National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for turbulence velocity wave

  1. wave velocity group velocity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walker, D. Greg

    -11 3.5e-11 4e-11 4.5e-11 5e-11 400 500 600 700 800 900 1000 location(nm) temperature(K) wave location 15 20 25 0 2 4 6 8 10 12 numberdensity(a.u.) frequency (THz) Summary Model Simulation Results Context. - Seitz and Koehler (1956) solve Boltzmann transport equations Monte Carlo approach is used to· 90 100 3e

  2. Wave turbulent statistics in non-weak wave turbulence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Naoto Yokoyama

    2011-05-08

    In wave turbulence, it has been believed that statistical properties are well described by the weak turbulence theory, in which nonlinear interactions among wavenumbers are assumed to be small. In the weak turbulence theory, separation of linear and nonlinear time scales derived from the weak nonlinearity is also assumed. However, the separation of the time scales is often violated even in weak turbulent systems where the nonlinear interactions are actually weak. To get rid of this inconsistency, closed equations are derived without assuming the separation of the time scales in accordance with Direct-Interaction Approximation (DIA), which has been successfully applied to Navier--Stokes turbulence. The kinetic equation of the weak turbulence theory is recovered from the DIA equations if the weak nonlinearity is assumed as an additional assumption. It suggests that the DIA equations is a natural extension of the conventional kinetic equation to not-necessarily-weak wave turbulence.

  3. Wave Decay in MHD Turbulence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andrey Beresnyak; Alex Lazarian

    2008-05-06

    We present a model for nonlinear decay of the weak wave in three-dimensional incompressible magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence. We show that the decay rate is different for parallel and perpendicular waves. We provide a general formula for arbitrarily directed waves and discuss particular limiting cases known in the literature. We test our predictions with direct numerical simulations of wave decay in three-dimensional MHD turbulence, and discuss the influence of turbulent damping on the development of linear instabilities in the interstellar medium and on other important astrophysical processes.

  4. Wave turbulence served up on a plate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pablo Cobelli; Philippe Petitjeans; Agnes Maurel; Vincent Pagneux; Nicolas Mordant

    2009-10-28

    Wave turbulence in a thin elastic plate is experimentally investigated. By using a Fourier transform profilometry technique, the deformation field of the plate surface is measured simultaneously in time and space. This enables us to compute the wavevector-frequency Fourier ($\\mathbf k, \\omega$) spectrum of the full space-time deformation velocity. In the 3D ($\\mathbf k, \\omega$) space, we show that the energy of the motion is concentrated on a 2D surface that represents a nonlinear dispersion relation. This nonlinear dispersion relation is close to the linear dispersion relation. This validates the usual wavenumber-frequency change of variables used in many experimental studies of wave turbulence. The deviation from the linear dispersion, which increases with the input power of the forcing, is attributed to weak non linear effects. Our technique opens the way for many new extensive quantitative comparisons between theory and experiments of wave turbulence.

  5. Fossil turbulence and fossil turbulence waves can be dangerous

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carl H Gibson

    2012-11-25

    Turbulence is defined as an eddy-like state of fluid motion where the inertial-vortex forces of the eddies are larger than any other forces that tend to damp the eddies out. By this definition, turbulence always cascades from small scales where vorticity is created to larger scales where turbulence fossilizes. Fossil turbulence is any perturbation in a hydrophysical field produced by turbulence that persists after the fluid is no longer turbulent at the scale of the perturbation. Fossil turbulence patterns and fossil turbulence waves preserve and propagate energy and information about previous turbulence. Ignorance of fossil turbulence properties can be dangerous. Examples include the Osama bin Laden helicopter crash and the Air France 447 Airbus crash, both unfairly blamed on the pilots. Observations support the proposed definitions, and suggest even direct numerical simulations of turbulence require caution.

  6. Wave VelocityWave Velocity Diff t f ti l l itDifferent from particle velocity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yoo, S. J. Ben

    Wave VelocityWave Velocity v=/T =f Diff t f ti l l itDifferent from particle velocity Depends on the medium in which the wave travelsDepends on the medium in which the wave travels stringaonvelocity F v of Waves11-8. Types of Waves Transverse wave Longitudinal wave Liu UCD Phy1B 2014 37 #12;Sound Wave

  7. Turbulent round jet under gravity waves 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ryu, Yong Uk

    2002-01-01

    The behavior of a neutrally buoyant horizontal turbulent round jet under a wavy environment was investigated. Progressive waves with different wave amplitudes in an intermediate water depth were used. The Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) technique...

  8. Wave turbulence buildup in a vibrating plate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Auliel, Maria Ines; Mordant, Nicolas

    2015-01-01

    We report experimental and numerical results on the buildup of the energy spectrum in wave turbulence of a vibrating thin elastic plate. Three steps are observed: first a short linear stage, then the turbulent spectrum is constructed by the propagation of a front in wave number space and finally a long time saturation due to the action of dissipation. The propagation of a front at the second step is compatible with scaling predictions from the Weak Turbulence Theory.

  9. Laminated Wave Turbulence: Generic Algorithms I

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    E. Kartashova; A. Kartashov

    2006-09-07

    The model of laminated wave turbulence presented recently unites both types of turbulent wave systems - statistical wave turbulence (introduced by Kolmogorov and brought to the present form by numerous works of Zakharov and his scientific school since nineteen sixties) and discrete wave turbulence (developed in the works of Kartashova in nineteen nineties). The main new feature described by this model is the following: discrete effects do appear not only in the long-wave part of the spectral domain (corresponding to small wave numbers) but all through the spectra thus putting forth a novel problem - construction of fast algorithms for computations in integers of order $10^{12}$ and more. In this paper we present a generic algorithm for polynomial dispersion functions and illustrate it by application to gravity and planetary waves.

  10. Edge Turbulence Velocity Changes with Lithium Coating on NSTX

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cao, A.; Zweben, S. J.; Stotler, D. P.; Bell, M.; Diallo, A.; Kaye, S. M.; LeBlanc, B.

    2012-08-10

    Lithium coating improves energy confinement and eliminates edge localized modes in NSTX, but the mechanism of this improvement is not yet well understood. We used the gas-puff-imaging (GPI) diagnostic on NSTX to measure the changes in edge turbulence which occurred during a scan with variable lithium wall coating, in order to help understand the reason for the confinement improvement with lithium. There was a small increase in the edge turbulence poloidal velocity and a decrease in the poloidal velocity fluctuation level with increased lithium. The possible effect of varying edge neutral density on turbulence damping was evaluated for these cases in NSTX. __________________________________________________

  11. Wave Packets and Turbulent Peter Jordan1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dabiri, John O.

    Wave Packets and Turbulent Jet Noise Peter Jordan1 and Tim Colonius2 1 D´epartement Fluides-control efforts is incomplete. Wave packets are intermittent, advecting disturbances that are correlated over review evidence of the existence, energetics, dynamics, and acous- tic efficiency of wave packets. We

  12. Aspects of wave turbulence in preheating

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Crespo, José A.; De Oliveira, H.P., E-mail: jaacrespo@gmail.com, E-mail: oliveira@dft.if.uerj.br [Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro, Instituto de Física - Departamento de Física Teórica, Rio de Janeiro, RJ, CEP 20550-013 Brazil. (Brazil)

    2014-06-01

    In this work we have studied the nonlinear preheating dynamics of several inflationary models. It is well established that after a linear stage of preheating characterized by the parametric resonance, the nonlinear dynamics becomes relevant driving the system towards turbulence. Wave turbulence is the appropriated description of this phase since the matter contents are fields instead of usual fluids. Turbulence develops due to the nonlinear interations of waves, here represented by the small inhomogeneities of the scalar fields. We present relevant aspects of wave turbulence such as the Kolmogorov-Zakharov spectrum in frequency and wave number that indicates the energy transfer through scales. From the power spectrum of the matter energy density we were able to estimate the temperature of the thermalized system.

  13. Multifractal statistics of Lagrangian velocity and acceleration in turbulence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    L. Biferale; G. Boffetta; A. Celani; B. J. Devenish; A. Lanotte; F. Toschi

    2004-03-11

    The statistical properties of velocity and acceleration fields along the trajectories of fluid particles transported by a fully developed turbulent flow are investigated by means of high resolution direct numerical simulations. We present results for Lagrangian velocity structure functions, the acceleration probability density function and the acceleration variance conditioned on the instantaneous velocity. These are compared with predictions of the multifractal formalism and its merits and limitations are discussed.

  14. Measurement of turbulent wind velocities using a rotating boom apparatus

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sandborn, V.A.; Connell, J.R.

    1984-04-01

    The present report covers both the development of a rotating-boom facility and the evaluation of the spectral energy of the turbulence measured relative to the rotating boom. The rotating boom is composed of a helicopter blade driven through a pulley speed reducer by a variable speed motor. The boom is mounted on a semiportable tower that can be raised to provide various ratios of hub height to rotor diameter. The boom can be mounted to rotate in either the vertical or horizontal plane. Probes that measure the three components of turbulence can be mounted at any location along the radius of the boom. Special hot-film sensors measured two components of the turbulence at a point directly in front of the rotating blade. By using the probe rotated 90/sup 0/ about its axis, the third turbulent velocity component was measured. Evaluation of the spectral energy distributions for the three components of velocity indicates a large concentration of energy at the rotational frequency. At frequencies slightly below the rotational frequency, the spectral energy is greatly reduced over that measured for the nonrotating case measurements. Peaks in the energy at frequencies that are multiples of the rotation frequency were also observed. We conclude that the rotating boom apparatus is suitable and ready to be used in experiments for developing and testing sensors for rotational measurement of wind velocity from wind turbine rotors. It also can be used to accurately measure turbulent wind for testing theories of rotationally sampled wind velocity.

  15. Proton Heating in Solar Wind Compressible Turbulence with Collisions between Counter-propagating Waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    He, Jiansen; Marsch, Eckart; Chen, Christopher H K; Wang, Linghua; Pei, Zhongtian; Zhang, Lei; Salem, Chadi S; Bale, Stuart D

    2015-01-01

    Magnetohydronamic turbulence is believed to play a crucial role in heating the laboratorial, space, and astrophysical plasmas. However, the precise connection between the turbulent fluctuations and the particle kinetics has not yet been established. Here we present clear evidence of plasma turbulence heating based on diagnosed wave features and proton velocity distributions from solar wind measurements by the Wind spacecraft. For the first time, we can report the simultaneous observation of counter-propagating magnetohydrodynamic waves in the solar wind turbulence. Different from the traditional paradigm with counter-propagating Alfv\\'en waves, anti-sunward Alfv\\'en waves (AWs) are encountered by sunward slow magnetosonic waves (SMWs) in this new type of solar wind compressible turbulence. The counter-propagating AWs and SWs correspond respectively to the dominant and sub-dominant populations of the imbalanced Els\\"asser variables. Nonlinear interactions between the AWs and SMWs are inferred from the non-orth...

  16. Toward Understanding and Modeling Compressibility Effects on Velocity Gradients in Turbulence 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Suman, Sawan

    2011-02-22

    Development of improved turbulence closure models for compressible fluid flow simulations requires better understanding of the effects of compressibility on various underlying processes of turbulence. Fundamental studies of turbulent velocity...

  17. Discrete wave turbulence of rotational capillary water waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adrian Constantin; Elena Kartashova; Erik Wahlén

    2010-05-12

    We study the discrete wave turbulent regime of capillary water waves with constant non-zero vorticity. The explicit Hamiltonian formulation and the corresponding coupling coefficient are obtained. We also present the construction and investigation of resonance clustering. Some physical implications of the obtained results are discussed.

  18. Simultaneous temperature and velocity Lagrangian measurements in turbulent thermal convection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liot, O; Zonta, F; Chibbaro, S; Coudarchet, T; Gasteuil, Y; Pinton, J -F; Salort, J; Chillà, F

    2015-01-01

    We report joint Lagrangian velocity and temperature measurements in turbulent thermal convection. Measurements are performed using an improved version (extended autonomy) of the neutrally-buoyant instrumented particle that was used by to performed experiments in a parallelepipedic Rayleigh-Benard cell. The temperature signal is obtained from a RFtransmitter. Simultaneously, we determine particle's position and velocity with one camera, which grants access to the Lagrangian heat flux. Due to the extended autonomy of the present particle, we obtain well converged temperature and velocity statistics, as well as pseudo-eulerian maps of velocity and heat flux. Present experimental results have also been compared with the results obtained by a corresponding campaign of Direct Numerical Simulations and Lagrangian Tracking of massless tracers. The comparison between experimental and numerical results show the accuracy and reliability of our experimental measurements. Finally, the analysis of lagrangian velocity and t...

  19. Contribution of small scale turbulence to burning velocity of flamelets in the thin reaction zone regime

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gülder, Ömer L.

    Contribution of small scale turbulence to burning velocity of flamelets in the thin reaction zone the turbulent burning velocity under the conditions corresponding to the thin reaction zones regime. Approaches turbulence on flam- elet burning velocity. An expression was derived to estimate the contribution of flame

  20. Laminated Wave Turbulence: Generic Algorithms II

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Elena Kartashova; Alexey Kartashov

    2006-11-17

    The model of laminated wave turbulence puts forth a novel computational problem - construction of fast algorithms for finding exact solutions of Diophantine equations in integers of order $10^{12}$ and more. The equations to be solved in integers are resonant conditions for nonlinearly interacting waves and their form is defined by the wave dispersion. It is established that for the most common dispersion as an arbitrary function of a wave-vector length two different generic algorithms are necessary: (1) one-class-case algorithm for waves interacting through scales, and (2) two-class-case algorithm for waves interacting through phases. In our previous paper we described the one-class-case generic algorithm and in our present paper we present the two-class-case generic algorithm.

  1. Wave Turbulence in Superfluid 4 Energy Cascades, Rogue Waves & Kinetic Phenomena

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fominov, Yakov

    Outline Wave Turbulence in Superfluid 4 He: Energy Cascades, Rogue Waves & Kinetic Phenomena Conference, Chernogolovka, 3 August 2009 McClintock Efimov Ganshin Kolmakov Mezhov-Deglin Wave Turbulence in Superfluid 4 He #12;Outline Outline 1 Introduction Motivation 2 Modelling wave turbulence Need for models

  2. Turbulent Convection in Stellar Interiors. II. The Velocity Field

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    David Arnett; Casey Meakin; P. A. Young

    2008-11-25

    We analyze stellar convection with the aid of 3D hydrodynamic simulations, introducing the turbulent cascade into our theoretical analysis. We devise closures of the Reynolds-decomposed mean field equations by simple physical modeling of the simulations (we relate temperature and density fluctuations via coefficients); the procedure (CABS, Convection Algorithms Based on Simulations) is terrestrially testable and is amenable to systematic improvement. We develop a turbulent kinetic energy equation which contains both nonlocal and time dependent terms, and is appropriate if the convective transit time is shorter than the evolutionary time scale. The interpretation of mixing-length theory (MLT) as generally used in astrophysics is incorrect; MLT forces the mixing length to be an imposed constant. Direct tests show that the damping associated with the flow is that suggested by Kolmogorov. The eddy size is approximately the depth of the convection zone, and this dissipation length corresponds to the "mixing length". New terms involving local heating by turbulent dissipation should appear in the stellar evolution equations. The enthalpy flux ("convective luminosity") is directly connected to the buoyant acceleration, and hence the velocity scale. MLT tends to systematically underestimate this velocity scale. Quantitative comparison with a variety of 3D simulations reveals a previously recognized consistency. Examples of application to stellar evolution will be presented in subsequent papers in this series.

  3. Cloud-Scale Vertical Velocity and Turbulent Dissipation Rate Retrievals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shupe, Matthew

    2013-05-22

    Time-height fields of retrieved in-cloud vertical wind velocity and turbulent dissipation rate, both retrieved primarily from vertically-pointing, Ka-band cloud radar measurements. Files are available for manually-selected, stratiform, mixed-phase cloud cases observed at the North Slope of Alaska (NSA) site during periods covering the Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment (MPACE, late September through early November 2004) and the Indirect and Semi-Direct Aerosol Campaign (ISDAC, April-early May 2008). These time periods will be expanded in a future submission.

  4. Cloud-Scale Vertical Velocity and Turbulent Dissipation Rate Retrievals

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Shupe, Matthew

    Time-height fields of retrieved in-cloud vertical wind velocity and turbulent dissipation rate, both retrieved primarily from vertically-pointing, Ka-band cloud radar measurements. Files are available for manually-selected, stratiform, mixed-phase cloud cases observed at the North Slope of Alaska (NSA) site during periods covering the Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment (MPACE, late September through early November 2004) and the Indirect and Semi-Direct Aerosol Campaign (ISDAC, April-early May 2008). These time periods will be expanded in a future submission.

  5. Gravity Wave Turbulence in Wave Tanks: Space and Time Statistics Sergei Lukaschuk,1,* Sergey Nazarenko,2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nazarenko, Sergey

    Gravity Wave Turbulence in Wave Tanks: Space and Time Statistics Sergei Lukaschuk,1,* Sergey the first simultaneous space-time measurements for gravity wave turbulence in a large laboratory flume. We found that the slopes of k and ! wave spectra depend on wave intensity. This cannot be explained by any

  6. Laminated Wave Turbulence: Generic Algorithms III

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Elena Kartashova; Alexey Kartashov

    2007-01-11

    Model of laminated wave turbulence allows to study statistical and discrete layers of turbulence in the frame of the same model. Statistical layer is described by Zakharov-Kolmogorov energy spectra in the case of irrational enough dispersion function. Discrete layer is covered by some system(s) of Diophantine equations while their form is determined by wave dispersion function. This presents a very special computational challenge - to solve Diophantine equations in many variables, usually 6 to 8, in high degrees, say 16, in integers of order $10^{16}$ and more. Generic algorithms for solving this problem in the case of {\\it irrational} dispersion function have been presented in our previous papers. In this paper we present a new generic algorithm for the case of {\\it rational} dispersion functions. Special importance of this case is due to the fact that in wave systems with rational dispersion the statistical layer does not exist and the general energy transport is governed by the discrete layer alone.

  7. Elastic wave-turbulence and intermittency

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chibbaro, Sergio

    2015-01-01

    Weak Wave Turbulence is a powerful theory to predict statistical observables of diverse relevant physical phenomena, such as ocean waves, magnetohydrodynamics and nonlinear optics. The theory is based upon an asymptotic closure permitted in the limit of small nonlinearity. Here, we explore the possible deviations from this mean-field framework, in terms of anomalous scaling, focusing on the case of elastic plates. We establish the picture of the possible behaviors at varying the extent of nonlinearity, and we show that the mean-field theory is appropriate when all excited scales remain dominated by linear dynamics. The other picture is non-trivial and our results suggest that, when large scales contain much energy, the cascade sustains extreme events at small scales and the system displays intermittency.

  8. Fluctuations of energy flux in wave turbulence Eric Falcon,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Falcon, Eric

    Fluctuations of energy flux in wave turbulence ´Eric Falcon,1 S´ebastien Auma^itre,2 Claudio Falc gravity and capillary wave turbulence in a statistically stationary regime displays fluctuations much interactions transfer kinetic energy toward small scales where viscous dissipation takes place

  9. Toward a wave turbulence formulation of statistical nonlinear optics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Garnier, Josselin

    Toward a wave turbulence formulation of statistical nonlinear optics Josselin Garnier,1, * Mietek optical waves have been reported in the literature. This article is aimed at providing a generalized wave, the process of optical wave thermalization to thermo- dynamic equilibrium, which slows down significantly

  10. Wave-Turbulence Interactions in a Breaking Mountain Wave Craig Epifanio and Tingting Qian

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    #12;Dissipation of Mean Wave Energy · Mean wave energy E is just the total energy (kinetic + available · The dissipation of mean wave energy is caused by the turbulent momentum fluxes--specifically, by their tendency

  11. Study of Nonlinear Interaction and Turbulence of Alfven Waves in LAPD Experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boldyrev, Stanislav; Perez, Jean Carlos

    2013-11-29

    The complete project had two major goals — investigate MHD turbulence generated by counterpropagating Alfven modes, and study such processes in the LAPD device. In order to study MHD turbulence in numerical simulations, two codes have been used: full MHD, and reduced MHD developed specialy for this project. Quantitative numerical results are obtained through high-resolution simulations of strong MHD turbulence, performed through the 2010 DOE INCITE allocation. We addressed the questions of the spectrum of turbulence, its universality, and the value of the so-called Kolmogorov constant (the normalization coefficient of the spectrum). In these simulations we measured with unprecedented accuracy the energy spectra of magnetic and velocity fluctuations. We also studied the so-called residual energy, that is, the difference between kinetic and magnetic energies in turbulent fluctuations. In our analytic work we explained generation of residual energy in weak MHD turbulence, in the process of random collisions of counterpropagating Alfven waves. We then generalized these results for the case of strong MHD turbulence. The developed model explained generation of residual energy is strong MHD turbulence, and verified the results in numerical simulations. We then analyzed the imbalanced case, where more Alfven waves propagate in one direction. We found that spectral properties of the residual energy are similar for both balanced and imbalanced cases. We then compared strong MHD turbulence observed in the solar wind with turbulence generated in numerical simulations. Nonlinear interaction of Alfv´en waves has been studied in the upgraded Large Plasma Device (LAPD). We have simulated the collision of the Alfven modes in the settings close to the experiment. We have created a train of wave packets with the apltitudes closed to those observed n the experiment, and allowed them to collide. We then saw the generation of the second harmonic, resembling that observed in the experiment.

  12. Wave turbulence revisited: Where does the energy flow?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    L. V. Abdurakhimov; I. A. Remizov; A. A. Levchenko; G. V. Kolmakov; Y. V. Lvov

    2014-04-03

    Turbulence in a system of nonlinearly interacting waves is referred to as wave turbulence. It has been known since seminal work by Kolmogorov, that turbulent dynamics is controlled by a directional energy flux through the wavelength scales. We demonstrate that an energy cascade in wave turbulence can be bi-directional, that is, can simultaneously flow towards large and small wavelength scales from the pumping scales at which it is injected. This observation is in sharp contrast to existing experiments and wave turbulence theory where the energy flux only flows in one direction. We demonstrate that the bi-directional energy cascade changes the energy budget in the system and leads to formation of large-scale, large-amplitude waves similar to oceanic rogue waves. To study surface wave turbulence, we took advantage of capillary waves on a free, weakly charged surface of superfluid helium He-II at temperature 1.7K. Although He-II demonstrates non-classical thermomechanical effects and quantized vorticity, waves on its surface are identical to those on a classical Newtonian fluid with extremely low viscosity. The possibility of directly driving a charged surface by an oscillating electric field and the low viscosity of He-II have allowed us to isolate the surface dynamics and study nonlinear surface waves in a range of frequencies much wider than in experiments with classical fluids.

  13. Internal wave energy radiated from a turbulent mixed layer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Munroe, James R.; Sutherland, Bruce R.

    2014-09-15

    We examine mixed-layer deepening and the generation of internal waves in stratified fluid resulting from turbulence that develops in response to an applied surface stress. In laboratory experiments the stress is applied over the breadth of a finite-length tank by a moving roughened conveyor belt. The turbulence in the shear layer is characterized using particle image velocimetry to measure the kinetic energy density. The internal waves are measured using synthetic schlieren to determine their amplitudes, frequencies, and energy density. We also perform fully nonlinear numerical simulations restricted to two dimensions but in a horizontally periodic domain. These clearly demonstrate that internal waves are generated by transient eddies at the integral length scale of turbulence and which translate with the background shear along the base of the mixed layer. In both experiments and simulations we find that the energy density of the generated waves is 1%–3% of the turbulent kinetic energy density of the turbulent layer.

  14. Soliton Turbulence in Shallow Water Ocean Surface Waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Costa, Andrea; Resio, Donald T; Alessio, Silvia; Chrivì, Elisabetta; Saggese, Enrica; Bellomo, Katinka; Long, Chuck E

    2014-01-01

    We analyze shallow water wind waves in Currituck Sound, North Carolina and experimentally confirm, for the first time, the presence of $soliton$ $turbulence$ in ocean waves. Soliton turbulence is an exotic form of nonlinear wave motion where low frequency energy may also be viewed as a $dense$ $soliton$ $gas$, described theoretically by the soliton limit of the Korteweg-deVries (KdV) equation, a $completely$ $integrable$ $soliton$ $system$: Hence the phrase "soliton turbulence" is synonymous with "integrable soliton turbulence." For periodic/quasiperiodic boundary conditions the $ergodic$ $solutions$ of KdV are exactly solvable by $finite$ $gap$ $theory$ (FGT), the basis of our data analysis. We find that large amplitude measured wave trains near the energetic peak of a storm have low frequency power spectra that behave as $\\sim\\omega^{-1}$. We use the linear Fourier transform to estimate this power law from the power spectrum and to filter $densely$ $packed$ $soliton$ $wave$ $trains$ from the data. We apply ...

  15. Crust and Upper Mantle P Wave Velocity Structure Beneath Valles...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Crust and Upper Mantle P Wave Velocity Structure Beneath Valles Caldera, New Mexico- Results from the Jemez Teleseismic Tomography Experiment Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI...

  16. Weakly Turbulent Magnetohydrodynamic Waves in Compressible Low-{beta} Plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chandran, Benjamin D. G.

    2008-12-05

    In this Letter, weak-turbulence theory is used to investigate interactions among Alfven waves and fast and slow magnetosonic waves in collisionless low-{beta} plasmas. The wave kinetic equations are derived from the equations of magnetohydrodynamics, and extra terms are then added to model collisionless damping. These equations are used to provide a quantitative description of a variety of nonlinear processes, including parallel and perpendicular energy cascade, energy transfer between wave types, 'phase mixing', and the generation of backscattered Alfven waves.

  17. Gravity Surface Wave Bifurcation in a Highly Turbulent Swirling Flow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Witten, Thomas A.

    Gravity Surface Wave Bifurcation in a Highly Turbulent Swirling Flow Michael Baumer University Gravity Wave 2 3 Measurements 3 4 Mechanical Hardware: Problems and Solutions 5 5 Results 7 6 Conclusions investigated a free-surface gravity wave bifurcation in the large-separation regime, that is, where

  18. Theory of High Frequency Acoustic Wave Scattering by Turbulent Flames

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lieuwen, Timothy C.

    of the wave equation and assumes that the smallest scales of flame wrinkling are much larger than the acoustic the integral equation approach used in this paper to assess other characteristics of acoustic waveTheory of High Frequency Acoustic Wave Scattering by Turbulent Flames TIM LIEUWEN* School

  19. Spectral Cascade and Energy Dissipation in Kinetic Alfven Wave Turbulence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, Zhihong

    Spectral Cascade and Energy Dissipation in Kinetic Alfv´en Wave Turbulence Xi Cheng, Zhihong Lin energy sources at large spatial scales. The energy of these non- linearly interacting Alfven waves. 2000). The wave-particle energy exchange rates of these channels depend on the spectral properties near

  20. Wavefield Analysis of Rayleigh Waves for Near-Surface Shear-Wave Velocity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zeng, Chong

    2011-05-18

    Shear (S)-wave velocity is a key property of near-surface materials and is the fundamental parameter for many environmental and engineering geophysical studies. Directly acquiring accurate S-wave velocities from a seismic shot gather is usually...

