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1

Brigantine OffshoreMW Phase 1 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Brigantine OffshoreMW Phase 1 Brigantine OffshoreMW Phase 1 Jump to: navigation, search Name Brigantine OffshoreMW Phase 1 Facility Brigantine OffshoreMW Phase 1 Sector Wind energy Facility Type Offshore Wind Facility Status Proposed Owner OffshoreMW Developer Offshore MW Location Atlantic Ocean NJ Coordinates 39.584°, -73.77° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":39.584,"lon":-73.77,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

2

Brigantine OffshoreMW Phase 2 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Brigantine OffshoreMW Phase 2 Brigantine OffshoreMW Phase 2 Facility Brigantine OffshoreMW Phase 2 Sector Wind energy Facility Type Offshore Wind Facility Status Proposed Owner OffshoreMW Developer OffshoreMW Location Atlantic Ocean NJ Coordinates 39.348°, -73.969° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":39.348,"lon":-73.969,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

3

TW0076.book  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

have a 16-gage perforated galvanized steel shell and are filled with 3 in. of mineral wool, may be removed for servicing. Pratt & Whitney TW-0076 2-24 2.1.6.5 Intercooler...

4

TW0076.book  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

TW-0076 TW-0076 03 May 2002 Published by Business Development Technical Writing NEXT GENERATION TURBINE PROGRAM TECHNICAL PROGRESS REPORT FINAL REPORT PERIOD OF PERFORMANCE: 16 AUGUST 2000 TO 14 JUNE 2002 Prepared for National Energy Technology Center U.S. Department of Energy AAD Document Control M/S 921-107 P.O. Box 10940 Pittsburgh, PA 15236 Prepared under Contract DE-AC26-00NT40847 Prepared by Pratt & Whitney Advanced Engine Programs 400 Main Street East Hartford, CT 06108 DISCLAMER NOTICE THIS REPORT WAS PREPARED AS AN ACCOUNT OF WORK SPONSORED BY AN AGENCY OF THE U.S. GOVERNMENT. NEITHER THE U.S GOVERNMENT NOR ANY AGENCY THEREOF, NOR ANY OF THEIR EMPLOYEES, MAKES ANY WARRANTY, EXPRESS OF IMPLIED, OR ASSUMES ANY LEGAL LIABILITY OR RESPONSIBILITY FOR THE ACCURACY, COMPLETENESS, OR USEFULNESS OF ANY INFORMATION, APPARATUS, PRODUCT, OR PROCESS DISCLOSED, OR REPRESENTS THAT

5

RELAP5-3D Results for Phase I (Exercise 2) of the OECD/NEA MHTGR-350 MW Benchmark  

SciTech Connect

The coupling of the PHISICS code suite to the thermal hydraulics system code RELAP5-3D has recently been initiated at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) to provide a fully coupled prismatic Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) system modeling capability as part of the NGNP methods development program. The PHISICS code consists of three modules: INSTANT (performing 3D nodal transport core calculations), MRTAU (depletion and decay heat generation) and a perturbation/mixer module. As part of the verification and validation activities, steady state results have been obtained for Exercise 2 of Phase I of the newly-defined OECD/NEA MHTGR-350 MW Benchmark. This exercise requires participants to calculate a steady-state solution for an End of Equilibrium Cycle 350 MW Modular High Temperature Reactor (MHTGR), using the provided geometry, material, and coolant bypass flow description. The paper provides an overview of the MHTGR Benchmark and presents typical steady state results (e.g. solid and gas temperatures, thermal conductivities) for Phase I Exercise 2. Preliminary results are also provided for the early test phase of Exercise 3 using a two-group cross-section library and the Relap5-3D model developed for Exercise 2.

Gerhard Strydom

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

TW Energy International | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

International Place Germany Sector Wind energy Product TW.Energy international is a joint venture between the two Hannover-based companies target GmbH and Windwrts Energie...

7

Solar Pilot Plant: Phase I. Quarterly report No. 3, April--June 1976. CDRL item No. 10. [10 MW  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The baseline design for a 10 MW proof-of-concept pilot central receiver solar power plant is described. Detailed designs for the collector, steam generator, and thermal storage subsystem research experiments are presented. (WHK)

None

1976-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

8

M TW T F_ SM TWTF 5  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Julyi 27," 2001 Julyi 27," 2001 Julhy 2001 August2001 M TW T F_ SM TWTF 5 1 2 34 567 1 2 3 4- .rnday 8 91011121314 5 6 7 8 91011 -15 16 17 18 19 20 21 . 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 29 30 31- 26 27 28 29 30 31 TaSk ad '_ .__________________ 0 _Getthe most out of Outook 98 - 800 900 1000_ _ 10:47am-11:02am Welcome to Calendar! - . 1100 _ 2 100 Notes 200 30o 4 oo 500 6 o Kipo i, 6 Knpowicz, Robert 1 DE039.Q136 2 F g52 68 July 30, 20 1 u ly 2001 0 Aug ust 20 01 |JUBly ^30U 2U 1 c M T W T F C M TW T F 1 2 3 4 5 6 - 12 34. 4londay 8 91011 121314 5 6 7 8 91011 -15 16 17 18 19 20 21 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 - 2223 24 25 26 27 28 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 2930 31 26 27 28 29 30 31 TaskPad 7 ~~~~~~am 7 "~'~~ 0_ 3 TO Q Taskdad 7___________________________ the mosoutof Outlook98

9

Solar Pilot Plant, Phase I. Preliminary design report. Volume I. Executive overview (approved). CDRL item 2. [10 MW; Barstow, California  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The project goals, program schedules, and preliminary design for the 10 MW central receiver pilot plant at Barstow, California are presented. Details of the collector field, receiver/tower, thermal storage system, electrical power conversion subsystem, and control systems are given. (WHK)

None

1977-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Collection and conversion of silicon furnace waste gas into higher value products: Phase 3, 6 MW pilot plant dc closed furnace technology. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The construction and operation of a 6 MW, closed dc furnace for smelting silicon was the primary focus of Phase 3. A 6 MW, dc closed furnace pilot plant was built in East Selkirk, Manitoba, Canada. The furnace is equipped with world`s most modern automatic control system used to control and monitor the process variables and operational data. This control system is suitable for commercial applications and could be used with either closed or open dc furnaces for smelting silicon or ferrosilicon. The construction was started in September 1990, and the facility was operational within 18 months. Following successful commissioning of the pilot plant in June 1992, twelve smelting test campaigns were conducted through November 1994.

Dosaj, V.D.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

$2001 SM TW T F S SM TW T F S  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

IBBJ^ry~~ ^(ft0,~~~~~ '^fi~ ~July IBBJ^ry~~ ^(ft0,~~~~~ '^fi~ ~July 2001 August 2001 JUly 20, $2001 SM TW T F S SM TW T F S .Friday ~1 2 1234567 1234 Friday 8 91011121314 5 6 7 8 91011 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 12 13141516 17 18 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 19 20 2122 23 24 25 29 30 31 26 27 28 29 30 31 -- _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ T a sk P a d 7 am1 D 1 lTaskPad .8 00 9 00 _ I 100, 12 pm6 Notes 2 00 3 00 4 00 I - 5 00 Kelliler, Joseph 5 3/23/2002 26326 Jll~ I 7~ 23~ 200uy J uly 2001 August 2001 July 23,, 2001$ S M T W T F S SM TW T F S Mnl~ondawy 8 ~ 23 4 s 6 1 345 7 1234 Nionday 8 91011121314 5 6 7 8 91011 15 16 1718 19 20 21 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 19 20 21 22 23 24 25

12

Final report on the power production phase of the 10 MW/sub e/ Solar Thermal Central Receiver Pilot Plant  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes the evaluations of the power production testing of Solar One, the 10 MW/sub e/ Solar Thermal Central Receiver Pilot Plant near Barstow, California. The Pilot Plant, a cooperative project of the US Department of Energy and utility firms led by the Southern California Edison Company, began a three year period of power production operation in August 1984. During this period, plant performance indicators, such as capacity factor, system efficiency, and availability, were studied to assess the operational capability of the Pilot Plant to reliably supply electrical power. Also studied was the long-term performance of such key plant components as the heliostats and the receiver. During the three years of power production, the Pilot Plant showed an improvement in performance. Considerable increases in capacity factor, system efficiency, and availability were achieved. Heliostat operation was reliable, and only small amounts of mirror corrosion were observed. Receiver tube leaks did occur, however, and were the main cause of the plant's unscheduled outages. The Pilot Plant provided valuable lessons which will aid in the design of future solar central receiver plants. 53 refs., 46 figs., 4 tabs.

Radosevich, L.G.

1988-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Central receiver solar thermal power system, Phase 1. CDRL Item 2. Pilot plant preliminary design report. Volume IV. Receiver subsystem. [10-MW Pilot Plant and 100-MW Commercial Plant  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The conception, design, and testing of the receiver subsystem proposed by the McDonnell Douglas/Rocketdyne Receiver team for the DOE 10-MW Pilot Plant and the 100-MW Commercial Plant are described. The receiver subsystem consists of the receiver unit, the tower on which the receiver unit is mounted above the collector field, and the supporting control and instrumentation equipment. The plans for implementation of the Pilot Plant are given including the anticipated schedule and production plan (procurement, installation, checkout, and maintenance). Specifications for the performance, design, and test requirements for the Pilot Plant receiver subsystem are included. (WHK)

Hallet, Jr., R. W.; Gervais, R. L.

1977-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Economics of a 75-MW(e) hot-dry-rock geothermal power station based upon the design of the Phase II reservoir at Fenton Hill  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Based upon EE-2 and EE-3 drilling costs and the proposed Fenton Hill Phase II reservoir conditions the break-even cost of producing electricity is 4.4 cents per kWh at the bus bar. This cost is based upon a 9-well, 12-reservoir hot dry rock (HDR) system producing 75 MW(e) for 10 yr with only 20% drawdown, and an assumed annual finance charge of 17%. Only one-third of the total, potentially available heat was utilized; potential reuse of wells as well as thermal stress cracking and augmentation of heat transfer was ignored. Nearly half the bus bar cost is due to drilling expenses, which prompted a review of past costs for wells GT-2, EE-1, EE-2, and EE-3. Based on comparable depth and completion times it is shown that significant cost improvements have been accomplished in the last seven years. Despite these improvements it was assumed for this study that no further advancements in drilling technology would occur, and that even in commercially mature HDR systems, drilling problems would continue nearly unabated.

Murphy, H.; Drake, R.; Tester, J.; Zyvoloski, G.

1982-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Low Wind Speed Technology Phase II: Development of a 2-MW Direct-Drive Wind Turbine for Low Wind Speed Sites; Northern Power Systems  

SciTech Connect

This fact sheet describes a subcontract with Northern Power Systems (NPS) to develop and evaluate a 2-MW wind turbine that could offer significant opportunities for reducing the cost of energy (COE).

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

S M TW T F S SM TWT F S  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

' - ' - S M TW T F S SM TWT F S 12 3 4 567 1 2345 ,May@°^i«^f 0Gi^ °"8 91011121314 6 78 9101112 M aB ynw WW 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 M ay 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 29 30 27 28 29 30 31 Monday. Apt 3C _- Thursday, May 03 Tuesday, May 01i_ Fnday, May ___ Wednesday. ay 021 oSatluay, May o Sunday, May O Hutto, Chase 1 2o6 4 DOE034-0018 hllag f -^ *May 2001 June2001 IMSa' y 07 - s M TW T F S S M TW T F S 1234 5 12 6 7 8 910 11 12 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 et-ayB W :~L.t~a3^ ~13 14 1516 17 18 19 10111213141516 filay .13 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 27 28 29 30 31 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 Monday, May 07 Thursday, May 1 , ___ Tuesday, May 0 ______ Friday, May 11 Weanesday, May 0o Saturday, May 1 ,_ _ __ Sunday, May 3 Huno, aase 1 2alw°5 DOE034-0019

17

Experimental laser wakefield acceleration scalings exceeding 100 TW  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Understanding the scaling of laser wakefield acceleration (LWFA) is crucial to the design of potential future systems. A number of computational and theoretical studies have predicted scalings with laser power for various parameters, but experimental studies have typically been limited to small parameter ranges. Here, we detail extensive measurements of LWFA experiments conducted over a considerable range in power from 20 to 110 TW, which allows for a greater plasma density range and for a large number of data points. These measurements include scalings of the electron beam charge and maximum energy as functions of density as well as injection threshold density, beam charge, and total beam energy as functions of laser power. The observed scalings are consistent with theoretical understandings of operation in the bubble regime.

McGuffey, C.; Matsuoka, T.; Schumaker, W.; Dollar, F.; Zulick, C.; Chvykov, V.; Kalintchenko, G.; Yanovsky, V.; Maksimchuk, A.; Thomas, A. G. R.; Krushelnick, K. [Center for Ultrafast Optical Science, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States); Kneip, S.; Najmudin, Z. [Blackett Laboratory, Imperial College London, London SW7 2BZ (United Kingdom)

2012-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

18

EVIDENCE FOR A SNOW LINE BEYOND THE TRANSITIONAL RADIUS IN THE TW Hya PROTOPLANETARY DISK  

SciTech Connect

We present an observational reconstruction of the radial water vapor content near the surface of the TW Hya transitional protoplanetary disk, and report the first localization of the snow line during this phase of disk evolution. The observations are comprised of Spitzer-IRS, Herschel-PACS, and Herschel-HIFI archival spectra. The abundance structure is retrieved by fitting a two-dimensional disk model to the available star+disk photometry and all observed H{sub 2}O lines, using a simple step-function parameterization of the water vapor content near the disk surface. We find that water vapor is abundant ({approx}10{sup -4} per H{sub 2}) in a narrow ring, located at the disk transition radius some 4 AU from the central star, but drops rapidly by several orders of magnitude beyond 4.2 AU over a scale length of no more than 0.5 AU. The inner disk (0.5-4 AU) is also dry, with an upper limit on the vertically averaged water abundance of 10{sup -6} per H{sub 2}. The water vapor peak occurs at a radius significantly more distant than that expected for a passive continuous disk around a 0.6 M{sub Sun} star, representing a volatile distribution in the TW Hya disk that bears strong similarities to that of the solar system. This is observational evidence for a snow line that moves outward with time in passive disks, with a dry inner disk that results either from gas giant formation or gas dissipation and a significant ice reservoir at large radii. The amount of water present near the snow line is sufficient to potentially catalyze the (further) formation of planetesimals and planets at distances beyond a few AU.

Zhang, K. [Division of Physics, Mathematics and Astronomy, MC 150-21, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States)] [Division of Physics, Mathematics and Astronomy, MC 150-21, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Pontoppidan, K. M. [Space Telescope Science Institute, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States)] [Space Telescope Science Institute, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Salyk, C. [National Optical Astronomy Observatory, 950 N. Cherry Ave., Tucson, AZ 85719 (United States)] [National Optical Astronomy Observatory, 950 N. Cherry Ave., Tucson, AZ 85719 (United States); Blake, G. A., E-mail: kzhang@caltech.edu [Division of Geological and Planetary Sciences, MC 150-21, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States)

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

TW Hya: SPECTRAL VARIABILITY, X-RAYS, AND ACCRETION DIAGNOSTICS  

SciTech Connect

The nearest accreting T Tauri star, TW Hya was intensively and continuously observed over {approx}17 days with spectroscopic and photometric measurements from four continents simultaneous with a long segmented exposure using the Chandra satellite. Contemporaneous optical photometry from WASP-S indicates a 4.74 day period was present during this time. The absence of a similar periodicity in the H{alpha} flux and the total X-ray flux which are dominated by accretion processes and the stellar corona, respectively, points to a different source of photometric variations. The H{alpha} emission line appears intrinsically broad and symmetric, and both the profile and its variability suggest an origin in the post-shock cooling region. An accretion event, signaled by soft X-rays, is traced spectroscopically for the first time through the optical emission line profiles. After the accretion event, downflowing turbulent material observed in the H{alpha} and H{beta} lines is followed by He I ({lambda}5876) broadening near the photosphere. Optical veiling resulting from the heated photosphere increases with a delay of {approx}2 hr after the X-ray accretion event. The response of the stellar coronal emission to an increase in the veiling follows {approx}2.4 hr later, giving direct evidence that the stellar corona is heated in part by accretion. Subsequently, the stellar wind becomes re-established. We suggest a model that incorporates the dynamics of this sequential series of events: an accretion shock, a cooling downflow in a supersonically turbulent region, followed by photospheric and later, coronal heating. This model naturally explains the presence of broad optical and ultraviolet lines, and affects the mass accretion rates determined from emission line profiles.

Dupree, A. K.; Brickhouse, N. S.; Cranmer, S. R.; Luna, G. J. M.; Schneider, E. E. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Bessell, M. S. [Australian National Observatory, Mount Stromlo Observatory, Canberra, ACT 2611 (Australia); Bonanos, A. [Institute of Astronomy and Astrophysics, National Observatory of Athens, 15236 Athens (Greece); Crause, L. A. [South African Astronomical Observatory, P.O. Box 9, Observatory 7935, Cape Town (South Africa); Lawson, W. A. [School of Physical, Environmental, and Math Sciences, University of New South Wales, Canberra, ACT 2600 (Australia); Mallik, S. V. [Indian Institute of Astrophysics, Bangalore 560034 (India); Schuler, S. C. [National Optical Astronomy Observatory, Tucson, AZ 85719 (United States)

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Central Receiver Solar Thermal Power System, Phase 1. CDRL Item 10. Third quarterly technical progress report, 1 April 1976--30 June 1976. [10 MW  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Results of analysis and design efforts by McDonnell Douglas Astronautics Company (MDAC), Rocketdyne, Stearns-Roger, Inc., Sheldahl, Inc., and the University of Houston between 1 April 1976 and 30 June 1976 on ERDA Contract No. EY-76-C-03-1108 are summarized. This is the third quarterly technical progress report published on the Phase 1 Central Receiver Solar Thermal Power System contract. The dominant activities during the reporting period have involved the preparation of test facilities for the subsystem research experiments and the fabrication of the test hardware. Summaries of these activities are presented. Alternative design approaches for the 10-MWe pilot plant system and the current pilot plant project schedule are also presented and described.

Hallet, Jr., R. W.; Gervais, R. L.

1976-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tw mw phase" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

New Multi-group Transport Neutronics (PHISICS) Capabilities for RELAP5-3D and its Application to Phase I of the OECD/NEA MHTGR-350 MW Benchmark  

SciTech Connect

PHISICS is a neutronics code system currently under development at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). Its goal is to provide state of the art simulation capability to reactor designers. The different modules for PHISICS currently under development are a nodal and semi-structured transport core solver (INSTANT), a depletion module (MRTAU) and a cross section interpolation (MIXER) module. The INSTANT module is the most developed of the mentioned above. Basic functionalities are ready to use, but the code is still in continuous development to extend its capabilities. This paper reports on the effort of coupling the nodal kinetics code package PHISICS (INSTANT/MRTAU/MIXER) to the thermal hydraulics system code RELAP5-3D, to enable full core and system modeling. This will enable the possibility to model coupled (thermal-hydraulics and neutronics) problems with more options for 3D neutron kinetics, compared to the existing diffusion theory neutron kinetics module in RELAP5-3D (NESTLE). In the second part of the paper, an overview of the OECD/NEA MHTGR-350 MW benchmark is given. This benchmark has been approved by the OECD, and is based on the General Atomics 350 MW Modular High Temperature Gas Reactor (MHTGR) design. The benchmark includes coupled neutronics thermal hydraulics exercises that require more capabilities than RELAP5-3D with NESTLE offers. Therefore, the MHTGR benchmark makes extensive use of the new PHISICS/RELAP5-3D coupling capabilities. The paper presents the preliminary results of the three steady state exercises specified in Phase I of the benchmark using PHISICS/RELAP5-3D.

Gerhard Strydom; Cristian Rabiti; Andrea Alfonsi

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

HI-MW Roadmap SCE DER  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... 4,000 MW Wind 1,000 MW Solar Energy Storage with Advanced PCS, A Solution? ... Reliable, Cost Competitive, Innovation Incentive Rate ...

2012-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

23

Guiding of 35 TW laser pulses in ablative capillary discharge waveguides  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An ablatively driven capillary discharge plasma waveguide has been used to demonstrate guiding of 30 fs, 35 TW laser pulses over distances up to 3 cm with incident intensity in excess of 4x10{sup 18} W/cm{sup 2}. The plasma density range over which good guiding was observed was 1-3x10{sup 18} cm{sup -3}. The quality of the laser spot at the exit mode was observed to be similar to that at the entrance and the transmitted energy was {approx}25% at input powers of 35 TW. The transmitted laser spectrum typically showed blueshifting due to ionization of carbon and hydrogen atoms in the capillary plasma by the high intensity laser pulse. The low plasma density regime in which these capillaries operate makes these devices attractive for use in single stage electron accelerators to multi-GeV energies driven by petawatt class laser systems.

McGuffey, C.; Matsuoka, T.; Chvykov, V.; Kalintchenko, G.; Rousseau, P.; Yanovsky, V.; Maksimchuk, A.; Krushelnick, K. [Center for Ultrafast Optical Science, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States); Levin, M.; Zigler, A. [Hebrew University, Jerusalem 91904 (Israel)

2009-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

24

Ormat's North Brawley plant with 17MW short of its 50MW potential | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Ormat's North Brawley plant with 17MW short of its 50MW potential Ormat's North Brawley plant with 17MW short of its 50MW potential Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: Ormat's North Brawley plant with 17MW short of its 50MW potential Author Think Geoenergy Published Publisher Not Provided, Date Not Provided DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http://crossref.org Online Internet link for Ormat's North Brawley plant with 17MW short of its 50MW potential Citation Think Geoenergy. Ormat's North Brawley plant with 17MW short of its 50MW potential [Internet]. [updated 40219;cited 2010]. Available from: http://thinkgeoenergy.com/archives/3654 Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Ormat%27s_North_Brawley_plant_with_17MW_short_of_its_50MW_potential&oldid=682479"

25

SM TW T F S S M T W T F  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Mardh 2001 Mardh 2001 February 09, 2001 SM TW T F S S M T W T F C^^-n'~~~.da.d 1 23 1 23 Friday 45 6 7 8910 4 S 6 7 8 910 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 226272829 30 31 800 __s^ ^ __,, _ _____ _ _ Noti Mee w/Gal Mars & Bob ipp - 5A10. 900 :Meet w/Coates, Gutteridge, N. Hebron, Knipp, sbjStategies for NE, 5A110. _00 500 .~ __ 300 6-00 _ -- Magwood, Wlliam 9 3/28/02 26812 DOE035-0040 February 2001 Marct 2001 February 10, 2001 5 M TW T F S SM TW T Sat a I ' 123 123 ~~~~Saturday~~ ~4 5 6 7 8 910 4 5 6 7 8 910 SaturdaIy , 11 12 1314 15 16 17 11 12 13 14 15 1617 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 Notes 7am 800 900 100 12n I00 20 0 300 400 5oo, 600 Magwood, William 10 3/28/02 26813DO

26

Innovative Clean Coal Technology (ICCT): 500 MW demonstration of advanced wall-fired combustion techniques for the reduction of nitrogen oxide (NO{sub x}) emissions from coal-fired boilers. Phase 3A, Low NO{sub x} burner tests  

SciTech Connect

This Phase 3A test report summarizes the testing activities and results for the third testing phase of an Innovative Clean Coal Technology (ICCT) demonstration of advanced wall-fired combustion techniques for the reduction of nitrogen oxide (NO{sub x}) emissions from coal-fired boilers. The project is being conducted at Georgia Power Company`s Plant Hammond Unit 4 located near Rome, Georgia. The primary goal of this project is the characterization of the low NO{sub x} combustion equipment through the collection and analysis of long-term emissions data. Described in this report are the test plans, data measurements, and data analyses performed during the Phase 3A effort. The present report also contains sufficient background material to provide an understanding of the overall program scope, the relationship of Phase 3A to the overall program, the testing methodologies, testing procedures, and unit configuration. Results from 66 short-term tests indicate increasing NO{sub x} emissions over the load range ranging from 0.5 lb/MBtu at 300 NM to around 0.65 lb/MBtu at 480 MW. Fly ash loss-on-ignition (LOI) for these loads ranged from 5.4 to 8.6 percent. Long-term test results indicated high load (480 MW) NO{sub x} emissions of approximately 0.65 lb/MBtu. At the 300 MW mid load point, the emissions dropped to 0.47 lb/MBtu which is slightly lower than the 0.50 lb/MBtu shown for the short-term data. The annual and 30-day average achievable NO{sub x} emissions were determined to be 0.55 and 0.64 lb/MBtu, respectively, for the load scenario experienced during the Phase 3A, long-term test period. Based on the long-term test results for Phase 3A, at full-load the low NO{sub x} burners (LNB) retrofit resulted in a NO{sub x} reduction of 48 percent from baseline, while at 300 MW the reduction was approximately 50 percent. A series of tests was also conducted to evaluate the effects of various burner equipment settings and mill coal flow biasing on both NO{sub x} and LOI emissions.

Not Available

1993-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

27

Toward TW-Level, Hard X-Ray Pulses at LCLS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Coherent diffraction imaging of complex molecules such as proteins requires a large number (e.g., {approx} 10{sup 13}/pulse) of hard X-ray photons within a time scale of {approx} 10 fs or less. This corresponds to a peak power of {approx} 1 TW, much larger than that currently generated by LCLS or other proposed X-ray free electron lasers (FELs). We study the feasibility of producing such pulses using a LCLS-like, low charge electron beam, as will be possible in the LCLS-II upgrade project, employing a configuration beginning with a SASE amplifier, followed by a 'self-seeding' crystal monochromator, and finishing with a long tapered undulator. Our results suggest that TW-level output power at 8.3 keV is possible from a total undulator system length around 200 m. In addition power levels larger than 100 GW are generated at the third harmonic. We present a tapering strategy that extends the original 'resonant particle' formalism by optimizing the transport lattice to maximize optical guiding and enhance net energy extraction. We discuss the transverse and longitudinal coherence properties of the output radiation pulse and the expected output pulse energy sensitivity, both to taper errors and to power fluctuations on the monochromatized SASE seed.

Fawley, W.M.; Frisch, J.; Huang, Z.; Jiao, Y.; Nuhn, H.-D.; /SLAC; Pellegrini, C.; /SLAC /UCLA; Reiche, S.; /PSI, Villigen; Wu, J,; /SLAC

2011-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

28

Above-60-MeV proton acceleration with a 150 TW laser system.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Laser-accelerated proton beams can be used in a variety of applications, e.g. ultrafast radiography of dense objects or strong electromagnetic fields. Therefore high energies of tens of MeV are required. We report on proton-acceleration experiments with a 150 TW laser system using mm-sized thin foils and mass-reduced targets of various thicknesses. Thin- foil targets yielded maximum energies of 50 MeV. A further reduction of the target dimensions from mm-size to 250 x 250 x 25 microns increased the maximum proton energy to >65 MeV, which is comparable to proton energies measured only at higher-energy, Petawatt-class laser systems. The dependence of the maximum energy on target dimensions was investigated, and differences between mm-sized thin foils and mass-reduced targets will be reported.

Sefkow, Adam B.; Atherton, Briggs W.; Geissel, Matthias; Schollmeier, Marius; Rambo, Patrick K.; Schwarz, Jens

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Crossroads (3 MW) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

MW) MW) Jump to: navigation, search Name Crossroads (3 MW) Facility Crossroads (3 MW) Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Oklahoma Gas & Electric Developer Renewable Energy Systems Ltd Energy Purchaser Oklahoma Gas & Electric Location Near Canton OK Coordinates 36.019889°, -98.669894° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":36.019889,"lon":-98.669894,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

30

Property:Installed Capacity (MW) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Capacity (MW) Jump to: navigation, search Property Name Installed Capacity (MW) Property Type Number Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleProperty:InstalledCapac...

31

Low Beam Voltage, 10 MW, L-Band Cluster Klystron  

SciTech Connect

Conceptual design of a multi-beam klystron (MBK) for possible ILC and Project X applications is presented. The chief distinction between this MBK design and existing 10-MW MBK's is the low operating voltage of 60 kV. There are at least four compelling reasons that justify development at this time of a low-voltage MBK, namely (1) no pulse transformer; (2) no oil tank for high-voltage components and for the tube socket; (3) no high-voltage cables; and (4) modulator would be a compact 60-kV IGBT switching circuit. The proposed klystron consists of four clusters containing six beams each. The tube has common input and output cavities for all 24 beams, and individual gain cavities for each cluster. A closely related optional configuration, also for a 10 MW tube, would involve four totally independent cavity clusters with four independent input cavities and four 2.5 MW output ports, all within a common magnetic circuit. This option has appeal because the output waveguides would not require a controlled atmosphere, and because it would be easier to achieve phase and amplitude stability as required in individual SC accelerator cavities.

Teryaev, V.; /Novosibirsk, IYF; Yakovlev, V.P.; /Fermilab; Kazakov, S.; /KEK, Tsukuba; Hirshfield, J.L.; /Yale U. /Omega-P, New Haven

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

PCFB Repowering Project 80 MW plant description  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report documents the design of a 80 MW Pressurized Circulating Fluidized Bed (PCFB) boiler for the repowering of Unit 1 at the Des Moines Energy Center. Objective is to demonstrate that PCFB combined-cycle technology is cost effective and environmentally superior compared to traditional pulverized coal burning facilities.

Not Available

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Property:Device Nameplate Capacity (MW) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Nameplate Capacity (MW) Nameplate Capacity (MW) Jump to: navigation, search Property Name Device Nameplate Capacity (MW) Property Type String Pages using the property "Device Nameplate Capacity (MW)" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) M MHK Projects/40MW Lewis project + 0 8MW 1MW Farms of multiple machines will be deployed with installed capacity of circa 20MW + MHK Projects/Algiers Light Project + 40 kW + MHK Projects/Anconia Point Project + 40 kW + MHK Projects/Ashley Point Project + 40 kW + MHK Projects/Avondale Bend Project + 40 kW + MHK Projects/Bar Field Bend + 40 kW + MHK Projects/Barfield Point + 40 kW + MHK Projects/Bayou Latenache + 40 kW + MHK Projects/BioSTREAM Pilot Plant + 250kW pilot 1MW commercial scale + MHK Projects/Bondurant Chute + 40 kW +

34

Raft River 5MW Geothermal Pilot Plant  

SciTech Connect

Elements of design of the 5 MW(e) binary cycle plant to be built in the Raft River Valley in Idaho are discussed. Advantages of the dual boiling cycle for use with moderate temperature (250 to 350/sup 0/F) resources are discussed. A breakdown of the heat loads and power requirements is presented. Various components, including pumps, heat exchangers, cooling tower, turbine-generators, and production and injection systems, are described. (JGB)

Whitbeck, J.F.; Piscitella, R.R.

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Economic Analysis of a 3MW Biomass Gasification Power Plant  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Collaborative, Biomass gasification / power generationANALYSIS OF A 3MW BIOMASS GASIFICATION POWER PLANT R obert Cas a feedstock for gasification for a 3 MW power plant was

Cattolica, Robert; Lin, Kathy

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Conceptual design 10 MW experimental power generation facility  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The overall or ultimate program envisions a small (10 MW) field experimental, highly instrumented, binary fluid cycle power plant facility planned to confirm the concept and evaluate technical and economic feasibility of the large scale use of geothermal energy resources. The eight year program duration anticipates four years for exploration and construction, two years for research and development of initial operations, and two years for research and development effort during production operating phase. The following are covered: a review of the design of all facilities between the supply and reinjection wells; a detailed description of the project scope; the project, system or performance requirements; the project design, procurement and construction schedule; the site layout, power plant perspective, plant layouts, single line electrical diagram, piping and instrument diagram and flow diagram; the cost estimate based on the included drawings; and project feasibility. (MHR)

Not Available

1974-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

37

Evaluation of Efficiency and Utilization Benefits from Trapezoidal Wire Aluminum Conductor Steel Reinforced (ACSR/TW) Conductor for High Voltage Transmission Lines  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A trapezoidal wire (TW) aluminum conductor steel reinforced (ACSR/TW) conductor consists of a stranded steel core with one or more layers of trapezoidal shaped aluminum wires. The use of compact trapezoidal strands for a line results in a resistance reduction of 15-20 compared to a round wire ACSR conductor of the same diameter. If some increase in conductor diameter over the original is possible with limited tower structural reinforcement, the resistance reduction can be in excess of 20; and the increas...

2011-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

38

Surveillance of South Belridge Diatomite T.W. Patzek, Shell Western E&P Inc.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

)computer-assisted monitoring of injection pressures and rates, (2) online databases with well tests. Full-scale water injection in Phases IA (direct pattern) and IB (staggered pattern) dual-string wells m). Well 552-33 began free-flowing just after injection was started in 552NR-LS at 1500 BWPD (238 m3

Patzek, Tadeusz W.

39

Property:Technology Nameplate Capacity (MW) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Nameplate Capacity (MW) Nameplate Capacity (MW) Jump to: navigation, search Property Name Technology Nameplate Capacity (MW) Property Type String Pages using the property "Technology Nameplate Capacity (MW)" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) M MHK Technologies/Aegir Dynamo + 100kW built and tested with 45kW 200kW and 1 4MW designs in development + MHK Technologies/AirWEC + 5kW + MHK Technologies/Aquantis + Proprietary + MHK Technologies/Atlantis AN 150 + 0 15 + MHK Technologies/Atlantis AR 1000 + 1 + MHK Technologies/Atlantis AS 400 + 0 4 + MHK Technologies/Bluetec + 1 + MHK Technologies/Current Power + from 10 kW and up + MHK Technologies/CurrentStar + 1 + MHK Technologies/Deep Green + 500 kW + MHK Technologies/Deep water capable hydrokinetic turbine + 30MW +

40

3D Simulation of a 5MW Wind Turbine.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??In the present work, the influence of turbulence and gravity forces on the tower and the rotor of a 5MW onshore wind turbine has been (more)

Namiranian, Abtin

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tw mw phase" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Simulation of the Bishop Steam Foam Pilot by T.W. Patzek and N.A. h4yhiil, Shell Development Co.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

,.. SEW SPE 18786 Simulation of the Bishop Steam Foam Pilot by T.W. Patzek and N.A. h4yhiil, Shell a simple model of steam foam transport and apply it to the Shell Kern River Bishop pilot. The only an incremental 5.5 percent OOIP recovery due to steam foam and additional 3 percent OOIP due to infill wells

Patzek, Tadeusz W.

42

INDIAN INSTITUTE TECHNOLOGY BOMBAY 1 MW SOLAR THEMAL POWER PROJECT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

INDIAN INSTITUTE TECHNOLOGY BOMBAY 1 MW SOLAR THEMAL POWER PROJECT PIPING MTO FOR 1 MW SOLAR THERMAL POWER PROJECT #12;PIPING MTO 1089-202-108 1 2 1 BE,7.1Thk.,Welded To ANSI B-36.10 12" 165 M

Narayanan, H.

43

4 MW upgrade to the DIII-D fast wave current drive system  

SciTech Connect

The DIII-D fast wave current drive (FWCD) system is being upgraded by an additional 4 MW in the 30 to 120 MHz frequency range. This capability adds to the existing 2 MW 30 to 60 MHz system. Two new ABB transmitters of the type that are in use on the ASDEX-Upgrade tokamak in Garching will be used to drive two new water-cooled four-strap antennas to be installed in DIII-D in early 1994. The transmission and tuning system for each antenna will be similar to that now in use for the first 2 MW system on DIII-D, but with some significant improvements. One improvement consists of adding a decoupler element to counter the mutual coupling between the antenna straps which results in large imbalances in the power to a strap for the usual current drive intrastrap phasing of 90{degrees}. Another improvement is to utilize pressurized, ceramic-insulated transmission lines. The intrastrap phasing will again be controlled in pairs, with a pair of straps coupled in a resonant loop configuration, locking their phase difference at either 0 or 180{degrees}, depending upon the length of line installed. These resonant loops will incorporate a phase shifter so that they will be able to be tuned to resonance at several frequencies in the operating band of the transmitter. With the frequency change capability of the ABB generators, the FWCD frequency will thus be selectable on a shot-to-shot basis, from this preselected set of frequencies. The schedule is for experiments to begin with this added 4 MW capability in mid-1994. The details of the system are described.

deGrassie, J.S.; Pinsker, R.I.; Cary, W.P.

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Property:Project Installed Capacity (MW) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Installed Capacity (MW) Installed Capacity (MW) Jump to: navigation, search Property Name Project Installed Capacity (MW) Property Type String Pages using the property "Project Installed Capacity (MW)" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) M MHK Projects/40MW Lewis project + 0 + MHK Projects/ADM 5 + 1 + MHK Projects/AWS II + 1 + MHK Projects/Admirality Inlet Tidal Energy Project + 22 + MHK Projects/Agucadoura + 2 + MHK Projects/Alaska 18 + 10 + MHK Projects/Alaska 36 + 10 + MHK Projects/Algiers Cutoff Project + 16 + MHK Projects/Algiers Light Project + 0 + MHK Projects/Anconia Point Project + 0 + MHK Projects/Ashley Point Project + 0 + MHK Projects/Astoria Tidal Energy + 300 + MHK Projects/Avondale Bend Project + 0 + MHK Projects/Bar Field Bend + 0 +

45

Puna Geothermal Venture 8MW Expantion | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Venture 8MW Expantion Venture 8MW Expantion Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: Puna Geothermal Venture 8MW Expantion Abstract Adding to its existing generating capacity of 27 MW, Ormat's Puna Geothermal Venture (PGV) geothermal power plant recently completed a successful 8MW expansion project bringing more renewable, low-cost electricity to the people of Hawaii. The project presented several technical challenges including use of high scale potential brine in a state-of-the-art binary plant, development of highly reliable brine pH monitoring and control system, and brine injection management in a high energy resource. Each of the project challenges were overcome with unique engineering solutions. Authors Mike Kaleikini, Paul Spielman, Tom Buchanan, Ormat Technologies

46

Property:Permit/License Buildout (MW) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Permit/License Buildout (MW) Permit/License Buildout (MW) Jump to: navigation, search Property Name Permit/License Buildout (MW) Property Type String Pages using the property "Permit/License Buildout (MW)" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) M MHK Projects/40MW Lewis project + 40 + MHK Projects/Algiers Light Project + 20 + MHK Projects/Anconia Point Project + 15 + MHK Projects/Ashley Point Project + 148 + MHK Projects/Avalon Tidal + 30 + MHK Projects/Avondale Bend Project + 18 + MHK Projects/BW2 Tidal + 3 + MHK Projects/Bar Field Bend + 94 + MHK Projects/Barfield Point + 114 + MHK Projects/Bayou Latenache + 50 + MHK Projects/Bondurant Chute + 152 + MHK Projects/Breeze Point + 198 + MHK Projects/Brilliant Point Project + 56 + MHK Projects/Brough Head Wave Farm + 200 +

47

Ultra Clean 1.1MW High Efficiency Natural Gas Engine Powered System  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Dresser, Inc. (GE Energy, Waukesha gas engines) will develop, test, demonstrate, and commercialize a 1.1 Megawatt (MW) natural gas fueled combined heat and power reciprocating engine powered package. This package will feature a total efficiency > 75% and ultra low CARB permitting emissions. Our modular design will cover the 1 6 MW size range, and this scalable technology can be used in both smaller and larger engine powered CHP packages. To further advance one of the key advantages of reciprocating engines, the engine, generator and CHP package will be optimized for low initial and operating costs. Dresser, Inc. will leverage the knowledge gained in the DOE - ARES program. Dresser, Inc. will work with commercial, regulatory, and government entities to help break down barriers to wider deployment of CHP. The outcome of this project will be a commercially successful 1.1 MW CHP package with high electrical and total efficiency that will significantly reduce emissions compared to the current central power plant paradigm. Principal objectives by phases for Budget Period 1 include: Phase 1 market study to determine optimum system performance, target first cost, lifecycle cost, and creation of a detailed product specification. Phase 2 Refinement of the Waukesha CHP system design concepts, identification of critical characteristics, initial evaluation of technical solutions, and risk mitigation plans. Background

Zurlo, James; Lueck, Steve

2011-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

48

350 MW(t) design fuel cycle selection. Revision 1  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document discusses the results of this evaluation and a recommendation to retain the graded fuel cycle in which one-half of the fuel elements are exchanged at each refueling. This recommendation is based on the better performance of the graded cycle relative to the evaluation criteria of both economics and control margin. A choice to retain the graded cycle and a power density of 5.9 MW/m{sup 3} for the upcoming conceptual design phase was deemed prudent for the following reasons: the graded cycle has significantly better economics, and essentially the same expected availability factor as the batch design, when both are evaluated against the same requirements, including water ingress; and the reduction in maximum fuel pin power peaking in the batch design compared to the graded cycle is only a few percent and gas hot streaks are not improved by changing to a batch cycle. The preliminary 2-D power distribution studies for both designs showed that maximum fuel pin power peaking, particularly near the inner reflector, was high for both designs and nearly the same in magnitude. 10 figs., 9 tabs.

Lane, R.K.; Lefler, W.; Shirley, G.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Economic Analysis of a 3MW Biomass Gasification Power Plant  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Accessed May 2008 from www.sce.com 9. The California BiomassCollaborative, Biomass gasification / power generationECONOMIC ANALYSIS OF A 3MW BIOMASS GASIFICATION POWER PLANT

Cattolica, Robert; Lin, Kathy

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Why Cogeneration? 24MW of local renewable energy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Why Cogeneration? · 24MW of local renewable energy · Reduced emissions and cleaner air · Retain 300 Wood Chips Sawdust Pulp Paper Emissions Production #12;Port Townsend Paper - Cogeneration Biomass

51

Update on the Southwest 1000 MW CSP Initiative  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The 1000 MW CSP project was initiated in FY02 based on a Congressional request of the DOE to investigate the feasibility of 1000 MW of Concentrating Solar Power in the Southwest by 2006. The original charge has grown and involved a number of activities including: outreach to the SW states, support of state-level activities in NM, CA, and CO, and analysis in support of the Western Governors' Association (WGA) 30 GW Clean Energy Initiative.

Mancini, T.; Mehos, M.; Wilkins, F.; Morse, F.

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Optimal power capturing of multi-MW wind generation system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recently, an increasing number of multi-MW (1MW and up) wind generation systems are being developed and variable speed-variable pitch (VS-VP) control technology is usually adopted to improve the fast response speed and obtain the optimal energy, which ... Keywords: adaptive fuzzy proportional integral derivative, doubly-fed induction generator, hydraulic variable pitch mechanism, optimal, variable speed-variable pitch, wind turbine

Kong Yigang; Wang Zhixin

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Aero-Structural Optimization of a 5 MW Wind Turbine Rotor.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??A 5 MW wind turbine rotor blade based on the NREL 5 MW Reference Turbine is optimized for maximum efficiency and minimum flapwise hub bending (more)

Vesel, Richard W., Jr.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Latest Results in SLAC 75-MW PPM Klystrons  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

75 MW X-band klystrons utilizing Periodic Permanent Magnet (PPM) focusing have been undergoing design, fabrication and testing at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) for almost nine years. The klystron development has been geared toward realizing the necessary components for the construction of the Next Linear Collider (NLC). The PPM devices built to date which fit this class of operation consist of a variety of 50 MW and 75 MW devices constructed by SLAC, KEK (Tsukuba, Japan) and industry. All these tubes follow from the successful SLAC design of a 50 MW PPM klystron in 1996. In 2004 the latest two klystrons were constructed and tested with preliminary results reported at EPAC2004. The first of these two devices was tested to the full NLC specifications of 75 MW, 1.6 microseconds pulse length, and 120 Hz. This 14.4 kW average power operation came with a tube efficiency >50%. The most recent testing of these last two devices will be presented here. Design and manufacturing issues of the latest klystron, due to be tested by the Fall of 2005, are also discussed.

Sprehn, D.; Caryotakis, G.; Haase, A.; Jongewaard, E.; Laurent, L.; Pearson, C.; Phillips, R.; /SLAC

2006-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

55

Reference Designs of 50 MW / 250 MWh Energy Storage Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Energy storage solutions for Renewable Integration and Transmission and Distribution (T&D) Grid Support often require systems of 10's of MWs in scale, and energy durations of longer than 4 hours. The goals of this study were to develop cost, performance and conceptual design information for several current and emerging alternative bulk storage systems in the scale of 50 MW / 250 MWh.

2011-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

56

Sacremento Municipal Utility District 100-MW sub e photovoltaic plant  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A status report on plans for the Sacramento Municipal Utility District (SMUD) 1-MW photovoltaic power plant is presented. DOE, the California Energy Commission, and SMUD will fund the project cooperatively. Emphasis is placed on the details of the government contract/cooperation agreement.

Powell, R.V.

1982-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Intense Atmospheric Vortices Associated with a 1000 MW Fire  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Observations of vortices of various types produced in a large thermal plume are described. The apparatus used to generate the plume is the Mtotron, an array of 105 fuel oil burners with a total heat output of approximately 1000 MW. Three types ...

Christopher R. Church; John T. Snow; Jean Dessens

1980-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Repowering the 250 MW Supercritical Power Plant at Lenenergo, Russia  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes the repowering of a supercritical 250 MW generating unit with an ABB 52.9 MN gas turbine at the Southern Plant of the Lenenergo system in Russia. It includes a review of the performance parameters of the repowered unit and an economic analysis of the repowering project.

1999-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

59

Activation of 200 MW refusegenerated CHP upward regulation effect (Smart  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Activation of 200 MW refusegenerated CHP upward regulation effect Activation of 200 MW refusegenerated CHP upward regulation effect Country Denmark Headquarters Location Sønderborg, Denmark Coordinates 54.913811°, 9.792178° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":54.913811,"lon":9.792178,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

60

MHK Projects/40MW Lewis project | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

40MW Lewis project 40MW Lewis project < MHK Projects Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":5,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"File:Aquamarine-marker.png","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":58.791595089019,"lon":-6.7286683246493,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"http:\/\/prod-http-80-800498448.us-east-1.elb.amazonaws.com\/w\/images\/7\/74\/Aquamarine-marker.png","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tw mw phase" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Operating and Maintaining a 465MW Cogeneration Plant  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The on-line avilability of the five Frame-7E gas turbine generators installed at the 465MW Lyondell Cogeneration Plant was 90% and 95.2% respectively for the first two years of operation (1986-87). The 140MW steam turbine generator availability was well over 98% each year. Such favorable results are due primarily to the (1) formal training programs utilized before and continued after plant startup, (2) redundancies designed into the critical components of the plant, (3) the immediate actions taken on failures or near-failures, (4) a sound preventive maintenance program, and (5) improvements performed promptly on discovered design, operating, and maintenance weaknesses uncovered during the early months of operation.

Theisen, R. E.

1988-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Greene County 100 MW Biomass Conceptual Engineering Study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Southern Company Services, Incorporated, (SCS) is interested in constructing a 100-megawatt (MW) (net) biomass-fueled facility at an existing facility to increase its share of renewable energy generation and to support future load growth. The site of interest is the Greene County Electric Generating Plant in Demopolis, Alabama. This report represents the formal compilation of key engineering deliverables that collectively provide a better understanding of the conceptual-level parameters associated with t...

