAL PHOTOVOLTAIC NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","TRANSPORTATIONPHOTOVOLTAIC NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","TOTAL PHOTOVOLTAIC NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","RESIDENTIAL WIND ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","COMMERCIAL WIND ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","INDUSTRIAL WIND ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","TRANSPORTATION WIND ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","TOTAL WIND ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","RESIDENTIAL WIND INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","COMMERCIAL WIND INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","INDUSTRIAL WIND INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","TRANSPORTATION WIND INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","TOTAL WIND INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","RESIDENTIAL WIND NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","COMMERCIAL WIND NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","INDUSTRIAL WIND NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","TRANSPORTATION WIND NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","TOTAL WIND NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","RESIDENTIAL OTHER ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","COMMERCIAL OTHER ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","INDUSTRIAL OTHER ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","TRANSPORTATION OTHER ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","TOTAL OTHER ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","RESIDENTIAL OTHER INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","COMMERCIAL OTHER INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","INDUSTRIAL OTHER INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","TRANSPORTATION OTHER INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","TOTAL OTHER INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","RESIDENTIAL OTHER NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","COMMERCIAL OTHER NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","INDUSTRIAL OTHER NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","TRANSPORTATION OTHER NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","TOTAL OTHER NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","RESIDENTIAL TOTAL ENERGY SOLD BACK TO THE UTILITY (MWh)","COMMERCIAL TOTAL ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","INDUSTRIAL TOTAL ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","TRANSPORTATION TOTAL ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","TOTAL ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","RESIDENTIAL TOTAL INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","COMMERCIAL TOTAL INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","INDUSTRIAL TOTAL INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","TRANSPORTATION TOTAL INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","TOTAL INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","RESIDENTIAL TOTAL NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","COMMERCIAL TOTAL NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","INDUSTRIAL TOTAL NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","TRANSPORTATION TOTAL NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","TOTAL NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","RESIDENTIAL ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK TO THE UTILITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MWh)","COMMERCIAL ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK TO THE UTILITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MWh)","INDUSTRIAL ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK TO THE UTILITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MWh)","TRANSPORTATION ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK TO THE UTILITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MWh)","TOTAL ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK TO THE UTILITYFOR ALL STATES SERVED(MWh)","RESIDENTIAL INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MW)","COMMERCIAL INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MW)","INDUSTRIAL INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MW)","TRANSPORTATION INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MW)","INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MW)","RESIDENTIAL NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT FOR ALL STATES SERVED","COMMERCIAL NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT FOR ALL STATES SERVED","INDUSTRIAL NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT FOR ALL STATES SERVED","TRANSPORTATION NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT FOR ALL STATES SERVED","NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT FOR ALL STATES SERVED"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

TRANSPORTATIONPHOTOVOLTAIC NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","TOTAL PHOTOVOLTAIC NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","RESIDENTIAL WIND ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","COMMERCIAL WIND ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","INDUSTRIAL WIND ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","TRANSPORTATION WIND ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","TOTAL WIND ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","RESIDENTIAL WIND INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","COMMERCIAL WIND INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","INDUSTRIAL WIND INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","TRANSPORTATION WIND INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","TOTAL WIND INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","RESIDENTIAL WIND NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","COMMERCIAL WIND NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","INDUSTRIAL WIND NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","TRANSPORTATION WIND NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","TOTAL WIND NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","RESIDENTIAL OTHER ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","COMMERCIAL OTHER ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","INDUSTRIAL OTHER ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","TRANSPORTATION OTHER ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","TOTAL OTHER ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","RESIDENTIAL OTHER INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","COMMERCIAL OTHER INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","INDUSTRIAL OTHER INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","TRANSPORTATION OTHER INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","TOTAL OTHER INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","RESIDENTIAL OTHER NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","COMMERCIAL OTHER NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","INDUSTRIAL OTHER NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","TRANSPORTATION OTHER NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","TOTAL OTHER NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","RESIDENTIAL TOTAL ENERGY SOLD BACK TO THE UTILITY (MWh)","COMMERCIAL TOTAL ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","INDUSTRIAL TOTAL ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","TRANSPORTATION TOTAL ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","TOTAL ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","RESIDENTIAL TOTAL INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","COMMERCIAL TOTAL INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","INDUSTRIAL TOTAL INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","TRANSPORTATION TOTAL INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","TOTAL INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","RESIDENTIAL TOTAL NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","COMMERCIAL TOTAL NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","INDUSTRIAL TOTAL NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","TRANSPORTATION TOTAL NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","TOTAL NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","RESIDENTIAL ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK TO THE UTILITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MWh)","COMMERCIAL ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK TO THE UTILITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MWh)","INDUSTRIAL ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK TO THE UTILITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MWh)","TRANSPORTATION ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK TO THE UTILITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MWh)","TOTAL ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK TO THE UTILITYFOR ALL STATES SERVED(MWh)","RESIDENTIAL INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MW)","COMMERCIAL INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MW)","INDUSTRIAL INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MW)","TRANSPORTATION INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MW)","INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MW)","RESIDENTIAL NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT FOR ALL STATES SERVED","COMMERCIAL NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT FOR ALL STATES SERVED","INDUSTRIAL NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT FOR ALL STATES SERVED","TRANSPORTATION NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT FOR ALL STATES SERVED","NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT FOR ALL STATES SERVED"

186

Crystal structures of MW1337R and lin2004: Representatives of a novel protein family that adopt a four-helical bundle fold  

SciTech Connect

To extend the structural coverage of proteins with unknown functions, we targeted a novel protein family (Pfam accession number PF08807, DUF1798) for which we proposed and determined the structures of two representative members. The MW1337R gene of Staphylococcus aureus subsp. aureus Rosenbach (Wood 46) encodes a protein with a molecular weight of 13.8 kDa (residues 1-116) and a calculated isoelectric point of 5.15. The lin2004 gene of the nonspore-forming bacterium Listeria innocua Clip11262 encodes a protein with a molecular weight of 14.6 kDa (residues 1-121) and a calculated isoelectric point of 5.45. MW1337R and lin2004, as well as their homologs, which, so far, have been found only in Bacillus, Staphylococcus, Listeria, and related genera (Geobacillus, Exiguobacterium, and Oceanobacillus), have unknown functions and are annotated as hypothetical proteins. The genomic contexts of MW1337R and lin2004 are similar and conserved in related species. In prokaryotic genomes, most often, functionally interacting proteins are coded by genes, which are colocated in conserved operons. Proteins from the same operon as MW1337R and lin2004 either have unknown functions (i.e., belong to DUF1273, Pfam accession number PF06908) or are similar to ypsB from Bacillus subtilis. The function of ypsB is unclear, although it has a strong similarity to the N-terminal region of DivIVA, which was characterized as a bifunctional protein with distinct roles during vegetative growth and sporulation. In addition, members of the DUF1273 family display distant sequence similarity with the DprA/Smf protein, which acts downstream of the DNA uptake machinery, possibly in conjunction with RecA. The RecA activities in Bacillus subtilis are modulated by RecU Holliday-junction resolvase. In all analyzed cases, the gene coding for RecU is in the vicinity of MW1337R, lin2004, or their orthologs, but on a different operon located in the complementary DNA strand. Here, we report the crystal structures of MW1337R and lin2004, which were determined using the semiautomated, high-throughput pipeline of the Joint Center for Structural Genomics (JCSG), part of the National Institute of General Medical Sciences Protein Structure Initiative.

Kozbial, Piotr; Xu, Qingping; Chiu, Hsiu-Ju; McMullan, Daniel; Krishna, S. Sri; Miller, Mitchell D.; Abdubek, Polat; Acosta, Claire; Astakhova, Tamara; Axelrod, Herbert L.; Carlton, Dennis; Clayton, Thomas; Deller, Marc; Duan, Lian; Elias, Ylva; Elsliger, Marc-Andr; Feuerhelm, Julie; Grzechnik, Slawomir K.; Hale, Joanna; Han, Gye Won; Jaroszewski, Lukasz; Jin, Kevin K.; Klock, Heath E.; Knuth, Mark W.; Koesema, Eric; Kumar, Abhinav; Marciano, David; Morse, Andrew T.; Murphy, Kevin D.; Nigoghossian, Edward; Okach, Linda; Oommachen, Silvya; Reyes, Ron; Rife, Christopher L.; Spraggon, Glen; Trout, Christina V.; ban den Bedem, Henry; Weekes, Dana; White, Aprilfawn; Wolf, Guenter; Zubieta, Chloe; Hodgson, Keith O.; Wooley, John; Deacon, Ashley M.; Godzik, Adam; Lesley, Scott A.; Wilson, Ian A. (Scripps); (SSRL); (JCSG); (UCSD); (Burnham)

2009-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

187

Numerical investigations of combustion and emissions of syngas as compared to methane in a 200MW package boiler  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract During the last decades, focus has been made on the use of syngas instead of conventional hydrocarbon fuels targeting \\{NOx\\} emission reduction in the exhaust gases. With advances in solar-steam methane reforming for the production of synthesis gas, the applicability of syngas at industrial scale becomes imperative. In the present work, syngas combustion and emission characteristics are numerically investigated and compared with the case of pure methane combustion in a two-burner 200MW package boiler. A detailed reaction kinetics mechanism of 21 steps and 11 species was considered for the modeling of syngasair combustion. Different syngas compositions were considered for combustion with air including 67% CO:33% H2, 50% CO:50% H2 and 33% CO:67% H2. The results showed a combustion delay in case of pure methane combustion as compared to syngas combustion. The case of 33% CO:67% H2 syngas composition was found to have the shortest flame as compared to that of other syngas compositions. The case of 50% CO:50% H2 syngas resulted in lowest maximum boiler temperature while 67% CO:33% H2 syngas resulted in highest maximum boiler temperature. The boiler exit temperature was found to increase with the increase of hydrogen content in the syngas. The excess air factor was found to have a significant effect on both CO and \\{NOx\\} emissions. \\{NOx\\} emission decreases by about 30% when the amount of excess air is increased from 5% to 25%, which is very promising. Among the tested syngas compositions, the 50% CO:50% H2 syngas composition had the lowest emissions with the best combustion characteristics.

Mohamed A. Habib; Esmail M.A. Mokheimer; Sofihullahi Y. Sanusi; Medhat A. Nemitallah

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

A 12-MW-scale pilot study of in-duct scrubbing (IDS) using a rotary atomizer  

SciTech Connect

A low-cost, moderate-removal efficiency, flue gas desulfurization (FGD) technology was selected by the US Department of Energy for pilot demonstration in its Acid Rain Precursor Control Technology Initiative. The process, identified as In-Duct Scrubbing (IDS), applies rotary atomizer techniques developed for lime-based spray dryer FGD while utilizing existing flue gas ductwork and particulate collectors. IDS technology is anticipated to result in a dry desulfurization process with a moderate removal efficiency (50% or greater) for high-sulfur coal-fired boilers. The critical elements for successful application are: (1) adequate mixing of sorbent droplets with flue gas for efficient reaction contact, (2) sufficient residence time to produce a non-wetting product, and (3) appropriate ductwork cross-sectional area to prevent deposition of wet reaction products before particle drying is comple. The ductwork in many older plants, previously modified to meet 1970 Clean Air Act requirements for particulate control, usually meet these criteria. A 12 MW-scale IDS pilot plant was constructed at the Muskingum River Plant of the American Electric Power System. The pilot plant, which operates from a slipstrem attached to the air-preheater outlet duct from the Unit 5 boiler at the Muskingum River Plant (which burns about 4% sulfur coal), is equipped with three atomizer stations to test the IDS concept in vertical and horizontal configurations. In addition, the pilot plant is equipped to test the effect of injecting IDS off- product upstream of the atomizer, on SO{sub 2}and NO{sub x} removals.

Samuel, E.A.; Murphy, K.R.; Demian, A.

1989-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Evaluation of the 3D-furnace simulation code AIOLOS by comparing CFD predictions of gas compositions with in-furnace measurements in a 210MW coal-fired utility boiler  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The furnace of a pulverised coal-fired utility boiler with a thermal output of 210MW, with dimensions of 8m x 8m x 29m and 12 burners located on three levels, is considered. Coal combustion is described by a five-step-reaction scheme. The model covers two heterogeneous reactions for pyrolysis and char combustion and three gas phase reactions for the oxidation of volatile matter. A standard k, ?-model is used for the description of turbulence. The interaction of turbulence and chemistry is modelled using the Eddy Dissipation Concept (EDC). The transport equations for mass, momentum, enthalpy and species are formulated in general curvilinear co-ordinates enabling an accurate treatment of boundaries and a very good control over the distribution of the grid lines. The discretisation is based on a non-staggered finite-volume approach and the coupling of velocities and pressure is achieved by the SIMPLEC method. Numerical diffusion is minimised by the use of the higher-order discretisation scheme MLU. The accuracy of the predictions is demonstrated by comparing the computational results with in-furnace measurements of carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide and oxygen concentrations and of temperatures.

Hermann Knaus; Uwe Schnell; Klaus R.G. Hein

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

TOXECON Retrofit for Mercury and Multi-Pollutant Control on Three 90 MW Coal-Fired Boilers (Completed September 30, 2009)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

TOXECON Retrofit for Mercury and TOXECON Retrofit for Mercury and Multi-Pollutant Control on Three 90 MW Coal-Fired Boilers (Completed September 30, 2009) Project Description Wisconsin Electric Power Company (We Energies) has designed, installed, operated, and evaluated the TOXECON process as an integrated mercury, particulate matter, SO 2 , and NO X emissions control system for application on coal-fired power generation systems. TOXECON is a process in which sorbents, including powdered activated

191

Solid radioactive waste management facility design for managing CANDU{sup R} 600 MW nuclear generating station re-tube/refurbishment Waste Streams  

SciTech Connect

The main design features of the re-tube canisters, waste handling equipment and waste containers designed by Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL{sup R}) and implemented in support of the re-tube/refurbishment activities for Candu 600 MW nuclear generating stations are described in this paper. The re-tube/refurbishment waste characterization and the waste management principles, which form the basis of the design activities, are also briefly outlined. (authors)

Pontikakis, N.; Hopkins, J.; Scott, D.; Bajaj, V.; Nosella, L. [AECL, 2251 Speakman Drive, Mississauga, Ontario, L5K 1B2 (Canada)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Geek-Up[3.4.2011]: 3,000+ MW and 2,500 Year-Old Greek Pottery | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Geek-Up[3.4.2011]: 3,000+ MW and 2,500 Year-Old Greek Pottery Geek-Up[3.4.2011]: 3,000+ MW and 2,500 Year-Old Greek Pottery Geek-Up[3.4.2011]: 3,000+ MW and 2,500 Year-Old Greek Pottery March 4, 2011 - 5:03pm Addthis An Attic black-figured amphora, currently in the British Museum, of the type that will be studied at SLAC. | Photo by Marie-Lan Nguyen, Courtesy of SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory An Attic black-figured amphora, currently in the British Museum, of the type that will be studied at SLAC. | Photo by Marie-Lan Nguyen, Courtesy of SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory Elizabeth Meckes Elizabeth Meckes Director of User Experience & Digital Technologies, Office of Public Affairs Last week, Bonneville Power Administration dispatchers in the Dittmer Control Center celebrated a milestone - for the first time, wind

193

Design & development fo a 20-MW flywheel-based frequency regulation power plant : a study for the DOE Energy Storage Systems program.  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the successful efforts of Beacon Power to design and develop a 20-MW frequency regulation power plant based solely on flywheels. Beacon's Smart Matrix (Flywheel) Systems regulation power plant, unlike coal or natural gas generators, will not burn fossil fuel or directly produce particulates or other air emissions and will have the ability to ramp up or down in a matter of seconds. The report describes how data from the scaled Beacon system, deployed in California and New York, proved that the flywheel-based systems provided faster responding regulation services in terms of cost-performance and environmental impact. Included in the report is a description of Beacon's design package for a generic, multi-MW flywheel-based regulation power plant that allows accurate bids from a design/build contractor and Beacon's recommendations for site requirements that would ensure the fastest possible construction. The paper concludes with a statement about Beacon's plans for a lower cost, modular-style substation based on the 20-MW design.

Rounds, Robert (Beacon Power, Tyngsboro, MA); Peek, Georgianne Huff

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Development of a dry low-NOx gas turbine combustor for a natural-gas fueled 2MW co-generation system  

SciTech Connect

A dry low-NOx gas turbine combustor has been developed for natural-gas fueled co-generation systems in the power range of 1--4MW. The combustor. called the Double Swirler Combustor, uses the lean premixed combustion to reduce NOx emission. The combustor is characterized by two staged lean premixed combustion with two coaxial annular burners and a simple fuel control system without the complex variable geometry. Substantially low NOx level has been achieved to meet the strict NOx regulation to co-generation systems in Japan. High combustion efficiency has been obtained for a wide operating range. In 1994, Tokyo Gas and Ishikawajima-Harima Heavy Industries initiated a collaborative program to develop a natural-gas fueled low NOx gas turbine engine for new 2MW class co-generation system, named IM270. The Double Swirler Combustor, originally developed by Tokyo Gas, was introduced into the natural gas fueled version of the IM270. Engine test of the first production unit was successfully conducted to confirm substantially low NOx level of less than 15 ppm (O{sub 2} = 16%) with the output power of more than 2MW. Test for the durability and the reliability of the system is being conducted at Tokyo Gas Negishi LNG Terminal in Kanagawa, Japan and successful results have been so far obtained.

Mori, Masaaki; Sato, Hiroshi

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Comparative ranking of 0. 1-10 MW/sub e/ solar thermal electric power systems. Volume II. Supporting data. Final report  

SciTech Connect

This report is part of a two-volume set summarizing the results of a comparative ranking of generic solar thermal concepts designed specifically for electric power generation. The original objective of the study was to project the mid-1990 cost and performance of selected generic solar thermal electric power systems for utility applications and to rank these systems by criteria that reflect their future commercial acceptance. This study considered plants with rated capacities of 1-10 MW/sub e/, operating over a range of capacity factors from the no-storage case to 0.7 and above. Later, the study was extended to include systems with capacities from 0.1 to 1 MW/sub e/, a range that is attractive to industrial and other nonutility applications. Volume I summarizes the results for the full range of capacities from 0.1 to 1.0 MW/sub e/. Volume II presents data on the performance and cost and ranking methodology.

Thornton, J.P.; Brown, K.C.; Finegold, J.G.; Gresham, J.B.; Herlevich, F.A.; Kriz, T.A.

1980-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Investigation of three-phase regions formed by petroleum sulfonate systems  

SciTech Connect

The three-phase region of the Witco TRS 10-80 sulfonate/nonane/isopropanol (IPA)/2.7% brine system was investigated in detail. A method is described to locate phase boundaries on pseudoternary diagrams, which are slices of the tetrahedron used to display phase boundaries of the four-component system. The three-phase region is wedge-like in shape extending from near the hydrocarbon apex to a point near 20% alcohol on the brine/alcohol edge of the tetrahedron. It was found to be triangular in cross section on pseudoternary diagrams of constant brine content, with its base toward the nonane/brine/IPA face. The apex of the three-phase region is a curved line where the M, H+M, and M+W regions meet. 18 refs.

Blevins, C.E.; Willhite, G.P.; Michnick, M.J.

1981-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Toxecon Retrofit for Mercury and Mulit-Pollutant Control on Three 90-MW Coal-Fired Boilers  

SciTech Connect

This U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Clean Coal Power Initiative (CCPI) project was based on a cooperative agreement between We Energies and the DOE Office of Fossil Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) to design, install, evaluate, and demonstrate the EPRI-patented TOXECON{trademark} air pollution control process. Project partners included Cummins & Barnard, ADA-ES, and the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI). The primary goal of this project was to reduce mercury emissions from three 90-MW units that burn Powder River Basin coal at the We Energies Presque Isle Power Plant in Marquette, Michigan. Additional goals were to reduce nitrogen oxide (NO{sub x}), sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}), and particulate matter emissions; allow reuse and sale of fly ash; advance commercialization of the technology; demonstrate a reliable mercury continuous emission monitor (CEM) suitable for use at power plants; and demonstrate recovery of mercury from the sorbent. Mercury was controlled by injection of activated carbon upstream of the TOXECON{trademark} baghouse, which achieved more than 90% removal on average over a 44-month period. During a two-week test involving trona injection, SO{sub 2} emissions were reduced by 70%, although no coincident removal of NOx was achieved. The TOXECON{trademark} baghouse also provided enhanced particulate control, particularly during startup of the boilers. On this project, mercury CEMs were developed and tested in collaboration with Thermo Fisher Scientific, resulting in a reliable CEM that could be used in the power plant environment and that could measure mercury as low as 0.1 {micro}g/m{sup 3}. Sorbents were injected downstream of the primary particulate collection device, allowing for continued sale and beneficial use of captured fly ash. Two methods for recovering mercury using thermal desorption on the TOXECON{trademark} PAC/ash mixture were successfully tested during this program. Two methods for using the TOXECON{trademark} PAC/ash mixture in structural concrete were also successfully developed and tested. This project demonstrated a significant reduction in the rate of emissions from Presque Isle Units 7, 8, and 9, and substantial progress toward establishing the design criteria for one of the most promising mercury control retrofit technologies currently available. The Levelized Cost for 90% mercury removal at this site was calculated at $77,031 per pound of mercury removed with a capital cost of $63,189 per pound of mercury removed. Mercury removal at the Presque Isle Power Plant averages approximately 97 pounds per year.

Steven Derenne; Robin Stewart

2009-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

198

2013 CEF RUN - PHASE 1 DATA ANALYSIS AND MODEL VALIDATION  

SciTech Connect

Phase 1 of the 2013 Cold cap Evaluation Furnace (CEF) test was completed on June 3, 2013 after a 5-day round-the-clock feeding and pouring operation. The main goal of the test was to characterize the CEF off-gas produced from a nitric-formic acid flowsheet feed and confirm whether the CEF platform is capable of producing scalable off-gas data necessary for the revision of the DWPF melter off-gas flammability model; the revised model will be used to define new safety controls on the key operating parameters for the nitric-glycolic acid flowsheet feeds including total organic carbon (TOC). Whether the CEF off-gas data were scalable for the purpose of predicting the potential flammability of the DWPF melter exhaust was determined by comparing the predicted H{sub 2} and CO concentrations using the current DWPF melter off-gas flammability model to those measured during Phase 1; data were deemed scalable if the calculated fractional conversions of TOC-to-H{sub 2} and TOC-to-CO at varying melter vapor space temperatures were found to trend and further bound the respective measured data with some margin of safety. Being scalable thus means that for a given feed chemistry the instantaneous flow rates of H{sub 2} and CO in the DWPF melter exhaust can be estimated with some degree of conservatism by multiplying those of the respective gases from a pilot-scale melter by the feed rate ratio. This report documents the results of the Phase 1 data analysis and the necessary calculations performed to determine the scalability of the CEF off-gas data. A total of six steady state runs were made during Phase 1 under non-bubbled conditions by varying the CEF vapor space temperature from near 700 to below 300C, as measured in a thermowell (T{sub tw}). At each steady state temperature, the off-gas composition was monitored continuously for two hours using MS, GC, and FTIR in order to track mainly H{sub 2}, CO, CO{sub 2}, NO{sub x}, and organic gases such as CH{sub 4}. The standard deviation of the average vapor space temperature during each steady state ranged from 2 to 6C; however, those of the measured off-gas data were much larger due to the inherent cold cap instabilities in the slurry-fed melters. In order to predict the off-gas composition at the sampling location downstream of the film cooler, the measured feed composition was charge-reconciled and input into the DWPF melter off-gas flammability model, which was then run under the conditions for each of the six Phase 1 steady states. In doing so, it was necessary to perform an overall heat/mass balance calculation from the melter to the Off-Gas Condensate Tank (OGCT) in order to estimate the rate of air inleakage as well as the true gas temperature in the CEF vapor space (T{sub gas}) during each steady state by taking into account the effects of thermal radiation on the measured temperature (T{sub tw}). The results of Phase 1 data analysis and subsequent model runs showed that the predicted concentrations of H{sub 2} and CO by the DWPF model correctly trended and further bounded the respective measured data in the CEF off-gas by over predicting the TOC-to-H{sub 2} and TOC-to-CO conversion ratios by a factor of 2 to 5; an exception was the 7X over prediction of the latter at T{sub gas} = 371C but the impact of CO on the off-gas flammability potential is only minor compared to that of H{sub 2}. More importantly, the seemingly-excessive over prediction of the TOC-to-H{sub 2} conversion by a factor of 4 or higher at T{sub gas} < ~350C was attributed to the conservative antifoam decomposition scheme added recently to the model and therefore is considered a modeling issue and not a design issue. At T{sub gas} > ~350C, the predicted TOC-to-H{sub 2} conversions were closer to but still higher than the measured data by a factor of 2, which may be regarded as adequate from the safety margin standpoint. The heat/mass balance calculations also showed that the correlation between T{sub tw} and T{sub gas} in the CEF vapor space was close to that of the scale SGM, whose data were ta

Choi, A.

2014-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

199

CrowdPhase: crowdsourcing the phase problem  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The idea of attacking the phase problem by crowdsourcing is introduced. Using an interactive, multi-player, web-based system, participants work simultaneously to select phase sets that correspond to better electron-density maps in order to solve low-resolution phasing problems.

Jorda, J.

2014-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

200

Quantum Spin Hall Phases  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......even it is called the weak topological in- sulator (WTI). The STI and WTI correspond to the QSH and I phases, respectively...are used to distinguish various phases in the STI or WTI phases, and each phase can be associated with a mod......

Shuichi Murakami

2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tw mw phase" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Initial tests and operation of a 110 GHz, 1 MW gyrotron with evacuated waveguide system on the DIII-D tokamak  

SciTech Connect

A gyrotron producing nominally 1 MW at 110 GHz has been installed at the DIII-D tokamak and operated in a program of initial tests with a windowless evacuated transmission line. The alignment and first test operation were performed in an air environment at atmospheric pressure. Under these conditions, the tube produced rf output in excess of 800 kW for pulse lengths greater than 10 msec and power near 500 kW for pulse lengths of about 100 msec into a free space dummy load. The gyrotron was operated into evacuated corrugated waveguide in the full power parameter regime for pulse lengths of up to 500 msec injecting greater than 0.5 MW into DIII-D for a preliminary series of experiments. Generated powers greater than 900 kW were achieved. A parasitic oscillation at various frequencies between 20 and 100 MHz, which was generated during the pulsing of the gyrotron electron beam, was suppressed somewhat by a capacitive filter attached to the gyrotron itself. Addition of a magnetic shield intended to alter the magnetic field geometry below the cathode eliminated internal tube sparks. Rework of the external power and interlock circuitry to improve the immunity to electromagnetic interference was also done in parallel so that the fast interlock circuitry could be used. The latest results of the test program, the design of the free space load and other test hardware, and the transmission line will be presented.

Lohr, J.; Ponce, D.; Tooker, J.F. [and others

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Test and demonstration of a 1-MW wellhead generator: helical screw expander power plant, Model 76-1. Final report to the International Energy Agency  

SciTech Connect

A 1-MW geothermal wellhead power plant incorporating a Lysholm or helical screw expander (HSE) was field tested between 1980 and 1983 by Mexico, Italy, and New Zealand with technical assistance from the United States. The objectives were to provide data on the reliability and performance of the HSE and to assess the costs and benefits of its use. The range of conditions under which the HSE was tested included loads up to 933 kW, mass flowrates of 14,600 to 395, 000 lbs/hr, inlet pressures of 64 to 220 psia, inlet qualities of 0 to 100%, exhaust pressures of 3.1 to 40 psia, total dissolved solids up to 310,000 ppM, and noncondensible gases up to 38% of the vapor mass flow. Typical machine efficiencies of 40 to 50% were calculated. For most operations efficiency increased approximately logarithmically with shaft power, while inlet quality and rotor speed had only small effects. The HSE was designed with oversized internal clearances in the expectation that adherent scale would form during operation. Improvements in machine efficiency of 3.5 to 4 percentage points were observed over some test periods with some scale deposition. A comparison with a 1-MW back-pressure turbine showed that the HSE can compete favorably under certain conditions. The HSE was found to be a rugged energy conversion machine for geothermal applications, but some subsystems were found to require further development. 7 refs., 28 figs., 5 tabs.