  1. Experimental signatures of localization in Langmuir wave turbulence

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rose, H.A.; DuBois, D.F.; Russell, D.; Bezzerides, B.

    1988-01-01

    Features in certain laser-plasma and ionospheric experiments are identified with the basic properties of Langmuir wave turbulence. Also, a model of caviton nucleation is presented which leads to certain novel scaling predictions. 12 refs., 19 figs.

  2. Turbulent Flow and Transport Modeling by Long Waves and Currents 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Dae Hong

    2010-10-12

    This dissertation presents models for turbulent flow and transport by currents and long waves in large domain. From the Navier-Stokes equations, a fully nonlinear depth-integrated equation model for weakly dispersive, ...

  3. Experimental study of Markstein number effects on laminar flamelet velocity in turbulent premixed flames

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weiss, M.; Zarzalis, N. [Division of Combustion Technology, Engler-Bunte-Institute, University of Karlsruhe (TH), Karlsruhe (Germany); Suntz, R. [Institute for Chemical Technology, University of Karlsruhe (TH), Karlsruhe (Germany)

    2008-09-15

    Effects of turbulent flame stretch on mean local laminar burning velocity of flamelets, u{sub n}, were investigated experimentally in an explosion vessel at normal temperature and pressure. In this context, the wrinkling, A{sub t}/A{sub l}, and the burning velocity, u{sub t}, of turbulent flames were measured simultaneously. With the flamelet assumption the mean local laminar burning velocity of flamelets, u{sub n}=u{sub t} x (A{sub t}/A{sub l}){sup -1}, was calculated for different turbulence intensities. The results were compared to the influence of stretch on spherically expanding laminar flames. For spherically expanding laminar flames the stretched laminar burning velocity, u{sub n}, varied linearly with the Karlovitz stretch factor, yielding Markstein numbers that depend on the mixture composition. Six different mixtures with positive and negative Markstein numbers were investigated. The measurements of the mean local laminar burning velocity of turbulent flamelets were used to derive an efficiency parameter, I, which reflects the impact of the Markstein number and turbulent flame stretch - expressed by the turbulent Karlovitz stretch factor - on the local laminar burning velocity of flamelets. The results showed that the efficiency is reduced with increasing turbulence intensity and the reduction can be correlated to unsteady effects. (author)

  4. On the Turbulence Beneath Finite Amplitude Water Waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Babanin, Alexander V

    2015-01-01

    The paper by Beya et al. (2012, hereinafter BPB) has a general title of Turbulence Beneath Finite Amplitude Water Waves, but is solely dedicated to discussing the experiment by Babanin and Haus (2009, hereinafter BH) who conducted measurements of wave-induced non-breaking turbulence by particle image velocimetry (PIV). The authors of BPB conclude that their observations contradict those of BH. Here we argue that the outcomes of BPB do not contradict BH. In addition, although the main conclusion of BPB is that there is no turbulence observed in their experiment, it actually is observed.

  5. VELOCITY-SHEAR-INDUCED MODE COUPLING IN THE SOLAR ATMOSPHERE AND SOLAR WIND: IMPLICATIONS FOR PLASMA HEATING AND MHD TURBULENCE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hollweg, Joseph V.; Chandran, Benjamin D. G.; Kaghashvili, Edisher Kh. E-mail: ekaghash@aer.com

    2013-06-01

    We analytically consider how velocity shear in the corona and solar wind can cause an initial Alfven wave to drive up other propagating signals. The process is similar to the familiar coupling into other modes induced by non-WKB refraction in an inhomogeneous plasma, except here the refraction is a consequence of velocity shear. We limit our discussion to a low-beta plasma, and ignore couplings into signals resembling the slow mode. If the initial Alfven wave is propagating nearly parallel to the background magnetic field, then the induced signals are mainly a forward-going (i.e., propagating in the same sense as the original Alfven wave) fast mode, and a driven signal propagating like a forward-going Alfven wave but polarized like the fast mode; both signals are compressive and subject to damping by the Landau resonance. For an initial Alfven wave propagating obliquely with respect to the magnetic field, the induced signals are mainly forward- and backward-going fast modes, and a driven signal propagating like a forward-going Alfven wave but polarized like the fast mode; these signals are all compressive and subject to damping by the Landau resonance. A backward-going Alfven wave, thought to be important in the development of MHD turbulence, is also produced, but it is very weak. However, we suggest that for oblique propagation of the initial Alfven wave the induced fast-polarized signal propagating like a forward-going Alfven wave may interact coherently with the initial Alfven wave and distort it at a strong-turbulence-like rate.

  6. Noninvasive electromechanical wave imaging and conduction velocity estimation in vivo

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Konofagou, Elisa E.

    Noninvasive electromechanical wave imaging and conduction velocity estimation in vivo Elisa University, New York, NY, USA E-mail: ek2191@columbia.edu Abstract-- Electromechanical imaging is a novel identify and separate the electromechanical waves from the hemodynamically induced waves and determine

  7. Sheared stably stratified turbulence and large-scale waves in a lid driven cavity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cohen, N; Elperin, T; Kleeorin, N; Rogachevskii, I

    2014-01-01

    We investigated experimentally stably stratified turbulent flows in a lid driven cavity with a non-zero vertical mean temperature gradient in order to identify the parameters governing the mean and turbulent flows and to understand their effects on the momentum and heat transfer. We found that the mean velocity patterns (e.g., the form and the sizes of the large-scale circulations) depend strongly on the degree of the temperature stratification. In the case of strong stable stratification, the strong turbulence region is located in the vicinity of the main large-scale circulation. We detected the large-scale nonlinear oscillations in the case of strong stable stratification which can be interpreted as nonlinear internal gravity waves. The ratio of the main energy-containing frequencies of these waves in velocity and temperature fields in the nonlinear stage is about 2. The amplitude of the waves increases in the region of weak turbulence (near the bottom wall of the cavity), whereby the vertical mean temperat...

  8. The Turbulence Velocity Power Spectrum of Neutral Hydrogen in the Small Magellanic Cloud

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chepurnov, Alexey; Lazarian, Alex; Stanimirovic, Snezana

    2015-01-01

    We present the results of the Velocity Coordinate Spectrum (VCS) technique to calculate the velocity power spectrum of turbulence in the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC) in 21cm emission. We have obtained a velocity spectral index of -3.85 and an injection scale of 2.3 kpc. The spectral index is steeper than the Kolmogorov index which is expected for shock-dominated turbulence which is in agreement with past works on the SMC gas dynamics. The injection scale of 2.3 kpc suggests that tidal interactions with the Large Magellanic Cloud are the dominate driver of turbulence in this dwarf galaxy. This implies turbulence maybe driven by multiple mechanisms in galaxies in addition to supernova injection and that galaxy-galaxy interactions may play an important role.

  9. Estimating propagation velocity through a surface acoustic wave sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Xu, Wenyuan (Oakdale, MN); Huizinga, John S. (Dellwood, MN)

    2010-03-16

    Techniques are described for estimating the propagation velocity through a surface acoustic wave sensor. In particular, techniques which measure and exploit a proper segment of phase frequency response of the surface acoustic wave sensor are described for use as a basis of bacterial detection by the sensor. As described, use of velocity estimation based on a proper segment of phase frequency response has advantages over conventional techniques that use phase shift as the basis for detection.

  10. The potential impact of turbulent velocity fluctuations on drizzle formation in Cumulus clouds in an idealized 2D setup

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andrejczuk, M; Blyth, A

    2015-01-01

    This article discusses a potential impact of turbulent velocity fluctuations of the air on a drizzle formation in Cumulus clouds. Two different representations of turbulent velocity fluctuations for a microphysics formulated in a Lagrangian framework are discussed - random walk model and the interpolation, and its effect on microphysical properties of the cloud investigated. Turbulent velocity fluctuations significantly enhances velocity differences between colliding droplets, especially those having small sizes. As a result drizzle forms faster in simulations including a representation of turbulence. Both representations of turbulent velocity fluctuations, random walk and interpolation, have similar effect on droplet spectrum evolution, but interpolation of the velocity does account for a possible anisotropy in the air velocity. All discussed simulations show relatively large standard deviation ($\\sim$1${\\mu}m$) of the cloud droplet distribution from the onset of cloud formation is observed. Because coalesen...

  11. Excitation of Langmuir wave turbulence in high-frequency (HF) pump waves over Gakona, Alaska

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rokusek, Daniel L

    2007-01-01

    (cont.) Investigated in this thesis are the excitation and observation of Langmuir wave turbulence caused by the parametric decay instability (PDI) in high-frequency space plasma heating experiments conducted at the NSF/DoD ...

  12. Nonlocal resonances in weak turbulence of gravity-capillary waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Quentin Aubourg; Nicolas Mordant

    2015-03-13

    We report a laboratory investigation of weak turbulence of water surface waves in the gravity-capillary crossover. By using time-space resolved profilometry and a bicoherence analysis, we observe that the nonlinear processes involve 3-wave resonant interactions. By studying the solutions of the resonance conditions we show that the nonlinear interaction is dominantly 1D and involves collinear wave vectors. Furthermore taking into account the spectral widening due to weak nonlinearity explains that nonlocal interactions are possible between a gravity wave and high frequency capillary ones. We observe also that nonlinear 3-wave coupling is possible among gravity waves and we raise the question of the relevance of this mechanism for oceanic waves.

  13. Gravity surface wave turbulence in a laboratory flume

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Petr Denissenko; Sergei Lukaschuk; Sergey Nazarenko

    2006-11-08

    We present experimental results for water wave turbulence excited by piston-like programmed wavemakers in a water flume with horisontal dimensions 6x12x1.5 meters. Our main finding is that for a wide range of excitation amplitudes the energy spectrum has a power-law scaling, $E_\\omega \\sim \\omega^{-\

  14. "Fast" evolution of wave turbulence Victor Shrira & Sergei Annenkov

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fominov, Yakov

    "Fast" evolution of wave turbulence Victor Shrira & Sergei Annenkov Department of Mathematics then its adjustment occurs on the "fast" (dynamical) -2 timescale, rather than the kinetic -4 timescale are NOT violated ? We show by DNS that the fast evolution still occurs. We generalize the KE to describe

  15. Turbulence transition and internal wave generation in density stratified jets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sutherland, Bruce

    Turbulence transition and internal wave generation in density stratified jets B. FL Sutherland (Received 3 June 1993; accepted 18 November 1993) The nonlinear evolution of an unstable symmetric jet torques. In this case, the mean flow of the fully evolved jet is stable to subharmonic disturbances

  16. Role of the basin boundary conditions in gravity wave turbulence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Luc Deike; Benjamin Miquel; Pablo Gutiérrez-Matus; Timothée Jamin; Benoit Semin; Michael Berhanu; Eric Falcon; Félicien Bonnefoy

    2015-09-02

    Gravity wave turbulence is studied experimentally in a large wave basin where irregular waves are generated unidirectionally. The role of the basin boundary conditions (absorbing or reflecting) and of the forcing properties are investigated. To that purpose, an absorbing sloping beach opposite to the wavemaker can be replaced by a reflecting vertical wall. We observe that the wave field properties depend strongly on these boundary conditions. Quasi-one dimensional field of nonlinear waves propagate before to be damped by the beach whereas a more multidirectional wave field is observed with the wall. In both cases, the wave spectrum scales as a frequency-power law with an exponent that increases continuously with the forcing amplitude up to a value close to -4, which is the value predicted by the weak turbulence theory. The physical mechanisms involved are probably different according to the boundary condition used, but cannot be easily discriminated with only temporal measurements. We have also studied freely decaying gravity wave turbulence in the closed basin. No self-similar decay of the spectrum is observed, whereas its Fourier modes decay first as a time power law due to nonlinear mechanisms, and then exponentially due to linear viscous damping. We estimate the linear, nonlinear and dissipative time scales to test the time scale separation that highlights the important role of a large scale Fourier mode. By estimation of the mean energy flux from the initial decay of wave energy, the Kolmogorov-Zakharov constant is evaluated and found to be compatible with a recent theoretical value.

  17. Role of the basin boundary conditions in gravity wave turbulence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Luc Deike; Benjamin Miquel; Pablo Gutiérrez-Matus; Timothée Jamin; Benoit Semin; Sébastien Aumaitre; Michael Berhanu; Eric Falcon; Félicien BONNEFOY

    2014-12-16

    Gravity wave turbulence is studied experimentally in a large wave basin where irregular waves are generated unidirectionally. The role of the basin boundary conditions (absorbing or reflecting) and of the forcing properties are investigated. To that purpose, an absorbing sloping beach opposite to the wavemaker can be replaced by a reflecting vertical wall. We observe that the wave field properties depend strongly on these boundary conditions. Quasi-one dimensional field of nonlinear waves propagate before to be damped by the beach whereas a more multidirectional wave field is observed with the wall. In both cases, the wave spectrum scales as a frequency-power law with an exponent that increases continuously with the forcing amplitude up to a value close to -4, which is the value predicted by the weak turbulence theory. The physical mechanisms involved are probably different according to the boundary condition used, but cannot be easily discriminated with only temporal measurements. We have also studied freely decaying gravity wave turbulence in the closed basin. No self-similar decay of the spectrum is observed, whereas its Fourier modes decay first as a time power law due to nonlinear mechanisms, and then exponentially due to linear viscous damping. We estimate the linear, nonlinear and dissipative time scales to test the time scale separation that highlights the important role of a large scale Fourier mode. By estimation of the mean energy flux from the initial decay of wave energy, the Kolmogorov-Zakharov constant is evaluated and found to be compatible with a recent theoretical value.

  18. VELOCITY FIELD OF A ROUND TURBULENT TRANSVERSE JET Suman Muppidi

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mahesh, Krishnan

    - bulent jet in a laminar crossflow. The velocity ratio is 5.7 and the Reynolds number is 5000. Mean Jets in crossflow, also called `transverse jets' are defined as the flow field where a jet of fluid enters and interacts with a crossflowing fluid. Examples of jets in crossflow are fuel injectors

  19. On electromagnetic waves with a negative group velocity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Makarov, V. P.; Rukhadze, A. A.; Samokhin, A. A. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Prokhorov Institute of General Physics (Russian Federation)

    2010-12-15

    Recent publications devoted to the electrodynamics of media in which waves with a negative group velocity can exist are discussed. The properties of such waves have been studied from the beginning of the past century, and the most important results in this field were obtained by Soviet physicists in the 1940s-1950s. However, in most recent publications, this circumstance has not been taken into account.

  20. Turbulent velocity profiles in a tilted heat pipe J. Salort, X. Riedinger,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Turbulent velocity profiles in a tilted heat pipe J. Salort, X. Riedinger, E. Rusaouen, J the ther- mal behavior of a square heat pipe, depending on its inclination angle and the applied heat flux (stresses). Heat pipes, or gravital flows in vertical or inclined Also at College of Engineering

  1. Effect of initial turbulence intensity and velocity profile on liquid jets for IFE beamline protection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abdou, Mohamed

    Effect of initial turbulence intensity and velocity profile on liquid jets for IFE beamline ion inertial fusion reactors utilize banks of liquid jets and vortex flow tubes to protect sensitive observations and quantitative data for rectangular and circular jets are compared in an effort to illuminate

  2. Effect of initial turbulence intensity and velocity profile on liquid jets for IFE beamline protection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Los Angeles, University of

    Effect of initial turbulence intensity and velocity profile on liquid jets for IFE beamline reactors utilize banks of liquid jets and vortex flow tubes to protect sensitive beam line components from for rectangular and circular jets are compared in an effort to illuminate the critical phenomena involved

  3. Continuous subsurface velocity measurement with coda wave interferometry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Niu, Fenglin

    . The experiment site is located 10 km west to the seismically very active Xiaojiang fault zone. An electric hammer was used as a source to generate highly repeatable seismic waves, which were recorded by 5 short is interpreted as the velocity response to the barometric pressure. A multivariate linear regression analysis

  4. Turbulence and internal waves in numerical models of the equatorial undercurrents system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pham, Hieu T.

    2010-01-01

    w ? field at t = 80; (b) Wave energy flux p ? w ? across thestress u ? w ? and (f) wave energy flux p ? w ? . Thefor dissipation of the internal wave energy by turbulence is

  5. Turbulence and internal waves in numerical models of the equatorial undercurrents system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pham, Hieu T.

    2010-01-01

    w ? field at t = 80; (b) Wave energy flux p ? w ? across thethe shear layer is wave energy and not turbulence. ) Thestress u ? w ? and (f) wave energy flux p ? w ? . The

  6. Covariance statistics of turbulence velocity components for wind-energy-conversion system design-homogeneous, isotropic case

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fichtl, G.H.

    1983-09-01

    When designing a wind energy converison system (WECS), it may be necessary to take into account the distribution of wind across the disc of rotation. The specific engineering applications include structural strength, fatigue, and control. This wind distribution consists of two parts, namely that associated with the mean wind profile and that associated with the turbulence velocity fluctuation field. The work reported herein is aimed at the latter, namely the distribution of turbulence velocity fluctuations across the WECS disk of rotation. A theory is developed for the two-time covariance matrix for turbulence velocity vector components for wind energy conversion system (WECS) design. The theory is developed for homogeneous and iotropic turbulance with the assumption that Taylor's hypothesis is valid. The Eulerian turbulence velocity vector field is expanded about the hub of the WECS. Formulae are developed for the turbulence velocity vector component covariance matrix following the WECS blade elements. It is shown that upon specification of the turbulence energy spectrum function and the WECS rotation rate, the two-point, two-time covariance matrix of the turbulent flow relative to the WECS bladed elements is determined. This covariance matrix is represented as the sum of nonstationary and stationary contributions. Generalized power spectral methods are used to obtain two-point, double frequency power spectral density functions for the turbulent flow following the blade elements. The Dryden turbulence model is used to demonstrate the theory. A discussion of linear system response analysis is provided to show how the double frequency turbulence spectra might be used to calculate response spectra of a WECS to turbulent flow. Finally the spectrum of the component of turbulence normal to the WECS disc of rotation, following the blade elements, is compared with experimental results.

  7. Gravity wave turbulence revealed by horizontal vibrations of the container B. Issenmann and E. Falcon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Gravity wave turbulence revealed by horizontal vibrations of the container B. Issenmann and E: December 20, 2012) We experimentally study the role of the forcing on gravity-capillary wave turbulence that the frequency power-law exponent of the gravity wave spectrum depends on the forcing parameters. By horizontally

  8. Internal waves generated from a turbulent mixed region K. Dohan and B. R. Sutherlanda)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sutherland, Bruce

    Internal waves generated from a turbulent mixed region K. Dohan and B. R. Sutherlanda) Department is a turbulent layer overlying the seasonal ther- mocline and it has been suggested that internal waves generated for additional generation of internal waves and may add to the enhanced mixing. Mixing box experiments4

  9. Gravity wave turbulence revealed by horizontal vibrations of the container

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bruno Issenmann; Eric Falcon

    2012-12-20

    We experimentally study the role of the forcing on gravity-capillary wave turbulence. Previous laboratory experiments using spatially localized forcing (vibrating blades) have shown that the frequency power-law exponent of the gravity wave spectrum depends on the forcing parameters. By horizontally vibrating the whole container, we observe a spectrum exponent that does not depend on the forcing parameters for both gravity and capillary regimes. This spatially extended forcing leads to a gravity spectrum exponent in better agreement with the theory than by using a spatially localized forcing. The role of the vessel shape has been also studied. Finally, the wave spectrum is found to scale linearly with the injected power for both regimes whatever the forcing type used.

  10. Photospheric Logarithmic Velocity Spirals as MHD Wave Generation Mechanisms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mumford, S J

    2015-01-01

    High-resolution observations of the solar photosphere have identified a wide variety of spiralling motions in the plasma. These spirals vary in properties, but are observed to be abundant on the solar surface. In this work these spirals are studied for their potential as magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) wave generation mechanisms. The inter-granular lanes, where these spirals are commonly observed, are also regions where the magnetic field strength is higher than average. This combination of magnetic field and spiralling plasma is a recipe for the generation of Alfv\\'en waves and other MHD waves. This work employs numerical simulations of a self-similar magnetic flux tube embedded in a realistic, gravitationally stratified, solar atmosphere to study the effects of a single magnetic flux tube perturbed by a logarithmic velocity spiral driver. The expansion factor of the logarithmic spiral driver is varied, multiple simulations are run for a range of values of the expansion factor centred around observational data. Th...

  11. An empirical model for the mean-velocity profiles of a turbulent boundary layer under the effects of surface curvature 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huynh, Long Quang

    1994-01-01

    An empirical model has been developed to predict the mean-velocity profile of a turbulent boundary layer under the influence of surface curvature. The model proposed is able to determine the profiles for both a convex and concave curvature...

  12. Stress-wave velocity of wood-based panels: Effect of moisture,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stress-wave velocity of wood-based panels: Effect of moisture, product type, and material direction Guangping Han Qinglin Wu Xiping Wang Abstract The effect of moisture on longitudinal stress-wave veloc- ity, particleboard, and southern pine lumber was evaluated. It was shown that the stress-wave velocity decreased

  13. TURBULENCE-INDUCED RELATIVE VELOCITY OF DUST PARTICLES. IV. THE COLLISION KERNEL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pan, Liubin [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Padoan, Paolo, E-mail: lpan@cfa.harvard.edu, E-mail: ppadoan@icc.ub.edu [ICREA and Institut de Ciències del Cosmos, Universitat de Barcelona, IEEC-UB, Martí Franquès 1, E-08028 Barcelona (Spain)

    2014-12-20

    Motivated by its importance for modeling dust particle growth in protoplanetary disks, we study turbulence-induced collision statistics of inertial particles as a function of the particle friction time, ?{sub p}. We show that turbulent clustering significantly enhances the collision rate for particles of similar sizes with ?{sub p} corresponding to the inertial range of the flow. If the friction time, ?{sub p,} {sub h}, of the larger particle is in the inertial range, the collision kernel per unit cross section increases with increasing friction time, ?{sub p,} {sub l}, of the smaller particle and reaches the maximum at ?{sub p,} {sub l} = ?{sub p,} {sub h}, where the clustering effect peaks. This feature is not captured by the commonly used kernel formula, which neglects the effect of clustering. We argue that turbulent clustering helps alleviate the bouncing barrier problem for planetesimal formation. We also investigate the collision velocity statistics using a collision-rate weighting factor to account for higher collision frequency for particle pairs with larger relative velocity. For ?{sub p,} {sub h} in the inertial range, the rms relative velocity with collision-rate weighting is found to be invariant with ?{sub p,} {sub l} and scales with ?{sub p,} {sub h} roughly as ? ?{sub p,h}{sup 1/2}. The weighting factor favors collisions with larger relative velocity, and including it leads to more destructive and less sticking collisions. We compare two collision kernel formulations based on spherical and cylindrical geometries. The two formulations give consistent results for the collision rate and the collision-rate weighted statistics, except that the spherical formulation predicts more head-on collisions than the cylindrical formulation.

  14. Stochastic simulation for the propagation of high-frequency acoustic waves through a random velocity field

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lu, B.; Darmon, M.; Leymarie, N.; Chatillon, S.; Potel, C.

    2012-05-17

    In-service inspection of Sodium-Cooled Fast Reactors (SFR) requires the development of non-destructive techniques adapted to the harsh environment conditions and the examination complexity. From past experiences, ultrasonic techniques are considered as suitable candidates. The ultrasonic telemetry is a technique used to constantly insure the safe functioning of reactor inner components by determining their exact position: it consists in measuring the time of flight of the ultrasonic response obtained after propagation of a pulse emitted by a transducer and its interaction with the targets. While in-service the sodium flow creates turbulences that lead to temperature inhomogeneities, which translates into ultrasonic velocity inhomogeneities. These velocity variations could directly impact the accuracy of the target locating by introducing time of flight variations. A stochastic simulation model has been developed to calculate the propagation of ultrasonic waves in such an inhomogeneous medium. Using this approach, the travel time is randomly generated by a stochastic process whose inputs are the statistical moments of travel times known analytically. The stochastic model predicts beam deviations due to velocity inhomogeneities, which are similar to those provided by a determinist method, such as the ray method.

  15. Fourier analysis of wave turbulence in a thin elastic plate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nicolas Mordant

    2010-06-18

    The spatio-temporal dynamics of the deformation of a vibrated plate is measured by a high speed Fourier transform profilometry technique. The space-time Fourier spectrum is analyzed. It displays a behavior consistent with the premises of the Weak Turbulence theory. A isotropic continuous spectrum of waves is excited with a non linear dispersion relation slightly shifted from the linear dispersion relation. The spectral width of the dispersion relation is also measured. The non linearity of this system is weak as expected from the theory. Finite size effects are discussed. Despite a qualitative agreement with the theory, a quantitative mismatch is observed which origin may be due to the dissipation that ultimately absorbs the energy flux of the Kolmogorov-Zakharov casade.

  16. Statistical analysis of the velocity and scalar fields in reacting turbulent wall-jets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pouransari, Z; Johansson, A V

    2015-01-01

    The concept of local isotropy in a chemically reacting turbulent wall-jet flow is addressed using direct numerical simulation (DNS) data. Different DNS databases with isothermal and exothermic reactions are examined. The chemical reaction and heat release effects on the turbulent velocity, passive scalar and reactive species fields are studied using their probability density functions (PDF) and higher order moments for velocities and scalar fields, as well as their gradients. With the aid of the anisotropy invariant maps for the Reynolds stress tensor the heat release effects on the anisotropy level at different wall-normal locations are evaluated and found to be most accentuated in the near-wall region. It is observed that the small-scale anisotropies are persistent both in the near-wall region and inside the jet flame. Two exothermic cases with different Damkohler number are examined and the comparison revealed that the Damkohler number effects are most dominant in the near-wall region, where the wall cooli...