2010-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

63

SPALLATION NEUTRON SOURCE OPERATIONAL EXPERIENCE AT 1 MW  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) has been operating at the MW level for about one year. Experience in beam loss control and machine activation at this power level is presented. Also experience with machine protection systems is reviewed, which is critical at this power level. One of the most challenging operational aspects of high power operation has been attaining high availability, which is also discussed

Galambos, John D [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Raft River 5-MW(e) geothermal pilot plant project  

SciTech Connect

The Raft River 5-MW(e) Pilot Plant Project was started in 1976. Construction is scheduled for completion in July 1980, with three years of engineering and operational testing to follow. The plant utilized a 280/sup 0/F geothermal fluid energy source and a dual boiling isobutane cycle. Developmental efforts are in progress in the areas of down hole pumps and chemical treatment of geothermal fluid for cooling tower makeup.

Rasmussen, T.L.; Whitbeck, J.F.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

MHK Technologies/14 MW OTECPOWER | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

MW OTECPOWER MW OTECPOWER < MHK Technologies Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Technology Profile Technology Type Click here OTEC - Closed Cycle Technology Readiness Level Click here TRL 5 6 System Integration and Technology Laboratory Demonstration Technology Description MINIMIZE SURFACE ACTIVITIES TO REDUCE THE CAPITAL COST AND TO IMPROVE EFFICIENCY ALTERNATE WORKING FLUIDS ARE USED FOR ENHANCED POWER EFFICIENCY IN OPTEC POWER HYBRID CYCLES ARE USED TO IMPROVE POWER AND NEED WITH SUBSEA HEAT EXCHANGERS ADVANCED SUPPORTING VESSEL CONCEPT AND FREE STANDING RISER TECHNOLOGIES TO WITH STAND HARSH OCEAN ENVIRONMENT IN DEEPWATER HAD BEEN DEVELOPED FOR THIS OPTEC POWER IT IS THE ONLY RELIABLE AND PROFITABLE RENEWABLE ENERGY SOURCE FOR THE NEED OF WORLD ENERGY FOR THE NEXT DECADE DESALINATION AND HDROGEN PRODUCTION ARE LINKED TO THE POWER GENERATION OF THE OTEC POWER FOR SEVERAL BY PRODUCTS COST EFFECTIVE PRODUCTION CLEAN ENERGY AND CLEAN WATER IS THE GOAL OF OTECPOWER INC OUR 14 MW OTEC POWER COSTS 50 MILLION USD ALL EQUIPMENT HAD BEEN DESINGED AND A FEW OF THEM ARE TESTED FOR OIL AND GAS INDUSTRY APPLICATION WHICHA RE BEING USED FOR OTECPOWER A RELIABLE AND FEASIBLE OTECPOWER IS PROPOSED

66

INTEGRATED GASIFICATION COMBINED CYCLE PROJECT 2 MW FUEL CELL DEMONSTRATION  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

With about 50% of power generation in the United States derived from coal and projections indicating that coal will continue to be the primary fuel for power generation in the next two decades, the Department of Energy (DOE) Clean Coal Technology Demonstration Program (CCTDP) has been conducted since 1985 to develop innovative, environmentally friendly processes for the world energy market place. The 2 MW Fuel Cell Demonstration was part of the Kentucky Pioneer Energy (KPE) Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) project selected by DOE under Round Five of the Clean Coal Technology Demonstration Program. The participant in the CCTDP V Project was Kentucky Pioneer Energy for the IGCC plant. FuelCell Energy, Inc. (FCE), under subcontract to KPE, was responsible for the design, construction and operation of the 2 MW fuel cell power plant. Duke Fluor Daniel provided engineering design and procurement support for the balance-of-plant skids. Colt Engineering Corporation provided engineering design, fabrication and procurement of the syngas processing skids. Jacobs Applied Technology provided the fabrication of the fuel cell module vessels. Wabash River Energy Ltd (WREL) provided the test site. The 2 MW fuel cell power plant utilizes FuelCell Energy's Direct Fuel Cell (DFC) technology, which is based on the internally reforming carbonate fuel cell. This plant is capable of operating on coal-derived syngas as well as natural gas. Prior testing (1992) of a subscale 20 kW carbonate fuel cell stack at the Louisiana Gasification Technology Inc. (LGTI) site using the Dow/Destec gasification plant indicated that operation on coal derived gas provided normal performance and stable operation. Duke Fluor Daniel and FuelCell Energy developed a commercial plant design for the 2 MW fuel cell. The plant was designed to be modular, factory assembled and truck shippable to the site. Five balance-of-plant skids incorporating fuel processing, anode gas oxidation, heat recovery, water treatment/instrument air, and power conditioning/controls were built and shipped to the site. The two fuel cell modules, each rated at 1 MW on natural gas, were fabricated by FuelCell Energy in its Torrington, CT manufacturing facility. The fuel cell modules were conditioned and tested at FuelCell Energy in Danbury and shipped to the site. Installation of the power plant and connection to all required utilities and syngas was completed. Pre-operation checkout of the entire power plant was conducted and the plant was ready to operate in July 2004. However, fuel gas (natural gas or syngas) was not available at the WREL site due to technical difficulties with the gasifier and other issues. The fuel cell power plant was therefore not operated, and subsequently removed by October of 2005. The WREL fuel cell site was restored to the satisfaction of WREL. FuelCell Energy continues to market carbonate fuel cells for natural gas and digester gas applications. A fuel cell/turbine hybrid is being developed and tested that provides higher efficiency with potential to reach the DOE goal of 60% HHV on coal gas. A system study was conducted for a 40 MW direct fuel cell/turbine hybrid (DFC/T) with potential for future coal gas applications. In addition, FCE is developing Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (SOFC) power plants with Versa Power Systems (VPS) as part of the Solid State Energy Conversion Alliance (SECA) program and has an on-going program for co-production of hydrogen. Future development in these technologies can lead to future coal gas fuel cell applications.

FuelCell Energy

2005-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

67

The simulation with the finite element method of the velocity and temperature fields for a nonturbionar jet burner of 35MW feeding with pulverized coal  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents the analysis of coal particle combustion in nonturbionar jet burner of 35MW used the Finite Element Method made with aid of the FLUENT programme. The pulverized coal combustion simulation involves modeling a continuous gas phase flow ... Keywords: FLUENT, coal-air mixture, combustion, finite element method, injection coal, nonturbionar jet

Mihai D. L. Talu; Stefan D. L. Talu; Mihai Negru

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

The design of a 200 MW interphase power controller prototype  

SciTech Connect

The paper addresses the practical design aspects of a 200 MW prototype for the interconnection of two synchronous 120-kV networks that are close to their short-circuit limits. The Interphase Power Controller is a new concept for the control of active and reactive power; it uses only standard components connected in an original manner. The paper gives the results of EMTP simulations for the conditions governing the design of the components. The significant steady-state and transient capabilities of the components are given as well as insulation coordination and protection aspects. Finally, a preliminary layout is presented for the prototype.

Habashi, K.; Lombard, J.J.; Mourad, S. (ABB Canada, Inc., Montreal, Quebec (Canada)); Pelletier, P.; Morin, G.; Beauregard, F.; Brochu, J. (CITEQ, Varennes, Quebec (Canada))

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Latest developments on the Dutch 1MW free electron maser  

SciTech Connect

The FOM Institute (Rijnhuizen, Netherlands), as part of their fusion technology program, has undertaken the development of a Free Electron Maser with the goal of producing 1MW long pulse to CW microwave output in the range 130 GHz{endash}250GHz with wall plug efficiencies of 60{percent}. This project has been carried out as a collaborative effort with Institute of Applied Physics, Nizhny Novgorod Russia, Kurchatov Institute, Moscow Russia, Lawrence Livermore Laboratory, U.S.A and CPI, U.S.A. The key design features of this FEM consists first of a conventional DC acceleration system at high voltage (2MV) which supplies only the unwanted beam interception current and a depressed collector system at 250kV which provides the main beam power. Low body current interception ({lt}25mA) is ensured by using robust inline beam focussing, a low emittance electron gun with halo suppression and periodic magnet side array focussing in the wiggler. The second key feature is use of a low-loss step corrugated waveguide circuit for broad band CW power handling and beam/RF separation. Finally, the required interaction efficiency and mode control is provided by a two stage stepped wiggler. The FEM has been constructed and recently undergone initial short pulse ({lt}10 usec) testing in an inverted mode with the depressed collector absent. Results to date have demonstrated 98.8{percent} beam transmission (over 5 Meters) at currents as high as 8.4 Amps, with 200GHz microwave output at 700kW. There has been good agreement between theory and experiment at the beam current levels tested so far. Details of the most recent experimental results will be presented, in particular the output frequency characteristics with detailed comparisons to theory. The immediate future plans are to operate the system at the design value of 12 Amps with at least 1MW output. The system will then be reconfigured with a 3 stage depressed collector to demonstrate, in the next year, long pulse operation (100 msec) and high wall plug efficiency. Long term future plans call for upgrading the FEM to 2MW and extrapolations up to 5MW are shown to be theoretically possible. {copyright} {ital 1999 American Institute of Physics.}

Caplan, M. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, 7000 East Ave, L-637 Livermore California, 94551 (United States); Verhoeven, A.G.; Urbanus, W. [FOM Instituut voor Plasma Fysica, Rijnhuizen, P.O. Box 1207, 3430 BE Nieuwegein (The Netherlands)

1999-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Activation of 200 MW refusegenerated CHP upward regulation effect (Smart  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

effect (Smart effect (Smart Grid Project) (Thisted, Denmark) Jump to: navigation, search Project Name Activation of 200 MW refusegenerated CHP upward regulation effect Country Denmark Headquarters Location Thisted, Denmark Coordinates 56.959167°, 8.703492° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":56.959167,"lon":8.703492,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

71

A conceptual design of the 2+ MW LBNE beam absorber  

SciTech Connect

The Long Baseline Neutrino Experiment (LBNE) will utilize a neutrino beamline facility located at Fermilab. The facility will aim a beam of neutrinos, produced by 60-120 GeV protons from the Fermilab Main Injector, toward a detector placed at the Deep Underground Science and Engineering Laboratory (DUSEL) in South Dakota. Secondary particles that do not decay into muons and neutrinos as well as any residual proton beam must be stopped at the end of the decay region to reduce noise/damage in the downstream muon monitors and reduce activation in the surrounding rock. This goal is achieved by placing an absorber structure at the end of the decay region. The requirements and conceptual design of such an absorber, capable of operating at 2+ MW primary proton beam power, is described.

Velev, G.; Childress, S.; Hurh, P.; Hylen, J.; Makarov, A.; Mohkhov, N.; Moore, C.D.; Novitski, I.; /Fermilab

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

5 MW pulsed spallation neutron source, Preconceptual design study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes a self-consistent base line design for a 5 MW Pulsed Spallation Neutron Source (PSNS). It is intended to establish feasibility of design and as a basis for further expanded and detailed studies. It may also serve as a basis for establishing project cost (30% accuracy) in order to intercompare competing designs for a PSNS not only on the basis of technical feasibility and technical merit but also on the basis of projected total cost. The accelerator design considered here is based on the objective of a pulsed neutron source obtained by means of a pulsed proton beam with average beam power of 5 MW, in {approx} 1 {mu}sec pulses, operating at a repetition rate of 60 Hz. Two target stations are incorporated in the basic facility: one for operation at 10 Hz for long-wavelength instruments, and one operating at 50 Hz for instruments utilizing thermal neutrons. The design approach for the proton accelerator is to use a low energy linear accelerator (at 0.6 GeV), operating at 60 Hz, in tandem with two fast cycling booster synchrotrons (at 3.6 GeV), operating at 30 Hz. It is assumed here that considerations of cost and overall system reliability may favor the present design approach over the alternative approach pursued elsewhere, whereby use is made of a high energy linear accelerator in conjunction with a dc accumulation ring. With the knowledge that this alternative design is under active development, it was deliberately decided to favor here the low energy linac-fast cycling booster approach. Clearly, the present design, as developed here, must be carried to the full conceptual design stage in order to facilitate a meaningful technology and cost comparison with alternative designs.

Not Available

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Alstom 3-MW Wind Turbine Installed at NWTC (Fact Sheet)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The 3-MW Alstom wind turbine was installed at NREL's NWTC in October 2010. Test data will be used to validate advanced turbine design and analysis tools. NREL signed a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement with Alstom in 2010 to conduct certification testing on the company's 3-MW ECO 100 wind turbine and to validate models of Alstom's unique drivetrain concept. The turbine was installed at NREL's National Wind Technology Center (NWTC) in October 2010 and engineers began certification testing in 2011. Tests to be conducted by NREL include a power quality test to finalize the International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC) requirements for type certification of the 60-Hz unit. The successful outcome of this test will enable Alstom to begin commercial production of ECO 100 in the United States. NREL also will obtain additional measurements of power performance, acoustic noise, and system frequency to complement the 50 Hz results previously completed in Europe. After NREL completes the certification testing on the ECO 100, it will conduct long-term testing to validate gearbox performance to gain a better understanding of the machine's unique ALSTOM PURE TORQUE{trademark} drivetrain concept. In conventional wind turbines, the rotor is supported by the shaft-bearing gearbox assembly. Rotor loads are partially transmitted to the gearbox and may reduce gearbox reliability. In the ALSTOM PURE TORQUE concept, the rotor is supported by a cast frame running through the hub, which transfers bending loads directly to the tower. Torque is transmitted to the shaft through an elastic coupling at the front of the hub. According to Alstom, this system will increase wind turbine reliability and reduce operation and maintenance costs by isolating the gearbox from rotor loads. Gearbox reliability has challenged the wind energy industry for more than two decades. Gearbox failures require expensive and time-consuming replacement, significantly increasing the cost of wind plant operation while reducing the plant's power output and revenue. To solve gearbox reliability issues, NREL launched a Gearbox Reliability Collaborative (GRC) in 2006 and brought together the world's leading turbine manufacturers, consultants, and experts from more than 30 companies and organizations. GRC's goal was to validate the typical design process-from wind turbine system loads to bearing ratings-through a comprehensive dynamometer and field-test program. Design analyses will form a basis for improving reliability of future designs and retrofit packages. Through its study of Alstom's Eco 100 gearbox, NREL can compare its GRC model gearbox with Alstom's and add the results to the GRC database, which is helping to advance more reliable wind turbine technology.

Not Available

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Model Validation at the 204-MW New Mexico Wind Energy Center  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Poster for WindPower 2006 held June 4-7, 2006, in Pittsburgh, PA, describing model validation at the 204-MW New Mexico Wind Energy Center.

Muljadi, E.; Butterfield, C. P.; Ellis, A.; Mechenbier, J.; Hochheimer, J.; Young, R.; Miller, N.; Delmerico, R.; Zavadil, R.; Smith, J. C.

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Baseline System Costs for 50.0 MW Enhanced Geothermal System...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Baseline System Costs for 50.0 MW Enhanced Geothermal System -- A Function of: Working Fluid, Technology, and Location Geothermal Project Jump to: navigation, search Last modified...

76

Wind industry installs almost 5,300 MW of capacity in December ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Approximately 40% of the total 2012 wind capacity additions (12,620 MW) came online in December, just before the scheduled expiration of the wind production tax ...

77

Design and Dynamic Modeling of the Support Structure for a 10 MW Offshore Wind Turbine.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? This thesis presents two designs of tension-leg-platforms (TLP) support structures for the 10 MW reference wind turbine being developed by the Norwegian Research Centre (more)

Crozier, Aina

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Property:Project Phase | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Phase Phase Jump to: navigation, search Property Name Project Phase Property Type Text This is a property of type String. Pages using the property "Project Phase" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) M MHK Projects/40MW Lewis project + Phase 2 + MHK Projects/ADM 3 + Phase ? + MHK Projects/ADM 4 + Phase ? + MHK Projects/ADM 5 + Phase 2 + MHK Projects/AW Energy EMEC + Phase 3 + MHK Projects/AWS II + Phase 1 + MHK Projects/Admirality Inlet Tidal Energy Project + Phase 1 + MHK Projects/Agucadoura + Phase 3 + MHK Projects/Alaska 1 + Phase 0 + MHK Projects/Alaska 13 + Phase ? + MHK Projects/Alaska 17 + Phase 0 + MHK Projects/Alaska 18 + Phase 0 + MHK Projects/Alaska 24 + Phase 0 + MHK Projects/Alaska 25 + Phase 0 + MHK Projects/Alaska 28 + Phase 0 +

79

Modular 5 MW geothermal power plant design considerations and guidelines  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The design considerations and guideline documents given define the principal design requirements for a nominal 5 MW geothermal power plant of a type to permit over-the-road transport of its several modules. The power plant system defined is supplied with steam from a single flash steam separator stage, located at the plant area, and supplied with steam from two wells at nominal pressure of 3.8 Kg/cm/sup 2/ Abs (54 psia). In some cases where the content of noxious noncondensable gases is high, a shell and tube condenser would be substituted for the direct contact type condenser specified and an additional module containing an H/sub 2/S removal system would be added. Guidelines are given for the following: site preparation, collection system, plant installation, assembly, and test; turbine generator module; condenser and noncondensable gas removal module; plant control and switchgear module; cooling water circulation pump module; steam-water separator module; maintenance, office, and lavatory module; reinjection pump module; cooling tower modules; spray pond installation and piping; and auxiliary generator module. (MHR)

Not Available

1976-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Environmental summary document for the Republic Geothermal, Inc. application for a geothermal loan guaranty project: 64 MW well field and 48 MW (net) geothermal power plant  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A comprehensive review and analysis is provided of the environmental consequences of (1) guaranteeing a load for the completion of the 64 MW well field and the 48 MW (net) power plant or (2) denying a guaranteed load that is needed to finish the project. Mitigation measures are discussed. Alternatives and their impacts are compared and some discussion is included on unavoidable adverse impacts. (MHR)

Layton, D.W.; Powers, D.J.; Leitner, P.; Crow, N.B.; Gudiksen, P.H.; Ricker, Y.E.

1979-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tw mw phase" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
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81

Optically Isolated HVIGBT Based MW Cascade Inverter Building...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

High-Voltage, IGBT-Based Inverter for DER Applications Presentation at DOE Energy Storage Systems Research Program Peer Review Washington, DC November 2, 2006 SBIR Phase II Grant...

82

Grid Simulator for Testing MW-Scale Wind Turbines at NREL (Poster)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

As described, an initiative by NREL to design and construct a 9-MVA grid simulator to operate with the existing 2.5 MW and new upcoming 5-MW dynamometer facilities will fulfill this role and bring many potential benefits to the U.S. wind industry with the ultimate goal of reducing wind energy integration costs.

Gevorgian, V.; McDade, M.; Wallen, R.; Mendoza, I.; Shirazi, M.

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

North Brawley Power Plant Placed in Service; Currently Generating 17 MW;  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

North Brawley Power Plant Placed in Service; Currently Generating 17 MW; North Brawley Power Plant Placed in Service; Currently Generating 17 MW; Additional Operations Update Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: North Brawley Power Plant Placed in Service; Currently Generating 17 MW; Additional Operations Update Author Electric Energy Publications Inc. Published Publisher Not Provided, Date Not Provided DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http://crossref.org Online Internet link for North Brawley Power Plant Placed in Service; Currently Generating 17 MW; Additional Operations Update Citation Electric Energy Publications Inc.. North Brawley Power Plant Placed in Service; Currently Generating 17 MW; Additional Operations Update [Internet]. [updated 2010;cited 2010]. Available from:

84

Nevada/Geothermal | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Nevada/Geothermal Nevada/Geothermal < Nevada Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Print PDF Nevada Geothermal General Regulatory Roadmap Geothermal Power Projects Under Development in Nevada Developer Location Estimated Capacity (MW) Development Phase Geothermal Area Geothermal Region Alligator Geothermal Geothermal Project Oski Energy LLC Ely, Nevada 20 MW20,000 kW 20,000,000 W 20,000,000,000 mW 0.02 GW 2.0e-5 TW Phase I - Resource Procurement and Identification Alum Geothermal Project Ram Power Silver Peak, Nevada 64 MW64,000 kW 64,000,000 W 64,000,000,000 mW 0.064 GW 6.4e-5 TW Phase II - Resource Exploration and Confirmation Alum Geothermal Area Walker-Lane Transition Zone Geothermal Region Aurora Geothermal Project Gradient Resources Hawthorne, Nevada 190 MW190,000 kW

85

Evaluation of battery converters based on 4. 8-MW fuel cell demonstrator inverter. Final report. [Contains brief glossary  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Electrical power conditioning is a critical element in the development of advanced electrochemical energy storage systems. This program evaluates the use of existing self-commutated converter technology (as developed by the Power Systems Division of United Technologies for the 4.8-MW Fuel Cell Demonstrator) with modification for use in battery energy storage systems. The program consists of three parts: evaluation of the cost and performance of a self-commutated converter modified to maintain production commonality between battery and fuel cell power conditioners, demonstration of the principal characteristics required for the battery application in MW-scale hardware, and investigation of the technical requirements of operation isolated from the utility system. A power-conditioning system consisting of a self-commutated converter augmented with a phase-controlled rectifier was selected and a preliminary design, prepared. A principal factor in this selection was production commonality with the fuel cell inverter system. Additional types of augmentation, and the use of a self-commutated converter system without augmentation, were also considered. A survey of advanced battery manufacturers was used to establish the dc interface characteristics. The principal characteristics of self-commutated converter operation required for battery application were demonstrated with the aid of an available 0.5-MW development system. A survey of five REA and municipal utilities and three A and E firms was conducted to determine technical requirements for operation in a mode isolated from the utility. Definitive requirements for this application were not established because of the limited scope of this study. 63 figures, 37 tables.

Not Available

1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

4 MW fast wave current drive upgrade for DIII-D  

SciTech Connect

The DIII-D program has just completed a major addition to its ion cyclotron range of frequency (ICRF) systems. This upgrade project added two new fast wave current drive (FWCD) systems, with each system consisting of a 2 MW, 30 to 120 MHz transmitter, ceramic insulated transmission lines and tuner elements, and water-cooled four-strap antenna. With this addition of 4 MW of FWCD power to the original 2 MW, 30 to 60 MHz capability, experiments can be performed that will explore advanced tokamak plasma configurations by using the centrally localized current drive to effect current profile modifications.

Callis, R.W.; Cary, W.P. [General Atomics, San Diego, CA (United States); Baity, F.W. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)] [and others

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Arizona College 5 MW System Will be "Solar with a Purpose" | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Arizona College 5 MW System Will be "Solar with a Purpose" Arizona College 5 MW System Will be "Solar with a Purpose" Arizona College 5 MW System Will be "Solar with a Purpose" May 28, 2010 - 2:19pm Addthis Arizona Western College (AWC) wants to be the go-to for solar, says Bill Smith, director of facilities management. AWC is based in Yuma, Ariz., and that, according to the Guinness Book of World Records, is the sunniest place on Earth. Now, a group of private companies, researchers and AWC educators will tap the solar potential by building a 4.995 MW solar array at the college. When the solar energy system is completed, it will be the largest solar array on any U.S. college campus. "We are strategically placed geographically. Now that we have this company that has approached us with this awesome opportunity, we want ...

88

Experimental study of a 1.5-MW, 110-GHz gyrotron oscillator  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis reports the design, construction and testing of a 1.5 MW, 110 GHz gyrotron oscillator. This high power microwave tube has been proposed as the next evolutionary step for gyrotrons used to provide electron ...

Anderson, James P. (James Paul), 1972-

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

BEOWAWE number1-A 10 MW geothermal unit in northern Nevada  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes a project to build and operate a nominal 10 mw electrical generating unit using the geothermal heat from the Beowawe, Nevada, geothermal reservoir to power an isobutane binary unit. This 10 mw unit would be fabricated on portable skids by equipment supplier for shipment to the site. The project will be owned and operated by the NORNEV Demonstration Geothermal Company which is made up of Pacific Power and Light, Eugene Water and Electric Board, Sierra Pacific Power Company, and Sacramento Municipal Utility District. The geothermal brine for powering the 10 mw binary WGU will be purchased from Chevron Resource Company. This first unit is a research and development unit and will, hopefully, lead to total development of the 300 mw plus Beowawe reservoir.

Keilman, L.

1982-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

A 1-mW vibration energy harvesting system for moth flight-control applications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis focuses on the approach and methodologies required to build a 1-mW energy-harvesting system for moth flight control applications. The crepuscular hawk moth Manduca sexta is the chosen test subject. This project ...

Chang, Samuel C

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Survey of Landfill Gas Generation Potential: 2-MW Molten Carbonate Fuel Cell  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Molten carbonate fuel cells can operate almost as efficiently on landfill gas as on natural gas. This study identified 749 landfills in the United States having the potential to support a total of nearly 3000 2-MW fuel cells.

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Arizona College 5 MW System Will be "Solar with a Purpose" | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Arizona College 5 MW System Will be "Solar with a Purpose" Arizona College 5 MW System Will be "Solar with a Purpose" Arizona College 5 MW System Will be "Solar with a Purpose" May 28, 2010 - 2:19pm Addthis Arizona Western College (AWC) wants to be the go-to for solar, says Bill Smith, director of facilities management. AWC is based in Yuma, Ariz., and that, according to the Guinness Book of World Records, is the sunniest place on Earth. Now, a group of private companies, researchers and AWC educators will tap the solar potential by building a 4.995 MW solar array at the college. When the solar energy system is completed, it will be the largest solar array on any U.S. college campus. "We are strategically placed geographically. Now that we have this company that has approached us with this awesome opportunity, we want ...

93

Performance of the H{sup -} Ion Source Supporting 1-MW Beam Operations at SNS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory reached 1-MW of beam power in September 2009, and now routinely operates near 1-MW for the production of neutrons. This paper reviews the performance, operational issues, implemented and planned mitigations of the SNS H{sup -} ion source to support such high power-level beams with high availability. Some results from R and D activities are also briefly described.

Han, B. X.; Hardek, T.; Kang, Y.; Murray, S. N. Jr.; Pennisi, T. R.; Piller, C.; Santana, M.; Welton, R. F.; Stockli, M. P. [Spallation Neutron Source, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States)

2011-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

94

Performance of the H- Ion Source Supporting 1-MW Beam Operations at SNS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory reached 1-MW of beam power in September 2009, and now routinely operates near 1-MW for the production of neutrons. This paper reviews the performance, operational issues, implemented and planned mitigations of the SNS H- ion source to support such high power-level beams with high availability. Some results from R&D activities are also briefly described.

Han, Baoxi [ORNL; Hardek, Thomas W [ORNL; Kang, Yoon W [ORNL; Murray Jr, S N [ORNL; Pennisi, Terry R [ORNL; Piller, Chip [ORNL; Santana, Manuel [ORNL; Welton, Robert F [ORNL; Stockli, Martin P [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Design and testing of a 13. 75-MW converter for a superconducting magnetic-energy-storage system  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A 30 MJ superconducting magnetic energy storage system will be installed in 1982 in Tacoma, WA, to act as a transmission line stabilizer. Two 6 MVA transformers and a 5.5 kA, + 2.5 kV converter will connect the superconducting coil to the 13.8 kV bus and regulate the power flow between the coil and the three phase system. The design philosophy for the converter including its control and protection system is given in the paper. The converter has been tested with 10% overvoltage at no load, with 10% overcurrent at zero output voltage and with a watercooled resistive load of about 1 MW. These test results show that the converter will meet the expected full load operating conditions.

Boenig, H.J.; Turner, R.D.; Neft, C.L.; Sueker, K.H.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Niland development project geothermal loan guaranty: 49-MW (net) power plant and geothermal well field development, Imperial County, California: Environmental assessment  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The proposed federal action addressed by this environmental assessment is the authorization of disbursements under a loan guaranteed by the US Department of Energy for the Niland Geothermal Energy Program. The disbursements will partially finance the development of a geothermal well field in the Imperial Valley of California to supply a 25-MW(e) (net) power plant. Phase I of the project is the production of 25 MW(e) (net) of power; the full rate of 49 MW (net) would be achieved during Phase II. The project is located on approximately 1600 acres (648 ha) near the city of Niland in Imperial County, California. Well field development includes the initial drilling of 8 production wells for Phase I, 8 production wells for Phase II, and the possible need for as many as 16 replacement wells over the anticipated 30-year life of the facility. Activities associated with the power plant in addition to operation are excavation and construction of the facility and associated systems (such as cooling towers). Significant environmental impacts, as defined in Council on Environmental Quality regulation 40 CFR Part 1508.27, are not expected to occur as a result of this project. Minor impacts could include the following: local degradation of ambient air quality due to particulate and/or hydrogen sulfide emissions, temporarily increased ambient noise levels due to drilling and construction activities, and increased traffic. Impacts could be significant in the event of a major spill of geothermal fluid, which could contaminate groundwater and surface waters and alter or eliminate nearby habitat. Careful land use planning and engineering design, implementation of mitigation measures for pollution control, and design and implementation of an environmental monitoring program that can provide an early indication of potential problems should ensure that impacts, except for certain accidents, will be minimized.

Not Available

1984-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Ac loss calorimeter for three-phase cable  

SciTech Connect

A calorimeter for measuring ac losses in meter-long lengths of HTS superconducting power transmission line cables is described. The calorimeter, which is based on a temperature difference technique, has a precision of 1 mW and measures single, two-phase (coupling), and three-phase losses. The measurements show significant coupling losses between phases.

Daney, D.E.; Boenig, H.J.; Maley, M.P.; McMurry, D.E.; DeBlanc, B.G. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States). Superconductivity Technology Center

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Idaho/Geothermal | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Idaho/Geothermal Idaho/Geothermal < Idaho Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Print PDF Idaho Geothermal General Regulatory Roadmap Geothermal Power Projects Under Development in Idaho Developer Location Estimated Capacity (MW) Development Phase Geothermal Area Geothermal Region Raft River II Geothermal Project U.S. Geothermal Raft River, AK 114 MW114,000 kW 114,000,000 W 114,000,000,000 mW 0.114 GW 1.14e-4 TW Phase III - Permitting and Initial Development Raft River Geothermal Area Northern Basin and Range Geothermal Region Raft River III Geothermal Project U.S. Geothermal Raft River, ID 114 MW114,000 kW 114,000,000 W 114,000,000,000 mW 0.114 GW 1.14e-4 TW Phase I - Resource Procurement and Identification Raft River Geothermal Area Northern Basin and Range Geothermal Region

99

Alaska/Geothermal | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Alaska/Geothermal Alaska/Geothermal < Alaska Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Print PDF Alaska Geothermal General Regulatory Roadmap Geothermal Power Projects Under Development in Alaska Developer Location Estimated Capacity (MW) Development Phase Geothermal Area Geothermal Region Akutan Geothermal Project City Of Akutan Akutan, Alaska 10 MW10,000 kW 10,000,000 W 10,000,000,000 mW 0.01 GW 1.0e-5 TW Phase II - Resource Exploration and Confirmation Akutan Fumaroles Geothermal Area Alaska Geothermal Region Pilgrim Hot Springs Geothermal Project Unaatuq (Near Nome), OR 10 MW10,000 kW 10,000,000 W 10,000,000,000 mW 0.01 GW 1.0e-5 TW Phase I - Resource Procurement and Identification Pilgrim Hot Springs Geothermal Area Alaska Geothermal Region Add a geothermal project.

100

Development of a 2 MW CW Waterload for Electron Cyclotron Heating Systems  

SciTech Connect

Calabazas Creek Research, Inc. developed a load capable of continuously dissipating 2 MW of RF power from gyrotrons. The input uses HE11 corrugated waveguide and a rotating launcher to uniformly disperse the power over the lossy surfaces in the load. This builds on experience with a previous load designed to dissipate 1 MW of continuous RF power. The 2 MW load uses more advanced RF dispersion to double the capability in the same size device as the 1 MW load. The new load reduces reflected power from the load to significantly less than 1 %. This eliminates requirements for a preload to capture reflected power. The program updated control electronics that provides all required interlocks for operation and measurement of peak and average power. The program developed two version of the load. The initial version used primarily anodized aluminum to reduce weight and cost. The second version used copper and stainless steel to meet specifications for the ITER reactor currently under construction in France. Tests of the new load at the Japanese Atomic Energy Agency confirmed operation of the load to a power level of 1 MW, which is the highest power currently available for testing the load. Additional tests will be performed at General Atomics in spring 2013. The U.S. ITER organization will test the copper/stainless steel version of the load in December 2012 or early in 2013. Both loads are currently being marketed worldwide.

R. Lawrence,Ives; Maxwell Mizuhara; George Collins; Jeffrey Neilson; Philipp Borchard

2012-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tw mw phase" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
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101

500 MW X-Band RF System of a 0.25 GeV Electron LINAC for Advanced Compton Scattering Source Application  

SciTech Connect

A Mono-Energetic Gamma-Ray (MEGa-Ray) Compton scattering light source is being developed at LLNL in collaboration with the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory. The electron beam for the Compton scattering interaction will be generated by a X-band RF gun and a X-band LINAC at the frequency of 11.424 GHz. High power RF in excess of 500 MW is needed to accelerate the electrons to energy of 250 MeV or greater for the interaction. Two high power klystron amplifiers, each capable of generating 50 MW, 1.5 msec pulses, will be the main high power RF sources for the system. These klystrons will be powered by state of the art solid-state high voltage modulators. A RF pulse compressor, similar to the SLED II pulse compressor, will compress the klystron output pulse with a power gain factor of five. For compactness consideration, we are looking at a folded waveguide setup. This will give us 500 MW at output of the compressor. The compressed pulse will then be distributed to the RF gun and to six traveling wave accelerator sections. Phase and amplitude control are located at the RF gun input and additional control points along the LINAC to allow for parameter control during operation. This high power RF system is being designed and constructed. In this paper, we will present the design, layout, and status of this RF system.

Chu, Tak Sum; /LLNL, Livermore; Anderson, Scott; /LLNL, Livermore; Barty, Christopher; /LLNL, Livermore; Gibson, David; /LLNL, Livermore; Hartemann, Fred; /LLNL, Livermore; Marsh, Roark; /LLNL, Livermore; Siders, Craig; /LLNL, Livermore; Adolphsen, Chris; /SLAC; Jongewaard, Erik; /SLAC; Raubenheimer, Tor; /SLAC; Tantawi, Sami; /SLAC; Vlieks, Arnold; /SLAC; Wang, Juwen; /SLAC

2012-07-03T23:59:59.000Z

102

500 MW X-BAND RF SYSTEM OF A 0.25 GEV ELECTRON LINAC FOR ADVANCED COMPTON SCATTERING SOURCE APPLICATION  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A Mono-Energetic Gamma-Ray (MEGa-Ray) Compton scattering light source is being developed at LLNL in collaboration with SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory. The electron beam for the Compton scattering interaction will be generated by a X-band RF gun and a X-band LINAC at the frequency of 11.424 GHz. High power RF in excess of 500 MW is needed to accelerate the electrons to energy of 250 MeV or greater for the interaction. Two high power klystron amplifiers, each capable of generating 50 MW, 1.5 msec pulses, will be the main high power RF sources for the system. These klystrons will be powered by state of the art solid-state high voltage modulators. A RF pulse compressor, similar to the SLED II pulse compressor, will compress the klystron output pulse with a power gain factor of five. For compactness consideration, we are looking at a folded waveguide setup. This will give us 500 MW at output of the compressor. The compressed pulse will then be distributed to the RF gun and to six traveling wave accelerator sections. Phase and amplitude control are located at the RF gun input and additional control points along the LINAC to allow for parameter control during operation. This high power RF system is being designed and constructed. In this paper, we will present the design, layout, and status of this RF system.

Chu, T S; Anderson, S G; Gibson, D J; Hartemann, F V; Marsh, R A; Siders, C; Barty, C P; Adolphsen, C; Jongewaard, E; Tantawi, S; Vlieks, A; Wang, J W; Raubenheimer, T

2010-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

103

TOXECON RETROFIT FOR MERCURY AND MULTI-POLLUTANT CONTROL ON THREE 90 MW COAL FIRED BOILERS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

With the Nation's coal-burning utilities facing tighter controls on mercury pollutants, the U.S. Department of Energy is supporting projects that could offer power plant operators better ways to reduce these emissions at much lower costs. Sorbent injection technology represents one of the simplest and most mature approaches to controlling mercury emissions from coal-fired boilers. It involves injecting a solid material such as powdered activated carbon into the flue gas. The gas-phase mercury in the flue gas contacts the sorbent and attaches to its surface. The sorbent with the mercury attached is then collected by a particle control device along with the other solid material, primarily fly ash. WE Energies has over 3,700 MW of coal-fired generating capacity and supports an integrated multi-emission control strategy for SO{sub 2}, NO{sub x} and mercury emissions while maintaining a varied fuel mix for electric supply. The primary goal of this project is to reduce mercury emissions from three 90 MW units that burn Powder River Basin coal at the WE Energies Presque Isle Power Plant. Additional goals are to reduce nitrogen oxide (NO{sub x}), sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}), and particulate matter (PM) emissions, allow for reuse and sale of fly ash, demonstrate a reliable mercury continuous emission monitor (CEM) suitable for use in the power plant environment, and demonstrate a process to recover mercury captured in the sorbent. To achieve these goals, WE Energies (the Participant) will design, install, and operate a TOXECON{trademark} (TOXECON) system designed to clean the combined flue gases of units 7, 8, and 9 at the Presque Isle Power Plant. TOXECON is a patented process in which a fabric filter system (baghouse) installed down stream of an existing particle control device is used in conjunction with sorbent injection for removal of pollutants from combustion flue gas. For this project, the flue gas emissions will be controlled from the three units using a single baghouse. Mercury will be controlled by injection of activated carbon or other novel sorbents, while NO{sub x} and SO{sub 2} will be controlled by injection of sodium based or other novel sorbents. Addition of the TOXECON baghouse will provide enhanced particulate control. Sorbents will be injected downstream of the existing particle collection device to allow for continued sale and reuse of captured fly ash from the existing particulate control device, uncontaminated by activated carbon or sodium sorbents. Methods for sorbent regeneration, i.e. mercury recovery from the sorbent, will be explored and evaluated. For mercury concentration monitoring in the flue gas streams, components available for use will be evaluated and the best available will be integrated into a mercury CEM suitable for use in the power plant environment. This project will provide for the use of a novel multi-pollutant control system to reduce emissions of mercury and other air pollutants, while minimizing waste, from a coal-fired power generation system.

Richard E. Johnson

2004-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

104

Ecosystem Solar Electric Corp aka Solar MW Energy Inc | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Solar Electric Corp aka Solar MW Energy Inc Solar Electric Corp aka Solar MW Energy Inc Jump to: navigation, search Name Ecosystem Solar Electric Corp, aka Solar MW Energy Inc Place Ontario, California Zip 91761 Product Plans to develop STEG plants in the Mojave desert. Coordinates 34.06457°, -117.647809° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":34.06457,"lon":-117.647809,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

105

Economic Development Impact of 1,000 MW of Wind Energy in Texas  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Texas has approximately 9,727 MW of wind energy capacity installed, making it a global leader in installed wind energy. As a result of the significant investment the wind industry has brought to Texas, it is important to better understand the economic development impacts of wind energy in Texas. This report analyzes the jobs and economic impacts of 1,000 MW of wind power generation in the state. The impacts highlighted in this report can be used in policy and planning decisions and can be scaled to get a sense of the economic development opportunities associated with other wind scenarios. This report can also inform stakeholders in other states about the potential economic impacts associated with the development of 1,000 MW of new wind power generation and the relationships of different elements in the state economy.

Reategui, S.; Hendrickson, S.

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

The conversion of the 2 MW reactor at the Rhode Island Nuclear Science Center  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The 2 MW Rhode Island Atomic Energy Commission reactor is required to convert from the use of High Enriched Uranium (HEU) fuel to the use of Low Enriched Uranium (LEU) fuel using a standard LEU fuel plate which is thinner and contains more U-235 than the current HEU plate. These differences, coupled with a desire to upgrade the characteristics and capability of the reactor, have resulted in core design studies and thermal hydraulic studies not only at the current 2 MW but also at the maximum power level of the reactor, 5 MW. In addition, during 23 years of operation, it has become clear that the main uses of the reactor have been neutron scattering and neutron activation analysis. The requirement to convert to LEU presents and opportunity to optimize the core for the utilization and to restudy the thermal hydraulics using modern techniques. This paper presents the current conclusions of both aspects. 2 refs., 9 figs.

DiMeglio, A.F.; Matos, J.E.; Freese, K.E.; Spring, E.F. (Rhode Island Atomic Energy Commission, Narragansett, RI (USA). Rhode Island Nuclear Science Center; Argonne National Lab., IL (USA); Rhode Island Atomic Energy Commission, Narragansett, RI (USA). Rhode Island Nuclear Science Center)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Decommissioning of the Austrian 10 MW Research Reactor, Results and Lessons learned Paper  

SciTech Connect

After the decision to shut down the 10 MW ASTRA-MTR Research Reactor was reached in May 1998, the possible options and required phases for decommissioning and removal of the radioactive components were evaluated in a decommissioning study. To support the decisions at each phase, an estimate of the activity inventory in the various parts of the reactor and the waste volume to be expected was performed. Of the possible options an immediate dismantling to phase 1 of IAEA Technical Guide Lines after the immediately following, continued dismantling to phase 2 of these guide lines was identified as the most reasonable and under the auspices optimum choice. The actual decommissioning work on the ASTRA-Reactor began in January 2000 after its final shutdown on July 31, 1999. Preliminary evaluations of the activity inventory gave an estimated amount of 320 kg of intermediate level waste, of about 60 metric tons of contaminated and another 100 metric tons of activated low level radioactive waste. The activities were roughly estimated to be at 200 TBq in the intermediate level and 6 GBq in the low level. The structure of the decommissioning process was decided against cost-, time- and risk-optimization following the basic layout of the main tasks, e.g. the removing of the fuel, the recovering and the treatment of the intermediate level activities in the vicinity of the core, the handling and conditioning of the neutron exposed graphite and the Beryllium-elements. As an example, the dismantling of approx. 1400 metric tons of the biological shield is described in more detail from the determination of the dismantling technique to the clearing procedures and the deposition. The process of dismantling of the biological shield is presented in fast motion. The dismantling of the pump-room installations of the primary loop, the processing of the contaminated or activated metals, the dismantling of the ventilation system and the radiological clearance of the reactor building was done under optimized conditions and is explained in the following. Spent fuel was generally delivered to the US Department of Energy - DOE in several shipments over the operational time of the ASTRA reactor. With the last shipment in May 2001 all the remaining spent fuel elements out of the ASTRA reactor consignment were transferred to DOE. To reduce waste from concrete shielding, German regulations Dt.StrSchV, annex IV, table 1, two clearance values referring to 'clearance restricted for permanent deposit' and to a clearance for unrestricted re-use were used. In order to reduce the amount of an estimated 60 tons of slightly contaminated metals, it was determined that introducing re-melting procedures were the most economical way. To obtain radiological clearance of the reactor building, compliance with the release limits according to Austrian Radiation Protection Ordinance had to be proved to the regulatory body. There, in general, the limits for unrestricted release were defined as a maximum dose rate of 10 {mu}Sv effective for an individual person per year. The results of the regular yearly medical examinations of the staff indicated no influence of the work related to decommissioning. The readings of the personal dosimeters over the entire project amounted to a total of 85.6 mSv, averaging to 1.07 mSv per year and person. After finishing the decommissioning process, the material balance showed 89.6 % for unrestricted reuse, 6.6 % for conventional mass-dumping and 3.8 % of ILW and LLW. The project was covered by an extensive documentation. All operations within NES followed ISO 9000 quality insurance standards. Experiences and knowledge were presented to and shared with the community, e.g. AFR and IAEA throughout the project. (authors)

Hillebrand, G.; Meyer, F. [Nuclear Engineering Seibersdorf GmbH (NES), Seibersdorf, Austria, Europe (Austria)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

2 MW Active Bouncer Converter Design for Long Pulse Klystron Modulators  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper presents some design issues of a 2 MW interleaved buck converter which is used as an active bouncer droop compensator for a 5.5MW long pulse klystron modulator. This novel design concept presents many challenges in terms of voltage ripple versus pulse rise-time. Issues related to the voltage ripple specification versus output filter design are discussed in detail. The design study is analyzed analytically, simulated numerically and is validated by experimental results obtained from a full power prototype.

Aguglia, D

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Internal Technical Report, Heat Exchanger Sizing for 20 MW Geothermal Power Plants at MX Sites  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report presents the details of the analyses used to size the heaters, steam condenser, and working fluid condenser for a proposed 20 MW geothermal power plant application at MX sites in the southwest. These units would use a mixture of hydrocarbons (90% isobutane--10% n-hexane) to extract energy from moderate temperature resources (resource temperatures of 365 F, 400 F, and 450 F were considered). The working fluid will be maintained at supercritical pressures in the heater units. Studies have shown that this cycle will provide a significant net power increase over standard dual boiling single fluid cycles currently in use, e.g., the Raft River 5 MW pilot plant.

Kochan, R.J.; Bliem, C.J.

1981-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

UPVG phase 2 report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Utility PhotoVoltaic Group (UPVG), supported by member dues and a grant from the US Department of Energy, has as its mission the acceleration of the use of cost-effective small-scale and emerging large-scale applications of photovoltaics for the benefit of electric utilities and their customers. Formed in October, 1992, with the support of the American Public Power Association, Edison Electric Institute, and the National Rural Electric Cooperative Association, the UPVG currently has 90 members from all sectors of the electric utility industry. The UPVG`s efforts as conceived were divided into four phases: Phase 0--program plan; Phase 1--organization and strategy development; Phase 2--creating market assurance; and Phase 3--higher volume purchases. The Phase 0 effort developed the program plan and was completed early in 1993. The Phase 1 goal was to develop the necessary background information and analysis to lead to a decision as to which strategies could be undertaken by utilities to promote greater understanding of PV markets and achieve increased volumes of PV purchases. This report provides the details of the UPVG`s Phase 2 efforts to initiate TEAM-UP, its multiyear, 50-MW hardware initiative.

NONE

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Model Validation at the 204 MW New Mexico Wind Energy Center: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In this paper, we describe methods to derive and validate equivalent models for a large wind farm. FPL Energy's 204-MW New Mexico Wind Energy Center, which is interconnected to the Public Service Company of New Mexico (PNM) transmission system, was used as a case study. The methods described are applicable to any large wind power plant.

Muljadi, E.; Butterfield, C. P.; Ellis, A.; Mechenbier, J.; Hochheimer, J.; Young, R.; Miller, N.; Delmerico, R.; Zavadil, R.; Smith, J. C.

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Model Validation at the 204 MW New Mexico Wind Energy Center: Preprint  

SciTech Connect

In this paper, we describe methods to derive and validate equivalent models for a large wind farm. FPL Energy's 204-MW New Mexico Wind Energy Center, which is interconnected to the Public Service Company of New Mexico (PNM) transmission system, was used as a case study. The methods described are applicable to any large wind power plant.