Not Available

1985-07-04T23:59:59.000Z

203

Application of a low pressure economizer for waste heat recovery from the exhaust flue gas in a 600MW power plant  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper presents a case study of recovering the waste heat of the exhaust flue gas before entering a flue gas desulphurizer (FGD) in a 600MW power plant. This waste heat can be recovered by installing a low pressure economizer (LPE) to heat the condensed water which can save the steam extracted from the steam turbine for heating the condensed water and then extra work can be obtained. The energy and water savings and the reduction of CO2 emission resulted from the LPE installation are assessed for three cases in a 600MW coal-fired power plant with wet stack. Serpentine pipes with quadrate finned extensions are selected for the LPE heat exchanger which has an overall coefficient of heat transfer of 37W/m2K and the static pressure loss of 781Pa in the optimized case. Analysis results show that it is feasible to install \\{LPEs\\} in the exhaust flue gas system between the pressurizing fan and the FGD, which has little negative impacts on the unit. The benefits generated include saving of standard coal equivalent (SCE) at 24g/(kWh) and saving of water at 2535t/h under full load operation with corresponding reduction of CO2 emission.

Chaojun Wang; Boshu He; Shaoyang Sun; Ying Wu; Na Yan; Linbo Yan; Xiaohui Pei

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Phase-Transfer Catalysts  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In previous chapters we learned that a phase-transfer catalyst must have two particular chemical functions to be successful, that is, it must rapidly transfer one of the reactant species into the normal phase ...

Charles M. Starks; Charles L. Liotta; Marc E. Halpern

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Piecewise Linear Phase Transitions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

It is shown how simple assumptions lead to piecewise linear behavior, which is observed in certain phase transitions.

Joseph B. Keller

2007-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

206

Multimedia Phase-Spaces  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Dynamic phase-spaces are suggested as a way of designing and implementing interactive multimedia systems. A dynamic phase-space is a space of properties overlayed with dynamics. The space is decorated with multimedia resources such ... Keywords: catastrophe theory, dynamics, installation, interactive narrative, museums, phase-space

Peter Bgh Andersen

1998-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Design, construction, system integration, and test results of the 1 MW CW RF system for the e-gun cavity in the energy recovery LINAC at Brookhaven National Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

Brookhaven's ERL (Energy Recovery LINAC) requires a 1 MW CW RF system for the superconducting electron gun cavity. The system consists primarily of a klystron tube, transmitter, and High-Voltage Power Supply (HVPS). The 703.75 MHz klystron made by CPl, Inc. provides RF power of 1MW CW with efficiency of 65%. It has a single output window, diode-type electron gun, and collector capable of dissipating the entire beam power. It was fully factory tested including 24-hour heat run at 1.1 MW CWo The solid state HVPS designed by Continental Electronics provides up to 100 kV at low ripple and 2.1 MW CW with over 95% efficiency. With minimal stored energy and a fast shut-down mode no crowbar circuit is needed. Continental 's transmitter includes PLC based user interface and monitoring, RF pre-amplifier, magnet and Vac-Ion pump supplies, cooling water instrumentation, and integral safety interlock system. BNL installed the klystron, HVPS, and transmitter along with other items, such as circulator, water load, and waveguide components. The collaboration of BNL, CPI, and Continental in the design, installation, and testing was essential to the successful operation of the 1MW system.

Lenci,S.J.; Eisen, E. L.; Dickey, D. L.; Sainz, J. E.; Utay, P. F.; Zaltsman, A.; Lambiase, R.

2009-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

208

An 8-{mu}m quantum cascade laserproduced by the metalorganic vapour phase epitaxy method  

SciTech Connect

An 8-{mu}m quantum cascade laser is fabricated by the metalorganic vapour phase epitaxy method. A scheme of vertical transitions in a structure consisting of three quantum wells is used. The laser operates in a pulsed regime at temperatures up to 250 K. The threshold current density was about 3 kA cm{sup -2} and increased up to 6 kA cm{sup -2} at 250 K. The 1-{mu}s pulse power in the multimode regime was 45 mW at 77 K.

Zasavitskii, I I; Pashkeev, D A [P N Lebedev Physical Institute, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation); Marmalyuk, Aleksandr A; Ryaboshtan, Yu L [M.F. Stel'makh Polyus Research and Development Institute, Moscow (Russian Federation); Mikaelyan, G T [OJSC Research and Manufacturing Enterprise 'Inject', Saratov (Russian Federation)

2010-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

209

Cooperation Reliability Testing of the Clipper Windpower Liberty 2.5 MW Turbine: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-07-210  

SciTech Connect

Clipper Windpower (CWP) has developed the Liberty 2.5 MW wind turbine. The development, manufacturing, and certification process depends heavily on being able to validate the full-scale system design and performance under load in both an accredited structural test facility and through accredited field testing. CWP requested that DOE/ NREL upgrade blade test capabilities to perform a scope of work including structural testing of the C-96 blade used on the CWP Liberty turbine. This funds-in CRADA was developed to upgrade NREL blade test capability, while enabling certification testing of the C-96 blade through the facility and equipment upgrades. NREL shared resource funds were used to develop hardware necessary to structurally attach a large wind turbine to the test stand at the NWTC. Participant funds-in monies were used for developing the test program.

Hughes, S.

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Solar aided power generation of a 300MW lignite fired power plant combined with line-focus parabolic trough collectors field  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Nowadays, conventional coal or gas fired power plants are the dominant way to generate electricity in the world. In recent years there is a growth in the field of renewable energy sources in order to avoid the threat of climate change from fossil fuel combustion. Solar energy, as an environmental friendly energy source, may be the answer to the reduction of global CO2 emissions. This paper presents the concept of Solar Aided Power Generation (SAPG), a combination of renewable and conventional energy sources technologies. The operation of the 300MW lignite fired power plant of Ptolemais integrated with a solar field of parabolic trough collectors was simulated using TRNSYS software in both power boosting and fuel saving modes. The power plant performance, power output variation, fuel consumption and CO2 emissions were calculated. Furthermore, an economic analysis was carried out for both power boosting and fuel saving modes of operation and optimum solar contribution was estimated.

G.C. Bakos; Ch. Tsechelidou

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

10 MW/sub e/ Solar Thermal Central Receiver Pilot Plant heliostat and beam characterization system evaluation, November 1981-December 1986  

SciTech Connect

Test and evaluation results for the heliostats and beam characterization system at the 10 MW/sub e/ Solar Thermal Central Receiver Pilot Plant are described in this report. Southern California Edison operated and maintained the plant during the five years covered by this evaluation. Therefore, the results represent what can be expected from a large number of heliostats that are operated over a long period of time in a power plant environment. The heliostats and beam characterization system were evaluated for their ability to meet performance and survival requirements. Heliostat evaluation results are reported for mirror soiling rates, mirror corrosion, wind loads, availability, maintenance requirements, tracking accuracy, beam quality, component temperatures, and operating power requirements. The heliostat beam characterization system accuracy is given for the measurement of beam quality, heliostat tracking accuracy, and power in the reflected beam. The heliostat technical specifications and design description are provided, and a detailed design description of the beam characterization system is included. 41 refs.

Mavis, C.L.

1988-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

NGNP PHASE I REVIEW  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

REVIEW REVIEW NEAC REACTOR TECHNOLOGY SUBCOMMITTEE FINAL REPORT JUNE 15, 2011 EPACT 2005 REQUIREMENTS * FIRST PROJECT PHASE REVIEW-On a determination by the Secretary that the appropriate activities under the first project phase under subsection (b)(1) are nearly complete, the Secretary shall request the NERAC to conduct a comprehensive review of the Project and to report to the Secretary the recommendation of the NERAC concerning whether the Project is ready to proceed to the second project phase under subsection (b)(2) NGNP PROJECT PHASES (1) FIRST PHASE.-A first project phase shall be conducted to- (A) select and validate the appropriate technology under subsection (a)(1); (B) carry out enabling research, development, and demonstration activities on technologies and components under

213

Holographic Magnetic Phase Transition  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study four-dimensional interacting fermions in a strong magnetic field, using the holographic Sakai-Sugimoto model of intersecting D4 and D8 branes in the deconfined, chiral-symmetric parallel phase. We find that as the magnetic field is varied, while staying in the parallel phase, the fermions exhibit a first-order phase transition in which their magnetization jumps discontinuously. Properties of this transition are consistent with a picture in which some of the fermions jump to the lowest Landau level. Similarities to known magnetic phase transitions are discussed.

Gilad Lifschytz; Matthew Lippert

2009-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

214

Degenerate Metric Phase Boundaries  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The structure of boundaries between degenerate and nondegenerate solutions of Ashtekar's canonical reformulation of Einstein's equations is studied. Several examples are given of such "phase boundaries" in which the metric is degenerate on one side of a null hypersurface and non-degenerate on the other side. These include portions of flat space, Schwarzschild, and plane wave solutions joined to degenerate regions. In the last case, the wave collides with a planar phase boundary and continues on with the same curvature but degenerate triad, while the phase boundary continues in the opposite direction. We conjecture that degenerate phase boundaries are always null.

Ingemar Bengtsson; Ted Jacobson

1999-01-23T23:59:59.000Z

215

During Phase 3, WIPP  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

UPDATE: April 14, 2014 Phase 3 activities begin Two teams re-entered the WIPP underground facility on Saturday, moving closer to suspected location of the February 14...

216

NGNP PHASE I REVIEW  

Energy Savers (EERE)

and start up operations of the prototype nuclear reactor and its associated hydrogen or electricity production facilities. Scope of Work for Review * Review Phase I reports in...

217

A Phase Odyssey  

SciTech Connect

We are introduced to the effects of phase from the earliest days of our childhood, from the nursery rhyme above (or its less verbose for 'Twinkle, Twinkle Little Star') to the shimmer over a hot road and the network of bright lines at the bottom of a swimming pool. These are all manifestations of phase. And there are many more.

Nugent, K.A.; Paganin, D.; Gureyev, T.E. (Melbourne)

2009-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

218

ARM - Measurement - Hydrometeor phase  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

phase phase ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Hydrometeor phase Hydrometeor phase such as liquid ice or mixed phase Categories Cloud Properties Instruments The above measurement is considered scientifically relevant for the following instruments. Refer to the datastream (netcdf) file headers of each instrument for a list of all available measurements, including those recorded for diagnostic or quality assurance purposes. Value-Added Products VISST : Minnis Cloud Products Using Visst Algorithm (Process) VISSTPX04G08V2MINNIS : VISST-derived pixel-level products from satellite GOES8, version 2 VISSTPX04G08V3MINNIS : VISST-derived pixel-level products from satellite GOES8, version 3

219

CARS 2002 H.U. Lemke, M.W. Vannier, K. Inamura, A.G. Farman, K. Doi & J.H.C. Reiber (Editors) CARS/Springer. All rights reserved.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CARS 2002 ­ H.U. Lemke, M.W. Vannier, K. Inamura, A.G. Farman, K. Doi & J.H.C. Reiber (Editors.W. Vannier, K. Inamura, A.G. Farman, K. Doi & J.H.C. Reiber (Editors) © CARS/Springer. All rights reserved. 2

Wahle, Andreas

220

CARS 2002 H.U. Lemke, M.W. Vannier; K. Inamura, A.G. Farman, K. Doi & J.H.C. Reiber (Editors) CARS/Springer. All rights reserved.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CARS 2002 ­ H.U. Lemke, M.W. Vannier; K. Inamura, A.G. Farman, K. Doi & J.H.C. Reiber (Editors.G. Farman, K. Doi & J.H.C. Reiber (Editors) CARS/Springer. All rights reserved. 2 2. Method 2.1. Computer

Payan, Yohan

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tw mw phase" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

CARS 2002 H.U. Lemke, M.W. Vannier; K. Inamura, A.G. Farman, K. Doi & J.H.C. Reiber (Editors) CARS/Springer. All rights reserved.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CARS 2002 ­ H.U. Lemke, M.W. Vannier; K. Inamura, A.G. Farman, K. Doi & J.H.C. Reiber (Editors. Inamura, A.G. Farman, K. Doi & J.H.C. Reiber (Editors) © CARS/Springer. All rights reserved. 756

222

Presentation 2.8: Program for the conversion of Russian municipal boilers with 20MW maximum capacity to biofuel due to funds from the emissions reduction units sell, under the Kyoto Protocol  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

economy in XXI century · High consumption of basic and service equipment · Low efficiency of equipment. roubles. Reconstruction period: 3 months Basic results: · Increased boiler's efficiency factor from 50Presentation 2.8: Program for the conversion of Russian municipal boilers with 20MW maximum

223

PRODUCTION START-UP OF 2 MW a-Si PV MANUFACTURING LINE AT SOVLUX M. Im, X. Den& II. C. Ovshinsky,R. Crucetand S.R Ovshimky  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PRODUCTION START-UP OF 2 MW a-Si PV MANUFACTURING LINE AT SOVLUX PLANT M. Im, X. Den& II. C assembled in sovlux plant using these solar cell material have demonstrated an initial efficiency of 9. roofiop modules. Lightweight, flexible rooftop modules with initial efficiency up to 9.3% were producedat

Deng, Xunming

224

A 97mW 110MS/s 12b Pipeline ADC Implemented in 0.18m Digital CMOS Terje N. Andersen, Atle Briskemyr, Frode Telst, Johnny Bjrnsen, Thomas E. Bonnerud,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A 97mW 110MS/s 12b Pipeline ADC Implemented in 0.18µm Digital CMOS Terje N. Andersen, Atle Semiconductor, Trondheim, Norway Abstract A 12 bit Pipeline ADC fabricated in a 0.18 m pure digital CMOS addresses these challenges by presenting a 12 bit pipeline ADC which utilizes a 1.8V supply voltage

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

225

Journal of the Korean Physical Society, Vol. 49, December 2006, pp. S309S313 High-Power Pulse Transformer for a 1.5-MW Magnetron of KSTAR LHCD  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Transformer for a 1.5-MW Magnetron of KSTAR LHCD Microwave Application Sung-Duck Jang, Yoon-Gyu Son and Jong-power magnetron. The high power pulse transformer has the function of transferring pulse energy from a pulsed power source to a high-power load. A pulse transformer producing a pulse with a peak voltage of 45 k

226

A comparative study of iron-, nickel-, and cobalt-base weldments exposed in TVA 20-MW and Rocketdyne atmospheric fluidized bed combustors  

SciTech Connect

Experimental iron-, nickel-, and cobalt-base weldment materials were exposed in TVA 20-MW and Rocketdyne atmospheric fluidized bed combustors (AFBCs) at 849{degree}C for 1261 h and 871{degree}C for 1000 h, respectively. Postexposure analyses were conducted at Argonne National Laboratory. All specimens experienced different degrees of internal oxidation/sulfidation. Among eight filler materials, Marathon 25/35R and Haynes 188 showed the least corrosion attack, i.e., less than 0.5 mm/yr. A high nickel content in the weldment was unfavorable for corrosion resistance in the AFBC environment. Differences in the coal/bed chemistry of the TVA and Rocketdyne systems yielded different corrosion behavior in the materials. Calcium sulfate deposits on the specimens significantly affected the internal oxidation/sulfidation of the alloys. The results of this study supplement the material data base, in particular that of weldment performance, and aid in materials selection for AFBC applications. 10 refs., 22 figs., 4 tabs.

Wang, D.Y.; Natesan, K.

1990-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Phasing tiny crystals  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

For tiny crystals, their diffraction intensities at and between the Bragg peaks become measurable due to the limited number of the unit cells, which can in principle be used to directly phase the crystal structures.

Miao, J.

2013-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

228

Sliding Luttinger liquid phases  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We study systems of coupled spin-gapped and gapless Luttinger liquids. First, we establish the existence of a sliding Luttinger liquid phase for a system of weakly coupled parallel quantum wires, with and without disorder. It is shown that the coupling can stabilize a Luttinger liquid phase in the presence of disorder. We then extend our analysis to a system of crossed Luttinger liquids and establish the stability of a non-Fermi-liquid state: the crossed sliding Luttinger liquid phase. In this phase the system exhibits a finite-temperature, long-wavelength, isotropic electric conductivity that diverges as a power law in temperature T as T?0. This two-dimensional system has many properties of a true isotropic Luttinger liquid, though at zero temperature it becomes anisotropic. An extension of this model to a three-dimensional stack exhibits a much higher in-plane conductivity than the conductivity in a perpendicular direction.

Ranjan Mukhopadhyay; C. L. Kane; T. C. Lubensky

2001-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

229

http://asdp.sinica.edu.tw/index.htm ......................................................................... 1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-to-Peer Computing Social Computing Ubiquitous Computing 17 Networked Embedded Systems Real-Time Systems PCM Real-Time Operating Systems Real-Time Database Systems 19 Multimedia Content Analysis 1 () Analysis of Algorithms Graph Theory Search Methods in Artificial Intelligence

230

(cfchou@phys.sinica.edu.tw) NCCU Red blood cells  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

spacing ~35 nm Office of Basic Energy Sciences Office of Science, U.S. DOE Version 05-26-06, pmd Micro of chemical to mechanical energy (efficiency 80-100%, torgue 120-150 pN·nm). Introduction to the F1-ATPase S O S O S O S O S P O O The Challenge Fabricate and combine nanoscale building blocks to make useful

Chen, Yang-Yuan

231

ICSICSICSICS http://cc.ee.ntu.edu.tw/~thlin/  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

(duplexer; RF passive device)· SWr GMD44 (duplexer; RF passive device) · Invensense MPU3050 MPU3050 Triple software ICS 15 #12;ICSICS IC d ig h IC design house Start-up company Design service company FoundryFoundry System house ... Pain is inevitable; suffering is optional. 16 #12;

Hung, Shih-Hao

232

Thermal-Hydraulic Bases for the Safety Limits and Limiting Safety System Settings for HFIR Operation at 100 MW and 468 psig Primary Pressure, Using Specially Selected Fuel Elements  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes thermal hydraulic analyses performed to support HFIR operation at 100 MW and 468 psig pressure using specially selected fuel elements. The analyses were performed with the HFIR steady state heat transfer code, originally developed during HFIR design. This report addresses the increased core heat removal capability which can be achieved in fuel elements having coolant channel thicknesses that exceed the minimum requirements of the HFIR fuel fabrication specifications. Specific requirements for the minimum value of effective uniform as-built coolant channel thickness are established for fuel elements to be used at 100 MW. The burnout correlation currently used in the steady-state heat transfer code was also compared with more recent experimental results for stability of high-velocity flow in narrow heated channels, and the burnout correlation was found to be conservative with respect to flow stability at typical HFIR hot channel exit conditions at full power.

Rothrock, R.B.

1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Viscosity near phase transitions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Probably the most enticing observation in theoretical physics during the last decade was the discovery of the great amount of consequences obtained from the AdS/CFT conjecture put forward by Maldacena. In this work we review how this correspondence can be used to address hydrodynamic properties such as the viscosity of some strongly interacting systems. We also employ the Boltzmann equation for those systems closer to low-energy QCD, and argue that this kind of transport coefficients can be related to phase transitions, in particular the QGP/hadronic phase transition studied in heavy ion collisions.

Antonio Dobado; Felipe J. Llanes-Estrada; Juan M. Torres-Rincon

2010-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

234

Linear phase compressive filter  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A phase linear filter for soliton suppression is in the form of a laddered series of stages of non-commensurate low pass filters with each low pass filter having a series coupled inductance (L) and a reverse biased, voltage dependent varactor diode, to ground which acts as a variable capacitance (C). L and C values are set to levels which correspond to a linear or conventional phase linear filter. Inductance is mapped directly from that of an equivalent nonlinear transmission line and capacitance is mapped from the linear case using a large signal equivalent of a nonlinear transmission line.

McEwan, Thomas E. (Livermore, CA)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Berry Phase Quantum Thermometer  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We show how Berry phase can be used to construct an ultra-high precision quantum thermometer. An important advantage of our scheme is that there is no need for the thermometer to acquire thermal equilibrium with the sample. This reduces measurement times and avoids precision limitations.

Martin-Martinez, E; Mann, R B; Fuentes, I

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Berry Phase Quantum Thermometer  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We show how Berry phase can be used to construct an ultra-high precision quantum thermometer. An important advantage of our scheme is that there is no need for the thermometer to acquire thermal equilibrium with the sample. This reduces measurement times and avoids precision limitations.

E. Martin-Martinez; A. Dragan; R. B. Mann; I. Fuentes

2013-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

237

Phase II Final Report  

SciTech Connect

The SkyTrough DSP will advance the state-of-the-art in parabolic troughs for utility applications, with a larger aperture, higher operating temperature, and lower cost. The goal of this project was to develop a parabolic trough collector that enables solar electricity generation in the 2020 marketplace for a 216MWe nameplate baseload power plant. This plant requires an LCOE of 9/kWhe, given a capacity factor of 75%, a fossil fuel limit of 15%, a fossil fuel cost of $6.75/MMBtu, $25.00/kWht thermal storage cost, and a domestic installation corresponding to Daggett, CA. The result of our optimization was a trough design of larger aperture and operating temperature than has been fielded in large, utility scale parabolic trough applications: 7.6m width x 150m SCA length (1,118m2 aperture), with four 90mm diameter 4.7m receivers per mirror module and an operating temperature of 500C. The results from physical modeling in the System Advisory Model indicate that, for a capacity factor of 75%: The LCOE will be 8.87/kWhe. SkyFuel examined the design of almost every parabolic trough component from a perspective of load and performance at aperture areas from 500 to 2,900m2. Aperture-dependent design was combined with fixed quotations for similar parts from the commercialized SkyTrough product, and established an installed cost of $130/m2 in 2020. This project was conducted in two phases. Phase I was a preliminary design, culminating in an optimum trough size and further improvement of an advanced polymeric reflective material. This phase was completed in October of 2011. Phase II has been the detailed engineering design and component testing, which culminated in the fabrication and testing of a single mirror module. Phase II is complete, and this document presents a summary of the comprehensive work.

Schuknecht, Nate [Project Manager; White, David [Principle Investigator; Hoste, Graeme [Research Engineer

2014-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

238

Thermodynamic and economic analysis of the different variants of a coal-fired, 460MW power plant using oxy-combustion technology  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract In the face of existing international provisions limiting the emissions of greenhouse gases, primarily carbon dioxide, it is necessary to introduce solutions that will allow the production of electricity from coal with high efficiency and low emissions. Oxy-combustion systems integrated with carbon capture and storage (CCS) installations may prove to be such a solution. This paper presents the main results from a thermodynamic analysis of a supercritical unit operating in oxy-combustion technology, fueled with pulverized coal with a power output of 460MW. The parameters of the live steam in the analyzed system are 600C/30MPa. To perform the numerical analyses, models of the individual components were built, including an oxygen production installation (ASU), a boiler, a steam cycle and a flue gas conditioning system (CPU). The models were built in the commercial programs GateCycle and Aspen and then integrated into the Excel environment. In this paper, different structures for an integrated oxy-type system were analyzed and compared. The auxiliary power rates were determined for individual technological installations of the oxy-combustion power plant. The highest value of this indicator, in the range between 15.65% and 19.10% was calculated for the cryogenic ASU. The total value of this index for the whole installation reaches as high as 35% for the base case. The use of waste heat from the interstage cooling of compressors in the air separation installation and flue gas conditioning system was considered as the methods of counteracting the efficiency decrease resulting from the introduction of ASU and CPU. The proposed configurations and optimization allow a significant reduction of the auxiliary power of the considered unit. In consequence, the efficiency decrease was reduced by approximately 3.5% points. An economic analysis of the different structures of the oxy-fuel system and the reference air-fired power plant was also conducted using a newly developed computational algorithm built in the Excel environment. The algorithm uses a Break Even Point (BEP) method, focusing mainly on determining a break-even price of electricity. It was found that about the profitability of this investment will mainly decide the price of emission allowances. For the assumptions made, the oxy-combustion power plant will be economically comparable with a reference plant without carbon dioxide capture when the price of allowances would be between 34 and 41/tonne. A sensitivity analysis concerning the influence of selected components of the cash flows on the break-even price of electricity was also performed. The main results of the calculations are presented in the paper.

Anna Skorek-Osikowska; Lukasz Bartela; Janusz Kotowicz; Marcin Job

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

NETL: Carbon Storage - Regional Partnership Validation Phase (Phase II)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Validation Phase (Phase II) Projects Validation Phase (Phase II) Projects The Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnerships' (RCSP) Validation Phase focuses on validating the most promising regional opportunities to deploy CCS technologies by building upon the accomplishments of the Characterization Phase. Two different CO2 storage approaches are being pursued in this phase: geologic and terrestrial carbon storage. The Validation Phase includes 20 geologic and 11 terrestrial CO2 storage projects. Efforts are being conducted to: Validate and refine current reservoir simulations for CO2 storage projects. Collect physical data to confirm CO2 storage potential and injectivity estimates. Demonstrate the effectiveness of monitoring, verification, and accounting (MVA) technologies. Develop guidelines for well completion, operations, and abandonment.

240

Advanced Communication and Control for Distributed Energy Resource Integration: Phase 2 Scientific Report  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this research project is to demonstrate sensing, communication, information and control technologies to achieve a seamless integration of multivendor distributed energy resource (DER) units at aggregation levels that meet individual user requirements for facility operations (residential, commercial, industrial, manufacturing, etc.) and further serve as resource options for electric and natural gas utilities. The fully demonstrated DER aggregation system with embodiment of communication and control technologies will lead to real-time, interactive, customer-managed service networks to achieve greater customer value. Work on this Advanced Communication and Control Project (ACCP) consists of a two-phase approach for an integrated demonstration of communication and control technologies to achieve a seamless integration of DER units to reach progressive levels of aggregated power output. Phase I involved design and proof-of-design, and Phase II involves real-world demonstration of the Phase I design architecture. The scope of work for Phase II of this ACCP involves demonstrating the Phase I design architecture in large scale real-world settings while integrating with the operations of one or more electricity supplier feeder lines. The communication and control architectures for integrated demonstration shall encompass combinations of software and hardware components, including: sensors, data acquisition and communication systems, remote monitoring systems, metering (interval revenue, real-time), local and wide area networks, Web-based systems, smart controls, energy management/information systems with control and automation of building energy loads, and demand-response management with integration of real-time market pricing. For Phase II, BPL Global shall demonstrate the Phase I design for integrating and controlling the operation of more than 10 DER units, dispersed at various locations in one or more Independent System Operator (ISO) Control Areas, at an aggregated scale of more than 1 MW, to provide grid support. Actual performance data with respect to each specified function above is to be collected during the Phase II field demonstration. At a minimum, the Phase II demonstration shall span one year of field operations. The demonstration performance will need to be validated by the target customer(s) for acceptance and subsequent implementation. An ISO must be involved in demonstration planning and execution. As part of the Phase II work, BPL Global shall develop a roadmap to commercialization that identifies and quantifies the potential markets for the integrated, aggregated DER systems and for the communication and control technologies demonstrated in Phase I. In addition, the roadmap must identify strategies and actions, as well as the regional and national markets where the aggregated DER systems with communication and control solutions will be introduced, along with a timeline projected for introduction into each identified market. In Phase I of this project, we developed a proof-of-concept ACCP system and architecture and began to test its functionality at real-world sites. These sites had just over 10 MW of DERs and allowed us to identify what needed to be done to commercialize this concept. As a result, we started Phase II by looking at our existing platform and identified its strengths and weaknesses as well as how it would need to evolve for commercialization. During this process, we worked with different stakeholders in the market including: Independent System Operators, DER owners and operators, and electric utility companies to fully understand the issues from all of the different perspectives. Once we had an understanding of the commercialized ACCP system, we began to document and prepare detailed designs of the different system components. The components of the system with the most significant design improvements were: the on-site remote terminal unit, the communication technology between the remote site and the data center, and the scalability and reliability of the data center application.