  17. Statistical analysis of the velocity and scalar fields in reacting turbulent wall-jets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Z. Pouransari; L. Biferale; A. V. Johansson

    2015-02-21

    The concept of local isotropy in a chemically reacting turbulent wall-jet flow is addressed using direct numerical simulation (DNS) data. Different DNS databases with isothermal and exothermic reactions are examined. The chemical reaction and heat release effects on the turbulent velocity, passive scalar and reactive species fields are studied using their probability density functions (PDF) and higher order moments for velocities and scalar fields, as well as their gradients. With the aid of the anisotropy invariant maps for the Reynolds stress tensor the heat release effects on the anisotropy level at different wall-normal locations are evaluated and found to be most accentuated in the near-wall region. It is observed that the small-scale anisotropies are persistent both in the near-wall region and inside the jet flame. Two exothermic cases with different Damkohler number are examined and the comparison revealed that the Damkohler number effects are most dominant in the near-wall region, where the wall cooling effects are influential. In addition, with the aid of PDFs conditioned on the mixture fraction, the significance of the reactive scalar characteristics in the reaction zone is illustrated. We argue that the combined effects of strong intermittency and strong persistency of anisotropy at the small scales in the entire domain can affect mixing and ultimately the combustion characteristics of the reacting flow.

  18. HIERARCHICAL STRUCTURE OF MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMIC TURBULENCE IN POSITION-POSITION-VELOCITY SPACE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burkhart, Blakesley; Lazarian, A.; Goodman, Alyssa; Rosolowsky, Erik

    2013-06-20

    Magnetohydrodynamic turbulence is able to create hierarchical structures in the interstellar medium (ISM) that are correlated on a wide range of scales via the energy cascade. We use hierarchical tree diagrams known as dendrograms to characterize structures in synthetic position-position-velocity (PPV) emission cubes of isothermal magnetohydrodynamic turbulence. We show that the structures and degree of hierarchy observed in PPV space are related to the presence of self-gravity and the global sonic and Alfvenic Mach numbers. Simulations with higher Alfvenic Mach number, self-gravity and supersonic flows display enhanced hierarchical structure. We observe a strong dependency on the sonic and Alfvenic Mach numbers and self-gravity when we apply the statistical moments (i.e., mean, variance, skewness, kurtosis) to the leaf and node distribution of the dendrogram. Simulations with self-gravity, larger magnetic field and higher sonic Mach number have dendrogram distributions with higher statistical moments. Application of the dendrogram to three-dimensional density cubes, also known as position-position-position (PPP) cubes, reveals that the dominant emission contours in PPP and PPV are related for supersonic gas but not for subsonic. We also explore the effects of smoothing, thermal broadening, and velocity resolution on the dendrograms in order to make our study more applicable to observational data. These results all point to hierarchical tree diagrams as being a promising additional tool for studying ISM turbulence and star forming regions for obtaining information on the degree of self-gravity, the Mach numbers and the complicated relationship between PPV and PPP data.

  19. Warm wave breaking of nonlinear plasma waves with arbitrary phase velocities C. B. Schroeder, E. Esarey, and B. A. Shadwick

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Geddes, Cameron Guy Robinson

    conventional technology nonlinear plasma waves driven by intense laser pulses. A basic quantity of interest, hence, the above expres- sion for Eth does not apply. Low-energy particle beam-driven plasma waves alsoWarm wave breaking of nonlinear plasma waves with arbitrary phase velocities C. B. Schroeder, E

  20. February 5, 2013 10:35 9in x 6in Advances in Wave Turbulence b1517-ch02 2nd Reading Fluctuations of the Energy Flux in Wave Turbulence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Falcon, Eric

    Fluctuations of the Energy Flux in Wave Turbulence S. Auma^itre , E. Falcon,§ and S. Fauve SPEC, DSM, CEA.falcon@univ-paris-diderot.fr The key governing parameter of wave turbulence is the energy flux that drives the waves and cascades of energy among different scales through the weak interaction between waves. It was understood first

  1. Anomalous shear wave delays and surface wave velocities at Yellowstone Caldera, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Daniel, R.G.; Boore, D.M.

    1982-04-10

    To investigate the effects of a geothermal area on the propagation of intermediate-period (1--30 s) teleseismic body waves and surface waves, a specially designed portable seismograph system was operated in Yellowstone Caldera, Wyoming. Travel time residuals, relative to a station outside the caldera, of up to 2 s for compressional phases are in agreement with short-period residuals for P phases measured by other investigators. Travel time delays for shear arrivals in the intermediate-period band range from 2 to 9 s and decrease with increasing dT/d..delta... Measured Rayleigh wave phase velocities are extremely low, ranging from 3.2 km/s at 27-s period to 2.0 km/s at 7-s period; the estimated uncertainty associated with these values is 15%. We propose a model for compressional and shear velocities and Poisson's ratio beneath the Yellowstone caldera which fits the teleseismic body and surface wave data: it consists of a highly anomalous crust with an average shear velocity of 3.0 km/s overlying an upper mantle with average velocity of 4.1 km/s. The high average value of Poisson's ratio in the crust (0.34) suggests the presence of fluids there; Poisson's ratio in the mantle between 40 and approximately 200 km is more nearly normal (0.29) than in the crust. A discrepancy between normal values of Poisson's ratio in the crust calculated from short-period data and high values calculated from teleseismic data can be resolved by postulating a viscoelastic crustal model with frequency-dependent shear velocity and attenuation.

  2. Variation of seismic-wave velocities in westerly granite under stress 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Al-Shaibani, Abdulaziz Muhareb

    1994-01-01

    Seismic-wave velocities in cracked rocks increase with stress. It is believed that, within less than half the rupture pressure, this velocity increase occurs due to the closure of cracks. Previous studies have shown that, ...

  3. PHYSICAL REVIEW E 89, 023003 (2014) Energy flux measurement from the dissipated energy in capillary wave turbulence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Falcon, Eric

    2014-01-01

    energy flux are in good agreement with wave turbulence theory. The Kolmogorov-Zakharov constant waves interact with each other, they can develop a regime of wave turbulence where the wave energyPHYSICAL REVIEW E 89, 023003 (2014) Energy flux measurement from the dissipated energy in capillary

  4. Internal waves generated from a turbulent mixed region K. Dohan and B. R. Sutherland a)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sutherland, Bruce

    Internal waves generated from a turbulent mixed region K. Dohan and B. R. Sutherland a) Department suggested that internal waves generated at the base of this region may act as a source of energy driving over rough topography may be re­ sponsible for additional generation of internal waves and may add

  5. An evaluation of linear instability waves as sources of sound in a supersonic turbulent jet

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Colonius, Tim

    instability wave at any given frequency as representative of the energy carrying wave componentAn evaluation of linear instability waves as sources of sound in a supersonic turbulent jet Kamran Mohsenia) Division of Engineering and Applied Science, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena

  6. Internal wave energy radiated from a turbulent mixed layer James R. Munroe1, a)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sutherland, Bruce

    Internal wave energy radiated from a turbulent mixed layer James R. Munroe1, a) and Bruce R of the mixed layer. In both experiments and simulations we find that the energy density of the generated waves examine mixed-layer deepening and the generation of internal waves in stratified fluid resulting from

  7. Three-dimensional P and S waves velocity structures of the Coso...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Three-dimensional P and S waves velocity structures of the Coso geothermal area, California, from microseismic travel time data Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference...

  8. Near-Surface Shear-Wave Velocity Measurements in Unlithified Sediment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rickards, Benjamin Thomas

    2011-05-31

    Shear-wave (S-wave) velocity can be directly correlated to material stiff¬ness making it a valuable physical property that has found uses in construction, engineering, and envi-ronmental projects. This study compares three ...

  9. Turbulence and internal waves in tidal flow over topography

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gayen, Bishakhdatta

    2012-01-01

    M. C. 2006 An estimate of tidal energy lost to turbulence atcant loss of low-mode tidal energy at 28.9 ? . Geophys. Res.of turbulent kinetic energy over a tidal cycle. Maximum T KE

  10. Numerical simulation of breaking waves by a multi-scale turbulence model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhao, Qun

    and diffusion are of the same order at the trough level. Above the trough level, turbulent convection dominates-dimensional MAC type finite difference method. The third-order upwind scheme proposed by Kawamura and KawaharaNumerical simulation of breaking waves by a multi-scale turbulence model Qun Zhaoa,*, Steve

  11. Alfven wave collisions, the fundamental building block of plasma turbulence. IV. Laboratory experiment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carter, Troy

    cascade of energy from large to small scales.9 In order to gain insight into this fundamental buildingAlfven wave collisions, the fundamental building block of plasma turbulence. IV. Laboratory heating, acceleration of the solar wind, and heating of the interstellar medium. Turbulence

  12. Wave turbulence description of interacting particles: Klein-Gordon model with a Mexican-hat potential

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gallet, Basile; Dubrulle, Bérengère

    2015-01-01

    In field theory, particles are waves or excitations that propagate on the fundamental state. In experiments or cosmological models one typically wants to compute the out-of-equilibrium evolution of a given initial distribution of such waves. Wave Turbulence deals with out-of-equilibrium ensembles of weakly nonlinear waves, and is therefore well-suited to address this problem. As an example, we consider the complex Klein-Gordon equation with a Mexican-hat potential. This simple equation displays two kinds of excitations around the fundamental state: massive particles and massless Goldstone bosons. The former are waves with a nonzero frequency for vanishing wavenumber, whereas the latter obey an acoustic dispersion relation. Using wave turbulence theory, we derive wave kinetic equations that govern the coupled evolution of the spectra of massive and massless waves. We first consider the thermodynamic solutions to these equations and study the wave condensation transition, which is the classical equivalent of Bo...

  13. Investigations of the cascade of Langmuir wave turbulence over HAARP Observatory in Gakona, Alaska

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burton, Laura M

    2007-01-01

    This thesis investigates the cascade lines from Langmuir wave turbulence as a result of Parametric Decay Instability (PDI) in the ionosphere. This effect is studied using a high-frequency (HF) heater located at the NSF/DoD ...

  14. Robust energy transfer mechanism via precession resonance in nonlinear turbulent wave systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miguel D. Bustamante; Brenda Quinn; Dan Lucas

    2014-04-30

    A robust energy transfer mechanism is found in nonlinear wave systems, which favours transfers towards modes interacting via triads with nonzero frequency mismatch, applicable in meteorology, nonlinear optics and plasma wave turbulence. We introduce the concepts of truly dynamical degrees of freedom and triad precession. Transfer efficiency is maximal when the triads' precession frequencies resonate with the system's nonlinear frequencies, leading to a collective state of synchronised triads with strong turbulent cascades at intermediate nonlinearity. Numerical simulations confirm analytical predictions.

  15. The excitation of spiral density waves through turbulent fluctuations in accretion discs I: WKBJ theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. Heinemann; J. C. B. Papaloizou

    2009-04-30

    We study and elucidate the mechanism of spiral density wave excitation in a differentially rotating turbulent flow. We formulate a set of wave equations with sources that are only non-zero in the presence of turbulent fluctuations. We solve these in a shearing box domain using a WKBJ method. It is found that, for a particular azimuthal wave length, the wave excitation occurs through a sequence of regularly spaced swings during which the wave changes from leading to trailing form. This is a generic process that is expected to occur in shearing discs with turbulence. Trailing waves of equal amplitude propagating in opposite directions are produced, both of which produce an outward angular momentum flux that we give expressions for as functions of the disc parameters and azimuthal wave length. By solving the wave amplitude equations numerically we justify the WKBJ approach for a Keplerian rotation law for all parameter regimes of interest. In order to quantify the wave excitation completely the important wave source terms need to be specified. Assuming conditions of weak nonlinearity, these can be identified and are associated with a quantity related to the potential vorticity, being the only survivors in the linear regime. Under the additional assumption that the source has a flat power spectrum at long azimuthal wave lengths, the optimal azimuthal wave length produced is found to be determined solely by the WKBJ response and is estimated to be 2 pi H, with H being the nominal disc scale height.

  16. Medium-induced jet evolution: wave turbulence and energy loss

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leonard Fister; Edmond Iancu

    2014-09-06

    We study the gluon cascade generated via successive medium-induced branchings by an energetic parton propagating through a dense QCD medium. We focus on the high-energy regime where the energy $E$ of the leading particle is much larger than the characteristic medium scale $\\omega_c=\\hat q L^2/2$, with $\\hat q$ the jet quenching parameter and $L$ the distance travelled through the medium. In this regime the leading particle loses only a small fraction $\\sim\\alpha_s(\\omega_c/E)$ of its energy and can be treated as a steady source of radiation for gluons with energies $\\omega\\le\\omega_c$. For this effective problem with a source, we obtain exact analytic solutions for the gluon spectrum and the energy flux. The solutions exhibit wave turbulence: the basic physical process is a continuing fragmentation which is `quasi-democratic' (i.e. quasi-local in energy) and which provides an energy transfer from the source to the medium at a rate (the energy flux $\\mathcal{F}$) which is quasi-independent of $\\omega$. The locality of the branching process implies a spectrum of the Kolmogorov-Obukhov type, i.e. a power-law spectrum which is a fixed point of the branching process and whose strength is proportional to the energy flux: $D(\\omega)\\sim\\mathcal{F}/\\sqrt\\omega$ for $\\omega\\ll\\omega_c$. Via this turbulent flow, the gluon cascade loses towards the medium an energy $\\Delta E\\sim\\alpha_s^2\\omega_c$, which is independent of the initial energy $E$ of the leading particle and of the details of the thermalization mechanism at the low-energy end of the cascade. This energy is carried away by very soft gluons, which propagate at very large angles with respect to the jet axis. Our predictions for the value of $\\Delta E$ and for its angular distribution appear to agree quite well, qualitatively and even semi-quantitatively, with the phenomenology of di-jet asymmetry in nucleus-nucleus collisions at the LHC.

  17. Wave turbulence on the surface of a ferrofluid submitted to a magnetic field Francois Boyer and Eric Falcon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Wave turbulence on the surface of a ferrofluid submitted to a magnetic field Fran¸cois Boyer the observation of wave turbulence on the surface of a ferrofluid mechanically forced and submitted to a static normal magnetic field. We show that magnetic surface waves arise only above a critical field. The power

  18. Freely Decaying Weak Turbulence for Sea Surface Gravity Waves M. Onorato, A. R. Osborne, and M. Serio

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zakharov, Vladimir

    turbulence, power law spectra (also known as Kolmogorov spectra) have been found as exact solutions variety of fields of physics including internal waves [5], waves on liquid hydrogen [6], Alfve´n waves. In spite of the fact that weak turbulence theory is at a rather advanced state analytically, the actual

  19. Wave Turbulence on the Surface of a Ferrofluid in a Magnetic Field Francois Boyer and Eric Falcon*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Falcon, Eric

    Wave Turbulence on the Surface of a Ferrofluid in a Magnetic Field Franc¸ois Boyer and Eric Falcon the observation of wave turbulence on the surface of a ferrofluid mechanically forced and submitted to a static normal magnetic field. We show that magnetic surface waves arise only above a critical field. The power

  20. Characterization of the effect of Froude number on surface waves and heat transfer in inclined turbulent

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abdou, Mohamed

    Characterization of the effect of Froude number on surface waves and heat transfer in inclined describes wave/heat transfer phenomena in inclined turbulent open surface water flows. The experiments were. These changes lead to a heat transfer improvement, enough to double the heat transfer coefficient

  1. Preventing transition to turbulence using streamwise traveling waves: theoretical analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jovanovic, Mihailo

    . INTRODUCTION Fluid motion is usually classified as either laminar or turbulent; flows that are smooth force on a vehicle moving through a fluid in the laminar regime. Sensorless flow control represents and ordered (laminar) may become complex and disordered (turbulent) as the flow strength increases

  2. In-situ, high-frequency P-Wave velocity measurements within 1 m of the Earth’s surface

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baker, Gregory S.; Steeples, Don W.; Schmeissner, Chris M.

    1999-03-01

    Seismic P-wave velocities in near?surface materials can be much slower than the speed of sound waves in air (normally 335 m/s or 1100 ft/s). Difficulties often arise when measuring these low?velocity P-waves because of interference by the air wave...

  3. Wave-induced velocities inside a model seagrass bed

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Luhar, Mitul

    Laboratory measurements reveal the flow structure within and above a model seagrass meadow (dynamically similar to Zostera marina) forced by progressive waves. Despite being driven by purely oscillatory flow, a mean current ...

  4. Integrated Study of the Nonlinear Dynamics of Collisional Drift Wave Turbulence

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    George R. Tynan

    2012-04-24

    An existing linear magnetized plasma device, the Controlled Shear Decorrelation experiment (CSDX) was used to study the transition from a state of coherent wave like activity to a state of turbulent activity using the magnetic field and thus magnetization of the plasma as the control parameter. The results show the onset of coherent drift waves consistent with linear stability analysis. As the magnetization is raised, at first multiple harmonics appear, consistent with wave steepening. This period is then followed by the beginning of nonlinear interactions between different wave modes, which then results in the formation of narrow frequency but distributed azimuthal wave number fluctuations that are consistent with the formation of long-lived coherent nonlinear structures within the plasmas. These structures, termed quasicoherent modes, persist as the magnetic field is raised. Measurements of turbulent momentum flux indicate that the plasma is also forming an azimuthally symmetric radially sheared fluid flow that is nonlinearly driven by smaller scaled turbulent fluctuations. Further increases in the magnetic field result in the breakup of the quasicoherent mode, and the clear formation of the sheared flow. Numerical simulations of the experiment reproduce the formation of the sheared flow via a vortex merging process, and confirm that the experiment is providing the first clear experimental evidence of the formation of sheared zonal flows from drift turbulent fluctuations in a magnetized plasma.

  5. Noninvasive electromechanical wave imaging and conduction-relevant velocity estimation in vivo

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Konofagou, Elisa E.

    Noninvasive electromechanical wave imaging and conduction-relevant velocity estimation in vivo-correlation Displacement Electromechanical Left ventricle Myocardial Pacing a b s t r a c t Electromechanical wave imaging-type mice (n = 12) at high frame rates in order to take advantage of the transient electromechanical

  6. Wave Packet for Massless Fermions and its Implication to the Superluminal Velocity Statistics of Neutrino

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kelin Wang; Zexian Cao

    2012-01-06

    Non-dispersive wave packet for massless fermions is formulated on the basis of squeezed coherent states that are put in a form of common eigenfunction for the Hamiltonian and the helicity operator, starting from the Dirac equation. The wave packet thus constructed is demonstrated to propagate at a constant velocity as that of light. This explicit expression of wave packet for the massless fermions can facilitate theoretical analysis of problems where a wave packet is of formal significance. Furthermore, extensive wave packet may result in a superluminal velocity statistics if determined from the time-of-flight measurement, as recently done on muon neutrinos, when a threshold particle flux or energy transfer, which is eventually referred to the propagation of wave packet, to invoke a detection event is assumed.

  7. A Two-component Transport Model for Solar Wind Fluctuations: Waves plus Quasi-2D Turbulence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oughton, Sean

    component. Thus, it would seem appropriate, and advantageous, to develop an energy-containing style modelA Two-component Transport Model for Solar Wind Fluctuations: Waves plus Quasi-2D Turbulence Sean for the transport of solar wind fluctuations, based on the assumption that they can be well-represented using two

  8. Alfven wave collisions, the fundamental building block of plasma turbulence. III. Theory for experimental design

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carter, Troy

    Alfven wave collisions, the fundamental building block of plasma turbulence. III. Theory is a ubiquitous phenomenon in space and astrophysical plasmas, driving a cascade of energy from large to small, influencing the heating of the solar corona and acceleration of the solar wind,1 the dynamics

  9. Kinetic Alfvén wave turbulence and formation of localized structures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sharma, R. P.; Modi, K. V.; Mechanical Engineering Department, Government Engineering College Valsad, Gujarat 396001

    2013-08-15

    This work presents non-linear interaction of magnetosonic wave with kinetic Alfvén wave for intermediate ?-plasma (m{sub e}/m{sub i}???1). A set of dimensionless equations have been developed for analysis by considering ponderomotive force due to pump kinetic Alfvén wave in the dynamics of magnetosonic wave. Stability analysis has been done to study modulational instability or linear growth rate. Further, numerical simulation has been carried out to study the nonlinear stage of instability and resulting power spectrum applicable to solar wind around 1 AU. Due to the nonlinearity, background density of magnetosonic wave gets modified which results in localization of kinetic Alfvén wave. From the obtained results, we observed that spectral index follows k{sup ?3.0}, consistent with observation received by Cluster spacecraft for the solar wind around 1 AU. The result shows the steepening of power spectrum which may be responsible for heating and acceleration of plasma particles in solar wind.

  10. Turbulent combined wave-current boundary layer model for application in coastal waters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Humbyrd, Chelsea Joy

    2012-01-01

    Accurately predicting transport processes, including sediment transport, in the coastal environment is impossible without correct current velocity and shear stress information. A combined wave-current boundary layer theory ...

  11. Turbulence and internal waves in tidal flow over topography

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gayen, Bishakhdatta

    2012-01-01

    Flow over sloping topography including streamwise vari-5 Flow over sloping topography without streamwise vari-of internal waves at sloping topography. Here, C p denotes

  12. Scalar and tensor spherical harmonics expansion of the velocity correlation in homogeneous anisotropic turbulence

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Rubinstein, Robert; Kurien, Susan; Cambon, Claude

    2015-06-22

    The representation theory of the rotation group is applied to construct a series expansion of the correlation tensor in homogeneous anisotropic turbulence. The resolution of angular dependence is the main analytical difficulty posed by anisotropic turbulence; representation theory parametrises this dependence by a tensor analogue of the standard spherical harmonics expansion of a scalar. As a result, the series expansion is formulated in terms of explicitly constructed tensor bases with scalar coefficients determined by angular moments of the correlation tensor.

  13. Flow, Turbulence and Combustion 62: 295333, 1999. 1999 Kluwer Academic Publishers. Printed in the Netherlands.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    PDF of velocity and turbulent frequency or the joint PDF of velocity, wave vector, and turbulent implemented in conjunction with several velocity models. The complete model yields good comparisons and reaction are treated without mod- eling assumption [3, 4]. In contrast, standard moment closure methods

  14. Extensional wave attenuation and velocity in partially-saturated sand in the sonic frequency range

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Z.; Rector, J.W.; Nihei, K.T.; Tomutsa, L.; Myer, L.R.; Nakagawa, S.

    2002-06-17

    Extensional wave attenuation and velocity measurements on a high permeability Monterey sand were performed over a range of gas saturations for imbibition and degassing conditions. These measurements were conducted using extensional wave pulse propagation and resonance over a 1 - 9 kHz frequency range for a hydrostatic confining pressure of 8.3 MPa. Analysis of the extensional wave data and the corresponding X-ray CT images of the gas saturation show strong attenuation resulting from the presence of the gas (QE dropped from 300 for the dry sand to 30 for the partially-saturated sand), with larger attenuation at a given saturation resulting from heterogeneous gas distributions. The extensional wave velocities are in agreement with Gassmann theory for the test with near-homogeneous gas saturation and with a patchy saturation model for the test with heterogeneous gas saturation. These results show that partially-saturated sands under moderate confining pressure can produce strong intrinsic attenuation for extensional waves.

  15. Excitation of solitons by an external resonant wave with a slowly varying phase velocity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aranson, I.; Meerson, B. [Hebrew Univ., Jerusalem (Israel). Racah Inst. of Physics; Tajima, Toshiki [Texas Univ., Austin, TX (United States)

    1992-02-01

    A novel mechanism is proposed for the excitation of solitons in nonlinear dispersive media. The mechanism employs an external pumping wave with a varying phase velocity, which provides a continuous resonant excitation of a nonlinear wave in the medium. Two different schemes of a continuous resonant growth (continuous phase-locking) of the induced nonlinear wave are suggested. The first of them requires a definite time dependence of the pumping wave phase velocity and is relatively sensitive to the initial wave phase. The second employs the dynamic autoresonance effect and is insensitive to the exact time dependence of the pumping wave phase velocity. It is demonstrated analytically and numerically, for a particular example of a driven Korteweg-de Vries (KdV) equation with periodic boundary conditions, that as the nonlinear wave grows, it transforms into a soliton, which continues growing and accelerating adiabatically. A fully nonlinear perturbation theory is developed for the driven KdV equation to follow the growing wave into the strongly nonlinear regime and describe the soliton formation.

  16. Filamentation of magnetosonic wave and generation of magnetic turbulence in laser plasma interaction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Modi, K. V.; Tiwary, Prem Pyari; Singh, Ram Kishor Sharma, R. P.; Satsangi, V. R.

    2014-10-15

    This paper presents a theoretical model for the magnetic turbulence in laser plasma interaction due to the nonlinear coupling of magnetosonic wave with ion acoustic wave in overdense plasma. For this study, dynamical equations of magnetosonic waves and the ion acoustic waves have been developed in the presence of ponderomotive force due to the pump magnetosonic wave. Slowly converging and diverging behavior has been studied semi-analytically, this results in the formation of filaments of the magnetosonic wave. Numerical simulation has also been carried out to study nonlinear stage. From the results, it has been found that the localized structures become quite complex in nature. Further, power spectrum has been studied. Results show that the spectral index follows (?k{sup ?2.0}) scaling at smaller scale. Relevance of the present investigation has been shown with the experimental observation.

  17. Wave turbulence description of interacting particles: Klein-Gordon model with a Mexican-hat potential

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Basile Gallet; Sergey Nazarenko; Bérengère Dubrulle

    2015-04-21

    In field theory, particles are waves or excitations that propagate on the fundamental state. In experiments or cosmological models one typically wants to compute the out-of-equilibrium evolution of a given initial distribution of such waves. Wave Turbulence deals with out-of-equilibrium ensembles of weakly nonlinear waves, and is therefore well-suited to address this problem. As an example, we consider the complex Klein-Gordon equation with a Mexican-hat potential. This simple equation displays two kinds of excitations around the fundamental state: massive particles and massless Goldstone bosons. The former are waves with a nonzero frequency for vanishing wavenumber, whereas the latter obey an acoustic dispersion relation. Using wave turbulence theory, we derive wave kinetic equations that govern the coupled evolution of the spectra of massive and massless waves. We first consider the thermodynamic solutions to these equations and study the wave condensation transition, which is the classical equivalent of Bose-Einstein condensation. We then focus on nonlocal interactions in wavenumber space: we study the decay of an ensemble massive particles into massless ones. Under rather general conditions, these massless particles accumulate at low wavenumber. We study the dynamics of waves coexisting with such a strong condensate, and we compute rigorously a nonlocal Kolmogorov-Zakharov solution, where particles are transferred non-locally to the condensate, while energy cascades towards large wave numbers through local interactions. This nonlocal cascading state constitute the intermediate asymptotics between the initial distribution of waves and the thermodynamic state reached in the long-time limit.