Muljadi, E.; Butterfield, C. P.; Ellis, A.; Mechenbier, J.; Hochheimer, J.; Young, R.; Miller, N.; Delmerico, R.; Zavadil, R.; Smith, J. C.

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Baseline System Costs for 50.0 MW Enhanced Geothermal System -- A Function  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Baseline System Costs for 50.0 MW Enhanced Geothermal System -- A Function Baseline System Costs for 50.0 MW Enhanced Geothermal System -- A Function of: Working Fluid, Technology, and Location Geothermal Project Jump to: navigation, search Last modified on July 22, 2011. Project Title Baseline System Costs for 50.0 MW Enhanced Geothermal System -- A Function of: Working Fluid, Technology, and Location Project Type / Topic 1 Recovery Act: Enhanced Geothermal Systems Component Research and Development/Analysis Project Type / Topic 2 Geothermal Analysis Project Description This effort will support the expansion of Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS), supporting DOE Strategic Themes of "energy security" and sub goal of "energy diversity"; reducing the Nation's dependence on foreign oil while improving our environment. A 50 MW has been chosen as a design point, so that the project may also assess how different machinery approaches will change the costing - it is a mid point in size where multiple solutions exist that will allow the team to effectively explore the options in the design space and understand the cost.

114

EK 131/132 module: Introduction to Wind Energy MW 3-5  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

EK 131/132 module: Introduction to Wind Energy MW 3-5 Course. This course provides an overview of wind turbine technology and energy concepts. The question of whether wind. Students will measure personal energy use and analyze wind turbine data from the Museum of Science's wind

115

Renewable Energy Transmission Initiative Phase 1A  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

94597 Tel: (913) 458-2000 www.bv.com #12;Principal Investigators: Ryan Pletka, Project Manager Andy Potential in RETI Study region. ......... 6-23 Table 6-11. Candidate LFG Projects (3 MW and Greater information to be used in Phase 1B of the California Renewable Energy Transmission Initiative project. 1

116

Design and Test of a 100MW X Band TE01 Window  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Research at Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) is in progress on a TeV-scale linear collider that will operate at 5-10 times the energy of present generation accelerators. This will require development of high power X-Band sources generating 50-100 MW per source. Conventional pillbox window designs are capable of transmitting peak rf powers up to about 30 MW, well below the desired level required for the use of a single window per tube. SLAC has developed a 75 MW TE{sub 01} window [1] that uses a 'traveling wave' design to minimize fields at the window face. Irises match to the dielectric window impedance, resulting in a pure traveling wave in the ceramic and minimum fields on the window face. The use of the TE{sub 01} mode also has zero electric field on the braze fillet. Unfortunately, in-band resonances prevented this window design from achieving the desired 75MW power level. It was believed the resonances resulted from sudden steps in the circular guide to match the 38mm input diameter to the overmoded (TE{sub 01} and TE{sub 02} mode propagating) 65 mm diameter of the window ceramic. Calabazas Creek Research Inc. is currently developing a traveling wave window using compact, numerically optimized, parabolic tapers to match the input diameter of 38mm to the window ceramic diameter of 76mm (Figure 1). The design is projected to handle 100 MW of pulse power with a peak field at the window face of 3.6 MV/m. Cold test of the window has shown the return loss to be better than -25 dB over a 100 MHz bandwidth and to be resonance free (Figure 2). The window is scheduled for high-power testing in July 2003 at the SLAC.

Neilson, J.; Ives, L.; Tantawi, S.G.; /Calabazas Creek Res., Saratoga /SLAC

2008-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

117

Total Cost Per MwH for all common large scale power generation sources |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Total Cost Per MwH for all common large scale power generation sources Total Cost Per MwH for all common large scale power generation sources Home > Groups > DOE Wind Vision Community In the US DOEnergy, are there calcuations for real cost of energy considering the negative, socialized costs of all commercial large scale power generation soruces ? I am talking about the cost of mountain top removal for coal mined that way, the trip to the power plant, the sludge pond or ash heap, the cost of the gas out of the stack, toxificaiton of the lakes and streams, plant decommision costs. For nuclear yiou are talking about managing the waste in perpetuity. The plant decomission costs and so on. What I am tring to get at is the 'real cost' per MWh or KWh for the various sources ? I suspect that the costs commonly quoted for fossil fuels and nucelar are

118

Sacramento Municipal Utility District 100 MW Photovoltaic Power Plant: Final environmental impact report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Sacramento Municipal Utility District (SMUD) proposes constructing a 100 megawatt (MW) solar photovoltaic electric generation facility adjacent to its Rancho Seco nuclear plant. The project, to be built in increments over the next 12 years, is the largest facility of its kind proposed by any utility in the country. The initial 1 MW photovoltaic field will consist of four 250 kW subfields, each with its own power conditioning unit. Photovoltaic cell modules will be mounted on flat-plate arrays attached to centrally located torque tubes which allow the arrays to rotate on their long axis to )openreverse arrowquotes)track)closereverse arrowquotes) the sun. This Final Environmental Impact Report (FEIR) addresses environmental aspects of the proposed project according to the guidelines for implementing the California Environmental Quality Act and the National Enviornmental Policy Act (NEPA).

Not Available

1982-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

NREL: Wind Research - The Denver Post Highlights the NWTC's New 5-MW  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The Denver Post Highlights the NWTC's New 5-MW Dynamometer The Denver Post Highlights the NWTC's New 5-MW Dynamometer January 2, 2014 On January 2, a reporter from The Denver Post toured the new 5-megawatt dynamometer test facility at the National Wind Technology Center (NWTC). Denver Post Writer Mark Jaffe spoke with NWTC Center Director Fort Felker to learn more about how these innovative research capabilities can impact the wind industry as a whole. Read the full story . Officially dedicated in December, the new facility houses one of the largest dynamometers in the world, which offers advanced capabilities to test the mechanical and electrical power-producing systems of multimegawatt wind turbines in a controlled environment. The new dynamometer can also be directly connected to the electric grid or through a controllable grid

120

MHK Projects/NJBPU 1 5 MW Demonstration Program | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

NJBPU 1 5 MW Demonstration Program NJBPU 1 5 MW Demonstration Program < MHK Projects Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":5,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"File:Aquamarine-marker.png","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":39.6032,"lon":-74.3401,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"http:\/\/prod-http-80-800498448.us-east-1.elb.amazonaws.com\/w\/images\/7\/74\/Aquamarine-marker.png","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tw mw phase" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Beam Loss Studies for the 2-MW LBNE Proton Beam Line  

SciTech Connect

Severe limits are put on allowable beam loss during extraction and transport of a 2.3 MW primary proton beam for the Long Baseline Neutrino Experiment (LBNE) at Fermilab. Detailed simulations with the STRUCT and MARS codes have evaluated the impact of beam loss of 1.6 x 10{sup 14} protons per pulse at 120 GeV, ranging from a single pulse full loss to sustained small fractional loss. It is shown that loss of a single beam pulse at 2.3 MW will result in a catastrophic event: beam pipe destruction, damaged magnets and very high levels of residual radiation inside and outside the tunnel. Acceptable beam loss limits have been determined and robust solutions developed to enable efficient proton beam operation under these constraints.

Drozhdin, A.I.; Childress, S.R.; Mokhov, N.V.; Tropin, I.S.; Zwaska, R.; /Fermilab

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Tests with a microcomputer based adaptive synchronous machine stabilizer on a 400MW thermal unit  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Field tests have been conducted on a microcomputer-based adaptive synchronous machine stabilizer. The adaptive control algorithm tracks the system operating conditions using a least squares identification technique with variable forgetting factor and the control is calculated by a self-searching pole-shift method. An outline of the control algorithm and the results of field tests on a 400MW thermal generating unit are described in this paper.

Malik, O.P.; Hope, G.S.; Hancock, G.C. (Univ. of Calgary, Alberta (Canada)); Mao, C.X. (Huazhong Univ. of Science and Technology, Wuhan (China)); Prakash, K.S. (Bharat Heavy Electricals, Banglore (India))

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Economics of a conceptual 75 MW Hot Dry Rock geothermal electric power station  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Man-made, Hot Dry Rock (HDR) geothermal energy reservoirs have been investigated for over ten years. As early as 1977 a research-sized reservoir was created at a depth of 2.9 km near the Valles Caldera, a dormant volcanic complex in New Mexico, by connecting two wells with hydraulic fractures. Thermal power was generated at rates of up to 5 MW(t) and the reservoir was operated for nearly a year with a thermal drawdown less than 10/sup 0/C. A small 60kW(e) electrical generation unit using a binary cycle (hot geothermal water and a low boiling point organic fluid, R-114) was operated. Interest is now worldwide with field research being conducted at sites near Le Mayet de Montagne, France; Falkenberg and Urach, Federal Republic of Germany; Yakedake, Japan; and Rosemanowes quarry in Cornwall, United Kingdom. To assess the commercial viability of future HDR electrical generating stations, an economic modeling study was conducted for a conceptual 75 MW(e) generating station operating at conditions similar to those prevailing at the New Mexico HDR site. The reservoir required for 75 MW(e), equivalent to 550 MW of thermal energy, uses at least 9 wells drilled to 4.3 km and the temperature of the water produced should average 230/sup 0/C. Thermodynamic considerations indicate that a binary cycle should result in optimum electricity generation and the best organic fluids are refrigerants R-22, R-32, R-115 or R-600a (Isobutane). The break-even bus bar cost of HDR electricity was computed by the levelized life-cycle method, and found to be competitive with most alternative electric power stations in the US.

Murphy, H.D.; Drake, R.H.; Tester, J.W.; Zyvoloski, G.A.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

1 MW / 7.2 MWh NaS Battery Demonstration and Case Study Update  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The New York Power Authority (NYPA), working together with the Metropolitan Transit Authority Long Island Bus (LIB) Company, has installed an advanced sodium sulfur battery energy storage system (NaS BESS) at the LIB facility located at 700 Commercial Avenue, Garden City, New York. The BESS is capable of providing a nominal 1MW of power to the bus fueling compressor station for 6-8 hours per day, 7 days per week.

2009-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

125

COST STUDY OF A 100-Mw(e) DIRECT-CYCLE BOILING WATER REACTOR PLANT  

SciTech Connect

A technical and economic evaluation is presented of a direct-cycle light- water boiling reactor designed for natural circulation and internal steam-water separation. The reference lOO-Mw(e) reactor power plant design evolved from the study should have the best chance (compared to similar plants) of approaching the 8 to 9 mill/kwh total power-cost level. (W.D.M.)

Bullinger, C.F.; Harrer, J.M.

1960-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Multi-Mission Capable, High g Load mW RPS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Over the past few years Hi-Z has been developing a wide range of mW generators and life testing thermoelectric modules for the Department of Energy (DOE) to fulfill requirements by NASA Ames and other agencies. The purpose of this report is to determine the capabilities of a wide range of mW generators for various missions. In the 1st quarterly report the power output of various mW generators was determined via thermal and mechanical modeling. The variable attributes of each generator modeled were: the number of RHUs (1-8), generator outer diameter (1.25-4 in.), and G-load (10, 500, or 2,000). The resultant power output was as high as 180 mW for the largest generator with the lowest Gload. Specifically, we looked at the design of a generator for high G loading that is insulated with Xenon gas and multifoil solid insulation. Because the design of this new generator varied considerably from the previous generator design, it was necessary to show in detail how it is to be assembled, calculate them as of the generator and determine the heat loss from the system. A new method of assembling the RHU was also included as part of the design. As a side issue we redesigned the test stations to provide better control of the cold sink temperature. This will help in reducing the test data by eliminating the need to 'normalize' the data to a specific temperature. In addition these new stations can be used to simulate the low ambient temperatures associated with Mars and other planets.

John C. Bass; Nathan Hiller; Velimir Jovanovic; Norbert B. Elsner

2007-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

127

Testing and Modeling of a 3-MW Wind Turbine Using Fully Coupled Simulation Codes (Poster)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This poster describes the NREL/Alstom Wind testing and model verification of the Alstom 3-MW wind turbine located at NREL's National Wind Technology Center. NREL,in collaboration with ALSTOM Wind, is studying a 3-MW wind turbine installed at the National Wind Technology Center(NWTC). The project analyzes the turbine design using a state-of-the-art simulation code validated with detailed test data. This poster describes the testing and the model validation effort, and provides conclusions about the performance of the unique drive train configuration used in this wind turbine. The 3-MW machine has been operating at the NWTC since March 2011, and drive train measurements will be collected through the spring of 2012. The NWTC testing site has particularly turbulent wind patterns that allow for the measurement of large transient loads and the resulting turbine response. This poster describes the 3-MW turbine test project, the instrumentation installed, and the load cases captured. The design of a reliable wind turbine drive train increasingly relies on the use of advanced simulation to predict structural responses in a varying wind field. This poster presents a fully coupled, aero-elastic and dynamic model of the wind turbine. It also shows the methodology used to validate the model, including the use of measured tower modes, model-to-model comparisons of the power curve, and mainshaft bending predictions for various load cases. The drivetrain is designed to only transmit torque to the gearbox, eliminating non-torque moments that are known to cause gear misalignment. Preliminary results show that the drivetrain is able to divert bending loads in extreme loading cases, and that a significantly smaller bending moment is induced on the mainshaft compared to a three-point mounting design.

LaCava, W.; Guo, Y.; Van Dam, J.; Bergua, R.; Casanovas, C.; Cugat, C.

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Alterative LEU designs for the FRM-II with power levels of 20-22 MW.  

SciTech Connect

Alternative LEU Designs for the FRM-II have been developed by the RERTR Program at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) at the request of an FRM-II Expert Group established by the German Federal Government in January 1999 to evaluate the options for using LEU fuel instead of HEU fuel in cores with power levels of 20 MW. The ANL designs would use the same building structure and maintain as many of the HEU design features as practical. The range of potential LEU fuels was expanded from previous studies to include already-tested silicide fuels with uranium densities up to 6.7 g/cm{sup 3} and the new U-Mo fuels that show excellent prospects for achieving uranium densities in the 8-9 g/cm{sup 3} range. For each of the LEU cores; the design parameters were chosen to match the 50 day cycle length of the HEU core and to maximize the thermal neutron flux in the Cold Neutron Source and beam tubes. The studies concluded that an LEU core with a diameter of about 29 cm instead of 24 cm in HEU design and operating at a power level of 20 MW would have thermal neutron fluxes that are 0.85 times that of the HEU design at the center of the Cold Neutron Source. With a potential future upgrade to a power of 22 MW, this ratio would increase to 0.93.

Hanan, N. A.; Smith, R. S.; Matos, J. E.

1999-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

129

Microsoft Word - huang.doc  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

required for classifying a cloud as ice-over-water for the entire 0.3 box is: 100% ice phase, Tc < 273K, Tw-Tc > 8 K and MWR LWP (LWP MW ) > 0.0 gm -2 . Multilayered clouds...

130

Microphysics of Clouds Initiated from a 1000 MW Dry Heat Source in Comparison with Environmental ClodsA Statistical Study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To evaluate potential atmospheric impacts of wate heat released by dry cooling towers, studies have been made of an oil burning system (the Mtotron), which emits sensible heat at a rate of 1000 MW and large quantities of aerosol particles ...

Pham van Dinh; Bruno Bnech; Lawrence F. Radke

1986-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Unique design features of the SMUDPV1 1MW /SUB AC/ photovoltaic central station powerplant  

SciTech Connect

This paper discusses the unique and innovative balance of system design features incorporated into the SMUDPV1 1MW /SUB ac/ photovoltaic central station powerplant design. These include: single-axis flat-plate tracking arrays, resistance grounded dc neutral, dc fault detection and location systems and other features designed to maximize the value of the plant to the utility, while complying with standard utility design practices and standards. The paper presents the design criteria and selection rationale, design description and expected cost and performance implications to PV1 and future large-scale photovoltaic powerplants.

Daniels, R.E.; Dilts, B.; Rosen, D.J.

1984-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

T/g upgrade adds 15 MW, extends unit life. [Turbogenerator  

SciTech Connect

This article describes turbogenerator upgrade at Maine Yankee's PWR. Maine Yankee Atomic Power Co.'s excellent experience in the upgrading and uprating of the two low-pressure (l-p) steam turbines at its only generating unit - an 865-MW, three-loop pressurized-water reactor installed in 1972 - has motivated the utility to also contract for replacement of both the high-pressure (h-p) steam path and the generator. ABB Power Generation Inc., North Brunswick, NJ, which retrofitted the l-p steam-path components, will handle the other two projects as well.

Not Available

1990-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

A new Main Injector radio frequency system for 2.3 MW Project X operations  

SciTech Connect

For Project X Fermilab Main Injector will be required to provide up to 2.3 MW to a neutrino production target at energies between 60 and 120 GeV. To accomplish the above power levels 3 times the current beam intensity will need to be accelerated. In addition the injection energy of Main Injector will need to be as low as 6 GeV. The current 30 year old Main Injector radio frequency system will not be able to provide the required power and a new system will be required. The specifications of the new system will be described.

Dey, J.; Kourbanis, I.; /Fermilab

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Fluidized bed combustor 50 MW thermal power plant, Krabi, Thailand. Feasibility study. Export trade information  

SciTech Connect

The report presents the results of a study prepared by Burns and Roe for the Electricity Generating Authority of Thailand to examine the technical feasibility and economic attractiveness for building a 50 MW Atmospheric Fluidized Bed Combustion lignite fired power plant at Krabi, southern Thailand. The study is divided into seven main sections, plus an executive summary and appendices: (1) Introduction; (2) Atmospheric Fluidized Bed Combustion Technology Overview; (3) Fuel and Limestone Tests; (4) Site Evaluation; (5) Station Design and Arrangements; (6) Environmental Considerations; (7) Economic Analysis.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

100-MW NUCLEAR POWER PLANT UTILIZING A SODIUM COOLED, GRAPHITE MODERATED REACTOR  

SciTech Connect

The conceptual design of a 100 Mw(e) nuclear power plant is described. The plant utilized a sodium-cooled graphite-moderated reactor with stainless- steel clad. slightiy enriched UO/sub 2/ fuel. The reactor is provided with three main coolant circuits, and the steam cycle has three stages of regenerative heating. The plant control system allows automatic operation over the range of 20 to 100% load, or manual operation at all loads. The site, reactor, sodium systems, reactor auxiliaries, fuel handling, instrumentation, turbine-generator, buildings. and safety measures are described. Engineering drawings are included. (W.D.M.)

1958-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

136

Global wind energy market report. Wind energy industry grows at steady pace, adds over 8,000 MW in 2003  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cumulative global wind energy generating capacity topped 39,000 megawatts (MW) by the end of 2003. New equipment totally over 8,000 MW in capacity was installed worldwide during the year. The report, updated annually, provides information on the status of the wind energy market throughout the world and gives details on various regions. A listing of new and cumulative installed capacity by country and by region is included as an appendix.

anon.

2004-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Can fluid-bed take on p-c units in the 250- to 400-MW range  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This article is a comparison of the state of fluid-bed design with commercial pulverized coal fossil-fuel power plants. With successful operation of several units in the 100- to 200-MW range, designers have set their sights on a doubling of unit capacity. To compete with p-c units, however, comparable gains in efficiency, operability, environmental performance, and cost are necessary, too. In a decade or so, circulating fluidized-bed (CFB) boilers and bubbling-bed units have progressed from industrial-sized curiosities to several 150-200-MW single units operating today. A 250-MW CFB unit is being installed in France for startup in 1995, a 225-MW unit is being designed for installation as part of the US DOE Clean Coal Technology Demonstration program, two 230-MW units are slated to start up in Poland in 1995, and a 350-MW bubbling-bed unit is under construction in Japan. Thus, fluid-bed technology is poised to compete with pulverized-coal (p-c)-fired units for utility-scale applications. But size isn't everything. To fully compete, CFB designers have to consider thermal efficiency, environmental performance, operability, fuel flexibility, cost, and a host of other factors.

Makansi, J.

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

MW-class hybrid power system based on planar solid oxide stack technology  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Scale-Up of Planar SOFC Stack Scale-Up of Planar SOFC Stack Technology for MW-Level Combined Cycle System Final Report TIAX LLC Acorn Park Cambridge, Massachusetts 02140-2390 Reference: D0136 Submitted to NETL October 3, 2003 1 NETL-Hybrid Scale-UP/D0136/SS/V1 1 Executive Summary 2 Background, Objectives & Approach 3 SOFC Cell Geometry and Modeling 4 SOFC Power Scale-up 5 System Design and Costs 6 Conclusions & Recommendations A Appendix 2 NETL-Hybrid Scale-UP/D0136/SS/V1 Executive Summary SECA Strategy NETL wanted to understand if and how SECA-style anode-supported SOFC stacks could be scaled-up for use in MW-level combined cycle plants. * SECA strategy relies on the use of modular, mass produced, SOFC stacks in the 3 - 10 kW capacity range for a wide range of applications. * Technical feasibility small-scale applications has been evaluated by SECA:

139

Initial operating experience of the 12-MW La Ola photovoltaic system.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The 1.2-MW La Ola photovoltaic (PV) power plant in Lanai, Hawaii, has been in operation since December 2009. The host system is a small island microgrid with peak load of 5 MW. Simulations conducted as part of the interconnection study concluded that unmitigated PV output ramps had the potential to negatively affect system frequency. Based on that study, the PV system was initially allowed to operate with output power limited to 50% of nameplate to reduce the potential for frequency instability due to PV variability. Based on the analysis of historical voltage, frequency, and power output data at 50% output level, the PV system has not significantly affected grid performance. However, it should be noted that the impact of PV variability on active and reactive power output of the nearby diesel generators was not evaluated. In summer 2011, an energy storage system was installed to counteract high ramp rates and allow the PV system to operate at rated output. The energy storage system was not fully operational at the time this report was written; therefore, analysis results do not address system performance with the battery system in place.

Ellis, Abraham; Lenox, Carl (SunPower Corporation, Richmond, CA); Johnson, Jay; Quiroz, Jimmy Edward; Schenkman, Benjamin L.

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Internal Technical Report, Safety Analysis Report 5 MW(e) Raft River Research and Development Plant  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Raft River Geothermal Site is located in Southern Idaho's Raft River Valley, southwest of Malta, Idaho, in Cassia County. EG and G idaho, Inc., is the DOE's prime contractor for development of the Raft River geothermal field. Contract work has been progressing for several years towards creating a fully integrated utilization of geothermal water. Developmental progress has resulted in the drilling of seven major DOE wells. Four are producing geothermal water from reservoir temperatures measured to approximately 149 C (approximately 300 F). Closed-in well head pressures range from 69 to 102 kPa (100 to 175 psi). Two wells are scheduled for geothermal cold 60 C (140 F) water reinjection. The prime development effort is for a power plant designed to generate electricity using the heat from the geothermal hot water. The plant is designated as the ''5 MW(e) Raft River Research and Development Plant'' project. General site management assigned to EG and G has resulted in planning and development of many parts of the 5 MW program. Support and development activities have included: (1) engineering design, procurement, and construction support; (2) fluid supply and injection facilities, their study, and control; (3) development and installation of transfer piping systems for geothermal water collection and disposal by injection; and (4) heat exchanger fouling tests.

Brown, E.S.; Homer, G.B.; Shaber, C.R.; Thurow, T.L.

1981-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tw mw phase" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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141

NREL Controllable Grid Interface for Testing MW-Scale Wind Turbine Generators (Poster)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In order to understand the behavior of wind turbines experiencing grid disturbances, it is necessary to perform a series of tests and accurate transient simulation studies. The latest edition of the IEC 61400-21 standard describes methods for such tests that include low voltage ride-through (LVRT), active power set-point control, ramp rate limitations, and reactive power capability tests. The IEC methods are being widely adopted on both national and international levels by wind turbine manufacturers, certification authorities, and utilities. On-site testing of wind turbines might be expensive and time consuming since it requires both test equipment transportation and personnel presence in sometimes remote locations for significant periods of time because such tests need to be conducted at certain wind speed and grid conditions. Changes in turbine control software or design modifications may require redoing of all tests. Significant cost and test-time reduction can be achieved if these tests are conducted in controlled laboratory environments that replicate grid disturbances and simulation of wind turbine interactions with power systems. Such testing capability does not exist in the United States today. An initiative by NREL to design and construct a 7-MVA grid simulator to operate with the existing 2.5 MW and new upcoming 5-MW dynamometer facilities will fulfill this role and bring many potential benefits to the U.S. wind industry with the ultimate goal of reducing wind energy integration costs.

McDade, M.; Gevorgian, V.; Wallen, R.; Erdman, W.

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Internal Technical Report, Safety Analysis Report 5 MW(e) Raft River Pilot Plant  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Raft River Geothermal Site is located in Southern Idaho's Raft River Valley, southwest of Malta, Idaho, in Cassia County. EG and G idaho, Inc., is the DOE's prime contractor for development of the Raft River geothermal field. Contract work has been progressing for several years towards creating a fully integrated utilization of geothermal water. Developmental progress has resulted in the drilling of seven major DOE wells. Four are producing geothermal water from reservoir temperatures measured to approximately 149 C (approximately 300 F). Closed-in well head pressures range from 69 to 102 kPa (100 to 175 psi). Two wells are scheduled for geothermal cold 60 C (140 F) water reinjection. The prime development effort is for a power plant designed to generate electricity using the heat from the geothermal hot water. The plant is designated as the ''5 MW(e) Raft River Research and Development Plant'' project. General site management assigned to EG and G has resulted in planning and development of many parts of the 5 MW program. Support and development activities have included: (1) engineering design, procurement, and construction support; (2) fluid supply and injection facilities, their study, and control; (3) development and installation of transfer piping systems for geothermal water collection and disposal by injection; and (4) heat exchanger fouling tests.

Brown, E.S.; Homer, G.B.; Spencer, S.G.; Shaber, C.R.

1980-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

143

Design of a 50 TW/20 J chirped-Pulse Amplification Laser for High-Energy-Density Plasma Physics Experiments at the Nevada Terawatt Facility of the University of Nevada  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

We have developed a conceptual design for a 50 TW/20 J short-pulse laser for performing high-energy-density plasma physics experiments at the Nevada Terawatt Facility of the University of Nevada, Reno. The purpose of the laser is to develop proton and x-ray radiography techniques, to use these techniques to study z-pinch plasmas, and to study deposition of intense laser energy into both magnetized and unmagnetized plasmas. Our design uses a commercial diode-pumped Nd:glass oscillator to generate 3-nJ. 200-fs mode-locked pulses at 1059 m. An all-reflective grating stretcher increases pulse duration to 1.1 ns. A two-stage chirped-pulse optical parametric amplifier (OPCPA) using BBO crystals boosts pulse energy to 12 mJ. A chain using mixed silicate-phosphate Nd:glass increases pulse energy to 85 J while narrowing bandwidth to 7.4 nm (FWHM). About 50 J is split off to the laser target chamber to generate plasma while the remaining energy is directed to a roof-mirror pulse compressor, where two 21 cm x 42 cm gold gratings recompress pulses to {approx}350 fs. A 30-cm-focal-length off-axis parabolic reflector (OAP) focuses {approx}20 J onto target, producing an irradiance of 10{sup 19} W/cm{sup 2} in a 10-{micro}m-diameter spot. This paper describes planned plasma experiments, system performance requirements, the laser design, and the target area design.

Erlandson, A C; Astanovitskiy, A; Batie, S; Bauer, B; Bayramian, A; Caird, J A; Cowan, T; Ebbers, C; Fuchs, J; Faretto, H; Glassman, J; Ivanov, V; LeGalloudec, B; LeGalloudec, N; Letzring, S; Payne, S; Stuart, B

2003-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

144

Ocean thermal energy conversion power system development-I. Phase I. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of the Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) Power System Development-I (PSD-I), Phase I, study was to develop conceptual and preliminary designs of closed-cycle ammonia power system modules for the 100-MW(e) OTEC Demonstration Plant, the 400-MW(e) Commercial Size Plant, and Heat Exchanger Test Articles representative of the full-size power system module design. Results are presented.

Not Available

1978-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

145

Phase Stability, Phase Transformations, and Reactive Phase ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Jul 31, 2012 ... New Phase in Stoichiometric Cu6Sn5 and Effect of Ni Addition on Phase Stabilization in Wide Temperature Range Optical Properties of...

146

Phase Diagrams  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mar 7, 2013 ... Computational Thermodynamics and Kinetics: Phase Diagrams ... TMS: Alloy Phases Committee, TMS: Chemistry and Physics of Materials...

147

Final Report, Validation of Novel Planar Cell Design for MW-Scale SOFC Power Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes the work completed by NexTech Materials, Ltd. during a three-year project to validate an electrolyte-supported planar solid oxide fuel cell design, termed the FlexCell, for coal-based, megawatt-scale power generation systems. This project was focused on the fabrication and testing of electrolyte-supported FlexCells with yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) as the electrolyte material. YSZ based FlexCells were made with sizes ranging from 100 to 500 cm2. Single-cell testing was performed to confirm high electrochemical performance, both with diluted hydrogen and simulated coal gas as fuels. Finite element analysis modeling was performed at The Ohio State University was performed to establish FlexCell architectures with optimum mechanical robustness. A manufacturing cost analysis was completed, which confirmed that manufacturing costs of less than $50/kW are achievable at high volumes (500 MW/year).

Swartz, Dr Scott L.; Thrun, Dr Lora B.; Arkenberg, Mr Gene B.; Chenault, Ms Kellie M.

2012-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

148

Beginning-of-life neutronic analysis of a 3000-MW(t) HTGR  

SciTech Connect

The results of a study of safety-related neutronic characteristics for the beginning-of-life core of a 3000-MW(t) High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor are presented. Emphasis was placed on the temperature-dependent reactivity effects of fuel, moderator, control poisons, and fission products. Other neutronic characteristics studied were gross and local power distributions, neutron kinetics parameters, control rod and other material worths and worth distributions, and the reactivity worth of a selected hypothetical perturbation in the core configuration. The study was performed for the most part using discrete-ordinates transport theory codes and neutron cross sections that were interpolated from a four-parameter nine-group library supplied by the HTGR vendor. A few comparison calculations were also performed using nine-group data generated with an independent cross-section processing code system. Results from the study generally agree well with results reported by the HTGR vendor. (auth)

Vigil, J.C.

1975-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Detailed design of the 2MW Demonstration Plant. Topical report, Task 2  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This document provides a summary of the design of the 2MW carbonate fuel cell power plant which will be built and tested under DOE cooperative agreement DE-FC2l-92MC29237. The report is divided into sections which describe the process and stack module design, and Appendices which provide additional design detail. Section 2.0 provides an overview of the program, including the project objectives, site location, and schedule. A description of the overall process is presented in Section 3.0. The design of the fuel cell stack Modules is described in Section 5.0, which discusses the design of the fuel cell stacks, multi-stack enclosures, and Stack Modules. Additional detail is provided in a report Appendix, the Final Design Criteria Summary. This is an abstract of the design criteria used in the design of the Submodules and Modules.

Not Available

1993-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

150

Experiences with titanium next-to-last LP blades in a 1300 MW turbine  

SciTech Connect

The use of titanium as a material for the end blades of LP turbines has already been investigated twenty years ago by Brown Boveri. Next-to-last LP blades in the past have several times been the cause of turbine damage, because these blades work in the zone of the first condensation and thus are subjected to mechanical stress in corrosive environment. Favorable corrosion properties of titanium provided a reason for developing and manufacturing two next-to-last titanium low pressure blade rows in 1980 and to use them in a 1300 MW plant. On the occasion of an overhaul, a visual check was carried out of the titanium blades and chemical analysis of the blade surface deposits were made. From the distribution of the deposits conclusions can be drawn, retroactively, as to why steel blades might have failed. The titanium blades are undergoing a further operation period.

Meyer, H.W.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Recent Performance of the SNS H-Source for 1-MW Neutron Production  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes the performance of the SNS ion source and LEBT as they continue to deliver ~50 mA H- beams at a 5.3% duty factor required for neutron production with a ~1MW proton beam since the fall of 2009. The source continues to deliver persistent H- beams for up to 6 weeks without adding Cs after an initial dose of ~4 mg, except when there are excessive plasma impurities. In one case the H- beam decayed due to an air leak, which is shown to be consistent with sputtering of the Cs layer, and which allows to bracket the plasma potential. In another case, the performance of two sources degraded progressively, which appears to be consistent with a progressive deterioration of the Cs covered Mo converter. These two and other recently discovered issues are discussed in detail.

Stockli, Martin P [ORNL; Han, Baoxi [ORNL; Murray Jr, S N [ORNL; Pennisi, Terry R [ORNL; Santana, Manuel [ORNL; Welton, Robert F [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

A miniaturized mW thermoelectric generator for nw objectives: continuous, autonomous, reliable power for decades.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

We have built and tested a miniaturized, thermoelectric power source that can provide in excess of 450 {micro}W of power in a system size of 4.3cc, for a power density of 107 {micro}W/cc, which is denser than any system of this size previously reported. The system operates on 150mW of thermal input, which for this system was simulated with a resistive heater, but in application would be provided by a 0.4g source of {sup 238}Pu located at the center of the device. Output power from this device, while optimized for efficiency, was not optimized for form of the power output, and so the maximum power was delivered at only 41mV. An upconverter to 2.7V was developed concurrently with the power source to bring the voltage up to a usable level for microelectronics.

Aselage, Terrence Lee; Siegal, Michael P.; Whalen, Scott; Frederick, Scott K.; Apblett, Christopher Alan; Moorman, Matthew Wallace

2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Model Validation at the 204-MW New Mexico Wind Energy Center (Poster)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objectives of this report are: (1) to investigate the impact of aggregation on a large wind farm; and (2) to explore the dynamic behaviors of the power system and the wind turbine. The methods used are: (1) use equivalencing method previously developed to simplify Taiban Mesa wind power plant; (2) use PSLF dynamic analysis to simulate the wind power plant with AWEA-proposed low voltage ride through (LVRT) used to test the systems; and (3) represent a 204-MW wind plant two ways, treat the entire wind farm feeding a large power system network as a single generator and treat each wind turbine within the wind farm as an individual generator (136 generators) feeding the large power system network.

Muljadi, E.; Butterfield, C. P.; Miller, N.; Delmerico, R.; Ellis, A.; Mechenbier, J.; Zavadil, R.; Smith, J. C.; Hochheimer, J.; Young, R.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

1170-MW(t) HTGR-PS/C plant application study report: shale oil recovery application  

SciTech Connect

The US has large shale oil energy resources, and many companies have undertaken considerable effort to develop economical means to extract this oil within environmental constraints. The recoverable shale oil reserves in the US amount to 160 x 10/sup 9/ m/sup 3/ (1000 x 10/sup 9/ bbl) and are second in quantity only to coal. This report summarizes a study to apply an 1170-MW(t) high-temperature gas-cooled reactor - process steam/cogeneration (HTGR-PS/C) to a shale oil recovery process. Since the highest potential shale oil reserves lie in th Piceance Basin of Western Colorado, the study centers on exploiting shale oil in this region.

Rao, R.; McMain, A.T. Jr.

1981-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

FAST OXIDE BREEDER-REACTOR. PART I. PARAMETRIC STUDY OF 300(e) MW REACTOR CORE  

SciTech Connect

Physics scoping studies of a 300-Mw(e) PuO/sub 2/-UO/sub 2/-fueled fast- breeder reactor are reported. Physics design parameters that effect fuel costs, full conservation, and reactor safety were evaluated for use in the selection of parameters for a reference design. The total breeding ratio varied from 1.1 to 1.5 in the range of parameters corsidered. Plutonium core loading ranged from 500 to 1500 kg. Doubling time was found to be reduced by high-density fuel and low steel content. A compromise figure on fuel-rod range of sizes (about 100 mils) yields a 5 operating reactivity and a small, negative sodium temperature coefficient. (J.R.D.)

Greebler, P.; Aline, P.; Sueoka, J.

1959-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

156

Validation of Novel Planar Cell Design for MW-Scale SOFC Power Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes the work completed by NexTech Materials, Ltd. during a three-year project to validate an electrolyte-supported planar solid oxide fuel cell design, termed the FlexCell, for coal-based, megawatt-scale power generation systems. This project was focused on the fabrication and testing of electrolyte-supported FlexCells with yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) as the electrolyte material. YSZ based FlexCells were made with sizes ranging from 100 to 500 cm{sup 2}. Single-cell testing was performed to confirm high electrochemical performance, both with diluted hydrogen and simulated coal gas as fuels. Finite element analysis modeling was performed at The Ohio State University was performed to establish FlexCell architectures with optimum mechanical robustness. A manufacturing cost analysis was completed, which confirmed that manufacturing costs of less than $50/kW are achievable at high volumes (500 MW/year). DISCLAIMER

Scott Swartz; Lora Thrun; Gene Arkenberg; Kellie Chenault

2011-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

157

Design and performance of the LAMPF 1-1/4 MW klystron modulator  

SciTech Connect

From 11th modulator symposium; New York, New York, USA (18 Sep 1973). A design for a very reliable single-triode modulator for a 11/4 MW modulating-anode klystron is presented. The operating voltage is 86 kV and the variable pulse length ranges from 200 4mmsec to 1.2 msec. The basic modulator circuit, which uses a novel Zener diode bias circuit, and several of the individual components are described in detail. Over 140,000 high-voltage hours have been accumulated on these modulators. The principal failure mechanism is grid emission from the triode. These failures can be anticipated and repaired during a normal maintenance period. The triode is then reprocessed and reused. Tube life data and a summary of the failures modes are presented. (auth)

Tallerico, P.J.; Cady, R.L.; Doss, J.D.

1974-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

158

The Los Alamos 600 MJ, 1500 MW inertial energy storage and pulsed power unit  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A 1430 MVA synchronous generator from a cancelled nuclear power plant has been installed and commissioned at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) to be used as the pulsed power generator for physics experiments. The generator is mounted on a spring foundation to prevent dynamic forces from being transmitted to the substructure and into the ground. A 6 MW load-commutated inverter drive accelerates the machine from standstill to the maximum operating speed of 1800 rpm and from 1260 rpm to 1800 rpm between load pulses. The generator cooling method has been changed from hydrogen to air cooling to facilitate operation. A current limiting fuse, with a fuse clearing current of 90 kA, will protect the generator output against short circuit currents. An overview of the installation is presented. The paper also addresses the overload capability of the generator for pulsed loads. 7 figs., 1 tab.

Boenig, H.J.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Eye hazard and glint evaluation for the 5-MW/sub t/ Solar Thermal Test Facility  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Potential eye hazards associated with concentrated reflected light are evaluated for the ERDA 5-MW/sub t/ Solar Thermal Test Facility to be constructed at Sandia Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico. Light intensities and hazardous ranges of single and multiple coincident heliostat beams are evaluated at ground level and in the air space above the facility. Possible long-range and short-range effects of distractive effects of reflected beams are discussed. Also described are certain beam control modifications which were incorporated to minimize the altitudes at which overflying aircraft could encounter unsafe levels. Recommendations are made for further evaluation of intensity excursions during fail-safe shutdown situations, and for experiments to verify analytical models and to assess distractive glint effects.

Brumleve, T.D.

1977-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Total cost of 46-Mw Borax cogen system put at $30M  

SciTech Connect

The cogeneration system, designed around a W-251B gas turbine power plant exhausting into a Deltak waste heat boiler to produce ''free'' process steam from the gas turbine exhaust, is discussed. The design includes water injection for NO/sub x/ control, self-cleaning inlet air filters, evaporative coolers, supercharger, and supplementary firing of the waste heat boiler. Once the system is operational Borax will be able to generate all of the electricity needed for on-site operations and a large share of process steam needs--plus still have 22-23 Mw surplus electric power to sell, so that the installation should pay for itself in less than 5 years of service.

de Biasi, V.

1983-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tw mw phase" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

TOXECON RETROFIT FOR MERCURY AND MULTI-POLLUTANT CONTROL-ON THREE 90 MW COAL FIRED BOILERS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

With the Nation's coal-burning utilities facing tighter controls on mercury pollutants, the U.S. Department of Energy is supporting projects that could offer power plant operators better ways to reduce these emissions at much lower costs. Sorbent injection technology represents one of the simplest and most mature approaches to controlling mercury emissions from coal-fired boilers. It involves injecting a solid material such as powdered activated carbon into the flue gas. The gas-phase mercury in the flue gas contacts the sorbent and attaches to its surface. The sorbent with the mercury attached is then collected by a particle control device along with the other solid material, primarily fly ash. We Energies has over 3,200 MW of coal-fired generating capacity and supports an integrated multi-emission control strategy for SO{sub 2}, NO{sub x} and mercury emissions while maintaining a varied fuel mix for electric supply. The primary goal of this project is to reduce mercury emissions from three 90 MW units that burn Powder River Basin coal at the We Energies Presque Isle Power Plant. Additional goals are to reduce nitrogen oxide (NO{sub x}), sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}), and particulate matter (PM) emissions, allow for reuse and sale of fly ash, demonstrate a reliable mercury continuous emission monitor (CEM) suitable for use in the power plant environment, and demonstrate a process to recover mercury captured in the sorbent. To achieve these goals, We Energies (the Participant) will design, install, and operate a TOXECON{trademark} (TOXECON) system designed to clean the combined flue gases of units 7, 8, and 9 at the Presque Isle Power Plant. TOXECON is a patented process in which a fabric filter system (baghouse) installed down stream of an existing particle control device is used in conjunction with sorbent injection for removal of pollutants from combustion flue gas. For this project, the flue gas emissions will be controlled from the three units using a single baghouse. Mercury will be controlled by injection of activated carbon or other novel sorbents, while NO{sub x} and SO{sub 2} will be controlled by injection of sodium based or other novel sorbents. Addition of the TOXECON baghouse will provide enhanced particulate control. Sorbents will be injected downstream of the existing particle collection device to allow for continued sale and reuse of captured fly ash from the existing particulate control device, uncontaminated by activated carbon or sodium sorbents. Methods for sorbent regeneration, i.e. mercury recovery from the sorbent, will be explored and evaluated. For mercury concentration monitoring in the flue gas streams, components available for use will be evaluated and the best available will be integrated into a mercury CEM suitable for use in the power plant environment. This project will provide for the use of a novel multi-pollutant control system to reduce emissions of mercury while minimizing waste, from a coal-fired power generation system.

Richard E. Johnson

2004-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

162

TOXECON RETROFIT FOR MERCURY AND MULTI-POLLUTANT CONTROL ON THREE 90-MW COAL-FIRED BOILERS  

SciTech Connect

With the Nation's coal-burning utilities facing tighter controls on mercury pollutants, the U.S. Department of Energy is supporting projects that could offer power plant operators better ways to reduce these emissions at much lower costs. Sorbent injection technology represents one of the simplest and most mature approaches to controlling mercury emissions from coal-fired boilers. It involves injecting a solid material such as powdered activated carbon into the flue gas. The gas-phase mercury in the flue gas contacts the sorbent and attaches to its surface. The sorbent with the mercury attached is then collected by a particulate control device along with the other solid material, primarily fly ash. We Energies has over 3,200 MW of coal-fired generating capacity and supports an integrated multi-emission control strategy for SO{sub 2}, NO{sub x}, and mercury emissions while maintaining a varied fuel mix for electric supply. The primary goal of this project is to reduce mercury emissions from three 90-MW units that burn Powder River Basin coal at the We Energies Presque Isle Power Plant. Additional goals are to reduce nitrogen oxide (NO{sub x}), sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}), and particulate matter (PM) emissions, allow for reuse and sale of fly ash, demonstrate a reliable mercury continuous emission monitor (CEM) suitable for use in the power plant environment, and demonstrate a process to recover mercury captured in the sorbent. To achieve these goals, We Energies (the Participant) will design, install, and operate a TOXECON{trademark} system designed to clean the combined flue gases of Units 7, 8, and 9 at the Presque Isle Power Plant. TOXECON{trademark} is a patented process in which a fabric filter system (baghouse) installed downstream of an existing particle control device is used in conjunction with sorbent injection for removal of pollutants from combustion flue gas. For this project, the flue gas emissions will be controlled from the three units using a single baghouse. Mercury will be controlled by injection of activated carbon or other novel sorbents, while NO{sub x} and SO{sub 2} will be controlled by injection of sodium-based or other novel sorbents. Addition of the TOXECON{trademark} baghouse will provide enhanced particulate control. Sorbents will be injected downstream of the existing particle collection device to allow for continued sale and reuse of captured fly ash from the existing particulate control device, uncontaminated by activated carbon or sodium sorbents. Methods for sorbent regeneration, i.e., mercury recovery from the sorbent, will be explored and evaluated. For mercury concentration monitoring in the flue gas streams, components available for use will be evaluated and the best available will be integrated into a mercury CEM suitable for use in the power plant environment. This project will provide for the use of a control system to reduce emissions of mercury while minimizing waste from a coal-fired power generation system.

Richard E. Johnson

2006-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

163

TOXECON RETROFIT FOR MERCURY AND MULTI-POLLUTANT CONTROL ON THREE 90-MW COAL-FIRED BOILERS  

SciTech Connect

With the Nation's coal-burning utilities facing tighter controls on mercury pollutants, the U.S. Department of Energy is supporting projects that could offer power plant operators better ways to reduce these emissions at much lower costs. Sorbent injection technology represents one of the simplest and most mature approaches to controlling mercury emissions from coal-fired boilers. It involves injecting a solid material such as powdered activated carbon into the flue gas. The gas-phase mercury in the flue gas contacts the sorbent and attaches to its surface. The sorbent with the mercury attached is then collected by a particulate control device along with the other solid material, primarily fly ash. We Energies has over 3,200 MW of coal-fired generating capacity and supports an integrated multi-emission control strategy for SO{sub 2}, NO{sub x}, and mercury emissions while maintaining a varied fuel mix for electric supply. The primary goal of this project is to reduce mercury emissions from three 90-MW units that burn Powder River Basin coal at the We Energies Presque Isle Power Plant. Additional goals are to reduce nitrogen oxide (NO{sub x}), sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}), and particulate matter (PM) emissions, allow for reuse and sale of fly ash, demonstrate a reliable mercury continuous emission monitor (CEM) suitable for use in the power plant environment, and demonstrate a process to recover mercury captured in the sorbent. To achieve these goals, We Energies (the Participant) will design, install, and operate a TOXECON{trademark} system designed to clean the combined flue gases of Units 7, 8, and 9 at the Presque Isle Power Plant. TOXECON{trademark} is a patented process in which a fabric filter system (baghouse) installed downstream of an existing particle control device is used in conjunction with sorbent injection for removal of pollutants from combustion flue gas. For this project, the flue gas emissions will be controlled from the three units using a single baghouse. Mercury will be controlled by injection of activated carbon or other novel sorbents, while NO{sub x} and SO{sub 2} will be controlled by injection of sodium-based or other novel sorbents. Addition of the TOXECON{trademark} baghouse will provide enhanced particulate control. Sorbents will be injected downstream of the existing particle collection device to allow for continued sale and reuse of captured fly ash from the existing particulate control device, uncontaminated by activated carbon or sodium sorbents. Methods for sorbent regeneration, i.e., mercury recovery from the sorbent, will be explored and evaluated. For mercury concentration monitoring in the flue gas streams, components available for use will be evaluated and the best available will be integrated into a mercury CEM suitable for use in the power plant environment. This project will provide for the use of a control system to reduce emissions of mercury while minimizing waste from a coal-fired power generation system.