BPL Global

2008-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tw mw phase" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Microcellular foams via phase separation  

SciTech Connect

A study of wide variety of processes for making plastic foams shows that phase separation processes for polymers from solutions offers the most viable methods for obtaining rigid plastic foams which met the physical requirements for fusion target designs. Four general phase separation methods have been shown to give polymer foams with densities less than 0.1 g/cm/sup 3/ and cell sizes of 30..mu..m or less. These methods involve the utilization of non-solvent, chemical or thermal cooling processes to achieve a controlled phase separation wherein either two distinct phases are obtained where the polymer phase is a continuous phase or two bicontinuous phases are obtained where both the polymer and solvent are interpenetrating, continuous, labyrinthine phases. Subsequent removal of the solvent gives the final foam structure.

Young, A.T.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Phase 1 -- 2  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2 2 Revised 8/7/02 " "Sample Statement of Work - Standard Service Offerings for Contractor-Identified Project" "Task #","Task Title","Work Scope","Deliverable","Agency Requirements" " " "Phase Two - Initial Project Development" "2-1","DO RFP Development - Direct Support","Based upon interviews Agency/site staff and consultation support, FEMP Services will prepare DO RFP for Agency/site. FEMP Services will provide onsite or telecon review of draft DO RFP with agency staff. FEMP Services will prepare 2nd draft DO RFP based on telecon and written agency review comments and recommendations. ","Draft DO RFP Document. On-site review of draft DO RFP.

243

Neutron phase echo  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The coherent overlap of the waves traversing the two legs of a perfect-crystal neutron interferometer is altered by a material with a neutron-nuclear optical potential. The fringe visibility is limited by the longitudinal coherence length. The loss of interference contrast caused by a slab of material of positive optical potential can be restored by placing another slab of material with a negative optical potential in the same leg of the interferometer. This paper describes the observation and detailed characterization of this quantum-mechanical phenomenon, which we call the phase-echo effect.

R. Clothier; H. Kaiser; S. A. Werner; H. Rauch; H. Wlwitsch

1991-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Phase 1 --2  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2 2 Rev 4-01-05 " "Statement of Work - Standard Service Offerings for Contractor-Identified Project at (insert project site)" "Task #","Task Title","Work Scope","Deliverable","Agency Requirements" " " "Phase Two - Initial Project Development" "2-1","DO RFP Development - Direct Support","Based upon interviews Agency/site staff and consultation support, FEMP Services will prepare DO RFP for Agency/site. FEMP Services will provide onsite or telecon review of draft DO RFP with agency staff. FEMP Services will prepare 2nd draft DO RFP based on telecon and written agency review comments and recommendations. ","Draft DO RFP Document. On-site review of draft DO RFP.

245

Phase 1 -- 4  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

4" 4" "Statement of Work - Optional Service Offerings for Contractor-Identified Project" "Task #","Task Title","Work Scope","Deliverable","Agency Requirements" " " "Phase Two - Initial Project Development" "Replace Std Task# 2-1","DO RFP Development - On Site Consultation","FEMP Services will provide technical consultation resources at the Agency's site to assist in the integration of the site's requirements into the DO RFP template.","Oral Comments","Agency staff will draft DO RFP. Provide copies to FEMP Services staff for review." "Phase Three - Negotiations and Award" "Replace Std Task# 3-4","Final Proposal Review - Direct Support","FEMP Services will provide direct technical resources to review final proposal. Review will include assessment of ESPC-unique data such as markups, performance period expenses, and financing interest rates. FEMP Services will assure that price schedules have been filled out correctly. ESCO specified equipment will be evaluated for its appropriateness and installation expense (labor and material). FEMP Services will coordinate and assemble agency and FEMP Services questions and issues for Agency CO to be presented to ESCO for discussions and negotiations. ","Telecon Advice and Written comments and recommendations","Agency will provide FEMP Services staff copies of final proposal with emphasis on selected equipment compatibility with agency performance requirements. Agency shall ensure applicable acquisition team members review final proposal. Agency will generate site questions or issues prior to scheduled telecons with FEMP Services staff. Agency will review questions and issues for ESCO discussions. Agency CO will submit questions and issues to ESCO."

246

7-29 A coal-burning power plant produces 300 MW of power. The amount of coal consumed during a one-day period and the rate of air flowing through the furnace are to be determined.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

7-11 7-29 A coal-burning power plant produces 300 MW of power. The amount of coal consumed during The heating value of the coal is given to be 28,000 kJ/kg. Analysis (a) The rate and the amount of heat inputs'tQQ The amount and rate of coal consumed during this period are kg/s48.33 s360024 kg10893.2 MJ/kg28 MJ101.8 6

Bahrami, Majid

247

3 - Thermodynamics and Phase Diagrams  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Many types of phase diagram sections involving temperature, composition, pressure, chemical potentials, partial pressures, volume and enthalpy as axis variables or constants are described for binary, ternary and multicomponent systems. The theme is the relationship between thermodynamics and phase diagrams. A review of the fundamentals of thermodynamics as required for the interpretation and calculation of phase diagrams is presented. One set of general geometrical rules which governs all types of single-valued phase diagram sections is derived. The computer calculation of phase diagrams from large critically assessed databases of model parameters is discussed.

Arthur D. Pelton

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

3-D particle-in-cell simulations for quasi-phase matched direct laser electron acceleration in density-modulated plasma waveguides  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Quasi-phase matched direct laser acceleration (DLA) of electrons can be realized with guided, radially polarized laser pulses in density-modulated plasma waveguides. A 3-D particle-in-cell model has been developed to describe the interactions among the laser field, injected electrons, and the background plasma in the DLA process. Simulations have been conducted to study the scheme in which seed electron bunches with moderate energies are injected into a plasma waveguide and the DLA is performed by use of relatively low-power (0.5-2 TW) laser pulses. Selected bunch injection delays with respect to the laser pulse, bunch lengths, and bunch transverse sizes have been studied in a series of simulations of DLA in a plasma waveguide. The results show that the injection delay is important for controlling the final transverse properties of short electron bunches, but it also affects the final energy gain. With a long injected bunch length, the enhanced ion-focusing force helps to collimate the electrons and a relativ...

Lin, M -W; Chen, S -H; Jovanovic, I

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Phase equilibrium studies  

SciTech Connect

A phase equilibrium model has been developed for the SRC-I process, as well as the other coal liquefaction processes. It is applicable to both vapor/liquid and liquid/liquid equilibria; it also provides an approximate but adequate description of aqueous mixtures where the volatile electrolyte components dissociate to form ionic species. This report completes the description of the model presented in an earlier report (Mathias and Stein, 1983a). Comparisons of the model to previously published data on coal-fluid mixtures are presented. Further, a preliminary analysis of new data on SRC-I coal fluids is presented. Finally, the current capabilities and deficiencies of the model are discussed. 25 references, 17 figures, 30 tables.

Mathias, P.M.; Stein, F.P.

1983-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Commensurate phases, incommensurate phases and the devils staircase  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Modulated structures with periods which are incommensurable (or high-order com-mensurable) with the basic lattice are quite common in condensed-matter physics. The structure may be another lattice, a periodic lattice distortion, a helical or sinusoidal magnetic structure, or a charge density wave in one, two or three dimensions. This review surveys recent theories on the transition between commensurate (C) and incommensurate (I) phases, and on the properties of the incommensurate phase. The predictions of theories will be compared with experiments. The CI transition is usually described in terms of wall, or soliton, formation. The nature of the transition and the structure of the I phase are quite different in two and three dimensions. In three dimensions the I phase seems to consist of an infinity of high-order locked C phases, which may or may not be separated by an infinity of truly incommensurate phases. This behaviour is known as the devils staircase. In two dimensions the incommensurate phase (at T # 0) is a floating phase without complete long-range order, and it does not lock-in at high-order commensurate phases. Phase diagrams are determined by the stability of two types of topological defects: walls, which destabilise the C phase with respect to I phases, and dislocations or vortices which generate paramagnetic or fluid phases. A consequence of this competition is that for sufficiently low order of commensurability the C and I phases are separated by a fluid phase. The properties of modulated systems can be studied by iterating certain area-preserving two-dimensional maps. Very recent studies indicate that, in addition to C and I phases, there are chaotic structures which are at least metastable. The chaotic regimes separate C and I phases and may be described as randomly pinned solitons. The relevance of the chaotic regimes to adsorbed monolayers, pinning of charge density waves, Peierls transitions and spin glasses is briefly discussed. This review was received in July 1981.

Per Bak

251

Experimental Study of Two-Phase Flow Oscillation in Natural Circulation  

SciTech Connect

The experiment was performed on the test loop HRTL-5, which simulates the geometry and system design of the 5-MW nuclear heating reactor developed by the Institute of Nuclear Energy Technology, Tsinghua University. The flow behavior for a wide range of inlet subcoolings, in which the flow experience varies from single- to two-phase, is described in a natural circulation system at different pressures (p = 0.1, 0.24, and 1.5 MPa). Several kinds of flow instability are investigated, including geysering, flashing-related flow instability, and high-frequency flow oscillation at p = 0.1 and 0.24 MPa, as well as low steam quality density wave oscillation at p = 1.5 MPa. The mechanisms of geysering, which has new features, and flashing-related flow instability, which has never been studied well enough in this field, are particularly interpreted. The experimental results show the following: First, for a low-pressure natural circulation system, the two-phase flow is unstable in most inlet subcooling conditions, and the two-phase stable flow can be reached only with very low inlet subcoolings. Second, at high inlet subcoolings, the flow instability is dominated by subcooling boiling in the heated section, and at intermediate inlet subcoolings, it is dominated by void flashing in the adiabatic long riser. Third, in the two-phase stable flow region, the conditions for boiling out of the core, namely, single-phase flow in the heated section and two-phase flow in the riser due to vapor flashing, can be realized. The experimental results are of significance for the design and accident analysis of vessel and swimming pool-type natural circulation nuclear heating reactors.

Jiang, S.Y.; Wu, X.X.; Zhang, Y.J. [Tsinghua University (China)

2000-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

252

Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

700 Total Electricity Generation Renewable Nuclear Power Plant with CCS Fossil Fuel Power Plant and concentrated solar power plants (300 MW each) · 9% by water (1.1 TW) · 900 hydroelectric plants (1,300 MW each Biopower Theoretical Potential 206,000 GW (PV) 11,100GW (CSP) 8,000 GW (onshore) 2,200 GW (offshore to 50

Das, Suman

253

Communicating Processes c! 2 || (c?. x:= c)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

:= max t (Tr + 1). c?. c! 5 = M: *int· T: *xnat· var r, w: xnat := 0· t:= max t (Tr + 1). r:= r+1. Mw = 5· var r, w: xnat := 0· t:= max t (Tr + 1). r:= r+1. Mw = 5 Tw = t (w:= w+1) = M: *int· T: *xnat· r, r, w, w: xnat· r:= 0. w:= 0. t:= max t (Tr + 1). r:= r+1. Mw = 5 Tw = t r=r w = w+1 t=t 17/64 #12

Hehner, Eric C.R.

254

Design requirements document for the phase 1 privatization electrical power system  

SciTech Connect

The electrical system for the Phase 1 privatization facilities will support the TWRS mission by providing the electrical power to the Phase 1 privatized facilities. This system will receive power from the Department of Energy-Richland Operations (RL) A4-8 230 kV transmission system powered from Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) Ashe and Midway 230 kV Substations. The existing RL 230 kV transmission line will be modified and looped 1021 into the new 230 kV substation bus. The new substation will be located in the vicinity of the privatized facilities, approximately 3.2 km (2 mi) south of the existing RL A4-8 230 kV transmission line. The substation will be capable of providing up to 40 MW of electrical power to support the Phase 1 privatization facilities and has space for accommodating future expansions. The substation will require at least two 230-13.8 kV transformers, 13.8 kV split bus switchgear, switchgear building, grounding transformers, instrument transformers, control and monitoring equipment, associated protection and isolation devices, lightning protection, yard lighting, cable and raceways, and infrastructure needed to provide desired availability and reliability. The power from the 13.8 kV switchgear located in the switchgear building will be delivered at the privatization facilities site boundaries. The 13.8 kV distribution system inside the privatization facilities site boundaries is the responsibility of the privatization contract.

Singh, G.

1997-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

255

The Noncommutative Anandan's Quantum Phase  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this work we study the noncommutative nonrelativistic quantum dynamics of a neutral particle, that possesses permanent magnetic and electric dipole momenta, in the presence of an electric and magnetic fields. We use the Foldy-Wouthuysen transformation of the Dirac spinor with a non-minimal coupling to obtain the nonrelativistic limit. In this limit, we will study the noncommutative quantum dynamics and obtain the noncommutative Anandan's geometric phase. We analyze the situation where magnetic dipole moment of the particle is zero and we obtain the noncommutative version of the He-McKellar-Wilkens effect. We demonstrate that this phase in the noncommutative case is a geometric dispersive phase. We also investigate this geometric phase considering the noncommutativity in the phase space and the Anandan's phase is obtained.

E. Passos; L. R. Ribeiro; C. Furtado; J. R. Nascimento

2007-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

256

The Noncommutative Anandan's Quantum Phase  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this work we study the noncommutative nonrelativistic quantum dynamics of a neutral particle, that possesses permanent magnetic and electric dipole momenta, in the presence of an electric and magnetic fields. We use the Foldy-Wouthuysen transformation of the Dirac spinor with a non-minimal coupling to obtain the nonrelativistic limit. In this limit, we will study the noncommutative quantum dynamics and obtain the noncommutative Anandan's geometric phase. We analyze the situation where magnetic dipole moment of the particle is zero and we obtain the noncommutative version of the He-McKellar-Wilkens effect. We demonstrate that this phase in the noncommutative case is a geometric dispersive phase. We also investigate this geometric phase considering the noncommutativity in the phase space and the Anandan's phase is obtained.

Passos, E; Nascimento, J R; Ribeiro, L R

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Identifying the Bose glass phase  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Introducing disorder into the Bose-Hubbard model at integer fillings leads to a Bose glass phase, along with the Mott insulator and superfluid phases. We suggest a new order parameter: the determinant of the one body density matrix, which is nonzero only within the Mott-insulator phase. Alongside the superfluid fraction, it is then possible to distinguish the three phases. The Bose glass phase is the only phase which has vanishing determinant and superfluid fraction. The vanishing of the determinant in the Bose glass phase occurs due to the partial fragmentation of the condensate into localized fragments, each with zero superfluid response, which implies the presence of unoccupied sites and hence the presence of lines of zeros in the one body density matrix. In the superfluid phase, the determinant vanish for another reason - due to the macroscopic occupation of a single particle state. Finally, we suggest the enhancement of the three body decay rate in the Bose glass phase, as an experimental indicator for the presence of localized fragments.

R. Pugatch; N. Bar-gill; N. Katz; E. Rowen; N. Davidson

2006-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

258

Phase correlations and optical coherence  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We examine the properties of the recently introduced degrees of coherence regarding the phase correlations of the optical field. It is seen that some of these quantities are...

Tervo, Jani; Setl, Tero; Friberg, Ari T

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Phase-Transfer-Catalyzed Oxidations  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Phase-transfer catalysis (PTC) offers many excellent opportunities for conducting oxidation reactions using inexpensive primary oxidants such as oxygen, sodium hypochlorite, hydrogen peroxide, electrooxidation...

Charles M. Starks; Charles L. Liotta; Marc E. Halpern

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Diffraction Studies of Ordered Phases and Phase Transitions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

on graphite and A neutron scattering study of the diluted uniaxial dipolar coupled ferromagnets LiTb.3Y.7F4 transition, the critical neutron scattering of either crystal exhibits the asymmetry characteristic PHASES AND PHASE TRANSITIONS: A synchrotron x-ray scattering study of monolayers of CF4 adsorbed

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tw mw phase" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Phasing Out the Phase Problem in Interfacial Crystallography  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

BESSRC/XOR BESSRC/XOR Phasing Out the Phase Problem in Interfacial Crystallography Photo of Paul Fenter (left) and Zhan Zhang at the mineral-fluid interface spectrometer at 12-ID-D (BESSRC/XOR). Paul Fenter (left) and Zhan Zhang at the mineral-fluid interface spectrometer at 12-ID-D (BESSRC/XOR). Since the advent of dedicated synchrotron radiation facilities, the applications of x-ray diffraction and scattering for structure determination have expanded to include a broad range of materials, from proteins and interfaces to nanoparticles. However, the well-known "phase problem" of crystallography limits these applications. The phase problem arises because the complete description of a structure requires a complex structure factor having both a magnitude and a phase. The measured x-ray

262

TWRS privatization phase 1 electrical power system  

SciTech Connect

This document includes Conceptual Design Report (CDR) for a new 11 km (7 miles) 230 kV transmission line and a new 40 MVA substation (A6) which will be located east of Grout Facility in 200E Area tank farm. This substation will provide electrical power up to 20 MW each for two private contractor facilities for immobilization and disposal of low activity waste (LAW).

Singh, G.

1997-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

263

PHASE CHANGE LIQUIDS  

SciTech Connect

Work is being performed to develop a new shipping system for frozen environmental samples (or other materials) that uses an optimal phase change liquid (PCL) formulation and an insulated shipping container with an on-board digital temperature data logger to provide a history of the temperature profile within the container during shipment. In previous work, several PCL formulations with temperatures of fusion ranging from approximately -14 to -20 C were prepared and evaluated. Both temperature of fusion and heat of fusion of the formulations were measured, and an optimal PCL formulation was selected. The PCL was frozen in plastic bags and tested for its temperature profile in a cooler using a digital temperature data logger. This testing showed that the PCL formulation can maintain freezer temperatures (< -7 to -20 C) for an extended period, such as the time for shipping samples by overnight courier. The results of the experiments described in this report provide significant information for use in developing an integrated freezer system that uses a PCL formulation to maintain freezer temperatures in coolers for shipping environmental samples to the laboratory. Experimental results show the importance of the type of cooler used in the system and that use of an insulating material within the cooler improves the performance of the freezer system. A new optimal PCL formulation for use in the system has been determined. The new formulation has been shown to maintain temperatures at < -7 to -20 C for 47 hours in an insulated cooler system containing soil samples. These results are very promising for developing the new technology.

Susan S. Sorini; John F. Schabron

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Two-phase flow studies  

SciTech Connect

The two-phase flow program is directed at understanding the hydrodynamics of two-phase flows. The two-phase flow regime is characterized by a series of flow patterns that are designated as bubble, slug, churn, and annular flow. Churn flow has received very little scientific attention. This lack of attention cannot be justified because calculations predict that the churn flow pattern will exist over a substantial portion of the two-phase flow zone in producing geothermal wells. The University of Houston is experimentally investigating the dynamics of churn flow and is measuring the holdup over the full range of flow space for which churn flow exists. These experiments are being conducted in an air/water vertical two-phase flow loop. Brown University has constructed and is operating a unique two-phase flow research facility specifically designed to address flow problems of relevance to the geothermal industry. An important feature of the facility is that it is dedicated to two-phase flow of a single substance (including evaporation and condensation) as opposed to the case of a two-component two-phase flow. This facility can be operated with horizontal or vertical test sections of constant diameter or with step changes in diameter to simulate a geothermal well profile.

Hanold, R.J.

1983-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Three phase downhole separator process  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Three Phase Downhole Separator Process (TPDSP) is a process which results in the separation of all three phases, (1) oil, (2) gas, and (3) water, at the downhole location in the well bore, water disposal injection downhole, and oil and gas production uphole.

Cognata, Louis John (Baytown, TX)

2008-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

266

500 MW demonstration of advanced wall-fired combustion techniques for the reduction of nitrogen oxide (NO[sub x]) emissions from coal-fired boilers  

SciTech Connect

The project provides a stepwise retrofit of an advanced overfire air (AOFA) system followed by low NO[sub x] burners (LNB). During each test phase of the project, diagnostic, performance, long-term, and verification testing will be performed. These tests are used to quantify the NO[sub x] reductions of each technology and evaluate the effects of those reductions on other combustion parameters such as particulatecharacteristics and boiler efficiency. Baseline, AOFA, and LNB without AOFA test segments have been completed. Analysis of the 94 days of LNB long-term data collected show the full-load NO[sub x] emission levels to be approximately 0.65 lb/MBtu. Flyash LOI values for the LNB configuration are approximately 8 percent at full-load. Corresponding values for the AOFA configuration are 0.94 lb/MBtu and approximately 10 percent. Abbreviated diagnostic tests for the LNB+AOFA configuration indicate that at 500 MWe, NO[sub x] emissions are approximately 0.55 lb/MBtu with corresponding flyash LOI values of approximately 11 percent. For comparison, the long-term full-load, baseline NO[sub x] emission level was approximately 1.24 lb/MBtu at 5.2 percent LOI. Comprehensive testing of the LNB+AOFA configuration will be performed when the stackparticulate emissions issue is resolved. Testing of a process optimization package on Plant Hammond Unit 4 was performed during this quarter. The software was configured to minimize NO[sub x] emissions using total combustion air flow and advanced overfire air distribution as the controlled parameters. Preliminary results from this testing indicate that this package shows promise in reducing NO[sub x] emissions while maintaining or improving other boiler performance parameters.

Not Available

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

SNMR pulse sequence phase cycling  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Technologies applicable to SNMR pulse sequence phase cycling are disclosed, including SNMR acquisition apparatus and methods, SNMR processing apparatus and methods, and combinations thereof. SNMR acquisition may include transmitting two or more SNMR pulse sequences and applying a phase shift to a pulse in at least one of the pulse sequences, according to any of a variety cycling techniques. SNMR processing may include combining SNMR from a plurality of pulse sequences comprising pulses of different phases, so that desired signals are preserved and indesired signals are canceled.

Walsh, David O; Grunewald, Elliot D

2013-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

268

Property:GEADevelopmentPhase | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GEADevelopmentPhase GEADevelopmentPhase Jump to: navigation, search Property Name GEADevelopmentPhase Property Type Page Description GEA Development Phase, as characterized by their Annual U.S. Geothermal Power Production and Development Report. See GEA_Development_Phases Allows Values Phase I - Resource Procurement and Identification;Phase II - Resource Exploration and Confirmation;Phase III - Permitting and Initial Development;Phase IV - Resource Production and Power Plant Construction Subproperties This property has the following 77 subproperties: A Abraham Hot Springs Geothermal Area Adak Geothermal Area Akun Strait Geothermal Area Akutan Fumaroles Geothermal Area Alum Geothermal Area Alvord Hot Springs Geothermal Area Amedee Geothermal Area Arrowhead Hot Springs Geothermal Area

269

Phase projection using three satellites  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This study seeks to investigate various techniques used in Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR) during the phase unwrapping process and the noise filtering step. In particular, as intuition would follow, we ...

Yeung, Michael C. (Michael Chi-Hang)

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Agenda Phase 2 Industry Day  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

JCTD Deputy Transition Manager, NAVFAC EXWC 11:00 - 11:15 Ft. Carson Sustainability and Net Zero Plan and Successes Hal Alguire, Director DPW 11:15 - 11:30 Phase 3, Future plans...

271

Precision digital pulse phase generator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A timing generator comprises a crystal oscillator connected to provide an output reference pulse. A resistor-capacitor combination is connected to provide a variable-delay output pulse from an input connected to the crystal oscillator. A phase monitor is connected to provide duty-cycle representations of the reference and variable-delay output pulse phase. An operational amplifier drives a control voltage to the resistor-capacitor combination according to currents integrated from the phase monitor and injected into summing junctions. A digital-to-analog converter injects a control current into the summing junctions according to an input digital control code. A servo equilibrium results that provides a phase delay of the variable-delay output pulse to the output reference pulse that linearly depends on the input digital control code. 2 figs.

McEwan, T.E.

1996-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

272

Phase retrieval with prior information  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

An algorithm for phase retrieval with Bayesian statistics is discussed. It is shown how the statistics of Kolmogorov turbulence can be used to compute the likelihood for a particular...

Irwan, R; Lane, R G

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Gas-phase chemical dynamics  

SciTech Connect

Research in this program is directed towards the spectroscopy of small free radicals and reactive molecules and the state-to-state dynamics of gas phase collision, energy transfer, and photodissociation phenomena. Work on several systems is summarized here.

Weston, R.E. Jr.; Sears, T.J.; Preses, J.M. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY (United States)

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Phase-Transfer-Catalyzed Reductions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Phase-transfer catalysis (PTC) procedures that have been developed for use with sodium borohydride, lithium aluminum hydride, and several other reducing agents involving anion transfer to organic media are des...

Charles M. Starks; Charles L. Liotta; Marc E. Halpern

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Insoluble Phase-Transfer Catalysts  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

An important problem facing the designer of industrial phase-transfer catalysis (PTC) processes using soluble PTC catalysts concerns the removal of the catalyst from the reaction mixture, and its economic recy...

Charles M. Starks; Charles L. Liotta; Marc E. Halpern

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Precision digital pulse phase generator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A timing generator comprises a crystal oscillator connected to provide an output reference pulse. A resistor-capacitor combination is connected to provide a variable-delay output pulse from an input connected to the crystal oscillator. A phase monitor is connected to provide duty-cycle representations of the reference and variable-delay output pulse phase. An operational amplifier drives a control voltage to the resistor-capacitor combination according to currents integrated from the phase monitor and injected into summing junctions. A digital-to-analog converter injects a control current into the summing junctions according to an input digital control code. A servo equilibrium results that provides a phase delay of the variable-delay output pulse to the output reference pulse that linearly depends on the input digital control code.

McEwan, Thomas E. (Livermore, CA)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Fireside corrosion testing of candidate superheater tube alloys, coatings, and claddings -- Phase 2 field testing  

SciTech Connect

In Phase 1 of this project, laboratory experiments were performed on a variety of developmental and commercial tubing alloys and claddings by exposing them to fireside corrosion tests which simulated a superheater or reheater in a coal-fired boiler. Phase 2 (in situ testing) has exposed samples of 347, RA85H, HR3C, RA253MA, Fe{sub 3}Al + 5Cr, Ta-modified 310, NF 709, 690 clad, 671 clad, and 800HT for up to approximately 16,000 hours to the actual operating conditions of a 250-MW, coal-fired boiler. The samples were installed on air-cooled, retractable corrosion probes, installed in the reheater cavity, and controlled to the operating metal temperatures of an existing and advanced-cycle, coal-fired boiler. Samples of each alloy were exposed for 4,483, 11,348, and 15,883 hours of operation. The present results are for the metallurgical examination of the corrosion probe samples after the full 15,883 hours of exposure. A previous topical report has been issued for the 4,483 hours of exposure.

Blough, J.L.; Seitz, W.W.; Girshik, A. [Foster Wheeler Development Corp., Livingston, NJ (United States)

1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Computational phase imaging based on intensity transport  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Light is a wave, having both an amplitude and a phase. However, optical frequencies are too high to allow direct detection of phase; thus, our eyes and cameras see only real values - intensity. Phase carries important ...

Waller, Laura A. (Laura Ann)

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Phase-Transfer Catalysis: Fundamentals I  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Critical to the success of phase-transfer catalytic (PTC) processes are (1) the maximization of the rate of transfer of reactant anions from the aqueous or solid phase to the organic phase, (2) the maximizatio...

Charles M. Starks; Charles L. Liotta; Marc E. Halpern

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Phase-Transfer Catalysis: Fundamentals II  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Phase-transfer catalytic (PTC) systems are characterized by the presence of at least two phases and at least one interfacial region separating the phases [18]. Reactions taking place in such systems usually i...