  18. Ulysses observations of magnetic waves due to newborn interstellar pickup ions. II. Application of turbulence concepts to limiting wave energy and observability

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cannon, Bradford E.; Smith, Charles W.; Isenberg, Philip A.; Vasquez, Bernard J.; Joyce, Colin J.; Murphy, Neil; Nuno, Raquel G. E-mail: Charles.Smith@unh.edu E-mail: Bernie.Vasquez@unh.edu E-mail: Neil.Murphy@jpl.nasa.gov

    2014-06-01

    The low-frequency magnetic waves that arise from the isotropization of newborn interstellar pickup ions (PUIs) are reasonably well described by linear and quasi-linear kinetic theory in so far as those theories predict the wave frequency and polarization in the spacecraft frame. Those theories fail to describe the scarce observability of the waves. Quasilinear theory predicts that the wave power should accumulate over long periods of time as the relatively weak kinetic instability slowly adds power to the observed spectrum. At the same time it has been argued that the same wave energy must serve as a secondary source of thermal ion heating in the outer heliosphere once the initial turbulence is depleted. To the extent that turbulent transport of the wave energy acts against the spectrally confined accumulation of wave energy, turbulence should be a limiting factor in observability. We argue that turbulence does limit the observability of the waves and we use turbulence theory to predict the observed wave energy. We compare this prediction against a database of 502 wave observations attributed to newborn interstellar PUIs observed by the Ulysses spacecraft.

  19. Minimal position-velocity uncertainty wave packets in relativistic and non-relativistic quantum mechanics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Al-Hashimi, M.H. Wiese, U.-J.

    2009-12-15

    We consider wave packets of free particles with a general energy-momentum dispersion relation E(p). The spreading of the wave packet is determined by the velocity v={partial_derivative}{sub p}E. The position-velocity uncertainty relation {delta}x{delta}v{>=}1/2 |<{partial_derivative}{sub p}{sup 2}E>| is saturated by minimal uncertainty wave packets {phi}(p)=Aexp(-{alpha}E(p)+{beta}p). In addition to the standard minimal Gaussian wave packets corresponding to the non-relativistic dispersion relation E(p)=p{sup 2}/2m, analytic calculations are presented for the spreading of wave packets with minimal position-velocity uncertainty product for the lattice dispersion relation E(p)=-cos(pa)/ma{sup 2} as well as for the relativistic dispersion relation E(p)={radical}(p{sup 2}+m{sup 2}). The boost properties of moving relativistic wave packets as well as the propagation of wave packets in an expanding Universe are also discussed.

  20. Non-Gaussian properties of second-order wave orbital velocity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alberello, Alberto; Gramstad, Odin; Babanin, Alexander V; Toffoli, Alessandro

    2015-01-01

    A stochastic second-order wave model is applied to assess the statistical properties of wave orbital velocity in random sea states below the water surface. Directional spreading effects as well as the dependency of the water depth are investigated by means of a Monte-Carlo approach. Unlike for the surface elevation, sub-harmonics dominate the second-order contribution to orbital velocity. We show that a notable set-down occurs for the most energetic and steepest groups. This engenders a negative skewness in the temporal evolution of the orbital velocity. A substantial deviation of the upper and lower tails of the probability density function from the Gaussian distribution is noticed, velocities are faster below the wave trough and slower below the wave crest when compared with linear theory predictions. Second-order nonlinearity effects strengthen with reducing the water depth, while weaken with the broadening of the wave spectrum. The results are confirmed by laboratory data. Corresponding experiments have b...

  1. A Bayesian fusion model for space-time reconstruction of finely resolved velocities in turbulent flows from low resolution measurements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Van Nguyen, Linh; Chainais, Pierre

    2015-01-01

    The study of turbulent flows calls for measurements with high resolution both in space and in time. We propose a new approach to reconstruct High-Temporal-High-Spatial resolution velocity fields by combining two sources of information that are well-resolved either in space or in time, the Low-Temporal-High-Spatial (LTHS) and the High-Temporal-Low-Spatial (HTLS) resolution measurements. In the framework of co-conception between sensing and data post-processing, this work extensively investigates a Bayesian reconstruction approach using a simulated database. A Bayesian fusion model is developed to solve the inverse problem of data reconstruction. The model uses a Maximum A Posteriori estimate, which yields the most probable field knowing the measurements. The DNS of a wall-bounded turbulent flow at moderate Reynolds number is used to validate and assess the performances of the present approach. Low resolution measurements are subsampled in time and space from the fully resolved data. Reconstructed velocities ar...

  2. MHD Waves and Coronal Heating: Unifying Empirical and MHD Turbulence Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sokolov, Igor V; Oran, Rona; Downs, Cooper; Roussev, Ilia I; Jin, Meng; Manchester, Ward B; Evans, Rebekah M; Gombosi, Tamas I

    2012-01-01

    We present a new global model of the solar corona, including the low corona, the transition region and the top of chromosphere. The realistic 3D magnetic field is simulated using the data from the photospheric magnetic field measurements. The distinctive feature of the new model is incorporating the MHD Alfven wave turbulence. We assume this turbulence and its non-linear dissipation to be the only momentum and energy source for heating the coronal plasma and driving the solar wind. The difference between the turbulence dissipation efficiency in coronal holes and that in closed field regions is because the non-linear cascade rate degrades in strongly anisotropic turbulence in coronal holes (no inward propagating wave), thus resulting in colder coronal holes with the bi-modal solar wind originating from them. The detailed presentation of the theoretical model is illustrated with the synthetic images for multi-wavelength EUV emission compared with the observations from SDO AIA and Stereo EUVI instruments for the...

  3. Robust energy transfer mechanism and critically balanced turbulence via non-resonant triads in nonlinear wave systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miguel D. Bustamante; Brenda Quinn

    2013-09-02

    A robust energy transfer mechanism is found in nonlinear wave systems, which favours transfers towards modes interacting via non-resonant triads, applicable in meteorology, nonlinear optics and plasma wave turbulence. Transfer efficiency is maximal when the frequency mismatch of the non-resonant triad balances the system's nonlinear frequency: at intermediate levels of oscillation amplitudes an instability is triggered that explores unstable manifolds of periodic orbits, so turbulent cascades are most efficient at intermediate nonlinearity. Numerical simulations confirm analytical predictions.

  4. Travelling-waves consistent with turbulence-driven secondary flow in a square duct

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Uhlmann, Markus; Pinelli, Alfredo; 10.1063/1.3466661

    2010-01-01

    We present numerically determined travelling-wave solutions for pressure-driven flow through a straight duct with a square cross-section. This family of solutions represents typical coherent structures (a staggered array of counter-rotating streamwise vortices and an associated low-speed streak) on each wall. Their streamwise average flow in the cross-sectional plane corresponds to an eight vortex pattern much alike the secondary flow found in the turbulent regime.

  5. Control of the chaotic velocity dispersion of a cold electron beam interacting with electrostatic waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guido Ciraolo; Cristel Chandre; Ricardo Lima; Marco Pettini; Michel Vittot

    2006-07-31

    In this article we present an application of a method of control of Hamiltonian systems to the chaotic velocity diffusion of a cold electron beam interacting with electrostatic waves. We numerically show the efficiency and robustness of the additional small control term in restoring kinetic coherence of the injected electron beam.

  6. Increase of shear wave velocity before the 1998 eruption of Merapi volcano (Indonesia)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Snieder, Roel

    Increase of shear wave velocity before the 1998 eruption of Merapi volcano (Indonesia) U. Wegler,1 of the edifice of Merapi volcano (Java, Indonesia) before its eruption in 1998 by analyzing multiply scattered eruption of Merapi volcano (Indonesia), Geophys. Res. Lett., 33, L09303, doi:10.1029/2006GL025928. 1

  7. perovskite phase suggests slow longitudinal elastic-wave velocities propagating along the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hansell, Dennis

    perovskite phase suggests slow longitudinal elastic-wave velocities propagating along the [010] direction. In addition, it is also inferred that the post-perovskite phase forms a platy crystal habit) observed in the D region (1, 2) is possibly caused by the preferred orientation of the post-perovskite

  8. Developing regionalized models of lithospheric thickness and velocity structure across Eurasia and the Middle East from jointly inverting P-wave and S-wave receiver functions with Rayleigh wave group and phase velocities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Julia, J; Nyblade, A; Hansen, S; Rodgers, A; Matzel, E

    2009-07-06

    In this project, we are developing models of lithospheric structure for a wide variety of tectonic regions throughout Eurasia and the Middle East by regionalizing 1D velocity models obtained by jointly inverting P-wave and S-wave receiver functions with Rayleigh wave group and phase velocities. We expect the regionalized velocity models will improve our ability to predict travel-times for local and regional phases, such as Pg, Pn, Sn and Lg, as well as travel-times for body-waves at upper mantle triplication distances in both seismic and aseismic regions of Eurasia and the Middle East. We anticipate the models will help inform and strengthen ongoing and future efforts within the NNSA labs to develop 3D velocity models for Eurasia and the Middle East, and will assist in obtaining model-based predictions where no empirical data are available and for improving locations from sparse networks using kriging. The codes needed to conduct the joint inversion of P-wave receiver functions (PRFs), S-wave receiver functions (SRFs), and dispersion velocities have already been assembled as part of ongoing research on lithospheric structure in Africa. The methodology has been tested with synthetic 'data' and case studies have been investigated with data collected at an open broadband stations in South Africa. PRFs constrain the size and S-P travel-time of seismic discontinuities in the crust and uppermost mantle, SRFs constrain the size and P-S travel-time of the lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary, and dispersion velocities constrain average S-wave velocity within frequency-dependent depth-ranges. Preliminary results show that the combination yields integrated 1D velocity models local to the recording station, where the discontinuities constrained by the receiver functions are superimposed to a background velocity model constrained by the dispersion velocities. In our first year of this project we will (i) generate 1D velocity models for open broadband seismic stations in the western half of the study area (Eurasia and the Middle East) and (ii) identify well located seismic events with event-station paths isolated to individual tectonic provinces within the study area and collect broadband waveforms and source parameters for the selected events. The 1D models obtained from the joint inversion will then be combined with published geologic terrain maps to produce regionalized models for distinctive tectonic areas within the study area, and the models will be validated through full waveform modeling of well-located seismic events recorded at local and regional distances.

  9. The relation between seismic P- and S-wave velocity dispersion in saturated rocks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mavko, G. [Stanford Univ., CA (United States). Dept. of Geophysics] [Stanford Univ., CA (United States). Dept. of Geophysics; Jizba, D. [CSTJF, Pau (France)] [CSTJF, Pau (France)

    1994-01-01

    Seismic velocity dispersion in fluid-saturated rocks appears to be dominated by two mechanisms: the large scale mechanism modeled by Biot, and the local flow or squirt mechanism. The two mechanisms can be distinguished by the ratio of P- to S-wave dispersions, or more conveniently, by the ratio of dynamic bulk to shear compliance dispersions derived from the wave velocities. The authors` formulation suggests that when local flow dominates, the dispersion of the shear compliance will be approximately 4/15 the dispersion of the compressibility. When the Biot mechanism dominates, the constant of proportionality is much smaller. Their examination of ultrasonic velocities from 40 sandstones and granites shows that most, but not all, of the samples were dominated by local flow dispersion, particularly at effective pressures below 40 MPa.

  10. MULTI-SPACECRAFT OBSERVATIONS OF LINEAR MODES AND SIDEBAND WAVES IN ION-SCALE SOLAR WIND TURBULENCE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Perschke, Christopher; Motschmann, Uwe; Narita, Yasuhito; Glassmeier, Karl-Heinz

    2014-10-01

    In the scenario of weak turbulence, energy is believed to be cascaded from smaller to larger wave numbers and frequencies due to weak wave-wave interactions. Based on its perturbative treatment one may regard plasma turbulence as a superposition of linear modes (or normal modes) and sideband waves (or nonlinear modes). In this study, we use magnetic field and plasma measurements of nine solar wind events obtained by the Cluster spacecraft and make extensive use of a high-resolution wave vector analysis method, the Multi-point Signal Resonator technique, to find frequencies and wave vectors of discrete modes on ion kinetic scales in the plasma rest frame. The primarily unstructured wave observations in the frequency-wave number diagram are classified into three distinct linear modes (proton Bernstein modes, helium-alpha Bernstein modes, and kinetic Alfvén waves) and the sideband waves by comparing with the dispersion relations derived theoretically from linear Vlasov theory using observational values of the plasma parameter beta and the propagation angle from the mean magnetic field. About 60% of the observed discrete modes can be explained by the linear modes, primarily as the proton Bernstein and the kinetic Alfvén waves, within the frequency uncertainties, while the rest of the population (about 40%) cannot be classified as linear modes due to the large deviation from dispersion relations. We conclude that both the linear modes and sideband wave components are needed to construct the wave picture of solar wind turbulence on ion-kinetic scales.

  11. Nonlinear three-mode interaction and drift-wave turbulence in a tokamak edge plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Batista, A.M.; Caldas, I.L.; Lopes, S.R.; Viana, R.L.; Horton, W.; Morrison, P.J. [Instituto de Fisica, Universidade de Sao Paulo, Caixa Postal 66318, 05315-970, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Departamento de Fisica, Universidade Federal do Parana, 81531-990, Curitiba, Parana (Brazil); Department of Physics and Institute for Fusion Studies, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas, 78712 (United States)

    2006-04-15

    A three-wave interaction model with quadratic nonlinearities and linear growth/decay rates is used to investigate the occurrence of drift-wave turbulence driven by pressure gradients in the edge plasma of a tokamak. Model parameters are taken from a typical set of measurements of the floating electrostatic potential in the tokamak edge region. Some aspects of the temporal dynamics exhibited by the three-wave interaction model are investigated, with special emphasis on a chaotic regime found for a wide range of the wave decay rate. An intermittent transition from periodic to chaotic behavior is observed and some statistical properties, such as the interburst and laminar length interval durations, are explored.

  12. Three-dimensional crustal S wave velocity structure in Japan using microseismic data recorded by Hi-net

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kawakatsu, Hitoshi

    Three-dimensional crustal S wave velocity structure in Japan using microseismic data recorded by Hi seismic noise. We applied this method to the recording of Hi-net tiltmeters in Japan at 679 stations from), Three-dimensional crustal S wave velocity structure in Japan using microseismic data recorded by Hi

  13. P-wave velocity structure of the crust and uppermost mantle beneath Iceland from local earthquake tomography

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shen, Yang

    P-wave velocity structure of the crust and uppermost mantle beneath Iceland from local earthquake and uppermost mantle beneath Iceland, the keys to understanding the magma plumbing system of the hotspot develop a three-dimensional P-wave velocity model of the Icelandic crust and uppermost mantle from

  14. Laboratory Study Investigating the Three-dimensional Turbulence and Kinematic Properties Associated with a Breaking Solitary Wave 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Swigler, David Townley

    2010-10-12

    was used to generate the wave, while the free surface elevations and fluid velocities were measured using wave gauges and three-dimensional acoustic-Doppler velocimeters (ADVs), respectively. From the free surface elevations, the evolution and runup...

  15. Extensional wave attenuation and velocity in partially saturated sand in the sonic frequency range

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Z.; Rector, J.W.; Nihei, K.T.; Tomutsa, L.; Myer, L.R.; Nakagawa, S.

    2001-08-10

    Extensional wave attenuation and velocity measurements on a high permeability Monterey sand were performed over a range of gas saturations for imbibition and degassing conditions. These measurements were conducted using extensional wave pulse propagation and resonance over a 1-9 kHz frequency range for a hydrostatic confining pressure of 8.3 MPa. Analysis of the extensional wave data and the corresponding X-ray CT images of the gas saturation show strong attenuation resulting from the presence of the gas (Q{sub E} dropped from 300 for the dry sand to 30 for the partially-saturated sand), with larger attenuation at a given saturation resulting from heterogeneous gas distributions. The extensional wave velocities are in agreement with Gassmann theory for the test with near-homogeneous gas saturation and with a patchy saturation model for the test with heterogeneous gas saturation. These results show that partially-saturated sands under moderate confining pressure can produce strong intrinsic attenuation for extensional waves.

  16. A velocity transformation for heat and mass transfer Center for Turbulence Research, Stanford, California 94305

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nicoud, Franck

    and transpiration is identified. Note that M M cf/2 so that for typical ``low speed'' values of M 0.05 and cf 0 or cooling, Eq. 4 can be rewritten in the form: UVD 2 W 1 WU 1 O M2 . 5 The first-order term in Eq. 5 , i parameter is W Vinj , the characteristic transpiration velocity being in wall units. Thus, the ``mixing

  17. Piezooptic Coefficients and Acoustic Wave Velocities in Sn2P2S6 Crystals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O. Mys; I. Martynyuk-Lototska; A. Grabar; Yu. Vysochanskii; R. Vlokh

    2007-06-28

    Piezooptic coefficients of Sn2P2S6 crystals are experimentally determined for l=623.8 nm and T=293 K with the aid of interferometric technique. The components of the elastic stiffness tensor for these crystals are calculated on the basis of studies for the acoustic wave velocities. It is shown that acoustooptic figure of merit can achieve extremely high values for Sn2P2S6 crystals (M2 - 2x10-12s3/kg2).

  18. Anomalous scaling of low-order structure functions of turbulent velocity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Y. Chen; B. Dhruva; S. Kurien; K. R. Sreenivasan; M. A. Taylor

    2004-11-30

    It is now believed that the scaling exponents of moments of velocity increments are anomalous, or that the departures from Kolmogorov's (1941) self-similar scaling increase nonlinearly with the increasing order of the moment. This appears to be true whether one considers velocity increments themselves or their absolute values. However, moments of order lower than 2 of the absolute values of velocity increments have not been investigated thoroughly for anomaly. Here, we discuss the importance of the scaling of non-integer moments of order between +2 and -1, and obtain them from direct numerical simulations at moderate Reynolds numbers (Taylor microscale Reynolds numbers $R_\\lambda \\le$ 450) and experimental data at high Reynolds numbers ($R_\\lambda \\approx$ 10,000). The relative difference between the measured exponents and Kolmogorov's prediction increases as the moment order decreases towards -1, thus showing that the anomaly that is manifest in high-order moments is present in low-order moments as well. This conclusion provides a motivation for seeking a theory of anomalous scaling as the order of the moment vanishes. Such a theory does not have to consider rare events--which may be affected by non-universal features such as shear--and so may be regarded as advantageous to consider and develop.

  19. Standard practice for measuring the ultrasonic velocity in polyethylene tank walls using lateral longitudinal (LCR) waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2011-01-01

    1.1 This practice covers a procedure for measuring the ultrasonic velocities in the outer wall of polyethylene storage tanks. An angle beam lateral longitudinal (LCR) wave is excited with wedges along a circumferential chord of the tank wall. A digital ultrasonic flaw detector is used with sending-receiving search units in through transmission mode. The observed velocity is temperature corrected and compared to the expected velocity for a new, unexposed sample of material which is the same as the material being evaluated. The difference between the observed and temperature corrected velocities determines the degree of UV exposure of the tank. 1.2 The practice is intended for application to the outer surfaces of the wall of polyethylene tanks. Degradation typically occurs in an outer layer approximately 3.2-mm (0.125-in.) thick. Since the technique does not interrogate the inside wall of the tank, wall thickness is not a consideration other than to be aware of possible guided (Lamb) wave effects or reflection...

  20. Two-fluid description of wave-particle interactions in strong Buneman turbulence

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Che, H.

    2014-06-15

    To understand the nature of anomalous resistivity in magnetic reconnection, we investigate turbulence-induced momentum transport and energy dissipation while a plasma is unstable to the Buneman instability in force-free current sheets. Using 3D particle-in-cell simulations, we find that the macroscopic effects generated by wave-particle interactions in Buneman instability can be approximately described by a set of electron fluid equations. We show that both energy dissipation and momentum transport along electric current in the current layer are locally quasi-static, but globally dynamic and irreversible. Turbulent drag dissipates both the streaming energy of the current sheet and the associated magnetic energy. The net loss of streaming energy is converted into the electron component heat conduction parallel to the magnetic field and increases the electron Boltzmann entropy. The growth of self-sustained Buneman waves satisfies a Bernoulli-like equation that relates the turbulence-induced convective momentum transport and thermal momentum transport. Electron trapping and de-trapping drive local momentum transports, while phase mixing converts convective momentum into thermal momentum. The drag acts like a micro-macro link in the anomalous heating processes. The decrease of magnetic field maintains an inductive electric field that re-accelerates electrons, but most of the magnetic energy is dissipated and converted into the component heat of electrons perpendicular to the magnetic field. This heating process is decoupled from the heating of Buneman instability in the current sheets. Ion heating is weak but ions play an important role in assisting energy exchanges between waves and electrons. Cold ion fluid equations together with our electron fluid equations form a complete set of equations that describes the occurrence, growth, saturation and decay of the Buneman instability.

  1. S wave velocity structure below central Mexico using highresolution surface wave tomography

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clayton, Robert W.

    to the coast and found significant difference between the two paths in the period range of 5 to 35 s. [4 regions; they also show a wellresolved lowvelocity zone just below the active part of the Trans Mexican zone. This knowledge is also critical in understanding amplification of seismic waves as they propagate

  2. Energy- and flux-budget turbulence closure model for stably stratified flows. Part II: the role of internal gravity waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. S. Zilitinkevich; T. Elperin; N. Kleeorin; V. L'vov; I. Rogachevskii

    2009-08-18

    We advance our prior energy- and flux-budget turbulence closure model (Zilitinkevich et al., 2007, 2008) for the stably stratified atmospheric flows and extend it accounting for additional vertical flux of momentum and additional productions of turbulent kinetic energy, turbulent potential energy (TPE) and turbulent flux of potential temperature due to large-scale internal gravity waves (IGW). Main effects of IGW are following: the maximal value of the flux Richardson number (universal constant 0.2-0.25 in the no-IGW regime) becomes strongly variable. In the vertically homogeneous stratification, it increases with increasing wave energy and can even exceed 1. In the heterogeneous stratification, when IGW propagate towards stronger stratification, the maximal flux Richardson number decreases with increasing wave energy, reaches zero and then becomes negative. In other words, the vertical flux of potential temperature becomes counter-gradient. IGW also reduce anisotropy of turbulence and increase the share of TPE in the turbulent total energy. Depending on the direction (downward or upward), IGW either strengthen or weaken the total vertical flux of momentum. Predictions from the proposed model are consistent with available data from atmospheric and laboratory experiments, direct numerical simulations and large-eddy simulations.

  3. Dissipation of Magnetohydrodynamic Waves on Energetic Particles: Impact on Interstellar Turbulence and Cosmic Ray Transport

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. S. Ptuskin; I. V. Moskalenko; F. C. Jones; A. W. Strong; V. N. Zirakashvili

    2006-01-21

    The physical processes involved in diffusion of Galactic cosmic rays in the interstellar medium are addressed. We study the possibility that the nonlinear MHD cascade sets the power-law spectrum of turbulence which scatters charged energetic particles. We find that the dissipation of waves due to the resonant interaction with cosmic ray particles may terminate the Kraichnan-type cascade below wavelengths 10^13 cm. The effect of this wave dissipation has been incorporated in the GALPROP numerical propagation code in order to asses the impact on measurable astrophysical data. The energy-dependence of the cosmic-ray diffusion coefficient found in the resulting self-consistent model may explain the peaks in the secondary to primary nuclei ratios observed at about 1 GeV/nucleon.

  4. Waves and vortices in the inverse cascade regime of stratified turbulence with or without rotation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Herbert, Corentin; Rosenberg, Duane; Pouquet, Annick

    2015-01-01

    We study the partition of energy between waves and vortices in stratified turbulence, with or without rotation, for a variety of parameters, focusing on the behavior of the waves and vortices in the inverse cascade of energy towards the large scales. To this end, we use direct numerical simulations in a cubic box at a Reynolds number Re=1000, with the ratio between the Brunt-V\\"ais\\"al\\"a frequency N and the inertial frequency f varying from 1/4 to 20, together with a purely stratified run. The Froude number, measuring the strength of the stratification, varies within the range 0.02 energy spectra and fluxes exhibit characteristics of an inverse cascade, even though their energy is not conserved. Surprisingly, the slow vortices still dominate when the ratio N/f increases, also in the stratified case, although less and less so. However, when N/f increases, the inverse cascade of the slow modes becomes we...

  5. Nonlinear interaction of proton whistler with kinetic Alfvén wave to study solar wind turbulence

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goyal, R.; Sharma, R. P.; Goldstein, M. L.; Dwivedi, N. K.

    2013-12-15

    This paper presents the nonlinear interaction between small but finite amplitude kinetic Alfvén wave (KAW) and proton whistler wave using two-fluid model in intermediate beta plasma, applicable to solar wind. The nonlinearity is introduced by modification in the background density. This change in density is attributed to the nonlinear ponderomotive force due to KAW. The solutions of the model equations, governing the nonlinear interaction (and its effect on the formation of localized structures), have been obtained using semi-analytical method in solar wind at 1AU. It is concluded that the KAW properties significantly affect the threshold field required for the filament formation and their critical size (for proton whistler). The magnetic and electric field power spectra have been obtained and their relevance with the recent observations of solar wind turbulence by Cluster spacecraft has been pointed out.

  6. Powerful High Velocity-Dispersion Molecular Hydrogen Associated with an Intergalactic Shock Wave in Stephan's Quintet

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. N. Appleton; K. C. Xu; W. Reach; M. A. Dopita; Y. Gao; N. Lu; C. C. Popescu; J. W. Sulentic; R. J. Tuffs; M. S. Yun

    2006-02-25

    We present the discovery of strong mid-infrared emission lines of molecular hydrogen of apparently high velocity dispersion (~870 km/s) originating from a group-wide shock wave in Stephan's Quintet. These Spitzer Space Telescope observations reveal emission lines of molecular hydrogen and little else. this is the first time an almost pure H_2 line spectrum has been seen in an extragalactic object. Along with the absence of PAH features and very low excitation ionized gas tracers, the spectra resemble shocked gas seen in Galactic supernova remnants, but on a vast scale. The molecular emission extends over 24 kpc along the X-ray emitting shock-front, but has ten times the surface luminosity as the soft X-rays, and about one-third the surface luminosity of the IR continuum. We suggest that the powerful H_2 emission is generated by the shock wave caused when a high-velocity intruder galaxy collides with filaments of gas in the galaxy group. Our observations suggest a close connection between galaxy-scale shock-waves and strong broad H_2 emission lines, like those seen in the spectra of Ultraluminous Infrared Galaxies where high-speed collisions between galaxy disks are common.