Steven T. Derenne

2006-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

164

A Pion Production and Capture System for a 4 MW Target Station  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A study of a pion production and capture system for a 4 MW target station for a neutrino factory or muon collider is presented. Using the MARS code, we simulate the pion production produced by the interaction of a free liquid mercury jet with an intense proton beam. We study the variation of meson production with the direction of the proton beam relative to the target. We also examine the influence on the meson production by the focusing of the proton beam. The energy deposition in the capture system is determined and the shielding required in order to avoid radiation damage is discussed. The exploration for the multiple proton beam entry directions relative to mercury jet in the 8GeV proton beam case demonstrates that an asymmetric layout is required in order to achieve the same beam/jet crossing angle at the jet axis. We find a correlation between the distance of beam relative to the jet and the meson production. The peak meson production is 8% higher than for the lowest case. The examination of the influence on the meson production by the focusing of the proton beam shows the meson production loss is negligible (<1%) for a beta function to be 0.3m or higher for the proton beam. By investigating the energy deposition in the target/capture system, we see that the bulk of 4-MW proton beam power is deposited in the water cooled tungsten-carbide (WC) shielding, the mercury jet and the capture beam pipe. In addition, high power deposition in the first superconducting coil causes an issue for its operation and life time. Enhanced shielding is necessary to lower the radiation damage.

Ding, X.; Kirk, H.; Berg, J.S.

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

NREL Establishes a 1.5-MW Wind Turbine Test Platform for Research Partnerships (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect

Research turbine supports sustained technology development. For more than three decades, engineers at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's (NREL) National Wind Technology Center (NWTC) have worked with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Wind Program and industry partners to advance wind energy technology, improve wind turbine performance, and reduce the cost of energy. Although there have been dramatic increases in performance and drops in the cost of wind energy-from $0.80 per kilowatt-hour to between $0.06 and $0.08 per kilowatt-hour-the goal of the DOE Wind Program is to further increase performance and reduce the cost of energy for land-based systems so that wind energy can compete with natural gas by 2020. In support of the program's research and development (R and D) efforts, NREL has constructed state-of-the-art facilities at the NWTC where industry partners, universities, and other DOE laboratories can conduct tests and experiments to further advance wind technology. The latest facility to come online is the DOE-GE 1.5-MW wind turbine test platform. Working with DOE, NREL purchased and installed a GE 1.5-MW wind turbine at the NWTC in 2009. Since then, NREL engineers have extensively instrumented the machine, conducted power performance and full-system modal tests, and collected structural loads measurements to obtain baseline characterization of the turbine's power curve, vibration characteristics, and fatigue loads in the uniquely challenging NWTC inflow environment. By successfully completing a baseline for the turbine's performance and structural response, NREL engineers have established a test platform that can be used by industry, university, and DOE laboratory researchers to test wind turbine control systems and components. The new test platform will also enable researchers to acquire the measurements needed to develop and validate wind turbine models and improve design codes.

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

NREL Establishes a 1.5-MW Wind Turbine Test Platform for Research Partnerships (Fact Sheet)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Research turbine supports sustained technology development. For more than three decades, engineers at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's (NREL) National Wind Technology Center (NWTC) have worked with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Wind Program and industry partners to advance wind energy technology, improve wind turbine performance, and reduce the cost of energy. Although there have been dramatic increases in performance and drops in the cost of wind energy-from $0.80 per kilowatt-hour to between $0.06 and $0.08 per kilowatt-hour-the goal of the DOE Wind Program is to further increase performance and reduce the cost of energy for land-based systems so that wind energy can compete with natural gas by 2020. In support of the program's research and development (R and D) efforts, NREL has constructed state-of-the-art facilities at the NWTC where industry partners, universities, and other DOE laboratories can conduct tests and experiments to further advance wind technology. The latest facility to come online is the DOE-GE 1.5-MW wind turbine test platform. Working with DOE, NREL purchased and installed a GE 1.5-MW wind turbine at the NWTC in 2009. Since then, NREL engineers have extensively instrumented the machine, conducted power performance and full-system modal tests, and collected structural loads measurements to obtain baseline characterization of the turbine's power curve, vibration characteristics, and fatigue loads in the uniquely challenging NWTC inflow environment. By successfully completing a baseline for the turbine's performance and structural response, NREL engineers have established a test platform that can be used by industry, university, and DOE laboratory researchers to test wind turbine control systems and components. The new test platform will also enable researchers to acquire the measurements needed to develop and validate wind turbine models and improve design codes.

Not Available

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

1170-MW(t) HTGR-PS/C plant application-study report: alumina-plant application  

SciTech Connect

This report considers the HTGR-PS/C application to producing alumina from bauxite. For the size alumina plant considered, the 1170-MW(t) HTGR-PS/C supplies 100% of the process steam and electrical power requirements and produces surplus electrical power and/or process steam, which can be used for other process users or electrical power production. Presently, the bauxite ore is reduced to alumina in plants geographically separated from the electrolysis plant. The electrolysis plants are located near economical electric power sources. However, with the integration of an 1170-MW(t) HTGR-PS/C unit in a commercial alumina plant, the excess electric power available (approx. 233 MW(e)) could be used for alumina electrolysis.

Rao, R.; McMain, A.T. Jr.; Stanley, J.D.

1981-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Serious pitting hazard in the raft river 5MW(e) Geothermal Power Plant isobutane cooling loop  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The 5MW(e) Dual Boiling Cycle Geothermal Power Plant, hence referred to as the Raft River plant, is being developed for DOE by EG and G, Inc., Idaho Falls, Idaho. This pilot power plant is of the binary concept and utilizes isobutane as the working second fluid. The plant will demonstrate the feasibility of power generation from an intermediate temperature ({approx} 290 F) resource. The plant is schematically diagrammed in Figure 1. During the final design phase and after the major components were specified to be made of carbon steel, and ordered, various conditions forced the power plant design to switch from surface water to geothermal fluid for the condenser cooling loop make-up water. Because the geothermal fluid contains significant concentrations of chlorides and sulfates, about 1000 ppm and 65 ppm respectively, aeration in the cooling tower causes this water to become extremely aggressive, especially in the pitting of carbon steel components. Although essentially all of the condenser cooling loop materials are carbon steel, the isobutane condenser and turbine lube oil cooler are the most vulnerable. These components are tubed with carbon steel tubes of 0.085 and 0.075 inch wall thickness. These two components are extremely leak critical heat exchangers. For example, even a single pit perforation in the isobutane condenser can cause plant shutdown through loss of isobutane. Such a leak also poses an explosion or fire hazard. As isobutane pressure falls, the incursion of cooling water into the isobutane loop could occur, causing damage to anhydrous service seals. Under a DOE contract for geothermal failure analysis, Radian Corporation has made a preliminary investigation of the pitting hazard presented by the aggressive cooling fluid and the corrosion inhibition treatment that has thus far been proposed. This report documents Radian's understanding of the present situation and the results of its investigation on possible mitigation of this hazard. Finally, various conclusions and recommendations are made that may, if pursued, lead to a satisfactory solution that will avert a certain early prolonged plant shutdown due to failure of the thin walled isobutane and turbine lube oil cooler tubes.

Ellis, Peter F.

1980-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

169

Economic Benefits, Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Emissions Reductions, and Water Conservation Benefits from 1,000 Megawatts (MW) of New Wind Power in Arizona (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy?s Wind Powering America Program is committed to educating state-level policymakers and other stakeholders about the economic, CO2 emissions, and water conservation impacts of wind power. This analysis highlights the expected impacts of 1000 MW of wind power in Arizona. Although construction and operation of 1000 MW of wind power is a significant effort, six states have already reached the 1000-MW mark. We forecast the cumulative economic benefits from 1000 MW of development in Arizona to be $1.15 billion, annual CO2 reductions are estimated at 2.0 million tons, and annual water savings are 818 million gallons.

Not Available

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Economic Benefits, Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Emissions Reductions, and Water Conservation Benefits from 1,000 Megawatts (MW) of New Wind Power in Nevada (Fact Sheet)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy?s Wind Powering America Program is committed to educating state-level policymakers and other stakeholders about the economic, CO2 emissions, and water conservation impacts of wind power. This analysis highlights the expected impacts of 1000 MW of wind power in Nevada. Although construction and operation of 1000 MW of wind power is a significant effort, six states have already reached the 1000-MW mark. We forecast the cumulative economic benefits from 1000 MW of development in Nevada to be $1.1 billion, annual CO2 reductions are estimated at 2.3 million tons, and annual water savings are 944 million gallons.

Not Available

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Economic Benefits, Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Emissions Reductions, and Water Conservation Benefits from 1,000 Megawatts (MW) of New Wind Power in Indiana  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy's Wind Powering America Program is committed to educating state-level policymakers and other stakeholders about the economic, CO2 emissions, and water conservation impacts of wind power. This analysis highlights the expected impacts of 1000 MW of wind power in Indiana. Although construction and operation of 1000 MW of wind power is a significant effort, six states have already reached the 1000-MW mark. We forecast the cumulative economic benefits from 1000 MW of development in Indiana to be $1.3 billion, annual CO2 reductions are estimated at 2.8 million tons, and annual water savings are 1,684 million gallons.

Lantz, E.; Tegen, S.

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Economic Benefits, Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Emissions Reductions, and Water Conservation Benefits from 1,000 Megawatts (MW) of New Wind Power in Utah (Fact Sheet)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy?s Wind Powering America Program is committed to educating state-level policymakers and other stakeholders about the economic, CO2 emissions, and water conservation impacts of wind power. This analysis highlights the expected impacts of 1000 MW of wind power in Utah. Although construction and operation of 1000 MW of wind power is a significant effort, six states have already reached the 1000-MW mark. We forecast the cumulative economic benefits from 1000 MW of development in Utah to be $1.1 billion, annual CO2 reductions are estimated at 2.0 million tons, and annual water savings are 828 million gallons.

Not Available

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Economic Benefits, Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Emissions Reductions, and Water Conservation Benefits from 1,000 Megawatts (MW) of New Wind Power in Idaho (Fact Sheet)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy?s Wind Powering America Program is committed to educating state-level policymakers and other stakeholders about the economic, CO2 emissions, and water conservation impacts of wind power. This analysis highlights the expected impacts of 1000 MW of wind power in Idaho. Although construction and operation of 1000 MW of wind power is a significant effort, six states have already reached the 1000-MW mark. We forecast the cumulative economic benefits from 1000 MW of development in Idaho to be $1.1 billion, annual CO2 reductions are estimated at 2.2 million tons, and annual water savings are 906 million gallons.

Not Available

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Phase five  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Phase five Phase five 1663 Los Alamos science and technology magazine Latest Issue:November 2013 All Issues » submit Phase five Los Alamos physicists have conclusively demonstrated the existence of a new phase of matter. November 25, 2013 Phase five Scientists still have more to learn about the exotic physics of specialty materials. What makes the cuprates special? How about a new phase of matter. Ceramic metals known as cuprates have mystified physicists for decades. They exhibit a variety of distinct phases of matter, each with its own specific properties, including a phase bearing an exotic type of magnetism, a high-temperature superconducting phase, an ordinary metal phase, a poorly understood and weird metallic phase simply called a strange metal, and an equally poorly understood metallic phase known as the pseudogap. The

175

Rationale for a spallation neutron source target system test facility at the 1-MW Long-Pulse Spallation Source  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The conceptual design study for a 1-MW Long-Pulse Spallation Source at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center has shown the feasibility of including a spallation neutron test facility at a relatively low cost. This document presents a rationale for developing such a test bed. Currently, neutron scattering facilities operate at a maximum power of 0.2 MW. Proposed new designs call for power levels as high as 10 MW, and future transmutation activities may require as much as 200 MW. A test bed will allow assessment of target neutronics; thermal hydraulics; remote handling; mechanical structure; corrosion in aqueous, non-aqueous, liquid metal, and molten salt systems; thermal shock on systems and system components; and materials for target systems. Reliable data in these areas are crucial to the safe and reliable operation of new high-power facilities. These tests will provide data useful not only to spallation neutron sources proposed or under development, but also to other projects in accelerator-driven transmutation technologies such as the production of tritium.

Sommer, W.F.

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Feasible experimental study on the utilization of a 300 MW CFB boiler desulfurizating bottom ash for construction applications  

SciTech Connect

CFB boiler ash cannot be used as a cement replacement in concrete due to its unacceptably high sulfur content. The disposal in landfills has been the most common means of handling ash in circulating fluidized bed boiler power plants. However for a 300 MW CFB boiler power plant, there will be 600,000 tons of ash discharged per year and will result in great volumes and disposal cost of ash byproduct. It was very necessary to solve the utilization of CFB ash and to decrease the disposal cost of CFB ash. The feasible experimental study results on the utilization of the bottom ashes of a 300 MW CFB boiler in Baima power plant in China were reported in this paper. The bottom ashes used for test came from the discharged bottom ashes in a 100 MW CFB boiler in which the anthracite and limestone designed for the 300 MW CFB project was burned. The results of this study showed that the bottom ash could be used for cementitious material, road concrete, and road base material. The masonry cements, road concrete with 30 MPa compressive strength and 4.0 MPa flexural strength, and the road base material used for base courses of the expressway, the main road and the minor lane were all prepared with milled CFB bottom ashes in the lab. The better methods of utilization of the bottom ashes were discussed in this paper.

Lu, X.F.; Amano, R.S. [University of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI (United States). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering

2006-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

177

Experiments of Sulfur Removal in 1MW Poly-Generation System with Partial Gasification and Combustion Combined  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An experimental study on sulfur release and adsorption during coal partial gasification and combustion is conducted in a 1MW circulating fluidized bed (CFB) poly-generation system. Limestone is added to gasifier as a sorbent of sulfur produced, where ... Keywords: partial gasification, poly-generation, recycled coal gas, limestone, desulfurization

Qin Hong; Wang Qing; Wang Qinhui; Luo Zhongyang

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Performance Analysis of Existing 600MW Coal-Fired Power Plant with Ammonia-Based CO2 Capture  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper analyzes the techno-economic performance of 600 MW coal-fired power plant with and without ammonia-based CO2 capture process, based on the operating data of an existing power plant. The simulation and analysis, with fully consideration of ... Keywords: CO2 capture, aqueous ammonia, existing power plant, techno-economic performance

Gang Xu; Liqiang Duan; Mingde Zhao; Yongping Yang; Ji Li; Le Li; Haizhan Chen

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Comparison of safety parameters and transient behavior of a generic 10 MW reactor with HEU and LEU fuels  

SciTech Connect

Key safety parameters are compared for equilibrium cores of the IAEA generic 10 MW reactor with HEU and LEU fuels. These parameters include kinetics parameters, reactivity feedback coefficients, control rod worths, power peaking factors, and shutdown margins. Reactivity insertion and loss-of-flow transients are compared. Results indicate that HEU and LEU cores will behave in a very similar manner.

Matos, J.E.; Freese, K.E.; Woodruff, W.L.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Sacramento Municipal Utility District, 100-MW photovoltaic power plant: draft environmental impact report  

SciTech Connect

The Sacramento Municipal Utility District proposes constructing a 100 MW solar photovoltaic electric generation facility adjacent to its Rancho Seco nuclear plant. After a brief description of the proposed facility, including the location and an explanation of the need for it, the project-specific environmental analysis is presented. This addresses: geology/seismicity, soils, biological resources, land use, air quality, water resources, water quality, wastes management, public/occupational health, safety, energy and material resources, cultural resources, socioeconomics, and aesthetics. For each of these areas, the setting is described, impacts analyzed, mitigation measures given where appropriate, and cumulative impacts described. Unavoidable adverse environmental effects, irreversible environmental changes and irretrievable commitments of energy and materials are summarized. Also briefly summarized is the relationship between local short-term use of the environment and the maintenance and enhancement of long-term productivity. Environmental benefits and disadvantages associated with various alternatives to building and operating the proposed solar photovoltaic power plant are described, considering project objectives other than producing electricity. (LEW)

Not Available

1982-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tw mw phase" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Transition from HEU to LEU fuel in Romania`s 14-MW TRIGA reactor  

SciTech Connect

The 14-MW TRIGA steady state reactor (SSR) located in Pitesti, Romania, first went critical in the fall of 1979. Initially, the core configuration for full power operation used 29 fuel clusters each containing a 5 {times} 5 square array of HEU (10 wt%) -- ZrH -- Er (2.8 wt%) fuel-moderator rods (1.295 cm o.d.) clad in Incology. With a total inventory of 35 HEU fuel clusters, burnup considerations required a gradual expansion of the core from 29 to 32 and finally to 35 clusters before the reactor was shut down because of insufficient excess reactivity. At this time each of the original 29 fuel clusters had an overage {sup 235}U burnup in the range from 50 to 62%. Because of the US policy regarding the export of highly enriched uranium, fresh HEU TRIGA replacement fuel is not available. After a number of safety-related measurements, the SSR is expected to resume full power operation in the near future using a mixed core containing five LEU TRIGA clusters of the same geometry as the original fuel but with fuel-moderator rods containing 45 wt% U (19.7% {sup 235}U enrichment) and 1.1 wt% Er. Rods for 14 additional LEU fuel clusters will be fabricated by General Atomics. In support of the SSR mixed core operation numerous neutronic calculations have been performed. This paper presents some of the results of those calculations.

Bretscher, M.M.; Snelgrove, J.L.

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

182

System Modeling of ORNL s 20 MW(t) Wood-fired Gasifying Boiler  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present an overview of the new 20 MW(t) wood-fired steam plant currently under construction by Johnson Controls, Inc. at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory in Tennessee. The new plant will utilize a low-temperature air-blown gasifier system developed by the Nexterra Systems Corporation to generate low-heating value syngas (producer gas), which will then be burned in a staged combustion chamber to produce heat for the boiler. This is considered a showcase project for demonstrating the benefits of clean, bio-based energy, and thus there is considerable interest in monitoring and modeling the energy efficiency and environmental footprint of this technology relative to conventional steam generation with petroleum-based fuels. In preparation for system startup in 2012, we are developing steady-state and dynamic models of the major process components, including the gasifiers and combustor. These tools are intended to assist in tracking and optimizing system performance and for carrying out future conceptual studies of process changes that might improve the overall energy efficiency and sustainability. In this paper we describe the status of our steady-state gasifier and combustor models and illustrate preliminary results from limited parametric studies.

Daw, C Stuart [ORNL; FINNEY, Charles E A [ORNL; Wiggins, Gavin [ORNL; Hao, Ye [ORNL

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Design and analysis of a 5-MW vertical-fluted-tube condenser for geothermal applications  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The design and analysis of an industtial-sized vertical-fluted-tube condenser. The condenser is used to condense superheated isobutane vapor discharged from a power turbine in a geothermal test facility operated for the US Department of Energy. The 5-MW condenser has 1150 coolant tubes in a four-pass configuration with a total heat transfer area of 725 m/sup 2/ (7800 ft/sup 2/). The unit is being tested at the Geothermal Components Test Facility in the Imperial Valley of East Mesa, California. The condenser design is based on previous experimental research work done at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory on condensing refrigerants on a wide variety of single vertical tubes. Condensing film coefficients obtained on the high-performance vertical fluted tubes in condensing refrigerants are as much as seven times greater than those obtained with vertical smooth tubes that have the same diameter and length. The overall heat transfer performance expected from the fluted tube condenser is four to five times the heat transfer obtained from the identical units employing smooth tubes. Fluted tube condensers also have other direct applications in the Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) program in condensing ammonia, in the petroleum industry in condensing light hydrocarbons, and in the air conditioning and refrigeration industry in condensing fluorocarbon vapors.

Llewellyn, G.H.

1982-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Central receiver solar thermal power system, Phase 1. Pilot plant cost and commercial plant cost and performance preliminary design report. [150 MW commercial tower focus plant and 10 MW pilot plant  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Detailed cost and performance data for the 10 MWe Pilot Plant and the 150 MWe Commercial Plant are given. The Commercial Plant consists of 15 integrated collector - receiver modules. Each module contains 1325 heliostats and an internally mounted steam-generating receiver on a steel tower with an aperture height of 90 M. The Pilot Plant consists of one full-scale collector - receiver module. The two-stage sensible heat storage system utilizes a heat transfer salt medium and a hydrocarbon oil storage medium. The electric power generation system uses a conventional steam turbine-generator. The Pilot Plant is one module of the Commercial Plant, providing for one-to-one scaling in the most critical areas. (WHK)

None

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Thermal-hydraulic analysis of the LANL/IPPE/EDO-GP 1-MW LBE target  

SciTech Connect

The accelerator-driven transmutation of waste (ATW) concept has been proposed by the United States and other countries to transmute plutonium, higher actinides, and other environmentally hazardous fission products. One of the key components in the ATW concept is a target that, via spallation, produces neutrons to transmute nuclear waste. Since significant heat is generated during fissioning of the waste actinides, an efficient heat removal system is necessary. Liquid lead-bismuth eutectic (LBE) is an efficient coolant as well as a good spallation target for production of neutrons. The LBE coolant technology has been successfully used in Russian submarine nuclear reactors. The International Science and Technology Center (ISTC) has funded the Institute of Physics and Power Engineering (IPPE) and the Experiment and Design Organization-Gidropress (EDO-GP) of Russia to design and manufacture a pilot target (Target Circuit One-TC1) that incorporates Russian LBE technology into the ATW concept. The target will be tested in the 800-MeV, 1-mA proton beam at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) in 2 yr. These target experiments will provide valuable information on the performance of LBE as both spallation target and coolant. They will also help to design target/blanket systems for future ATW facilities. In summary, the authors have carried out thermal-hydraulic analyses for the LANL/IPPE/EDO-GP 1-MW LBE target. It is shown that the current design is suitable for the beam-on tests. The diffuser plate successfully enhances the coolant flow around the window center but still avoids generating recirculation zone downstream. The temperature range is within the proper operation range for both the LBE coolant and the structural materials.

He, X.; Ammerman, C.; Woloshun, K.; Li, N.

2000-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

SYNCHEM feasibility report: Phase 1  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Several Czech and US companies have entered into a development agreement for the purposes of determining the technical and economic feasibility and overall financeability of an integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) regional energy facility to be located adjacent to the Chemopetrol refinery in Litvinov, Czech Republic. The Project would use a feedstock comprised of coal supplied by Doly a upravny Komorany s.p. (DUK) coal mining company and mined from the Most/Litvinov area together with high sulfur residual oils from the Chemopetrol refinery. When gasified together with oxygen from an Air Products air separation plant, and based on an average yearly consumption of 2,100K metric tons per year of coal (as delivered) and 630K tonnes per year of oil, approximately 11 million normal cubic meters per day of syngas will be produced. At its current projected design capacity, when combusted in two General Electric advanced technology Frame 9FA gas turbines, the Project will produce approximately 690MW of electric power; 250 metric tons/hour of steam for process; and 135 thermal equivalent MW of district heat. The Feasibility Phase efforts described in this report indicate the real possibility for a successful and profitable IGCC Project for the Czech Republic. It is therefore incumbent upon all the Project Participants to review and evaluate the information contained herein such that a go/no-go decision can be reached by early next year.

Not Available

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Listening to Customers: How Deliberative Polling Helped Build 1,000 MW of New Renewable Energy Projects in Texas  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3 * NREL/TP-620-33177 3 * NREL/TP-620-33177 Listening to Customers: How Deliberative Polling Helped Build 1,000 MW of New Renewable Energy Projects in Texas R.L. Lehr Attorney W. Guild, Ph.D. The Guild Group, Inc. D.L. Thomas, Ph.D. Dennis Thomas and Associates B.G. Swezey National Renewable Energy Laboratory National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole Boulevard Golden, Colorado 80401-3393 NREL is a U.S. Department of Energy Laboratory Operated by Midwest Research Institute * Battelle * Bechtel Contract No. DE-AC36-99-GO10337 June 2003 * NREL/TP-620-33177 Listening to Customers: How Deliberative Polling Helped Build 1,000 MW of New Renewable Energy Projects in Texas R.L. Lehr Attorney W. Guild, Ph.D. The Guild Group, Inc. D.L. Thomas, Ph.D. Dennis Thomas and Associates

188

10MW Class Direct Drive HTS Wind Turbine: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-08-00312  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper summarizes the work completed under the CRADA between NREL and American Superconductor (AMSC). The CRADA combined NREL and AMSC resources to benchmark high temperature superconducting direct drive (HTSDD) generator technology by integrating the technologies into a conceptual wind turbine design, and comparing the design to geared drive and permanent magnet direct drive (PMDD) wind turbine configurations. Analysis was accomplished by upgrading the NREL Wind Turbine Design Cost and Scaling Model to represent geared and PMDD turbines at machine ratings up to 10 MW and then comparing cost and mass figures of AMSC's HTSDD wind turbine designs to theoretical geared and PMDD turbine designs at 3.1, 6, and 10 MW sizes.

Musial, W.

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

10MW Class Direct Drive HTS Wind Turbine: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-08-00312  

SciTech Connect

This paper summarizes the work completed under the CRADA between NREL and American Superconductor (AMSC). The CRADA combined NREL and AMSC resources to benchmark high temperature superconducting direct drive (HTSDD) generator technology by integrating the technologies into a conceptual wind turbine design, and comparing the design to geared drive and permanent magnet direct drive (PMDD) wind turbine configurations. Analysis was accomplished by upgrading the NREL Wind Turbine Design Cost and Scaling Model to represent geared and PMDD turbines at machine ratings up to 10 MW and then comparing cost and mass figures of AMSC's HTSDD wind turbine designs to theoretical geared and PMDD turbine designs at 3.1, 6, and 10 MW sizes.

Musial, W.

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

1170-MW(t) HTGR-PS/C plant application study report: Geismar, Louisiana refinery/chemical complex application  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes a study to apply an 1170-MW(t) high-temperature gas-cooled reactor - process steam/cogeneration (HTGR-PS/C) to an industrial complex at Geismar, Louisiana. This study compares the HTGR with coal and oil as process plant fuels. This study uses a previous broad energy alternative study by the Stone and Webster Corporation on refinery and chemical plant needs in the Gulf States Utilities service area. The HTGR-PS/C was developed by General Atomic (GA) specifically for industries which require both steam and electric energy. The GA 1170-MW(t) HTGR-PC/C design is particularly well suited to industrial applications and is expected to have excellent cost benefits over other energy sources.

McMain, Jr., A. T.; Stanley, J. D.

1981-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Dry SO/sub 2/ particulate removal for coal-fired boilers. Volume 2. 22-MW demonstration using nahcolite, trona, and soda ash. Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The second phase of a full scale demonstration of the integration of the dry injection of sodium sorbents coupled with a fabric filter baghouse was conducted at Public Service Company of Colorado's Cameo Unit 1, a 22 MW coal-fired utility boiler equipped with an eight compartment baghouse. An initial test series conducted in 1980 had demonstrated the capability of 70% SO/sub 2/ removal with nahcolite injection without significant impact on the baghouse operation. The objectives of the second test series were to expand the evaluation of nahcolite to operation at reduced baghouse temperatures, high temperature injection and varied coal applications, and the use of several alternative and potentially more available sorbent materials. SO/sub 2/ removal was shown to be primarily a function of the type and rate of sorbent injection. The performance of nahcolite was consistent with the previous tests achieving approximately 80% SO/sub 2/ removal with the injection of a stoichiometric amount into the flue gases. Comparable injection quantities of the three trona materials evaluated resulted in 55% SO/sub 2/ removal. Soda ash was ineffective in removing SO/sub 2/ at all injection rates. No significant differences in the SO/sub 2/ removal characteristics of nahcolite were observed while firing coal from several sources. Sorbent injection had no appreciable impact on the baghouse pressure drop characteristics or bag cleanability. Baghouse collection efficiency remained at 99.9+% levels. 3 references, 19 figures, 8 tables.

Muzio, L.J.; Sonnichsen, T.W.

1984-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

An analysis of the proposed MITR-III core to establish thermal-hydraulic limits at 10 MW. Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The 5 MW Massachusetts Institute of Technology Research Reactor (MITR-II) is expected to operate under a new license beginning in 1999. Among the options being considered is an upgrade in the heat removal system to allow operation at 10 MW. The purpose of this study is to predict the Limiting Safety System Settings and Safety Limits for the upgraded reactor (MITR-III). The MITR Multi-Channel Analysis Code was written to analyze the response of the MITR system to a series of anticipated transients in order to determine the Limiting Safety System Settings and Safety Limits under various operating conditions. The MIT Multi-Channel Analysis Code models the primary and secondary systems, with special emphasis placed on analyzing the thermal-hydraulic conditions in the core. The code models each MITR fuel element explicitly in order to predict the behavior of the system during flow instabilities. The results of the code are compared to experimental data from MITR-II and other sources. New definitions are suggested for the Limiting Safety System Settings and Safety Limits. MITR Limit Diagrams are included for three different heat removal system configurations. It is concluded that safe, year-round operating at 10 MW is possible, given that the primary and secondary flow rates are both increased by approximately 40%.

Harling, O.K.; Lanning, D.D.; Bernard, J.A.; Meyer, J.E.; Henry, A.F.

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Design and Analyses of Transmission Lines for the 110 GHzECH Upgrade to 6 MW for DIII-D  

SciTech Connect

During the summer of 1999 the installation of three new Electron Cyclotron Heating (ECH) transmission lines began as part of the 110 GHz ECH Upgrade to 6 MW project for DIII-D. An important step in the development of the transmission line design was the selection of the waveguide size. To make this selection, analyses were conducted to characterize the thermal and radio frequency (rf) loss performance of the key corrugated waveguide components under 1 MW, long pulse (10 s, 1% duty cycle) operation. Other factors that were analyzed included vacuum conductance and pumping speed, ease of installation, space considerations, and overall cost. The two candidate transmission line sizes were 2.50 in. and 1.25 in. id. An overview of the design and layout of the proposed transmission lines for the DIII-D ECH upgrade project is presented. Details and results are given for the vacuum conductance analysis of the overall transmission line, the rf loss analyses and tests on corrugated waveguide and miter bends, and the thermal analyses of the mirrors in the corrugated waveguide switch and the power monitor miter bend. Finally, a discussion is presented which weighs the results of these analyses with the experience gained through the installation and operation of the existing three 1 MW ECH systems at DIII-D and concludes with the selection of 1.25 in. i.d. waveguide and components for the upgrade project.

Grunloh, H.J.; Baxi, C.B.; Chin, E.; Condon, M.; Doane, J.L.; Moeller, C.P.; O'Neill, R.C.

1999-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Expansion of Michigan EOR Operations Using Advanced Amine Technology at a 600 MW Project Wolverine Carbon Capture and Storage Project  

SciTech Connect

Wolverine Power Supply Cooperative Inc, a member owned cooperative utility based in Cadillac Michigan, proposes to demonstrate the capture, beneficial utilization and storage of CO{sub 2} in the expansion of existing Enhanced Oil Recovery operations. This project is being proposed in response to the US Department of Energy Solicitation DE-FOA-0000015 Section III D, 'Large Scale Industrial CCS projects from Industrial Sources' Technology Area 1. The project will remove 1,000 metric tons per day of CO{sub 2} from the Wolverine Clean Energy Venture 600 MW CFB power plant owned and operated by WPC. CO{sub 2} from the flue gas will be captured using Hitachi's CO{sub 2} capture system and advanced amine technology. The capture system with the advanced amine-based solvent supplied by Hitachi is expected to significantly reduce the cost and energy requirements of CO{sub 2} capture compared to current technologies. The captured CO{sub 2} will be compressed and transported for Enhanced Oil Recovery and CO{sub 2} storage purposes. Enhanced Oil Recovery is a proven concept, widely used to recover otherwise inaccessible petroleum reserves. While post-combustion CO{sub 2} capture technologies have been tested at the pilot scale on coal power plant flue gas, they have not yet been demonstrated at a commercial scale and integrated with EOR and storage operations. Amine-based CO{sub 2} capture is the leading technology expected to be available commercially within this decade to enable CCS for utility and industrial facilities firing coal and waste fuels such as petroleum coke. However, traditional CO{sub 2} capture process utilizing commercial amine solvents is very energy intensive for regeneration and is also susceptible to solvent degradation by oxygen as well as SOx and NO{sub 2} in the flue gas, resulting in large operating costs. The large volume of combustion flue gas with its low CO{sub 2} concentration requires large equipment sizes, which together with the highly corrosive nature of the typical amine-based separation process leads to high plant capital investment. According to recent DOE-NETL studies, MEA-based CCS will increase the cost of electricity of a new pulverized coal plant by 80-85% and reduce the net plant efficiency by about 30%. Non-power industrial facilities will incur similar production output and efficiency penalties when implementing conventional carbon capture systems. The proposed large scale demonstration project combining advanced amine CO{sub 2} capture integrated with commercial EOR operations significantly advances post-combustion technology development toward the DOE objectives of reducing the cost of energy production and improving the efficiency of CO{sub 2} Capture technologies. WPC has assembled a strong multidisciplinary team to meet the objectives of this project. WPC will provide the host site and Hitachi will provide the carbon capture technology and advanced solvent. Burns and Roe bring expertise in overall engineering integration and plant design to the team. Core Energy, an active EOR producer/operator in the State of Michigan, is committed to support the detailed design, construction and operation of the CO{sub 2} pipeline and storage component of the project. This team has developed a Front End Engineering Design and Cost Estimate as part of Phase 1 of DOE Award DE-FE0002477.

H Hoffman; Y kishinevsky; S. Wu; R. Pardini; E. Tripp; D. Barnes

2010-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

195

PHASE DETECTOR  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A phase detector circuit is described for use at very high frequencies of the order of 50 megacycles. The detector circuit includes a pair of rectifiers inverted relative to each other. One voltage to be compared is applied to the two rectifiers in phase opposition and the other voltage to be compared is commonly applied to the two rectifiers. The two result:ng d-c voltages derived from the rectifiers are combined in phase opposition to produce a single d-c voltage having amplitude and polarity characteristics dependent upon the phase relation between the signals to be compared. Principal novelty resides in the employment of a half-wave transmission line to derive the phase opposing signals from the first voltage to be compared for application to the two rectifiers in place of the transformer commonly utilized for such purpose in phase detector circuits for operation at lower frequency.

Kippenhan, D.O.

1959-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Design and testing of an internal mode converter for a 1.5 MW, 110 GHz gyrotron with a depressed collector  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We report experimental results on a 1.5 MW, 110 GHz, 3 microsecond pulsed gyrotron with a single-stage depressed collector. A simplified mode converter with smooth mirror surfaces has been installed in the tube. The converter ...

Tax, David Samuel

197

Economic Benefits, Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Emissions Reductions, and Water Conservation Benefits from 1,000 Megawatts (MW) of New Wind Power in Tennessee (Fact Sheet)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy?s Wind Powering America Program is committed to educating state-level policymakers and other stakeholders about the economic, CO2 emissions, and water conservation impacts of wind power. This analysis highlights the expected impacts of 1000 MW of wind power in Tennessee. Although construction and operation of 1000 MW of wind power is a significant effort, seven states have already reached the 1000-MW mark. We forecast the cumulative economic benefits from 1000 MW of development in Tennessee to be $1.2 billion, annual CO2 reductions are estimated at 2.4 million tons, and annual water savings are 1,321 million gallons.

Lantz, E.; Tegen, S.

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Economic Benefits, Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Emissions Reductions, and Water Conservation Benefits from 1,000 Megawatts (MW) of New Wind Power in Wisconsin (Fact Sheet)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy?s Wind Powering America Program is committed to educating state-level policymakers and other stakeholders about the economic, CO2 emissions, and water conservation impacts of wind power. This analysis highlights the expected impacts of 1000 MW of wind power in Wisconsin. Although construction and operation of 1000 MW of wind power is a significant effort, six states have already reached the 1000-MW mark. We forecast the cumulative economic benefits from 1000 MW of development in Wisconsin to be $1.1 billion, annual CO2 reductions are estimated at 3.2 million tons, and annual water savings are 1,476 million gallons.

Not Available

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Economic Benefits, Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Emissions Reductions, and Water Conservation Benefits from 1,000 Megawatts (MW) of New Wind Power in North Carolina (Fact Sheet)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy?s Wind Powering America Program is committed to educating state-level policymakers and other stakeholders about the economic, CO2 emissions, and water conservation impacts of wind power. This analysis highlights the expected impacts of 1000 MW of wind power in North Carolina. Although construction and operation of 1000 MW of wind power is a significant effort, seven states have already reached the 1000-MW mark. We forecast the cumulative economic benefits from 1000 MW of development in North Carolina to be $1.1 billion, annual CO2 reductions are estimated at 2.9 million tons, and annual water savings are 1,558 million gallons.

Not Available

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Economic Benefits, Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Emissions Reductions, and Water Conservation Benefits from 1,000 Megawatts (MW) of New Wind Power in West Virginia (Fact Sheet)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy?s Wind Powering America Program is committed to educating state-level policymakers and other stakeholders about the economic, CO2 emissions, and water conservation impacts of wind power. This analysis highlights the expected impacts of 1000 MW of wind power in West Virginia. Although construction and operation of 1000 MW of wind power is a significant effort, six states have already reached the 1000-MW mark. We forecast the cumulative economic benefits from 1000 MW of development in West Virginia to be $1.0 billion, annual CO2 reductions are estimated at 3.3 million tons, and annual water savings are 1,763 million gallons.

Not Available

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tw mw phase" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Economic Benefits, Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Emissions Reductions, and Water Conservation Benefits from 1,000 Megawatts (MW) of New Wind Power in Massachusetts (Fact Sheet)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy?s Wind Powering America Program is committed to educating state-level policymakers and other stakeholders about the economic, CO2 emissions, and water conservation impacts of wind power. This analysis highlights the expected impacts of 1000 MW of wind power in Massachusetts. Although construction and operation of 1000 MW of wind power is a significant effort, seven states have already reached the 1000-MW mark. We forecast the cumulative economic benefits from 1000 MW of development in Massachusetts to be $1.4 billion, annual CO2 reductions are estimated at 2.6 million tons, and annual water savings are 1,293 million gallons.

Lantz, E.; Tegen, S.

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Economic Benefits, Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Emissions Reductions, and Water Conservation Benefits from 1,000 Megawatts (MW) of New Wind Power in South Dakota (Fact Sheet)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy?s Wind Powering America Program is committed to educating state-level policymakers and other stakeholders about the economic, CO2 emissions, and water conservation impacts of wind power. This analysis highlights the expected impacts of 1000 MW of wind power in South Dakota. Although construction and operation of 1000 MW of wind power is a significant effort, six states have already reached the 1000-MW mark. We forecast the cumulative economic benefits from 1000 MW of development in South Dakota to be $1.1 billion, annual CO2 reductions are estimated at 4.0 million tons, and annual water savings are 1,795 million gallons.

Not Available

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Economic Benefits, Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Emissions Reductions, and Water Conservation Benefits from 1,000 Megawatts (MW) of New Wind Power in Pennsylvania (Fact Sheet)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy?s Wind Powering America Program is committed to educating state-level policymakers and other stakeholders about the economic, CO2 emissions, and water conservation impacts of wind power. This analysis highlights the expected impacts of 1000 MW of wind power in Pennsylvania. Although construction and operation of 1000 MW of wind power is a significant effort, six states have already reached the 1000-MW mark. We forecast the cumulative economic benefits from 1000 MW of development in Pennsylvania to be $1.2 billion, annual CO2 reductions are estimated at 3.4 million tons, and annual water savings are 1,837 million gallons.

Not Available

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Economic Benefits, Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Emissions Reductions, and Water Conservation Benefits from 1,000 Megawatts (MW) of New Wind Power in Montana (Fact Sheet)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy?s Wind Powering America Program is committed to educating state-level policymakers and other stakeholders about the economic, CO2 emissions, and water conservation impacts of wind power. This analysis highlights the expected impacts of 1000 MW of wind power in Montana. Although construction and operation of 1000 MW of wind power is a significant effort, six states have already reached the 1000-MW mark. We forecast the cumulative economic benefits from 1000 MW of development in Montana to be $1.2 billion, annual CO2 reductions are estimated at 2.9 million tons, and annual water savings are 1,207 million gallons.

Not Available

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Economic Benefits, Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Emissions Reductions, and Water Conservation Benefits from 1,000 Megawatts (MW) of New Wind Power in New Mexico (Fact Sheet)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy?s Wind Powering America Program is committed to educating state-level policymakers and other stakeholders about the economic, CO2 emissions, and water conservation impacts of wind power. This analysis highlights the expected impacts of 1000 MW of wind power in New Mexico. Although construction and operation of 1000 MW of wind power is a significant effort, six states have already reached the 1000-MW mark. We forecast the cumulative economic benefits from 1000 MW of development in New Mexico to be $1.1 billion, annual CO2 reductions are estimated at 2.6 million tons, and annual water savings are 1,117 million gallons.

Not Available

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Economic Benefits, Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Emissions Reductions, and Water Conservation Benefits from 1,000 Megawatts (MW) of New Wind Power in Maine (Fact Sheet)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy?s Wind Powering America Program is committed to educating state-level policymakers and other stakeholders about the economic, CO2 emissions, and water conservation impacts of wind power. This analysis highlights the expected impacts of 1000 MW of wind power in Maine. Although construction and operation of 1000 MW of wind power is a significant effort, six states have already reached the 1000-MW mark. We forecast the cumulative economic benefits from 1000 MW of development in Maine to be $1.3 billion, annual CO2 reductions are estimated at 2.8 million tons, and annual water savings are 1,387 million gallons.

Not Available

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Producing Persistent, High-Current, High-Duty-Factor H- Beams for Routine 1 MW Operation of SNS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Since 2009, SNS has been producing neutrons with ion beam powers near 1 MW, which requires the extraction of ~50 mA H- ions from the ion source with a ~5% duty factor. The 50 mA are achieved after an initial dose of ~3 mg of Cs and heating the Cs collar to ~170 C. The 50 mA normally persist for the entire 4-week source service cycles. Fundamental processes are reviewed to elucidate the persistence of the SNS H- beams without a steady feed of Cs and why the Cs collar temperature may have to be kept near 170 C.

Stockli, Martin P [ORNL; Han, Baoxi [ORNL; Hardek, Thomas W [ORNL; Kang, Yoon W [ORNL; Murray Jr, S N [ORNL; Pennisi, Terry R [ORNL; Piller, Chip [ORNL; Santana, Manuel [ORNL; Welton, Robert F [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

WESTCARB Phase III Factsheet  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

by almond orchards, a fruit processing plant, and California Highway 99. It is currently home to Clean Energy Systems' 5 MW oxy-combustion pilot plant-which has been the host for...

209

Dynamometer Testing of Samsung 2.5MW Drivetrain: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-08-311  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

SHI's prototype 2.5 MW wind turbine drivetrain was tested at the NWTC 2.5 MW dynamometer test facility over the course of 4 months between December 2009 and March 2010. This successful testing campaign allowed SHI to validate performance, safety, control tuning, and reliability in a controlled environment before moving to full-scale testing and subsequent introduction of a commercial product into the American market.

Wallen, R.

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Design and construction of the SMUDPV2 1-MW photovoltaic power plant. Final report I  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Sacramento Municipal Utility District (SMUD), with cofunding from the US Department of Energy (DOE), has designed, procured, installed, and initiated operation of an additional nominal 1000 kilowatt power generating facility as the second phase of its photovoltaic power plant project. The facility converts solar energy directly into electricity using flat plate photovoltaic modules which are mounted on modular single-axis tracking structures. The facility is located adjacent to the Rancho Seco Nuclear Generating Station, southeast of Sacramento, California. Design work for the second phase began in 1983 and the plant began operation in December 1985. Direct current power from the multiple tracking structures is converted to 12.47-kV alternating current power by solid state power conditioning equipment. Overall conversion efficiency, sunlight to utility grid power, is predicted to be between 8 and 10 percent. The plant is expected to generate 2.6 million kWh annually. The capital cost of the plant was $10.9 million.

Henss, R.R.; Hooker, D.W.

1986-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Environmental influences contributing to window failure of the SLAC 50 MW klystron  

SciTech Connect

The additional heating of the klystron window is due to the intense x-ray level, produced inside the klystron, illuminating the entrance of the output wave guide. Photo-electric effect, although of low efficiency, produces enough electrons at the right location and right phase to start multipactor, which progresses with increasing intensity towards the window. The intercepted charge and the concomitant x-radiation heat the window, but the heating is not the cause of the breakdown per se. The accumulated charge on the window creates electric stress, which comes in addition to the RF stress. It could therefore be a major cause of electrical breakdown. The coating, which is intended to carry this charge off, should have a relaxation time constant small compared to the pulse duration. Unfortunately the coating can not be made conducting enough because it conflicts with the Joule heating in the RF field.

Krienen, F.