Charles M. Starks; Charles L. Liotta; Marc E. Halpern

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tw mw phase" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Analysis and design of some new single phase to three phase static converters  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

three phase ac motor. In Chapter III, four single phase to three phase converters for fixed frequency, fixed voltage operation is proposed. They are divided into two categories: (a) half-bridge converters and (b) full-bridge converters. Suitable...? Experimental results oi' the half-bridge single phase to three phase con- verter. . . . . . . . , . . . . . . . . 58 CHAPTER I INTRODUCTION Single phase to three phase converters are widely used where three phase ac motors need to be operated from a...

Rahman, Ashek

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

282

Laser Crystallization of Phase Change Material  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Geoffrey Campbell is the Principal Investigator for Laser Crystallization of Phase Change Material LLNL BES Programs Highlight Laser Crystallization of Phase Change Material False...

283

Gas-Phase Molecular Dynamics  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Gas-Phase Molecular Dynamics Gas-Phase Molecular Dynamics The Gas-Phase Molecular Dynamics Group is dedicated to developing and applying spectroscopic and theoretical tools to challenging problems in chemical physics related to reactivity, structure, dynamics and kinetics of transient species. Recent theoretical work has included advances in exact variational solution of vibrational quantum dynamics, suitable for up to five atoms in systems where large amplitude motion or multiple strongly coupled modes make simpler approximations inadequate. Other theoretical work, illustrated below, applied direct dynamics, quantum force trajectory calculations to investigate a series of reactions of the HOCO radical. The potential energy surface for the OH + CO/ H + CO2 reaction, showing two barriers (TS1 and TS2) and the deep HOCO well along the minimum energy pathway. The inset figure shows the experimental and calculated reactivity of HOCO with selected collision partners. See J.S. Francisco, J.T. Muckerman and H.-G. Yu, "HOCO radical chemistry,"

284

Phase Transformations in Confined Nanosystems  

SciTech Connect

This project discovered that non-equilibrium structures, including chemically ordered structures not observed in bulk systems, form in isolated nanoscale systems. Further, a generalized model was developed that effectively explained the suppression of equilibrium phase transformations. This thermodynamic model considered the free energy decrease associated with the phase transformation was less than the increase in energy associated with the formation of an interphase interface, therefore inhibiting the phase transformation. A critical diameter exists where the system transitions to bulk behavior, and a generalized equation was formulated that successfully predicted this transition in the Fe-Au system. This provided and explains a new route to novel structures not possible in bulk systems. The structural characterization was accomplished using transmission electron microscopy in collaboration with Matthew Kramer of Ames Laboratory. The PI and graduate student visited Ames Laboratory several times a year to conduct the experiments.

Shield, Jeffrey E. [Department of Mechanical & Materials Engineering] [Department of Mechanical & Materials Engineering; Belashchenko, Kirill [Department of Physics & Astronomy] [Department of Physics & Astronomy

2014-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

285

Phase appearance or disappearance in two-phase flows  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in a large variety of industrial or natural systems involving boiling or condensing fluids, reacting flows-phase flows. Such models have crucial importance in many industrial areas such as nuclear power plant safety considered. Numerical results are presented which demonstrate the efficiency of the proposed solutions. Key

Boyer, Edmond

286

Ising model: secondary phase transition  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Lttice-spin phonons are considered, which make the heat capacity at the critical temperature satisfy experimental observations better. There is a BEC phase transition in an Ising model attributable to the lattice-spin phonons. We proved that the spin-wave theory only is available after BEC transition, and the magnons have the same characteristics as the lattice-spin phonons', resulting from quantum effect. Energy-level overlap effect at ultralow temperature is found. A prediction of BEC phase transition in a crystal is put forward as our theory generalization.

You-gang Feng

2012-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

287

Arizona/Geothermal | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Arizona/Geothermal Arizona/Geothermal < Arizona Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Print PDF Arizona Geothermal General Regulatory Roadmap Geothermal Power Projects Under Development in Arizona No geothermal projects listed. Add a geothermal project. Operational Geothermal Power Plants in Arizona No geothermal power plants listed. Add a geothermal energy generation facility. Geothermal Areas in Arizona Mean Capacity (MW) Number of Plants Owners Geothermal Region Clifton Hot Springs Geothermal Area 14.453 MW14,453.335 kW 14,453,335.43 W 14,453,335,430 mW 0.0145 GW 1.445334e-5 TW Rio Grande Rift Geothermal Region Gillard Hot Springs Geothermal Area 11.796 MW11,796.115 kW 11,796,114.7 W 11,796,114,700 mW 0.0118 GW 1.179611e-5 TW Rio Grande Rift Geothermal Region

288

Montana/Geothermal | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Montana/Geothermal Montana/Geothermal < Montana Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Print PDF Montana Geothermal General Regulatory Roadmap Geothermal Power Projects Under Development in Montana No geothermal projects listed. Add a geothermal project. Operational Geothermal Power Plants in Montana No geothermal power plants listed. Add a geothermal energy generation facility. Geothermal Areas in Montana Mean Capacity (MW) Number of Plants Owners Geothermal Region Boulder Hot Springs Geothermal Area 5.21 MW5,210.319 kW 5,210,318.609 W 5,210,318,609 mW 0.00521 GW 5.210319e-6 TW Northern Basin and Range Geothermal Region Broadwater Hot Spring Geothermal Area 5.256 MW5,255.823 kW 5,255,823.43 W 5,255,823,430 mW 0.00526 GW 5.255823e-6 TW Northern Basin and Range Geothermal Region

289

Phase Errors and the Capture Effect  

SciTech Connect

This slide-show presents analysis of spectrograms and the phase error of filtered noise in a signal. When the filtered noise is smaller than the signal amplitude, the phase error can never exceed 90{deg}, so the average phase error over many cycles is zero: this is called the capture effect because the largest signal captures the phase and frequency determination.

Blair, J., and Machorro, E.

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Woods In and Around Towns: Phase II  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Policy WIAT Woods In and Around Towns: Phase II #12;2 | Woods In and Around Towns: Phase II working with Forestry Commission Scotland on Woods In and Around Towns #12;Woods In and Around Towns: Phase II Woods In and Around Towns: Phase II | 3 What is this about? The Woods In and Around Towns (WIAT) Programme provides

291

Instantons in the Higgs phase  

SciTech Connect

When instantons are put into the Higgs phase, vortices are attached to instantons. We construct such composite solitons as 1/4 BPS states in five-dimensional supersymmetric U(N{sub C}) gauge theory with N{sub F}({>=}N{sub C}) fundamental hypermultiplets. We solve the hypermultiplet BPS equation and show that all 1/4 BPS solutions are generated by an N{sub C}xN{sub F} matrix which is holomorphic in two complex variables, assuming the vector multiplet BPS equation does not give additional moduli. We determine the total moduli space formed by topological sectors patched together and work out the multi-instanton solution inside a single vortex with complete moduli. Small instanton singularities are interpreted as small sigma-model lump singularities inside the vortex. The relation between monopoles and instantons in the Higgs phase is also clarified as limits of calorons in the Higgs phase. Another type of instantons stuck at an intersection of two vortices and dyonic instantons in the Higgs phase are also discussed.

Eto, Minoru; Isozumi, Youichi; Nitta, Muneto; Ohashi, Keisuke; Sakai, Norisuke [Department of Physics, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Tokyo 152-8551 (Japan)

2005-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

292

Phase and birefringence aberration correction  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A Brillouin enhanced four wave mixing phase conjugate mirror corrects phase aberrations of a coherent electromagnetic beam and birefringence induced upon that beam. The stimulated Brillouin scattering (SBS) phase conjugation technique is augmented to include Brillouin enhanced four wave mixing (BEFWM). A seed beam is generated by a main oscillator which arrives at the phase conjugate cell before the signal beams in order to initiate the Brillouin effect. The signal beam which is being amplified through the amplifier chain is split into two perpendicularly polarized beams. One of the two beams is chosen to be the same polarization as some component of the seed beam, the other orthogonal to the first. The polarization of the orthogonal beam is then rotated 90.degree. such that it is parallel to the other signal beam. The three beams are then focused into cell containing a medium capable of Brillouin excitation. The two signal beams are focused such that they cross the seed beam path before their respective beam waists in order to achieve BEFWM or the two signal beams are focused to a point or points contained within the focused cone angle of the seed beam to achieve seeded SBS, and thus negate the effects of all birefringent and material aberrations in the system.

Bowers, Mark (Modesto, CA); Hankla, Allen (Livermore, CA)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Two Flavour QCD Phase Transition  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Results on the phase transition in QCD with two flavours of light staggered fermions from an ongoing simulation are presented. We find the restoration of the chiral SU(2) x SU(2) symmetry, but not of the axial U_A(1) symmetry.

G. Boyd; F. Karsch; E. Laermann; M. Oevers

1996-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

294

Indirect measurement of sin2?W (or MW) using ?+?? pairs from ?*/Z bosons produced in pp collisions at a center-of-momentum energy of 1.96TeV  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Drell-Yan lepton pairs are produced in the process pp??+??+X through an intermediate ?*/Zboson. The forward-backward asymmetry in the polar-angle distribution of the ?? as a function of the invariant mass of the ?+?? pair is used to obtain the effective leptonic determination sin2?efflept of the electroweak-mixing parameter sin2?W, from which the value of sin2?W is derived assuming the standard model. The measurement sample, recorded by the Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF), corresponds to 9.2??fb?1 of integrated luminosity from pp collisions at a center-of-momentum energy of 1.96TeV, and is the full CDF Run II data set. The value of sin2?efflept is found to be 0.23150.0010, where statistical and systematic uncertainties are combined in quadrature. When interpreted within the context of the standard model using the on-shell renormalization scheme, where sin2?W=1?MW2/MZ2, the measurement yields sin2?W=0.22330.0009, or equivalently a W-boson mass of 80.3650.047??GeV/c2. The value of the W-boson mass is in agreement with previous determinations in electron-positron collisions and at the Tevatron collider.

T. Aaltonen et al.

2014-04-04T23:59:59.000Z

295

2.3-MW Medium-Voltage, Three-Level Wind Energy Inverter Applying a Unique Bus Structure and 4.5-kV Si/SiC Hybrid Isolated Power Modules: Preprint  

SciTech Connect

A high-efficiency, 2.3-MW, medium-voltage, three-level inverter utilizing 4.5-kV Si/SiC (silicon carbide) hybrid modules for wind energy applications is discussed. The inverter addresses recent trends in siting the inverter within the base of multimegawatt turbine towers. A simplified split, three-layer laminated bus structure that maintains low parasitic inductances is introduced along with a low-voltage, high-current test method for determining these inductances. Feed-thru bushings, edge fill methods, and other design features of the laminated bus structure provide voltage isolation that is consistent with the 10.4-kV module isolation levels. Inverter efficiency improvement is a result of the (essential) elimination of the reverse recovery charge present in 4.5-kV Si PIN diodes, which can produce a significant reduction in diode turn-off losses as well as insulated-gate bipolar transistor (IGBT) turn-on losses. The hybrid modules are supplied in industry-standard 140 mm x 130 mm and 190 mm x 130 mm packages to demonstrate direct module substitution into existing inverter designs. A focus on laminated bus/capacitor-bank/module subassembly level switching performance is presented.

Erdman, W.; Keller, J.; Grider, D.; VanBrunt, E.

2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

Phase behavior of polymers and monomers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

perspective. Objective The objective of this study is to investigate the phase behavior of monomer- solvent and copolymer-solvent mixtures at elevated pressures. Supercritical ethylene will be the solvent used throughout the experiment to simulate... phase region within the reactor. The transition of the polymers from a single phase solution in the ethylene supercritical fluid solvent into two phases is referred to as the "cloud point. " Phase diagrams produced from the pressure and temperature...

Purifoy, Jonathan Patrick

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

RETI Phase 1B Final Report Update NET SHORT RECALCULATION AND NEW PV ASSUMPTIONS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of distributed PV capacity by the year 2016.8 In response to the California Solar Initiative, a component,7 However, California has established the Go Solar California program with a goal of installing 3,000 MW of the Go Solar California program, 158 MW were installed in 2008 alone.9 The reasonableness of the CEC

298

Fluid Phase Equilibria 218 (2004) 221228 Phase equilibrium in aqueous two-phase systems containing ethylene  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ethylene oxide­propylene oxide block copolymers and dextran Eduardo dos Santos Tadaa, Watson Loha,1, Pedro equilibrium of aqueous two-phase systems containing the polysaccharide dextran and ethylene oxide (EO; Data; Dextran; Ethylene oxide­propylene oxide block copolymers; Gibbs energy; Thermodynamic modeling 1

Loh, Watson

299

A global investigation of phase equilibria using the Perturbed-Chain Statistical-Associating-Fluid-Theory (PC-SAFT) approach  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The recently developed Perturbed-Chain Statistical Associating Fluid Theory (PC-SAFT) is investigated for a wide range of model parameters including the parameter m representing the chain length and the thermodynamic temperature T and pressure p. This approach is based upon the first-order thermodynamic perturbation theory for chain molecules developed by Wertheim and Chapman et al. and includes dispersion interactions via the second-order perturbation theory of Barker and Henderson. We systematically study a hierarchy of models which are based on the PC-SAFT approach using analytical model calculations and Monte Carlo simulations. For one-component systems we find that the analytical model in contrast to the simulation results exhibits two phase-separation regions in addition to the common gas-liquid coexistence region: One phase separation occurs at high density and low temperature. The second demixing takes place at low density and high temperature where usually the ideal gas phase is expected in the phase diagram. These phenomena, which are referred to as "liquid-liquid" and "gas-gas" equilibria, give rise to multiple critical points in one-component systems, as well as to critical end points (CEP) and equilibria of three fluid phases, which can usually be found in multicomponent mixtures only. Furthermore, it is shown that the "liquid-liquid" demixing in this model is not a consequence of a "softened" repulsive interaction as assumed in the theoretical derivation of the model. Experimental data for the melt density of polybutadiene with molecular mass Mw=45000g/mol are correlated here using the PC-SAFT equation. It is shown that the discrepancies in modeling the polymer density at ambient temperature and high pressure can be traced back to ...

L. Yelash; M. Mueller; W. Paul; K. Binder

2005-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

300

10 MW Final Report Body.doc  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

United States Department of Energy United States Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory FINAL REPORT Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC26-00NT 40804 Project Title: FABRICATE AND TEST AN ADVANCED NON-POLLUTING TURBINE DRIVE GAS GENERATOR From 1 September 2000 to 1 June 2003 Performed by: Clean Energy Systems, Inc. United States Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory FINAL REPORT of a project to FABRICATE AND TEST AN ADVANCED NON-POLLUTING TURBINE DRIVE GAS GENERATOR Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC26-00NT 40804 PROJECT DURATION: From 1 September 2000 to 1 June 2003 Authors: Eugene Baxter, Project Manager Roger E. Anderson, Principal Investigator Stephen E. Doyle, President, CES May 2003 Performed by: Clean Energy Systems, Inc.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tw mw phase" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

1 MW SYSTEM Klystron Block Diagram  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

been made ­ the SCR unit is currently in use at LANL. · SCR uses a 1500 VAC input, the IGBT system uses a 4160 VAC input. · SCR design is water cooled, IGBT design is air cooled only. · Control of either. Two different designs are being considered ­ an SCR system with a crowbar, and an IGBT based system

302

ccpi_285-mw | netl.doe.gov  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2 Industrial Carbon Capture and Storage Clean Coal Power Initiative Power Plant Improvement Initiative Clean Coal Technology Demonstration Program FutureGen Demonstration of a...

303

PhaseII1.PDF  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Stakeholder Meeting Stakeholder Meeting DOE-NETL Proposed Phase II Large Scale Mercury Control Technology Field Testing Program September 12, 2002 Meeting Summary A meeting was held in Arlington, VA on September 12 on DOE-NETL's plans to go forward with a second phase of field testing of advanced mercury control technology. The meeting was held in conjunction with the Air Quality III Conference and was attended by approximately 53 representatives from the coal and electric-utility industries, technology developers, EPA, and other interested parties (see attached attendees list). Scott Renninger provided a brief overview of DOE-NETL's current mercury field testing program. A summary of the results from an earlier stakeholder meeting held in Washington on June 4 were also presented as a starting point for discussion to help

304

Coherent Phase Argument for Inflation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cosmologists have developed a phenomenally successful picture of structure in the universe based on the idea that the universe expanded exponentially in its earliest moments. There are three pieces of evidence for this exponential expansion -- {\\it inflation} -- from observations of anisotropies in the cosmic microwave background. First, the shape of the primordial spectrum is very similar to that predicted by generic inflation models. Second, the angular scale at which the first acoustic peak appears is consistent with the flat universe predicted by inflation. Here I describe the third piece of evidence, perhaps the most convincing of all: the phase coherence needed to account for the clear peak/trough structure observed by the WMAP satellite and its predecessors. I also discuss alternatives to inflation that have been proposed recently and explain how they produce coherent phases.

Scott Dodelson

2003-09-05T23:59:59.000Z

305

Phase transformations in engineering materials  

SciTech Connect

Phase transformations in engineering materials are inevitably related to mechanical behavior and are often precursors to residual stress and distortion. Neutron scattering in general is a valuable tool for studying their effects, and pulsed neutrons are of special value, because of the inherently comprehensive crystallographic coverage they provide in each measurement. At the Manuel Lujan neutron scattering center several different research programs have addressed the relationships between phase transformation/mechanical behavior and residual strains. Three disparate examples are presented; (1) stress induced transformation in a NiTi shape memory alloy, (2) cryogenically induced transformation in a quenched 5180 steel, and (3) time resolved evolution of strain induced martensite in 304 stainless steel. In each case a brief description of the principle result will be discussed in the context of using neutrons for the measurement.

Bourke, M.A.M.; Lawson, A.C. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Dunand, D.C. [Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Cambridge, MA (United States). Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering; Priesmeyer, H.G. [GKSS-Forschungszentrum Geesthacht GmbH (Germany)

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Is the beta phase maximal?  

SciTech Connect

indicates that 2|Vub / Vcb/ Vus| = (1-z) with z given by z = 0.19 +(-) 0.14. This fact implies that irrespective of the form of the quark Yukawa matrices, the measured value of the SM CP phase beta is approximately the maximum allowed by the measured absolute values of the CKM elements. This is beta = pi/6 - z/sqrt{3} for gamma = pi/3 + z/sqrt{3}, which implies alpha = pi/2. Alternatively, assuming that beta is exactly maximal and using the experimental measurement, sin(2beta) = 0.726+(-) 0.037, the phase gamma is predicted to be gamma = pi/2 - beta = 66.3 +(-) 1.7. The maximality of beta, if confirmed by the near-future experiments, may give us some clues as to the origin of CP violation.

Ferrandis, Javier; Ferrandis, Javier

2005-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

307

Light-driven phase shifter  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A light-driven phase shifter is provided for modulating a transmission light beam. A gaseous medium such as argon is provided with electron energy states excited to populate a metastable state. A tunable dye laser is selected with a wavelength effective to deplete the metastable electron state and may be intensity modulated. The dye laser is directed through the gaseous medium to define a first optical path having an index of refraction determined by the gaseous medium having a depleted metastable electron state. A transmission laser beam is also directed through the gaseous medium to define a second optical path at least partially coincident with the first optical path. The intensity of the dye laser beam may then be varied to phase modulate the transmission laser beam.

Early, James W. (Los Alamos, NM)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Agent review phase one report.  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes the findings for phase one of the agent review and discusses the review methods and results. The phase one review identified a short list of agent systems that would prove most useful in the service architecture of an information management, analysis, and retrieval system. Reviewers evaluated open-source and commercial multi-agent systems and scored them based upon viability, uniqueness, ease of development, ease of deployment, and ease of integration with other products. Based on these criteria, reviewers identified the ten most appropriate systems. The report also mentions several systems that reviewers deemed noteworthy for the ideas they implement, even if those systems are not the best choices for information management purposes.

Zubelewicz, Alex Tadeusz; Davis, Christopher Edward; Bauer, Travis LaDell

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

ICCS Area 2, Phase 2 Renewal Applications  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

10, 2010 10, 2010 1. When does Phase II start date? Assume July 1? Answer: Per the FOA, "Projects that are selected for Phase 2 will receive no more than a 4 month extension to Phase 1 to allow DOE and the Phase 2 Recipient(s) sufficient time to negotiate the full scope and budget for Phase 2. DOE reserves the right to award Phase 2 anytime during this 4 month period". DOE will not extend a Phase 1 project beyond September 30, 2010; therefore, it is likely that no more than a 3 month extension will be provided. Further, depending upon the positive cooperation and responsiveness of the Phase 2 Recipient, DOE will be able to make the full Phase 2 award more quickly. Any start date proposed by the Recipient is subject to negotiation with DOE if the project is selected.

310

Thermophysical properties of coexistent phases of plutonium  

SciTech Connect

Plutonium is the element with the greatest number of allotropic phases. Thermally induced transformations between these phases are typically characterized by thermal hysteresis and incomplete phase reversion. With Ga substitutal in the lattice, low symmetry phases are replaced by a higher symmetry phase. However, the low temperature Martensitic phase transformation ({delta} {yields} {alpha}{prime}) in Ga stabilized {delta}-phase Pu is characterized by a region of thermal hysteresis which can reach 200 C in extent. These regions of thermal hysteresis offer a unique opportunity to study thermodynamics in inhomogeneous systems of coexistent phases. The results of thermophysical properties measured for samples of inhomogeneous unalloyed and Ga alloyed Pu will be discussed and compared with similar measurements of their single phase constituents.

Freibert, Franz J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Mitchell, Jeremy N [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Saleh, Tarik A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Schwartz, Dan S [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Phase change material storage heater  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A storage heater for storing heat and for heating a fluid, such as water, has an enclosure defining a chamber therein. The chamber has a lower portion and an upper portion with a heating element being disposed within the enclosure. A tube through which the fluid flows has an inlet and an outlet, both being disposed outside of the enclosure, and has a portion interconnecting the inlet and the outlet that passes through the enclosure. A densely packed bed of phase change material pellets is disposed within the enclosure and is surrounded by a viscous liquid, such as propylene glycol. The viscous liquid is in thermal communication with the heating element, the phase change material pellets, and the tube and transfers heat from the heating element to the pellets and from the pellets to the tube. The viscous fluid has a viscosity so that the frictional pressure drop of the fluid in contact with the phase change material pellets substantially reduces vertical thermal convection in the fluid. As the fluid flows through the tube heat is transferred from the viscous liquid to the fluid flowing through the tube, thereby heating the fluid.

Goswami, D. Yogi (Gainesville, FL); Hsieh, Chung K. (Gainesville, FL); Jotshi, Chand K. (Gainesville, FL); Klausner, James F. (Gainesville, FL)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

QCD Phase Transitions, Volume 15  

SciTech Connect

The title of the workshop, ''The QCD Phase Transitions'', in fact happened to be too narrow for its real contents. It would be more accurate to say that it was devoted to different phases of QCD and QCD-related gauge theories, with strong emphasis on discussion of the underlying non-perturbative mechanisms which manifest themselves as all those phases. Before we go to specifics, let us emphasize one important aspect of the present status of non-perturbative Quantum Field Theory in general. It remains true that its studies do not get attention proportional to the intellectual challenge they deserve, and that the theorists working on it remain very fragmented. The efforts to create Theory of Everything including Quantum Gravity have attracted the lion share of attention and young talent. Nevertheless, in the last few years there was also a tremendous progress and even some shift of attention toward emphasis on the unity of non-perturbative phenomena. For example, we have seen some efforts to connect the lessons from recent progress in Supersymmetric theories with that in QCD, as derived from phenomenology and lattice. Another example is Maldacena conjecture and related development, which connect three things together, string theory, super-gravity and the (N=4) supersymmetric gauge theory. Although the progress mentioned is remarkable by itself, if we would listen to each other more we may have chance to strengthen the field and reach better understanding of the spectacular non-perturbative physics.

Schaefer, T.; Shuryak, E.

1999-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

313

Ponderomotive phase plate for transmission electron microscopes  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A ponderomotive phase plate system and method for controllably producing highly tunable phase contrast transfer functions in a transmission electron microscope (TEM) for high resolution and biological phase contrast imaging. The system and method includes a laser source and a beam transport system to produce a focused laser crossover as a phase plate, so that a ponderomotive potential of the focused laser crossover produces a scattering-angle-dependent phase shift in the electrons of the post-sample electron beam corresponding to a desired phase contrast transfer function.

Reed, Bryan W. (Livermore, CA)

2012-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

314

Microwave concrete decontamination - Phase II results  

SciTech Connect

This report documents the results of the second phase of a four-phase development program to develop a system to decontaminate concrete using microwave energy. In the first phase of the program the feasibility of using microwaves to remove concrete surfaces was demonstrated. In the first phase experiments, concrete slabs were placed on a translator and moved beneath a stationery microwave system. The second phase demonstrated the ability to mobilize the technology to remove the surfaces from concrete floors. Phases III and IV will further develop the technology to be remotely operated and capable of removing concrete from floors as well as from vertical surfaces.

White, T.L.; Foster, D. Jr.

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

X-ray studies of the phases and phase transitions of liquid crystals  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Recent X-ray diffraction studies of liquid crystals are reviewed. The topics are twist grain-boundary phases, antiferroelectric phases studied using resonant diffraction and smectic phases within gel structures.

Clegg, P.S.

2004-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

316

Indirect measurement of $\\sin^2 ?_W$ (or $M_W$) using $?^+?^-$ pairs from $?^*/Z$ bosons produced in $p\\bar{p}$ collisions at a center-of-momentum energy of 1.96 TeV  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Drell-Yan lepton pairs are produced in the process $p\\bar{p} \\rightarrow \\mu^+\\mu^- + X$ through an intermediate $\\gamma^*/Z$ boson. The forward-backward asymmetry in the polar-angle distribution of the $\\mu^-$ as a function of the invariant mass of the $\\mu^+\\mu^-$ pair is used to obtain the effective leptonic determination $\\sin^2 \\theta^{lept}_{eff}$ of the electroweak-mixing parameter $\\sin^2 \\theta_W$, from which the value of $\\sin^2 \\theta_W$ is derived assuming the standard model. The measurement sample, recorded by the Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF), corresponds to 9.2 fb-1 of integrated luminosity from $p\\bar{p}$ collisions at a center-of-momentum energy of 1.96 TeV, and is the full CDF Run II data set. The value of $\\sin^2 \\theta^{lept}_{eff}$ is found to be 0.2315 +- 0.0010, where statistical and systematic uncertainties are combined in quadrature. When interpreted within the context of the standard model using the on-shell renormalization scheme, where $\\sin^2 \\theta_W = 1 - M_W^2/M_Z^2$, the measurement yields $\\sin^2 \\theta_W$ = 0.2233 +- 0.0009, or equivalently a W-boson mass of 80.365 +- 0.047 GeV/c^2. The value of the W-boson mass is in agreement with previous determinations in electron-positron collisions and at the Tevatron collider.