  7. A perturbative model for predicting the high-Reynolds-number behaviour of the streamwise travelling waves technique in turbulent drag reduction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Belan, Marco

    2013-01-01

    The background of this work is the problem of reducing the aerodynamic turbulent friction drag, which is an important source of energy waste in innumerable technological fields. We develop a theoretical framework aimed at predicting the behaviour of existing drag reduction techniques when used at the large values of Re which are typical of applications. We focus on one recently proposed and very promising technique, which consists in creating at the wall streamwise-travelling waves of spanwise velocity. A perturbation analysis of the Navier-Stokes equations that govern the fluid motion is carried out, for the simplest wall-bounded flow geometry, i.e. the plane channel flow. The streamwise base flow is perturbed by the spanwise time-varying base flow induced by the travelling waves. An asymptotic expansion is then carried out with respect to the velocity amplitude of the travelling wave. The analysis, although based on several assumptions, leads to predictions of drag reduction that agree well with the measure...

  8. Measurement of shear wave velocity of heavy oil De-hua Han, Jiajin Liu, University of Houston

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 Measurement of shear wave velocity of heavy oil De-hua Han, Jiajin Liu, University of Houston modulus and therefore no shear wave can propagate through fluids. But heavy oils have properties that are much complex than lighter oils. At low temperatures, heavy oils are extremely viscous and begin to act

  9. The thin section rock physics: Modeling and measurement of seismic wave velocity on the slice of carbonates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wardaya, P. D. Noh, K. A. B. M. Yusoff, W. I. B. W.; Ridha, S.; Nurhandoko, B. E. B.

    2014-09-25

    This paper discusses a new approach for investigating the seismic wave velocity of rock, specifically carbonates, as affected by their pore structures. While the conventional routine of seismic velocity measurement highly depends on the extensive laboratory experiment, the proposed approach utilizes the digital rock physics view which lies on the numerical experiment. Thus, instead of using core sample, we use the thin section image of carbonate rock to measure the effective seismic wave velocity when travelling on it. In the numerical experiment, thin section images act as the medium on which wave propagation will be simulated. For the modeling, an advanced technique based on artificial neural network was employed for building the velocity and density profile, replacing image's RGB pixel value with the seismic velocity and density of each rock constituent. Then, ultrasonic wave was simulated to propagate in the thin section image by using finite difference time domain method, based on assumption of an acoustic-isotropic medium. Effective velocities were drawn from the recorded signal and being compared to the velocity modeling from Wyllie time average model and Kuster-Toksoz rock physics model. To perform the modeling, image analysis routines were undertaken for quantifying the pore aspect ratio that is assumed to represent the rocks pore structure. In addition, porosity and mineral fraction required for velocity modeling were also quantified by using integrated neural network and image analysis technique. It was found that the Kuster-Toksoz gives the closer prediction to the measured velocity as compared to the Wyllie time average model. We also conclude that Wyllie time average that does not incorporate the pore structure parameter deviates significantly for samples having more than 40% porosity. Utilizing this approach we found a good agreement between numerical experiment and theoretically derived rock physics model for estimating the effective seismic wave velocity of rock.

  10. Wave-Particle Decorrelation and Transport of Anisotropic Turbulence in Collisionless Plasmas Z. Lin,* I. Holod, and L. Chen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, Zhihong

    Wave-Particle Decorrelation and Transport of Anisotropic Turbulence in Collisionless Plasmas Z. Lin,* I. Holod, and L. Chen Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Irvine, California 92697, USA P. H. Diamond Department of Physics, University of California, San Diego, California

  11. Inertial waves and mean velocity profiles in a rotating pipe and a circular annulus with axial flow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Yantao; Wu, J Z; Orlandi, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we solve the inviscid inertial wave solutions in a circular pipe or annulus rotating constantly about its axis with moderate angular speed. The solutions are constructed by the so-called helical wave functions. We reveal that the mean velocity profiles must satisfy certain conditions to accommodate the inertial waves at the bulk region away from boundary. These conditions require the axial and azimuthal components of the mean velocity take the shapes of the zeroth and first order Bessel functions of the first kind, respectively. The theory is then verified by data obtained from direct numerical simulations for both rotating pipe and circular annulus, and excellent agreement is found between theory and numerical results. Large scale vortex clusters are found in the bulk region where the mean velocity profiles match the theoretical predictions. The success of the theory in rotating pipe, circular annulus, and streamwise rotating channel suggests that such inertial waves are quite common in wall bo...

  12. FLUID-INDUCED CHANGES IN SHEAR VELOCITY FROM SURFACE WAVES Michael West and William Menke, Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory and Department of Earth

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    West, Michael

    respond to changes in the bulk modulus, shear modulus and density caused by the presence of water. WeFLUID-INDUCED CHANGES IN SHEAR VELOCITY FROM SURFACE WAVES Michael West and William Menke, Lamont transient ground water by detecting changes in seismic velocity. Compressional and shear wave velocities

  13. Effect of the drift wave turbulence on the evolution of the low-[ital m] tearing modes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Siva Rama Prasad, P.V.; Tewari, D.P. )

    1994-01-01

    The effect of the background drift wave turbulence on the evolution of the low-[ital m] tearing modes has been studied, in the quasilinear regime, in various limiting cases. It is found, in the cases of the [ital m]=1 classical, collisionless, and drift-tearing modes, that the turbulence introduces finite real frequencies to these modes, which are otherwise purely growing ones, but reduces their instability activity. In the case of the [ital m][ge]2 classical modes, in a limit [vert bar][alpha][vert bar][sup 1/2][much gt][rho][sub [ital i

  14. New insights into the decay of ion waves to turbulence, ion heating, and soliton generation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chapman, T. Banks, J. W.; Berger, R. L.; Cohen, B. I.; Williams, E. A.; Brunner, S.

    2014-04-15

    The decay of a single-frequency, propagating ion acoustic wave (IAW) via two-ion wave decay to a continuum of IAW modes is found to result in a highly turbulent plasma, ion soliton production, and rapid ion heating. Instability growth rates, thresholds, and sensitivities to plasma conditions are studied via fully kinetic Vlasov simulations. The decay rate of IAWs is found to scale linearly with the fundamental IAW potential amplitude ?{sub 1} for ZT{sub e}/T{sub i}?20, beyond which the instability is shown to scale with a higher power of ?{sub 1}, where Z is the ion charge number and T{sub e} (T{sub i}) is the electron (ion) thermal temperature. The threshold for instability is found to be smaller by an order of magnitude than linear theory estimates. Achieving a better understanding of the saturation of stimulated Brillouin scatter levels observed in laser-plasma interaction experiments is part of the motivation for this study.

  15. MEASUREMENT OF COMPRESSIONAL-WAVE SEISMIC VELOCITIES IN 29 WELLS AT THE HANFORD SITE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    PETERSON SW

    2010-10-08

    Check shot seismic velocity surveys were collected in 100 B/C, 200 East, 200-PO-1 Operational Unit (OU), and the Gable Gap areas in order to provide time-depth correlation information to aid the interpretation of existing seismic reflection data acquired at the Hanford Site (Figure 1). This report details results from 5 wells surveyed in fiscal year (FY) 2008, 7 wells in FY 2009, and 17 wells in FY 2010 and provides summary compressional-wave seismic velocity information to help guide future seismic survey design as well as improve current interpretations of the seismic data (SSC 1979/1980; SGW-39675; SGW-43746). Augmenting the check shot database are four surveys acquired in 2007 in support of the Bechtel National, Inc. Waste Treatment Plant construction design (PNNL-16559, PNNL-16652), and check shot surveys in three wells to support seismic testing in the 200 West Area (Waddell et al., 1999). Additional sonic logging was conducted during the late 1970s and early 1980s as part of the Basalt Waste Isolation Program (BWIP) (SSC 1979/1980) and check shot/sonic surveys as part of the safety report for the Skagit/Hanford Nuclear project (RDH/10-AMCP-0164). Check shot surveys are used to obtain an in situ measure of compressional-wave seismic velocity for sediment and rock in the vicinity of the well point, and provide the seismic-wave travel time to geologic horizons of interest. The check shot method deploys a downhole seismic receiver (geophone) to record the arrival of seismic waves generated by a source at the ground surface. The travel time of the first arriving seismic-wave is determined and used to create a time-depth function to correlate encountered geologic intervals with the seismic data. This critical tie with the underlying geology improves the interpretation of seismic reflection profile information. Fieldwork for this investigation was conducted by in house staff during the weeks of September 22, 2008 for 5 wells in the 200 East Area (Figure 2); June 1, 2009 for 7 wells in the 200-PO-1 OU and Gable Gap regions (see Figure 3 and Figure 4); and March 22, 2010 and April 19, 2010 for 17 wells in the 200 East, The initial scope of survey work was planned for Wells 299-EI8-1, 699-2-E14, 699-12-18, 699-16-51, 699-42-30, 699-53-55B, 699-54-18D, and 699-84-34B. Well 299-E18-1 could not be entered due to bent casing (prevented removal of the pump), wells 699-12-18 and 699-42-30 could not be safely reached by the logging truck, Well 699-16-51 was decommissioned prior to survey start, Well 699-53-55B did not have its pump pulled, and Wells 699-2-EI4, 699-54-18D, and 699-84-34B are artesian and capped with an igloo structure. Table 1 provides a list of wells that were surveyed and Figure 1 through Figure 5 show the well locations relative to the Hanford Site.

  16. Seismic Velocity Structure and Depth-Dependence of Anisotropy in the Red Sea and Arabian Shield from Surface Wave Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hansen, S; Gaherty, J; Schwartz, S; Rodgers, A; Al-Amri, A

    2007-07-25

    We investigate the lithospheric and upper mantle structure as well as the depth-dependence of anisotropy along the Red Sea and beneath the Arabian Peninsula using receiver function constraints and phase velocities of surface waves traversing two transects of stations from the Saudi Arabian National Digital Seismic Network. Frequency-dependent phase delays of fundamental-mode Love and Rayleigh waves, measured using a cross-correlation procedure, require very slow shear velocities and the presence of anisotropy throughout the upper mantle. Linearized inversion of these data produce path-averaged 1D radially anisotropic models with about 4% anisotropy in the lithosphere, increasing to about 4.8% anisotropy across the lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary (LAB). Models with reasonable crustal velocities in which the mantle lithosphere is isotropic cannot satisfy the data. The lithospheric lid, which ranges in thickness from about 70 km near the Red Sea coast to about 90 km beneath the Arabian Shield, is underlain by a pronounced low-velocity zone with shear velocities as low as 4.1 km/s. Forward models, which are constructed from previously determined shear-wave splitting estimates, can reconcile surface and body wave observations of anisotropy. The low shear velocity values are similar to many other continental rift and oceanic ridge environments. These low velocities combined with the sharp velocity contrast across the LAB may indicate the presence of partial melt beneath Arabia. The anisotropic signature primarily reflects a combination of plate- and density-driven flow associated with active rifting processes in the Red Sea.

  17. Joint migration velocity analysis of PP-and PS-waves for VTI media Pengfei Cai1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsvankin, Ilya

    estimated, accurate depth images can be obtained by migrating the recorded PP and PS data. INTRODUCTION Prestack depth migration (PSDM) and reflection tomography in the migrated domain are widely used in PJoint migration velocity analysis of PP- and PS-waves for VTI media Pengfei Cai1 and Ilya Tsvankin2

  18. Green's Functions for Surface Waves in a Generic Velocity Structure by Victor C. Tsai and Sarun Atiganyanun*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsai, Victor C.

    , it is not in others. Moreover, calculating the complete Green's functions for a specific case may take significantShort Note Green's Functions for Surface Waves in a Generic Velocity Structure by Victor C. Tsai displacement/stress eigenfunctions and Green's functions have been well established for many decades. However

  19. Derivation of site-specific relationships between hydraulic parameters and p-wave velocities based on hydraulic and seismic tomography

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brauchler, R.; Doetsch, J.; Dietrich, P.; Sauter, M.

    2012-01-10

    In this study, hydraulic and seismic tomographic measurements were used to derive a site-specific relationship between the geophysical parameter p-wave velocity and the hydraulic parameters, diffusivity and specific storage. Our field study includes diffusivity tomograms derived from hydraulic travel time tomography, specific storage tomograms, derived from hydraulic attenuation tomography, and p-wave velocity tomograms, derived from seismic tomography. The tomographic inversion was performed in all three cases with the SIRT (Simultaneous Iterative Reconstruction Technique) algorithm, using a ray tracing technique with curved trajectories. The experimental set-up was designed such that the p-wave velocity tomogram overlaps the hydraulic tomograms by half. The experiments were performed at a wellcharacterized sand and gravel aquifer, located in the Leine River valley near Göttingen, Germany. Access to the shallow subsurface was provided by direct-push technology. The high spatial resolution of hydraulic and seismic tomography was exploited to derive representative site-specific relationships between the hydraulic and geophysical parameters, based on the area where geophysical and hydraulic tests were performed. The transformation of the p-wave velocities into hydraulic properties was undertaken using a k-means cluster analysis. Results demonstrate that the combination of hydraulic and geophysical tomographic data is a promising approach to improve hydrogeophysical site characterization.

  20. Stochastic acceleration of electrons by fast magnetosonic waves in solar flares: the effects of anisotropy in velocity and wavenumber space

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pongkitiwanichakul, Peera; Chandran, Benjamin D. G.

    2014-11-20

    We develop a model for stochastic acceleration of electrons in solar flares. As in several previous models, the electrons are accelerated by turbulent fast magnetosonic waves ({sup f}ast waves{sup )} via transit-time-damping (TTD) interactions. (In TTD interactions, fast waves act like moving magnetic mirrors that push the electrons parallel or anti-parallel to the magnetic field). We also include the effects of Coulomb collisions and the waves' parallel electric fields. Unlike previous models, our model is two-dimensional in both momentum space and wavenumber space and takes into account the anisotropy of the wave power spectrum F{sub k} and electron distribution function f {sub e}. We use weak turbulence theory and quasilinear theory to obtain a set of equations that describes the coupled evolution of F{sub k} and f {sub e}. We solve these equations numerically and find that the electron distribution function develops a power-law-like non-thermal tail within a restricted range of energies E in (E {sub nt}, E {sub max}). We obtain approximate analytic expressions for E {sub nt} and E {sub max}, which describe how these minimum and maximum energies depend upon parameters such as the electron number density and the rate at which fast-wave energy is injected into the acceleration region at large scales. We contrast our results with previous studies that assume that F{sub k} and f {sub e} are isotropic, and we compare one of our numerical calculations with the time-dependent hard-X-ray spectrum observed during the 1980 June 27 flare. In our numerical calculations, the electron energy spectra are softer (steeper) than in models with isotropic F{sub k} and f {sub e} and closer to the values inferred from observations of solar flares.

  1. Anomalous electron-ion energy coupling in electron drift wave turbulence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhao, Lei

    annulus arises due to a wave energy flux differential acrossprincipal collisionless wave energy dissipation channel inOn the other hand, wave energy can be dissipated by ion

  2. Multi-scale interaction of driftWave turbulence with large scale shear flows

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDevitt, Christopher J.

    2008-01-01

    then to impose outgoing wave energy boundary conditions [Appendix A, this outgoing wave energy condition implies thatMHD. Appendix A: Outgoing Wave Energy Boundary Conditions In

  3. Physica D 135 (2000) 98116 Turbulence of capillary waves --theory and numerical simulation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zakharov, Vladimir

    2000-01-01

    wavebreaking at arbitrary small wind [1]. Capillary waves are pumped by gravity waves and carry the energy flux

  4. Shear Wave Velocity Structure of Southern African Crust: Evidence for Compositional Heterogeneity within Archaean and Proterozoic Terrains

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kgaswane, E M; Nyblade, A A; Julia, J; Dirks, P H H M; Durrheim, R J; Pasyanos, M E

    2008-11-11

    Crustal structure in southern Africa has been investigated by jointly inverting receiver functions and Rayleigh wave group velocities for 89 broadband seismic stations spanning much of the Precambrian shield of southern Africa. 1-D shear wave velocity profiles obtained from the inversion yield Moho depths that are similar to those reported in previous studies and show considerable variability in the shear wave velocity structure of the lower part of the crust between some terrains. For many of the Archaean and Proterozoic terrains in the shield, S velocities reach 4.0 km/s or higher over a substantial part of the lower crust. However, for most of the Kimberley terrain and adjacent parts of the Kheis Province and Witwatersrand terrain, as well as for the western part of the Tokwe terrain, mean shear wave velocities of {le} 3.9 km/s characterize the lower part of the crust along with slightly ({approx}5 km) thinner crust. These findings indicate that the lower crust across much of the shield has a predominantly mafic composition, except for the southwest portion of the Kaapvaal Craton and western portion of the Zimbabwe Craton, where the lower crust is intermediate-to-felsic in composition. The parts of the Kaapvaal Craton underlain by intermediate-to-felsic lower crust coincide with regions where Ventersdorp rocks have been preserved, and thus we suggest that the intermediate-to-felsic composition of the lower crust and the shallower Moho may have resulted from crustal melting during the Ventersdorp tectonomagmatic event at c. 2.7 Ga and concomitant crustal thinning caused by rifting.

  5. The Magnetic Field Sign Reversal and Evolution of Rossby and Alfven Waves Induced by Velocity Shear Oscillations on the Sun

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. D. Pataraya; T. A. Pataraya; B. M. Shergelashvili

    2000-05-08

    The behaviour of the toroidal and meridional components of the solar large-scale magnetic field and linear Alfven and Rossby waves during solar activity cycles and bi-annual time periods are theoretically investigated in this work. We consider the case of periodical velocity shear with bi-annual oscillation period . The large-scale magnetic field toroidal and meridional components are obtained as harmonic functions of the time. The sign reversal of these magnetic field components is studied. The numerical simulations show that, due to the velocity shear oscillations, the toroidal or meridional component of the large-scale magnetic field reverses its sign three times in one of the hemispheres (northern or southern) of the Sun, during the solar activity cycle 23. According to our results the appearance of velocity shear oscillations leads to the modulation of the magnetic field 22-year period oscillations by the bi-annual ones. The presented model is applicable for investigation of the magnetic field evolution at the base of convection zone as well as for understanding the magnetic field properties in the upper solar atmosphere. The excitement of the linear Rossby and Alfven waves in the shear layer at the base of the convection zone is also considered. The periodical impulsive growth is characteristic to the energy density of Alfven and Rossby waves and they propagate as localized in time powerful pulses. Such behavior of waves well explains mechanisms of the solar flare excitement and activity.

  6. Interplay of waves and eddies in rotating stratified turbulence and the link with kinetic-potential energy partition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marino, Raffaele; Herbert, Corentin; Pouquet, Annick

    2015-01-01

    The interplay between waves and eddies in stably stratified rotating flows is investigated by means of world-class direct numerical simulations using up to $3072^3$ grid points. Strikingly, we find that the shift from vortex to wave dominated dynamics occurs at a wavenumber $k_R$ which does not depend on Reynolds number, suggesting that partition of energy between wave and vortical modes is not sensitive to the development of turbulence at the smaller scales. We also show that $k_R$ is comparable to the wavenumber at which exchanges between kinetic and potential modes stabilize at close to equipartition, emphasizing the role of potential energy, as conjectured in the atmosphere and the oceans. Moreover, $k_R$ varies as the inverse of the Froude number as explained by the scaling prediction proposed, consistent with recent observations and modeling of the Mesosphere-Lower Thermosphere and of the ocean.

  7. Spatially evolving vortex-gas turbulent free shear layers: Part 1. Effect of velocity ratio, and upstream and downstream conditions on spread-rate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Suryanarayanan, Saikishan

    2015-01-01

    The relevance of the vortex-gas model to the large scale dynamics of temporally evolving turbulent free shear layers in an inviscid incompressible fluid has recently been established by extensive numerical simulations (Suryanarayanan et al, Phys. Rev. E 89, 013009, 2014). Here, the effects of the velocity ratio across a spatially evolving 2D free shear layer are investigated by vortex-gas simulations, using a computational model based on Basu et al (1992, 1995), but with a crucial improvement that ensures conservation of global circulation. These are carried out for a range of values of the velocity ratio parameter $\\lambda= (U_1-U_2)/(U_1+U_2)$, where $U_1$ and $U_2$ ($< U_1$) are respective velocities across the layer. The simulations show that the conditions imposed at the beginning of the free shear layer and at the exit to the domain can affect the flow evolution in their respective neighborhoods, the latter being particularly strong as $\\lambda \\rightarrow 1$. In between the two neighborhoods is a re...

  8. Dissipation of Magnetohydrodynamic Waves on Energetic Particles: Impact on Interstellar Turbulence and Cosmic Ray

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Strong, Andrew W.

    acceleration of cosmic rays by MHD waves is accompanied by the damping of the waves, since the wave energy zirak@mpimail.mpi-hd.mpg.de 1 Also Institute for Physical Science and Technology, University of Maryland

  9. Turbulence and internal waves in numerical models of the equatorial undercurrents system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pham, Hieu T.

    2010-01-01

    w ? field at t = 80; (b) Wave energy flux p ? w ? across thestress u ? w ? and (f) wave energy flux p ? w ? . Thewaves. The ratio of the wave energy flux to the rate of

  10. On breaking waves and turbulence at the air-sea interface /

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sutherland, Peter Jesse

    2013-01-01

    transfer equation of wave energy or action, which has threeSurface impulse and wave energy dissipation rates, Journalaverage rate of gravity wave energy loss per unit area by

  11. An investigation of the relationships between mountain waves and clear air turbulence encountered by the XB-70 airplane in the stratosphere 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Incrocci, Thomas Paul

    1970-01-01

    troposphere of the average profiles of L and Ri for those cases with wind components less than 10 m sec normal to the mountain tops 43 INTRODUCTION The problem of stratospheric turbulence was vividly brought to light when the supersonic XB-70 airplane...AN INVESTIGATION OF THE RELATIONSHIPS BETWEEN MOUNTAIN WAVES AND CLEAR AIR TURBULENCE ENCOUNTERED BY TIIE XB-70 AIRPLANE IN THE STRATOSPHERE A Thesis by THOMAS PAUL INCROCCI Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University...

  12. Multi-scale interaction of driftWave turbulence with large scale shear flows

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDevitt, Christopher J.

    2008-01-01

    pro?le, killing the free energy source of the turbulence.environmentally benign source of energy free from many ofin fact act as a source of free energy for the convective

  13. Capillary wave turbulence on a spherical fluid surface in low gravity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Falcon, Eric

    .epljournal.org #12;Europhysics Letters (EPL) has a new online home at www.epljournal.org Take a look for the latest. The surface wave amplitude displays power law spectrum over two decades in frequency, corresponding´en waves in solar wind [3], plasmas [4], surface waves on elastic plates [5], and spin waves in solids

  14. Toward the Theory of Turbulence in Magnetized Plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boldyrev, Stanislav

    2013-07-26

    The goal of the project was to develop a theory of turbulence in magnetized plasmas at large scales, that is, scales larger than the characteristic plasma microscales (ion gyroscale, ion inertial scale, etc.). Collisions of counter-propagating Alfven packets govern the turbulent cascade of energy toward small scales. It has been established that such an energy cascade is intrinsically anisotropic, in that it predominantly supplies energy to the modes with mostly field-perpendicular wave numbers. The resulting energy spectrum of MHD turbulence, and the structure of the fluctuations were studied both analytically and numerically. A new parallel numerical code was developed for simulating reduced MHD equations driven by an external force. The numerical setting was proposed, where the spectral properties of the force could be varied in order to simulate either strong or weak turbulent regimes. It has been found both analytically and numerically that weak MHD turbulence spontaneously generates a “condensate”, that is, concentration of magnetic and kinetic energy at small k{sub {parallel}}. A related topic that was addressed in the project is turbulent dynamo action, that is, generation of magnetic field in a turbulent flow. We were specifically concentrated on the generation of large-scale magnetic field compared to the scales of the turbulent velocity field. We investigate magnetic field amplification in a turbulent velocity field with nonzero helicity, in the framework of the kinematic Kazantsev-Kraichnan model.

  15. Inversion of OBC seismic data for P- and S-wave velocities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hall, Guy R

    This thesis describes an new method for deriving a shared-earth velocity model for P-P ans P-SV reflections measured with ocean bottom cable (OBC) data. The data have the potential to reveal lithological and fluid ...

  16. Numerical study of turbulence and wave damping induced by vegetation canopies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kirby, James T.

    accurate predictions of vegetation-induced wave energy dissipation. Wave propagation through a finite patch binder that resists coastal erosion. Vegetation can also dissipate wave energy (Augustin et al., 2009, Tamkang University, Taipei, Taiwan d Department of Marine Engineering Technology, Texas A & M University

  17. Group velocity of acoustic waves in strongly scattering media: Dependence on the volume fraction of scatterers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Page, John

    the solid scatterers, and by ii tortuosity effects, where the wave energy is largely confined University of Science and Technology, Clear Water Bay, Kowloon, Hong Kong Received 4 June 1998 We study, both

  18. One-Way Wave Propagators For Velocity Analysis On Curvilinear Coordinates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Budkick, Scott

    2008-01-01

    Due to present computational limitations, migration by the one-way wave equation remains an integral tool in seismic exploration. For the realistic interpretation of common image point gathers, it is necessary that migration ...

  19. Localized measurement of turbulent fluctuations in tokamaks with coherent scattering of electromagnetic waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mazzucato, Ernesto

    Localized measurement of turbulent fluctuations in tokamaks with coherent scattering in tokamaks are still an outstanding problem. In this paper, the method of coherent scattering as the potential cause of anomalous transport in tokamaks. The best spatial resolution can be achieved when

  20. Four Lectures on Turbulent Combustion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peters, Norbert

    Four Lectures on Turbulent Combustion N. Peters Institut f¨ur Technische Mechanik RWTH Aachen Turbulent Combustion: Introduction and Overview 1 1.1 Moment Methods in Modeling Turbulence with Combustion and Velocity Scales . . . . . . . . . . . 11 1.4 Regimes in Premixed Turbulent Combustion

  1. Bulletin of the Seismological Society of America, Vol. 94, No. 6, pp. 22222228, December 2004 A Shallow Shear-Wave Velocity Transect

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , 1997) provisions (Building Seismic Safety Council [BSSC], 1998) sites are categorized for shaking-wave velocity measure- ments in the basin to be able to assess the success of alter- native NEHRP classification. Ambient seismic noise (vehicle traffic, etc.) excited Rayleigh waves in urban alluvium, eliminating

  2. Contribution of Velocity Vortices and Fast Shock Reflection and Refraction to the Formation of EUV Waves in Solar Eruptions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Hongjuan; Gong, Jiancun; Wu, Ning; Lin, Jun

    2015-01-01

    We numerically study the detailed evolutionary features of the wave-like disturbance and its propagation in the eruption. This work is a follow-up to Wang et al., using significantly upgraded new simulations. We focus on the contribution of the velocity vortices and the fast shock reflection and refraction in the solar corona to the formation of the EUV waves. Following the loss of equilibrium in the coronal magnetic structure, the flux rope exhibits rapid motions and invokes the fast-mode shock forward of the rope, which then produces the type II radio burst. The expansion of the fast shock, which is associated with outward motion, takes place in various directions, and the downward expansion shows the reflection and the refraction as a result of the non-uniform background plasma. The reflected component of the fast shock propagates upward and the refracted component propagates downward. As the refracted component reaches the boundary surface, a weak echo is excited. The Moreton wave is invoked as the fast s...