1984-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Solar Thermal Small Power Systems Study. Inventory of US industrial small electric power generating systems. [Less than 10 MW  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This inventory of small industrial electric generating systems was assembled by The Aerospace Corporation to provide a data base for analyses being conducted to estimate the potential for displacement of these fossil-fueled systems by solar thermal electric systems no larger than 10 MW in rated capacity. The approximately 2100 megawatts generating capacity of systems in this category constitutes a potential market for small solar thermal and other solar electric power systems. The sources of data for this inventory were the (former) Federal Power Commission (FPC) Form 4 Industrial Ledger and Form 12-C Ledger for 1976. Table 1 alphabetically lists generating systems located at industrial plants and at Federal government installations in each of the 50 states. These systems are differentiated by type of power plant: steam turbine, diesel generator, or gas turbine. Each listing is designated as a power system rather than a power unit because the FPC Ledgers do not provide a means of determining whether more than one unit is associated with each industrial installation. Hence, the user should consider each listing to be a system capacity rating wherein the system may consist of one or more generating units with less than 10 MW/sub e/ combined rating. (WHK)

Not Available

1979-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

California/Geothermal | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

California/Geothermal California/Geothermal < California Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Print PDF California Geothermal General Regulatory Roadmap Geothermal Power Projects Under Development in California Developer Location Estimated Capacity (MW) Development Phase Geothermal Area Geothermal Region Alum Geothermal Project Ram Power Silver Peak, Nevada 64 MW64,000 kW 64,000,000 W 64,000,000,000 mW 0.064 GW 6.4e-5 TW Phase II - Resource Exploration and Confirmation Alum Geothermal Area Walker-Lane Transition Zone Geothermal Region Bald Mountain Geothermal Project Oski Energy LLC Susanville, California 20 MW20,000 kW 20,000,000 W 20,000,000,000 mW 0.02 GW 2.0e-5 TW Phase II - Resource Exploration and Confirmation Black Rock I Geothermal Project CalEnergy Generation Phase III - Permitting and Initial Development North Shore Mono Lake Geothermal Area Walker-Lane Transition Zone Geothermal Region

214

"YEAR","MONTH","STATE","UTILITY CODE","UTILITY NAME","RESIDENTIAL PHOTOVOLTAIC ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","COMMERCIAL PHOTOVOLTAIC ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","INDUSTRIAL PHOTOVOLTAIC ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","TRANSPORTATION PHOTOVOLTAIC ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","TOTAL PHOTOVOLTAIC ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","RESIDENTIAL PHOTOVOLTAIC INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","COMMERCIAL PHOTOVOLTAIC INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","INDUSTRIAL PHOTOVOLTAIC INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","TRANSPORTATION PHOTOVOLTAIC INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","TOTAL PHOTOVOLTAIC INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","RESIDENTIAL PHOTOVOLTAIC NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","COMMERCIAL PHOTOVOLTAIC NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","INDUSTRIAL PHOTOVOLTAIC NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","TRANSPORTATION PHOTOVOLTAIC NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","TOTAL PHOTOVOLTAIC NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","RESIDENTIAL WIND ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","COMMERCIAL WIND ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","INDUSTRIAL WIND ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","TRANSPORTATION WIND ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","TOTAL WIND ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","RESIDENTIAL WIND INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","COMMERCIAL WIND INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","INDUSTRIAL WIND INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","TRANSPORTATION WIND INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","TOTAL WIND INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","RESIDENTIAL WIND NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","COMMERCIAL WIND NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","INDUSTRIAL WIND NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","TRANSPORTATION WIND NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","TOTAL WIND NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","RESIDENTIAL OTHER ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","COMMERCIAL OTHER ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","INDUSTRIAL OTHER ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","TRANSPORTATION OTHER ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","TOTAL OTHER ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","RESIDENTIAL OTHER INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","COMMERCIAL OTHER INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","INDUSTRIAL OTHER INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","TRANSPORTATION OTHER INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","TOTAL OTHER INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","RESIDENTIAL OTHER NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","COMMERCIAL OTHER NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","INDUSTRIAL OTHER NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","TRANSPORTATION OTHER NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","TOTAL OTHER NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","RESIDENTIAL TOTAL ENERGY SOLD BACK TO THE UTILITY (MWh)","COMMERCIAL TOTAL ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","INDUSTRIAL TOTAL ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","TRANSPORTATION TOTAL ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","TOTAL ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","RESIDENTIAL TOTAL INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","COMMERCIAL TOTAL INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","INDUSTRIAL TOTAL INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","TRANSPORTATION TOTAL INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","TOTAL INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","RESIDENTIAL TOTAL NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","COMMERCIAL TOTAL NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","INDUSTRIAL TOTAL NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","TRANSPORTATION TOTAL NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","TOTAL NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","RESIDENTIAL ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK TO THE UTILITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MWh)","COMMERCIAL ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK TO THE UTILITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MWh)","INDUSTRIAL ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK TO THE UTILITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MWh)","TRANSPORTATION ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK TO THE UTILITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MWh)","TOTAL ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK TO THE UTILITYFOR ALL STATES SERVED(MWh)","RESIDENTIAL INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MW)","COMMERCIAL INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MW)","INDUSTRIAL INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MW)","TRANSPORTATION INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MW)","INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MW)","RESIDENTIAL NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT FOR ALL STATES SERVED","COMMERCIAL NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT FOR ALL STATES SERVED","INDUSTRIAL NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT FOR ALL STATES SERVED","TRANSPORTATION NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT FOR ALL STATES SERVED","NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT FOR ALL STATES SERVED"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

UTILITYFOR ALL STATES SERVED(MWh)","RESIDENTIAL INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MW)","COMMERCIAL INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MW)","INDUSTRIAL INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MW)","TRANSPORTATION INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MW)","INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MW)","RESIDENTIAL NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT FOR ALL STATES SERVED","COMMERCIAL NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT FOR ALL STATES SERVED","INDUSTRIAL NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT FOR ALL STATES SERVED","TRANSPORTATION NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT FOR ALL STATES SERVED","NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT FOR ALL STATES SERVED"

215

"YEAR","MONTH","STATE","UTILITY CODE","UTILITY NAME","RESIDENTIAL PHOTOVOLTAIC ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","COMMERCIAL PHOTOVOLTAIC ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","INDUSTRIAL PHOTOVOLTAIC ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","TRANSPORTATION PHOTOVOLTAIC ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","TOTAL PHOTOVOLTAIC ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","RESIDENTIAL PHOTOVOLTAIC INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","COMMERCIAL PHOTOVOLTAIC INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","INDUSTRIAL PHOTOVOLTAIC INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","TRANSPORTATION PHOTOVOLTAIC INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","TOTAL PHOTOVOLTAIC INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","RESIDENTIAL PHOTOVOLTAIC NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","COMMERCIAL PHOTOVOLTAIC NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","INDUSTRIAL PHOTOVOLTAIC NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","TRANSPORTATION PHOTOVOLTAIC NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","TOTAL PHOTOVOLTAIC NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","RESIDENTIAL WIND ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","COMMERCIAL WIND ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","INDUSTRIAL WIND ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","TRANSPORTATION WIND ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","TOTAL WIND ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","RESIDENTIAL WIND INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","COMMERCIAL WIND INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","INDUSTRIAL WIND INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","TRANSPORTATION WIND INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","TOTAL WIND INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","RESIDENTIAL WIND NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","COMMERCIAL WIND NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","INDUSTRIAL WIND NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","TRANSPORTATION WIND NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","TOTAL WIND NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","RESIDENTIAL OTHER ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","COMMERCIAL OTHER ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","INDUSTRIAL OTHER ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","TRANSPORTATION OTHER ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","TOTAL OTHER ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","RESIDENTIAL OTHER INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","COMMERCIAL OTHER INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","INDUSTRIAL OTHER INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","TRANSPORTATION OTHER INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","TOTAL OTHER INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","RESIDENTIAL OTHER NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","COMMERCIAL OTHER NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","INDUSTRIAL OTHER NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","TRANSPORTATION OTHER NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","TOTAL OTHER NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","RESIDENTIAL TOTAL ENERGY SOLD BACK TO THE UTILITY (MWh)","COMMERCIAL TOTAL ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","INDUSTRIAL TOTAL ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","TRANSPORTATION TOTAL ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","TOTAL ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","RESIDENTIAL TOTAL INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","COMMERCIAL TOTAL INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","INDUSTRIAL TOTAL INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","TRANSPORTATION TOTAL INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","TOTAL INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","RESIDENTIAL TOTAL NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","COMMERCIAL TOTAL NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","INDUSTRIAL TOTAL NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","TRANSPORTATION TOTAL NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","TOTAL NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","RESIDENTIAL ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK TO THE UTILITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MWh)","COMMERCIAL ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK TO THE UTILITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MWh)","INDUSTRIAL ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK TO THE UTILITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MWh)","TRANSPORTATION ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK TO THE UTILITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MWh)","TOTAL ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK TO THE UTILITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MWh)","RESIDENTIAL INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MW)","COMMERCIAL INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MW)","INDUSTRIAL INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MW)","TRANSPORTATION INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MW)","INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MW)","RESIDENTIAL NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT FOR ALL STATES SERVED","COMMERCIAL NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT FOR ALL STATES SERVED","INDUSTRIAL NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT FOR ALL STATES SERVED","TRANSPORTATION NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT FOR ALL STATES SERVED","NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT FOR ALL STATES SERVED"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

UTILITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MWh)","RESIDENTIAL INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MW)","COMMERCIAL INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MW)","INDUSTRIAL INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MW)","TRANSPORTATION INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MW)","INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MW)","RESIDENTIAL NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT FOR ALL STATES SERVED","COMMERCIAL NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT FOR ALL STATES SERVED","INDUSTRIAL NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT FOR ALL STATES SERVED","TRANSPORTATION NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT FOR ALL STATES SERVED","NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT FOR ALL STATES SERVED"

216

Phase Transformations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Aug 9, 2013 ... O. Advanced Neutron and Synchrotron Studies of Materials: Phase .... We will describe recent advances at the Advanced Photon Source in ... Finally, we will describe upgrade plans for microdiffraction capabilities at the APS.

217

Ocean thermal energy conversion power system development-I. Phase I. Preliminary design report. Volume 1. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The results of a conceptual and preliminary design study of Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) closed loop ammonia power system modules performed by Lockheed Missiles and Space Company, Inc. (LMSC) are presented. This design study is the second of 3 tasks in Phase I of the Power System Development-I Project. The Task 2 objectives were to develop: 1) conceptual designs for a 40 to 50-MW(e) closed cycle ammonia commercial plant size power module whose heat exchangers are immersed in seawater and whose ancillary equipments are in a shirt sleeve environment; preliminary designs for a modular application power system sized at 10-MW(e) whose design, construction and material selection is analogous to the 50 MW(e) module, except that titanium tubes are to be used in the heat exchangers; and 3) preliminary designs for heat exchanger test articles (evaporator and condenser) representative of the 50-MW(e) heat exchangers using aluminum alloy, suitable for seawater service, for testing on OTEC-1. The reference ocean platform was specified by DOE as a surface vessel with the heat exchanger immersed in seawater to a design depth of 0 to 20 ft measured from the top of the heat exchanger. For the 50-MW(e) module, the OTEC 400-MW(e) Plant Ship, defined in the Platform Configuration and Integration study, was used as the reference platform. System design, performance, and cost are presented. (WHK)

Not Available

1978-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

218

Project Eagle Phase 1 Direct Wafer/Cell Solar Facility  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Project Eagle Phase 1 Direct Wafer/Cell Solar Facility Project Eagle Phase 1 Direct Wafer/Cell Solar Facility 1366 Technologies Description of Proposed Action: The Department of Energy (DOE) proposed action is for the use of a federal loan guarantee by 1366 Technologies (1366) to support the renovation of an existing building, located at 159 Wells Avenue, Newton, Massachusetts, into a solar wafer production facility. The new facility would constitute Phase 1 of Project Eagle and accommodate 20 megawatts (MW) of multi crystalline silicon wafer production, laboratory areas, offices, and ancillary spaces. Phase 2 of Proje~y an existing DOE Categorical Exclusion and would occur at a site in _ _ _ _ . The Phase 1 facility in Newton, MA is an existing building of 50,600 square feet on a site approximately 4.7 acres. 1366 would renovate the interior of the facility to provide office

219

Puna Geothermal Project | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Puna Geothermal Project Puna Geothermal Project Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Development Project: Puna Geothermal Project Project Location Information Location Puna, Hawaii County Hawaii County, Hawaii Geothermal Area Hawaii Geothermal Region Geothermal Project Profile Developer Puna Geothermal Venture Project Type Hybrid Flash/Binary GEA Development Phase Operational"Operational" is not in the list of possible values (Phase I - Resource Procurement and Identification, Phase II - Resource Exploration and Confirmation, Phase III - Permitting and Initial Development, Phase IV - Resource Production and Power Plant Construction) for this property. Planned Capacity (MW) 38 MW38,000 kW 38,000,000 W 38,000,000,000 mW 0.038 GW 3.8e-5 TW GEA Report Date

220

CHARACTERISTICS OF DIAMOND WINDOWS ON THE 1 MW, 110 GHz GYROTRON SYSTEMS ON THE DIII-D TOKAMAK  

SciTech Connect

Diamond disks made using the chemical vapor deposition (CVD) technique are now in common use as gyrotron output windows. The low millimeter wave losses and excellent thermal conductivity of diamond have made it possible to use such windows in gyrotrons with {approx}1 MW output power and pulse length up to and greater than 10 s. A ubiquitous characteristic of diamond gyrotron windows is the presence of apparent hot spots in the infrared images registered during rf pulses. Many of these spots are co-located with bright points seen in visible video images. The spots do not seem to compromise the integrity of the windows. Analysis of the infrared observations on several different gyrotrons operating at the DIII-D tokamak are reported.

Y.A. GORELOV; J. LOHR; R.W. CALLIS; D. PONCE

2002-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

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While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Design of An 18 MW Beam Dump for 500 GeV Electron/Positron Beams at An ILC  

SciTech Connect

This article presents a report on the progress made in designing 18 MW water based Beam Dumps for electrons or positrons for an International Linear Collider (ILC). Multi-dimensional technology issues have to be addressed for the successful design of the Beam Dump. They include calculations of power deposition by the high energy electron/positron beam bunch trains, computational fluid dynamic analysis of turbulent water flow, mechanical design, process flow analysis, hydrogen/oxygen recombiners, handling of radioactive 7Be and 3H, design of auxiliary equipment, provisions for accident scenarios, remote window exchanger, radiation shielding, etc. The progress made to date is summarized, the current status, and also the issues still to be addressed.

Amann, John; /SLAC; Arnold, Ray; /SLAC; Seryi, Andrei; /SLAC; Walz, Dieter; /SLAC; Kulkarni, Kiran; /Bhabha Atomic Res. Ctr.; Rai, Pravin; /Bhabha Atomic Res. Ctr.; Satyamurthy, Polepalle; /Bhabha Atomic Res. Ctr.; Tiwari, Vikar; /Bhabha Atomic Res. Ctr.; Vincke, Heinz; /CERN

2012-07-05T23:59:59.000Z

222

TECHNICAL EVALUATION OF TEMPORAL GROUNDWATER MONITORING VARIABILITY IN MW66 AND NEARBY WELLS, PADUCAH GASEOUS DIFFUSION PLANT  

SciTech Connect

Evaluation of disposal records, soil data, and spatial/temporal groundwater data from the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP) Solid Waste Management Unit (SWMU) 7 indicate that the peak contaminant concentrations measured in monitoring well (MW) 66 result from the influence of the regional PGDP NW Plume, and does not support the presence of significant vertical transport from local contaminant sources in SWMU 7. This updated evaluation supports the 2006 conceptualization which suggested the high and low concentrations in MW66 represent different flow conditions (i.e., local versus regional influences). Incorporation of the additional lines of evidence from data collected since 2006 provide the basis to link high contaminant concentrations in MW66 (peaks) to the regional 'Northwest Plume' and to the upgradient source, specifically, the C400 Building Area. The conceptual model was further refined to demonstrate that groundwater and the various contaminant plumes respond to complex site conditions in predictable ways. This type of conceptualization bounds the expected system behavior and supports development of environmental cleanup strategies, providing a basis to support decisions even if it is not feasible to completely characterize all of the 'complexities' present in the system. We recommend that the site carefully consider the potential impacts to groundwater and contaminant plume migration as they plan and implement onsite production operations, remediation efforts, and reconfiguration activities. For example, this conceptual model suggests that rerouting drainage water, constructing ponds or basin, reconfiguring cooling water systems, capping sites, decommissioning buildings, fixing (or not fixing) water leaks, and other similar actions will potentially have a 'direct' impact on the groundwater contaminant plumes. Our conclusion that the peak concentrations in MW66 are linked to the regional PGDP NW Plume does not imply that there TCE is not present in SWMU 7. The available soil and groundwater data indicate that the some of the waste disposed in this facility contacted and/or were contaminated by TCE. In our assessment, the relatively small amount of TCE associated with SWMU 7 is not contributing detectable TCE to the groundwater and does not represent a significant threat to the environment, particularly in an area where remediation and/or management of TCE in the NW plume will be required for an extended timeframe. If determined to be necessary by the PGDP team and regulators, additional TCE characterization or cleanup activities could be performed. Consistent with the limited quantity of TCE in SWMU 7, we identify a range of low cost approaches for such activities (e.g., soil gas surveys for characterization or SVE for remediation). We hope that this information is useful to the Paducah team and to their regulators and stakeholders to develop a robust environmental management path to address the groundwater and soil contamination associated with the burial ground areas.

Looney, B.; Eddy-Dilek, C.

2012-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

223

Design of an 18 MW Beam Dump for 500 GeV Electron/Positron Beams at an ILC  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This article presents a report on the progress made in designing 18 MW water based Beam Dumps for electrons or positrons for an International Linear Collider (ILC). Multi-dimensional technology issues have to be addressed for the successful design of the Beam Dump. They include calculations of power deposition by the high energy electron/positron beam bunch trains, computational fluid dynamic analysis of turbulent water flow, mechanical design, process flow analysis, hydrogen/oxygen recombiners, handling of radioactive 7Be and 3H, design of auxiliary equipment, provisions for accident scenarios, remote window exchanger, radiation shielding, etc. The progress made to date is summarized, the current status, and also the issues still to be addressed

Amann, John; Seryi, Andrei; Walz, Dieter; Kulkarni, Kiran; Rai, Pravin; Satyamurthy, Polepalle; Tiwari, Vikar; Vincke, Heinz

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Rotational Augmentation on a 2.3 MW Rotor Blade with Thick Flatback Airfoil Cross-Sections: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Rotational augmentation was analyzed for a 2.3 MW wind turbine, which was equipped with thick flatback airfoils at inboard radial locations and extensively instrumented for acquisition of time varying surface pressures. Mean aerodynamic force and surface pressure data were extracted from an extensive field test database, subject to stringent criteria for wind inflow and turbine operating conditions. Analyses of these data showed pronounced amplification of aerodynamic forces and significant enhancements to surface pressures in response to rotational influences, relative to two-dimensional, stationary conditions. Rotational augmentation occurrence and intensity in the current effort was found to be consistent with that observed in previous research. Notably, elevated airfoil thickness and flatback design did not impede rotational augmentation.

Schreck, S.; Fingersh, L.; Siegel, K.; Singh, M.; Medina, P.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Reference design of 100 MW-h lithium/iron sulfide battery system for utility load leveling  

SciTech Connect

The first year in a two-year cooperative effort between Argonne National Laboratory and Rockwell International to develop a conceptual design of a lithium alloy/iron sulfide battery for utility load leveling is presented. A conceptual design was developed for a 100 MW-h battery system based upon a parallel-series arrangement of 2.5 kW-h capacity cells. The sales price of such a battery system was estimated to be very high, $80.25/kW-h, exclusive of the cost of the individual cells, the dc-to-ac converters, site preparation, or land acquisition costs. Consequently, the second year's efforts were directed towards developing modified designs with significantly lower potential costs.

Zivi, S.M.; Kacinskas, H.; Pollack, I.; Chilenskas, A.A.; Barney, D.L.; Grieve, W.; McFarland, B.L.; Sudar, S.; Goldstein, E.; Adler, E.

1980-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

"Neutrino-4" experiment: preparations for search for sterile neutrino at 100 MW reactor SM-3 at 6-13 meters  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

There has been designed an experimental project "Neutrino-4" for 100 MW reactor SM-3 to test the hypothesis of the "reactor antineutrino anomaly". Advantages of the reactor SM-3 for such an experiment are low background conditions as well as small dimensions of a reactor core - 35x42x42 cm3. One has carried on the Monte-Carlo modeling of a position sensitive antineutrino detector consisting of 5 operation sections, which as a result of displacement, covers the distance from 6 to 13 meters from the reactor core. One has succeeded in obtaining an experimental area of sensitivity to oscillation parameters, which enables to verify the hypothesis of reactor antineutrino oscillations into a sterile state.

A. P. Serebrov; A. K. Fomin; V. G. Zinoviev; Yu. E. Loginov; M. S. Onegin; A. M. Gagarsky; G. A. Petrov; V. A. Solovey; A. V. Chernyi; O. M. Zherebtsov; V. P. Martemyanov; V. G. Zinoev; V. G. Tarasenkov; V. I. Alyoshin; A. L. Petelin; S. V. Pavlov; M. N. Svyatkin; A. L. Izhutov; S. A. Sazontov; D. K. Ryazanov; M. O. Gromov; N. S. Khramkov; V. I. Ryikalin

2012-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

227

Utah/Geothermal | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Utah/Geothermal < Utah Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Print PDF Utah Geothermal General Regulatory Roadmap Geothermal Power Projects Under Development in Utah Developer Location Estimated Capacity (MW) Development Phase Geothermal Area Geothermal Region Cove Fort Geothermal Project Oski Energy LLC 50 MW50,000 kW 50,000,000 W 50,000,000,000 mW 0.05 GW 5.0e-5 TW Phase II - Resource Exploration and Confirmation Cove Fort Geothermal Area Northern Basin and Range Geothermal Region Drum Mountain Geothermal Project Raser Technologies Inc Delta, Utah 0 MW0 kW

228

Geek-Up[3.4.2011]: 3,000+ MW and 2,500 Year-Old Greek Pottery | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3.4.2011]: 3,000+ MW and 2,500 Year-Old Greek Pottery 3.4.2011]: 3,000+ MW and 2,500 Year-Old Greek Pottery Geek-Up[3.4.2011]: 3,000+ MW and 2,500 Year-Old Greek Pottery March 4, 2011 - 5:03pm Addthis An Attic black-figured amphora, currently in the British Museum, of the type that will be studied at SLAC. | Photo by Marie-Lan Nguyen, Courtesy of SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory An Attic black-figured amphora, currently in the British Museum, of the type that will be studied at SLAC. | Photo by Marie-Lan Nguyen, Courtesy of SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory Elizabeth Meckes Elizabeth Meckes Director of User Experience & Digital Technologies, Office of Public Affairs Last week, Bonneville Power Administration dispatchers in the Dittmer Control Center celebrated a milestone - for the first time, wind

229

Comparative ranking of 0. 1 to 10 MW(e) solar thermal electric power systems. Volume I. Summary of results. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report is part of a two-volume set summarizing the results of a comparative ranking of generic solar thermal concepts designed specifically for electric power generation. The original objective of the study was to project the mid-1990 cost and performance of selected generic solar thermal electric power systems for utility applications and to rank these systems by criteria that reflect their future commercial acceptance. This study considered plants with rated capacities of 1 to 10 MW(e), operating over a range of capacity factors from the no-storage case to 0.7 and above. Later, the study was extended to include systems with capacities from 0.1 to 1 MW(e), a range that is attractive to industrial and other non-utility applications. This volume summarizes the results for the full range of capacities from 0.1 to 10 MW(e). Volume II presents data on performance and cost and ranking methodology.

Thornton, J.P.; Brown, K.C.; Finegold, J.G.; Gresham, J.B.; Herlevich, F.A.; Kowalik, J.S.; Kriz, T.A.

1980-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Economic Benefits, Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Emissions Reductions, and Water Conservation Benefits from 1,000 Megawatts (MW) of New Wind Power in Kansas (Fact Sheet)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy's Wind Powering America Program is committed to educating state-level policy makers and other stakeholders about the economic, CO2 emissions, and water conservation impacts of wind power. This analysis highlights the expected impacts of 1000 MW of wind power in Kansas. We forecast the cumulative economic benefits from 1000 MW of development in Kansas to be $1.08 billion, annual CO2 reductions are estimated at 3.2 million tons, and annual water savings are 1,816 million gallons.

Not Available

2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Economic Benefits, Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Emissions Reductions, and Water Conservation Benefits from 1000 Megawatts (MW) of New Wind Power in Michigan  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy's Wind Powering America Program is committed to educating state-level policy makers and other stakeholders about the economic, CO2 emissions, and water conservation impacts of wind power. This analysis highlights the expected impacts of 1000 MW of wind power in Michigan. We forecast the cumulative economic benefits from 1000 MW of development in Michigan to be $1.3 billion, annual CO2 reductions are estimated at 2.9 million tons, and annual water savings are 1,542 million gallons.

Not Available

2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Economic Benefits, Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Emissions Reductions, and Water Conservation Benefits from 1,000 Megawatts (MW) of New Wind Power in Virginia (Fact Sheet)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy's Wind Powering America Program is committed to educating state-level policy makers and other stakeholders about the economic, CO2 emissions, and water conservation impacts of wind power. This analysis highlights the expected impacts of 1000 MW of wind power in Virginia. We forecast the cumulative economic benefits from 1000 MW of development in Virginia to be $1.2 billion, annual CO2 reductions are estimated at 3.0 million tons, and annual water savings are 1,600 million gallons.

Not Available

2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Economic Benefits, Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Emissions Reductions, and Water Conservation Benefits from 1000 Megawatts (MW) of New Wind Power in Nebraska (Fact Sheet)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy's Wind Powering America Program is committed to educating state-level policy makers and other stakeholders about the economic, CO2 emissions, and water conservation impacts of wind power. This analysis highlights the expected impacts of 1000 MW of wind power in Nebraska. We forecast the cumulative economic benefits from 1000 MW of development in Nebraska to be $1.1 billion, annual CO2 reductions are estimated at 4.1 million tons, and annual water savings are 1,840 million gallons.

Not Available

2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Economic Benefits, Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Emissions Reductions, and Water Conservation Benefits from 1,000 Megawatts (MW) of New Wind Power in Arkansas (Fact Sheet)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy's Wind Powering America Program is committed to educating state-level policy makers and other stakeholders about the economic, CO2 emissions, and water conservation impacts of wind power. This analysis highlights the expected impacts of 1000 MW of wind power in Arkansas. We forecast the cumulative economic benefits from 1000 MW of development in Arkansas to be $1.15 billion, annual CO2 reductions are estimated at 2.7 million tons, and annual water savings are 1,507 million gallons.

Not Available

2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Economic Benefits, Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Emissions Reductions, and Water Conservation Benefits from 1000 Megawatts (MW) of New Wind Power in Ohio (Fact Sheet)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy's Wind Powering America Program is committed to educating state-level policy makers and other stakeholders about the economic, CO2 emissions, and water conservation impacts of wind power. This analysis highlights the expected impacts of 1000 MW of wind power in Ohio. We forecast the cumulative economic benefits from 1000 MW of development in Ohio to be $1.3 billion, annual CO2 reductions are estimated at 2.5 million tons, and annual water savings are 1,343 million gallons.

Not Available

2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Economic Benefits, Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Emissions Reduction, and Water Conservation Benefits from 1,000 Megawatts (MW) of New Wind Power in Georgia (Fact Sheet)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy's Wind Powering America Program is committed to educating state-level policy makers and other stakeholders about the economic, CO2 emissions, and water conservation impacts of wind power. This analysis highlights the expected impacts of 1000 MW of wind power in Georgia. We forecast the cumulative economic benefits from 1000 MW of development in Georgia to be $2.1 billion, annual CO2 reductions are estimated at 3.0 million tons, and annual water savings are 1,628 million gallons.

Not Available

2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Economic Benefits, Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Emissions Reductions, and Water Conservation Benefits from 1000 Megawatts (MW) of New Wind Power in Maryland (Fact Sheet)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy's Wind Powering America Program is committed to educating state-level policy makers and other stakeholders about the economic, CO2 emissions, and water conservation impacts of wind power. This analysis highlights the expected impacts of 1000 MW of wind power in Michigan. We forecast the cumulative economic benefits from 1000 MW of development in Maryland to be $1.2 billion, annual CO2 reductions are estimated at 3 million tons, and annual water savings are 1,581 million gallons.

Not Available

2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Economic Benefits, Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Emissions reductions, and Water Conservation Benefits from 1,000 Megawatts (MW) of New Wind Power in New York (Fact Sheet)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy's Wind Powering America Program is committed to educating state-level policy makers and other stakeholders about the economic, CO2 emissions, and water conservation impacts of wind power. This analysis highlights the expected impacts of 1000 MW of wind power in New York. We forecast the cumulative economic benefits from 1000 MW of development in New York to be $1.3 billion, annual CO2 reductions are estimated at 2.5 million tons, and annual water savings are 1,230 million gallons.

Not Available

2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Oregon/Geothermal | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Oregon/Geothermal Oregon/Geothermal < Oregon Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Print PDF Oregon Geothermal General Regulatory Roadmap Geothermal Power Projects Under Development in Oregon Developer Location Estimated Capacity (MW) Development Phase Geothermal Area Geothermal Region Crump Geyser Geothermal Project Nevada Geo Power, Ormat Utah 80 MW80,000 kW 80,000,000 W 80,000,000,000 mW 0.08 GW 8.0e-5 TW Phase II - Resource Exploration and Confirmation Crump's Hot Springs Geothermal Area Northwest Basin and Range Geothermal Region Neal Hot Springs Geothermal Project U.S. Geothermal Vale, Oregon Phase III - Permitting and Initial Development Neal Hot Springs Geothermal Area Snake River Plain Geothermal Region Neal Hot Springs II Geothermal Project U.S. Geothermal Vale, Oregon Phase I - Resource Procurement and Identification Neal Hot Springs Geothermal Area Snake River Plain Geothermal Region

240

mhbai@sinica.edu.tw, kchen@iis.sinica.edu.tw, jschang@cs.nthu.edu.tw WordNet (word  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

] WordNet "plant" WordNet "plant, works, industrial plant" (power plant/) WordNet [Diab et al 2 evaporation tank evaporation/ tank/ wind-wave tank wind-wave/ tank/ wave tank wave/ tank

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tw mw phase" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

History of First U.S. Compressed Air Energy Storage (CAES) Plant (110-MW-26 h): Volume 1: Early CAES Development  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In 1991, Alabama Electric Cooperative's 110-MW-26 h compressed air energy storage (CAES) plant, the first in the United States, became commercially operational. This report, first in a series, documents the history of the plant from project conception to the beginning of plant construction.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Simulation System on the Thermal Stress and Fatigue Life Loss of Startup and Shutdown for a Domestic 600MW Steam Turbo Generator Unit  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Simulation System on the thermal stresses and fatigue life loss of the rotator during startup and shutdown for a domestic 600MW steam turbo generator unit, By means of the analysis of Simulation System on the thermal stress and life loss of the rotor, ... Keywords: steam turbine unit, thermal stress, Fatigue Life Loss, rotator, startup, shutdown

Yunchun Xia

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Wake Turbulence of Two NREL 5-MW Wind Turbines Immersed in a Neutral Atmospheric Boundary-Layer Flow  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The fluid dynamics video considers an array of two NREL 5-MW turbines separated by seven rotor diameters in a neutral atmospheric boundary layer (ABL). The neutral atmospheric boundary-layer flow data were obtained from a precursor ABL simulation using a Large-Eddy Simulation (LES) framework within OpenFOAM. The mean wind speed at hub height is 8m/s, and the surface roughness is 0.2m. The actuator line method (ALM) is used to model the wind turbine blades by means of body forces added to the momentum equation. The fluid dynamics video shows the root and tip vortices emanating from the blades from various viewpoints. The vortices become unstable and break down into large-scale turbulent structures. As the wakes of the wind turbines advect further downstream, smaller-scale turbulence is generated. It is apparent that vortices generated by the blades of the downstream wind turbine break down faster due to increased turbulence levels generated by the wake of the upstream wind turbine.

Bashioum, Jessica L; Schmitz, Sven; Duque, Earl P N

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Annual progress report on the development of a 2 MW/10 second battery energy storage system for power disturbance protection  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Sandia National Laboratories (SNL), acting for the US Department of Energy (DOE), contracts for and administers programs for the purpose of promoting the development and commercialization of large scale, transportable battery energy storage systems. Under DOE Co-Op Agreement No. DE-FC04-94AL99852, SNL has contracted for the development and delivery of an initial prototype 250 kW bridge that becomes an integral subsystem of a 2 MW/10 Second System that can be used by utility customers to protect power sensitive equipment from power disturbances. Development work includes field installation and testing of the prototype unit at a participating utility site for extended product testing with subsequent relocation to an industrial or commercial participating utility customer site for additional evaluation. The program described by the referenced document calls for cost sharing with the successful bidder and eventual title transfer to the participating utility. Prototype delivery is scheduled for January of 1996, with a period of two years allowed for field testing. A final report summarizing the test data with conclusions and recommendations is part of the contract.

NONE

1996-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

245

Demo.mw - CECM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

... Check U A V = S zip( R[`-`], S, MatrixMatrixMultiply[R](MatrixMatrixMultiply[R](U ,A),V) ); LUklbXJvd+RkAvRkNRIUYnL Now, we consider F as a field. We need...

246

GTdemo (.mw) - CECM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Algorithm: Backtracking (Branch & Bound) MaximumIndependentSet(G); NygiIiMiIiQiIiYiIiciIigiIzc= MaximumClique(G); NyUiIiMiIikiIio= ChromaticNumber( G...

247

GRR/Section 4-FD-a - Exploration Permit BLM | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » GRR/Section 4-FD-a - Exploration Permit BLM < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Resource Area: Details Technical Info Geology Power Plants (70 Projects (56 Activities (1574 Geothermal Area Profile Location Exploration Region GEA Development Phase 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp Estimated Reservoir Volume Mean Capacity Power Production Profile Gross Production Capacity 300.7 MW300,700 kW 300,700,000 W 300,700,000,000 mW 0.301 GW 3.007e-4 TW Net Production Capacity 206,358 MW206,358,000 kW 206,358,000,000 W 206,358,000,000,000 mW 206.358 GW

248

Hawaii/Geothermal | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Hawaii/Geothermal Hawaii/Geothermal < Hawaii Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Print PDF Hawaii Geothermal General Regulatory Roadmap Geothermal Power Projects Under Development in Hawaii Developer Location Estimated Capacity (MW) Development Phase Geothermal Area Geothermal Region Haleakala SW Rift Zone Exploration Ormat Technologies Inc , US Department of Energy Haleakala Southwest Rift Zone Haleakala Volcano Geothermal Area Hawaii Geothermal Region Puna Geothermal Venture Ormat Technologies Inc Pahoa, Hawaii 38 MW38,000 kW 38,000,000 W 38,000,000,000 mW 0.038 GW 3.8e-5 TW Kilauea East Rift Geothermal Area Hawaii Geothermal Region Add a geothermal project. Operational Geothermal Power Plants in Hawaii Owner Facility Type Capacity (MW) Commercial Online

249

Final report on the development of a 2 MW/10 second battery energy storage system for power disturbance protection  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Voltage sags, swells and momentary power interruptions lasting a few cycles to several seconds are common disturbances on utility power distribution systems. These disturbances are a result of normal utility recloser switching activity due in part to distribution system short circuits from natural causes such as lightning, rodents, traffic accidents, and current overloads. Power disturbances pose serious problems for many customers with critical, voltage sensitive equipment. Faults can interrupt a manufacturing process, cause PLC`s to initialize their programmed logic and restart equipment out of sequence, create computer data errors, interrupt communications, lockup PC keyboards and cause equipment to malfunction. These momentary disturbances result in billions of dollars of lost productivity annually due to downtime, cleanup, lost production and the loss of customer confidence in the business. This report describes prototype development work for a factory assembled 2 MW/10 Second Battery Energy Storage System. The system design includes (1) a modular battery energy storage system comprised of several strings of batteries-each string provided with an integral Power Conversion System (PCS), (2) an Electronic Selector Device (ESD) comprised of a solid state static switch with sensing and power switching controls, and utility interconnection termination bus bars, and (3) a separate isolation transformer to step-up PCS output voltage to interface directly with the distribution transformer serving the industrial or commercial customer. The system monitors the utility distribution system voltage for voltage sags, swells, and interruptions, switches the customer`s critical loads from utility power to the energy stored in the systems batteries and provides up to 2 MVA until the disturbance clears or up to 10 seconds. Once the ESD sensing circuits have confirmed that the utility is again stable, it seamlessly returns the critical load to the utility. 22 figs., 1 tab.

NONE

1996-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

250

Crystal structures of MW1337R and lin2004: Representatives of a novel protein family that adopt a four-helical bundle fold  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

To extend the structural coverage of proteins with unknown functions, we targeted a novel protein family (Pfam accession number PF08807, DUF1798) for which we proposed and determined the structures of two representative members. The MW1337R gene of Staphylococcus aureus subsp. aureus Rosenbach (Wood 46) encodes a protein with a molecular weight of 13.8 kDa (residues 1-116) and a calculated isoelectric point of 5.15. The lin2004 gene of the nonspore-forming bacterium Listeria innocua Clip11262 encodes a protein with a molecular weight of 14.6 kDa (residues 1-121) and a calculated isoelectric point of 5.45. MW1337R and lin2004, as well as their homologs, which, so far, have been found only in Bacillus, Staphylococcus, Listeria, and related genera (Geobacillus, Exiguobacterium, and Oceanobacillus), have unknown functions and are annotated as hypothetical proteins. The genomic contexts of MW1337R and lin2004 are similar and conserved in related species. In prokaryotic genomes, most often, functionally interacting proteins are coded by genes, which are colocated in conserved operons. Proteins from the same operon as MW1337R and lin2004 either have unknown functions (i.e., belong to DUF1273, Pfam accession number PF06908) or are similar to ypsB from Bacillus subtilis. The function of ypsB is unclear, although it has a strong similarity to the N-terminal region of DivIVA, which was characterized as a bifunctional protein with distinct roles during vegetative growth and sporulation. In addition, members of the DUF1273 family display distant sequence similarity with the DprA/Smf protein, which acts downstream of the DNA uptake machinery, possibly in conjunction with RecA. The RecA activities in Bacillus subtilis are modulated by RecU Holliday-junction resolvase. In all analyzed cases, the gene coding for RecU is in the vicinity of MW1337R, lin2004, or their orthologs, but on a different operon located in the complementary DNA strand. Here, we report the crystal structures of MW1337R and lin2004, which were determined using the semiautomated, high-throughput pipeline of the Joint Center for Structural Genomics (JCSG), part of the National Institute of General Medical Sciences Protein Structure Initiative.

Kozbial, Piotr; Xu, Qingping; Chiu, Hsiu-Ju; McMullan, Daniel; Krishna, S. Sri; Miller, Mitchell D.; Abdubek, Polat; Acosta, Claire; Astakhova, Tamara; Axelrod, Herbert L.; Carlton, Dennis; Clayton, Thomas; Deller, Marc; Duan, Lian; Elias, Ylva; Elsliger, Marc-Andr; Feuerhelm, Julie; Grzechnik, Slawomir K.; Hale, Joanna; Han, Gye Won; Jaroszewski, Lukasz; Jin, Kevin K.; Klock, Heath E.; Knuth, Mark W.; Koesema, Eric; Kumar, Abhinav; Marciano, David; Morse, Andrew T.; Murphy, Kevin D.; Nigoghossian, Edward; Okach, Linda; Oommachen, Silvya; Reyes, Ron; Rife, Christopher L.; Spraggon, Glen; Trout, Christina V.; ban den Bedem, Henry; Weekes, Dana; White, Aprilfawn; Wolf, Guenter; Zubieta, Chloe; Hodgson, Keith O.; Wooley, John; Deacon, Ashley M.; Godzik, Adam; Lesley, Scott A.; Wilson, Ian A. (Scripps); (SSRL); (JCSG); (UCSD); (Burnham)

2009-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

251

"YEAR","MONTH","STATE","UTILITY CODE","UTILITY NAME","RESIDENTIAL PHOTOVOLTAIC ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","COMMERCIAL PHOTOVOLTAIC ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","INDUSTRIAL PHOTOVOLTAIC ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","TRANSPORTATION PHOTOVOLTAIC ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","TOTAL PHOTOVOLTAIC ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","RESIDENTIAL PHOTOVOLTAIC INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","COMMERCIAL PHOTOVOLTAIC INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","INDUSTRIAL PHOTOVOLTAIC INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","TRANSPORTATION PHOTOVOLTAIC INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","TOTAL PHOTOVOLTAIC INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","RESIDENTIAL PHOTOVOLTAIC NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","COMMERCIAL PHOTOVOLTAIC NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","INDUSTRIAL PHOTOVOLTAIC NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","TRANSPORTATIONPHOTOVOLTAIC NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","TOTAL PHOTOVOLTAIC NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","RESIDENTIAL WIND ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","COMMERCIAL WIND ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","INDUSTRIAL WIND ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","TRANSPORTATION WIND ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","TOTAL WIND ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","RESIDENTIAL WIND INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","COMMERCIAL WIND INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","INDUSTRIAL WIND INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","TRANSPORTATION WIND INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","TOTAL WIND INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","RESIDENTIAL WIND NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","COMMERCIAL WIND NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","INDUSTRIAL WIND NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","TRANSPORTATION WIND NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","TOTAL WIND NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","RESIDENTIAL OTHER ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","COMMERCIAL OTHER ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","INDUSTRIAL OTHER ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","TRANSPORTATION OTHER ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","TOTAL OTHER ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","RESIDENTIAL OTHER INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","COMMERCIAL OTHER INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","INDUSTRIAL OTHER INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","TRANSPORTATION OTHER INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","TOTAL OTHER INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","RESIDENTIAL OTHER NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","COMMERCIAL OTHER NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","INDUSTRIAL OTHER NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","TRANSPORTATION OTHER NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","TOTAL OTHER NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","RESIDENTIAL TOTAL ENERGY SOLD BACK TO THE UTILITY (MWh)","COMMERCIAL TOTAL ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","INDUSTRIAL TOTAL ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","TRANSPORTATION TOTAL ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","TOTAL ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","RESIDENTIAL TOTAL INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","COMMERCIAL TOTAL INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","INDUSTRIAL TOTAL INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","TRANSPORTATION TOTAL INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","TOTAL INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","RESIDENTIAL TOTAL NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","COMMERCIAL TOTAL NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","INDUSTRIAL TOTAL NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","TRANSPORTATION TOTAL NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","TOTAL NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","RESIDENTIAL ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK TO THE UTILITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MWh)","COMMERCIAL ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK TO THE UTILITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MWh)","INDUSTRIAL ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK TO THE UTILITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MWh)","TRANSPORTATION ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK TO THE UTILITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MWh)","TOTAL ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK TO THE UTILITYFOR ALL STATES SERVED(MWh)","RESIDENTIAL INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MW)","COMMERCIAL INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MW)","INDUSTRIAL INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MW)","TRANSPORTATION INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MW)","INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MW)","RESIDENTIAL NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT FOR ALL STATES SERVED","COMMERCIAL NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT FOR ALL STATES SERVED","INDUSTRIAL NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT FOR ALL STATES SERVED","TRANSPORTATION NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT FOR ALL STATES SERVED","NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT FOR ALL STATES SERVED"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

TRANSPORTATIONPHOTOVOLTAIC NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","TOTAL PHOTOVOLTAIC NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","RESIDENTIAL WIND ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","COMMERCIAL WIND ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","INDUSTRIAL WIND ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","TRANSPORTATION WIND ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","TOTAL WIND ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","RESIDENTIAL WIND INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","COMMERCIAL WIND INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","INDUSTRIAL WIND INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","TRANSPORTATION WIND INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","TOTAL WIND INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","RESIDENTIAL WIND NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","COMMERCIAL WIND NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","INDUSTRIAL WIND NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","TRANSPORTATION WIND NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","TOTAL WIND NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","RESIDENTIAL OTHER ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","COMMERCIAL OTHER ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","INDUSTRIAL OTHER ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","TRANSPORTATION OTHER ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","TOTAL OTHER ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","RESIDENTIAL OTHER INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","COMMERCIAL OTHER INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","INDUSTRIAL OTHER INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","TRANSPORTATION OTHER INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","TOTAL OTHER INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","RESIDENTIAL OTHER NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","COMMERCIAL OTHER NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","INDUSTRIAL OTHER NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","TRANSPORTATION OTHER NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","TOTAL OTHER NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","RESIDENTIAL TOTAL ENERGY SOLD BACK TO THE UTILITY (MWh)","COMMERCIAL TOTAL ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","INDUSTRIAL TOTAL ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","TRANSPORTATION TOTAL ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","TOTAL ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","RESIDENTIAL TOTAL INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","COMMERCIAL TOTAL INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","INDUSTRIAL TOTAL INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","TRANSPORTATION TOTAL INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","TOTAL INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","RESIDENTIAL TOTAL NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","COMMERCIAL TOTAL NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","INDUSTRIAL TOTAL NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","TRANSPORTATION TOTAL NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","TOTAL NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","RESIDENTIAL ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK TO THE UTILITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MWh)","COMMERCIAL ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK TO THE UTILITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MWh)","INDUSTRIAL ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK TO THE UTILITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MWh)","TRANSPORTATION ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK TO THE UTILITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MWh)","TOTAL ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK TO THE UTILITYFOR ALL STATES SERVED(MWh)","RESIDENTIAL INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MW)","COMMERCIAL INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MW)","INDUSTRIAL INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MW)","TRANSPORTATION INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MW)","INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MW)","RESIDENTIAL NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT FOR ALL STATES SERVED","COMMERCIAL NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT FOR ALL STATES SERVED","INDUSTRIAL NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT FOR ALL STATES SERVED","TRANSPORTATION NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT FOR ALL STATES SERVED","NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT FOR ALL STATES SERVED"

252

Wei-Ting So () 985402001@cc.ncu.edu.tw  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Pro- cessing Advances in Wireless Communica- tions, pp. 565-569, July 2008. [8] U. Toseef, M. A. Khan. Islam and A. Z. Kou- zani, "Peak to Average Power Ratio Analysis for LTE Systems," IEEE 2nd. on Wire- less Communication, Vol. 8, pp.2161-2165, May 2009. [6] M. Wang, Z. Zhong and Q. Liu, "Resource

Jiang, Jehn-Ruey

253

Wen-Hsien Li () whli@phy.ncu.edu.tw  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Trench ManillaTrench 8.2cm/yr Okinawa Trough SlateBelt Foothills Eurasian Plate LuzonArc North 100 km

Chen, Yang-Yuan

254

Micro-joule sub-10-fs VUV pulse generation by MW pump pulse using highly efficient chirped-four-wave mixing in hollow-core photonic crystal fibers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We theoretically study chirped four-wave mixing for VUV pulse generation in hollow-core photonic crystal fibers. We predict the generation of sub-10-fs VUV pulses with energy of up to hundreds of microjoule by broad-band chirped idler pulses at 830 nm and MW pump pulses with narrow-band at 277 nm. MW pump could be desirable to reduce the complexity of the laser system or use a high repetition rate-laser system. The energy conversion efficiency from pump pulse to VUV pulse reaches to 30%. This generation can be realized in kagome-lattice hollow-core PCF filled with noble gas of high pressure with core-diameter less than 40 micrometers which would enable technically simple or highly efficient coupling to fundamental mode of the fiber.

Im, Song-Jin

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

TOXECON Retrofit for Mercury and Multi-Pollutant Control on Three 90 MW Coal-Fired Boilers (Completed September 30, 2009)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

TOXECON Retrofit for Mercury and TOXECON Retrofit for Mercury and Multi-Pollutant Control on Three 90 MW Coal-Fired Boilers (Completed September 30, 2009) Project Description Wisconsin Electric Power Company (We Energies) has designed, installed, operated, and evaluated the TOXECON process as an integrated mercury, particulate matter, SO 2 , and NO X emissions control system for application on coal-fired power generation systems. TOXECON is a process in which sorbents, including powdered activated

256

Solid radioactive waste management facility design for managing CANDU{sup R} 600 MW nuclear generating station re-tube/refurbishment Waste Streams  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The main design features of the re-tube canisters, waste handling equipment and waste containers designed by Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL{sup R}) and implemented in support of the re-tube/refurbishment activities for Candu 600 MW nuclear generating stations are described in this paper. The re-tube/refurbishment waste characterization and the waste management principles, which form the basis of the design activities, are also briefly outlined. (authors)

Pontikakis, N.; Hopkins, J.; Scott, D.; Bajaj, V.; Nosella, L. [AECL, 2251 Speakman Drive, Mississauga, Ontario, L5K 1B2 (Canada)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

King County Carbonate Fuel Cell Demonstration Project: Case Study of a 1MW Fuel Cell Power Plant Fueled by Digester Gas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This case study documents the first-year demonstration experiences of a 1-MW carbonate fuel cell system operating on anaerobic digester gas at a wastewater treatment plant in King County, Washington. The case study is one of several fuel cell project case studies under research by the EPRI Distributed Energy Resources Program. This case study is designed to help utilities and other interested parties understand the early applications of fuel cell systems to help them in their resource planning efforts an...