CDF Collaboration; T. Aaltonen; S. Amerio; D. Amidei; A. Anastassov; A. Annovi; J. Antos; G. Apollinari; J. A. Appel; T. Arisawa; A. Artikov; J. Asaadi; W. Ashmanskas; B. Auerbach; A. Aurisano; F. Azfar; W. Badgett; T. Bae; A. Barbaro-Galtieri; V. E. Barnes; B. A. Barnett; P. Barria; P. Bartos; M. Bauce; F. Bedeschi; S. Behari; G. Bellettini; J. Bellinger; D. Benjamin; A. Beretvas; A. Bhatti; K. R. Bland; B. Blumenfeld; A. Bocci; A. Bodek; D. Bortoletto; J. Boudreau; A. Boveia; L. Brigliadori; C. Bromberg; E. Brucken; J. Budagov; H. S. Budd; K. Burkett; G. Busetto; P. Bussey; P. Butti; A. Buzatu; A. Calamba; S. Camarda; M. Campanelli; F. Canelli; B. Carls; D. Carlsmith; R. Carosi; S. Carrillo; B. Casal; M. Casarsa; A. Castro; P. Catastini; D. Cauz; V. Cavaliere; M. Cavalli-Sforza; A. Cerri; L. Cerrito; Y. C. Chen; M. Chertok; G. Chiarelli; G. Chlachidze; K. Cho; D. Chokheli; A. Clark; C. Clarke; M. E. Convery; J. Conway; M. Corbo; M. Cordelli; C. A. Cox; D. J. Cox; M. Cremonesi; D. Cruz; J. Cuevas; R. Culbertson; N. d'Ascenzo; M. Datta; P. de Barbaro; L. Demortier; L. Marchese; M. Deninno; F. Devoto; M. D'Errico; A. Di Canto; B. Di Ruzza; J. R. Dittmann; M. D'Onofrio; S. Donati; M. Dorigo; A. Driutti; K. Ebina; R. Edgar; A. Elagin; R. Erbacher; S. Errede; B. Esham; S. Farrington; J. P. Fernndez Ramos; R. Field; G. Flanagan; R. Forrest; M. Franklin; J. C. Freeman; H. Frisch; Y. Funakoshi; C. Galloni; A. F. Garfinkel; P. Garosi; H. Gerberich; E. Gerchtein; S. Giagu; V. Giakoumopoulou; K. Gibson; C. M. Ginsburg; N. Giokaris; P. Giromini; G. Giurgiu; V. Glagolev; D. Glenzinski; M. Gold; D. Goldin; A. Golossanov; G. Gomez; G. Gomez-Ceballos; M. Goncharov; O. Gonzlez Lpez; I. Gorelov; A. T. Goshaw; K. Goulianos; E. Gramellini; S. Grinstein; C. Grosso-Pilcher; R. C. Group; J. Guimaraes da Costa; S. R. Hahn; J. Y. Han; F. Happacher; K. Hara; M. Hare; R. F. Harr; T. Harrington-Taber; K. Hatakeyama; C. Hays; J. Heinrich; M. Herndon; A. Hocker; Z. Hong; W. Hopkins; S. Hou; R. E. Hughes; U. Husemann; M. Hussein; J. Huston; G. Introzzi; M. Iori; A. Ivanov; E. James; D. Jang; B. Jayatilaka; E. J. Jeon; S. Jindariani; M. Jones; K. K. Joo; S. Y. Jun; T. R. Junk; M. Kambeitz; T. Kamon; P. E. Karchin; A. Kasmi; Y. Kato; W. Ketchum; J. Keung; B. Kilminster; D. H. Kim; H. S. Kim; J. E. Kim; M. J. Kim; S. B. Kim; S. H. Kim; Y. K. Kim; Y. J. Kim; N. Kimura; M. Kirby; K. Knoepfel; K. Kondo; D. J. Kong; J. Konigsberg; A. V. Kotwal; M. Kreps; J. Kroll; M. Kruse; T. Kuhr; M. Kurata; A. T. Laasanen; S. Lammel; M. Lancaster; K. Lannon; G. Latino; H. S. Lee; J. S. Lee; S. Leo; S. Leone; J. D. Lewis; A. Limosani; E. Lipeles; A. Lister; H. Liu; Q. Liu; T. Liu; S. Lockwitz; A. Loginov; A. Luc; D. Lucchesi; J. Lueck; P. Lujan; P. Lukens; G. Lungu; J. Lys; R. Lysak; R. Madrak; P. Maestro; S. Malik; G. Manca; A. Manousakis-Katsikakis; F. Margaroli; P. Marino; M. Martnez; K. Matera; M. E. Mattson; A. Mazzacane; P. Mazzanti; R. McNulty; A. Mehta; P. Mehtala; C. Mesropian; T. Miao; D. Mietlicki; A. Mitra; H. Miyake; S. Moed; N. Moggi; C. S. Moon; R. Moore; M. J. Morello; A. Mukherjee; Th. Muller; P. Murat; M. Mussini; J. Nachtman; Y. Nagai; J. Naganoma; I. Nakano; A. Napier; J. Nett; C. Neu; T. Nigmanov; L. Nodulman; S. Y. Noh; O. Norniella; L. Oakes; S. H. Oh; Y. D. Oh; I. Oksuzian; T. Okusawa; R. Orava; L. Ortolan; C. Pagliarone; E. Palencia; P. Palni; V. Papadimitriou; W. Parker; G. Pauletta; M. Paulini; C. Paus; T. J. Phillips; G. Piacentino; E. Pianori; J. Pilot; K. Pitts; C. Plager; L. Pondrom; S. Poprocki; K. Potamianos; F. Prokoshin; A. Pranko; F. Ptohos; G. Punzi; N. Ranjan; I. Redondo Fernndez; P. Renton; M. Rescigno; F. Rimondi; L. Ristori; A. Robson; T. Rodriguez; S. Rolli; M. Ronzani; R. Roser; J. L. Rosner; F. Ruffini; A. Ruiz; J. Russ; V. Rusu; W. K. Sakumoto; Y. Sakurai; L. Santi; K. Sato; V. Saveliev; A. Savoy-Navarro; P. Schlabach; E. E. Schmidt; T. Schwarz; L. Scodellaro; F. Scuri; S. Seidel; Y. Seiya; A. Semenov; F. Sforza; S. Z. Shalhout; T. Shears; P. F. Shepard; M. Shimojima; M. Shochet; I. Shreyber-Tecker; A. Simonenko; K. Sliwa; J. R. Smith; F. D. Snider; V. Sorin; H. Song; M. Stancari; R. St. Denis; D. Stentz; J. Strologas; Y. Sudo; A. Sukhanov; I. Suslov; K. Takemasa; Y. Takeuchi; J. Tang; M. Tecchio; P. K. Teng; J. Thom; E. Thomson; V. Thukral; D. Toback; S. Tokar; K. Tollefson; T. Tomura; D. Tonelli; S. Torre; D. Torretta; P. Totaro; M. Trovato; F. Ukegawa; S. Uozumi; F. Vzquez; G. Velev; C. Vellidis; C. Vernieri; M. Vidal; R. Vilar; J. Vizn; M. Vogel; G. Volpi; P. Wagner; R. Wallny; S. M. Wang; D. Waters; W. C. Wester III; D. Whiteson; A. B. Wicklund; S. Wilbur; H. H. Williams; J. S. Wilson; P. Wilson; B. L. Winer; P. Wittich; S. Wolbers; H. Wolfe; T. Wright; X. Wu; Z. Wu; K. Yamamoto; D. Yamato; T. Yang; U. K. Yang; Y. C. Yang; W. -M. Yao; G. P. Yeh; K. Yi; J. Yoh; K. Yorita; T. Yoshida; G. B. Yu

2014-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

317

Innovative Clean Coal Technology (ICCT): 180 MW demonstration of advanced tangentially-fired combustion techniques for the reduction of nitrogen oxide (NO{sub x}) emissions from coal-fired boilers. Technical progress report, first quarter 1992  

SciTech Connect

This quarterly report discusses the technical progress of a US Department of Energy (DOE) Innovative Clean Coal Technology (ICCT) Project demonstrating advanced tangentially-fired combustion techniques for the reduction of nitrogen oxide (NO{sub x}) emissions from a coal-fired boiler. The project is being conducted at Gulf Power Company`s Plant Lansing Smith Unit 2 located near Panama City, Florida. The primary objective of this demonstration is to determine the long-term effects of commercially available tangentially-fired low NO{sub x} combustion technologies on NO{sub x} emissions and boiler performance. A target of achieving fifty percent NO{sub x} reduction using combustion modifications has been established for the project. The stepwise approach that is being used to evaluate the NO{sub x} control technologies requires three plant outages to successively install the test instrumentation and the different levels of the low NO{sub x} concentric firing system (LNCFS). Following each outage, a series of four groups of tests are performed. These are (1) diagnostic, (2) performance, (3) long-term, and (4) verification. These tests are used to quantify the NO{sub x} reductions of each technology and evaluate the effects of those reductions on other combustion parameters such as particulate characteristics and boiler efficiency. This technical progess report presents the LNCFS Level III long-term data collected during this quarter. NO{sub x} emissions for each day of long-term testing are presented. The average NO{sub x} emission during long-term testing was 0.39 lb/MBtu at an average load of 155 MW. The effect of the low NO{sub x} combustion system on other combustion parameters such as carbon monoxide, excess oxygen level, and carbon carryover are also included.

Not Available

1992-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

318

Innovative Clean Coal Technology (ICCT): 180 MW demonstration of advanced tangentially-fired combustion techniques for the reduction of nitrogen oxide (NO[sub x]) emissions from coal-fired boilers  

SciTech Connect

This quarterly report discusses the technical progress of a US Department of Energy (DOE) Innovative Clean Coal Technology (ICCT) Project demonstrating advanced tangentially-fired combustion techniques for the reduction of nitrogen oxide (NO[sub x]) emissions from a coal-fired boiler. The project is being conducted at Gulf Power Company's Plant Lansing Smith Unit 2 located near Panama City, Florida. The primary objective of this demonstration is to determine the long-term effects of commercially available tangentially-fired low NO[sub x] combustion technologies on NO[sub x] emissions and boiler performance. A target of achieving fifty percent NO[sub x] reduction using combustion modifications has been established for the project. The stepwise approach that is being used to evaluate the NO[sub x] control technologies requires three plant outages to successively install the test instrumentation and the different levels of the low NO[sub x] concentric firing system (LNCFS). Following each outage, a series of four groups of tests are performed. These are (1) diagnostic, (2) performance, (3) long-term, and (4) verification. These tests are used to quantify the NO[sub x] reductions of each technology and evaluate the effects of those reductions on other combustion parameters such as particulate characteristics and boiler efficiency. This technical progess report presents the LNCFS Level III long-term data collected during this quarter. NO[sub x] emissions for each day of long-term testing are presented. The average NO[sub x] emission during long-term testing was 0.39 lb/MBtu at an average load of 155 MW. The effect of the low NO[sub x] combustion system on other combustion parameters such as carbon monoxide, excess oxygen level, and carbon carryover are also included.

Not Available

1992-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

319

Phase evolution in carbide dispersion strengthened nanostructured copper composite by high energy ball milling  

SciTech Connect

In this study, high-energy ball milling was applied to synthesis in situ nanostructured copper based composite reinforced with metal carbides. Cu, M (M=W or Ti) and graphite powder mixture were mechanically alloyed for various milling time in a planetary ball mill with composition of Cu-20vol%WC and Cu-20vol%TiC. Then the as-milled powder were compacted at 200 to 400 MPa and sintered in a vacuum furnace at 900 Degree-Sign C. The results of X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive spectroscopy analysis showed that formation of tungsten carbides (W{sub 2}C and WC phases) was observed after sintering of Cu-W-C mixture while TiC precipitated in as-milled powder of Cu-Ti-C composite after 5 h and become amorphous with longer milling. Mechanism of MA explained the cold welding and fracturing event during milling. Cu-W-C system shows fracturing event is more dominant at early stage of milling and W particle still existed after milling up to 60 h. While in Cu-Ti-C system, cold welding is more dominant and all Ti particles dissolved into Cu matrix.

Hussain, Zuhailawati; Nur Hawadah, M. S. [School of Materials and Mineral Resources Engineering, Engineering Campus, Universiti Sains Malaysia, 14300 Nibong Tebal, Penang (Malaysia)

2012-09-06T23:59:59.000Z

320

Phase synchronization analysis by assessment of the phase difference gradient Martin Vejmelka  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of rhythms of self-sustained oscillatory systems. Typically when trying to identify phase synchronization of coupled self-sustained oscillatory systems, phase synchronization, given by a relation

Savicky, Petr

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tw mw phase" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Science Learning+: Phase 1 projects Science Learning+  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Science Learning+: Phase 1 projects Science Learning+ Phase 1 projects 2 December 2014 #12..............................................................................................................4 Youth access and equity in informal science learning: developing a research and practice agenda..................................................................................................5 Enhancing informal learning through citizen science..............................................6

Rambaut, Andrew

322

FCH Optical Phase-Locked Loop  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

¦ î ¤ ü ? ø Ð Ð ú ¸ ? í ® FCH Optical Phase- Locked Loop? ? û ³ è Optimization of Optica1 Phase

Choi, Woo-Young

323

The post-spinel phase of forsterite  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... in MgSiO3 (ref. 6), I had not doubted the interpretation of the post-spinel phase for Mg2SiO4 as representing mixed oxides. A schematic isothermal phase diagram for the ... as follows

LIN-GUN LIU

1976-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

324

Basic Concepts in Phase-Transfer Catalysis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Phase-transfer catalysis (PTC) is a powerful tool in many areas of chemistry. It is a technique for conducting reactions between two or more reagents in two or more phases, when reaction is inhibited because t...

Charles M. Starks; Charles L. Liotta; Marc E. Halpern

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Phase diagram Ag-Cu-Ge  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This document is part of Subvolume A Nonequilibrium Phase Diagrams of Ternary Amorphous Alloys of Volume 37 Phase Diagrams and Physical Properties of Nonequilibrium Alloys of Landolt-Brnstein - Group III ...

Y. Kawazoe; T. Masumoto; K. Suzuki; A. Inoue

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Phase diagram Al-Ge-V  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This document is part of Subvolume A Nonequilibrium Phase Diagrams of Ternary Amorphous Alloys of Volume 37 Phase Diagrams and Physical Properties of Nonequilibrium Alloys of Landolt-Brnstein - Group III ...

Y. Kawazoe; T. Masumoto; K. Suzuki; A. Inoue

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Phase diagram Au-Ge-Si  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This document is part of Subvolume A Nonequilibrium Phase Diagrams of Ternary Amorphous Alloys of Volume 37 Phase Diagrams and Physical Properties of Nonequilibrium Alloys of Landolt-Brnstein - Group III ...

Y. Kawazoe; T. Masumoto; K. Suzuki; A. Inoue

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

Phase diagram Al-Ge-Mn  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This document is part of Subvolume A Nonequilibrium Phase Diagrams of Ternary Amorphous Alloys of Volume 37 Phase Diagrams and Physical Properties of Nonequilibrium Alloys of Landolt-Brnstein - Group III ...

Y. Kawazoe; T. Masumoto; K. Suzuki; A. Inoue

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Phenomenological theories of ferroelectric phase transitions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Phenomenological theories of ferroelectric phase transitions W. Cao parameter in the free energy expansion, phenomenological theory can also describe inhomogeneous structures appear-Phenomenological parent and product phases. phenomenological theories in multidimensions for describ-Phenomenological

Cao, Wenwu

330

Three-cell traveling wave superconducting test structure  

SciTech Connect

Use of a superconducting traveling wave accelerating (STWA) structure with a small phase advance per cell rather than a standing wave structure may provide a significant increase of the accelerating gradient in the ILC linac. For the same surface electric and magnetic fields the STWA achieves an accelerating gradient 1.2 larger than TESLA-like standing wave cavities. The STWA allows also longer acceleration cavities, reducing the number of gaps between them. However, the STWA structure requires a SC feedback waveguide to return the few hundreds of MW of circulating RF power from the structure output to the structure input. A test single-cell cavity with feedback was designed, manufactured and successfully tested demonstrating the possibility of a proper processing to achieve a high accelerating gradient. These results open way to take the next step of the TW SC cavity development: to build and test a travelingwave three-cell cavity with a feedback waveguide. The latest results of the single-cell cavity tests are discussed as well as the design of the test 3-cell TW cavity.

Avrakhov, Pavel; Kanareykin, Alexei; /Euclid Techlabs, Solon; Kazakov, Sergey; Solyak, Nikolay; Wu, Genfa; Yakovlev, Vyacheslav P.; /Fermilab

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

Subcritical Fluctuations at the Electroweak Phase Transition  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study the importance of thermal fluctuations during the electroweak phase transition. We evaluate in detail the equilibrium number density of large amplitude subcritical fluctuations and discuss the importance of phase mixing to the dynamics of the phase transition. Our results show that, for realistic Higgs masses, the phase transition can be completed by the percolation of the true vacuum, induced by the presence of subcritical fluctuations.

Rudnei O. Ramos

1996-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

332

Vapor phase modifiers for oxidative coupling  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Volatilized metal compounds retard vapor phase alkane conversion reactions in oxidative coupling processes that convert lower alkanes to higher hydrocarbons.

Warren, Barbara K. (Charleston, WV)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Map of Biomass Facilities/Data | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Map of Biomass Facilities/Data Map of Biomass Facilities/Data < Map of Biomass Facilities Jump to: navigation, search Download a CSV file of the table below: CSV FacilityType Owner Developer EnergyPurchaser Place GeneratingCapacity NumberOfUnits CommercialOnlineDate HeatRate WindTurbineManufacturer FacilityStatus AES Mendota Biomass Facility Fresno County, California 25 MW25,000 kW 25,000,000 W 25,000,000,000 mW 0.025 GW 2.5e-5 TW 1989 17,873.6 APS Biomass I Biomass Facility Arizona 2.85 MW2,850 kW 2,850,000 W 2,850,000,000 mW 0.00285 GW 2.85e-6 TW 2006 8,911 Aberdeen Biomass Facility Sierra Pacific Industries Aberdeen, Washington 12 MW12,000 kW 12,000,000 W 12,000,000,000 mW 0.012 GW 1.2e-5 TW Acme Landfill Biomass Facility Landfill Gas Contra Costa County, California 0.27 MW270 kW

334

Three phase AC motor controller  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A motor controller for a three phase AC motor (10) which is adapted to operate bidirectionally from signals received either from a computer (30) or a manual control (32). The controller is comprised of digital logic circuit means which implement a forward and reverse command signal channel (27, 29) for the application of power through the forward and reverse power switching relays (16, 18, 20, 22). The digital logic elements are cross coupled to prevent activation of both channels simultaneously and each includes a plugging circuit (65, 67) for stopping the motor upon the removal of control signal applied to one of the two channels (27, 29) for a direction of rotation desired. Each plugging circuit (65, 67) includes a one-shot pulse signal generator (88, 102) which outputs a single pulse signal of predetermined pulsewidth which is adapted to inhibit further operation of the application of power in the channel which is being activated and to apply a reversal command signal to the other channel which provides a reversed phase application of power to the motor for a period defined by the pulse-width output of the one-shot signal generator to plug the motor (10) which will then be inoperative until another rotational command signal is applied to either of the two channels.

Vuckovich, Michael (Elizabeth, PA); Wright, Maynard K. (Bethel Park, PA); Burkett, John P. (South Huntington Township, Westmoreland County, PA)

1984-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

335

6 - Modelling phase transformations in steel  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract: This chapter discusses aspects of the physical and numerical modelling of phase transformations in steels. The basic features of these phase transformations are described. Dilatometric tests, which are performed to identify the parameters of phase transformation models, are explained. Four models of phase transformations of various complexity and various predictive capability are described. The chapter includes a case study of the simulation and optimization of two industrial processes for dual-phase steel strips: laminar cooling after hot rolling, and cooling after continuous annealing.

M. Pietrzyk; R. Kuziak

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

November 2004 Phase 2 Progress Report  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

06 Phase 2 Progress Report: 06 Phase 2 Progress Report: 100kW LOW COST ENERGY STORAGE INVERTER Larry Rinehart Managing Director Rinehart Motion Systems, LLC This work is sponsored by US Department of Energy Grant DE-FG02- 03ER83768 Technical support and management provided by Sandia Labs R S M TM Rinehart Motion Systems, LLC 4/8/2010 DOE Grant DE-FG02-03ER83768 2 Background Rinehart Motion completed Phase 1 R&D activities July 2003 thru April 2004 * In Phase 1 we worked on the Inverter hardware, substantially reducing the size and cost of future Inverters Phase 2 activities began in July 2004 and were scheduled to end June 2006 (a 9 month no-cost extension has been granted) * Phase 2 work is focused on the Inverter / PCS system design The Phase 2 work plan includes: * Determine the scalability boundaries of the technology. Target down

337

Electric field controlled emulsion phase contactor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A system is described for contacting liquid phases comprising a column for transporting a liquid phase contacting system, the column having upper and lower regions. The upper region has a nozzle for introducing a dispersed phase and means for applying thereto a vertically oriented high intensity pulsed electric field. This electric field allows improved flow rates while shattering the dispersed phase into many micro-droplets upon exiting the nozzle to form a dispersion within a continuous phase. The lower region employs means for applying to the dispersed phase a horizontally oriented high intensity pulsed electric field so that the dispersed phase undergoes continuous coalescence and redispersion while being urged from side to side as it progresses through the system, increasing greatly the mass transfer opportunity. 5 figs.

Scott, T.C.

1995-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

338

Phase-field modeling of three-phase electrode microstructures in solid oxide fuel cells  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A phase-field model for describing three-phase electrode microstructure (i.e. electrode-phase electrolyte-phase and pore-phase) in solid oxide fuel cells is proposed using the diffuse-interface theory. Conserved composition and non-conserved grain orientation order parameters are simultaneously used to describe the coupled phase coarsening and grain growth in the three-phase electrode. The microstructural evolution simulated by the phase-field approach demonstrates the significant dependence of morphological microstructure and output statistic material features on the prescribed kinetic parameters and three-phase volume fractions. The triple-phase boundary fraction is found to have a major degradation in the early evolution.

Qun Li; Linyun Liang; Kirk Gerdes; Long-Qing Chen

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Phase I Final Technical Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Final Report to Final Report to Phase I Final Technical Report 10121.4302.01.Final1 Ultra-High Conductivity Umbilicals: Polymer Nanotube Umbilicals (PNUs) 10121-4302-01 June 24, 2013 Christopher A. Dyke Principal Investigator NanoRidge Materials, Inc. 15850 Vickery Drive Houston, Texas 77032 LEGAL NOTICE THIS REPORT WAS PREPARED BY NANORIDGE MATERIALS, INC. AS AN ACCOUNT OF WORK SPONSORED BY THE RESEARCH PARTNERSHIP TO SECURE ENERGY FOR AMERICA, RPSEA. NEITHER RPSEA MEMBERS OF RPSEA, THE NATIONAL ENERGY TECHNOLOGY LABORATORY, THE U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY, NOR ANY PERSON ACTING ON BEHALF OF ANY OF THE ENTITIES: a. MAKES ANY WARRANTY OR REPRESENTATION, EXPRESS OR IMPLIED WITH RESPECT TO ACCURACY, COMPLETENESS, OR USEFULNESS OF THE INFORMATION

340

Phase Contours and Bootstraps. I  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Previous work on phase contours is extended to include reaction amplitudes that have Regge behavior at high energies. General results are obtained on relations between resonance poles and surfaces of zeros of the collision amplitudes. These results depend on the symmetry properties of the amplitudes and on the nature of the dominant Regge trajectories and the dominant resonances. They are also affected by the spin of the colliding particles. Zeros of collision amplitudes can be located asymptotically from Regge formulas, and along certain symmetry lines they can be located at finite values of the energy variables by means of a narrow-resonance approximation. We relate the asymptotic zeros and these "symmetry" zeros by making a unitarity hypothesis. This leads to bootstrap conditions which are generalizations of the linear constraints contained in the Veneziano model.

Charles B. Chiu, Richard J. Eden, Michael B. Green, and Francoise Gurin

1969-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tw mw phase" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Phase Contours and Bootstraps. II  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The phase-contour method is applied to reactions of the types PP?PP, PP?PV, and PP?PT, where P, V, and T denote, respectively, the pseudoscalar mesons ?, ?, K; the vector mesons ?, ?, K*; and the tensor mesons A2, f0, K**. Relations are obtained between zeros of the collision amplitudes and the resonance poles associated with the appropriate Regge trajectories. In a narrow-resonance approximation, and with a unitarity hypothesis that relates certain residue zeros and symmetry zeros of a collision amplitude, bootstrap constraints, which are generalizations of the Veneziano constraint, are obtained on the trajectory functions. A number of other ways of deriving these constraints are discussed. These constraints are then studied for all allowed meson reactions of the types noted above, and are compared with data on the Regge parameters that have been obtained from experiment.

Charles B. Chiu, Richard J. Eden, and Michael B. Green

1969-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

342

Two phase titanium aluminide alloy  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A two-phase titanic aluminide alloy having a lamellar microstructure with little intercolony structures. The alloy can include fine particles such as boride particles at colony boundaries and/or grain boundary equiaxed structures. The alloy can include alloying additions such as .ltoreq.10 at % W, Nb and/or Mo. The alloy can be free of Cr, V, Mn, Cu and/or Ni and can include, in atomic %, 45 to 55% Ti, 40 to 50% Al, 1 to 5% Nb, 0.3 to 2% W, up to 1% Mo and 0.1 to 0.3% B. In weight %, the alloy can include 57 to 60% Ti, 30 to 32% Al, 4 to 9% Nb, up to 2% Mo, 2 to 8% W and 0.02 to 0.08% B.

Deevi, Seetharama C. (Midlothian, VA); Liu, C. T. (Oak Ridge, TN)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Thermal Performance of Phase Change Wallboard for Residential Cooling Application  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

H. Manz; "Theory of Phase Change Materials with and withoutand A.K. Sircar; "Phase Change Materials for Heating andmanufacturing of phase change material (PCM) implemented in

Feustel, H.E.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

High performance Zintl phase TE materials with embedded nanoparticles...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

performance Zintl phase TE materials with embedded nanoparticles High performance Zintl phase TE materials with embedded nanoparticles Performance of zintl phase thermoelectric...

345

410 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON MAGNETICS, VOL. 36, NO. 1, JANUARY 2000 Erratum_______________________________________________________________________________________  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, mutual impedance effect which is important in phased ar- ray coils [2] design and other coil meshes Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan (e-mail: chen@me.ee.ntu.edu.tw; skjeng@ew.ee.ntu.edu.tw). W.-P. Kuan

346

Phase transformation and crystallization kinetics of a-Ge/Cu bilayer for blue-ray recording under thermal annealing and pulsed laser irradiation  

SciTech Connect

Similar phase formation and crystallization behaviors have been observed in the a-Ge/Cu bilayer under thermal annealing and pulsed laser irradiation. The Cu{sub 3}Ge phase would form prior to the crystallization of a-Ge. The crystallization temperature and activation energy for crystallization of a-Ge were reduced to 310 deg. C and 2.75 eV, respectively, due to the fast Ge diffusion in the already formed germanide phases. The reaction exponent m of {approx}2.0 for the a-Ge/Cu bilayer corresponds to a crystallization process in which grain growth occurs with nucleation, and the nucleation rate decreases with the progress of the grain growth process. Under pulsed laser irradiation, the maximum data-transfer-rates of 44, 56, 74, and 112 Mbit/s can be achieved in the write-once blue-ray disk at the recording powers of 3, 4, 5, and 6 mW, respectively. The a-Ge/Cu bilayer also demonstrated sufficient optical contrast and adequate absorptance for low power and high speed write-once blue-ray recording.