  3. Structure of the Crust beneath Cameroon, West Africa, from the Joint Inversion of Rayleigh Wave Group Velocities and Receiver Functions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tokam, A K; Tabod, C T; Nyblade, A A; Julia, J; Wiens, D A; Pasyanos, M E

    2010-02-18

    The Cameroon Volcanic Line (CVL) is a major geologic feature that cuts across Cameroon from the south west to the north east. It is a unique volcanic lineament which has both an oceanic and a continental sector and consists of a chain of Tertiary to Recent, generally alkaline volcanoes stretching from the Atlantic island of Pagalu to the interior of the African continent. The oceanic sector includes the islands of Bioko (formerly Fernando Po) and Sao Tome and Principe while the continental sector includes the Etinde, Cameroon, Manengouba, Bamboutos, Oku and Mandara mountains, as well as the Adamawa and Biu Plateaus. In addition to the CVL, three other major tectonic features characterize the region: the Benue Trough located northwest of the CVL, the Central African Shear Zone (CASZ), trending N70 degrees E, roughly parallel to the CVL, and the Congo Craton in southern Cameroon. The origin of the CVL is still the subject of considerable debate, with both plume and non-plume models invoked by many authors (e.g., Deruelle et al., 2007; Ngako et al, 2006; Ritsema and Allen, 2003; Burke, 2001; Ebinger and Sleep, 1998; Lee et al, 1994; Dorbath et al., 1986; Fairhead and Binks, 1991; King and Ritsema, 2000; Reusch et al., 2010). Crustal structure beneath Cameroon has been investigated previously using active (Stuart et al, 1985) and passive (Dorbath et al., 1986; Tabod, 1991; Tabod et al, 1992; Plomerova et al, 1993) source seismic data, revealing a crust about 33 km thick at the south-western end of the continental portion of the CVL (Tabod, 1991) and the Adamawa Plateau, and thinner crust (23 km thick) beneath the Garoua Rift in the north (Stuart et al, 1985) (Figure 1). Estimates of crustal thickness obtained using gravity data show similar variations between the Garoua rift, Adamawa Plateau, and southern part of the CVL (Poudjom et al., 1995; Nnange et al., 2000). In this study, we investigate further crustal structure beneath the CVL and the adjacent regions in Cameroon using 1-D shear wave velocity models obtained from the joint inversion of Rayleigh wave group velocities and P-receiver functions for 32 broadband seismic stations. From the 1-D shear wave velocity models, we obtain new insights into the composition and structure of the crust and upper mantle across Cameroon. After briefly reviewing the geological framework of Cameroon, we describe the data and the joint inversion method, and then interpret variations in crustal structure found beneath Cameroon in terms of the tectonic history of the region.

  4. Coastal Wave Generation and Wave Breaking over Terrain: Two Problems in Mesoscale Wave Dynamics 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Qian, Tingting

    2010-07-14

    Two problems in mesoscale wave dynamics are addressed: (i) wave-turbulence interaction in a breaking mountain wave and (ii) gravity wave generation associated with coastal heating gradients. The mean and turbulent structures in a breaking mountain...

  5. Hydrodynamic forces on larvae affect their settlement on coral reefs in turbulent, wave-driven flow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Koehl, Mimi

    on the reef top were 3­10 times greater than on larvae 5­10 cm below the reef top. Intermittent bursts of high the recruitment of water-dispersed marine larvae onto benthic substrata: the sweeping away of larvae that have a laboratory flume to measure water velocities encountered 200 mm from coral surfaces by microscopic larvae

  6. Determination of elastic properties of a MnO{sub 2} coating by surface acoustic wave velocity dispersion analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sermeus, J.; Glorieux, C.; Sinha, R.; Vereecken, P. M.; Vanstreels, K.

    2014-07-14

    MnO{sub 2} is a material of interest in the development of high energy-density batteries, specifically as a coating material for internal 3D structures, thus ensuring rapid energy deployment. Its electrochemical properties have been mapped extensively, but there are, to the best of the authors' knowledge, no records of the elastic properties of thin film MnO{sub 2}. Impulsive stimulated thermal scattering (ISTS), also known as the heterodyne diffraction or transient grating technique, was used to determine the Young's modulus (E) and porosity (?) of a 500?nm thick MnO{sub 2} coating on a Si(001) substrate. ISTS is an all optical method that is able to excite and detect surface acoustic waves (SAWs) on opaque samples. From the measured SAW velocity dispersion, the Young's modulus and porosity were determined to be E?=?25?±?1?GPa and ?=42±1%, respectively. These values were confirmed by independent techniques and determined by a most-squares analysis of the carefully fitted SAW velocity dispersion. This study demonstrates the ability of the presented technique to determine the elastic parameters of a thin, porous film on an anisotropic substrate.

  7. Predictive Simulations of Drift Wave Turbulence, Extended MHD, and Heating and Current Drive

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of the ITER pedestal and scrape-off layer (SOL) are key challenges to the theory and computational community on fluctuations, pedestal and SOL coupling, the density limit, radio frequency (RF) wave propagation and heating is then to evaluate the global profile evolution by treating the wide range of space-time scales spanned

  8. Single-wavenumber Representation of Nonlinear Energy Spectrum in Elastic-Wave Turbulence of {F}öppl-von {K}ármán Equation: Energy Decomposition Analysis and Energy Budget

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Naoto Yokoyama; Masanori Takaoka

    2014-12-09

    A single-wavenumber representation of nonlinear energy spectrum, i.e., stretching energy spectrum is found in elastic-wave turbulence governed by the F\\"oppl-von K\\'arm\\'an (FvK) equation. The representation enables energy decomposition analysis in the wavenumber space, and analytical expressions of detailed energy budget in the nonlinear interactions are obtained for the first time in wave turbulence systems. We numerically solved the FvK equation and observed the following facts. Kinetic and bending energies are comparable with each other at large wavenumbers as the weak turbulence theory suggests. On the other hand, the stretching energy is larger than the bending energy at small wavenumbers, i.e., the nonlinearity is relatively strong. The strong correlation between a mode $a_{\\bm{k}}$ and its companion mode $a_{-\\bm{k}}$ is observed at the small wavenumbers. Energy transfer shows that the energy is input into the wave field through stretching-energy transfer at the small wavenumbers, and dissipated through the quartic part of kinetic-energy transfer at the large wavenumbers. A total-energy flux consistent with the energy conservation is calculated directly by using the analytical expression of the total-energy transfer, and the forward energy cascade is observed clearly.

  9. Geophys. J. R. astr. SOC.(1987) 91,429437 On the relation between seismic wave velocity and stress in a solid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lyakhovsky, Vladimir

    1987-01-01

    -elastic isotropic models (Zaichenko et al. 1984; Schukin 1984). Interpretation of seismic results based on the Hooke in seismic zones implies that the traditional interpretation of geophysical investigations basedGeophys. J. R. astr. SOC.(1987) 91,429437 On the relation between seismic wave velocity and stress

  10. The dynamics of transition to turbulence in plane Couette flow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Viswanath, D

    2007-01-01

    In plane Couette flow, the incompressible fluid between two plane parallel walls is driven by the motion of those walls. The laminar solution, in which the streamwise velocity varies linearly in the wall-normal direction, is known to be linearly stable at all Reynolds numbers ($Re$). Yet, in both experiments and computations, turbulence is observed for $Re \\gtrsim 360$. In this article, we show that when the laminar flow is perturbed on to the transition {\\it threshold}, the flow approaches either steady or traveling wave solutions. These solutions exhibit some aspects of turbulence but are not fully turbulent even at $Re=4000$. However, these solutions are linearly unstable and flows that evolve along their unstable directions become fully turbulent. The solution approached by a threshold perturbation depends upon the nature of the perturbation. Surprisingly, the positive eigenvalue that corresponds to one family of solutions decreases in magnitude with increasing $Re$, with the rate of decrease given by $Re...

  11. Reynolds number of transition and large-scale properties of strong turbulence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yakhot, Victor

    2014-01-01

    A turbulent flow is characterized by velocity fluctuations excited in an extremely broad interval of wave numbers $k> \\Lambda_{f}$ where $\\Lambda_{f}$ is a relatively small set of the wave-vectors where energy is pumped into fluid by external forces. Iterative averaging over small-scale velocity fluctuations from the interval $\\Lambda_{f}statistics of spatial velocity derivatives. The calculated relation $Re(\\Lambda_{f})=Re_{tr}$ "selects" the lowest - order non-linearity as the only relevant one. This means that in the infra-red limit $k\\rightarrow \\Lambda_{f...

  12. Residual energy in magnetohydrodynamic turbulence and in the solar wind

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanislav Boldyrev; Jean Carlos Perez; Vladimir Zhdankin

    2011-08-30

    Recent observations indicate that kinetic and magnetic energies are not in equipartition in the solar wind turbulence. Rather, magnetic fluctuations are more energetic and have somewhat steeper energy spectrum compared to the velocity fluctuations. This leads to the presence of the so-called residual energy E_r=E_v-E_b in the inertial interval of turbulence. This puzzling effect is addressed in the present paper in the framework of weak turbulence theory. Using a simple model of weakly colliding Alfv\\'en waves, we demonstrate that the kinetic-magnetic equipartition indeed gets broken as a result of nonlinear interaction of Alfv\\'en waves. We establish that magnetic energy is indeed generated more efficiently as a result of these interactions, which proposes an explanation for the solar wind observations.

  13. The spatio-temporal spectrum of turbulent flows

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    di Leoni, P Clark; Mininni, P D

    2015-01-01

    Identification and extraction of vortical structures and of waves in a disorganized flow is a mayor challegen in the study of turbulence. We present a study of the spatio-temporal behavior of turbulent flows in the presence of different restitutive forces. We show how to compute and analyze the spatio-temporal spectrum from data stemming from numerical simulations and from laboratory experiments. Four cases are considered: homogeneous and isotropic turbulence, rotating turbulence, stratified turbulence, and water wave turbulence. For homogeneous and isotropic turbulence, the spectrum allows identification of random sweeping. For rotating and for stratified turbulence, the spectrum allows identification of the waves, quantification of the energy in the waves and in the turbulent eddies, and identification of physical mechanisms such as Doppler shift and wave absorption in critical layers. Finally, in water wave turbulence the spectrum shows a transition from gravity-capillary waves to bound waves as the amplit...

  14. Energy Spectrum of Superfluid Turbulence without Normal Fluid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsunehiko Araki; Makoto Tsubota; Sergey K. Nemirovskii

    2002-09-03

    The energy spectrum of the superfluid turbulence without the normal fluid is studied numerically under the vortex filament model. Time evolution of the Taylor-Green vortex is calculated under the full nonlocal Biot-Savart law. It is shown that for kenergy spectrum is very similar to the Kolmogorov's -5/3 law which is the most important statistical property of the conventional turbulence, where k is the wave number of the Fourier component of the velocity field and 1 the average intervortex spacing. The vortex length distribution becomes to obey a scaling property reflecting the self-similarity of the tangle.

  15. Turbulent combustion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Talbot, L.; Cheng, R.K. [Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, CA (United States)

    1993-12-01

    Turbulent combustion is the dominant process in heat and power generating systems. Its most significant aspect is to enhance the burning rate and volumetric power density. Turbulent mixing, however, also influences the chemical rates and has a direct effect on the formation of pollutants, flame ignition and extinction. Therefore, research and development of modern combustion systems for power generation, waste incineration and material synthesis must rely on a fundamental understanding of the physical effect of turbulence on combustion to develop theoretical models that can be used as design tools. The overall objective of this program is to investigate, primarily experimentally, the interaction and coupling between turbulence and combustion. These processes are complex and are characterized by scalar and velocity fluctuations with time and length scales spanning several orders of magnitude. They are also influenced by the so-called {open_quotes}field{close_quotes} effects associated with the characteristics of the flow and burner geometries. The authors` approach is to gain a fundamental understanding by investigating idealized laboratory flames. Laboratory flames are amenable to detailed interrogation by laser diagnostics and their flow geometries are chosen to simplify numerical modeling and simulations and to facilitate comparison between experiments and theory.

  16. 3 - 4 Turbulent combustion Princeton.key

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    speed (s T ) Turbulent RMS velocity in the fresh gas (u') Low turbulence zone s T a u' Bending zone Quenching l i m i t s L 0 Problem: these functions are configuration...

  17. Gravitational Waves from Neutron Stars: A Review

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paul D. Lasky

    2015-08-26

    Neutron stars are excellent emitters of gravitational waves. Squeezing matter beyond nuclear densities invites exotic physical processes, many of which violently transfer large amounts of mass at relativistic velocities, disrupting spacetime and generating copious quantities of gravitational radiation. I review mechanisms for generating gravitational waves with neutron stars. This includes gravitational waves from radio and millisecond pulsars, magnetars, accreting systems and newly born neutron stars, with mechanisms including magnetic and thermoelastic deformations, various stellar oscillation modes and core superfluid turbulence. I also focus on what physics can be learnt from a gravitational wave detection, and where additional research is required to fully understand the dominant physical processes at play.

  18. Gravitational Waves from Neutron Stars: A Review

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lasky, Paul D

    2015-01-01

    Neutron stars are excellent emitters of gravitational waves. Squeezing matter beyond nuclear densities invites exotic physical processes, many of which violently transfer large amounts of mass at relativistic velocities, disrupting spacetime and generating copious quantities of gravitational radiation. I review mechanisms for generating gravitational waves with neutron stars. This includes gravitational waves from radio and millisecond pulsars, magnetars, accreting systems and newly born neutron stars, with mechanisms including magnetic and thermoelastic deformations, various stellar oscillation modes and core superfluid turbulence. I also focus on what physics can be learnt from a gravitational wave detection, and where additional research is required to fully understand the dominant physical processes at play.

  19. Laboratory observations of electron energization and associated lower-hybrid and Trivelpiece–Gould wave turbulence during magnetic reconnection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fox, William R.

    This work presents an experimental study of current-driven turbulence in a plasma undergoing magnetic reconnection in a low-?, strong-guide-field regime. Electrostatic fluctuations are observed by small, high-bandwidth, ...

  20. PHYSICAL REVIEW LETTERS Submitted 21 May 1997 Exact Result for the 3rd Order Correlations of Velocity in Turbulence with Helicity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Procaccia, Itamar

    PHYSICAL REVIEW LETTERS Submitted 21 May 1997 Exact Result for the 3rd Order Correlations conservation. This law states that the energy flux expressed as a spatial derivative of the 3rd order velocity as a second spatial derivative of the 3rd order velocity correlator with the rate of helicity dissipation

  1. 2011 Waves -1 STANDING WAVES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gustafsson, Torgny

    2011 Waves - 1 STANDING WAVES ON A STRING The objectives of the experiment are: · To show that standing waves can be set up on a string. · To determine the velocity of a standing wave. · To understand of waves. A #12;2011 Waves - 2 A standing wave is caused by superposing two similar (same frequency

  2. Three-dimensional hybrid simulation study of anisotropic turbulence in the proton kinetic regime

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vasquez, Bernard J.; Markovskii, Sergei A.; Chandran, Benjamin D. G. E-mail: sergei.markovskii@unh.edu

    2014-06-20

    Three-dimensional numerical hybrid simulations with particle protons and quasi-neutralizing fluid electrons are conducted for a freely decaying turbulence that is anisotropic with respect to the background magnetic field. The turbulence evolution is determined by both the combined root-mean-square (rms) amplitude for fluctuating proton bulk velocity and magnetic field and by the ratio of perpendicular to parallel wavenumbers. This kind of relationship had been considered in the past with regard to interplanetary turbulence. The fluctuations nonlinearly evolve to a turbulent phase whose net wave vector anisotropy is usually more perpendicular than the initial one, irrespective of the initial ratio of perpendicular to parallel wavenumbers. Self-similar anisotropy evolution is found as a function of the rms amplitude and parallel wavenumber. Proton heating rates in the turbulent phase vary strongly with the rms amplitude but only weakly with the initial wave vector anisotropy. Even in the limit where wave vectors are confined to the plane perpendicular to the background magnetic field, the heating rate remains close to the corresponding case with finite parallel wave vector components. Simulation results obtained as a function of proton plasma to background magnetic pressure ratio ? {sub p} in the range 0.1-0.5 show that the wave vector anisotropy also weakly depends on ? {sub p}.

  3. Proceedings of the Combustion Institute, Volume 29, 2002/pp. 18171824 ANALYSIS OF ACOUSTIC WAVE INTERACTIONS WITH TURBULENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lieuwen, Timothy C.

    Institute of Technology Atlanta, GA 30332-0150, USA This paper analyzes acoustic wave interactions to the prior study the problem is posed with an integral formulation of the wave equation and assumes burning rate. This result contrasts with the strong impor- tance of these parameters in laminar-flame­acoustic-wave

  4. Turbulent burning rates of methane and methane-hydrogen mixtures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fairweather, M. [School of Process, Environmental and Materials Engineering, University of Leeds, Leeds LS2 9JT (United Kingdom); Ormsby, M.P.; Sheppard, C.G.W. [School of Mechanical Engineering, University of Leeds, Leeds LS2 9JT (United Kingdom); Woolley, R. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Sheffield, Sheffield S1 3JD (United Kingdom)

    2009-04-15

    Methane and methane-hydrogen (10%, 20% and 50% hydrogen by volume) mixtures have been ignited in a fan stirred bomb in turbulence and filmed using high speed cine schlieren imaging. Measurements were performed at 0.1 MPa (absolute) and 360 K. A turbulent burning velocity was determined for a range of turbulence velocities and equivalence ratios. Experimental laminar burning velocities and Markstein numbers were also derived. For all fuels the turbulent burning velocity increased with turbulence velocity. The addition of hydrogen generally resulted in increased turbulent and laminar burning velocity and decreased Markstein number. Those flames that were less sensitive to stretch (lower Markstein number) burned faster under turbulent conditions, especially as the turbulence levels were increased, compared to stretch-sensitive (high Markstein number) flames. (author)

  5. Turbulent Energy Transport in Nonradiative Accretion Flows

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Steven A. Balbus

    2003-09-24

    Just as correlations between fluctuating radial and azimuthal velocities produce a coherent stress contributing to the angular momentum transport in turbulent accretion disks, correlations in the velocity and temperature fluctuations produce a coherent energy flux. This nonadvective energy flux is always of secondary importance in thin radiative disks, but cannot be neglected in nonradiative flows, in which it completes the mean field description of turbulence. It is, nevertheless, generally ignored in accretion flow theory, with the exception of models explicitly driven by thermal convection, where it is modeled phenomenologically. This flux embodies both turbulent thermal convection as well as wave transport, and its presence is essential for a proper formulation of energy conservation, whether convection is present or not. The sign of the thermal flux is likely to be outward in real systems, but the restrictive assumptions used in numerical simulations may lead to inward thermal transport, in which case qualitatively new effects may be exhibited. We find, for example, that a static solution would require inward, not outward, thermal transport. Even if it were present, thermal convection would be unlikely to stifle accretion, but would simply add to the outward rotational energy flux that must already be present.

  6. Modulational instability of ion-acoustic waves in a plasma with a q-nonextensive electron velocity distribution

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bains, A. S.; Gill, T. S.; Tribeche, Mouloud

    2011-02-15

    The modulational instability (MI) of ion-acoustic waves (IAWs) in a two-component plasma is investigated in the context of the nonextensive statistics proposed by Tsallis [J. Stat. Phys. 52, 479 (1988)]. Using the reductive perturbation method, the nonlinear Schroedinger equation (NLSE) which governs the MI of the IAWs is obtained. The presence of the nonextensive electron distribution is shown to influence the MI of the waves. Three different ranges of the nonextensive q-parameter are considered and in each case the MI sets in under different conditions. Furthermore, the effects of the q-parameter on the growth rate of MI are discussed in detail.

  7. Observation of an extrinsic critical velocity using matter wave interferometry Yuki Sato, Aditya Joshi, and Richard Packard

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sato, Yuki

    to the initial onset of a single vortex motion. We place a flow tube in one arm of a matter wave interferometer and directly monitor the order-parameter phase difference across the tube's ends. When a vortex initially quantum interference device to probe the initial onset of the motion of a single vortex line driven

  8. P and S wave velocity and VP///VS in the wake of the Yellowstone hot spot

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Humphreys, Eugene

    magmatism occurred at the eastern Snake River Plain $6­10 m.y. B.P. Data are teleseismic P and S travel time. The dominant structure is a zone which extends beneath the Snake River Plain to a depth of $190 km that is high to density. Specifically, we infer that the low-velocity mantle beneath the Snake River Plain is partially

  9. In-plane ultrasonic velocity measurement of longitudinal and shear waves in the machine direction with transducers in rotating wheels

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hall, Maclin S. (Marietta, GA); Jackson, Theodore G. (Atlanta, GA); Knerr, Christopher (Lawrenceville, GA)

    1998-02-17

    An improved system for measuring the velocity of ultrasonic signals within the plane of moving web-like materials, such as paper, paperboard and the like. In addition to velocity measurements of ultrasonic signals in the plane of the web in the MD and CD, one embodiment of the system in accordance with the present invention is also adapted to provide on-line indication of the polar specific stiffness of the moving web. In another embodiment of the invention, the velocity of ultrasonic signals in the plane of the web are measured by way of a plurality of ultrasonic transducers carried by synchronously driven wheels or cylinders, thus eliminating undue transducer wear due to any speed differences between the transducers and the web. In order to provide relatively constant contact force between the transducers and the webs, the transducers are mounted in a sensor housings which include a spring for biasing the transducer radially outwardly. The sensor housings are adapted to be easily and conveniently mounted to the carrier to provide a relatively constant contact force between the transducers and the moving web.

  10. In-plane ultrasonic velocity measurement of longitudinal and shear waves in the machine direction with transducers in rotating wheels

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hall, M.S.; Jackson, T.G.; Knerr, C.

    1998-02-17

    An improved system for measuring the velocity of ultrasonic signals within the plane of moving web-like materials, such as paper, paperboard and the like. In addition to velocity measurements of ultrasonic signals in the plane of the web in the MD and CD, one embodiment of the system in accordance with the present invention is also adapted to provide on-line indication of the polar specific stiffness of the moving web. In another embodiment of the invention, the velocity of ultrasonic signals in the plane of the web are measured by way of a plurality of ultrasonic transducers carried by synchronously driven wheels or cylinders, thus eliminating undue transducer wear due to any speed differences between the transducers and the web. In order to provide relatively constant contact force between the transducers and the webs, the transducers are mounted in a sensor housings which include a spring for biasing the transducer radially outwardly. The sensor housings are adapted to be easily and conveniently mounted to the carrier to provide a relatively constant contact force between the transducers and the moving web. 37 figs.

  11. Numerical Study of a Turbulent Hydraulic Jump

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhao, Qun

    Numerical Study of a Turbulent Hydraulic Jump Qun Zhao, Shubhra Misra, Ib. A. Svendsen and James T of a Turbulent Hydraulic Jump ­ p.1/14 #12;Objective Our ultimate goal is to study the breaking waves. Numerical Study of a Turbulent Hydraulic Jump ­ p.2/14 #12;A moving bore Qiantang Bore China (Courtesy of Dr J

  12. Simple Models for Turbulent Self-Regulation in Galaxy Disks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Curtis Struck; Daniel C. Smith

    1999-07-29

    We propose that turbulent heating, wave pressure and gas exchanges between different regions of disks play a dominant role in determining the preferred, quasi-equilibrium, self-similar states of gas disks on large-scales. We present simple families of analytic, thermohydrodynamic models for these global states, which include terms for turbulent pressure and Reynolds stresses. Star formation rates, phase balances, and hydrodynamic forces are all tightly coupled and balanced. The models have stratified radial flows, with the cold gas slowly flowing inward in the midplane of the disk, and with the warm/hot phases that surround the midplane flowing outward. The models suggest a number of results that are in accord with observation, as well as some novel predictions, including the following. 1) The large-scale gas density and thermal phase distributions in galaxy disks can be explained as the result of turbulent heating and spatial couplings. 2) The turbulent pressures and stresses that drive radial outflows in the warm gas also allow a reduced circular velocity there. This effect was observed by Swaters, Sancisi and van der Hulst in NGC 891, a particularly turbulent edge-on disk. The models predict that the effect should be universal in such disks. 3) They suggest that a star formation rate like the phenomenological Schmidt Law is the natural result of global thermohydrodynamical balance, and may not obtain in disks far from equilibrium. (Abridged)

  13. MHD turbulence model for global simulations of the solar wind and SEP acceleration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sokolov, Igor V.; Roussev, Ilia I.

    2008-08-25

    The aim of the present work is to unify the various transport equations for turbulent waves that are used in different areas of space physics. We mostly focus on the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence, in particular the Alfvenic turbulence.

  14. Dissipation via Landau Damping in Two- and Three-Dimensional Plasma Turbulence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Tak Chu; Klein, Kristopher G; TenBarge, Jason M

    2015-01-01

    Plasma turbulence is ubiquitous in space and astrophysical plasmas, playing an important role in plasma energization, but the physical mechanisms that lead to dissipation of the turbulent energy remain to be definitively identified. This work addresses the fundamental physics of turbulent dissipation by examining the velocity-space structure that develops as a result of the collisionless interaction between the turbulent electromagnetic fluctuations and the particles in a low beta plasma. Both two- and three-dimensional (2D and 3D) nonlinear gyrokinetic simulations show an electron velocity-space signature qualitatively similar to that of the linear Landau damping of Alfv\\'en waves in a 3D linear simulation. This evidence strongly suggests that the turbulent energy is transferred by Landau damping to electrons in low beta plasmas in both 2D and 3D, making possible the ultimate irreversible heating of the plasma. Although, in the 2D case with no variation along the equilibrium magnetic field, it may be expecte...

  15. SUR LES CASCADES D'ENERGIE EN ECOULEMENTS TURBULENTS CASCADE OF ENERGY IN TURBULENT FLOWS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rosa, Ricardo M. S.