2005-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

258

Solar Total Energy System, Large Scale Experiment, Shenandoah, Georgia. Final technical progress report. Volume III. Appendix. [1. 72 MW thermal and 383. 6 kW electric power for 42,000 ft/sup 2/ knitwear plant  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This is the appendix to the Stearns-Roger Engineering Company conceptual design report on ERDA's Large Scale Experiment No. 2 (LSE No. 2). The object of this LSE is to design, construct, test, evaluate and operate a STES for the purpose of obtaining experience with large scale hardware systems and to establish engineering capability for subsequent demonstration projects. This particular LSE is to be located at Shenandoah, Georgia, and will provide power to the Bleyle knitwear factory. Under this contract Stearns-Roger developed a conceptual design, which was site specific, containing the following major elements: System Requirements Analysis, Site Description, System Conceptual Design, Conceptual Test and Operating Plans, Development Plans, Procurement and Management Plans for Subsequent Phases, and Cost Estimates. The Solar Total Energy system is sized to supply 1.720 MW thermal power and 383.6 KW electrical power. The STES is sized for the extended knitwear plant of 3902 M/sup 2/ (42,000 sq-ft) which will eventually employ 300 people. Drawings, tables, and data sheets are included on hourly temperatures, displacement, utility rates, power conversion system, seasonal design load summary, average collector temperature optimization study, system operating temperature optimization study, power conversion system seasonal performance, thermal storage/fluid loop, system integration, and cost estimates. (WHK)

None,

1977-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

259

Geek-Up[3.4.2011]: 3,000+ MW and 2,500 Year-Old Greek Pottery | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Geek-Up[3.4.2011]: 3,000+ MW and 2,500 Year-Old Greek Pottery Geek-Up[3.4.2011]: 3,000+ MW and 2,500 Year-Old Greek Pottery Geek-Up[3.4.2011]: 3,000+ MW and 2,500 Year-Old Greek Pottery March 4, 2011 - 5:03pm Addthis An Attic black-figured amphora, currently in the British Museum, of the type that will be studied at SLAC. | Photo by Marie-Lan Nguyen, Courtesy of SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory An Attic black-figured amphora, currently in the British Museum, of the type that will be studied at SLAC. | Photo by Marie-Lan Nguyen, Courtesy of SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory Elizabeth Meckes Elizabeth Meckes Director of User Experience & Digital Technologies, Office of Public Affairs Last week, Bonneville Power Administration dispatchers in the Dittmer Control Center celebrated a milestone - for the first time, wind

260

Comparative ranking of 0. 1-10 MW/sub e/ solar thermal electric power systems. Volume II. Supporting data. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report is part of a two-volume set summarizing the results of a comparative ranking of generic solar thermal concepts designed specifically for electric power generation. The original objective of the study was to project the mid-1990 cost and performance of selected generic solar thermal electric power systems for utility applications and to rank these systems by criteria that reflect their future commercial acceptance. This study considered plants with rated capacities of 1-10 MW/sub e/, operating over a range of capacity factors from the no-storage case to 0.7 and above. Later, the study was extended to include systems with capacities from 0.1 to 1 MW/sub e/, a range that is attractive to industrial and other nonutility applications. Volume I summarizes the results for the full range of capacities from 0.1 to 1.0 MW/sub e/. Volume II presents data on the performance and cost and ranking methodology.

Thornton, J.P.; Brown, K.C.; Finegold, J.G.; Gresham, J.B.; Herlevich, F.A.; Kriz, T.A.

1980-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tw mw phase" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Design & development fo a 20-MW flywheel-based frequency regulation power plant : a study for the DOE Energy Storage Systems program.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes the successful efforts of Beacon Power to design and develop a 20-MW frequency regulation power plant based solely on flywheels. Beacon's Smart Matrix (Flywheel) Systems regulation power plant, unlike coal or natural gas generators, will not burn fossil fuel or directly produce particulates or other air emissions and will have the ability to ramp up or down in a matter of seconds. The report describes how data from the scaled Beacon system, deployed in California and New York, proved that the flywheel-based systems provided faster responding regulation services in terms of cost-performance and environmental impact. Included in the report is a description of Beacon's design package for a generic, multi-MW flywheel-based regulation power plant that allows accurate bids from a design/build contractor and Beacon's recommendations for site requirements that would ensure the fastest possible construction. The paper concludes with a statement about Beacon's plans for a lower cost, modular-style substation based on the 20-MW design.

Rounds, Robert (Beacon Power, Tyngsboro, MA); Peek, Georgianne Huff

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

THE ORNL GCR-3, A 750-Mw(e) GAS-COOLED CLAD-FUEL REACTOR POWER PLANT. A JOINT DESIGN STUDY  

SciTech Connect

ABS>An advanced, gas-cooled, clad-fuel reactor power plant to generate 750 Mw of electricity was designed as a study of the potential capability of that system. The graphitemoderated reactor generates 1908 Mw of heat in 1062 fuel channels 21 ft long for a power density of 5.5 kw/liter. Gas temperatures entering and leaving the reactor are 574 and 1150 deg F, respectively, operating at 420 psia. Steam at 2415 psia and 950 deg F with reheat to 1000 deg F drives a 763-Mw(e) turbogenerator and also four 31,000-hp blower drive turbines and the boiler feed pumps. Net thermal efficiency of the plant is 39.4%. Estimated direct cost of construction is 0,267,000, or 7 per kilowatt net electric output. Fuel-cycle costs at 20,000 Mwd per metric ton of uranium are 1.46 mills/ kwhr, operating and maintenance costs are 0.39 mill, and fixed charges range from 1.80 to 4.65 mills, depending on method of financing. Total power generation costs at an 80% load factor range from 3.65 to 6.50 mills/kwhr. (auth)

1963-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

TESTS ON HALF-SCALE FLOW MODEL OF 40-MW(E) PROTOTYPE HTGR (PEACH BOTTOM ATOMIC POWER STATION)  

SciTech Connect

A half-scale clear plastic nonnuclear flow model of the 40-Mw(e) Peach Bottom High-temperature Gas-cooled Reactor (HTGR) vessel and internals was operated during the period from January 1981, through October 1981. The model was operated as an induced system using ambient air as the working fluid. The maximum Reynolds number achieved in the model was approximately one-half of the Reynolds number corresponding to the full-load design conditions in the prototype. The prototype reactor pressure-drop values extrapolated from the flow-model data indicated a pressure drop of 2.0 psi for a helium flow rate of 468,000 lb/hr and pressure of 350 psia, and a constant inlet and Outlet temperature of 650 deg F. The corresponding conservatively calculated pressure-drop value was approximately 2.9 psi. No areas of serious flow starvation were observed within the model during tests with flow through only one nozzle or through both nozzles. The inlet flow divided almost equally into the upward and downward directions. Regions where low velocities were indicated appeared to be turbulent and free from stagnation. Completely closing the four off-center openings in the top head reduced the flow of air from the outer flow jacket to the inner flow jackets by only about 20%. This result supported the design approach of providing only one nozzle in the center of the top head for flow from the outer to the inner flow jackets. The heat-transfer coefficients measured at the inner surface of the pressure vessel varied over a range from 50 to 200 Btu/(hr)(ft2)( deg F), at the design flow rate, and in general were about twice the caiculated values for corresponding points. The tilting reflector was found to be a workable concept. No vibration or movement could be induced in the core by manual manipulation of various reflector blocks. There was no detectable vibration of the core during any mode of flowmodel operation. (auth)

Ross, S.; Dav, E.A.; Skeehan, R.A.

1962-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

264

Toxecon Retrofit for Mercury and Mulit-Pollutant Control on Three 90-MW Coal-Fired Boilers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Clean Coal Power Initiative (CCPI) project was based on a cooperative agreement between We Energies and the DOE Office of Fossil Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) to design, install, evaluate, and demonstrate the EPRI-patented TOXECON{trademark} air pollution control process. Project partners included Cummins & Barnard, ADA-ES, and the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI). The primary goal of this project was to reduce mercury emissions from three 90-MW units that burn Powder River Basin coal at the We Energies Presque Isle Power Plant in Marquette, Michigan. Additional goals were to reduce nitrogen oxide (NO{sub x}), sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}), and particulate matter emissions; allow reuse and sale of fly ash; advance commercialization of the technology; demonstrate a reliable mercury continuous emission monitor (CEM) suitable for use at power plants; and demonstrate recovery of mercury from the sorbent. Mercury was controlled by injection of activated carbon upstream of the TOXECON{trademark} baghouse, which achieved more than 90% removal on average over a 44-month period. During a two-week test involving trona injection, SO{sub 2} emissions were reduced by 70%, although no coincident removal of NOx was achieved. The TOXECON{trademark} baghouse also provided enhanced particulate control, particularly during startup of the boilers. On this project, mercury CEMs were developed and tested in collaboration with Thermo Fisher Scientific, resulting in a reliable CEM that could be used in the power plant environment and that could measure mercury as low as 0.1 {micro}g/m{sup 3}. Sorbents were injected downstream of the primary particulate collection device, allowing for continued sale and beneficial use of captured fly ash. Two methods for recovering mercury using thermal desorption on the TOXECON{trademark} PAC/ash mixture were successfully tested during this program. Two methods for using the TOXECON{trademark} PAC/ash mixture in structural concrete were also successfully developed and tested. This project demonstrated a significant reduction in the rate of emissions from Presque Isle Units 7, 8, and 9, and substantial progress toward establishing the design criteria for one of the most promising mercury control retrofit technologies currently available. The Levelized Cost for 90% mercury removal at this site was calculated at $77,031 per pound of mercury removed with a capital cost of $63,189 per pound of mercury removed. Mercury removal at the Presque Isle Power Plant averages approximately 97 pounds per year.

Steven Derenne; Robin Stewart

2009-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

265

Initiation of a phase-I trial of neutron capture therapy at the MIT research reactor  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), the New England Medical Center (NEMC), and Boston University Medical Center (BUMC) initiated a phase-1 trial of boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) on September 6, 1994, at the 5-MW(thermal) MIT research reactor (MITR). A novel form of experimental cancer therapy, BNCT is being developed for certain types of highly malignant brain tumors such as glioblastoma and melanoma. The results of the phase-1 trials on patients with tumors in the legs or feet are described.

Harling, O.K.; Bernard, J.A.; Yam, Chun-Shan [Massachussets Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA (United States)] [and others

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

266

Semiconductor diode laser having an intracavity spatial phase controller for beam control and switching  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A high-power broad-area semiconductor laser having a intracavity spatial phase controller is disclosed. The integrated intracavity spatial phase controller is easily formed by patterning an electrical contact metallization layer when fabricating the semiconductor laser. This spatial phase controller changes the normally broad far-field emission beam of such a laser into a single-lobed near-diffraction-limited beam at pulsed output powers of over 400 mW. Two operating modes, a thermal and a gain operating mode, exist for the phase controller, allowing for steering and switching the beam as the modes of operation are switched, and the emission beam may be scanned, for example, over a range of 1.4 degrees or switched by 8 degrees. More than one spatial phase controller may be integrated into the laser structure. 6 figs.

Hohimer, J.P.

1994-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

267

Semiconductor diode laser having an intracavity spatial phase controller for beam control and switching  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A high-power broad-area semiconductor laser having a intracavity spatial phase controller is disclosed. The integrated intracavity spatial phase controller is easily formed by patterning an electrical contact metallization layer when fabricating the semiconductor laser. This spatial phase controller changes the normally broad far-field emission beam of such a laser into a single-lobed near-diffraction-limited beam at pulsed output powers of over 400 mW. Two operating modes, a thermal and a gain operating mode, exist for the phase controller, allowing for steering and switching the beam as the modes of operation are switched, and the emission beam may be scanned, for example, over a range of 1.4 degrees or switched by 8 degrees. More than one spatial phase controller may be integrated into the laser structure.

Hohimer, John P. (Albuquerque, NM)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Semiconductor diode laser having an intracavity spatial phase controller for beam control and switching  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A high-power broad-area semiconductor laser having a intracavity spatial phase controller is disclosed. The integrated intracavity spatial phase controller is easily formed by patterning an electrical contact metallization layer when fabricating the semiconductor laser. This spatial phase controller changes the normally broad far-field emission bean, of such a laser into a single-lobed near-diffraction-limited beam at pulsed output powers of over 400 mW. Two operating modes, a thermal and a gain operating mode, exist for the phase controller, allowing for steering and switching the beam as the modes of operation are switched, and the emission beam may be scanned, for example, over a range of 1.4 degrees or switched by 8 degrees. More than one spatial phase controller may be integrated into the laser structure.

Hohimer, J.P.

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

269

Transitioning water to an enhanced heat-conducting phase  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Water can be transitioned to an enhanced heat-conducting phase by supercooling only the water at the bottom of a container. The temperature gradient across the 4 cm in the center of an 8 cm long column of water with a 397 mW heat source at the top was lowered from 32oC to 0.75oC when the temperature at the bottom of the column was lowered from 1.2 oC to -5.6oC. The effective thermal conductivity of the water was increased from ~0.607 W/mK to ~24 W/mK. This result demonstrates that water has a high effective thermal conducting phase that has not been previously reported.

Brownridge, James D

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Ocean thermal energy conversion power system development-I. Preliminary design report. Volume 3. Appendixes D, E, and F. Phase I. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The conceptual design of a 40 to 50 MW closed cycle ammonia OTEC commercial plant, the preliminary design of a 10 MW OTEC module analogous to the 50 MW module, and the preliminary design of heat exchanger test articles (evaporator and condenser) representative of the 50 MW heat exchangers for testing in OTEC-1 are presented. This volume includes the appendices: D) system equipment (hardware breakdown structure; 10-MW hardware listing; list of support and maintenance equipment, tools and spare parts; sacrificial anodes; M.A.N. brush; and Alclad 3004 data); E) heat exchanger supporting data (analyses/configuration, contract tooling, manufacturing plan, specification, and evaporator ammonia liquid distribution system); and F) rotating machinery (performance characteristics, radial inflow turbine; item descriptions; weight calculation-rotor; producibility analysis; long lead-time items; spares; support equipment; non recurring costs; performance characteristics-axial flow turbine; Worthington pump data; and American M.A.N. Corporation data). Also included is attachment 1 to the phase I final report which presents details of the system modeling; design, materials considerations, and systems analysis of the baseline module; system cost analysis; and supporting data. (WHK)

Not Available

1978-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

271

Conceptual design of electrical balance of plant for advanced battery energy storage facility. Annual report, March 1979. [20-MW, 100 MWh  

SciTech Connect

Large-scale efforts are in progress to develop advanced batteries for utility energy storage systems. Realization of the full benefits available from those systems requires development, not only of the batteries themselves, but also the ac/dc power converter, the bulk power interconnecting equipment, and the peripheral electric balance of plant equipment that integrate the battery/converter into a properly controlled and protected energy system. This study addresses these overall system aspects; although tailored to a 20-MW, 100-MWh lithium/sulfide battery system, the technology and concepts are applicable to any battery energy storage system. 42 figures, 14 tables. (RWR)

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Metastable Phase Transformations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Oct 8, 2012 ... The omega phase is commonly observed in many commercial beta or near-beta titanium alloys on quenching from single beta phase field.

273

MHD advanced power train. Phase 1, Final report: Volume 1, Executive summary  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Phase I objective of defining a plan for the development program that will provide qualification of the engineering data base for MHD power trains for MHD/steam plants with 200 MW(e) capacity, has been achieved. A program has been defined for engineering development of components, scale-up of power train components to reach 200 MW(e), integration of components into proof-of-concept power train systems at two logical ratings, and integration of power train system into the total plant at the larger rating. There is no requirement for scientific breakthrough. The plan will produce technical success in the shortest schedule and at lowest cost; it identifies the required management and engineering tools and expertise.

Jones, A.R.

1985-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Results from integrated tests of a 50MW /SUB t/ MHD channel and inverter at the CDIF  

SciTech Connect

An important series of tests have been completed at the Component Development and Integration Facility (CDIF); MHD generated DC power was transmitted as three-phase AC power to the commercial power grid, via a line-commutated inverter. Test results presented show the inverter to be a useful tool for characterization of MHD channel electrical output as a function of various plasma and load conditions, during both transient and steady-state operations. Coupled MHD channel-to-inverter operation was achieved and sufficient data were gathered to verify inverter operation in three modes: voltage, current, and impedance. An overall DC to AC power transfer relationship was established and an evaluation of inverter output characteristics including voltage, current, and power factor, were obtained. Load characteristics for maximum MHD channel power output and sensitivity of the MHD channel performance to a wide range of external load settings were determined. During the test series, 2.7 MWh of three-phase AC power was transmitted to the commercial power grid.

Farrar, L.C.; Ferraro, R.J.; Koester, J.K.; Ray, E.R.

1983-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Damage to DNA thymine residues in CHO cells by hydrogen peroxide and copper, ascorbate and copper, hypochlorite, or other oxidants: Protection by low MW polyethylene glycol  

SciTech Connect

Polyethylene glycol (PEG) MW 200-600, has been shown to protect animals against oxidant and radiation damage. In order to study the mechanism the authors examined the effect of PEG on damage to thymine residues in the DNA of living Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells. After growing to confluence in the presence of (methyl{sup 3}H)thymidine, the cells were treated, usually for 1 hr, with various combinations of H{sub 2}O{sub 2}, Cu{sup ++}, Fe{sup ++}, Ocl{sup {minus}}, ascorbate UV or X-irradiation, and PEG MW 300. The oxidants H{sub 2}O{sub 2}/Cu{sup ++}, and OCL{sup {minus}} released {sup 3}H into the medium from DNA thymine, and also formed thymine glycol residues in the DNA that were assayed by alkaline borohydride. The presence of 10% PEG during treatment significantly reduced the release of {sup 3}H into the medium but did not prevent formation of thymine glycol residues bound to the DNA. PEG at 10% had no effect on the cloning efficiency of CHO cells.

Schellenberg, K.A.; Shaeffer, J. (Eastern Virginia Medical School, Norfolk (United States))

1991-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

276

Test and demonstration of a 1-MW wellhead generator: helical screw expander power plant, Model 76-1. Final report to the International Energy Agency  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A 1-MW geothermal wellhead power plant incorporating a Lysholm or helical screw expander (HSE) was field tested between 1980 and 1983 by Mexico, Italy, and New Zealand with technical assistance from the United States. The objectives were to provide data on the reliability and performance of the HSE and to assess the costs and benefits of its use. The range of conditions under which the HSE was tested included loads up to 933 kW, mass flowrates of 14,600 to 395, 000 lbs/hr, inlet pressures of 64 to 220 psia, inlet qualities of 0 to 100%, exhaust pressures of 3.1 to 40 psia, total dissolved solids up to 310,000 ppM, and noncondensible gases up to 38% of the vapor mass flow. Typical machine efficiencies of 40 to 50% were calculated. For most operations efficiency increased approximately logarithmically with shaft power, while inlet quality and rotor speed had only small effects. The HSE was designed with oversized internal clearances in the expectation that adherent scale would form during operation. Improvements in machine efficiency of 3.5 to 4 percentage points were observed over some test periods with some scale deposition. A comparison with a 1-MW back-pressure turbine showed that the HSE can compete favorably under certain conditions. The HSE was found to be a rugged energy conversion machine for geothermal applications, but some subsystems were found to require further development. 7 refs., 28 figs., 5 tabs.

Not Available

1985-07-04T23:59:59.000Z

277

Thermodynamics and Phase Diagrams  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

...Alloy Phase Diagrams and Microstructure, Metals Handbook Desk Edition, ASM International, 1998, p. 95??114...

278

Multimegawatt space nuclear power supply, Phase 1 Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Specification establishes the performance, design, development, and test requirements for the Boeing Multimegawatt Space Nuclear Power System (MSNPS). The Boeing Multimegawatt Space Power System is part of the DOE/SDIO Multimegawatt Space Nuclear Power Program. The purpose of this program is to provide a space-based nuclear power system to meet the needs of SDIO missions. The Boeing MSNPS is a category 1 concept which is capable of delivering 10's of MW(e) for 100's of seconds with effluent permitted. A design goal is for the system to have growth or downscale capability for other power system concepts. The growth objective is to meet the category 3 capability of 100's of MW(e) for 100's of seconds, also with effluent permitted. The purpose of this preliminary document is to guide the conceptual design effort throughout the Phase 1 study effort. This document will be updated through out the study. It will thus result in a record of the development of the design effort.

Not Available

1989-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

279

MHD coal combustor technology. Final report, phase II  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The design, performance, and testing of a 20-MW coal combustor for scaleup to 50 MW for use in an MHD generator are described. The design incorporates the following key features: (1) a two-stage combustor with an intermediate slag separator to remove slag at a low temperture, thus minimizing enthalpy losses required for heating and vaporizing the slag; (2) a first-stage pentad (four air streams impinging on one coal stream) injector design with demonstrated efficient mixing, promoting high carbon burnout; (3) a two-section first-stage combustion chamber; the first stage using a thin slag-protected refractory layer and the second section using a thick refractory layer, both to minimize heat losses; (4) a refractory lining in the slag separator to minimize heat losses; (5) a second-stage combustor, which provided both de-swirl of the combustion products exiting from the slag separator and simple mixing of the vitiated secondary air and seed; (6) a dense-phase coal feed system to minimize cold carrier gas entering the first-stage combustors; (7) a dry seed injection system using pulverized K/sub 2/CO/sub 3/ with a 1% amorphous, fumed silicon dioxide additive to enhance flowability, resulting in rapid vaporization and ionization and ensuring maximum performance; and (8) a performance evaluation module (PEM) of rugged design based on an existing, successfully-fired unit. (WHK)

Not Available

1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Producing persistent, high-current, high-duty-factor H{sup -} beams for routine 1 MW operation of Spallation Neutron Source (invited)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Since 2009, the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) has been producing neutrons with ion beam powers near 1 MW, which requires the extraction of {approx}50 mA H{sup -} ions from the ion source with a {approx}5% duty factor. The 50 mA are achieved after an initial dose of {approx}3 mg of Cs and heating the Cs collar to {approx}170 deg. C. The 50 mA normally persist for the entire 4-week source service cycles. Fundamental processes are reviewed to elucidate the persistence of the SNS H{sup -} beams without a steady feed of Cs and why the Cs collar temperature may have to be kept near 170 deg. C.

Stockli, Martin P.; Han, B. X.; Hardek, T. W.; Kang, Y. W.; Murray, S. N.; Pennisi, T. R.; Piller, C.; Santana, M.; Welton, R. [Spallation Neutron Source, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 (United States)

2012-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tw mw phase" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Cooperation Reliability Testing of the Clipper Windpower Liberty 2.5 MW Turbine: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-07-210  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Clipper Windpower (CWP) has developed the Liberty 2.5 MW wind turbine. The development, manufacturing, and certification process depends heavily on being able to validate the full-scale system design and performance under load in both an accredited structural test facility and through accredited field testing. CWP requested that DOE/ NREL upgrade blade test capabilities to perform a scope of work including structural testing of the C-96 blade used on the CWP Liberty turbine. This funds-in CRADA was developed to upgrade NREL blade test capability, while enabling certification testing of the C-96 blade through the facility and equipment upgrades. NREL shared resource funds were used to develop hardware necessary to structurally attach a large wind turbine to the test stand at the NWTC. Participant funds-in monies were used for developing the test program.

Hughes, S.

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Short-Term Power Fluctuation of Wind Turbines: Analyzing Data from the German 250-MW Measurement Program from the Ancillary Services Viewpoint  

SciTech Connect

Short-term power fluctuations from wind farms may affect interconnected-grid operating costs and stability. With the increasing availability of wind power worldwide, this has become a concern for some utilities. Under electric industry restructuring in the United States, the impact of these fluctuations will be evaluated by examining provisions and costs of ancillary services for wind power. However, the magnitude of the impact and the effect of aggregation of multiple turbines are not well quantified due to a lack of actual wind farm power data. This paper analyzes individual turbine and aggregate power output data from the German ''250-MW Wind'' data project. Electric system load following and regulation impacts are examined as a function of the number of turbines and turbine spacing in order to quantify the impacts of aggregation. The results show a significant decrease in the relative system regulation burden with increasing number of turbines, even if the turbines are in close proximity.

Ernst, B. (Institut fur Solare Energieversorgungstechnik); Wan, Y.-H. (National Renewable Energy Laboratory); Kirby, B. (Oak Ridge National Laboratory)

1999-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

283

Locality phase prediction  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As computer memory hierarchy becomes adaptive, its performance increasingly depends on forecasting the dynamic program locality. This paper presents a method that predicts the locality phases of a program by a combination of locality profiling and run-time ... Keywords: dynamic optimization, locality analysis and optimization, phase hierarchy, program phase analysis and prediction, reconfigurable architecture

Xipeng Shen; Yutao Zhong; Chen Ding

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Thermodynamics and Phase Diagrams  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

...of two-phase fields meet also is limited by thermodynamics. That is, the angle must be such that the extension of each beyond the point of intersection projects into a two-phase field, rather than a one-phase

285

Effect of Load Phase Angle on Wind Turbine Blade Fatigue Damage: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper examines the importance of phase angle variations with respect to fatigue damage. The operating loads on a generic conventional three-bladed upwind 1.5-MW wind turbine blade were analyzed over a range of operating conditions, and an aggregate probability distribution for the actual phase angles between the in-plane (lead-lag) and out-of-plane (flap) loads was determined. Using a finite element model of a generic blade and Miner's Rule, the accumulated theoretical damage (based on axial strains) resulting from a fatigue test with variable phase angles was compared to the damage resulting from a fatigue test with a constant phase angle. The nodal damage distribution at specific blade cross-sections are compared for the constant and variable phase angle cases. The sequence effects of various phase angle progressions were also considered. For this analysis, the finite element results were processed using the nonlinear Marco-Starkey damage accumulation model. Each phase angle sequence was constrained to have the same overall phase angle distribution and the same total number of cycles but the order in which the phase angles were applied was varied.

White, D. L.; Musial, W. D.

2003-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

Capstone C30 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

mW 3.0e-5 GW 3.0e-8 TW Heat Recovery Systems Unifin Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleCapstoneC30&oldid580526" Category: Distributed Generation Prime Mover...

287

Central Nevada Seismic Zone Geothermal Region | Open Energy Informatio...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

mW 0.385 GW 3.85e-4 TW Plants Included in Planned Estimate 4 Plants with Unknown Planned Capacity 9 Geothermal Areas within the Central Nevada Seismic Zone Geothermal Region...

288

Final technical report, Phase 1, Photovoltaic manufacturing technology. Final subcontract report, 9 January 1991--14 April 1991  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A development/manufacturing program is described for achieving photovoltaic modules at a cost less than $.50/Watt and solar generating fields at a total installed system cost of less than $1.50/Watt. The basic approach is to construct a fully automated continuous production line based on close spaced sublimation (CSS) deposition of CdTe to produce 60 cm x 120 cm thin-film PV modules. The high deposition rate possible with CSS opens up the possibility of obtaining very high throughput in the range of hundreds of megawatts per year. This leads to dramatic reductions in the capital, labor and overhead cost per unit. The program includes a development phase, an initial production line of about 5-MW/year capacity, a 5 MW solar generating field, and a high-throughput production line with a capacity in the range of hundreds of megawatts per year.

Brown, J. [Solar Cells, Inc., Toledo, TX (US)

1991-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

NGNP PHASE I REVIEW  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

REVIEW REVIEW NEAC REACTOR TECHNOLOGY SUBCOMMITTEE FINAL REPORT JUNE 15, 2011 EPACT 2005 REQUIREMENTS * FIRST PROJECT PHASE REVIEW-On a determination by the Secretary that the appropriate activities under the first project phase under subsection (b)(1) are nearly complete, the Secretary shall request the NERAC to conduct a comprehensive review of the Project and to report to the Secretary the recommendation of the NERAC concerning whether the Project is ready to proceed to the second project phase under subsection (b)(2) NGNP PROJECT PHASES (1) FIRST PHASE.-A first project phase shall be conducted to- (A) select and validate the appropriate technology under subsection (a)(1); (B) carry out enabling research, development, and demonstration activities on technologies and components under

290

Gymnastics in Phase Space  

SciTech Connect

As accelerator technology advances, the requirements on accelerator beam quality become increasingly demanding. Facing these new demands, the topic of phase space gymnastics is becoming a new focus of accelerator physics R&D. In a phase space gymnastics, the beam's phase space distribution is manipulated and precision tailored to meet the required beam qualities. On the other hand, all realization of such gymnastics will have to obey accelerator physics principles as well as technological limitations. Recent examples of phase space gymnastics include Emittance exchanges, Phase space exchanges, Emittance partitioning, Seeded FELs and Microbunched beams. The emittance related topics of this list are reviewed in this report. The accelerator physics basis, the optics design principles that provide these phase space manipulations, and the possible applications of these gymnastics, are discussed. This fascinating new field promises to be a powerful tool of the future.

Chao, Alexander Wu; /SLAC

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Crystal phase identification  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and apparatus for determining the crystalline phase and crystalline characteristics of a sample. This invention provides a method and apparatus for unambiguously identifying and determining the crystalline phase and crystalline characteristics of a sample by using an electron beam generator, such as a scanning electron microscope, to obtain a backscattered electron Kikuchi pattern of a sample, and extracting crystallographic and composition data that is matched to database information to provide a quick and automatic method to identify crystalline phases.

Michael, Joseph R. (Albuquerque, NM); Goehner, Raymond P. (Albuquerque, NM); Schlienger, Max E. (Albuquerque, NM)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Phase Transition - CECM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Dec 24, 2003 ... Another example is the order-disorder phases in binary alloy such as brass. The copper and zinc atoms occupy alternate sites in a regular...

293

NGNP PHASE I REVIEW  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

REVIEW NEAC REACTOR TECHNOLOGY SUBCOMMITTEE CURRENT STATUS DECEMBER 9, 2010 EPACT 2005 REQUIREMENTS * FIRST PROJECT PHASE REVIEW-On a determination by the Secretary that the...

294

ARM - Measurement - Cloud phase  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

property that captures the state o f the hydrometeors within a cloud (liquid, ice, or mixed-phase). This is distinct from cloud type that involves property descriptors...

295

Phase Stability II  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... and Mo-Pu-U are presented with a discussion on phase identification versus ... the formulation of more robust principles of kinetics and path selection.

296

Biology and Phase Transition - CECM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Dec 24, 2003 ... next up previous. Next: Kaufman and percolation Up: Phase Transition Models in Previous: Phase Transition Models in...

297

Analytical analyses of startup measurements associated with the first use of LEU fuel in Romania's 14-MW TRIGA reactor  

SciTech Connect

The 14-MW TRIGA steady state reactor (SSR) is located in Pitesti, Romania. Beginning with an HEU core (10 wt% U), the reactor first went critical in November 1979 but was shut down ten years later because of insufficient excess reactivity. Last November the Institute for Nuclear Research (INR), which operates the SSR, received from the ANL RERTR program a shipment of 125 LEU pins fabricated by General Atomics and of the same geometry as the original fuel but with an enrichment of 19.7% 235U and a loading of 45 wt% U. Using 100 of these pins, four LEU clusters, each containing a 5 x 5 square array of fuel rods, were assembled. These four LEU clusters replaced the four most highly burned HEU elements in the SSR. The reactor resumed operations last February with a 35-element mixed HEU/LEU core configuration. In preparation for full power operation of the SSR with this mixed HEU/LEU core, a number of measurements were made. These included control rod calibrations, excess reactivity determinations, worths of experiment facilities, reaction rate distributions, and themocouple measurements of fuel temperatures as a function of reactor power. This paper deals with a comparison of some of these measured reactor parameters with corresponding analytical calculations.

Bretscher, M.M.; Snelgrove, J.L. (Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)); Ciocanescu, M. (Institute for Nuclear Research, Pitesti (Romania))

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Analytical analyses of startup measurements associated with the first use of LEU fuel in Romania`s 14-MW TRIGA reactor  

SciTech Connect

The 14-MW TRIGA steady state reactor (SSR) is located in Pitesti, Romania. Beginning with an HEU core (10 wt% U), the reactor first went critical in November 1979 but was shut down ten years later because of insufficient excess reactivity. Last November the Institute for Nuclear Research (INR), which operates the SSR, received from the ANL RERTR program a shipment of 125 LEU pins fabricated by General Atomics and of the same geometry as the original fuel but with an enrichment of 19.7% 235U and a loading of 45 wt% U. Using 100 of these pins, four LEU clusters, each containing a 5 x 5 square array of fuel rods, were assembled. These four LEU clusters replaced the four most highly burned HEU elements in the SSR. The reactor resumed operations last February with a 35-element mixed HEU/LEU core configuration. In preparation for full power operation of the SSR with this mixed HEU/LEU core, a number of measurements were made. These included control rod calibrations, excess reactivity determinations, worths of experiment facilities, reaction rate distributions, and themocouple measurements of fuel temperatures as a function of reactor power. This paper deals with a comparison of some of these measured reactor parameters with corresponding analytical calculations.

Bretscher, M.M.; Snelgrove, J.L. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Ciocanescu, M. [Institute for Nuclear Research, Pitesti (Romania)

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Suggested performance specifications of standard modular controls for the automation of small hydro electric facilities. [Plant capacities from 50 kW to 15 MW  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

These specifications are made available by the Department of Energy for the voluntary use by any person, corporation or governmental body in the writing of purchase specifications for the automatic control of small hydro generating stations, i.e., hydro plants ranging in size from 50 kW to 15 MW. It is believed that the use of these specifications will permit competition among capable vendors and, at the same time, assure proper and reliable operation of both the automation hardware and software purchased. The specifications are detailed to a degree which should assure the interchangeability of hardware and software from various suppliers. This also increases the likelihood that spare parts and service will be available for many years. The specifications are written in modules, each of which can be included or excluded for ease of editing to match a particular application. Brief but detailed instructions are included for such editing. An extensive appendix gives the alternatives which were considered and reasons for the various choices specified.

Beckwith, R.W.

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Superconducting phase qubits  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Experimental progress is reviewed for superconducting phase qubit research at the University of California, Santa Barbara. The phase qubit has a potential advantage of scalability, based on the low impedance of the device and the ability to microfabricate ... Keywords: 03.65.Yz, 03.67.Lx, 85.25.Cp, Decoherence, Quantum computation, Qubits, Superconductivity

John M. Martinis

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tw mw phase" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Biomass power for rural development. Technical progress report Phase-II. Contractual reporting period October-December 1999  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The project undertaken by the Salix Consortium is a multi-phased, multi-partner endeavor. Phase 1 focused on initial development and testing of the technology and forging the necessary agreements to demonstrate commercial willow production. The Phase 1 objectives have been successfully completed: preparing design plans for 2 utility pulverized coal boilers for 20 MW of biopower capacity; developing fuel supply plans for the project with a goal of establishing 365 ha (900 ac) of willow; obtaining power production commitments from the power companies for Phase 2; obtaining construction and environmental permits; and developing an experimental strategy for crop production and power generation improvements needed to assure commercial success. The R and D effort also addresses environmental issues pertaining to introduction of the willow energy system.

Neuhauser, Edward; The Salix Consortium

2000-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

302

ARM - Measurement - Hydrometeor phase  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

phase phase ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Hydrometeor phase Hydrometeor phase such as liquid ice or mixed phase Categories Cloud Properties Instruments The above measurement is considered scientifically relevant for the following instruments. Refer to the datastream (netcdf) file headers of each instrument for a list of all available measurements, including those recorded for diagnostic or quality assurance purposes. Value-Added Products VISST : Minnis Cloud Products Using Visst Algorithm (Process) VISSTPX04G08V2MINNIS : VISST-derived pixel-level products from satellite GOES8, version 2 VISSTPX04G08V3MINNIS : VISST-derived pixel-level products from satellite GOES8, version 3

303

220-MW compressed air storage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

SOYLAND Power Cooperative, Inc., a Decatur, Illinois based co-op, could get reasonably priced baseload power from neighboring utilities, had a plant of its own planned for the near future as well as a share in another, but peaking power, generated by oil and gas, to meet surges in demand, was very costly. The co-op's solution, first in the U.S., is a 220-megawatt compressed air energy storage system (CAES), which the electric utility industry is watching with great interest. CAES splits the two basic stages of a conventional gas turbine, making the most of baseload power while using the least peaking or intermediate fuel. During off-peak periods, inexpensive baseload electricity from coal or nuclear power plants runs a combination motor-generator in motor mode which, in turn, operates a compressor. The compressed air is cooled and pumped into an underground storage reservoir hundreds of thousands of cubic yards in volume and about two thousand feet (about 610 m) below the surface. There the air remains, at pressures up to about 60 atm (6.1 MPa), until peaking or intermediate power is required. Then, the air is released into a combustor at a controlled rate, heated by oil or gas, and expanded through a turbine. The turbine drives the motor-generator in a generator mode, thereby supplying peaking or intermediate power to the grid.

Lihach, N.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Phase 2 of the array automated assembly task for the low cost silicon solar array project. Interim report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The LSA Automated Array Assembly Task has as its goal the manufacture of photovoltaic modules at a capacity of 500 MW per year at a cost of $0.50 per peak watt. Divided between ten solar cell manufacturers, each installation should produce 50 MW per year. This implies that automated machinery would continuously produce 120 solar cells per minute. The purpose of this report is to detail the processes and techniques which are believed to have great promise of accomplishing this task. The initial stages of the program were involved in studying the possibility of automated assembly. Phase 1 reviewed a large cross section of processes, conceptual designs, and innovative technologies in preparation for 1986. Through this documentation, a large amount of comprehensive data has been collected. It is these reports upon which the next phase of the program is based. The purpose of Phase 2 is to propose an automated sequence, verify it and present future cost projections. Utilizing the large amount of information available from Phase 1 and drawing from its own experience Solarex has proposed a process sequence which it is believed has great potential of achieving the LSA goals. This report describes the processes, details, the verification tests performed, and estimates the cost of such an automated array assembly.

Wihl, M.; Toro, J.; Scheinine, A.; Anderson, J.

1978-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Biomass power for rural development. Technical progress report, Phase 2, July 1--September 30, 1998  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The project undertaken by the Salix Consortium is a multi-phased, multi-partner endeavor. Phase 1 focused on initial development and testing of the technology and forging the necessary agreements to demonstrate commercial willow production. The Phase 1 objectives have been successfully completed: preparing final design plans for two utility pulverized coal boiler for 20 MW of biopower capacity; developing fuel supply plans for the project with a goal of establishing 365 ha (900 ac) of willow; obtaining power production commitments from the power companies for Phase 2; obtaining construction and environmental permits; and developing an experimental strategy for crop production and power generation improvements needed to assure commercial success. The R and D effort also addresses environmental issues pertaining to introduction of the willow energy system. Beyond those Phase 1 requirements, the Consortium has already successfully demonstrated cofiring at Greenidge Station and has initiated development of the required nursery capacity for acreage scale-up. In Phase 2 every aspect of willow production and power generation from willow biomass will be demonstrated. The ultimate objective of Phase 2 is to transition the work performed under the Biomass Power for Rural Development project into a thriving, self-supported energy crop enterprise.

Neuhauser, E.

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Inhomogeneous chiral symmetry breaking phases  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We investigate inhomogeneous chiral symmetry breaking phases in the phase diagram of the two-flavor Nambu-Jona-Lasinio model, concentrating on phases with one-dimensional modulations. It is found that the first-order transition line in the phase diagram of homogeneous phases gets completely covered by an inhomogeneous phase which is bordered by second-order transition lines. The inhomogeneous phase turns out to be remarkably stable when vector interactions are included.

Buballa, M., E-mail: michael.buballa@physik.tu-darmstadt.de; Carignano, S., E-mail: carignano@crunch.ikp.physik.tu-darmstadt.de [Technische Universitaet Darmstadt, Institut fuer Kernphysik (Germany); Nickel, D., E-mail: mdjn@u.washington.edu [University of Washington, Institute for Nuclear Theory (United States)

2012-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

307

Internal Technical Report, Management Plan for Fluid Supply and Injection System for the Raft River 5 MW(e) Pilot Power Plant  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report details a plan for developing a fluid supply system for the First 5 MW(e) Pilot Power Plant at Raft River. The pilot plant has been specifically designed to use the medium-temperature geothermal water so common throughout the West. EG and G Idaho, Inc., the Department of Energy Raft River Rural Electric Co-op, the US Geological Survey (USGS) and the State of Idaho have worked together to develop a facility that will use an organic liquid as the working fluid. Four wells have been drilled in the Raft River Valley, about ten miles South of Malta, in southern Idaho. The completed well system will consist of seven wells: two conventional injection wells, three production wells, and a standby reserve well of each type. The additional three wells are to be drilled in FY-1978, in order to complete a coordinated test program before the First Pilot Power Plant is ready for operation. The system has been designed to meet the test-loop pilot plant's basic requirement: a 2450 gpm supply of geothermal fluid, at a nominal temperature of 290 F and with salinity of less than 5000 ppm. Injection of cooled geothermal fluid into the Raft River reservoir will also require a network of monitor wells. The Idaho Department of Water Resources (IDWR), USGS, EG and G Idaho, and the Department of Energy will jointly select sites for two 1500-foot and five 500-foot monitoring wells. This plan considers the work required to complete construction of the fluid supply system and obtain a preliminary check of its performance capability; the plan will discuss project management, costs, schedules, drilling, testing, environmental monitoring, and safety.

None

1978-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

308

Engineering study of a 20 MW lead--acid battery energy storage demonstration plant. Final report for the period ending October 1976  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Research and Engineering Operation of Bechtel Corporation conducted an engineering study of a 20-MW lead--acid battery energy storage demonstration plant. Ten alternative designs were evaluated. Basically, the configurations proposed for the demonstration plants are those of the mature plants which would follow. The designs of the individual plants are based on the cell designs and the means used to house the cells. Initially, proposed cell designs from five manufacturers were considered. To conform with the level of effort allowed for this engineering study, two manufacturers' cells (one open-tank design and one sealed cell design) were selected by ERDA and Bechtel as being representative. These designs formed the basis for the detailed evaluation conducted in this study. The plant and battery configurations evaluated in the study are a large open-tank cell, configured in rows and housed in four buildings; a sealed cell, configured in a single layer of close packed rows in a single building; a sealed cell, configured in a three-tiered arrangement in a single building; and a sealed cell, configured with groups of cells housed in weatherproof modules and placed outdoors. Annual operating costs based on these mature plant costs show lead--acid load-leveling plants are generally not economically competitive with the alternatives when no consideration is given to their other possible benefits to the power system. However, application of credits (e.g., transmission line or spinning reserve credits) can make such plants economically competitive with gas turbine peaking units in specific situations. 46 figures, 25 tables. (RWR)

Not Available

1976-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Geology and potential uses of the geopressure resources of the Gulf Coast. [6,000 MW-centuries of recoverable electric energy, 200 Tcf of methane  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The US ERDA has supported efforts to evaluate the potential contribution to the national energy supply of geopressured geothermal resources in the Gulf Coast. Efforts include a program of resource assessment and programs to examine utilization of the resource for the production of electricity and as a source of industrial-process heat. Work on resource assessment has suggested the presence of perhaps as much as 6,000 MW-centuries of recoverable electric energy and of 200 Tcf of methane. This program has emphasized finding significantly large sand bodies within the geopressured stratigraphic section in addition to defining the distribution of abnormal fluid pressures and formation temperatures. Regional sand facies analyses conducted thus far indicate five locations in the Frio formation of Central and South Texas where adequately large geopressured geothermal resources may be present. Engineering studies of energy-conversion systems based on total-flow, flashed-steam, and binary-cycle concepts show that development of electric power from the Gulf Coast geopressure resource is technically feasible. Study of use of the resource as process heat in pulp and paper mills and new sugar refineries has shown that these uses also are technically sound. The thermal content of a barrel of geothermal brine can cost as little as 9 mills when credited for recoverable hydraulic energy and methane. The value of heat approaches 50 mills per bbl for certain applications. All programs have pointed out clearly the need for better specific understanding of the resource, especially its dissolved methane content and its ability to produce for tens of years.

Howard, J.H.; House, P.A.; Johnson, P.M.; Towse, D.F.; Bebout, D.G.; Dorfman, M.H.; Agagu, O.K.; Hornburg, C.D.; Morin, O.J.

1976-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Faster Phase Estimation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We develop several algorithms for performing quantum phase estimation based on basic measurements and classical post-processing. We present a pedagogical review of quantum phase estimation and simulate the algorithm to numerically determine its scaling in circuit depth and width. We show that the use of purely random measurements requires a number of measurements that is optimal up to constant factors, albeit at the cost of exponential classical post-processing; the method can also be used to improve classical signal processing. We then develop a quantum algorithm for phase estimation that yields an asymptotic improvement in runtime, coming within a factor of log* of the minimum number of measurements required while still requiring only minimal classical post-processing. The corresponding quantum circuit requires asymptotically lower depth and width (number of qubits) than quantum phase estimation.

Krysta M. Svore; Matthew B. Hastings; Michael Freedman

2013-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

311

Innovative clean coal technology: 500 MW demonstration of advanced wall-fired combustion techniques for the reduction of nitrogen oxide (NOx) emissions from coal-fired boilers. Final report, Phases 1 - 3B  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the results of a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Innovative Clean Coal Technology (ICCT) project demonstrating advanced wall-fired combustion techniques for the reduction of nitrogen oxide (NOx) emissions from coal-fired boilers. The project was conducted at Georgia Power Company`s Plant Hammond Unit 4 located near Rome, Georgia. The technologies demonstrated at this site include Foster Wheeler Energy Corporation`s advanced overfire air system and Controlled Flow/Split Flame low NOx burner. The primary objective of the demonstration at Hammond Unit 4 was to determine the long-term effects of commercially available wall-fired low NOx combustion technologies on NOx emissions and boiler performance. Short-term tests of each technology were also performed to provide engineering information about emissions and performance trends. A target of achieving fifty percent NOx reduction using combustion modifications was established for the project. Short-term and long-term baseline testing was conducted in an {open_quotes}as-found{close_quotes} condition from November 1989 through March 1990. Following retrofit of the AOFA system during a four-week outage in spring 1990, the AOFA configuration was tested from August 1990 through March 1991. The FWEC CF/SF low NOx burners were then installed during a seven-week outage starting on March 8, 1991 and continuing to May 5, 1991. Following optimization of the LNBs and ancillary combustion equipment by FWEC personnel, LNB testing commenced during July 1991 and continued until January 1992. Testing in the LNB+AOFA configuration was completed during August 1993. This report provides documentation on the design criteria used in the performance of this project as it pertains to the scope involved with the low NOx burners and advanced overfire systems.