Her, Yung-Chiun; Tu, Wei-Ting; Tsai, Ming-Hsin [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Chung Hsing University, Taichung, Taiwan 40254 (China)

2012-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

347

Pure Phase Solubility Limits: LANL  

SciTech Connect

The natural and engineered system at Yucca Mountain (YM) defines the site-specific conditions under which one must determine to what extent the engineered and the natural geochemical barriers will prevent the release of radioactive material from the repository. Most important mechanisms for retention or enhancement of radionuclide transport include precipitation or co-precipitation of radionuclide-bearing solid phases (solubility limits), complexation in solution, sorption onto surfaces, colloid formation, and diffusion. There may be many scenarios that could affect the near-field environment, creating chemical conditions more aggressive than the conditions presented by the unperturbed system (such as pH changes beyond the range of 6 to 9 or significant changes in the ionic strength of infiltrated waters). For an extended period of time, the near-field water composition may be quite different and more extreme in pH, ionic strength, and CO{sub 2} partial pressure (or carbonate concentration) than waters at some distance from the repository. Reducing conditions, high pH (up to 11), and low carbonate concentration may be present in the near-field after reaction of infiltrating groundwater with engineered barrier systems, such as cementitious materials. In the far-field, conditions are controlled by the rock-mass buffer providing a near-neutral, oxidizing, low-ionic-strength environment that controls radionuclide solubility limits and sorption capacities. There is the need for characterization of variable chemical conditions that affect solubility, speciation, and sorption reactions. Modeling of the groundwater chemistry is required and leads to an understanding of solubility and speciation of the important radionuclides. Because experimental studies cannot be performed under the numerous potential chemical conditions, solubility limitations must rely on geochemical modeling of the radionuclide's chemistry. Fundamental thermodynamic properties, such as solubility products, complex stability constants, and redox potentials for radionuclides in different oxidation states, form the underlying database to be used for those calculations. The potentially low solubilities of many radionuclides in natural waters constitute the first barrier for their migration from the repository into the environment. Evaluation of this effect requires a knowledge of the site-specific water chemistry and the expected spatial and temporal ranges of its variability. Quantitative determinations of radionuclide solubility in waters within the range of chemistry must be made. Speciation and molecular complexation must be ascertained to interpret and apply solubility results. The solubilities thus determined can be used to assess the effectiveness of solubility in limiting radionuclide migration. These solubilities can also be used to evaluate the effectiveness of other retardation processes expected to occur once dissolution of the source material and migration begin. Understanding the solubility behavior of radionuclides will assist in designing valuable sorption experiments that must be conducted below the solubility limit since only soluble species participate in surface reactions and sorption processes. The present strategy for radionuclide solubility tasks has been to provide a solubility model from bulk-experiments that attempt to bracket the estimate made for this Analysis and Modeling Report (AMR) of water conditions on site. The long-term goal must be to develop a thermodynamic database for solution speciation and solid-state determination as a prerequisite for transport calculations and interpretation of empirical solubility data. The model has to be self-consistent and tested against known solubility studies in order to predict radionuclide solubilities over the continuous distribution ranges of potential water compositions for performance assessment of the site. Solubility studies upper limits for radionuclide concentrations in natural waters. The concentration in the aqueous phase is controlled by the radionuclide-bearing solid phase and by

C. Stockman

2001-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

348

Novel 3-Phase Inductive Fault Current Limiter  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The paper describes the inductive three-phase fault current limiter. In this work I examine the novel arrangements of the perfect closed superconducting loop made of HTS wire. I applied one iron core with 3 limbs and special loops for uniform temperature of the superconducting wire. In this work I present the results of my experiments with this device. I present the static and dynamic measured results of this solution. It has got several advantages e. g. fast switching and less fault power for high-power electric machines. The advantage of the equipment is that in the case of single-phase short circuit the current will decrease in all the three phases. This can be an appropriate solution for high power machines. For example, in the case of high-power electric motor if there is a single-phase breaking or a single phase short circuit, we can decrease the current in the three phases.

Janos Kosa

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Stationary phase deposition based on onium salts  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Onium salt chemistry can be used to deposit very uniform thickness stationary phases on the wall of a gas chromatography column. In particular, the stationary phase can be bonded to non-silicon based columns, especially microfabricated metal columns. Non-silicon microfabricated columns may be manufactured and processed at a fraction of the cost of silicon-based columns. In addition, the method can be used to phase-coat conventional capillary columns or silicon-based microfabricated columns.

Wheeler, David R. (Albuquerque, NM); Lewis, Patrick R. (Albuquerque, NM); Dirk, Shawn M. (Albuquerque, NM); Trudell, Daniel E. (Albuquerque, NM)

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Environmental Effects on the Geometric Phase  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The behavior of the geometric phase gained by a single spin-1/2 nucleus immersed into a thermal or a squeezed environment is investigated. Both the time dependence of the phase and its value at infinity are examined against several physical parameters. It is observed that for some intermediate ranges of the temperature and the coupling strength, the presence of squeezing enhances the geometric phase.

A. C. Gnhan; S. Turgut; N. K. Pak

2009-12-25T23:59:59.000Z

351

Vapor phase modifiers for oxidative coupling  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Volatilized metal compounds are described which are capable of retarding vapor phase alkane conversion reactions in oxidative coupling processes that convert lower alkanes to higher hydrocarbons.

Warren, B.K.

1991-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

352

Double acting stirling engine phase control  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A mechanical device for effecting a phase change between the expansion and compression volumes of a double-acting Stirling engine uses helical elements which produce opposite rotation of a pair of crankpins when a control rod is moved, so the phase between two pairs of pistons is changed by +.psi. and the phase between the other two pairs of pistons is changed by -.psi.. The phase can change beyond .psi.=90.degree. at which regenerative braking and then reversal of engine rotation occurs.

Berchowitz, David M. (Scotia, NY)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

May 16, 2008 Changes from the Draft Final to the Final Report for Phase 1A  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

was included · The dimensions for the example 200 MW solar chimney project were updated. · Appendix B, which and performance impacts of dry-cooling for solar thermal projects · Noted that out-of-state resources that can

354

Hawaii Geothermal Region | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geothermal Region Geothermal Region Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Hawaii Geothermal Region Details Areas (16) Power Plants (1) Projects (2) Techniques (0) References Geothermal Region Data State(s) Hawaii Area 28,311 km²28,311,000,000 m² 10,928.046 mi² 304,736,772,900 ft² 33,859,956,000 yd² 6,995,789.655 acres USGS Resource Estimate for this Region Identified Mean Potential 181 MW181,000 kW 181,000,000 W 181,000,000,000 mW 0.181 GW 1.81e-4 TW Undiscovered Mean Potential 2,435 MW2,435,000 kW 2,435,000,000 W 2,435,000,000,000 mW 2.435 GW 0.00244 TW Planned Capacity Planned Capacity 50 MW50,000 kW 50,000,000 W 50,000,000,000 mW 0.05 GW 5.0e-5 TW Plants Included in Planned Estimate 1 Plants with Unknown Planned Capacity 0 Geothermal Areas within the Hawaii Geothermal Region

355

Yellowstone Caldera Geothermal Region | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Yellowstone Caldera Geothermal Region Yellowstone Caldera Geothermal Region Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Yellowstone Caldera Geothermal Region Details Areas (3) Power Plants (0) Projects (0) Techniques (25) Map: {{{Name}}} Replace Citation[1] References ↑ "Replace Citation" Geothermal Region Data State(s) Wyoming, Idaho, Montana Area 11,841 km²11,841,000,000 m² 4,570.626 mi² 127,455,339,900 ft² 14,161,836,000 yd² 2,925,970.305 acres USGS Resource Estimate for this Region Identified Mean Potential 44.0 MW44,000 kW 44,000,000 W 44,000,000,000 mW 0.044 GW 4.4e-5 TW Undiscovered Mean Potential 209.9 MW209,900 kW 209,900,000 W 209,900,000,000 mW 0.21 GW 2.099e-4 TW Planned Capacity Planned Capacity 0 MW0 kW 0 W 0 mW 0 GW 0 TW Plants Included in Planned Estimate 0 Plants with Unknown

356

Summer is almost upon us. The mercury is going through the roof, and the air-conditioning and gasoline bills are following right behind. What to do, what to do?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-Generation Plant This onsite, 12.5-MW natural-gas power plant cogenerates heat and steam that are then utilized. Here, at the Field labora- tory for optimized Wind energy power consumption was about 15 TW in 2008, wind could--in principle--power the entire planet. but one big problem with wind pow- er

357

J.M. Tarascon, et al. , Electrochemical energy storage  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

opportunities for Electrochemical Energy Storage (EES) Mass storage (MW): Which technology? Compressed air #12J.M. Tarascon, et al. , Electrochemical energy storage for renewable energies CNRS, Jeudi 3 Octobre 28 TW Renewable EnergiesRenewable EnergiesRenewable Energies WHY ENERGY STORAGE ? Billionsdebarils

Canet, Léonie

358

Applied fractionalization : quantum phases and phase transitions of strongly interacting systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Strongly correlated systems present interesting challenges in condensed matter physics. On the one hand, the theoretical work in the last two decades suggests that strong interactions may lead to new phases and phase ...

Grover, Tarun, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Reducing Nonlinear Distortion in Optical Phase Conjugation using a Midway Phase-Shifting Filter  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The performance of optical phase conjugation (OPC) is improved by splitting the nonlinear element and inserting a phase-shifting filter. The maximum signal quality increases by 1.2 dB...

Morshed, Mohammad M; Lowery, Arthur J; Du, Liang B

360

Phase diagram and phase transitions of monolayer and bilayer CF4 on graphite  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The phase diagram of CF4 adsorbed on graphite in the monolayer and bilayer region is mapped out in an ac heat-capacity study. In the monolayer region, the resultant phase diagram shows the existence of five different solid phases. The melting transition can proceed from the (22) commensurate, I(S) (an incommensurate phase), and the hexagonal incommensurate (HI) phases. Strongly-first-order melting is found from the (22) and the I(S) phases. In contrast, a sharp and small heat-capacity peak followed by a broad anomaly, similar to the melting of Ar on graphite in the submonolayer region, is observed at the melting of the HI phase. In the bilayer region, four different regions of coexisting solid phases are found. The melting of the bilayer solid occurs at a triple point at 89.05 K. Our data also suggest a bilayer critical point at 93 K.

Q. M. Zhang; H. K. Kim; M. H. W. Chan

1986-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tw mw phase" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Phase Space Navigator: Towards Automating Control Synthesis in Phase Spaces for Nonlinear Control Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We develop a novel autonomous control synthesis strategy called Phase Space Navigator for the automatic synthesis of nonlinear control systems. The Phase Space Navigator generates global control laws by synthesizing ...

Zhao, Feng

1991-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

Symmetry, Defects, and Gauging of Topological Phases  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We examine the interplay of symmetry and topological order in $2+1$ dimensional topological phases of matter. We present a definition of the \\it topological symmetry \\rm group, which characterizes the symmetry of the emergent topological quantum numbers of a topological phase $\\mathcal{C}$, and describe its relation with the microscopic symmetry of the underlying physical system. We derive a general framework to classify symmetry fractionalization in topological phases, including non-Abelian phases and the possibility that the symmetries permute the quasiparticle types. We develop a theory of extrinsic defects (fluxes) associated with elements of the symmetry group, which provides a general classification of symmetry-enriched topological phases derived from a topological phase of matter $\\mathcal{C}$ with (on-site) symmetry group $G$. The algebraic theory of the defects, known as a $G$-crossed braided tensory category $\\mathcal{C}_{G}^{\\times}$, allows one to compute many properties, such as the number of topologically distinct types of defects associated with each group element, their fusion rules, quantum dimensions, zero modes, braiding exchange transformations, a generalized Verlinde formula for the defects, and modular transformations of the $G$-crossed extensions of topological phases. We also examine the promotion of the global symmetry to a local gauge invariance, wherein the extrinsic $G$-defects are turned into deconfined quasiparticle excitations, which results in a different topological phase $\\mathcal{C}/G$. A number of instructive and/or physically relevant examples are studied in detail.

Maissam Barkeshli; Parsa Bonderson; Meng Cheng; Zhenghan Wang

2014-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

363

COP5621 Project Phase 4 Code Generator  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

COP5621 Project Phase 4 Code Generator Purpose: This project is intended to give you experience in the text and in class. Project Summary: Your task is to write a code generator, the final phase of your the same task. Predefined Functions in PASC: You should write your own predefined procedures and functions

Yuan, Xin

364

The Ethics of Phase 0 Oncology Trials  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Cancer Research CCR Focus CCR Focus The Ethics of Phase 0 Oncology Trials Emily Abdoler...feasibility, community acceptance, and ethics (8-13). This last topic is the subject...these trials (1, 2, 4, 6, 14). Ethics of Phase I Oncology Trials Given the small...

Emily Abdoler; Holly Taylor; David Wendler

2008-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

365

Intermediate Energy NN Phase Shifts. II  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......Progress Letters Intermediate Energy NN Phase Shifts. II Norio...Takatoshi Watanabe Department of Nuclear Engineering, Faculty of Engineering...1019-1024 Intermediate Energy pp Phase Shifts to 1000 MeV...Dakhno et al. Leningrad Nuclear Physics Institute report 692......

Norio Hoshizaki; Takatoshi Watanabe

1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

Proceedings: EPRI Second Phased Array Inspection Seminar  

SciTech Connect

The Second EPRI Phased Array Inspection Seminar focused on industrial applications of phased array technology that have been achieved to date or are planned for the near future. Presentations were made by developers of inspection techniques, inspection services vendors, and utility personnel who have performed inspections using arrays.

None

2001-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

Phase Stability of Multicomponent NAPLs Containing PAHs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to produce complex synthetic NAPLs which can be used as surrogate materials to simulate the behavior of a contaminant is dependent on its phase state. For solid phase contaminants in contact with water, the maximum assessment, predicting remediation effectiveness, and experimental research. In this paper, we discuss NAPL

Peters, Catherine A.

368

Second-quantized formulation of geometric phases  

SciTech Connect

The level crossing problem and associated geometric terms are neatly formulated by the second-quantized formulation. This formulation exhibits a hidden local gauge symmetry related to the arbitrariness of the phase choice of the complete orthonormal basis set. By using this second-quantized formulation, which does not assume adiabatic approximation, a convenient exact formula for the geometric terms including off-diagonal geometric terms is derived. The analysis of geometric phases is then reduced to a simple diagonalization of the Hamiltonian, and it is analyzed both in the operator and path-integral formulations. If one diagonalizes the geometric terms in the infinitesimal neighborhood of level crossing, the geometric phases become trivial (and thus no monopole singularity) for arbitrarily large but finite time interval T. The integrability of Schroedinger equation and the appearance of the seemingly nonintegrable phases are thus consistent. The topological proof of the Longuet-Higgins' phase-change rule, for example, fails in the practical Born-Oppenheimer approximation where a large but finite ratio of two time scales is involved and T is identified with the period of the slower system. The difference and similarity between the geometric phases associated with level crossing and the exact topological object such as the Aharonov-Bohm phase become clear in the present formulation. A crucial difference between the quantum anomaly and the geometric phases is also noted.

Deguchi, Shinichi; Fujikawa, Kazuo [Institute of Quantum Science, College of Science and Technology, Nihon University, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo 101-8308 (Japan)

2005-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

369

Iterative Algorithms for Ptychographic Phase Retrieval  

SciTech Connect

Ptychography promises diffraction limited resolution without the need for high resolution lenses. To achieve high resolution one has to solve the phase problem for many partially overlapping frames. Here we review some of the existing methods for solving ptychographic phase retrieval problem from a numerical analysis point of view, and propose alternative methods based on numerical optimization.

Yang, Chao; Qian, Jianliang; Schirotzek, Andre; Maia, Filipe; Marchesini, Stefano

2011-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

370

Gas-Phase Spectroscopy of Biomolecular  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Gas-Phase Spectroscopy of Biomolecular Building Blocks Mattanjah S. de Vries1 and Pavel Hobza2 1, REMPI, computational chemistry, spectral hole burning, jet cooling Abstract Gas-phase spectroscopy lends. In recent years, we have seen enormous progress in the study of biomolecular building blocks in the gas

de Vries, Mattanjah S.

371

AIR QUALITY: Control Enters New Phase  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

AIR QUALITY: Control Enters New Phase ... Federal enforcement of air pollution is about to enter a new, more technically sophisticated, phase. ... Now air pollution control moves into the criteria and standards period, when numbers eventually will be the basis for enforcement and the country becomes zoned into 32 air quality regions. ...

1968-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

372

CONDENSATION AND EVAPORATION FOR THERMALLY UNEQUILIBRATED PHASES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CONDENSATION AND EVAPORATION FOR THERMALLY UNEQUILIBRATED PHASES R. A. Marcus1 , A. V. Fedkin2-K) equation for the rate of condensation of a gas or evaporation of a solid or liquid is used for systems, Tg, differs from that of the condensed phase, Ts . Here, we modify the H-K equation for this case

Grossman, Lawrence

373

Charm -- a thermometer of the mixed phase  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A charmed quark experiences drag and diffusion in the quark-gluon plasma, as well as strong interaction with the plasma surface. Our simulations indicate that charmed quarks created in heavy ion collisions will be trapped in the mixed phase and will come to equilibrium in it. Their momentum distribution will thus reflect the temperature at the confinement phase transition.

Benjamin Svetitsky; Asher Uziel

1997-09-03T23:59:59.000Z

374

Extreme phase and rotated quadrature measurements  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We determine the extreme points of the convex set of covariant phase observables. Such extremals describe the best phase parameter measurements of laser light - the best in the sense that they are free from classical randomness due to fluctuations in the measuring procedure. We also characterize extreme fuzzy rotated quadratures.

Juha-Pekka Pellonp

2009-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

375

Phasing Renewable Energy Implementation | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Phasing Renewable Energy Implementation Phasing Renewable Energy Implementation Phasing Renewable Energy Implementation October 16, 2013 - 4:41pm Addthis If conventional or other renewable energy funding cannot be procured, or if an agency is working towards a higher goal for renewable energy usage that cannot be met with the current budget, agencies may choose to phase renewable energy into their project. This lays the groundwork and infrastructure now so that some or all of the renewable energy can easily be installed at a later date. A guide to phasing the development of renewable energy is the Solar Ready Buildings Planning Guide, developed by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL). The renewable energy project funding page has more information on applicable methods for financing the renewable energy system

376

Nonlinear multiferroic phase shifters for microwave frequencies  

SciTech Connect

A nonlinear microwave phase shifter based on a planar multiferroic composite has been studied. The multiferroic structure is fabricated in the form of a bilayer consisting of yttrium iron garnet and barium strontium titanate. The principle of operation of the device is based on the linear and nonlinear control of the phase shift of the hybrid spin-electromagnetic waves propagating in the bilayer. The linear control is realized with magnetic and electric fields. The nonlinear control is provided by the input power of microwave signal. The device showed a nonlinear phase shift up to 250, electric field induced phase shift up to 330, and magnetic field induced phase shift of more than 180.

Ustinov, Alexey B.; Kalinikos, Boris A. [Department of Physical Electronics and Technology, St. Petersburg Electrotechnical University, St. Petersburg 197376 (Russian Federation); Srinivasan, G. [Department of Physics, Oakland University, Rochester, Michigan 48309 (United States)

2014-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

377

Phase equilibria in solutions of disklike particles  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The Flory lattice method has been utilized to study phase equilibria in solutions of disklike molecules. It is found that the critical disk diameter-to-width ratio x for the formation of the stable nematic phase is about 3.015. Temperature-concentration phase diagrams are studied for several values of x. For x<8.6 isotropic and nematic phases are separated by a biphasic range of concentrations. Above x?8.6 a reentrant nematic feature appears, i.e., at a given temperature either of two pairs of phases, isotropic-nematic or nematic-nematic, occurred. The locations of the corresponding critical and triple points are computed. 1996 The American Physical Society.

Maciej Wnek and Jozef K. Moscicki

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Robustness of phase retrieval methods in x-ray phase contrast imaging: A comparison  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: The robustness of the phase retrieval methods is of critical importance for limiting and reducing radiation doses involved in x-ray phase contrast imaging. This work is to compare the robustness of two phase retrieval methods by analyzing the phase maps retrieved from the experimental images of a phantom. Methods: Two phase retrieval methods were compared. One method is based on the transport of intensity equation (TIE) for phase contrast projections, and the TIE-based method is the most commonly used method for phase retrieval in the literature. The other is the recently developed attenuation-partition based (AP-based) phase retrieval method. The authors applied these two methods to experimental projection images of an air-bubble wrap phantom for retrieving the phase map of the bubble wrap. The retrieved phase maps obtained by using the two methods are compared. Results: In the wrap's phase map retrieved by using the TIE-based method, no bubble is recognizable, hence, this method failed completely for phase retrieval from these bubble wrap images. Even with the help of the Tikhonov regularization, the bubbles are still hardly visible and buried in the cluttered background in the retrieved phase map. The retrieved phase values with this method are grossly erroneous. In contrast, in the wrap's phase map retrieved by using the AP-based method, the bubbles are clearly recovered. The retrieved phase values with the AP-based method are reasonably close to the estimate based on the thickness-based measurement. The authors traced these stark performance differences of the two methods to their different techniques employed to deal with the singularity problem involved in the phase retrievals. Conclusions: This comparison shows that the conventional TIE-based phase retrieval method, regardless if Tikhonov regularization is used or not, is unstable against the noise in the wrap's projection images, while the AP-based phase retrieval method is shown in these experiments to be superior to the TIE-based method for the robustness in performing the phase retrieval.

Yan, Aimin; Wu, Xizeng; Liu, Hong [Department of Radiology, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, Alabama 35233 (United States); Center for Bioengineering and School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Oklahoma, Norman, Oklahoma 73019 (United States)

2011-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

379

Signatures of an electronic nematic phase at the isotropic-nematic phase transition  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The electronic nematic phase occurs when the point-group symmetry of the lattice structure is broken, due to electron-electron interactions. We study a model for the nematic phase on a square lattice with emphasis on the phase transition between isotropic and nematic phases within mean-field theory. We find the transition to be first order, with dramatic changes in the Fermi-surface topology accompanying the transition. Furthermore, we study the conductivity tensor and Hall constant as probes of the nematic phase and its transition. The relevance of our findings to Hall resistivity experiments in the high-Tc cuprates is discussed.

Hae-Young Kee; Eugene H. Kim; Chung-Hou Chung

2003-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

380

A-B Phase Transition and Pinning of Phase Boundary of Superfluid 3He in Aerogel  

SciTech Connect

Phase transition in superfluid 3He in aerogel has been studied by NMR. Above 19 bar, we have clearly observed the A-like and B-like phases by following changes in the NMR lineshapes and resonance frequencies. There is a wide temperature region in which the A-like phase and the B-like phase coexist, extending from near the superfluid transition temperature T{sub c}{sup aero} to the lowest temperature of coexistence, T{sub AB}{sup aero}, below which only the B-like phase exists. There are two temperature regions, only in which the phase conversion occurs. Both regions are a few tens of {mu}K wide, the upper region being just below T{sub c}{sup aero} and the lower one just above T{sub AB}{sup aero}. In cooling down and warming up with the two phases in coexistence, no phase conversion occurs between the two regions. The phase boundary between the A-like phase and B-like phase cannot move in aerogel due to strong pinning by inhomogenities of aerogel.

Ishikawa, Osamu; Kado, Ryusuke; Obara, Ken; Yano, Hideo; Hata, Tohru [Graduate School of Science, Osaka City University, Osaka 558-8585 (Japan); Nakagawa, Hisashi [Metrology Institute of Japan, Advanced Industrial Science and Technology Tsukuba, 305-8563 (Japan); Yokogawa, Hiroshi; Yokoyama, Masaru [Matsushita Electric Works Ltd. Kadoma, Osaka, 571-0500 (Japan)

2006-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tw mw phase" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Phase Contours of Scattering Amplitudes. I. Phase Contours, Zeros, and High-Energy Behavior  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We define phase contours as curves along which the phase of an invariant scattering amplitude is a constant. These curves are sections of a complex surface, which we take either in the real (s,t) plane or in the complex plane of one of the variables. The relation between phase contours, zeros of the amplitude, and high-energy behavior is discussed. Characteristic features of phase contours are investigated in a variety of special models, and it is seen that basic assumptions about high-energy behavior can readily be expressed in terms of the topology of the phase contours. Specific illustrations of phase contours are given for pionnucleon scattering based on phase-shift solutions at low and medium energies and on an extrapolation from Regge solutions at high energies.

Charles B. Chiu, Richard J. Eden, and Chung-I Tan

1968-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

382

A Phase-Field Model for Phase Transformations in Glass-Forming Alloys  

SciTech Connect

A phase-field model is proposed for phase transformations in glass-forming alloys. The glass transition is introduced as a structural relaxation, and the competition between the glass and crystalline phases is investigated. The simulations are performed for Cu-Zr alloys, employing thermodynamic and kinetic parameters derived from reported thermodynamic modeling and molecular dynamics simulation results,[13] respectively. Four distinct phase fields are treated with a multi-phase-field approach, representing the liquid/glass, Cu10Zr7, CuZr, and CuZr2 phases. In addition, a continuum-field method is applied to the liquid to accommodate the liquidglass transformation. The combined phase-field approach is used to investigate the glass formation tendency, and critical cooling rates are estimated and compared with the reported experimental values.

Wang, Tao; Napolitano, Ralph E.

2012-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

383

Thermodynamic phase-field model for microstructure with multiple components and phases: The possibility of metastable phases  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A diffuse-interface model for microstructure with an arbitrary number of components and phases was developed from basic thermodynamic and kinetic principles and formalized within a variational framework. The model includes ...

Cogswell, Daniel A.

384

Offshore Code Comparison Collaboration within IEA Wind Task 23: Phase IV Results Regarding Floating Wind Turbine Modeling; Preprint  

SciTech Connect

Offshore wind turbines are designed and analyzed using comprehensive simulation codes that account for the coupled dynamics of the wind inflow, aerodynamics, elasticity, and controls of the turbine, along with the incident waves, sea current, hydrodynamics, and foundation dynamics of the support structure. This paper describes the latest findings of the code-to-code verification activities of the Offshore Code Comparison Collaboration, which operates under Subtask 2 of the International Energy Agency Wind Task 23. In the latest phase of the project, participants used an assortment of codes to model the coupled dynamic response of a 5-MW wind turbine installed on a floating spar buoy in 320 m of water. Code predictions were compared from load-case simulations selected to test different model features. The comparisons have resulted in a greater understanding of offshore floating wind turbine dynamics and modeling techniques, and better knowledge of the validity of various approximations. The lessons learned from this exercise have improved the participants' codes, thus improving the standard of offshore wind turbine modeling.

Jonkman, J.; Larsen, T.; Hansen, A.; Nygaard, T.; Maus, K.; Karimirad, M.; Gao, Z.; Moan, T.; Fylling, I.

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Offshore Code Comparison Collaboration, Continuation within IEA Wind Task 30: Phase II Results Regarding a Floating Semisubmersible Wind System: Preprint  

SciTech Connect

Offshore wind turbines are designed and analyzed using comprehensive simulation tools (or codes) that account for the coupled dynamics of the wind inflow, aerodynamics, elasticity, and controls of the turbine, along with the incident waves, sea current, hydrodynamics, and foundation dynamics of the support structure. This paper describes the latest findings of the code-to-code verification activities of the Offshore Code Comparison Collaboration, Continuation (OC4) project, which operates under the International Energy Agency (IEA) Wind Task 30. In the latest phase of the project, participants used an assortment of simulation codes to model the coupled dynamic response of a 5-MW wind turbine installed on a floating semisubmersible in 200 m of water. Code predictions were compared from load-case simulations selected to test different model features. The comparisons have resulted in a greater understanding of offshore floating wind turbine dynamics and modeling techniques, and better knowledge of the validity of various approximations. The lessons learned from this exercise have improved the participants? codes, thus improving the standard of offshore wind turbine modeling.

Robertson, A.; Jonkman, J.; Vorpahl, F.; Popko, W.; Qvist, J.; Froyd, L.; Chen, X.; Azcona, J.; Uzungoglu, E.; Guedes Soares, C.; Luan, C.; Yutong, H.; Pengcheng, F.; Yde, A.; Larsen, T.; Nichols, J.; Buils, R.; Lei, L.; Anders Nygard, T.; et al.

2014-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

Anode-supported micro-tubular SOFCs fabricated by a phase-inversion and dip-coating process  

SciTech Connect

A simple phase-inversion process is successfully combined with a dip-coating process to fabricate anode-supported micro-tubular solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs). Several processing parameters were systematically investigated to optimize cell microstructure and performance, including the amount of pore former used in the support substrate and the number of electrolyte coatings. Single cells with ?240 ?m thick NiO-YSZ support and 10 ?m thick YSZ electrolyte were successfully fabricated, demonstrating peak power densities of 752 and 277 mW cm{sup ?2} at 800 and 600 C, respectively, when a composite cathode consisting of La{sub 0.85}Sr{sub 0.15}MnO{sub 3} and Sm{sub 0.2}Ce{sub 0.8}O{sub 2??} was used. This simple fabrication technique can be readily used for optimization of fuel cell microstructures and for cost-effective fabrication of high-performance SOFCs, potentially reducing the cost of SOFC technologies.