    SUR LES CASCADES D'´ENERGIE EN ´ECOULEMENTS TURBULENTS CASCADE OF ENERGY IN TURBULENT FLOWS CIPRIAN energy is transferred from low wave number modes to high wave number modes (L. Onsager (1945)). Such a transfer of energy occurs in a spectral range beyond that of injection of energy, and it underlies the so

  16. Rogue Wave Modes for the Long Wave-Short Wave Resonance Kwok Wing CHOW*(1)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 Rogue Wave Modes for the Long Wave-Short Wave Resonance Model Kwok Wing CHOW*(1) , Hiu Ning CHAN.45.Yv; 47.35.Fg ABSTRACT The long wave-short wave resonance model arises physically when the phase velocity of a long wave matches the group velocity of a short wave. It is a system of nonlinear evolution

  17. Rogue Wave Modes for the Long WaveShort Wave Resonance Model Kwok Wing CHOW

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rogue Wave Modes for the Long Wave­Short Wave Resonance Model Kwok Wing CHOW 1Ã , Hiu Ning CHAN 1 online June 11, 2013) The long wave­short wave resonance model arises physically when the phase velocity of a long wave matches the group velocity of a short wave. It is a system of nonlinear evolution equations

  18. Can we characterize turbulence in premixed flames?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lipatnikov, A.N. [Department of Applied Mechanics, Chalmers University of Technology, Gothenburg, 412 96 (Sweden)

    2009-06-15

    Modeling of premixed turbulent combustion involves averaging reaction rates in turbulent flows. The focus of most approaches to resolving this problem has been placed on determining the dependence of the mean rate w of product creation on the laminar flame speed S{sub L}, the rms turbulence velocity u', etc. The goal of the present work is to draw attention to another issue: May the input quantity u{sup '} for a model of w= w(u'/S{sub L},..) be considered to be known? The point is that heat release substantially affects turbulence and, hence, turbulence characteristics in premixed flames should be modeled. However, standard moment methods for numerically simulating turbulent flows do not allow us to evaluate the true turbulence characteristics in a flame. For instance, the Reynolds stresses in premixed flames are affected not only by turbulence itself, but also by velocity jump across flamelets. A common way to resolving this problem consists of considering the Reynolds stresses conditioned on unburned (or burned) mixture to be the true turbulence characteristics. In the present paper, this widely accepted but never proved hypothesis is put into question, first, by considering simple model constant-density problems (flame motion in an oscillating one-dimensional laminar flow; flame stabilized in a periodic shear, one-dimensional, laminar flow; turbulent mixing). In all the cases, the magnitude of velocity fluctuations, calculated using the conditioned Reynolds stresses, is affected by the intermittency of reactants and products and, hence, is not the true rms velocity. Second, the above claim is further supported by comparing balance equations for the mean and conditioned Reynolds stresses. The conditioned Reynolds stresses do not characterize the true turbulence in flames, because conditional averaging cuts off flow regions characterized by either high or low velocities. (author)

  19. Experimental study of internal wave generation by convection in water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bars, Michael Le; Perrard, Stéphane; Ribeiro, Adolfo; Rodet, Laetitia; Aurnou, Jonathan M; Gal, Patrice Le

    2015-01-01

    We experimentally investigate the dynamics of water cooled from below at 0^oC and heated from above. Taking advantage of the unusual property that water's density maximum is at about 4^oC, this set-up allows us to simulate in the laboratory a turbulent convective layer adjacent to a stably stratified layer, which is representative of atmospheric and stellar conditions. High precision temperature and velocity measurements are described, with a special focus on the convectively excited internal waves propagating in the stratified zone. Most of the convective energy is at low frequency, and corresponding waves are localized to the vicinity of the interface. However, we show that some energy radiates far from the interface, carried by shorter horizontal wavelength, higher frequency waves. Our data suggest that the internal wave field is passively excited by the convective fluctuations, and the wave propagation is correctly described by the dissipative linear wave theory.

  20. Energy spectra in bubbly turbulence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prakash, Vivek N; Ramos, Fabio Ernesto Mancilla; Tagawa, Yoshiyuki; Lohse, Detlef; Sun, Chao

    2013-01-01

    We conduct experiments in a turbulent bubbly flow to study the unknown nature of the transition between the classical -5/3 energy spectrum scaling for a single-phase turbulent flow and the -3 scaling for a swarm of bubbles rising in a quiescent liquid and of bubble-dominated turbulence. The bubblance parameter, b, which measures the ratio of the bubble-induced kinetic energy to the kinetic energy induced by the turbulent liquid fluctuations before bubble injection, is used to characterise the bubbly flow. We vary b from $b = \\infty$ (pseudo-turbulence) to b = 0 (single-phase flow) over 2-3 orders of magnitude: ~O(0.01, 0.1, 5) to study its effect on the turbulent energy spectrum and liquid velocity fluctuations. The experiments are conducted in a multi-phase turbulent water tunnel with air bubbles of diameters 2-4 mm and 3-5 mm. An active-grid is used to generate nearly homogeneous and isotropic turbulence in the liquid flow. The liquid speeds and gas void fractions are varied to achieve the above mentioned b...

  1. Vertical stratified turbulent transport mechanism indicated by remote sensing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carl H. Gibson; R. Norris Keeler; Valery G. Bondur

    2007-12-02

    Satellite and shipboard data reveal the intermittent vertical information transport mechanism of turbulence and internal waves that mixes the ocean, atmosphere, planets and stars.

  2. Advances in compressible turbulent mixing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dannevik, W.P.; Buckingham, A.C.; Leith, C.E.

    1992-01-01

    This volume includes some recent additions to original material prepared for the Princeton International Workshop on the Physics of Compressible Turbulent Mixing, held in 1988. Workshop participants were asked to emphasize the physics of the compressible mixing process rather than measurement techniques or computational methods. Actual experimental results and their meaning were given precedence over discussions of new diagnostic developments. Theoretical interpretations and understanding were stressed rather than the exposition of new analytical model developments or advances in numerical procedures. By design, compressibility influences on turbulent mixing were discussed--almost exclusively--from the perspective of supersonic flow field studies. The papers are arranged in three topical categories: Foundations, Vortical Domination, and Strongly Coupled Compressibility. The Foundations category is a collection of seminal studies that connect current study in compressible turbulent mixing with compressible, high-speed turbulent flow research that almost vanished about two decades ago. A number of contributions are included on flow instability initiation, evolution, and transition between the states of unstable flow onset through those descriptive of fully developed turbulence. The Vortical Domination category includes theoretical and experimental studies of coherent structures, vortex pairing, vortex-dynamics-influenced pressure focusing. In the Strongly Coupled Compressibility category the organizers included the high-speed turbulent flow investigations in which the interaction of shock waves could be considered an important source for production of new turbulence or for the enhancement of pre-existing turbulence. Individual papers are processed separately.

  3. Bedforms in a turbulent stream.Part 1: Turbulent flow over topography

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Fourrière; P. Claudin; B. Andreotti

    2008-11-14

    In the context of subaqueous ripple and dune formation, we present here a Reynolds averaged calculation of the turbulent flow over a topography. We perform a weakly non-linear expansion of the velocity field, sufficiently accurate to recover the separation of streamlines and the formation of a recirculation bubble above some aspect ratio. The basal stresses are investigated in details; in particular, we show that the phase shift of the shear stress with respect to the topography, responsible for the formation of bedforms, appears in an inner boundary layer where shear stress and pressure gradients balance. We study the sensitivity of the calculation with respect to (i) the choice of the turbulence closure, (ii) the motion of the bottom (growth or propagation), (iii) the physics at work in the surface layer, responsible for the hydrodynamic roughness of the bottom, (iv) the aspect ratio of the bedform and (v) the effect of the free surface, which can be interpreted in terms of standing gravity waves excited by topography. The most important effects are those of points (iii) to (v). We show that the dynamical mechanisms controlling the hydrodynamical roughness (mixing due to roughness elements, viscosity, sediment transport, etc) have an influence on the basal shear stress when the thickness of the surface layer is comparable to that of the inner layer. We evidence that non-linear effects tend to oppose linear ones and are of the same order for bedform aspect ratios of the order of 1/10. We show that the influence of the free surface on the basal shear stress is dominant when the wavelength is large compared to the flow depth, so that the inner layer extends throughout the flow and in the resonant conditions, and when the downstream material velocity balances the upstream wave propagation.

  4. ON QUIET-TIME SOLAR WIND ELECTRON DISTRIBUTIONS IN DYNAMICAL EQUILIBRIUM WITH LANGMUIR TURBULENCE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zaheer, S.; Yoon, P. H.

    2013-10-01

    A recent series of papers put forth a self-consistent theory of an asymptotically steady-state electron distribution function and Langmuir turbulence intensity. The theory was developed in terms of the ? distribution which features Maxwellian low-energy electrons and a non-Maxwellian energetic power-law tail component. The present paper discusses a generalized ? distribution that features a Davydov-Druyvesteyn type of core component and an energetic power-law tail component. The physical motivation for such a generalization is so that the model may reflect the influence of low-energy electrons interacting with low-frequency kinetic Alfvénic turbulence as well as with high-frequency Langmuir turbulence. It is shown that such a solution and the accompanying Langmuir wave spectrum rigorously satisfy the balance requirement between the spontaneous and induced emission processes in both the particle and wave kinetic equations, and approximately satisfy the similar balance requirement between the spontaneous and induced scattering processes, which are nonlinear. In spite of the low velocity modification of the electron distribution function, it is shown that the resulting asymptotic velocity power-law index ?, where f{sub e} ? v {sup –?} is close to the average index observed during the quiet-time solar wind condition, i.e., ? ? O(6.5) whereas ?{sub average} ? 6.69, according to observation.

  5. Phase mixing vs. nonlinear advection in drift-kinetic plasma turbulence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schekochihin, A A; Highcock, E G; Dellar, P J; Dorland, W; Hammett, G W

    2015-01-01

    A scaling theory of long-wavelength electrostatic turbulence in a magnetised, weakly collisional plasma (e.g., drift-wave turbulence driven by temperature gradients) is proposed, with account taken both of the nonlinear advection of the perturbed particle distribution by fluctuating ExB flows and of its phase mixing, which is caused by the streaming of the particles along the mean magnetic field and, in a linear problem, would lead to Landau damping. A consistent theory is constructed in which very little free energy leaks into high velocity moments of the distribution, rendering the turbulent cascade in the energetically relevant part of the wave-number space essentially fluid-like. The velocity-space spectra of free energy expressed in terms of Hermite-moment orders are steep power laws and so the free-energy content of the phase space does not diverge at infinitesimal collisionality (while it does for a linear problem); collisional heating due to long-wavelength perturbations vanishes in this limit (also i...

  6. Turbulent Jets SUMMARY: This chapter is concerned with turbulent jets, namely their overall

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cushman-Roisin, Benoit

    Chapter 9 Turbulent Jets SUMMARY: This chapter is concerned with turbulent jets, namely their overall shape and velocity structure. The first jets being considered are those penetrating in homogeneous terminology. Continuous Intermittent injection injection Momentum only Jet Puff Buoyancy only Plume Thermal

  7. THE EFFICIENCY OF SECOND-ORDER FERMI ACCELERATION BY WEAKLY COMPRESSIBLE MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMIC TURBULENCE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lynn, Jacob W.; Quataert, Eliot; Parrish, Ian J.; Chandran, Benjamin D. G.

    2013-11-10

    We investigate the effects of pitch-angle scattering on the efficiency of particle heating and acceleration by MHD turbulence using phenomenological estimates and simulations of non-relativistic test particles interacting with strong, subsonic MHD turbulence. We include an imposed pitch-angle scattering rate, which is meant to approximate the effects of high-frequency plasma waves and/or velocity space instabilities. We focus on plasma parameters similar to those found in the near-Earth solar wind, though most of our results are more broadly applicable. An important control parameter is the size of the particle mean free path ?{sub mfp} relative to the scale of the turbulent fluctuations L. For small scattering rates, particles interact quasi-resonantly with turbulent fluctuations in magnetic field strength. Scattering increases the long-term efficiency of this resonant heating by factors of a few times 10, but the distribution function does not develop a significant non-thermal power-law tail. For higher scattering rates, the interaction between particles and turbulent fluctuations becomes non-resonant, governed by particles heating and cooling adiabatically as they encounter turbulent density fluctuations. Rapid pitch-angle scattering can produce a power-law tail in the proton distribution function, but this requires fine-tuning of parameters. Moreover, in the near-Earth solar wind, a significant power-law tail cannot develop by this mechanism because the particle acceleration timescales are longer than the adiabatic cooling timescale set by the expansion of the solar wind. Our results thus imply that MHD-scale turbulent fluctuations are unlikely to be the origin of the v {sup –5} tail in the proton distribution function observed in the solar wind.

  8. Gravitational Collapse in Turbulent Molecular Clouds. II. Magnetohydrodynamical Turbulence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    F. Heitsch; M. -M. Mac Low; R. S. Klessen

    2000-09-14

    Hydrodynamic supersonic turbulence can only prevent local gravitational collapse if the turbulence is driven on scales smaller than the local Jeans lengths in the densest regions, a very severe requirement (Paper I). Magnetic fields have been suggested to support molecular clouds either magnetostatically or via magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) waves. Whereas the first mechanism would form sheet-like clouds, the second mechanism not only could exert a pressure onto the gas counteracting the gravitational forces, but could lead to a transfer of turbulent kinetic energy down to smaller spatial scales via MHD wave interactions. This turbulent magnetic cascade might provide sufficient energy at small scales to halt local collapse. We test this hypothesis with MHD simulations at resolutions up to 256^3 zones, done with ZEUS-3D. We first derive a resolution criterion for self-gravitating, magnetized gas: in order to prevent collapse of magnetostatically supported regions due to numerical diffusion, the minimum Jeans length must be resolved by four zones. Resolution of MHD waves increases this requirement to roughly six zones. We then find that magnetic fields cannot prevent local collapse unless they provide magnetostatic support. Weaker magnetic fields do somewhat delay collapse and cause it to occur more uniformly across the supported region in comparison to the hydrodynamical case. However, they still cannot prevent local collapse for much longer than a global free-fall time.

  9. Rogue Wave Modes for the Long Wave-Short Wave Resonance Kwok Wing CHOW*(1)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of a long wave matches the group velocity of a short wave. Significant interactions and energy transfer can1 Rogue Wave Modes for the Long Wave-Short Wave Resonance Model Kwok Wing CHOW*(1) , Hiu Ning CHAN.45.Yv; 47.35.Fg ABSTRACT The long wave-short wave resonance model arises physically when the phase

  10. Lunar Laser-Ranging Detection of Light-Speed Anisotropy and Gravitational Waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reginald T Cahill

    2010-02-03

    The Apache Point Lunar Laser-ranging Operation (APOLLO), in NM, can detect photon bounces from retro-reflectors on the moon surface to 0.1ns timing resolution. This facility enables not only the detection of light speed anisotropy, which defines a local preferred frame of reference - only in that frame is the speed of light isotropic, but also fluctuations/turbulence (gravitational waves) in the flow of the dynamical 3-space relative to local systems/observers. So the APOLLO facility can act as an effective "gravitational wave" detector. A recently published small data set from November 5, 2007, is analysed to characterise both the average anisotropy velocity and the wave/turbulence effects. The results are consistent with some 13 previous detections, with the last and most accurate being from the spacecraft earth-flyby Doppler-shift NASA data.

  11. Turbulence Induced Transport in Tokamaks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Caldas, I. L.; Marcus, F. A.; Heller, M. V. A. P.; Guimaraes-Filho, Z. O. [Instituto de Fisica, Universidade de Sao Paulo, Caixa Postal 66318, 05315-970, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Batista, A. M. [Departamento de Matematica e Estatistica, Universidade Estadual de Ponta Grossa, Ponta Grossa, PR (Brazil); Viana, R. L.; Lopes, S. R. [Departamento de Fisica, Universidade Federal do Parana, 81531-990, Curitiba, PR (Brazil); Morrison, P. J.; Horton, W. [Department of Physics, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas, 78712 (United States); Institute for Fusion Studies, The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas, 78712 (United States)

    2006-12-04

    This report is concerned with plasma edge turbulence and its relation to anomalous particle transport in tokamaks. First, experimental evidence of turbulence driven particle transport and measurements of the gradients of the equilibrium profiles in the Brazilian tokamaks TBR and TCABR are presented. Next, diffusion in a two drift-wave system is discussed. In this nonintegrable system, particle transport is associated with the onset of chaotic orbits. Finally, numerical evidence suggesting that a nonlinear three-mode interaction could contribute to the intermittent plasma fluctuations observed in tokamaks is presented.

  12. The Origin of Molecular Cloud Turbulence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Padoan, Paolo; Haugboelle, Troels; Nordlund, Ake

    2015-01-01

    Turbulence is ubiquitous in molecular clouds (MCs), but its origin is still unclear because MCs are usually assumed to live longer than the turbulence dissipation time. It has been shown that interstellar medium (ISM) turbulence is likely driven by SN explosions, but it has never been demonstrated that SN explosions can establish and maintain a turbulent cascade inside MCs consistent with the observations. In this work, we carry out a simulation of SN-driven turbulence in a volume of (250 pc)^3, specifically designed to test if SN driving alone can be responsible for the observed turbulence inside MCs. We find that SN driving establishes velocity scaling consistent with the usual scaling laws of supersonic turbulence. This also means that previous idealized simulations of MC turbulence, driven with a random, large-scale volume force, were correctly adopted as appropriate models for MC turbulence, despite the artificial driving. We also find the same scaling laws extend to the interior of MCs, and their normal...

  13. Few-Freedom Turbulence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. V. Chirikov; V. G. Davidovsky

    2000-06-15

    The results of numerical experiments on the structure of chaotic attractors in the Khalatnikov - Kroyter model of two freedoms are presented. This model was developed for a qualitative description of the wave turbulence of the second sound in helium. The attractor dimension, size, and the maximal Lyapunov exponent in dependence on the single dimensionless parameter $F$ of the model are found and discussed. The principal parameter $F$ is similar to the Reynolds number in hydrodynamic turbulence. We were able to discern four different attractors characterized by a specific critical value of the parameter ($F=F_{cr}$), such that the attractor exists for $F>F_{cr}$ only. A simple empirical relation for this dependence on the argument ($F-F_{cr}$) is presented which turns out to be universal for different attractors with respect to the dimension and dimensionless Lyapunov exponents. Yet, it differs as to the size of attractor. In the main region of our studies the dependence of all dimensionless characteristics of the chaotic attractor on parameter $F$ is very slow (logarithmic) which is qualitatively different as compared to that of a multi-freedom attractor, e.g., in hydrodynamic turbulence (a power law). However, at very large $F\\sim 10^7$ the transition to a power-law dependence has been finally found, similar to the multi-freedom attractor. Some unsolved problems and open questions are also discussed.

  14. GEOPHYSICALRESEARCHLETTERS, VOL. 20, NO. 5, PAGES391-394,MARCH 5, 1993 F_,LASC WAVE A'ITENUATiON AND VELOCITY OF BEREA SANDSTONE MEASURED

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    'ITENUATiON AND VELOCITY OF BEREA SANDSTONE MEASURED IN THE FREQUENCY DOMAIN T. J. Shank!and1 Institutde.Usingmeasurementsinthefrequencydomainwe havemeasuredqualityfactorQandtraveltimesofdirectand side-reflectedelasticwavesin a 1.8mlongsampleofBerea sandstoneDVM. Possibletravelpathsinadditiontodirecttransmissioninclude sidewall reflectionsandsurfacewaves. 391 #12;392 Shanklandetal.:AttenuationandVelocityofSandstone

  15. Evaluation of three lidar scanning strategies for turbulence measurements

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Newman, J. F.; Klein, P. M.; Wharton, S.; Sathe, A.; Bonin, T. A.; Chilson, P. B.; Muschinski, A.

    2015-11-24

    Several errors occur when a traditional Doppler-beam swinging (DBS) or velocity–azimuth display (VAD) strategy is used to measure turbulence with a lidar. To mitigate some of these errors, a scanning strategy was recently developed which employs six beam positions to independently estimate the u, v, and w velocity variances and covariances. In order to assess the ability of these different scanning techniques to measure turbulence, a Halo scanning lidar, WindCube v2 pulsed lidar and ZephIR continuous wave lidar were deployed at field sites in Oklahoma and Colorado with collocated sonic anemometers. Results indicate that the six-beam strategy mitigates somemore »of the errors caused by VAD and DBS scans, but the strategy is strongly affected by errors in the variance measured at the different beam positions. The ZephIR and WindCube lidars overestimated horizontal variance values by over 60 % under unstable conditions as a result of variance contamination, where additional variance components contaminate the true value of the variance. A correction method was developed for the WindCube lidar that uses variance calculated from the vertical beam position to reduce variance contamination in the u and v variance components. The correction method reduced WindCube variance estimates by over 20 % at both the Oklahoma and Colorado sites under unstable conditions, when variance contamination is largest. This correction method can be easily applied to other lidars that contain a vertical beam position and is a promising method for accurately estimating turbulence with commercially available lidars.« less

  16. Diffusion Processes in Turbulent Magnetic Fields

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alex Lazarian

    2007-07-05

    We study of the effect of turbulence on diffusion processes within magnetized medium. While we exemplify our treatment with heat transfer processes, our results are quite general and are applicable to different processes, e.g. diffusion of heavy elements. Our treatment is also applicable to describing the diffusion of cosmic rays arising from magnetic field wandering. In particular, we find that when the energy injection velocity is smaller than the Alfven speed the heat transfer is partially suppressed, while in the opposite regime the effects of turbulence depend on the intensity of driving. In fact, the scale $l_A$ at which the turbulent velocity is equal the Alfven velocity is a new important parameter. When the electron mean free path $\\lambda$ is larger than $l_A$, the stronger the the turbulence, the lower thermal conductivity by electrons is. The turbulent motions, however, induces their own advective transport, that can provide effective diffusivity. For clusters of galaxies, we find that the turbulence is the most important agent for heat transfer. We also show that the domain of applicability of the subdiffusion concept is rather limited.

  17. Alfvenic Turbulence in the Extended Solar Corona: Kinetic Effects and Proton Heating

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. R. Cranmer; A. A. van Ballegooijen

    2003-05-08

    We present a model of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence in the extended solar corona that contains the effects of collisionless dissipation and anisotropic particle heating. Measurements made by UVCS/SOHO have revived interest in the idea that ions are energized by the dissipation of ion cyclotron resonant waves, but such high-frequency (i.e., small wavelength) fluctuations have not been observed. A turbulent cascade is one possible way of generating small-scale fluctuations from a pre-existing population of low-frequency MHD waves. We model this cascade as a combination of advection and diffusion in wavenumber space. The dominant spectral transfer occurs in the direction perpendicular to the background magnetic field. As expected from earlier models, this leads to a highly anisotropic fluctuation spectrum with a rapidly decaying tail in parallel wavenumber. The wave power that decays to high enough frequencies to become ion cyclotron resonant depends on the relative strengths of advection and diffusion in the cascade. For the most realistic values of these parameters, though, there is insufficient power to heat protons and heavy ions. The dominant oblique fluctuations (with dispersion properties of kinetic Alfven waves) undergo Landau damping, which implies strong parallel electron heating. We discuss the probable nonlinear evolution of the electron velocity distributions into parallel beams and discrete phase-space holes (similar to those seen in the terrestrial magnetosphere) which can possibly heat protons via stochastic interactions.

  18. Signatures of fast and slow magnetohydrodynamic shocks in turbulent molecular clouds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lehmann, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    The character of star formation is intimately related to the supersonic magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulent dynamics of the giant molecular clouds in which stars form. A significant amount of the turbulent energy dissipates in low-velocity shock waves. These shocks cause molecular line cooling of the compressed and heated gas, and so their radiative signatures probe the nature of the turbulence. In MHD fluids the three distinct families of shocks---fast, intermediate and slow---differ in how they compress and heat the molecular gas, and so observational differences between them may also distinguish driving modes of turbulent regions. Here we use a two-fluid model to compare the characteristics of one-dimensional fast and slow MHD shocks propagating at low speeds (a few km/s) in molecular clouds. Fast MHD shocks are magnetically driven, forcing ion species to stream through the neutral gas ahead of the shock front. This magnetic precursor heats the gas sufficiently to create a large, warm transition zone where...

  19. Combustion-turbulence interaction in the turbulent boundary layer over a hot surface

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ng, T.T.; Cheng, R.K.; Robben, F.; Talbot, L.

    1982-01-01

    The turbulence-combustion interaction in a reacting turbulent boundary layer over a heated flat plate was studied. Ethylene/air mixture with equivalence ratio of 0.35 was used. The free stream velocity was 10.5 m/s and the wall temperature was 1250/sup 0/K. Combustion structures visualization was provided by high-speed schlieren photographs. Fluid density statistics were deduced from Rayleigh scattering intensity measurements. A single-component laser Doppler velocimetry system was used to obtain mean and root-mean-square velocity distributions, the Reynolds stress, the streamwise and the cross-stream turbulent kinetic energy diffusion, and the production of turbulent kinetic energy by Reynolds stress. The combustion process was dominated by large-scale turbulent structures of the boundary layer. Combustion causes expansion of the boundary layer. No overall self-similarity is observed in either the velocity or the density profiles. Velocity fluctuations were increased in part of the boundary layer and the Reynolds stress was reduced. The turbulent kinetic energy diffusion pattern was changed significantly and a modification of the boundary layer assumption will be needed when dealing with this problem analytically. 11 figures, 1 table.

  20. PHYSICAL REVIEW E 91, 023101 (2015) Permutation entropy and statistical complexity analysis of turbulence in laboratory plasmas and the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown, Michael R.

    2015-01-01

    of turbulence in laboratory plasmas and the solar wind P. J. Weck, D. A. Schaffner, and M. R. Brown Swarthmore) turbulence in the plasma wind tunnel of the Swarthmore Spheromak Experiment (SSX), drift-wave turbulence turbulent magnetic fluctuations of the solar wind taken from the Wind spacecraft. The entropy and complexity

  1. Charecterization of inertial and pressure effects in homogeneous turbulence 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bikkani, Ravi Kiran

    2005-11-01

    and anisotropy components and invariants are examined. In the second part of the thesis, the velocity gradient dynamics in turbulent flows are studied with the help of inviscid 3D Burgers equations and restricted Euler equations. The analytical asymptotic...