NONE

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Fireside corrosion testing of candidate superheater tube alloys, coatings, and claddings -- Phase 2 field testing  

SciTech Connect

In Phase 1 of this project, a variety of developmental and commercial tubing alloys and claddings was exposed to laboratory fireside corrosion testing simulating a superheater or reheater in a coal-fired boiler. Phase 2 (in situ testing) has exposed samples of 347, RA85H, HR3C, 253MA, Fe{sub 3}Al + 5Cr, 310 modified, NF 709, 690 clad, and 671 clad for over 10,000 hours to the actual operating conditions of a 250-MW coal-fired boiler. The samples were installed on air-cooled, retractable corrosion probes, installed in the reheater cavity, controlled to the operating metal temperatures of an existing and advanced-cycle, coal-fired boiler. Samples of each alloy are being exposed for 4,000, 12,000, and 16,000 hours of operation. The present results are for the metallurgical examination of the corrosion probe samples after approximately 4,400 hours of exposure.

Blough, J.L. [Foster Wheeler Development Corp., Livingston, NJ (United States)

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

For Edison Phase 1 users  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

For Edison Phase 1 users For Edison Phase 1 users You can run jobs in the same way as you did on the phase 1 system, but keep in mind that the number of cores per node is 24...

314

Another View of Phase Diagrams  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

On 2D phase fraction charts these are lines where the fraction equals one. However another type of diagram can be drawn using lines where the phase fraction...

315

Solar Total Energy System, Large Scale Experiment, Shenandoah, Georgia. Final technical progress report. Volume II, Section 3. Facility concept design. [1. 72 MW thermal and 383. 6 kW electric power for 42,000 ft/sup 2/ knitwear plant  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Stearns-Roger Engineering Company conceptual design of ERDA's Large Scale Experiment No. 2 (LSE No. 2) is presented. The various LSEs are part of ERDA's Solar Total Energy Program (STES) and a separate activity of the National Solar Thermal Power Systems Program. The object of this LSE is to design, construct, test, evaluate and operate a STES for the purpose of obtaining experience with large scale hardware systems and to establish engineering capability for subsequent demonstration projects. This particular LSE is to be located at Shenandoah, Georgia, and will provide power to the Bleyle knitwear factory. The Solar Total Energy system is sized to supply 1.720 MW thermal power and 383.6 KW electrical power. The STES is sized for the extended knitwear plant of 3902 M/sup 2/ (42,000 sq-ft) which will eventually employ 300 people. The details of studies conducted for Phase II of the Solar Total Energy System (STES) for the conceptual design requirements of the facility are presented. Included in this section are the detailed descriptions and analyses of the following subtasks: facility concept design, system concept design, performance analysis, operation plan, component and subsystem development, procurement plan, cost estimating and scheduling, and technical and management plans. (WHK)

None,

1977-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

316

Iterative phase estimation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We give an iterative algorithm for phase estimation of a parameter theta, which is within a logarithmic factor of the Heisenberg limit. Unlike other methods, we do not need any entanglement or an extra rotation gate which can perform arbitrary rotations with almost perfect accuracy: only a single copy of the unitary channel and basic measurements are needed. Simulations show that the algorithm is successful. We also look at iterative phase estimation when depolarizing noise is present. It is seen that the algorithm is still successful provided the number of iterative stages is below a certain threshold.

Caleb J O'Loan

2009-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

317

Striped phases from holography  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We discuss new types of second order phase transitions in holography by constructing striped black holes in D=4 with $AdS_{4}$ asymptotics. In the context of $AdS/CFT$, they provide the gravity duals to field theory phases in which translational symmetry is spontaneously broken due to the formation of current density waves. These black holes are associated to three dimensional CFTs at finite temperature and deformed by a uniform chemical potential. We numerically solve a non-linear system of PDEs in order to construct the black hole geometries and extract some of their thermodynamic properties.

Aristomenis Donos

2013-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

318

Linear phase compressive filter  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A phase linear filter for soliton suppression is in the form of a laddered series of stages of non-commensurate low pass filters with each low pass filter having a series coupled inductance (L) and a reverse biased, voltage dependent varactor diode, to ground which acts as a variable capacitance (C). L and C values are set to levels which correspond to a linear or conventional phase linear filter. Inductance is mapped directly from that of an equivalent nonlinear transmission line and capacitance is mapped from the linear case using a large signal equivalent of a nonlinear transmission line.

McEwan, Thomas E. (Livermore, CA)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

DELTA PHASE PLUTONIUM ALLOYS  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Delta-phase plutonium alloys were developed suitable for use as reactor fuels. The alloys consist of from 1 to 4 at.% zinc and the balance plutonium. The alloys have good neutronic, corrosion, and fabrication characteristics snd possess good dimensional characteristics throughout an operating temperature range from 300 to 490 deg C.

Cramer, E.M.; Ellinger, F.H.; Land. C.C.

1960-03-22T23:59:59.000Z

320

Examples of Phase Diagrams  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

...The phase diagram of the lead-tin system ( Fig. 31 ) shows the importance of the low-melting eutectic in this system to the success of lead-tin solders. While solders having tin contents between 18.3 to 61.9%

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tw mw phase" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Phase Field Simulations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mar 6, 2013 ... The anisotropic solid-vapor surface energy for a 2D PFC hexagonal crystal is ... Finally, we examine the dynamic case of step-flow growth of a crystal into ... Thermal and Dispersed-Phase Analysis of Nano Fluid Using CFD-A Hybrid ... gas turbine power generation systems because of its high melting point,...

322

Solar Pilot Plant: Phase I. Final report, July 1, 1975--July 1, 1977  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Honeywell was given a 2-year contract by the Energy Research and Development Administration on 1 July 1975 to develop a preliminary design for a 10-MW(e) solar pilot plant of the central receiver type. The program culminated in mid-1977 with delivery of a pilot plant preliminary design, estimates for its cost, and performance, and cost estimates for a 100-MW(e) plant, which will be detailed during the operation of and built as a follow-on to the pilot plant. The pilot plant preliminary design evolved through three iterations, which were verified and refined by analysis and experimentation. Subsystem research experiments (SREs) were conducted on the collector subsystem and the steam generator portion of the receiver subsystem. A lesser amount of testing was done on a latent-heat storage subsystem before a sensible-heat storage subsystem was incorporated at the direction of ERDA. All test results and analyses pointed to the feasibility of the pilot plant, and by extension to commercial-scale plants. On that basis and in light of the worsening energy situation, Honeywell recommended that Phase II of the program be undertaken as quickly as practical.

None

1978-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Caterpillar G379 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Manufacturer Caterpillar Technology Type Internal Combustion Engine Engine Type Inverter Power Output 200 kW0.2 MW 200,000 W 200,000,000 mW 2.0e-4 GW 2.0e-7 TW Heat Recovery...

324

Aisin Seiki G60 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Manufacturer Aisin Seiki Technology Type Internal Combustion Engine Engine Type Inverter Power Output 6 kW0.006 MW 6,000 W 6,000,000 mW 6.0e-6 GW 6.0e-9 TW Heat Recovery...

325

Coast Intelligen CI60 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Manufacturer Coast Intelligen Technology Type Internal Combustion Engine Engine Type Inverter Power Output 60 kW0.06 MW 60,000 W 60,000,000 mW 6.0e-5 GW 6.0e-8 TW Heat Recovery...

326

NETL: Carbon Storage - Regional Partnership Validation Phase (Phase II)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Validation Phase (Phase II) Projects Validation Phase (Phase II) Projects The Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnerships' (RCSP) Validation Phase focuses on validating the most promising regional opportunities to deploy CCS technologies by building upon the accomplishments of the Characterization Phase. Two different CO2 storage approaches are being pursued in this phase: geologic and terrestrial carbon storage. The Validation Phase includes 20 geologic and 11 terrestrial CO2 storage projects. Efforts are being conducted to: Validate and refine current reservoir simulations for CO2 storage projects. Collect physical data to confirm CO2 storage potential and injectivity estimates. Demonstrate the effectiveness of monitoring, verification, and accounting (MVA) technologies. Develop guidelines for well completion, operations, and abandonment.

327

Automated Phase Design and Timing Adjustment for Signal Phase Design  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper we describe the design processes of human traffic engineers and the development of an automated system that solves the problem of timing adjustment in signal phase sequence design. i>Signal phase sequencing refers to the sequence of ... Keywords: automated design, case-based reasoning, signal phase design, traffic management

L. Wang; C. C. Hayes; R. R. Penner

2001-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

7-29 A coal-burning power plant produces 300 MW of power. The amount of coal consumed during a one-day period and the rate of air flowing through the furnace are to be determined.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

7-11 7-29 A coal-burning power plant produces 300 MW of power. The amount of coal consumed during The heating value of the coal is given to be 28,000 kJ/kg. Analysis (a) The rate and the amount of heat inputs'tQQ The amount and rate of coal consumed during this period are kg/s48.33 s360024 kg10893.2 MJ/kg28 MJ101.8 6

Bahrami, Majid

329

Advanced Gearless Drivetrain - Phase I Technical Report  

SciTech Connect

Boulder Wind Power (???¢????????BWP???¢???????) collaborated with the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) in Golden, Colorado, to demonstrate the economics of scaling an advanced gearless drivetrain technology to 6MW (and larger) turbine applications. The project goal was to show that this advanced drivetrain technology enables a cost of energy of less than $0.10/kWH in offshore applications. This drivetrain technology achieves this Cost of Energy (???¢????????COE???¢???????) advantage via a 70% greater torque density versus current state-of-the-art drivetrain technologies. In addition, a new dynamically compliant design strategy is required to optimize turbine system-level COE. The BWP generator is uniquely suited for this new design strategy. This project developed a concept design for a 6MW drivetrain and culminated in a plan for a system-level test of this technology at 3MW scale. The project further demonstrated the advantage of the BWP drivetrain with increasing power ratings, with conceptual designs through 10 MW.

Sandy Butterfield; Jim Smith; Derek Petch; Brian Sullivan; Peter Smith; Kirk Pierce

2012-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

330

Phase 1 -- 2  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2 2 Revised 8/7/02 " "Sample Statement of Work - Standard Service Offerings for Contractor-Identified Project" "Task #","Task Title","Work Scope","Deliverable","Agency Requirements" " " "Phase Two - Initial Project Development" "2-1","DO RFP Development - Direct Support","Based upon interviews Agency/site staff and consultation support, FEMP Services will prepare DO RFP for Agency/site. FEMP Services will provide onsite or telecon review of draft DO RFP with agency staff. FEMP Services will prepare 2nd draft DO RFP based on telecon and written agency review comments and recommendations. ","Draft DO RFP Document. On-site review of draft DO RFP.

331

Holographic striped phases  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We discuss new types of instabilities of D=4 electrically charged AdS-Reissner-Nordstr\\"om black branes that involve neutral pseudo-scalars. The instabilities spontaneously break translational invariance and are associated with the dual three-dimensional CFTs, at finite temperature and fixed chemical potential with respect to a global abelian symmetry, acquiring striped phases. We show that such instabilities are present for the infinite class of skew-whiffed $AdS_4\\times SE_7$ solutions of D=11 supergravity, albeit at a lower temperature than the known superfluid instabilities.

Aristomenis Donos; Jerome P. Gauntlett

2011-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

332

Composition and Phases  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Table 3   Characteristics of phase constituents in aluminum-rich aluminum alloys...25% Ni Branched polyhedra Al 3 Ti Tetragonal, I4/mmm a = 3.848 c = 8.596 36.5??37.5% Ti 25% Ti Platelets AlSb Cubic, F43m a = 6.096 81.9% Sb 50% Sb Compact particles Al 6 V Hexagonal, P6 3 /mmc a = 7.718 c = 17.15 23.8% V 14.3% V Dispersed particles Al 11 V Cubic, Im3 a = 14.586 15.1??15.9% V 8.3% V...

333

Phase 1 --2  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2 2 Rev 4-01-05 " "Statement of Work - Standard Service Offerings for Contractor-Identified Project at (insert project site)" "Task #","Task Title","Work Scope","Deliverable","Agency Requirements" " " "Phase Two - Initial Project Development" "2-1","DO RFP Development - Direct Support","Based upon interviews Agency/site staff and consultation support, FEMP Services will prepare DO RFP for Agency/site. FEMP Services will provide onsite or telecon review of draft DO RFP with agency staff. FEMP Services will prepare 2nd draft DO RFP based on telecon and written agency review comments and recommendations. ","Draft DO RFP Document. On-site review of draft DO RFP.

334

Advanced Communication and Control for Distributed Energy Resource Integration: Phase 2 Scientific Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of this research project is to demonstrate sensing, communication, information and control technologies to achieve a seamless integration of multivendor distributed energy resource (DER) units at aggregation levels that meet individual user requirements for facility operations (residential, commercial, industrial, manufacturing, etc.) and further serve as resource options for electric and natural gas utilities. The fully demonstrated DER aggregation system with embodiment of communication and control technologies will lead to real-time, interactive, customer-managed service networks to achieve greater customer value. Work on this Advanced Communication and Control Project (ACCP) consists of a two-phase approach for an integrated demonstration of communication and control technologies to achieve a seamless integration of DER units to reach progressive levels of aggregated power output. Phase I involved design and proof-of-design, and Phase II involves real-world demonstration of the Phase I design architecture. The scope of work for Phase II of this ACCP involves demonstrating the Phase I design architecture in large scale real-world settings while integrating with the operations of one or more electricity supplier feeder lines. The communication and control architectures for integrated demonstration shall encompass combinations of software and hardware components, including: sensors, data acquisition and communication systems, remote monitoring systems, metering (interval revenue, real-time), local and wide area networks, Web-based systems, smart controls, energy management/information systems with control and automation of building energy loads, and demand-response management with integration of real-time market pricing. For Phase II, BPL Global shall demonstrate the Phase I design for integrating and controlling the operation of more than 10 DER units, dispersed at various locations in one or more Independent System Operator (ISO) Control Areas, at an aggregated scale of more than 1 MW, to provide grid support. Actual performance data with respect to each specified function above is to be collected during the Phase II field demonstration. At a minimum, the Phase II demonstration shall span one year of field operations. The demonstration performance will need to be validated by the target customer(s) for acceptance and subsequent implementation. An ISO must be involved in demonstration planning and execution. As part of the Phase II work, BPL Global shall develop a roadmap to commercialization that identifies and quantifies the potential markets for the integrated, aggregated DER systems and for the communication and control technologies demonstrated in Phase I. In addition, the roadmap must identify strategies and actions, as well as the regional and national markets where the aggregated DER systems with communication and control solutions will be introduced, along with a timeline projected for introduction into each identified market. In Phase I of this project, we developed a proof-of-concept ACCP system and architecture and began to test its functionality at real-world sites. These sites had just over 10 MW of DERs and allowed us to identify what needed to be done to commercialize this concept. As a result, we started Phase II by looking at our existing platform and identified its strengths and weaknesses as well as how it would need to evolve for commercialization. During this process, we worked with different stakeholders in the market including: Independent System Operators, DER owners and operators, and electric utility companies to fully understand the issues from all of the different perspectives. Once we had an understanding of the commercialized ACCP system, we began to document and prepare detailed designs of the different system components. The components of the system with the most significant design improvements were: the on-site remote terminal unit, the communication technology between the remote site and the data center, and the scalability and reliability of the data center application.

BPL Global

2008-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

335

Single and three-phase AC losses in HTS superconducting power transmission line prototype cables  

SciTech Connect

AC losses in two, one-meter-long lengths of HTS prototype multi-strand conductors (PMC`s) are measured with a temperature-difference calorimeter. Both single-phase and three-phase losses are examined with ac currents up to 1,000 A rms. The calorimeter, designed specifically for these measurements, has a precision of 1 mW. PMC {number_sign}1 has two helically-wound, non-insulated layers of HTS tape (19 tapes per layer), each layer wrapped with opposite pitch. PMC {number_sign}2 is identical except for insulation between the layers. The measured ac losses show no significant effect of interlayer insulation and depend on about the third power of the current--a result in agreement with the Bean-Norris model adapted to the double-helix configuration. The three-phase losses are a factor of two higher than those exhibited by a single isolated conductor, indicating a significant interaction between phases.

Daney, D.E.; Boenig, H.J.; Maley, M.P.; Coulter, J.Y. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Fleshler, S. [American Superconductor, Inc., Westborough, MA (United States)

1997-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

Experiment 7: Heat Phase Changes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Experiment 7: Heat Phase Changes Matter has 4 phases or states: solid, liquid, gas, and plasma. This lab looks at the phase transitions from solid to liquid to gas. 1. Obtain the following materials: 600mL beaker of ice, thermometer, hot plate, timer. 2. Add a very small amount of water to the ice so

Peterson, Blake R.

337

Phase-multiplication holography  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This disclosure relates generally to nondestructive testing for identifying structural characteristics of an object by scanned holographic techniques using a known source of radiation, such as electromagnetic or acoustical radiation. It is an object of this invention to provide an apparatus and method for synthetic aperture expansion in holographic imaging applications to construct fringe patterns capable of holographic reproduction where aperture restrictions in nondestructive testing applications would conventionally make such imaging techniques impossible. The apparatus and method result in the production of a sharply defined frontal image of structural characteristics which could not otherwise be imaged because they occur either near the surface of the object or are confined by geometry restricting aperture dimensions available for scanning purposes. The depth of the structural characteristic below the surface of the object can also be determined by the reconstruction parameters which produce the sharpest focus. Lateral resolution is established by simulated reduction in the radiation wavelength and may easily be an order of magnitude less than the electromagnetic wavelength in the material or 2 times the standard depth of penetration. Since the phase multiplication technique is performed on the detected data, the penetration depth available due to the longer wavelength signals applied to the test object remains unchanged. The phase multiplication technique can also be applied to low frequency acoustic holography, resulting in a test which combines excellent penetration of difficult materials with high resolution images.

Collins, H.D.; Prince, J.M.; Davis, T.J.

1982-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

338

Phase 1 -- 4  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

4" 4" "Statement of Work - Optional Service Offerings for Contractor-Identified Project" "Task #","Task Title","Work Scope","Deliverable","Agency Requirements" " " "Phase Two - Initial Project Development" "Replace Std Task# 2-1","DO RFP Development - On Site Consultation","FEMP Services will provide technical consultation resources at the Agency's site to assist in the integration of the site's requirements into the DO RFP template.","Oral Comments","Agency staff will draft DO RFP. Provide copies to FEMP Services staff for review." "Phase Three - Negotiations and Award" "Replace Std Task# 3-4","Final Proposal Review - Direct Support","FEMP Services will provide direct technical resources to review final proposal. Review will include assessment of ESPC-unique data such as markups, performance period expenses, and financing interest rates. FEMP Services will assure that price schedules have been filled out correctly. ESCO specified equipment will be evaluated for its appropriateness and installation expense (labor and material). FEMP Services will coordinate and assemble agency and FEMP Services questions and issues for Agency CO to be presented to ESCO for discussions and negotiations. ","Telecon Advice and Written comments and recommendations","Agency will provide FEMP Services staff copies of final proposal with emphasis on selected equipment compatibility with agency performance requirements. Agency shall ensure applicable acquisition team members review final proposal. Agency will generate site questions or issues prior to scheduled telecons with FEMP Services staff. Agency will review questions and issues for ESCO discussions. Agency CO will submit questions and issues to ESCO."

339

Phase equilibrium studies  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A phase equilibrium model has been developed for the SRC-I process, as well as the other coal liquefaction processes. It is applicable to both vapor/liquid and liquid/liquid equilibria; it also provides an approximate but adequate description of aqueous mixtures where the volatile electrolyte components dissociate to form ionic species. This report completes the description of the model presented in an earlier report (Mathias and Stein, 1983a). Comparisons of the model to previously published data on coal-fluid mixtures are presented. Further, a preliminary analysis of new data on SRC-I coal fluids is presented. Finally, the current capabilities and deficiencies of the model are discussed. 25 references, 17 figures, 30 tables.

Mathias, P.M.; Stein, F.P.

1983-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

Options Study - Phase II  

SciTech Connect

The Options Study has been conducted for the purpose of evaluating the potential of alternative integrated nuclear fuel cycle options to favorably address the issues associated with a continuing or expanding use of nuclear power in the United States. The study produced information that can be used to inform decisions identifying potential directions for research and development on such fuel cycle options. An integrated nuclear fuel cycle option is defined in this study as including all aspects of the entire nuclear fuel cycle, from obtaining natural resources for fuel to the ultimate disposal of used nuclear fuel (UNF) or radioactive wastes. Issues such as nuclear waste management, especially the increasing inventory of used nuclear fuel, the current uncertainty about used fuel disposal, and the risk of nuclear weapons proliferation have contributed to the reluctance to expand the use of nuclear power, even though it is recognized that nuclear power is a safe and reliable method of producing electricity. In this Options Study, current, evolutionary, and revolutionary nuclear energy options were all considered, including the use of uranium and thorium, and both once-through and recycle approaches. Available information has been collected and reviewed in order to evaluate the ability of an option to clearly address the challenges associated with the current implementation and potential expansion of commercial nuclear power in the United States. This Options Study is a comprehensive consideration and review of fuel cycle and technology options, including those for disposal, and is not constrained by any limitations that may be imposed by economics, technical maturity, past policy, or speculated future conditions. This Phase II report is intended to be used in conjunction with the Phase I report, and much information in that report is not repeated here, although some information has been updated to reflect recent developments. The focus in this Options Study was to identify any nuclear fuel cycle technology or option that may result in a significant beneficial impact to the issues as compared to the current U.S. approach of once-through use of nuclear fuel in LWRs or similar reactors followed by direct disposal of UNF. This approach was taken because incremental differences may be difficult to clearly identify and justify due to the large uncertainties that can be associated with the specific causes of the issues. Phase II of this Options Study continued the review of nuclear fuel cycle options that was initiated and documented during Phase I, concentrating on reviewing and summarizing the potential of integrated nuclear fuel cycles. However, based on the reviews of previous studies and available data, it was not always possible to clearly determine sufficiently large differences between the various fuel cycle and technology options for some of the issues or evaluation measures, for example, in cases where only incremental differences with respect to the issues might be achieved regardless of the fuel cycle option or technologies being considered, or where differences were insufficient to clearly rise above the uncertainties.

R. Wigeland; T. Taiwo; M. Todosow; W. Halsey; J. Gehin

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tw mw phase" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

30-60 MHz FWCD system on DIII-D: Power division, phase control and tuning for a four-element antenna array  

SciTech Connect

The 2 MW Fast Wave Current Drive system on DIII-D is intended to provide a near-term demonstration of up to 0.3 MA of current driven by the fast wave. The system used to drive the four element phased antenna array which produces the required directional spectrum is presented. This system must be able to cope with strong coupling between antenna elements and the time-varying plasma load seen by the antennas. Computer modelling shows that this system should be able to maintain a directional spectrum at full power under most anticipated load conditions. 5 refs., 1 fig.

Pinsker, R.I.; Mayberry, M.J.; Petty, C.C.; Cary, W.P.; Pusl, J.; Remsen, D. (General Atomics, San Diego, CA (United States)); Baity, F.W.; Goulding, R.H.; Hofmann, D.J. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States))

1991-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Digitally controlled distributed phase shifter  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A digitally controlled distributed phase shifter is comprised of N phase shifters. Digital control is achieved by using N binary length-weighted electrodes located on the top surface of a waveguide. A control terminal is attached to each electrode thereby allowing the application of a control signal. The control signal is either one of two discrete bias voltages. The application of the discrete bias voltages change the modal index of a portion of the waveguide that corresponds to a length of the electrode to which the bias voltage is applied, thereby causing the phase to change through the underlying portion of the waveguide. The digitally controlled distributed phase shift network has a total phase shift comprised of the sum of the individual phase shifters.

Hietala, V.M.; Kravitz, S.H.; Vawter, G.A.

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

343

Digitally controlled distributed phase shifter  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A digitally controlled distributed phase shifter is comprised of N phase shifters. Digital control is achieved by using N binary length-weighted electrodes located on the top surface of a waveguide. A control terminal is attached to each electrode thereby allowing the application of a control signal. The control signal is either one or two discrete bias voltages. The application of the discrete bias voltages changes the modal index of a portion of the waveguide that corresponds to a length of the electrode to which the bias voltage is applied, thereby causing the phase to change through the underlying portion of the waveguide. The digitally controlled distributed phase shift network has a total phase shift comprised of the sum of the individual phase shifters.

Hietala, V.M.; Kravitz, S.H.; Vawter, G.A.

1993-08-17T23:59:59.000Z

344

Ben Bierman March 6th, 2011  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

courtesy of Ginger Lab at University of Washington 1 TW of plant-based power requires ~1/4th of coastline * 14 kW/m = 0.12 TW Even deployed on this massive scale, wave power could not be the only solution W/m number based on the projected rating of a 50MW 2.1 km x 400 m Pelamis wave energy converter http://www.slideshare.net/sustenergy/wave-power

Kammen, Daniel M.

345

Phase structure of soliton molecules  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Temporal optical soliton molecules were recently demonstrated; they potentially allow further increase of data rates in optical telecommunication. Their binding mechanism relies on the internal phases, but these have not been experimentally accessible so far. Conventional frequency-resolved optical gating techniques are not suited for measurement of their phase profile: Their algorithms fail to converge due to zeros both in their temporal and their spectral profile. We show that the VAMPIRE (very advanced method of phase and intensity retrieval of E-fields) method performs reliably. With VAMPIRE the phase profile of soliton molecules has been measured, and further insight into the mechanism is obtained.

Hause, A.; Hartwig, H.; Seifert, B.; Stolz, H.; Boehm, M.; Mitschke, F. [Universitaet Rostock, Institut fuer Physik, Rostock (Germany)

2007-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

346

'Multi-Phase' Steel Microstructures  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Application of Conical Beam X-Ray Tomography to Multi-Phase Materials ... Digital Construction and Characterization of Reticulated Porous Microstructures...

347

Phase Transformation and Microstructural Evolution  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Jul 31, 2012 ... Yunzhi Wang, Ohio State University. Scope, Phase transformation is still one of the most effective and efficient means to produce desired...

348

Kinetics/Phase Transformations: Visualizations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

VISUALS: Animation and video of solidification of solid crystals from a liquid ... JOM article including phase field and level set model animations, 0, 710, Cathy...

349

Method for aqueous phase reactions  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for converting liquid organic material in a mixture into a product utilizing a catalyst in the form of a plurality of porous particles wherein each particle is a support having nickel metal catalytic phase or reduced nickel deposited thereon in a first dispersed phase and an additional metal deposited onto the support in a second dispersed phase. The additional metal is effective in retarding or reducing agglomeration or sintering of the nickel metal catalytic phase without substantially affecting the catalytic activity, thereby increasing the life time of the catalyst.

Elliott, Douglas C. (Richland, WA); Hart, Todd R. (Kennewick, WA)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Design requirements document for the phase 1 privatization electrical power system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The electrical system for the Phase 1 privatization facilities will support the TWRS mission by providing the electrical power to the Phase 1 privatized facilities. This system will receive power from the Department of Energy-Richland Operations (RL) A4-8 230 kV transmission system powered from Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) Ashe and Midway 230 kV Substations. The existing RL 230 kV transmission line will be modified and looped 1021 into the new 230 kV substation bus. The new substation will be located in the vicinity of the privatized facilities, approximately 3.2 km (2 mi) south of the existing RL A4-8 230 kV transmission line. The substation will be capable of providing up to 40 MW of electrical power to support the Phase 1 privatization facilities and has space for accommodating future expansions. The substation will require at least two 230-13.8 kV transformers, 13.8 kV split bus switchgear, switchgear building, grounding transformers, instrument transformers, control and monitoring equipment, associated protection and isolation devices, lightning protection, yard lighting, cable and raceways, and infrastructure needed to provide desired availability and reliability. The power from the 13.8 kV switchgear located in the switchgear building will be delivered at the privatization facilities site boundaries. The 13.8 kV distribution system inside the privatization facilities site boundaries is the responsibility of the privatization contract.

Singh, G.

1997-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

351

High-Penetration PV Deployment in the Arizona Public Service System, Phase 1 Update: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In an effort to better understand the impacts of high penetrations of photovoltaic generators on distribution systems, Arizona Public Service and its partners have begun work on a multi-year project to develop the tools and knowledge base needed to safely and reliably integrate high penetrations of utility- and residential-scale photovoltaics (PV). Building upon the APS Community Power Project -- Flagstaff Pilot, this project will analyze the impact of PV on a representative feeder in northeast Flagstaff. To quantify and catalog the effects of the estimated 1.3 MW of PV that will be installed on the feeder (both smaller units at homes as well as large, centrally located systems), high-speed weather and electrical data acquisition systems and digital 'smart' meters are being designed and installed to facilitate monitoring and to build and validate comprehensive, high-resolution models of the distribution system. These models will be used to analyze the impacts of the PV on distribution circuit protection systems (including anti-islanding), predict voltage regulation and phase balance issues, and develop volt/var control schemes. This paper continues from a paper presented at the 2011 IEEE PVSC conference that introduces the project and describes some of the preliminary consideration, as well as project plans and early results. This paper gives a status update of the project and presents selected results from Phase 2 of the project. It discusses baseline feeder modeling, load allocation, data acquisition, utility-scale PV integration, preliminary model validation, and plans for future phases.

Hambrick, J.; Narang, D.

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Phasing Out the Phase Problem in Interfacial Crystallography  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

BESSRC/XOR BESSRC/XOR Phasing Out the Phase Problem in Interfacial Crystallography Photo of Paul Fenter (left) and Zhan Zhang at the mineral-fluid interface spectrometer at 12-ID-D (BESSRC/XOR). Paul Fenter (left) and Zhan Zhang at the mineral-fluid interface spectrometer at 12-ID-D (BESSRC/XOR). Since the advent of dedicated synchrotron radiation facilities, the applications of x-ray diffraction and scattering for structure determination have expanded to include a broad range of materials, from proteins and interfaces to nanoparticles. However, the well-known "phase problem" of crystallography limits these applications. The phase problem arises because the complete description of a structure requires a complex structure factor having both a magnitude and a phase. The measured x-ray

353

Bibliography on Phase Change Materials in Construction ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Cell Using Light Wallboards Coupling Vacuum Isolation Panels and Phase ... of Phase Change Materials in Concrete," Solar Energy Materials and ...

2013-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

354

Atomic Phase Conjugation From a Bose Condensate  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... phase conjugation is rapidly destroyed by incoherent ... sponta- neous emission rapidly destroy phase conjugation ... DF Walls, and BC Sanders, Phys. ...

2010-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

355

TWRS privatization phase 1 electrical power system  

SciTech Connect

This document includes Conceptual Design Report (CDR) for a new 11 km (7 miles) 230 kV transmission line and a new 40 MVA substation (A6) which will be located east of Grout Facility in 200E Area tank farm. This substation will provide electrical power up to 20 MW each for two private contractor facilities for immobilization and disposal of low activity waste (LAW).

Singh, G.

1997-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

356

Two-phase flow studies  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The two-phase flow program is directed at understanding the hydrodynamics of two-phase flows. The two-phase flow regime is characterized by a series of flow patterns that are designated as bubble, slug, churn, and annular flow. Churn flow has received very little scientific attention. This lack of attention cannot be justified because calculations predict that the churn flow pattern will exist over a substantial portion of the two-phase flow zone in producing geothermal wells. The University of Houston is experimentally investigating the dynamics of churn flow and is measuring the holdup over the full range of flow space for which churn flow exists. These experiments are being conducted in an air/water vertical two-phase flow loop. Brown University has constructed and is operating a unique two-phase flow research facility specifically designed to address flow problems of relevance to the geothermal industry. An important feature of the facility is that it is dedicated to two-phase flow of a single substance (including evaporation and condensation) as opposed to the case of a two-component two-phase flow. This facility can be operated with horizontal or vertical test sections of constant diameter or with step changes in diameter to simulate a geothermal well profile.

Hanold, R.J.

1983-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Three phase downhole separator process  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Three Phase Downhole Separator Process (TPDSP) is a process which results in the separation of all three phases, (1) oil, (2) gas, and (3) water, at the downhole location in the well bore, water disposal injection downhole, and oil and gas production uphole.

Cognata, Louis John (Baytown, TX)

2008-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

358

516-2007 FAX: 572-4038 E-mail: nthunews@my.nthu.edu.tw  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

/11( ) I170 11/13( ) AM9-12 - ( ) I180 11/18( ) #12;2008 DIY & IELTS Jas Huang/ Rita Chang Q&A / 2008

Huang, Haimei

359

cfchou@phys.sinica.edu.tw Global Warming -Lohachara Island by Robert Clemenzi  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Chicago #12; > #12;#12; #12; #12; #12; 10 % #12;#12;#12;#12;Ocean Wave Power The Geysers San Francisco, CA Solar power plants III-VII at Kramer Junction, CA #12; #12; #12

Chen, Yang-Yuan

360

Advances in X-Band TW Accelerator Structures Operating in the 100 MV/M Regime  

SciTech Connect

A CERN-SLAC-KEK collaboration on high gradient X-band accelerator structure development for CLIC has been ongoing for three years. The major outcome has been the demonstration of stable 100 MV/m gradient operation of a number of CLIC prototype structures. These structures were fabricated using the technology developed from 1994 to 2004 for the GLC/NLC linear collider initiative. One of the goals has been to refine the essential parameters and fabrication procedures needed to realize such a high gradient routinely. Another goal has been to develop structures with stronger dipole mode damping than those for GLC/NLC. The latter requires that the surface temperature rise during the pulse be higher, which may increase the breakdown rate. One structure with heavy damping has been RF processed and another is nearly finished. The breakdown rates of these structures were found to be higher by two orders of magnitude compared to those with equivalent acceleration mode parameters but without the damping features. This paper presents these results together with some of the earlier results from non-damped structures.

Higo, Toshiyasu; /KEK, Tsukuba; Higashi, Yasuo; /KEK, Tsukuba; Matsumoto, Shuji; /KEK, Tsukuba; Yokoyama, Kazue; /KEK, Tsukuba; Adolphsen, Chris; /SLAC; Dolgashev, Valery; /SLAC; Jensen, Aaron; /SLAC; Laurent, Lisa; /SLAC; Tantawi, Sami; /SLAC; Wang, Faya; /SLAC; Wang, Juwen; /SLAC; Dobert, Steffen; /CERN; Grudiev, Alexej; /CERN; Riddone, Germana; /CERN; Wuensch, Walter; /CERN; Zennaro, Riccardo; /CERN

2012-07-05T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tw mw phase" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Phase-sensitive flow cytometer  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This report describes phase-sensitive flow cytometer (FCM) which provides additional FCM capability to use the fluorescence lifetime of one or more fluorochromes bound to single cells to provide additional information regarding the cells. The resulting fluorescence emission can be resolved into individual fluorescence signals if two fluorochromes are present or can be converted directly to a decay lifetime from a single fluorochrome. The excitation light for the fluorochromes is modulated to produce an amplitude modulated fluorescence pulse as the fluorochrome is excited in the FCM. The modulation signal also forms a reference signal that is phase-shifted a selected amount for subsequent mixing with the output modulated fluorescence intensity signal in phase-sensitive detection circuitry. The output from the phase-sensitive circuitry is then an individual resolved fluorochrome signal or a single fluorochrome decay lifetime, depending on the applied phase shifts.

Steinkamp, J.A.

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

362

Phase stable rf transport system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention is comprised of an RF transport system which delivers a phase-stable RF signal to a load, such as an RF cavity of a charged particle accelerator. A circuit generates a calibration signal at an odd multiple frequency of the RF signal where the calibration signal is superimposed with the RF signal on a common cable that connects the RF signal with the load. Signal isolating diplexers are located at both the RF signal source end and load end of the common cable to enable the calibration to be inserted and extracted from the cable signals without any affect on the RF signal. Any phase shift in the calibration signal during traverse of the common cable is then functionally related to the phase shift in the RF signal. The calibration phase shift is used to control a phase shifter for the RF signal to maintain a stable RF signal at the load.

Curtin, M.T.; Natter, E.F.; Denney, P.M.

1991-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

363

Phase stable RF transport system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An RF transport system delivers a phase-stable RF signal to a load, such as an RF cavity of a charged particle accelerator. A circuit generates a calibration signal at an odd multiple frequency of the RF signal where the calibration signal is superimposed with the RF signal on a common cable that connects the RF signal with the load. Signal isolating diplexers are located at both the RF signal source end and load end of the common cable to enable the calibration to be inserted and extracted from the cable signals without any affect on the RF signal. Any phase shift in the calibration signal during traverse of the common cable is then functionally related to the phase shift in the RF signal. The calibration phase shift is used to control a phase shifter for the RF signal to maintain a stable RF signal at the load.

Curtin, Michael T. (Los Alamos, NM); Natter, Eckard F. (San Francisco, CA); Denney, Peter M. (Los Alamos, NM)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Phase-sensitive flow cytometer  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A phase-sensitive flow cytometer (FCM) provides additional FCM capability to use the fluorescence lifetime of one or more fluorochromes bound to single cells to provide additional information regarding the cells. The resulting fluorescence emission can be resolved into individual fluorescence signals if two fluorochromes are present or can be converted directly to a decay lifetime from a single fluorochrome. The excitation light for the fluorochromes is modulated to produce an amplitude modulated fluorescence pulse as the fluorochrome is excited in the FCM. The modulation signal also forms a reference signal that is phase-shifted a selected amount for subsequent mixing with the output modulated fluorescence intensity signal in phase-sensitive detection circuitry. The output from the phase-sensitive circuitry is then an individual resolved fluorochrome signal or a single fluorochrome decay lifetime, depending on the applied phase shifts. 15 figures.

Steinkamp, J.A.

1993-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

365

Multiple pollutant removal using the condensing heat exchanger: Phase 1 final report, October 1995--July 1997  

SciTech Connect

The Integrated Flue Gas Treatment (IFGT) system is a new concept whereby a Teflon{reg_sign} covered condensing heat exchanger is adapted to remove certain flue gas constitutents, both particulate and gaseous, while recovering low level heat. Phase 1 includes two experimental tasks. One task dealt principally with the pollutant removal capabilities of the IFGT at a scale of about 1.2MW{sub t}. The other task studied the durability of the Teflon{reg_sign} covering to withstand the rigors of abrasive wear by fly ash emitted as a result of coal combustion. The pollutant removal characteristics of the IFGT system were measured over a wide range of operating conditions. The coals tested included high, medium and low-sulfur coals. The flue gas pollutants studied included ammonia, hydrogen chloride, hydrogen fluoride, particulate, sulfur dioxide, gas phase and particle phase mercury and gas phase and particle phase trace elements. The particulate removal efficiency and size distribution was investigated. These test results demonstrated that the IFGT system is an effective device for both acid gas absorption and fine particulate collection. The durability of the Teflon{reg_sign} covered heat exchanger tubes was studied on a pilot-scale single-stage condensing heat exchanger (CHX{reg_sign}). Data from the test indicate that virtually no decrease in Teflon{reg_sign} thickness was observed for the coating on the first two rows of heat exchanger tubes, even at high inlet particulate loadings. Evidence of wear was present only at the microscopic level, and even then was very minor in severity.

Bailey, R.T.; Jankura, B.J.; Kudlac, G.A.

1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

Geoantineutrino Spectrum, 3He/4He-ratio Distribution in the Earth's Interior and Slow Nuclear Burning on the Boundary of the Liquid and Solid Phases of the Earth's Core  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The description problem of geoantineutrino spectrum and reactor antineutrino experimental spectrum in KamLAND, which takes place for antineutrino energy \\~2.8 MeV, and also the experimental results of the interaction of uranium dioxide and carbide with iron-nickel and silicaalumina melts at high pressure (5-10 GP?) and temperature (1600-2200C) have motivated us to consider the possible consequences of the assumption made by V.Anisichkin and coauthors that there is an actinid shell on boundary of liquid and solid phases of the Earth's core. We have shown that the activation of a natural nuclear reactor operating as the solitary waves of nuclear burning in 238U- and/or 232Th-medium (in particular, the neutron- fission progressive wave of Feoktistov and/or Teller-Ishikawa-Wood) can be such a physical consequence. The simplified model of the kinetics of accumulation and burnup in U-Pu fuel cycle of Feoktistov is developed. The results of the numerical simulation of neutron-fission wave in two-phase UO2/Fe medium on a surface of the Earth's solid core are presented. The georeactor model of 3He origin and the 3He/4He-ratio distribution in the Earth's interior is offered. It is shown that the 3He/4He ratio distribution can be the natural quantitative criterion of georeactor thermal power. On the basis of O'Nions-Evensen-Hamilton geochemical model of mantle differentiation and the crust growth supplied by actinid shell on the boundary of liquid and solid phases of the Earth's core as a nuclear energy source (georeactor with power of 30 TW), the tentative estimation of geoantineutrino intensity and geoantineutrino spectrum on the Earth surface are given.

V. D. Rusov; V. N. Pavlovich; V. N. Vaschenko; V. A. Tarasov; T. N. Zelentsova; V. N. Bolshakov; D. A. Litvinov; S. I. Kosenko; O. A. Byegunova

2006-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

367

Liquid-phase compositions from vapor-phase analyses  

SciTech Connect

Arsenic normally is not considered to be a contaminant. However, because arsenic was found in many cylinders of UF{sub 6}, including in corrosion products, a study was performed of the distribution of the two arsenic fluorides, AsF{sub 3} and AsF{sub 5}, between liquid and vapor phases. The results of the study pertain to condensation or vaporization of liquid UF{sub 6}. This study includes use of various experimental data plus many extrapolations necessitated by the meagerness of the experimental data. The results of this study provide additional support for the vapor-liquid equilibrium model of J.M. Prausnitz and his coworkers as a means of describing the distribution of various impurities between vapor and liquid phases of UF{sub 6}. Thus, it is concluded that AsF{sub 3} will tend to concentrate in the liquid phase but that the concentration of AsF{sub 5} in the vapor phase will exceed its liquid-phase concentration by a factor of about 7.5, which is in agreement with experimental data. Because the weight of the liquid phase in a condensation operation may be in the range of thousands of times that of the vapor phase, most of any AsF{sub 5} will be in the liquid phase in spite of this separation factor of 7.5. It may also be concluded that any arsenic fluorides fed into a uranium isotope separation plant will either travel with other low-molecular-weight gases or react with materials present in the plant. 25 refs., 3 figs., 6 tabs.

Davis, W. Jr. (Oak Ridge Gaseous Diffusion Plant, TN (USA)); Cochran, H.D. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (USA))

1990-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

Nanoparticle Gas-Phase Electrophoresis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Page 1. Nanoparticle Gas-Phase Electrophoresis ... L f d f ? = L f /d f , f is the fraction of diffuse gas collisions with the cylinder -V + and where ? ? ...

2013-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

369

Phase Relationships in Rene' 95  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

1980 quantitative phase relationship information is indeed rare. .... by x-ray energy dispersive spectroscopy. (EDS) appears similar. The "M" portion is ... size particles, and have determined that the average secondary. DAS ranges from about 1...

370

Self-adjoint phase operator  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

and E.V. Damaskinskii ... 1 . Introduction. The problem of quantizing classical action-phase (angle) .... of the ordinary canonical operators Q and P in L2([0, 1])).

371

Property:GEADevelopmentPhase | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GEADevelopmentPhase GEADevelopmentPhase Jump to: navigation, search Property Name GEADevelopmentPhase Property Type Page Description GEA Development Phase, as characterized by their Annual U.S. Geothermal Power Production and Development Report. See GEA_Development_Phases Allows Values Phase I - Resource Procurement and Identification;Phase II - Resource Exploration and Confirmation;Phase III - Permitting and Initial Development;Phase IV - Resource Production and Power Plant Construction Subproperties This property has the following 77 subproperties: A Abraham Hot Springs Geothermal Area Adak Geothermal Area Akun Strait Geothermal Area Akutan Fumaroles Geothermal Area Alum Geothermal Area Alvord Hot Springs Geothermal Area Amedee Geothermal Area Arrowhead Hot Springs Geothermal Area

372

Arizona/Geothermal | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Arizona/Geothermal Arizona/Geothermal < Arizona Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Print PDF Arizona Geothermal General Regulatory Roadmap Geothermal Power Projects Under Development in Arizona No geothermal projects listed. Add a geothermal project. Operational Geothermal Power Plants in Arizona No geothermal power plants listed. Add a geothermal energy generation facility. Geothermal Areas in Arizona Mean Capacity (MW) Number of Plants Owners Geothermal Region Clifton Hot Springs Geothermal Area 14.453 MW14,453.335 kW 14,453,335.43 W 14,453,335,430 mW 0.0145 GW 1.445334e-5 TW Rio Grande Rift Geothermal Region Gillard Hot Springs Geothermal Area 11.796 MW11,796.115 kW 11,796,114.7 W 11,796,114,700 mW 0.0118 GW 1.179611e-5 TW Rio Grande Rift Geothermal Region

373

Montana/Geothermal | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Montana/Geothermal Montana/Geothermal < Montana Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Print PDF Montana Geothermal General Regulatory Roadmap Geothermal Power Projects Under Development in Montana No geothermal projects listed. Add a geothermal project. Operational Geothermal Power Plants in Montana No geothermal power plants listed. Add a geothermal energy generation facility. Geothermal Areas in Montana Mean Capacity (MW) Number of Plants Owners Geothermal Region Boulder Hot Springs Geothermal Area 5.21 MW5,210.319 kW 5,210,318.609 W 5,210,318,609 mW 0.00521 GW 5.210319e-6 TW Northern Basin and Range Geothermal Region Broadwater Hot Spring Geothermal Area 5.256 MW5,255.823 kW 5,255,823.43 W 5,255,823,430 mW 0.00526 GW 5.255823e-6 TW Northern Basin and Range Geothermal Region

374

Research Article Effect of Microwave Radiation on Enzymatic and Chemical Peptide Bond Synthesis on Solid Phase  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Peptide bond synthesis was performed on PEGA beads under microwave radiations. Classical chemical coupling as well as thermolysin catalyzed synthesis was studied, and the effect of microwave radiations on reaction kinetics, beads integrity, and enzyme activity was assessed. Results demonstrate that microwave radiations can be profitably exploited to improve reaction kinetics in solid phase peptide synthesis when both chemical and biocatalytic strategies are used. Copyright 2009 Alessandra Basso et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. The use of microwave (MW) heating has found successful applications in solid phase organic synthesis (SPOS) [17]. As far back as 1992, Wang described the use of a single-mode microwave as a heating source to accelerate the chemical coupling [8] of many amino acids. Reactions on SP often suffer from unsatisfactory reaction kinetics due to slow diffusion. Since microwave energy activates any molecule with dipole moment, a rapid heating at a molecular level is

Ra Basso; Loris Sinigoi; Lucia Gardossi; Sabine Flitsch

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

ICFT: An initial closed-loop flow test of the Fenton Hill Phase II HDR reservoir  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A 30-day closed-loop circulation test of the Phase II Hot Dry Rock reservoir at Fenton Hill, New Mexico, was conducted to determine the thermal, hydraulic, chemical, and seismic characteristics of the reservoir in preparation for a long-term energy-extraction test. The Phase II heat-extraction loop was successfully tested with the injection of 37,000 m/sup 3/ of cold water and production of 23,300 m/sup 3/ of hot water. Up to 10 MW/sub t/ was extracted when the production flow rate reached 0.0139 m/sup 3//s at 192/degree/C. By the end of the test, the water-loss rate had decreased to 26% and a significant portion of the injected water was recovered; 66% during the test and an additional 20% during subsequent venting. Analysis of thermal, hydraulic, geochemical, tracer, and seismic data suggests the fractured volume of the reservoir was growing throughout the test. 19 refs., 64 figs., 19 tabs.