Chen, Changcheng; Liu, Mingfei; Yang, Lei; Liu, Meilin

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Gas Phase Photoacoustic Sensor at 8.41 mu m Using Quartz Tuning Forks and Amplitude Modulated Quantum Cascade Lasers  

SciTech Connect

We demonstrate the performance of a novel long-wave infrared photoacoustic laser absorbance spectrometer for gas-phase species using an amplitude modulated (AM) quantum cascade (QC) laser and a quartz tuning fork microphone. Photoacoustic signal was generated by focusing the output of a Fabry-Perot QC laser operating at 8.41 ?m between the legs of a quartz tuning fork which served as a transducer for the transient acoustic pressure wave. The QC laser was modulated at the resonant frequency of the tuning fork (32.8 kHz) and delivered a modest 5.3 mW at the tuning fork. This spectrometer was calibrated using the infrared absorber Freon-134a by performing a simultaneous absorption measurement using a 35 cm absorption cell. The NEAS of this instrument was determined to be 2 x 10{sup -8} W cm-1 Hz{sup -1/2}. A corresponding theoretical analysis of the instrument sensitivity is presented and is capable of quantitatively reproducing the experimental NEAS, indicating that the fundamental sensitivity of this technique is limited by the noise floor of the tuning fork itself.

Wojcik, Michael D.; Phillips, Mark C.; Cannon, Bret D.; Taubman, Matthew S.

2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Quantum Nature of a Nuclear Phase Transition  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

At finite temperatures and low densities, nuclei may undergo a phase change similar to a classical liquid-gas phase transition. Temperature is the control parameter while density and pressure are the conjugate variables. In the nucleus the difference between the proton and neutron concentrations acts as an additional order parameter, for which the symmetry potential is the conjugate variable. We present experimental results which reveal the N/Z dependence of the phase transition and discuss possible implications of these observations in terms of the Landau free energy description of critical phenomena.

A. Bonasera; Z. Chen; R. Wada; K. Hagel; J. Natowitz; P. Sahu; L. Qin; S. Kowalski; Th. Keutgen; T. Materna; T. Nakagawa

2008-09-18T23:59:59.000Z

389

Quantum Phase Extraction in Isospectral Electronic Nanostructures  

SciTech Connect

Quantum phase is not a direct observable and is usually determined by interferometric methods. We present a method to map complete electron wave functions, including internal quantum phase information, from measured single-state probability densities. We harness the mathematical discovery of drum-like manifolds bearing different shapes but identical resonances, and construct quantum isospectral nanostructures possessing matching electronic structure but divergent physical structure. Quantum measurement (scanning tunneling microscopy) of these 'quantum drums' [degenerate two-dimensional electron states on the Cu(111) surface confined by individually positioned CO molecules] reveals that isospectrality provides an extra topological degree of freedom enabling robust quantum state transplantation and phase extraction.

Moon, Christopher

2010-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

390

Phase recovery for x-ray crystallography  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

For many years people have believed that in conventional x-ray crystallography one can only record the diffraction intensities but not the phases. In order to obtain the atomic arrangements, one usually has to guess a structure and then fit the intensity data by refining its parameters. Here, we show that the phases are in fact hidden in the intensity data, and can be directly recovered from the peak profiles. This method is demonstrated by the normal two-beam x-ray diffraction of a noncentrosymmetric crystal, and nontrivial phases are recovered from the intensity data alone.

G. Xu, G. E. Zhou, and X. Y. Zhang

1999-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Phase 2, Solid waste retrieval strategy  

SciTech Connect

Solid TRU retrieval, Phase 1 is scheduled to commence operation in 1998 at 218W-4C-T01 and complete recovery of the waste containers in 2001. Phase 2 Retrieval will recover the remaining buried TRU waste to be retrieved and provide the preliminary characterization by non-destructive means to allow interim storage until processing for disposal. This document reports on researching the characterization documents to determine the types of wastes to be retrieved and where located, waste configurations, conditions, and required methods for retrieval. Also included are discussions of wastes encompassed by Phase 2 for which there are valid reasons to not retrieve.

Johnson, D.M.

1994-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

392

Unruh effect, quantum thermometer and geometric phase  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We analyze the properties of the geometric phase of a two level atom system in the case in which the atoms are accelerated by an external potential and in the case in which they interact with a thermal state. Non-trivial values of the geometric phases are obtained. We then propose the realization of an interferometer in which the analysis of Mukunda-Simon phase can demonstrate the existence of the Unruh effect. The realization of a very precise quantum thermometer is also discussed.

A. Capolupo; G. Vitiello

2015-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

393

Chapter 6: Innovation-Focused Policy Framework for TW-Scale PV Deployment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

generators at "avoided cost" [4]. According to the Database of State Incentives for Renewables & Efficiency, and installation, which all have one common goal: to reduce the cost of PV technology and make it an affordable a specific portion can be carved out for solar energy due to its higher cost compared with other renewables

Kammen, Daniel M.

394

e-mail: d9454104@mail.nchu.edu.tw [10][11][12][13][14  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

+ (inverse participation ratio, IPR) #12;289 () 2008 4 1 N k kii I w= (13) IPR 1/ N 1 1/ N () IPR=1/ N 1 0 IPR=1 IPR 3/ N IPR IPR Inverse Participation Ratio IPR, ~3 / 0.013kI N = ( 1

395

516-2007 FAX: 572-4038 E-mail: nthunews@my.nthu.edu.tw  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

22-24 Innovation Award ­Applications /Energy category Wind Power and Solar Power Hybrid System 2008.com 97 12 3 ( )1900-2100 97 12 16 ( )1900-2100 Global Warming and the Energy Crisis http/16 The Pilgrim 12/20 City Lights 12/23 A Woman of Paris 12/27 Limelight 12/30 A King in New York http

Huang, Haimei

396

E-mailwindeal@ms2.hinet.net elink@windeal.com.tw  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. 2. 3. Browsing 4. Searching Quick Search Advanced Search Search Results Search Tips 5. My () Harriet Tubman "Harriet Tubman" () Harriet Tubman Quick Search automobile automobiles Advanced Search Did You Mean? Advanced Search Advanced Search Full text author title 6/12 #12;ABC

Wu, Yih-Min

397

http://www.iis.sinica.edu.tw/~swc/index_c.html DirectX runtime  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Application DirectX DirectX DirectDraw DirectDraw GDI HAL DirectDrawDirectDraw Direct3D 1 #12; 3D API Windows API Win32 Windows API Win32 kernel32.dlluser32.dll gdi32.dll Win32 API Win32

Chen, Sheng-Wei

398

S e c t i o n Tw o Areas of Study and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

as of engineering. Physics of fluids refers to research in areas closer to applied physics than to direct technical The Guggenheim Aeronautical Laboratory, the Kármán Labora- tory of Fluid Mechanics and Jet Propulsion as aerospace. Areas of Research Aerospace has evolved at Caltech from a field of basic research and engineering

Greer, Julia R.

399

S e c t i o n Tw o Areas of Study and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

as a discipline is as much a part of physics as of engineering. Physics of fluids refers to research in areas The Guggenheim Aeronautical Laboratory, the Kármán Labora- tory of Fluid Mechanics and Jet Propulsion from a field of basic research and engineering, primarily related to the development of the air- plane

Greer, Julia R.

400

Solano Phase 3 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Phase 3 Phase 3 Jump to: navigation, search Name Solano Phase 3 Facility Solano Phase 3 Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Sacramento Municipal Utility District Developer Sacramento Municipal Utility District Energy Purchaser Sacramento Municipal Utility District Location Birds Landing CA Coordinates 38.12672486°, -121.8601799° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":38.12672486,"lon":-121.8601799,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tw mw phase" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Cleveland Project Phase 2 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Phase 2 Phase 2 Jump to: navigation, search Name Cleveland Project Phase 2 Facility Cleveland Project Phase 2 Sector Wind energy Facility Type Offshore Wind Facility Status Proposed Developer Lake Erie Energy Development Corporation Location Lake Erie OH Coordinates 41.725°, -81.802° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.725,"lon":-81.802,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

402

Tillamook Windfloat Phase 1 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Windfloat Phase 1 Windfloat Phase 1 Jump to: navigation, search Name Tillamook Windfloat Phase 1 Facility Tillamook Windfloat Phase 1 Sector Wind energy Facility Type Offshore Wind Facility Status Proposed Owner Principle Power Developer Principle Power Location Pacific Ocean OR Coordinates 45.54°, -124.156° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":45.54,"lon":-124.156,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

403

3 Phases Energy Services | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Phases Energy Services Phases Energy Services Jump to: navigation, search Name 3 Phases Energy Services Place California Utility Id 21093 Utility Location Yes Ownership R NERC Location WECC NERC WECC Yes ISO CA Yes Activity Retail Marketing Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png No rate schedules available. Average Rates Residential: $0.1220/kWh Commercial: $0.1090/kWh Industrial: $0.0707/kWh References ↑ "EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=3_Phases_Energy_Services&oldid=678228"

404

Windy Flats Phase III | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Phase III Phase III Jump to: navigation, search Name Windy Flats Phase III Facility Windy Flats Phase III Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status Proposed Owner Cannon Power Group Developer Cannon Power Group Location Goldendale WA Coordinates 45.76201437°, -120.5455971° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":45.76201437,"lon":-120.5455971,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

405

K Basins Sludge Treatment Project Phase 1  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

K Basins Sludge Treatment Project Phase 1 K Basins Sludge Treatment Project Phase 1 Technology Readiness Assessment Report Herb G. Sutter Michael Poirier Art W. Etchells Gary Smith Kris Thomas Jim J. Davis Paul Macbeth November 16, 2009 Prepared by the U.S. Department of Energy Washington, D.C. K Basins Sludge Treatment Project Phase 1 Technology Readiness Assessment Report November 16, 2009 ii Herbert G. Sutter, Team Lead Date Michael Poirier, Team Member Date Arthur W. Etchells, Team Member Date Gary Smith, Team Member Date Kris Thomas, Team Member Date Jim J. Davis, Team Member Date Paul Macbeth, Team Member Date Signatures 11/09/2009 11/09/2009 11/09/2009 K Basins Sludge Treatment Project Phase 1 Technology Readiness Assessment Report November 16, 2009

406

Edison Phase II Compute Cabinets Arrive  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Edison Phase II Compute Cabinets Arrive at NERSC Edison Phase II Compute Cabinets Arrive at NERSC Edison Phase II Compute Cabinets Arrive at NERSC June 27, 2013 by Zhengji Zhao (1 Comments) The compute cabinets were shiped to NERSC between June 24 and 25, 2013.They have been installed on the machine room floor in Oakland. The 28 canbinets that comprise the Phase II system were powered up on June 27, 2013. Post your comment You cannot post comments until you have logged in. Login Here. Comments I re-compiled my program on Edison with Intel compiler. Once submitted the job, the waiting time in the regular queue was very short compared to Hopper. The run on Edison was smooth and with no problems. Comparing the CPU time for the run, I found that the job run almost twice as faster as in Hopper (using PGI compilers). (In Edison it took 111 seconds and in Hopper/PGI 203

407

Exploring topological phases with quantum walks  

SciTech Connect

The quantum walk was originally proposed as a quantum-mechanical analog of the classical random walk, and has since become a powerful tool in quantum information science. In this paper, we show that discrete-time quantum walks provide a versatile platform for studying topological phases, which are currently the subject of intense theoretical and experimental investigations. In particular, we demonstrate that recent experimental realizations of quantum walks with cold atoms, photons, and ions simulate a nontrivial one-dimensional topological phase. With simple modifications, the quantum walk can be engineered to realize all of the topological phases, which have been classified in one and two dimensions. We further discuss the existence of robust edge modes at phase boundaries, which provide experimental signatures for the nontrivial topological character of the system.

Kitagawa, Takuya; Rudner, Mark S.; Berg, Erez; Demler, Eugene [Department of Physics, Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02138 (United States)

2010-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

408

Phase transitions of helium in aerogel  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The effect of dilute quenched impurities on the liquid-vapor critical point, superfluid and He3?He4 phase separation transitions were studied by introducing liquid helium into aerogel. Aerogel is a highly porous ...

M. H. W. Chan

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Nuclear Concrete Materials Database Phase I Development  

SciTech Connect

The FY 2011 accomplishments in Phase I development of the Nuclear Concrete Materials Database to support the Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program are summarized. The database has been developed using the ORNL materials database infrastructure established for the Gen IV Materials Handbook to achieve cost reduction and development efficiency. In this Phase I development, the database has been successfully designed and constructed to manage documents in the Portable Document Format generated from the Structural Materials Handbook that contains nuclear concrete materials data and related information. The completion of the Phase I database has established a solid foundation for Phase II development, in which a digital database will be designed and constructed to manage nuclear concrete materials data in various digitized formats to facilitate electronic and mathematical processing for analysis, modeling, and design applications.

Ren, Weiju [ORNL; Naus, Dan J [ORNL

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

Engineered Phase-Matching for Quantum Photonics  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We demonstrate Gaussian-shaped quasi-phase matching of a nonlinear optical crystal via custom duty-cycle modulation on its grating structure. Our analysis shows this crystal can...

Dixon, P Ben; Shapiro, Jeffrey H; Wong, Franco N

411

Metamorphosis: Phases of UF{sub 6}  

SciTech Connect

A 15-minute videotape is presented. The subject matter is 150 grams of UF{sub 6} sealed in a glass tube. Close-up views show the UF{sub 6} as phase changes are effected by the addition or removal of heat from the closed system. The solid-to-liquid transition is shown as heat is added, both slowly and rapidly. The solid phases which result from freezing and from desublimation are contrasted. In the solid state, uranium hexafluoride is a nearly-white, dense crystalline solid. The appearance of this solid depends on whether it is formed by freezing from the liquid or by desublimation from the vapor phase. If frozen from the liquid, the solid particles take the form of irregularly shaped coarse grains, while the solid product of desublimation tends to be a rather formless mass without individually distinguishable particles. The changes in state are presented in terms of the UF{sub 6} phase diagram.

Dyer, R.H. [Department of Energy, Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

412

Chiral Discotic Columnar Phases in Liquid Crystals  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We introduce a model to describe columnar phases of chiral discotic liquid phases in which the normals to disc-like molecules are constrained to lie parallel to columnar axes. The model includes separate chiral interactions favoring, respectively, relative twist of chiral molecules along the axes of the columns and twist of the two-dimensional columnar lattice. It also includes a coupling between the lattice and the orientation of the discotic molecules. We discuss the instability of the aligned hexagonal lattice phase to the formation of a soliton lattice in which molecules twist within their columns without affecting the lattice and to the formation of a moir\\'{e} phase consisting of a periodic array of twist grain boundaries perpendicular to the columns.

Gu Yan; T. C. Lubensky

1996-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

413

Stormwater Pollution Prevention Plan Seismic Phase II  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Stormwater Pollution Prevention Plan Seismic Phase II Prepared by: Environment, Health and Safety Division Environmental Services Group May 2010 Revision 1 Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National ..................................................................................................................... 15 2.1.1 Demolition of Building 25/25B

414

Picosecond laser timing by rf phase shifting  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

lasers pumped by synchronized mode?locked, Q?switched, cw Nd:YAG lasers. The phase shifter operates with better than 10?ps precision and generates time delays from 0 to 26 ns....

Johnson, Carey K.; Qian, Jun

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

Synthesis of alloys with controlled phase structure  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for preparing controlled phase alloys useful for engineering and hydrogen storage applications. This novel method avoids melting the constituents by employing vapor transport, in a hydrogen atmosphere, of an active metal constituent, having a high vapor pressure at temperatures .apprxeq.300 C. and its subsequent condensation on and reaction with the other constituent (substrate) of an alloy thereby forming a controlled phase alloy and preferably a single phase alloy. It is preferred that the substrate material be a metal powder such that diffusion of the active metal constituent, preferably magnesium, and reaction therewith can be completed within a reasonable time and at temperatures .apprxeq.300 C. thereby avoiding undesirable effects such as sintering, local compositional inhomogeneities, segregation, and formation of unwanted second phases such as intermetallic compounds.

Guthrie, Stephen Everett (Livermore, CA); Thomas, George John (Livermore, CA); Bauer, Walter (Livermore, CA); Yang, Nancy Yuan Chi (Lafayette, CA)

1999-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

416

Synthesis of alloys with controlled phase structure  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is described for preparing controlled phase alloys useful for engineering and hydrogen storage applications. This novel method avoids melting the constituents by employing vapor transport, in a hydrogen atmosphere, of an active metal constituent, having a high vapor pressure at temperatures {approx_equal}300 C and its subsequent condensation on and reaction with the other constituent (substrate) of an alloy thereby forming a controlled phase alloy and preferably a single phase alloy. It is preferred that the substrate material be a metal powder such that diffusion of the active metal constituent, preferably magnesium, and reaction therewith can be completed within a reasonable time and at temperatures {approx_equal}300 C thereby avoiding undesirable effects such as sintering, local compositional inhomogeneities, segregation, and formation of unwanted second phases such as intermetallic compounds. 4 figs.

Guthrie, S.E.; Thomas, G.J.; Bauer, W.; Yang, N.Y.C.

1999-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

417

Adaptive phase measurements for narrowband squeezed beams  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We have previously [Phys. Rev. A 65, 043803 (2002)] analyzed adaptive measurements for estimating the continuously varying phase of a coherent beam, and a broadband squeezed beam. A real squeezed beam must have finite photon flux N and hence can be significantly squeezed only over a limited frequency range. In this paper we analyze adaptive phase measurements of this type for a realistic model of a squeezed beam. We show that, provided it is possible to suitably choose the parameters of the beam, a mean-square phase uncertainty scaling as (N/kappa)^{-5/8} is possible, where kappa is the linewidth of the beam resulting from the fluctuating phase. This is an improvement over the (N/kappa)^{-1/2} scaling found previously for coherent beams. In the experimentally realistic case where there is a limit on the maximum squeezing possible, the variance will be reduced below that for coherent beams, though the scaling is unchanged.

Dominic W. Berry; Howard M. Wiseman

2006-03-22T23:59:59.000Z

418

Phase-Transfer Catalysis: Industrial Perspective  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In the early 1990s, it was estimated that approximately 500 commercial phase-transfer catalysis (PTC) processes were being performed using at least 25 million pounds per year of catalyst. It was also estimated...

Charles M. Starks; Charles L. Liotta; Marc E. Halpern

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

Two phase flow in capillary tubes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The flow of two phases, gas and liquid, has been studied in horizontal tubes of capillary diameter. The flow has been primarily studied in the regime where the gas flows as long bubbles separated from the wall of the tube ...

Suo, Mikio

1963-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

Phase Change Memory An Architecture and Systems Perspective  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

#12;Phase Change Memory Store data within phase change material [Ovshinsky68] Set phase via currentPhase Change Memory An Architecture and Systems Perspective Benjamin Lee Computer Architecture lifetime 1 B.Lee et al. "Architecting phase change memory as a scalable DRAM alternative." ISCA-36

Lee, Benjamin C.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tw mw phase" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Dynamical phase trajectories for relativistic nuclearcollisions  

SciTech Connect

Central collisions of gold nuclei are simulated by severalexisting models and the central net baryon density rho and the energydensity eps are extrac ted at successive times, for beam kinetic energiesof 5-40 GeV per nucleon. The resulting trajectories in the (rho,eps)phase plane are discussed from the perspective of experimentallyexploring the expected first-order hadronization phase transition withthe planned FAIR at GSI or in a low-energy campaign at RHIC.

Arsene, I.C.; Bravina, L.V.; Cassing, W.; Ivanov, Yu.B.; Larionov, A.; Randrup, J.; Russkikh, V.N.; Toneev, V.D.; Zeeb, G.; Zschiesche, D.

2006-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

422

Robust phase sensitive inversion recovery imaging  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in all the cases was maintained constant with maximum variation rate of 0:026 cycles per pixel. : : : : : : : : 43 19 Phasesensitivereconstructionofimagewithveryhighbackground phase variation rate using block merging algorithm. (a) True image, (b) Real... re- construction, (d) PSIR image obtained using block merging algorithm. 46 21 Error vs. SNR plot for the region growing algorithm. The back- ground phase variation in all the cases was maintained constant with maximum variation rate of 0:026 cycles...

Garach, Ravindra Mahendrakumar

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

Polarized neutron reflectometry with phase analysis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A novel technique, polarized neutron reflectometry with phase analysis (PNRPA), is suggested, in which not only the moduli of reflection matrix elements but also up to three phase differences are measured. It is realized in the scheme with two flippers and an analyzer, by reflection of neutrons with the spin, in succession, parallel and antiparallel to two inclined axes fixed to the sample. More detailed information about magnetic layered structures can be thus obtained. An adequate mathematical formalism is given.

N.K. Pleshanov

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

Deformation of C15 Laves phase alloys  

SciTech Connect

Details of the structure and previous work on the deformation of C Laves phases are reviewed. The phase diagram of the Hf-V-Nb system, some metallurgical and physical properties, mechanical behavior, and the deformation mechanisms of HfV{sub 2}+Nb (CI5 HfV{sub 2}+Nb and V-rich bcc solution) are presented based on our previous work. Theoretical approaches to understanding the results of these studies are discussed.

Chu, F.; Pope, D.P.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

425

Acoustically enhanced remediation, Phase 2: Technology scaling  

SciTech Connect

Weiss Associates is conducting the following three phase program investigating the in-situ application of acoustically enhanced remediation (AER) of contaminated unconsolidated soil and ground water under both saturated and unsaturated conditions: Phase I-- laboratory scale parametric investigation; Phase II--technology Scaling; and Phase III--large scale field tests. AER addresses the need for NAPL (either lighter or denser than water: LNAPL or DNAPL, respectively) in high and low permeability sediments, and the remediation of other types of subsurface contaminants (e.g., metals, radionuclides) in low permeability soils. This program has been placed in the U.S. Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) DNAPL product. Phase I indicated that AER could be used to effectively remediate NAPL in high permeability soil, and that removal of NAPL from low permeability soil could be increased since the water flux through these soils was significantly increased. Phase II, Technology Scaling, the subject of this paper, focused on (1) evaluating the characteristics of an AER field deployment system, (2) developing DNAPL flow and transport performance data under acoustic excitation, (3) predicting the effect of acoustic remediation in three-dimensional unconsolidated hydrogeologic conditions, (4) conducting an engineering analysis of acoustical sources, and (5) identifying candidate field site(s) for large-scale field testing of the technology.

Iovenitti, J.L.; Hill, D.G. [Weiss Associates, Emeryville, CA (United States); Rynne, T.M.; Spadaro, J.F.; Hutchinson, W. [Scientific Applications and Research Associates, Inc., Huntington Beach, CA (United States); Illangasakere, T. [Colorado Univ., Boulder, CO (United States). Dept. of Civil, Environmental, and Architectural Engineering

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

426

Overpotential-Dependent Phase Transformation Pathways  

SciTech Connect

An objective in battery development for higher storage energy density is the design of compounds that can accommodate maximum changes in ion concentration over useful electrochemical windows. Not surprisingly, many storage compounds undergo phase transitions in situ, including production of metastable phases. Unique to this environment is the frequent application of electrical over- and underpotentials, which are the electrical analogs to undercooling and superheating. Surprisingly, overpotential effects on phase stability and transformation mechanisms have not been studied in detail. Here we use synchrotron X-ray diffraction performed in situ during potentiostatic and galvanostatic cycling, combined with phase-field modeling, to reveal a remarkable dependence of phase transition pathway on overpotential in the model olivine Li{sub 1-x}FePO{sub 4}. For a sample of particle size {approx}113 nm, at both low (e.g., <20 mV) and high (>75 mV) overpotentials a crystal-to-crystal olivine transformation dominates, whereas at intermediate overpotentials a crystalline-to-amorphous phase transition is preferred. As particle sizes decrease to the nanoscale, amorphization is further emphasized. Implications for battery use and design are considered.

Y Kao; M Tang; N Meethong; J Bai; W Carter; Y Chiang

2011-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

427

The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) Refrigerator System at Brookhaven National Laboratory: Phase III of the System Performance and Operations Upgrades for 2006  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

An ongoing program at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) consists of improving the efficiency of the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) cryogenic system and reducing its power consumption. Phase I and II of the program addressed plant operational improvements and modifications that resulted in substantial operational cost reduction and improved system reliability and stability and a compressor input power reduction of 2 MW has been demonstrated. Phase III now under way consists of plans for further increasing the efficiency of the plant by adding a load wet turbo?expander and its associated heat exchangers at the low temperature end of the plant. This additional stage of cooling at the coldest level will further reduce the required compressor flow and therefore compressor power input. This paper presents the results of the plant characterization as it is operating presently as well as the results of the plant simulations of the various planned upgrades for the plant. The immediate upgrade includes the changes associated with the load expander. The subsequent upgrade will involve the resizing of expander 5 and 6 to increase their efficiencies. The paper summarizes the expected improvement in the plant efficiency and the overall reduction in the compressor power.

A. Sidi?Yekhlef; R. Than; J. Tuozzolo; V. Ganni; P. Knudsen; D. Arenius

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

Crystallization of Ge2Sb2Te5 nanometric phase change material clusters made by gas-phase condensation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Crystallization of Ge2Sb2Te5 nanometric phase change material clusters made by gas- phase=pdfcov Published by the AIP Publishing Articles you may be interested in Nanoscale nuclei in phase change materials phase change material clusters made by gas-phase condensation G. E. Ghezzi,1,2 R. Morel,3 A. Brenac,3 N

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

429

Thermal Performance of Phase Change Wallboard for Residential Cooling Application  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

H. Manz; "Theory of Phase Change Materials with and withoutand A.K. Sircar; "Phase Change Materials for Heating andContaining a Phase Change Material", Proceedings of the 25th

Feustel, H.E.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

An economical optical system design using phase diversity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The resolution of an incoherent imaging system is olden limited aberrations. Phase aberrations by phase arise from a variety of sources including atmospheric turbulence, misaligned optical and improper mirror figure. Knowledge of phase aberrations...

Thosani, Samir C.

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

431

Face recognition with disparity corrected gabor phase differences  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We analyze the relative relevance of Gabor amplitudes and phases for face recognition. We propose an algorithm to reliably estimate offset point disparities from phase differences and show that disparity-corrected Gabor phase differences are well suited ...

Manuel Gnther; Dennis Haufe; Rolf P. Wrtz

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

GTC Phase-2 Preparation Tool Gran Telescopio Canarias  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

GTC Phase-2 Preparation Tool 1 Gran Telescopio Canarias Phase-2 Preparation Tool Valid from period describes how to use the Phase-2 tool for preparing observations at the Gran Telescopio CANARIAS (GTC). Each

433

Phase-Transfer Catalysis: Chiral Phase-Transfer-Catalyzed Formation of Carbon-Carbon Bonds  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

It is only within the last two decades that heterogeneous enantioselective syntheses involving chiral phase-transfer catalysts (quaternary ammonium and phosphonium salts, macrocyclic miltidentate ligands, poly...

Charles M. Starks; Charles L. Liotta; Marc E. Halpern

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

OPTICAL PHASE CURVES OF KEPLER EXOPLANETS  

SciTech Connect

We conducted a comprehensive search for optical phase variations of all close-in (a/R{sub *} < 10) planet candidates in 15 quarters of Kepler space telescope data. After correcting for systematics, we found eight systems that show secondary eclipses as well as phase variations. Of these, five (Kepler-5, Kepler-6, Kepler-8, KOI-64, and KOI-2133) are new and three (TrES-2, HAT-P-7, and KOI-13) have published phase curves, albeit with many fewer observations. We model the full phase curve of each planet candidate, including the primary and secondary transits, and derive their albedos, dayside and nightside temperatures, ellipsoidal variations, and Doppler beaming. We find that KOI-64 and KOI-2133 have nightside temperatures well above their equilibrium values (while KOI-2133 also has an albedo, >1), so we conclude that they are likely to be self-luminous objects rather than planets. The other six candidates have characteristics consistent with their being planets with low geometric albedos (<0.3). For TrES-2 and KOI-13, the Kepler bandpass appears to probe atmospheric layers hotter than the planet's equilibrium temperature. For KOI-13, we detect a never-before-seen third cosine harmonic with an amplitude of 6.7 {+-} 0.3 ppm and a phase shift of -1.1 {+-} 0.1 rad in the phase curve residual, possibly due to its spin-orbit misalignment. We report derived planetary parameters for all six planets, including masses from ellipsoidal variations and Doppler beaming, and compare our results to published values when available. Our results nearly double the number of Kepler exoplanets with measured phase curve variations, thus providing valuable constraints on the properties of hot Jupiters.

Esteves, Lisa J.; De Mooij, Ernst J. W.; Jayawardhana, Ray, E-mail: esteves@astro.utoronto.ca, E-mail: demooij@astro.utoronto.ca, E-mail: rayjay@astro.utoronto.ca [Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of Toronto, 50 St. George Street, Toronto, Ontario M5S 3H4 (Canada)

2013-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

435

Project Profile: Innovative Phase Change Thermal Energy Storage...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Phase Change Thermal Energy Storage Solution for Baseload Power Project Profile: Innovative Phase Change Thermal Energy Storage Solution for Baseload Power Infinia logo Infinia,...

436

Two-Phase Cooling Technology for Power Electronics with Novel...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Two-Phase Cooling Technology for Power Electronics with Novel Coolants Two-Phase Cooling Technology for Power Electronics with Novel Coolants 2011 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells...

437

Novel and Optimized Materials Phases for High Energy Density...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Novel and Optimized Materials Phases for High Energy Density Batteries Novel and Optimized Materials Phases for High Energy Density Batteries 2013 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells...

438

BSU GHP District Heating and Cooling System (Phase I) | Department...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

BSU GHP District Heating and Cooling System (Phase I) BSU GHP District Heating and Cooling System (Phase I) Project objectives: Create a campus geothermal heating and cooling...

439

SPIDERS JCTD Phase 3 Status and Way Ahead  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

NAVFAC UNCLASSIFIED UNCLASSIFIED Page-2 Phase 3 Objectives * Phase 3 is the entire Camp Smith installation * Multiple integrated microgrids will support mission Integration of...

440

Advanced Collaborative Emissions Study (ACES): Phase 2 Status...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

: Phase 2 Status Report Advanced Collaborative Emissions Study (ACES): Phase 2 Status Report Discusses status of ACES, a cooperative multi-party effort to characterize emissions...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tw mw phase" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Phase 1 of the Advanced Collaborative Emissions Study (ACES)...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Phase 1 of the Advanced Collaborative Emissions Study (ACES): Highlights of Project Finding Phase 1 of the Advanced Collaborative Emissions Study (ACES): Highlights of Project...

442

Advanced Envelope Research for Factory Built Housing, Phase 3...  

Energy Savers (EERE)

Advanced Envelope Research for Factory Built Housing, Phase 3-Design Development and Prototyping Advanced Envelope Research for Factory Built Housing, Phase 3-Design Development...

443

Equivalence of cost generators for minimum cost flow phase unwrapping  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Phase unwrapping represents a crucial step in processing phase data obtained with techniques such as synthetic aperture radar interferometry, speckle interferometry, and magnetic...

Hubig, Michael; Suchandt, Steffen; Adam, Nico

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

Used Fuel Disposition Campaign Phase I Ring Compression Testing...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Phase I Ring Compression Testing of High Burnup Cladding Used Fuel Disposition Campaign Phase I Ring Compression Testing of High Burnup Cladding The purpose of ring compression...

445

In Situ TEM Investigation of Congruent Phase Transition and Structural...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of Congruent Phase Transition and Structural Evolution of Nanostructured SiliconCarbon Anode for In Situ TEM Investigation of Congruent Phase Transition and Structural Evolution...

446

K Basins Sludge Treatment Project Phase 1 | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

K Basins Sludge Treatment Project Phase 1 K Basins Sludge Treatment Project Phase 1 Full Document and Summary Versions are available for download K Basins Sludge Treatment Project...

447

First-principles calculations of the electronic structure, phase...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

calculations of the electronic structure, phase transition and properties of ZrSiO4 polymorphs. First-principles calculations of the electronic structure, phase transition and...

448

DECOUPLED ENERGY STABLE SCHEMES FOR A PHASE-FIELD ...  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Phase-field, two-phase flow, Navier-Stokes, variable density, stability, energy stable ... numerical simulations, including the dynamics of an air bubble rising in

2014-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

449

Diffraction Phase Cytometry: blood on a CD-ROM  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We demonstrate Diffraction Phase Cytometry (DPC) as a single shot, full-field, high throughput quantitative phase imaging modality, dedicated to analyzing whole blood smears. Utilizing...

Mir, Mustafa; Wang, Zhuo; Tangella, Krishnarao; Popescu, Gabriel

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

Factors Affecting HCCI Combustion Phasing for Fuels with Single...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Affecting HCCI Combustion Phasing for Fuels with Single- and Dual-Stage Chemistry Factors Affecting HCCI Combustion Phasing for Fuels with Single- and Dual-Stage Chemistry 2004...

451

Study of second phase in bioabsorbable magnesium alloys: Phase stability evaluation via Dmol{sup 3} calculation  

SciTech Connect

Thermodynamical stabilities of four conventional second phases as well as magnesium matrix in bioabsorbable magnesium alloys were investigated theoretically via computer calculation method. Model of individual phase and systems including phase and four water molecular (phase-4H{sub 2}O) were established to simulate the in vitro and in vivo environment. Local orbital density functional theory approach was applied to calculate the total energy for the individual phase and phase-4H{sub 2}O system. The results demonstrated that all the second phases possessed higher phase stability compared with magnesium matrix, but the phase stability was quite different for different types of second phases or second phase-4H{sub 2}O systems. Furthermore, a schematic process of inflammation reaction caused by magnesium alloy implants was proposed for the further evaluation on biocompatibility of different second phases.

Yang, Huazhe [Institute of Metal Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shenyang 110016 (China); Department of Biophysics, China Medical University, Shenyang 110001 (China); Liu, Chen [Institute of Metal Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shenyang 110016 (China); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Nanjing University of Science and Technology, Nanjing 210094 (China); Wan, Peng; Tan, Lili; Yang, Ke, E-mail: kyang@imr.ac.cn [Institute of Metal Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shenyang 110016 (China)

2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

452

Phase transformations in Cu-Zr multilayers  

SciTech Connect

A study of phase transformations is reported for Cu-rich, Cu-Zr multilayer foils synthesized using magnetron sputter deposition and annealed using a differential scanning calorimeter. The foils range in composition from 1.6 to 9.0 at% Zr and consist of alternate layers of polycrystalline Cu and Zr. Differential scanning calorimetry, X-ray analysis and electron microscopy were used to three distinct reactions in the foils: a mixing and an amorphization of the Cu and die Zr, a crystallization on of this amorphous phase to the metastable intermetallic Cu{sub 5l}Zr{sub l4}, and a transformation of the Cu{sub 5l}Zr{sub l4} phase into the equilibrium phase Cu{sub 9}Zr{sub 2}. The as-deposited layering remained stable during the first two reactions and then broke down in the third reaction as large grains of Cu{sub 9}Zr{sub 2} encompassed the smaller Cu grains. Heats of the reactions and activation energies of these reactions are measured and are compared to values reported for bulk samples. The measured heats provide evidence that amorphous Cu-Zr alloys phase separate and that mixing and short range ordering produce 3.5 times more heat than long range ordering produces when Ca and Zr react and form Cu{sub 5l}Zr{sub l4}.

Weihs, T.P.; Barbee, T.W. Jr.; Wall, M.A.

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

453

Cummins Power Generation SECA Phase 1  

SciTech Connect

The following report documents the progress of the Cummins Power Generation (CPG) SECA Phase 1 SOFC development and final testing under the U.S. Department of Energy Solid State Energy Conversion Alliance (SECA) contract DE-FC26-01NT41244. This report overviews and summarizes CPG and partner research development leading to successful demonstration of the SECA Phase 1 objectives and significant progress towards SOFC commercialization. Significant Phase 1 Milestones: (1) Demonstrated: (a) Operation meeting Phase 1 requirements on commercial natural gas. (b) LPG and Natural Gas CPOX fuel reformers. (c) SOFC systems on dry CPOX reformate. (c) Steam reformed Natural Gas operation. (d) Successful start-up and shut-down of SOFC system without inert gas purge. (e) Utility of stack simulators as a tool for developing balance of plant systems. (2) Developed: (a) Low cost balance of plant concepts and compatible systems designs. (b) Identified low cost, high volume components for balance of plant systems. (c) Demonstrated high efficiency SOFC output power conditioning. (d) Demonstrated SOFC control strategies and tuning methods. The Phase 1 performance test was carried out at the Cummins Power Generation facility in Minneapolis, Minnesota starting on October 2, 2006. Performance testing was successfully completed on January 4, 2007 including the necessary steady-state, transient, efficiency, and peak power operation tests.

Charles Vesely

2007-08-17T23:59:59.000Z

454

Phase Transformations in Binary Colloidal Monolayers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Phase transformations can be difficult to characterize at the microscopic level due to the inability to directly observe individual atomic motions. Model colloidal systems, by contrast, permit the direct observation of individual particle dynamics and of collective rearrangements, which allows for real-space characterization of phase transitions. Here, we study a quasi-two-dimensional, binary colloidal alloy that exhibits liquid-solid and solid-solid phase transitions, focusing on the kinetics of a diffusionless transformation between two crystal phases. Experiments are conducted on a monolayer of magnetic and nonmagnetic spheres suspended in a thin layer of ferrofluid and exposed to a tunable magnetic field. A theoretical model of hard spheres with point dipoles at their centers is used to guide the choice of experimental parameters and characterize the underlying materials physics. When the applied field is normal to the fluid layer, a checkerboard crystal forms; when the angle between the field and the normal is sufficiently large, a striped crystal assembles. As the field is slowly tilted away from the normal, we find that the transformation pathway between the two phases depends strongly on crystal orientation, field strength, and degree of confinement of the monolayer. In some cases, the pathway occurs by smooth magnetostrictive shear, while in others it involves the sudden formation of martensitic plates.

Ye Yang; Lin Fu; Catherine Marcoux; Joshua E. S. Socolar; Patrick Charbonneau; Benjamin B. Yellen

2015-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

455

Innovative Clean Coal Technology (ICCT): 500 MW demonstration of advanced wall-fired combustion techniques for the reduction of nitrogen oxide (NO{sub x}) emissions from coal-fired boilers. Technical progress report, fourth quarter 1991  

SciTech Connect

This quarterly report discusses the technical progress of an Innovative Clean Coal Technology (ICCT) demonstration of advanced wall-fired combustion techniques for the reduction of nitrogen oxide (NO{sub x}) emissions from coal-fired boilers. The project is being conducted at Georgia Power Company`s Plant Hammond Unit 4 located near Rome, Georgia. The primary goal of this project is the characterization of the low NO{sub x} combustion equipment through the collection and analysis of long-term emissions data. A target of achieving fifty percent NO{sub x} reduction using combustion modifications has been established for the project. The project provides a stepwise retrofit of an advanced overfire air (AOFA) system followed by low NO{sub x} burners (LNB). During each test phase of the project, diagnostic, performance, long-term, and verification testing will be performed. These tests are used to quantify the NO{sub x} reductions of each technology and evaluate the effects of those reductions on other combustion parameters such as parameters such as particulate characteristics and boiler efficiency.

Not Available

1992-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

456

Innovative Clean Coal Technology (ICCT): 500 MW demonstration of advanced wall-fired combustion techniques for the reduction of nitrogen oxide (NO{sub x}) emissions from coal-fired boilers. Technical progress report, Second quarter 1992  

SciTech Connect

This quarterly report discusses the technical progress of an Innovative Clean Coal Technology (ICCT) demonstration of advanced wall-fired combustion techniques for the reduction of nitrogen oxide (No{sub x}) emissions from coal-fired boilers. The project is being conducted at Georgia Power Company`s Plant Hammond Unit 4 located near Rome, Georgia. The primary goal of this project is the characterization of the low NO{sub x} combustion equipment through the collection and analysis of long-term emissions data. A target of achieving fifty percent NO{sub x} reduction using combustion modifications has been established for the project. The project provides a stepwise retrofit of an advanced overfire air (AOFA) system followed by low NO{sub x} burners (LNB). During each test phase of the project, diagnostic, performance, long-term, and verification testing will be performed. These tests are used to quantify the NO{sub x} reductions of each technology and evaluate the effects of those reductions on other combustion parameters such as particulate characteristics and boiler efficiency.

Not Available

1992-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

457

Innovative Clean Coal Technology (ICCT): 500 MW demonstration of advanced wall-fired combustion techniques for the reduction of nitrogen oxide (NO{sub x}) emissions from coal-fired boilers. Technical progress report, First quarter 1992  

SciTech Connect

This quarterly report discusses the technical progress of an Innovative Clean Coal Technology (ICCT) demonstration of advanced wall-fired combustion techniques for the reduction of nitrogen oxide (NO{sub x}) emissions from coal-fired boilers. The project is being conducted at Georgia Power Company`s Plant Hammond Unit 4 located near Rome, Georgia. The primary goal of this project is the characterization of the low NO{sub x} combustion equipment through the collection and analysis of long-term emissions data. A target of achieving fifty percent NO{sub x} reduction using combustion modifications has been established for the project. The project provides a stepwise retrofit of an advanced overfire air (AOFA) system followed by low NO{sub x} burners (LNB). During each test phase of the project, diagnostic, performance, long-term, and verification testing will be performed. These tests are used to quantify the NO{sub x} reductions of each technology and evaluate the effects of those reductions on other combustion parameters such as particulate characteristics and boiler efficiency.

Not Available

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

458

Innovative Clean Coal Technology (ICCT): 500 MW demonstration of advanced wall-fired combustion techniques for the reduction of nitrogen oxide (NO[sub x]) emissions from coal-fired boilers  

SciTech Connect

This quarterly report discusses the technical progress of an Innovative Clean Coal Technology (ICCT) demonstration of advanced wall-fired combustion techniques for the reduction of nitrogen oxide (No[sub x]) emissions from coal-fired boilers. The project is being conducted at Georgia Power Company's Plant Hammond Unit 4 located near Rome, Georgia. The primary goal of this project is the characterization of the low NO[sub x] combustion equipment through the collection and analysis of long-term emissions data. A target of achieving fifty percent NO[sub x] reduction using combustion modifications has been established for the project. The project provides a stepwise retrofit of an advanced overfire air (AOFA) system followed by low NO[sub x] burners (LNB). During each test phase of the project, diagnostic, performance, long-term, and verification testing will be performed. These tests are used to quantify the NO[sub x] reductions of each technology and evaluate the effects of those reductions on other combustion parameters such as particulate characteristics and boiler efficiency.

Not Available

1992-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

459

Innovative Clean Coal Technology (ICCT): 500 MW demonstration of advanced wall-fired combustion techniques for the reduction of nitrogen oxide (NO sub x ) emissions from coal-fired boilers  

SciTech Connect

This quarterly report discusses the technical progress of an Innovative Clean Coal Technology (ICCT) demonstration of advanced wall-fired combustion techniques for the reduction of nitrogen oxide (NO{sub x}) emissions from coal-fired boilers. The project is being conducted at Georgia Power Company's Plant Hammond Unit 4 located near Rome, Georgia. The primary goal of this project is the characterization of the low NO{sub x} combustion equipment through the collection and analysis of long-term emissions data. A target of achieving fifty percent NO{sub x} reduction using combustion modifications has been established for the project. The project provides a stepwise retrofit of an advanced overfire air (AOFA) system followed by low NO{sub x} burners (LNB). During each test phase of the project, diagnostic, performance, long-term, and verification testing will be performed. These tests are used to quantify the NO{sub x} reductions of each technology and evaluate the effects of those reductions on other combustion parameters such as parameters such as particulate characteristics and boiler efficiency.

Not Available

1992-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

460

KODE Novus Phase I | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

KODE Novus Phase I KODE Novus Phase I Facility KODE Novus Phase I Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner DeWind Developer DeWind Energy Purchaser Xcel Energy Location Guymon OK Coordinates 36.530381°, -101.365947° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":36.530381,"lon":-101.365947,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tw mw phase" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

KODE Novus Phase II | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

KODE Novus Phase II KODE Novus Phase II Facility KODE Novus Phase II Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner DeWind Developer DeWind Energy Purchaser Xcel Energy Location Guymon OK Coordinates 36.53170885°, -101.3325691° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":36.53170885,"lon":-101.3325691,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

462

Protein folding, anisotropic collapse and blue phases  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study a homopolymer model of a protein chain, where each monomer carries a dipole moment. To mimic the geometry of the peptidic bond, these dipoles are constrained to be locally perpendicular to the chain. The tensorial character of the dipolar interaction leads naturally to a (tensorial) liquid crystal-like order parameter. For non chiral chains, a mean field study of this model shows that a classical $\\theta$ collapse transition occurs first; at lower temperature, nematic order sets in. For chiral chains, an anisotropic (tensorial) collapse transition may occur before the $\\theta$ temperature is reached: the ordered phase can be described as a ``compact phase of secondary structures'', and possesses great similarities with the liquid crystal blue phases.

E. Pitard; T. Garel; H. Orland

1997-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

463

Friction forces on phase transition fronts  

SciTech Connect

In cosmological first-order phase transitions, the microscopic interaction of the phase transition fronts with non-equilibrium plasma particles manifests itself macroscopically as friction forces. In general, it is a nontrivial problem to compute these forces, and only two limits have been studied, namely, that of very slow walls and, more recently, ultra-relativistic walls which run away. In this paper we consider ultra-relativistic velocities and show that stationary solutions still exist when the parameters allow the existence of runaway walls. Hence, we discuss the necessary and sufficient conditions for the fronts to actually run away. We also propose a phenomenological model for the friction, which interpolates between the non-relativistic and ultra-relativistic values. Thus, the friction depends on two friction coefficients which can be calculated for specific models. We then study the velocity of phase transition fronts as a function of the friction parameters, the thermodynamic parameters, and the amount of supercooling.

Mgevand, Ariel, E-mail: megevand@mdp.edu.ar [IFIMAR (CONICETUNMdP), Departamento de Fsica, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, UNMdP, Den Funes 3350, (7600) Mar del Plata (Argentina)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

464

Program predicts two-phase pressure gradients  

SciTech Connect

The calculator program discussed, ORK, was designed for the HP-41CV hand-held calculator and uses the Orkiszewski correlation for predicting 2-phase pressure gradients in vertical tubulars. Accurate predictions of pressure gradients in flowing and gas lift wells over a wide range of well conditions can be obtained with this method, which was developed based on data from 148 wells. The correlation is one of the best generalized 2-phase pressure gradient prediction methods developed to date for vertical flow. It is unique in that hold-up is derived from observed physical phenomena, and the pressure gradient is related to the geometrical distribution of the liquid and gas phase (flow regime).

Jacks, D.C.; Hill, A.D.

1983-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

465

Wind Turbine Drivetrain Condition Monitoring During GRC Phase 1 and Phase 2 Testing  

SciTech Connect

This report will present the wind turbine drivetrain condition monitoring (CM) research conducted under the phase 1 and phase 2 Gearbox Reliability Collaborative (GRC) tests. The rationale and approach for this drivetrain CM research, investigated CM systems, test configuration and results, and a discussion on challenges in wind turbine drivetrain CM and future research and development areas, will be presented.

Sheng, S.; Link, H.; LaCava, W.; van Dam, J.; McNiff, B.; Veers, P.; Keller, J.; Butterfield, S.; Oyague, F.

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

466

Microscopic mechanisms of metastable phase formation during ball milling of intermetallic TiAl phases  

SciTech Connect

Powders of the intermetallic equilibrium phases {alpha}{sub 2}-Ti{sub 3}Al, {gamma}-TiAl and TiAl{sub 3} were ball milled in order to investigate the microscopic origins of the energetic destabilization and the transformation into metastable phases during the milling process. It was found that the intermetallic phases were chemically partially disordered on milling followed by the transformation into solid solution phases after long milling. In detail, for the {gamma} phase, the formation of numerous deformation twins, thin h.c.p. lamellae and lamellae of the 9R phase formed by an antitwin operation was observed by TEM. The disordering of the D0{sub 22}-TiAl{sub 3} phase occurred inhomogeneously in the material via the formation of antiphase boundaries on (001) planes, resulting in a f.c.c. solid solution in the final state. In summary, it can be concluded that the formation of the observed metastable phases results from chemical disordering, whereas the excess enthalpy of grain boundaries plays only a minor role for the energetical destabilization of the intermetallic compounds during milling in this case.

Klassen, T.; Oehring, M.; Bormann, R. [GKSS Research Centre, Geesthacht (Germany)] [GKSS Research Centre, Geesthacht (Germany)

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

467

Phase boundary detection for dilution refrigerators  

SciTech Connect

We describe a device to conveniently measure the positions of the phase boundaries in a dilution refrigerator. We show how a simple modification of a standard capacitive level gauge (segmentation of one of the electrodes) permits a direct calibration of the capacitance versus phase boundary position. We compare this direct calibration with the indirect procedure that must be adopted for a conventional capacitive level gauge. The device facilitates the correct adjustment of the {sup 3}He/{sup 4}He fraction in the dilution refrigerator.

Haar, E. ter; Martin, R.V. [DFMT, Instituto de Fisica, Universidade de Sao Paulo, C.P. 66.318, 05315-970 Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

2004-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

468

Systematic Classification of Phase Contours and Zeros  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A systematic classification of phases contours and zeros is introduced and their effect on asymptotic behavior investigated. A constraint is found on the spacing of closed contours if they are not to contribute to asymptotic behavior. Use is made of a theorem due to Plya and Szeg about entire functions with real negative zeros. The concept of topological equivalence of phase contour maps is discussed. The theorem due to Plya and Szeg is applied to the fixed-angle scattering amplitude with the assumption that certain kinds of contours or zeros dominate this leads to a constraint on the order of the entire function by which the amplitude may be approximated.

G. D. Kaiser

1969-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

469

Cavity-QED-based quantum phase gate  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

are detuned by an amount D from the cavity mode 1, i.e., vbc5n11D . A quantum phase gate with a p phase shift is implemented if the atom in its ground state uc& passes through the cavity such that ~1! the detuning D is equal to g2, and ~2! the interaction...- lowing. The effective Hamiltonian for the interaction, in the di- pole and rotating-wave approximations, is H5H01H1 , ~3! where H05\

Zubairy, M. Suhail; Kim, M.; Scully, Marlan O.

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

470

Gravitational Phase Transition of Heavy Neutrino Matter  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study the phase transition of a system of self-gravitating neutrinos in the presence of a large radiation density background in the framework of the Thomas-Fermi model. We show that, by cooling a non-degenerate gas of massive neutrinos below some critical temperature, a condensed phase emerges, consisting of quasi-degenerate supermassive neutrino stars. These compact dark objects could play an important role in structure formation in this universe, as they might in fact provide the seeds for galactic nuclei and quasi-stellar objects.

Neven Bilic; Raoul D. Viollier

1996-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

471

Frustrated phase separation and high temperature superconductivity  

SciTech Connect

A dilute system of neutral holes in an antiferromagnet separates into a hole-rich and a hole-poor phase. The phase separation is frustrated by long-range Coulomb interactions but, provided the dielectric constant is sufficiently large, there remain large-amplitude low-energy fluctuations in the hole density at intermediate length scales. The extensive experimental evidence showing that this behavior giver, a reasonable picture of high temperature superconductors is surveyed. Further, it is shown that the scattering of mobile holes from the local density fluctuations may account for the anomalous normal-state properties of high temperature superconductors and also provide the mechanism of pairing.

Emery, V.J. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); Kivelson, S.A. [California Univ., Los Angeles, CA (United States). Dept. of Physics

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

472

Frustrated phase separation and high temperature superconductivity  

SciTech Connect

A dilute system of neutral holes in an antiferromagnet separates into a hole-rich and a hole-poor phase. The phase separation is frustrated by long-range Coulomb interactions but, provided the dielectric constant is sufficiently large, there remain large-amplitude low-energy fluctuations in the hole density at intermediate length scales. The extensive experimental evidence showing that this behavior giver, a reasonable picture of high temperature superconductors is surveyed. Further, it is shown that the scattering of mobile holes from the local density fluctuations may account for the anomalous normal-state properties of high temperature superconductors and also provide the mechanism of pairing.

Emery, V.J. (Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)); Kivelson, S.A. (California Univ., Los Angeles, CA (United States). Dept. of Physics)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

473

Hybrid phase shifted carrier modulation fed five-phase multilevel inverter for multiphase induction motor drive  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper proposes an energy efficient modulation scheme suitable for multilevel inverter fed five-phase induction motor. Five-phase multilevel inverter provides good quality five-phase variable voltage and variable frequency supply to five-phase induction motor, which ensure reduced torque ripple and improved drive efficiency. This modulation inherits the features of fundamental frequency modulation and phase shifted carrier modulation in power conversion and resolves the contradiction between high frequency and accuracy in a digital control scheme. Base modulator and hybrid formulation control algorithms are realised with TMS320F2407 DSP processor and Xilinx XC95108 CPLD controllers. The performance studies with induction motor are evaluated in terms of power loss, weighted total harmonic distortion and torque ripple. Selected simulation and experiment results are reported to verify and validate the effectiveness of the proposed technique.

C. Govindaraju

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

474

doi: 10.3319/TAO.2011.09.23.02(T) * Corresponding author  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

doi: 10.3319/TAO.2011.09.23.02(T) * Corresponding author E-mail: cchan@ntu.edu.tw Terr. Atmos, directivity, high fault strength, a slapdown phase, and hanging wall effect. The Darfield sequence case

Wu, Yih-Min

475

180 MW demonstration of advanced tangentially-fired combustion techniques for the reduction of nitrogen oxide (NOx) emissions from coal-fired boilers. Technical progress report, First quarter 1991  

SciTech Connect

This project is being conducted at Gulf Power Company`s Plant Lansing Smith Unit 2 (LS-2) located near Panama City, Florida. The primary objective of this demonstration is to determine the long-term effects of commercially available tangentially-fired low NOx combustion technologies on NOx emissions and boiler performance. The stepwise approach that is being used to evaluate the NOx control technologies requires three plant outages to successively install the test instrumentation and the different levels of the low NOx concentric firing system (LNCFS). Following each outage, a series of four groups of tests are performed. These are (1) diagnostic, (2) performance, (3) long-term, and (4) verification. These tests are used to quantify the NOx reductions of each technology and evaluate the effects of those reductions on other combustion parameters such as particulate characteristics and boiler efficiency. This quarterly update provides a description of the flow modeling study. This modeling effort centers on evaluating the in-furnace flow and mixing phenomena for the various low NOx firing systems being demonstrated at LS-2. Testing on the 1/12 scale model of the LS-2 boiler and the 1/6 scale model of the overfire air ductwork was completed. The test matrix included an analysis of the overfire air ductwork and three different boiler configurations. This report also contains results from the Phase 1 baseline tests. Data from the diagnostic, performance, and verification tests are presented. In addition, NOx emissions data and unit load profiles collected during long-term testing are reported. At the full load condition, the baseline NOx emission level at LS-2 is 0.62 lb/mBtu.

Not Available

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

476

A review on Phase Change Materials Integrated in Building Walls  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A review on Phase Change Materials Integrated in Building Walls Fr´ed´eric Kuznika, , Damien Davida review of the integration of phase change materials in building walls. Many considerations are discussed in this paper including physical considerations about building envelop and phase change material, phase change

477

Electrochemical investigations of various high-temperature superconductor phases  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Electrochemical investigations of various high-temperature superconductor phases ... Electrochemistry of High-Temperature Superconductor