Dash, Z.V. (ed.); Aguilar, R.G.; Dennis, B.R.; Dreesen, D.S.; Fehler, M.C.; Hendron, R.H.; House, L.S.; Ito, H.; Kelkar, S.M.; Malzahn, M.V.

1989-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

Combined Analysis: structure-texture-microstructure-phase-  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Combined Analysis: structure-texture-microstructure-phase- stresses-reflectivity determination by x #12;Combined Analysis: structure-texture-microstructure-phase-stresses- reflectivity determination ................................................................................................. 83 2.10.1 The phase problem in diffraction

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

377

Evaluating Heuristic Optimization Phase Order Search Algorithms  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Program-specific or function-specific optimization phase sequences are universally accepted to achieve better overall performance than any fixed optimization phase ordering. A number of heuristic phase order space search algorithms have been devised ...

Prasad A. Kulkarni; David B. Whalley; Gary S. Tyson

2007-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Phase measurement system using a dithered clock  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A phase measurement system is disclosed which measures the phase shift between two signals by dithering a clock signal and averaging a plurality of measurements of the phase differences between the two signals. 8 figures.

Fairley, C.R.; Patterson, S.R.

1991-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

379

Phase-1 of Edison Arrives at NERSC  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Phase 1 of Edison Arrives at NERSC Phase 1 of Edison Arrives at NERSC November 27, 2012 Photo by Roy Kaltschmidt, Berkeley Lab Phase 1 of NERSC's newest supercomputer, named...

380

Texas Wind Energy Forecasting System Development and Testing, Phase 1: Initial Testing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes initial results from the Texas Wind Energy Forecasting System Development and Testing Project at a 75-MW wind project in west Texas.

2003-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tw mw phase" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Physicochemical Perturbations of Phase Equilibriums  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The alternative approach to the displacement of gas/liquid equilibrium is developed on the basis of the Clapeyron equation. The phase transition in the system with well-established properties is taken as a reference process to search for the parameters of phase transition in the perturbed equilibrium system. The main equation, derived in the framework of both classical thermodynamics and statistical mechanics, establishes a correlation between variations of enthalpies of evaporation, \\Delta (\\Delta H), which is induced by perturbations, and the equilibrium vapor pressures. The dissolution of a solute, changing the surface shape, and the effect of the external field of adsorbents are considered as the perturbing actions on the liquid phase. The model provides the unified method for studying (1) solutions, (2) membrane separations (3) surface phenomena, and (4) effect of the adsorption field; it leads to the useful relations between \\Delta (\\Delta H), on the one hand, and the osmotic pressures, the Donnan potential, the surface curvature, and the pore structure, on the other hand. The value of \\Delta(\\Delta H) has a clear physical meaning and gives a new insight into our understanding of the apparently different phenomena. The model is applicable if the change between entropies of the comparable gas phases is far more than the difference between entropies of the liquid phases.

Vladimir Kh. Dobruskin

2010-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

382

Pulsed Ponderomotive Phase Plate - Industrial Partnerships Office  

Ability to adjust the size and phase shift profile of the phase plate through laser parameters; Potential Applications. High-contrast, ...

383

PHASE CHANGE DEVICE - Energy Innovation Portal  

Heating of the phase change material to initiate a change in phase can be provided by the application of ... Building Energy Efficiency; ... Solar Thermal; Startup ...

384

Gas-Phase Molecular Dynamics  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Gas-Phase Molecular Dynamics Gas-Phase Molecular Dynamics The Gas-Phase Molecular Dynamics Group is dedicated to developing and applying spectroscopic and theoretical tools to challenging problems in chemical physics related to reactivity, structure, dynamics and kinetics of transient species. Recent theoretical work has included advances in exact variational solution of vibrational quantum dynamics, suitable for up to five atoms in systems where large amplitude motion or multiple strongly coupled modes make simpler approximations inadequate. Other theoretical work, illustrated below, applied direct dynamics, quantum force trajectory calculations to investigate a series of reactions of the HOCO radical. The potential energy surface for the OH + CO/ H + CO2 reaction, showing two barriers (TS1 and TS2) and the deep HOCO well along the minimum energy pathway. The inset figure shows the experimental and calculated reactivity of HOCO with selected collision partners. See J.S. Francisco, J.T. Muckerman and H.-G. Yu, "HOCO radical chemistry,"

385

Physicochemical Perturbations of Phase Equilibriums  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The alternative approach to the displacement of gas/liquid equilibrium is developed on the basis of the Clapeyron equation. The phase transition in the system with well-established properties is taken as a reference process to search for the parameters of phase transition in the perturbed equilibrium system. The main equation, derived in the framework of both classical thermodynamics and statistical mechanics, establishes a correlation between variations of enthalpies of evaporation, \\Delta (\\Delta H), which is induced by perturbations, and the equilibrium vapor pressures. The dissolution of a solute, changing the surface shape, and the effect of the external field of adsorbents are considered as the perturbing actions on the liquid phase. The model provides the unified method for studying (1) solutions, (2) membrane separations (3) surface phenomena, and (4) effect of the adsorption field; it leads to the useful relations between \\Delta (\\Delta H), on the one hand, and the osmotic pressures, the Donnan poten...

Dobruskin, Vladimir Kh

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

Shock dynamics of phase diagrams  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A thermodynamic phase transition denotes a drastic change of state of a physical system due to a continuous change of thermodynamic variables, as for instance pressure and temperature. The classical van der Waals equation of state is the simplest model that predicts the occurrence of a critical point associated with the gas-liquid phase transition. Nevertheless, below the critical temperature, theoretical predictions of the van der Waals theory significantly depart from the observed physical behaviour. We develop a novel approach to classical thermodynamics based on the solution of Maxwell relations for a generalised family of nonlocal entropy functions. This theory provides an exact mathematical description of discontinuities of the order parameter within the phase transition region, it explains the universal form of the equations of state and the occurrence of triple points in terms of the dynamics of nonlinear shock wave fronts.

Antonio Moro

2013-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

387

Phase Conjugation in Quantum Optomechanics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We analyze the phase conjugate coupling of a pair of optomechanical oscillator modes driven by the time-dependent beat-note due to a two-color optical field. The dynamics of the direct and phase conjugate modes exhibit familiar time-reversed qualities, leading to opposite sign temperatures for the modes in the classical regime of operation, but these features are limited by quantum effects due to the non-commutative nature of quantum mechanical operators. The effects are measurable by read-out of the oscillator via a qubit. As a potential application of this system in sensing, we discuss a protocol applying phase-conjugate swaps to cancel external forces acting on the system.

L. F. Buchmann; E. M. Wright; P. Meystre

2013-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

388

10 MW Final Report Body.doc  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

United States Department of Energy United States Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory FINAL REPORT Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC26-00NT 40804 Project Title: FABRICATE AND TEST AN ADVANCED NON-POLLUTING TURBINE DRIVE GAS GENERATOR From 1 September 2000 to 1 June 2003 Performed by: Clean Energy Systems, Inc. United States Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory FINAL REPORT of a project to FABRICATE AND TEST AN ADVANCED NON-POLLUTING TURBINE DRIVE GAS GENERATOR Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC26-00NT 40804 PROJECT DURATION: From 1 September 2000 to 1 June 2003 Authors: Eugene Baxter, Project Manager Roger E. Anderson, Principal Investigator Stephen E. Doyle, President, CES May 2003 Performed by: Clean Energy Systems, Inc.

389

10 MW Final Report Body.doc  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cost Comparison 38 Competitive Position 38 Status of Marketing Activities 41 Premium Price Electricity Markets 41 Enhanced Hydrocarbon Recovery Applications 41 California...

390

Associate Consultant (m/w) Ihre Aufgaben  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Architecture (AIA), Business Intelligence (BI) und Microsoft Dynamics CRM mit Business Intelligence (BI), Biz Management (CRM) und Business Intelligence (BI) im europäischen Markt. ec4u bietet ihren Kunden Best an in anspruchsvolle Projekte integriert. ec4u bietet Ihnen dabei die Möglichkeit, mit State-of-the-Art Produkten

Bennewitz, Maren

391

The MW Technology and Activities in Japan  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... it possible for system design from existing fire furnaces and microwave ovens. ... Continuous Microwave Furnaces for Industrial-Scale Sintering, Calcining and...

392

Three-cell traveling wave superconducting test structure  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Use of a superconducting traveling wave accelerating (STWA) structure with a small phase advance per cell rather than a standing wave structure may provide a significant increase of the accelerating gradient in the ILC linac. For the same surface electric and magnetic fields the STWA achieves an accelerating gradient 1.2 larger than TESLA-like standing wave cavities. The STWA allows also longer acceleration cavities, reducing the number of gaps between them. However, the STWA structure requires a SC feedback waveguide to return the few hundreds of MW of circulating RF power from the structure output to the structure input. A test single-cell cavity with feedback was designed, manufactured and successfully tested demonstrating the possibility of a proper processing to achieve a high accelerating gradient. These results open way to take the next step of the TW SC cavity development: to build and test a travelingwave three-cell cavity with a feedback waveguide. The latest results of the single-cell cavity tests are discussed as well as the design of the test 3-cell TW cavity.

Avrakhov, Pavel; Kanareykin, Alexei; /Euclid Techlabs, Solon; Kazakov, Sergey; Solyak, Nikolay; Wu, Genfa; Yakovlev, Vyacheslav P.; /Fermilab

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Instantons in the Higgs Phase  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

When instantons are put into the Higgs phase, vortices are attached to instantons. We construct such composite solitons as 1/4 BPS states in five-dimensional supersymmetric U(Nc) gauge theory with Nf(>=Nc) fundamental hypermultiplets. We solve the hypermultiplet BPS equation and show that all 1/4 BPS solutions are generated by an Nc x Nf matrix which is holomorphic in two complex variables, assuming the vector multiplet BPS equation does not give additional moduli. We determine the total moduli space formed by topological sectors patched together and work out the multi-instanton solution inside a single vortex with complete moduli. Small instanton singularities are interpreted as small sigma-model lump singularities inside the vortex. The relation between monopoles and instantons in the Higgs phase is also clarified as limits of calorons in the Higgs phase. Another type of instantons stuck at an intersection of two vortices and dyonic instantons in the Higgs phase are also discussed.

Minoru Eto; Youichi Isozumi; Muneto Nitta; Keisuke Ohashi; Norisuke Sakai

2004-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

394

Predicting locality phases for dynamic memory optimization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Dynamic data, cache, and memory adaptation can significantly improve program performance when they are applied on long continuous phases of execution that have dynamic but predictable locality. To support phase-based adaptation, this paper defines the ... Keywords: Dynamic optimization, Locality analysis and optimization, Phase hierarchy, Program phase prediction, Reconfigurable architecture

Xipeng Shen; Yutao Zhong; Chen Ding

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

Quantum phase transition from the topological viewpoint  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This study targets quantum phases which are characterized by topological properties and no associated with the symmetry breaking. We concern ourselves primarily with the transitions among these quantum phases. This type of quantum phase transition was investigated by $G$-cobordism in unified framework. This framework provides a useful method to investigate a new quantum phase.

Izumi Tanaka

2013-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

396

Map of Biomass Facilities/Data | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Map of Biomass Facilities/Data Map of Biomass Facilities/Data < Map of Biomass Facilities Jump to: navigation, search Download a CSV file of the table below: CSV FacilityType Owner Developer EnergyPurchaser Place GeneratingCapacity NumberOfUnits CommercialOnlineDate HeatRate WindTurbineManufacturer FacilityStatus AES Mendota Biomass Facility Fresno County, California 25 MW25,000 kW 25,000,000 W 25,000,000,000 mW 0.025 GW 2.5e-5 TW 1989 17,873.6 APS Biomass I Biomass Facility Arizona 2.85 MW2,850 kW 2,850,000 W 2,850,000,000 mW 0.00285 GW 2.85e-6 TW 2006 8,911 Aberdeen Biomass Facility Sierra Pacific Industries Aberdeen, Washington 12 MW12,000 kW 12,000,000 W 12,000,000,000 mW 0.012 GW 1.2e-5 TW Acme Landfill Biomass Facility Landfill Gas Contra Costa County, California 0.27 MW270 kW

397

Phase 1 environmental report for the Advanced Neutron Source at Oak Ridge National Laboratory  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The US Department of Energy (DOE) has proposed the construction and operation of the Advanced Neutron Source (ANS), a 330-MW(f) reactor, at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to support neutron scattering and nuclear physics experiments. ANS would provide a steady-state source of neutrons that are thermalized to produce sources of hot, cold, and very coal neutrons. The use of these neutrons in ANS experiment facilities would be an essential component of national research efforts in basic materials science. Additionally, ANS capabilities would include production of transplutonium isotopes, irradiation of potential fusion and fission reactor materials, activation analysis, and production of medical and industrial isotopes such as {sup 252}Cf. Although ANS would not require licensing by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), DOE regards the design, construction, and operation of ANS as activities that would produce a licensable facility; that is, DOE is following the regulatory guidelines that NRC would apply if NRC were licensing the facility. Those guidelines include instructions for the preparation of an environmental report (ER), a compilation of available data and preliminary analyses regarding the environmental impacts of nuclear facility construction and operation. The ER, described and outlined in NRC Regulatory Guide 4.2, serves as a background document to facilitate the preparation of environmental impact statements (EISs). Using Regulatory Guide 4.2 as a model, this ANS ER provides analyses and information specific to the ANS site and area that can be adopted (and modified, if necessary) for the ANS EIS. The ER is being prepared in two phases. Phase 1 ER includes many of the data and analyses needed to prepare the EIS but does not include data or analyses of alternate sites or alternate technologies. Phase 2 ER will include the additional data and analyses stipulated by Regulatory Guide 4.2.

Blasing, T.J.; Brown, R.A.; Cada, G.F.; Easterly, C.; Feldman, D.L.; Hagan, C.W.; Harrington, R.M.; Johnson, R.O.; Ketelle, R.H.; Kroodsma, R.L.; McCold, L.N.; Reich, W.J.; Scofield, P.A.; Socolof, M.L.; Taleyarkhan, R.P.; Van Dyke, J.W.

1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

PhaseII1.PDF  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Stakeholder Meeting Stakeholder Meeting DOE-NETL Proposed Phase II Large Scale Mercury Control Technology Field Testing Program September 12, 2002 Meeting Summary A meeting was held in Arlington, VA on September 12 on DOE-NETL's plans to go forward with a second phase of field testing of advanced mercury control technology. The meeting was held in conjunction with the Air Quality III Conference and was attended by approximately 53 representatives from the coal and electric-utility industries, technology developers, EPA, and other interested parties (see attached attendees list). Scott Renninger provided a brief overview of DOE-NETL's current mercury field testing program. A summary of the results from an earlier stakeholder meeting held in Washington on June 4 were also presented as a starting point for discussion to help

399

Light-driven phase shifter  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A light-driven phase shifter is provided for modulating a transmission light beam. A gaseous medium such as argon is provided with electron energy states excited to populate a metastable state. A tunable dye laser is selected with a wavelength effective to deplete the metastable electron state and may be intensity modulated. The dye laser is directed through the gaseous medium to define a first optical path having an index of refraction determined by the gaseous medium having a depleted metastable electron state. A transmission laser beam is also directed through the gaseous medium to define a second optical path at least partially coincident with the first optical path. The intensity of the dye laser beam may then be varied to phase modulate the transmission laser beam. 2 figs.

Early, J.W.

1986-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

400

Light-driven phase shifter  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A light-driven phase shifter is provided for modulating a transmission light beam. A gaseous medium such as argon is provided with electron energy states excited to populate a metastable state. A tunable dye laser is selected with a wavelength effective to deplete the metastable electron state and may be intensity modulated. The dye laser is directed through the gaseous medium to define a first optical path having an index of refraction determined by the gaseous medium having a depleted metastable electron state. A transmission laser beam is also directed through the gaseous medium to define a second optical path at least partially coincident with the first optical path. The intensity of the dye laser beam may then be varied to phase modulate the transmission laser beam.

Early, James W. (Los Alamos, NM)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tw mw phase" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

PowerGuard{reg_sign} Advanced Manufacturing; PVMaT Phase 1 Final Technical Report: June 1, 1998 to September 30, 1999  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

During Phase 1 of PowerGuard{reg_sign} Advanced Manufacturing, PowerLight Corporation accomplished the following advancements: (1) Decreased system cost by 15%; (2) Increased PowerGuard tile production capacity from 5 MW/year to 8 MW/yr; (3) Established a manufacturing layout master plan for sequential integration of semi-automated and automated component workstations; (4) Defined semi-automation or automation of selected stages of the existing tile fabrication sequence, including PV module preparation, XPS processing, and coating; (5) Completed the advancement of several design improvements to the grid-tied inverter control board, including controller redesign, integrated data acquisition system (DAS), and communications for audit-worthy verification of PV system performance; (6) Conformed to NEPA, OSHA, and other federal and state regulations applicable to the proposed production process and mitigated potential for waste streams; (7) Initiated Underwriters Laboratories listings and international certifications on PowerGuard improvements; (8) Developed finance packages and integrated warranties; (9) Evaluated commercial demonstrations that incorporated the new design features and manufacturing process.

Marshall, M. C.; Dinwoodie, T. L.; O'Brian, C.; Botkin, J.; Ansley, J.

2000-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

402

Ferromagnetic state and phase transitions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Evidence is summarized attesting that the standard exchange field theory of ferromagnetism by Heisenberg has not been successful. It is replaced by the crystal field and a simple assumption that spin orientation is inexorably associated with the orientation of its carrier. It follows at once that both ferromagnetic phase transitions and magnetization must involve a structural rearrangement. The mechanism of structural rearrangements in solids is nucleation and interface propagation. The new approach accounts coherently for ferromagnetic state and its manifestations.

Yuri Mnyukh

2011-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

403

Final Report: Sensorpedia Phase 3  

SciTech Connect

This report is a summary of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory s (ORNL s) Phase 3 development of Sensorpedia, a sensor information sharing platform. Sensorpedia is ORNL s Wikipedia for Sensors. The overall goal of Sensorpedia is to enable global scale sensor information sharing for scientific research, national security and defense, public health and safety, emergency preparedness and response, and general community awareness and outreach.

Gorman, Bryan L [ORNL; Resseguie, David R [ORNL

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

Phase comparator apparatus and method  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention finds especially useful application for interferometer measurements made in plasma fusion devices (e.g., for measuring the line integral of electron density in the plasma). Such interferometers typically use very high intermediate frequencies (e.g., on the order of 10 to 70 MHz) and therefore the phase comparison circuitry should be a high speed circuit with a linear transfer characteristic so as to accurately differentiate between small fractions of interference fringes.

Coffield, F.E.

1985-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

QCD Phase Transitions, Volume 15  

SciTech Connect

The title of the workshop, ''The QCD Phase Transitions'', in fact happened to be too narrow for its real contents. It would be more accurate to say that it was devoted to different phases of QCD and QCD-related gauge theories, with strong emphasis on discussion of the underlying non-perturbative mechanisms which manifest themselves as all those phases. Before we go to specifics, let us emphasize one important aspect of the present status of non-perturbative Quantum Field Theory in general. It remains true that its studies do not get attention proportional to the intellectual challenge they deserve, and that the theorists working on it remain very fragmented. The efforts to create Theory of Everything including Quantum Gravity have attracted the lion share of attention and young talent. Nevertheless, in the last few years there was also a tremendous progress and even some shift of attention toward emphasis on the unity of non-perturbative phenomena. For example, we have seen some efforts to connect the lessons from recent progress in Supersymmetric theories with that in QCD, as derived from phenomenology and lattice. Another example is Maldacena conjecture and related development, which connect three things together, string theory, super-gravity and the (N=4) supersymmetric gauge theory. Although the progress mentioned is remarkable by itself, if we would listen to each other more we may have chance to strengthen the field and reach better understanding of the spectacular non-perturbative physics.

Schaefer, T.; Shuryak, E.

1999-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

406

Opportunities for Open Automated Demand Response in Wastewater Treatment Facilities in California - Phase II Report. San Luis Rey Wastewater Treatment Plant Case Study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

demand of 1.3 MW, with peak demand reaching 2 MW. Figure 1summer period. SDG&Es peak demand period is between 11 AMlast 10 with the highest peak demand (Coughlin 2008). Unlike

Thompson, Lisa

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

ICCS Area 2, Phase 2 Renewal Applications  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

10, 2010 10, 2010 1. When does Phase II start date? Assume July 1? Answer: Per the FOA, "Projects that are selected for Phase 2 will receive no more than a 4 month extension to Phase 1 to allow DOE and the Phase 2 Recipient(s) sufficient time to negotiate the full scope and budget for Phase 2. DOE reserves the right to award Phase 2 anytime during this 4 month period". DOE will not extend a Phase 1 project beyond September 30, 2010; therefore, it is likely that no more than a 3 month extension will be provided. Further, depending upon the positive cooperation and responsiveness of the Phase 2 Recipient, DOE will be able to make the full Phase 2 award more quickly. Any start date proposed by the Recipient is subject to negotiation with DOE if the project is selected.

408

Ponderomotive phase plate for transmission electron microscopes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A ponderomotive phase plate system and method for controllably producing highly tunable phase contrast transfer functions in a transmission electron microscope (TEM) for high resolution and biological phase contrast imaging. The system and method includes a laser source and a beam transport system to produce a focused laser crossover as a phase plate, so that a ponderomotive potential of the focused laser crossover produces a scattering-angle-dependent phase shift in the electrons of the post-sample electron beam corresponding to a desired phase contrast transfer function.

Reed, Bryan W. (Livermore, CA)

2012-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

409

Quantum gates and their coexisting geometric phases  

SciTech Connect

Geometric phases arise naturally in a variety of quantum systems with observable consequences. They also arise in quantum computations when dressed states are used in gating operations. Here we show how they arise in these gating operations and how one may take advantage of the dressed states producing them. Specifically, we show that for a given, but arbitrary Hamiltonian, and at an arbitrary time {tau}, there always exists a set of dressed states such that a given gate operation can be performed by the Hamiltonian up to a phase {phi}. The phase is a sum of a dynamical phase and a geometric phase. We illustrate the dressed phase for several systems.

Wu Lianao [Ikerbasque, Basque Foundation for Science, E-48011 Bilbao (Spain); Department of Theoretical Physics and History of Science, Basque Country University (EHU/UPV), P.O. Box 644, E-48080 Bilbao (Spain); Bishop, C. Allen [Physics Department, Southern Illinois University, Carbondale, Illinois 62901-4401 (United States); Byrd, Mark S. [Physics Department, Southern Illinois University, Carbondale, Illinois 62901-4401 (United States); Computer Science Department, Southern Illinois University, Carbondale, Illinois 62901 (United States)

2011-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

410

Phase Equilibria: On-line tutorials  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Virtual chemistry experiments showing s->l->g phase diagrams, 0, 862, Cathy Rohrer ... Binary phase diagram tutorial, 0, 947, Cathy Rohrer, 2/11/2007 2:42 PM

411

A Focus On Mixed-Phase Clouds  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The phase composition and microphysical structure of clouds define the manner in which they modulate atmospheric radiation and contribute to the hydrologic cycle. Issues regarding cloud phase partitioning and transformation come to bear directly ...

Matthew D. Shupe; John S. Daniel; Gijs de Boer; Edwin W. Eloranta; Pavlos Kollias; Edward P. Luke; Charles N. Long; David D. Turner; Johannes Verlinde

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Constructing an Optimisation Phase Using Grammatical Evolution  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Invariant Hoisting Common Subexpression Elimination Dead Code Elimination Block Reordering Current Approaches #12;Alexander/Gratton Current Approaches · Phase seqencing Loop Invariant Hoisting Common/Gratton Current Approaches · Phase seqencing Loop Invariant Hoisting Common Subexpression Elimination Dead Code

Alexander, Brad

413

Phases in Iron-Base Superalloys  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

catted by athe u and a phtiti wuz qtie di66c~~~L ... such as a, Laves, G and u phase can in- .... CT phase, with the decrease in the elongation being less sen-.

414

Edison Phase II Compute Cabinets Arrive  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Edison Phase II Compute Cabinets Arrive at NERSC Edison Phase II Compute Cabinets Arrive at NERSC June 27, 2013 by Zhengji Zhao (1 Comments) The compute cabinets were shiped to...

415

Martensitic Phase Transformations and Functional Materials  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Phase Transformation and Microstructural Evolution: Martensitic Phase ... of Bordeaux; Francisca Caballero, National Center for Metallurgical Research ... The finding challenges the conventional view that martensite always returns to ... The experimental data are explained in terms of both mechanical and chemical effects.

416

Cloud Particle Phase Determination with the AVHRR  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An accurate determination of cloud particle phase is required for the retrieval of other cloud properties from satellite and for radiative flux calculations in climate models. The physical principles underlying phase determination using the ...

Jeffrey R. Key; Janet M. Intrieri

2000-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

FUNDAMENTALS OF GAMMA TITANIUM ALUMINIDES: I: Phase ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

They are disordered solution phases: liquid, (Ti, Al), (Ti, Al), (Al); ordered intermetallic phases: 2Ti3Al, TiAl, TiAl3 and stoichiometric compounds: TiAl2, Ti2Al5.

418

Phase-Covariant Quantum Benchmarks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We give a quantum benchmark for teleportation and quantum storage experiments suited for pure and mixed test states. The benchmark is based on the average fidelity over a family of phase-covariant states and certifies that an experiment can not be emulated by a classical setup, i.e., by a measure-and-prepare scheme. We give an analytical solution for qubits, which shows important differences with standard state estimation approach, and compute the value of the benchmark for coherent and squeezed states, both pure and mixed.

Calsamiglia, J; Muoz-Tpia, R; Bagn, E

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

Phase-Covariant Quantum Benchmarks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We give a quantum benchmark for teleportation and quantum storage experiments suited for pure and mixed test states. The benchmark is based on the average fidelity over a family of phase-covariant states and certifies that an experiment can not be emulated by a classical setup, i.e., by a measure-and-prepare scheme. We give an analytical solution for qubits, which shows important differences with standard state estimation approach, and compute the value of the benchmark for coherent and squeezed states, both pure and mixed.

J. Calsamiglia; M. Aspachs; R. Munoz-Tapia; E. Bagan

2008-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

420

Vapor phase heat transport systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Vapor phase heat-transport systems are being tested in two of the passive test cells at Los Alamos. The systems consist of an active fin-and-tube solar collector and a condenser inside a water storage tank. The refrigerant, R-11, can be returned to the collector by a pump or by a self-pumping scheme. In one of the test cells the liquid was self-pumped to the roof-mounted collector 17 ft above the condenser. A mechanical valve was designed and tested that showed that the system could operate in a completely passive mode. Performance comparisons have been made with a passive water wall test cell.

Hedstrom, J.C.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tw mw phase" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Phase Transition in Reconstituted Chromatin  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

By observing reconstituted chromatin by fluorescence microscopy (FM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM), we found that the density of nucleosomes exhibits a bimodal profile, i.e., there is a large transition between the dense and dispersed states in reconstituted chromatin. Based on an analysis of the spatial distribution of nucleosome cores, we deduced an effective thermodynamic potential as a function of the nucleosome-nucleosome distance. This enabled us to interpret the folding transition of chromatin in terms of a first-order phase transition. This mechanism for the condensation of chromatin is discussed in terms of its biological significance.

Tonau Nakai; Kohji Hizume; Shige. H. Yoshimura; Kunio Takeyasu; Kenichi Yoshikawa

2004-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

422

Phase evolution in carbide dispersion strengthened nanostructured copper composite by high energy ball milling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this study, high-energy ball milling was applied to synthesis in situ nanostructured copper based composite reinforced with metal carbides. Cu, M (M=W or Ti) and graphite powder mixture were mechanically alloyed for various milling time in a planetary ball mill with composition of Cu-20vol%WC and Cu-20vol%TiC. Then the as-milled powder were compacted at 200 to 400 MPa and sintered in a vacuum furnace at 900 Degree-Sign C. The results of X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive spectroscopy analysis showed that formation of tungsten carbides (W{sub 2}C and WC phases) was observed after sintering of Cu-W-C mixture while TiC precipitated in as-milled powder of Cu-Ti-C composite after 5 h and become amorphous with longer milling. Mechanism of MA explained the cold welding and fracturing event during milling. Cu-W-C system shows fracturing event is more dominant at early stage of milling and W particle still existed after milling up to 60 h. While in Cu-Ti-C system, cold welding is more dominant and all Ti particles dissolved into Cu matrix.

Hussain, Zuhailawati; Nur Hawadah, M. S. [School of Materials and Mineral Resources Engineering, Engineering Campus, Universiti Sains Malaysia, 14300 Nibong Tebal, Penang (Malaysia)

2012-09-06T23:59:59.000Z

423

Solar thermal small power systems study, program summary report. Phase II: study results  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This Phase II Study of small solar power systems (SSPS) has been structured to determine conditions under which SSPS can be cost-effective sources of electric power in the US in the period 1985 to 2015. An extensive data base, which provides a discrete identification of all utility and industrial electric generating units up to and including 10 MW/sub e/ in rated capacity, has been prepared. This data base defines the market for which comparative evaluations are made of SSPS and alternative fossil-fueled power plants. The market penetration of SSPS is determined and the effect of economic incentives on accelerating the penetration is evaluated. The solar electric power system is evaluated as either a complete replacement for existing conventional electric power systems or as a repowering installation for boilers supplying steam to turbine-driven generators. The cost data used in the market penetration analysis are for a central receiver-type of small solar theral power system. While the market penetration discussed herein is for this type of SSPS, the sensitivity data in the report can be used to determine the market penetration of other types of solar thermal power systems (e.g., point focus distributed receiver) with different system costs.

Lapedes, D.E.; Munjal, P.K.; Sitney, L.R.

1979-07-12T23:59:59.000Z

424

Oxidation Kinetics Modeling Applying Phase Field Approach  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Oxidation Kinetics Modeling Applying Phase Field Approach ... chemical reaction rates will increase exponentially and environmental attack...

425

Black branes dual to striped phases  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We construct inhomogeneous charged black branes in AdS, holographically dual to a phase at finite chemical potential with spontaneously broken translation invariance in one direction. These are obtained numerically, solving PDEs for the fully backreacted system. Fixing the periodicity scale, we find a second order phase transition to the inhomogeneous phase. We comment on the properties of the state emerging at low temperatures. For some models we demonstrate the existence of a branch of striped solutions but no continuous phase transition.

Benjamin Withers

2013-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

426

Vapor phase modifiers for oxidative coupling  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Volatilized metal compounds retard vapor phase alkane conversion reactions in oxidative coupling processes that convert lower alkanes to higher hydrocarbons.

Warren, Barbara K. (Charleston, WV)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

Novel Stationary Phase Materials in Separation Science ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Description: The Organic Chemical Metrology Group maintains on ongoing effort to study liquid and gas chromatographic stationary phases. ...

2012-10-09T23:59:59.000Z

428

Catalyst and method for aqueous phase reactions  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention is a catalyst in the form of a plurality of porous particles wherein each particle is a support having nickel metal catalytic phase or reduced nickel deposited thereon in a first dispersed phase and an additional metal deposited onto the support in a second dispersed phase. The additional metal is effective in retarding or reducing agglomeration or sintering of the nickel metal catalytic phase without substantially affecting the catalytic activity, thereby increasing the life time of the catalyst.

Elliott, Douglas C. (Richland, WA); Hart, Todd R. (Kennewick, WA)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

QCD Phase Diagram with Imaginary Chemical Potential  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We report our recent results on the QCD phase diagram obtained from the lattice QCD simulation. The location of the phase boundary between hadronic and QGP phases in the two-flavor QCD phase diagram is investigated. The imaginary chemical potential approach is employed, which is based on Monte Carlo simulations of the QCD with imaginary chemical potential and analytic continuation to the real chemical potential region.

Nagata, Keitaro

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

Computational Thermodynamics and Phase Transformations - TMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

May 1, 2007 ... Computational Thermodynamics and Phase Transformations ... Computation also provides a powerful tool for increasing basic understanding...

431

MHD seed recovery/regeneration, Phase 2  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Task I calls for the design, procurement, construction, and installation of the Seed Regeneration Proof-of-Concept Facility (SRPF) that will produce tonnage quantities of recyclable potassium formate seed at a design rate of 250 lb/hr for testing in the channel at the CDIF while collecting data that will be used to upgrade the design of a 300 MW[sub t] system. Approximately 12 tons of KCOOH (dry basis) as 70--75 wt % solution have been produced. The long-term plant securing operations which were started in May were completed during this reporting period. Securing operations included both the front end of the plant (potassium sulfate reaction and solids separation/washing units) and the evaporator/crystallizer. In addition, weekly preventative maintenance was performed. TRW is awaiting word from the CDIF in Montana that it is alright to ship the 41 drums of concentrated potassium formate final product to Montana.

Not Available

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

POSTPEROVSKITE PHASE TRANSITION AND ITS GEOPHYSICAL IMPLICATIONS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the experimental and theoretical studies, phase transitions from perovskite to postperovskite have been reported so. Crystal structure of the postperovskite phase projected along [001], [100], and [010] directions. [2004] and Tsuchiya et al. [2004b]. [23] The high-P-T phase diagram of MgSiO3 was also investigated

Jellinek, Mark

433

Exhaustive Optimization Phase Order Space Exploration  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The phase-ordering problem is a long standing issue for compiler writers. Most optimizing compilers typically have numerous different code-improving phases, many of which can be applied in any order. These phases interact by enabling or disabling opportunities ...

Prasad A. Kulkarni; David B. Whalley; Gary S. Tyson; Jack W. Davidson

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

8, 1175511819, 2008 mixed-phase Arctic  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, process of ice phase initiation due to freezing of25 supercooled water in both saturatedACPD 8, 11755­11819, 2008 Simulating mixed-phase Arctic stratus clouds I. Sednev et al. Title Page.0 License. Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics Discussions Simulating mixed-phase Arctic stratus clouds

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

435

Gyroid Phase in Nuclear Pasta  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nuclear matter is considered to be inhomogeneous at subnuclear densities that are realized in supernova cores and neutron star crusts, and the structures of nuclear matter change from spheres to cylinders, slabs, cylindrical holes and spherical holes as the density increases. In this letter, we discuss other possible structures, that is, gyroid and double-diamond morphologies, which are periodic bicontinuous structures discovered in a block copolymer. Utilizing the compressible liquid drop model, we evaluate their surface and Coulomb energies and show that there is a chance of gyroid appearance near the transition point from a cylinder to a slab. This interesting analogy between nuclear and polymer systems is not merely qualitative. The volume fraction at the phase transition is also similar for the two systems. Although the five shapes listed initially have been long thought to be the only major constituents of so-called nuclear pasta at subnuclear densities, our findings imply that this may not be the case and suggest that more detailed studies on nuclear pasta including the gyroid phase are needed.

Ken'ichiro Nakazato; Kazuhiro Oyamatsu; Shoichi Yamada

2009-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

436

Chaotic eigenfunctions in phase space  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study individual eigenstates of quantized area-preserving maps on the 2-torus which are classically chaotic. In order to analyze their semiclassical behavior, we use the Bargmann-Husimi representations for quantum states, as well as their stellar parametrization, which encodes states through a minimal set of points in phase space (the constellation of zeros of the Husimi density). We rigorously prove that a semiclassical uniform distribution of Husimi densities on the torus entails a similar equidistribution for the corresponding constellations. We deduce from this property a universal behavior for the phase patterns of chaotic Bargmann eigenfunctions, which reminds of the WKB approximation for eigenstates of integrable systems (though in a weaker sense). In order to obtain more precise information on ``chaotic eigenconstellations", we then model their properties by ensembles of random states, generalizing former results on the 2-sphere to the torus geometry. This approach yields statistical predictions for the constellations, which fit quite well the chaotic data. We finally observe that specific dynamical information, e.g. the presence of high peaks (like scars) in Husimi densities, can be recovered from the knowledge of a few long-wavelength Fourier coefficients, which therefore appear as valuable order parameters at the level of individual chaotic eigenfunctions.

S. Nonnenmacher; A. Voros

1997-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

437

Three phase AC motor controller  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A motor controller for a three phase AC motor (10) which is adapted to operate bidirectionally from signals received either from a computer (30) or a manual control (32). The controller is comprised of digital logic circuit means which implement a forward and reverse command signal channel (27, 29) for the application of power through the forward and reverse power switching relays (16, 18, 20, 22). The digital logic elements are cross coupled to prevent activation of both channels simultaneously and each includes a plugging circuit (65, 67) for stopping the motor upon the removal of control signal applied to one of the two channels (27, 29) for a direction of rotation desired. Each plugging circuit (65, 67) includes a one-shot pulse signal generator (88, 102) which outputs a single pulse signal of predetermined pulsewidth which is adapted to inhibit further operation of the application of power in the channel which is being activated and to apply a reversal command signal to the other channel which provides a reversed phase application of power to the motor for a period defined by the pulse-width output of the one-shot signal generator to plug the motor (10) which will then be inoperative until another rotational command signal is applied to either of the two channels.

Vuckovich, Michael (Elizabeth, PA); Wright, Maynard K. (Bethel Park, PA); Burkett, John P. (South Huntington Township, Westmoreland County, PA)

1984-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

438

Browse wiki | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

6,000,000 mW, 6.0e-6 GW, 6.0e-9 TW, 6.0e-12 PW, 6.0e-15 EW, 6.0e-18 ZW) + Engine Type Inverter + Organizations Aisin Seiki + Technology Internal Combustion Engine + Categories...

439

Browse wiki | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

mW, 6.0e-5 GW, 6.0e-8 TW, 6.0e-11 PW, 6.0e-14 EW, 6.0e-17 ZW) + Engine Type Inverter + Organizations Coast Intelligen + Technology Internal Combustion Engine + Categories...

440

Browse wiki | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

mW, 2.0e-4 GW, 2.0e-7 TW, 2.0e-10 PW, 2.0e-13 EW, 2.0e-16 ZW) + Engine Type Inverter + Organizations Caterpillar + Technology Internal Combustion Engine + Categories...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tw mw phase" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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441

Stripe Dynamics, Global Phase Ordering and Quantum  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

By modeling the stripe phase in cuprates as spin gapped stripes coupled to the RVB liquid of preformed electron pairs, I derive the low energy effective theory of the RVB phase variable. It is found that the effect of stripe dynamics (including both longitudinal and transverse modes) leads to incipient temporal phase stiffness in the RVB liquid, which tunes a quantum phase transition toward a superconducting ground state with global phase order. Physical consequences of this quantum criticality are discussed. Typeset using REVTEX 1 I.

Criticality High; Tc Superconductors; Wenjun Zheng

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

Yellowstone Caldera Geothermal Region | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Yellowstone Caldera Geothermal Region Yellowstone Caldera Geothermal Region Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Yellowstone Caldera Geothermal Region Details Areas (3) Power Plants (0) Projects (0) Techniques (25) Map: {{{Name}}} Replace Citation[1] References ↑ "Replace Citation" Geothermal Region Data State(s) Wyoming, Idaho, Montana Area 11,841 km²11,841,000,000 m² 4,570.626 mi² 127,455,339,900 ft² 14,161,836,000 yd² 2,925,970.305 acres USGS Resource Estimate for this Region Identified Mean Potential 44.0 MW44,000 kW 44,000,000 W 44,000,000,000 mW 0.044 GW 4.4e-5 TW Undiscovered Mean Potential 209.9 MW209,900 kW 209,900,000 W 209,900,000,000 mW 0.21 GW 2.099e-4 TW Planned Capacity Planned Capacity 0 MW0 kW 0 W 0 mW 0 GW 0 TW Plants Included in Planned Estimate 0 Plants with Unknown

443

Hawaii Geothermal Region | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geothermal Region Geothermal Region Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Hawaii Geothermal Region Details Areas (16) Power Plants (1) Projects (2) Techniques (0) References Geothermal Region Data State(s) Hawaii Area 28,311 km²28,311,000,000 m² 10,928.046 mi² 304,736,772,900 ft² 33,859,956,000 yd² 6,995,789.655 acres USGS Resource Estimate for this Region Identified Mean Potential 181 MW181,000 kW 181,000,000 W 181,000,000,000 mW 0.181 GW 1.81e-4 TW Undiscovered Mean Potential 2,435 MW2,435,000 kW 2,435,000,000 W 2,435,000,000,000 mW 2.435 GW 0.00244 TW Planned Capacity Planned Capacity 50 MW50,000 kW 50,000,000 W 50,000,000,000 mW 0.05 GW 5.0e-5 TW Plants Included in Planned Estimate 1 Plants with Unknown Planned Capacity 0 Geothermal Areas within the Hawaii Geothermal Region

444

November 2004 Phase 2 Progress Report  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

06 Phase 2 Progress Report: 06 Phase 2 Progress Report: 100kW LOW COST ENERGY STORAGE INVERTER Larry Rinehart Managing Director Rinehart Motion Systems, LLC This work is sponsored by US Department of Energy Grant DE-FG02- 03ER83768 Technical support and management provided by Sandia Labs R S M TM Rinehart Motion Systems, LLC 4/8/2010 DOE Grant DE-FG02-03ER83768 2 Background Rinehart Motion completed Phase 1 R&D activities July 2003 thru April 2004 * In Phase 1 we worked on the Inverter hardware, substantially reducing the size and cost of future Inverters Phase 2 activities began in July 2004 and were scheduled to end June 2006 (a 9 month no-cost extension has been granted) * Phase 2 work is focused on the Inverter / PCS system design The Phase 2 work plan includes: * Determine the scalability boundaries of the technology. Target down

445

Electric field controlled emulsion phase contactor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A system for contacting liquid phases comprising a column for transporting a liquid phase contacting system, the column having upper and lower regions. The upper region has a nozzle for introducing a dispersed phase and means for applying thereto a vertically oriented high intensity pulsed electric field. This electric field allows improved flow rates while shattering the dispersed phase into many micro-droplets upon exiting the nozzle to form a dispersion within a continuous phase. The lower region employs means for applying to the dispersed phase a horizontally oriented high intensity pulsed electric field so that the dispersed phase undergoes continuous coalescence and redispersion while being urged from side to side as it progresses through the system, increasing greatly the mass transfer opportunity.

Scott, Timothy C. (Knoxville, TN)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

Shaping the Phase of a Single Photon  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

While the phase of a coherent light field can be precisely known, the phase of the individual photons that create this field, considered individually, cannot. Phase changes within single-photon wave packets, however, have observable effects. In fact, actively controlling the phase of individual photons has been identified as a powerful resource for quantum communication protocols. Here we demonstrate the arbitrary phase control of a single photon. The phase modulation is applied without affecting the photon's amplitude profile and is verified via a two-photon quantum interference measurement, which can result in the fermionic spatial behaviour of photon pairs. Combined with previously demonstrated control of a single photon's amplitude, frequency, and polarisation, the fully deterministic phase shaping presented here allows for the complete control of single-photon wave packets.

H. P. Specht; J. Bochmann; M. Muecke; B. Weber; E. Figueroa; D. L. Moehring; G. Rempe

2009-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

447

Electric field controlled emulsion phase contactor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A system is described for contacting liquid phases comprising a column for transporting a liquid phase contacting system, the column having upper and lower regions. The upper region has a nozzle for introducing a dispersed phase and means for applying thereto a vertically oriented high intensity pulsed electric field. This electric field allows improved flow rates while shattering the dispersed phase into many micro-droplets upon exiting the nozzle to form a dispersion within a continuous phase. The lower region employs means for applying to the dispersed phase a horizontally oriented high intensity pulsed electric field so that the dispersed phase undergoes continuous coalescence and redispersion while being urged from side to side as it progresses through the system, increasing greatly the mass transfer opportunity. 5 figs.

Scott, T.C.

1995-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

448

On a phase field model for solid-liquid phase transitions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

distinct phases. This is the case for solid-liquid mix- tures (e.g. ice-water or alloys duringOn a phase field model for solid-liquid phase transitions S. Benzoni-Gavage , L. Chupin , D. Jamet , and J. Vovelle December 3, 2010 Contents 1 Introduction 2 2 Phase field equations 3 2.1 Derivation

449

Phase I Final Technical Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Final Report to Final Report to Phase I Final Technical Report 10121.4302.01.Final1 Ultra-High Conductivity Umbilicals: Polymer Nanotube Umbilicals (PNUs) 10121-4302-01 June 24, 2013 Christopher A. Dyke Principal Investigator NanoRidge Materials, Inc. 15850 Vickery Drive Houston, Texas 77032 LEGAL NOTICE THIS REPORT WAS PREPARED BY NANORIDGE MATERIALS, INC. AS AN ACCOUNT OF WORK SPONSORED BY THE RESEARCH PARTNERSHIP TO SECURE ENERGY FOR AMERICA, RPSEA. NEITHER RPSEA MEMBERS OF RPSEA, THE NATIONAL ENERGY TECHNOLOGY LABORATORY, THE U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY, NOR ANY PERSON ACTING ON BEHALF OF ANY OF THE ENTITIES: a. MAKES ANY WARRANTY OR REPRESENTATION, EXPRESS OR IMPLIED WITH RESPECT TO ACCURACY, COMPLETENESS, OR USEFULNESS OF THE INFORMATION

450

40-MW(E) PROTOTYPE HIGH-TEMPERATURE GAS-COOLED REACTOR RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT PROGRAM. Summary Report for the Period January 1, 1959-December 31, 1959 and Quarterly Progress Report for the Period October 1, 1959-December 31, 1959  

SciTech Connect

The HTGR prototype plant (Peach Bottom Power Reactor) is being designed to produce steam at l450 psi and 1000 deg F and to have a net capacity of 40 Mw(e). The fuel temperatures and gas pressures will be approximately the same as those required for larger plants. The reactor data and operating conditions for the graphite-clad core are given. The reactor and primary coolant systems are described. The prospects for development of the graphite-clad fuel element in time for use in the first loading of the reactor were improved by important advances in methods of fabrication and testing of both fuel compacts and graphite sleeves. The hot-pressing process for making fuel compacts was used successfully to make full-size compacts with a uniform distribution of ThC/sub 2/- UC/sub 2/ particles. Three irradiation capsules were fabricated and inserted in a test reactor to determine fuel compact and sleeve performance under HTGR conditions of irradiation and temperature. Two of these ran satisfactorily for the scheduled