  2. Penetration of lower hybrid current drive waves in tokamaks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Horton, W. [The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas 78712 (United States) [The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas 78712 (United States); Aix-Marseille University, 58, Bd Charles Livon, 13284 Marseille (France); Goniche, M.; Peysson, Y.; Decker, J.; Ekedahl, A.; Litaudon, X. [CEA, IRFM, F-13108 Saint-Paul-Lez Durance (France)] [CEA, IRFM, F-13108 Saint-Paul-Lez Durance (France)

    2013-11-15

    Lower hybrid (LH) ray propagation in toroidal plasma is shown to be controlled by combination of the azimuthal spectrum launched by the antenna, the poloidal variation of the magnetic field, and the scattering of the waves by the drift wave fluctuations. The width of the poloidal and radial radio frequency wave spectrum increases rapidly as the rays penetrate into higher density and scatter from the drift waves. The electron temperature gradient (ETG) spectrum is particularly effective in scattering the LH waves due to its comparable wavelengths and phase velocities. ETG turbulence is also driven by the radial gradient of the electron current profile giving rise to an anomalous viscosity spreading the LH driven plasma currents. The LH wave scattering is derived from a Fokker-Planck equation for the distribution of the ray trajectories with diffusivities derived from the drift wave fluctuations. The condition for chaotic diffusion for the rays is derived. The evolution of the poloidal and radial mode number spectrum of the lower hybrid waves are both on the antenna spectrum and the spectrum of the drift waves. Antennas launching higher poloidal mode number spectra drive off-axis current density profiles producing negative central shear [RS] plasmas with improved thermal confinement from ETG transport. Core plasma current drive requires antennas with low azimuthal mode spectra peaked at m = 0 azimuthal mode numbers.

  3. New perspectives on superparameterization for geophysical turbulence

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Majda, Andrew J.; Grooms, Ian

    2014-08-15

    This is a research expository paper regarding superparameterization, a class of multi-scale numerical methods designed to cope with the intermittent multi-scale effects of inhomogeneous geophysical turbulence where energy often inverse-cascades from the unresolved scales to the large scales through the effects of waves, jets, vortices, and latent heat release from moist processes. Original as well as sparse space–time superparameterization algorithms are discussed for the important case of moist atmospheric convection including the role of multi-scale asymptotic methods in providing self-consistent constraints on superparameterization algorithms and related deterministic and stochastic multi-cloud parameterizations. Test models for the statistical numerical analysis of superparameterization algorithms are discussed both to elucidate the performance of the basic algorithms and to test their potential role in efficient multi-scale data assimilation. The very recent development of grid-free seamless stochastic superparameterization methods for geophysical turbulence appropriate for “eddy-permitting” mesoscale ocean turbulence is presented here including a general formulation and illustrative applications to two-layer quasigeostrophic turbulence, and another difficult test case involving one-dimensional models of dispersive wave turbulence. This last test case has randomly generated solitons as coherent structures which collapse and radiate wave energy back to the larger scales, resulting in strong direct and inverse turbulent energy cascades.

  4. On the role of large-scale structures in wall turbulence Ivan Marusic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marusic, Ivan

    On the role of large-scale structures in wall turbulence Ivan Marusic Citation: Phys. Fluids 13. Related Articles Lagrangian evolution of the invariants of the velocity gradient tensor in a turbulent in a turbulent boundary layer: Non-local closures for particle dispersion tensors accounting for particle

  5. Effects of electron drift on the collisionless damping of kinetic Alfv\\'en waves in the solar wind

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tong, Yuguang; Chen, Christopher H K; Salem, Chadi S; Verscharen, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    The collisionless dissipation of anisotropic Alfv\\'enic turbulence is a promising candidate to solve the solar wind heating problem. Extensive studies examined the kinetic properties of Alfv\\'en waves in simple Maxwellian or bi-Maxwellian plasmas. However, the observed electron velocity distribution functions in the solar wind are more complex. In this study, we analyze the properties of kinetic Alfv\\'en waves in a plasma with two drifting electron populations. We numerically solve the linearized Maxwell-Vlasov equations and find that the damping rate and the proton-electron energy partition for kinetic Alfv\\'en waves are significantly modified in such plasmas, compared to plasmas without electron drifts. We suggest that electron drift is an important factor to take into account when considering the dissipation of Alfv\\'enic turbulence in the solar wind or other $\\beta \\sim 1$ astrophysical plasmas.

  6. Sandia Energy - Turbulent Combustion

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Combustion Home Transportation Energy Predictive Simulation of Engines Reacting Flow Experiments Turbulent Combustion Turbulent CombustionAshley Otero2015-10-30T01:39:47+00...

  7. Stress Wave Source Characterization: Impact, Fracture, and Sliding Friction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McLaskey, Gregory Christofer

    2011-01-01

    717-725. Graff, K. (1975). Wave Motion in Elastic Solids (and deterioration on stress wave velocities in concrete,Greenspan, M. (1981) Surface-wave displacement: absolute

  8. WAVE-ENERGY DENSITY AND WAVE-MOMENTUM DENSITY OF EACH SPECIES OF A COLLISION-LESS PLASMA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cary, John R.

    2012-01-01

    case, the electrons have negative wave energy for 2w ne w wave energy for 2w .w > 0 nl Hence, unstable waves with negative phase velocity,

  9. Gyrokinetic simulation of momentum transport with residual stress from diamagnetic level velocity shears

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Waltz, R. E.; Staebler, G. M.; Solomon, W. M.

    2011-04-15

    Residual stress refers to the remaining toroidal angular momentum (TAM) flux (divided by major radius) when the shear in the equilibrium fluid toroidal velocity (and the velocity itself) vanishes. Previously [Waltz et al., Phys. Plasmas 14, 122507 (2007); errata 16, 079902 (2009)], we demonstrated with GYRO [Candy and Waltz, J. Comp. Phys. 186, 545 (2003)] gyrokinetic simulations that TAM pinching from (ion pressure gradient supported or diamagnetic level) equilibrium ExB velocity shear could provide some of the residual stress needed to support spontaneous toroidal rotation against normal diffusive loss. Here we show that diamagnetic level shear in the intrinsic drift wave velocities (or ''profile shear'' in the ion and electron density and temperature gradients) provides a comparable residual stress. The individual signed contributions of these small (rho-star level) ExB and profile velocity shear rates to the turbulence level and (rho-star squared) ion energy transport stabilization are additive if the rates are of the same sign. However because of the additive stabilization effect, the contributions to the small (rho-star cubed) residual stress is not always simply additive. If the rates differ in sign, the residual stress from one can buck out that from the other (and in some cases reduce the stabilization.) The residual stress from these diamagnetic velocity shear rates is quantified by the ratio of TAM flow to ion energy (power) flow (M/P) in a global GYRO core simulation of a ''null'' toroidal rotation DIII-D [Mahdavi and Luxon, Fusion Sci. Technol. 48, 2 (2005)] discharge by matching M/P profiles within experimental uncertainty. Comparison of global GYRO (ion and electron energy as well as particle) transport flow balance simulations of TAM transport flow in a high-rotation DIII-D L-mode quantifies and isolates the ExB shear and parallel velocity (Coriolis force) pinching components from the larger ''diffusive'' parallel velocity shear driven component and the much smaller profile shear residual stress component.

  10. DETERMINATION OF NON-THERMAL VELOCITY DISTRIBUTIONS FROM SERTS LINEWIDTH OBSERVATIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coyner, Aaron J. [Department of Physics, Catholic University of America, 620 Michigan Avenue, Washington, DC 20064 (United States); Davila, Joseph M., E-mail: aaron.j.coyner@nasa.gov [Code 671, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States)

    2011-12-01

    Non-thermal velocities obtained from the measurement of coronal Extreme Ultraviolet (EUV) linewidths have been consistently observed in solar EUV spectral observations and have been theorized to result from many plausible scenarios including wave motions, turbulence, or magnetic reconnection. Constraining these velocities can provide a physical limit for the available energy resulting from unresolved motions in the corona. We statistically determine a series of non-thermal velocity distributions from linewidth measurements of 390 emission lines from a wide array of elements and ionization states observed during the Solar Extreme Ultraviolet Research Telescope and Spectrograph 1991-1997 flights covering the spectral range 174-418 A and a temperature range from 80,000 K to 12.6 MK. This sample includes 248 lines from active regions, 101 lines from quiet-Sun regions, and 41 lines were observed from plasma off the solar limb. We find a strongly peaked distribution corresponding to a non-thermal velocity of 19-22 km s{sup -1} in all three of the quiet-Sun, active region, and off-limb distributions. For the possibility of Alfven wave resonance heating, we find that velocities in the core of these distributions do not provide sufficient energy, given typical densities and magnetic field strengths for the coronal plasma, to overcome the estimated coronal energy losses required to maintain the corona at the typical temperatures working as the sole mechanism. We find that at perfect efficiency 50%-60% of the needed energy flux can be produced from the non-thermal velocities measured.

  11. Inhomogeneous distribution of droplets in cloud turbulence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Itzhak Fouxon; Yongnam Park; Roei Harduf; Changhoon Lee

    2014-10-30

    We solve the problem of spatial distribution of inertial particles that sediment in turbulent flow with small ratio of acceleration of fluid particles to acceleration of gravity $g$. The particles are driven by linear drag and have arbitrary inertia. The pair-correlation function of concentration obeys a power-law in distance with negative exponent. Divergence at zero signifies singular distribution of particles in space. Independently of particle size the exponent is ratio of integral of energy spectrum of turbulence times the wavenumber to $g$ times numerical factor. We find Lyapunov exponents and confirm predictions by direct numerical simulations of Navier-Stokes turbulence. The predictions include typical case of water droplets in clouds. This significant progress in the study of turbulent transport is possible because strong gravity makes the particle's velocity at a given point unique.

  12. Planar Richtmyer-Meshkov instabilities and transition to turbulence

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grinstein, Fernando F [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Gowardhan, Akshay [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Ristorcelli, Ray [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2011-01-21

    Extensive recent work has demonstrated that predictive under-resolved simulations of the velocity fields in turbulent flows are possible without resorting to explicit subgrid models. When using a class of physics-capturing high-resolution finite-volume numerical algorithms. This strategy is denoted implicit large eddy simulation (ILES, MILES). The performance of ILES in the substantially more difficult problem of under-resolved material mixing driven by under-resolved velocity fields and initial conditions (ICs) is a focus of the present work. Progress is presented in analyzing the effects of IC combined spectral content and thickness parametrizations. In the large eddy simulation (LES). the large energy containing structures are resolved, the smaller, presumably more isotropic, structures are filtered out, and effects of subgrid scales (SGS) are modeled. ILES effectively addresses the seemingly insurmountable issues posed to LES by under-resolution. by relying on the use of SGS modeling and filtering provided implicitly by a class of physics capturing numerics; extensive verification and validation in areas of engineering. geophysics. and astrophysics has been reported. In many areas of interest such as. inertial confinement fusion. understanding the collapse of the outer cores of supernovas. and supersonic combustion engines, vorticity is introduced at material interfaces by the impulsive loading of shock waves. and turbulence is generated via Richtmyer-Meshkov instabilities (RMI). Given that ILES is based on locally-adaptive, non-oscillatory. finite-volume methods it is naturally suited to emulate shock physics. The unique combination of shock and turbulence emulation capabilities supports direct use of ILES as an effective simulation anzatz for RMI. Here, we further test this approach using a particular strategy based on a nominally-inviscid, Schmidt number {approx} 1, simulation model that uses the LANL RAGE code to investigate planar RMI. Issues of initial material interface characterization and modeling difficulties, and effects of IC resolved spectral content on transitional and late-time turbulent mixing were examined in our previous work. The focus here is to carry out a systematic analysis of effects of combined IC spectral content and thickness.

  13. Outflow Driven Turbulence in Molecular Clouds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jonathan J. Carroll; Adam Frank; Eric G. Blackman; Andrew J. Cunningham; Alice C. Quillen

    2008-05-30

    In this paper we explore the relationship between protostellar outflows and turbulence in molecular clouds. Using 3-D numerical simulations we focus on the hydrodynamics of multiple outflows interacting within a parsec scale volume. We explore the extent to which transient outflows injecting directed energy and momentum into a sub-volume of a molecular cloud can be converted into random turbulent motions. We show that turbulence can readily be sustained by these interactions and show that it is possible to broadly characterize an effective driving scale of the outflows. We compare the velocity spectrum obtained in our studies to that of isotropically forced hydrodynamic turbulence finding that in outflow driven turbulence a power law is indeed achieved. However we find a steeper spectrum (beta ~ 3) is obtained in outflow driven turbulence models than in isotropically forced simulations (beta ~ 2). We discuss possible physical mechanisms responsible for these results as well and their implications for turbulence in molecular clouds where outflows will act in concert with other processes such as gravitational collapse.

  14. Gyrokinetic turbulence: a nonlinear route to dissipation through phase space

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. A. Schekochihin; S. C. Cowley; W. Dorland; G. W. Hammett; G. G. Howes; G. G. Plunk; E. Quataert; T. Tatsuno

    2008-11-04

    This paper describes a conceptual framework for understanding kinetic plasma turbulence as a generalized form of energy cascade in phase space. It is emphasized that conversion of turbulent energy into thermodynamic heat is only achievable in the presence of some (however small) degree of collisionality. The smallness of the collision rate is compensated by the emergence of small-scale structure in the velocity space. For gyrokinetic turbulence, a nonlinear perpendicular phase mixing mechanism is identified and described as a turbulent cascade of entropy fluctuations simultaneously occurring at spatial scales smaller than the ion gyroscale and in velocity space. Scaling relations for the resulting fluctuation spectra are derived. An estimate for the collisional cutoff is provided. The importance of adequately modeling and resolving collisions in gyrokinetic simulations is biefly discussed, as well as the relevance of these results to understanding the dissipation-range turbulence in the solar wind and the electrostatic microturbulence in fusion plasmas.

  15. Azimuthally Anisotropic 3D Velocity Continuation

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Burnett, William; Fomel, Sergey

    2011-01-01

    We extend time-domain velocity continuation to the zero-offset 3D azimuthally anisotropic case. Velocity continuation describes how a seismic image changes given a change in migration velocity. This description turns out to be of a wave propagation process, in which images change along a velocity axis. In the anisotropic case, the velocity model is multiparameter. Therefore, anisotropic image propagation is multidimensional. We use a three-parameter slowness model, which is related to azimuthal variations in velocity, as well as their principal directions. This information is useful for fracture and reservoir characterization from seismic data. We provide synthetic diffraction imaging examples to illustratemore »the concept and potential applications of azimuthal velocity continuation and to analyze the impulse response of the 3D velocity continuation operator.« less

  16. Temporal Velocity Variations beneath the Coso Geothermal Field...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Temporal Velocity Variations beneath the Coso Geothermal Field Observed using Seismic Double Difference Tomography of Compressional and Shear Wave Arrival Times Jump to:...

  17. Local Energy Velocity of Classical Fields

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    I. V. Drozdov; A. A. Stahlhofen

    2007-04-19

    It is proposed to apply a recently developed concept of local wave velocities to the dynamical field characteristics, especially for the canonical field energy density. It is shown that local energy velocities can be derived from the lagrangian directly. The local velocities of zero- and first- order for energy propagation has been obtained for special cases of scalar and vector fields. Some important special cases of these results are discussed.

  18. Energy dissipation processes in solar wind turbulence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Y; Feng, X S; Xu, X J; Zhang, J; Sun, T R; Zuo, P B

    2015-01-01

    Turbulence is a chaotic flow regime filled by irregular flows. The dissipation of turbulence is a fundamental problem in the realm of physics. Theoretically, dissipation cannot be ultimately achieved without collisions, and so how turbulent kinetic energy is dissipated in the nearly collisionless solar wind is a challenging problem. Wave particle interactions and magnetic reconnection are two possible dissipation mechanisms, but which mechanism dominates is still a controversial topic. Here we analyze the dissipation region scaling around a solar wind magnetic reconnection region. We find that the magnetic reconnection region shows a unique multifractal scaling in the dissipation range, while the ambient solar wind turbulence reveals a monofractal dissipation process for most of the time. These results provide the first observational evidences for the intermittent multifractal dissipation region scaling around a magnetic reconnection site, and they also have significant implications for the fundamental energy...

  19. Model turbulent floods with the Smagorinski large eddy closure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. J. Roberts; D. J. Georgiev; D. V. Strunin

    2008-05-21

    Floods, tides and tsunamis are turbulent, yet conventional models are based upon depth averaging inviscid irrotational flow equations. We propose to change the base of such modelling to the Smagorinksi large eddy closure for turbulence in order to appropriately match the underlying fluid dynamics. Our approach allows for large changes in fluid depth to cater for extreme inundations. The key to the analysis underlying the approach is to choose surface and bed boundary conditions that accommodate a constant turbulent shear as a nearly neutral mode. Analysis supported by slow manifold theory then constructs a model for the coupled dynamics of the fluid depth and the mean turbulent lateral velocity. The model resolves the internal turbulent shear in the flow and thus may be used in further work to rationally predict erosion and transport in turbulent floods.

  20. The deterministic chaos and random noise in turbulent jet

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yao, Tian-Liang; Liu, Hai-Feng Xu, Jian-Liang; Li, Wei-Feng

    2014-06-01

    A turbulent flow is usually treated as a superposition of coherent structure and incoherent turbulence. In this paper, the largest Lyapunov exponent and the random noise in the near field of round jet and plane jet are estimated with our previously proposed method of chaotic time series analysis [T. L. Yao, et al., Chaos 22, 033102 (2012)]. The results show that the largest Lyapunov exponents of the round jet and plane jet are in direct proportion to the reciprocal of the integral time scale of turbulence, which is in accordance with the results of the dimensional analysis, and the proportionality coefficients are equal. In addition, the random noise of the round jet and plane jet has the same linear relation with the Kolmogorov velocity scale of turbulence. As a result, the random noise may well be from the incoherent disturbance in turbulence, and the coherent structure in turbulence may well follow the rule of chaotic motion.

  1. Optical Turbulence Characterization at LAMOST Site: Observations and Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, L -Y; Yao, Y -Q; Vernin, J; Chadid, M; Wang, H -S; Yin, J; Wang, Y -P

    2015-01-01

    Atmospheric optical turbulence seriously limits the performance of high angular resolution instruments. An 8-night campaign of measurements was carried out at the LAMOST site in 2011, to characterize the optical turbulence. Two instruments were set up during the campaign: a Differential Image Motion Monitor (DIMM) used to measure the total atmospheric seeing, and a Single Star Scidar (SSS) to measure the vertical profiles of the turbulence C_n^2(h) and the horizontal wind velocity V(h). The optical turbulence parameters are also calculated with the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model coupled with the Trinquet-Vernin model, which describes optical effects of atmospheric turbulence by using the local meteorological parameters. This paper presents assessment of the optical parameters involved in high angular resolution astronomy. Its includes seeing, isoplanatic angle, coherence time, coherence etendue, vertical profiles of optical turbulence intensity _n^2(h)$ and horizontal wind speed V(h). The median...

  2. Interpreting Power Anisotropy Measurements in Plasma Turbulence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, C H K; Horbury, T S; Schekochihin, A A

    2009-01-01

    A relationship between power anisotropy and wavevector anisotropy in turbulent fluctuations is derived. This can be used to interpret plasma turbulence measurements, for example in the solar wind. If fluctuations are anisotropic in shape then the ion gyroscale break point in spectra in the directions parallel and perpendicular to the magnetic field would not occur at the same frequency, and similarly for the electron gyroscale break point. This is an important consideration when interpreting solar wind observations in terms of anisotropic turbulence theories. Model magnetic field power spectra are presented assuming a cascade of critically balanced Alfven waves in the inertial range and kinetic Alfven waves in the dissipation range. The variation of power anisotropy with scale is compared to existing solar wind measurements and the similarities and differences are discussed.

  3. Interstellar Turbulence, Cloud Formation and Pressure Balance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Enrique Vazquez-Semadeni

    1998-10-23

    We discuss HD and MHD compressible turbulence as a cloud-forming and cloud-structuring mechanism in the ISM. Results from a numerical model of the turbulent ISM at large scales suggest that the phase-like appearance of the medium, the typical values of the densities and magnetic field strengths in the intercloud medium, as well as Larson's velocity dispersion-size scaling relation in clouds may be understood as consequences of the interstellar turbulence. However, the density-size relation appears to only hold for the densest simulated clouds, there existing a large population of small, low-density clouds, which, on the other hand, are hardest to observe. We then discuss several tests and implications of a fully dynamical picture of interstellar clouds. The results imply that clouds are transient, constantly being formed, distorted and disrupted by the turbulent velocity field, with a fraction of these fluctuations undergoing gravitational collapse. Simulated line profiles and estimated cloud lifetimes are consistent with observational data. In this scenario, we suggest it is quite unlikely that quasi-hydrostatic structures on any scale can form, and that the near pressure balance between clouds and the intercloud medium is an incidental consequence of the density field driven by the turbulence and in the presence of appropriate cooling, rather than a driving or confining mechanism.

  4. Logarithmic violation of scaling in strongly anisotropic turbulent transfer of a passive vector field

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    N. V. Antonov; N. M. Gulitskiy

    2015-01-21

    Inertial-range asymptotic behavior of a vector (e.g., magnetic) field, passively advected by a strongly anisotropic turbulent flow, is studied by means of the field theoretic renormalization group and the operator product expansion. The advecting velocity field is Gaussian, not correlated in time, with the pair correlation function of the form $\\propto \\delta(t-t') / k_{\\bot}^{d-1+\\xi}$, where $k_{\\bot}=|{\\bf k}_{\\bot}|$ and ${\\bf k}_{\\bot}$ is the component of the wave vector, perpendicular to the distinguished direction (`direction of the flow') -- the $d$-dimensional generalization of the ensemble introduced by Avellaneda and Majda [{\\it Commun. Math. Phys.} {\\bf 131}: 381 (1990)]. The stochastic advection-diffusion equation for the transverse (divergence-free) vector field includes, as special cases, the kinematic dynamo model for magnetohydrodynamic turbulence and the linearized Navier--Stokes equation. In contrast to the well known isotropic Kraichnan's model, where various correlation functions exhibit anomalous scaling behavior with infinite sets of anomalous exponents, here the dependence on the integral turbulence scale $L$ has a logarithmic behavior: instead of power-like corrections to ordinary scaling, determined by naive (canonical) dimensions, the anomalies manifest themselves as polynomials of logarithms of $L$. The key point is that the matrices of scaling dimensions of the relevant families of composite operators appear nilpotent and cannot be diagonalized. The detailed proof of this fact is given for correlation functions of arbitrary order.

  5. Evidence of Shock-Driven Turbulence in the Solar Chromosphere

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    K. P. Reardon; F. Lepreti; V. Carbone; A. Vecchio

    2008-09-24

    We study the acoustic properties of the solar chromosphere in the high-frequency regime using a time sequence of velocity measurements in the chromospheric Ca II 854.2 nm line taken with the Interferometric Bidimensional Spectrometer (IBIS). We concentrate on quiet-Sun behavior, apply Fourier analysis, and characterize the observations in terms of the probability density functions (PDFs) of velocity increments. We confirm the presence of significant oscillatory fluctuation power above the cutoff frequency and find that it obeys a power-law distribution with frequency up to our 25 mHz Nyquist limit. The chromospheric PDFs are non-Gaussian and asymmetric and they differ among network, fibril, and internetwork regions. This suggests that the chromospheric high-frequency power is not simply the result of short-period waves propagating upward from the photosphere but rather is the signature of turbulence generated within the chromosphere from shock oscillations near the cutoff frequency. The presence of this pervasive and broad spectrum of motions in the chromosphere is likely to have implications for the excitation of coronal loop oscillations.

  6. Wave-wave interactions in solar type III radio bursts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thejappa, G.; MacDowall, R. J.

    2014-02-11

    The high time resolution observations from the STEREO/WAVES experiment show that in type III radio bursts, the Langmuir waves often occur as localized magnetic field aligned coherent wave packets with durations of a few ms and with peak intensities well exceeding the strong turbulence thresholds. Some of these wave packets show spectral signatures of beam-resonant Langmuir waves, down- and up-shifted sidebands, and ion sound waves, with frequencies, wave numbers, and tricoherences satisfying the resonance conditions of the oscillating two stream instability (four wave interaction). The spectra of a few of these wave packets also contain peaks at f{sub pe}, 2f{sub pe} and 3 f{sub pe} (f{sub pe} is the electron plasma frequency), with frequencies, wave numbers and bicoherences (computed using the wavelet based bispectral analysis techniques) satisfying the resonance conditions of three wave interactions: (1) excitation of second harmonic electromagnetic waves as a result of coalescence of two oppositely propagating Langmuir waves, and (2) excitation of third harmonic electromagnetic waves as a result of coalescence of Langmuir waves with second harmonic electromagnetic waves. The implication of these findings is that the strong turbulence processes play major roles in beam stabilization as well as conversion of Langmuir waves into escaping radiation in type III radio bursts.

  7. Second-order model of entrainment in planar turbulent jets at low Reynolds number S. Paillat and E. Kaminski

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kaminski, Edouard

    Second-order model of entrainment in planar turbulent jets at low Reynolds number S. Paillat and E.1063/1.4767535 Investigations on the local entrainment velocity in a turbulent jet Phys. Fluids 24, 105110 (2012); 10-order model of entrainment in planar turbulent jets at low Reynolds number S. Paillata) and E. Kaminski

  8. ENSEMBLE SIMULATIONS OF PROTON HEATING IN THE SOLAR WIND VIA TURBULENCE AND ION CYCLOTRON RESONANCE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cranmer, Steven R.

    2014-07-01

    Protons in the solar corona and heliosphere exhibit anisotropic velocity distributions, violation of magnetic moment conservation, and a general lack of thermal equilibrium with the other particle species. There is no agreement about the identity of the physical processes that energize non-Maxwellian protons in the solar wind, but a traditional favorite has been the dissipation of ion cyclotron resonant Alfvén waves. This paper presents kinetic models of how ion cyclotron waves heat protons on their journey from the corona to interplanetary space. It also derives a wide range of new solutions for the relevant dispersion relations, marginal stability boundaries, and nonresonant velocity-space diffusion rates. A phenomenological model containing both cyclotron damping and turbulent cascade is constructed to explain the suppression of proton heating at low alpha-proton differential flow speeds. These effects are implemented in a large-scale model of proton thermal evolution from the corona to 1 AU. A Monte Carlo ensemble of realistic wind speeds, densities, magnetic field strengths, and heating rates produces a filled region of parameter space (in a plane described by the parallel plasma beta and the proton temperature anisotropy ratio) similar to what is measured. The high-beta edges of this filled region are governed by plasma instabilities and strong heating rates. The low-beta edges correspond to weaker proton heating and a range of relative contributions from cyclotron resonance. On balance, the models are consistent with other studies that find only a small fraction of the turbulent power spectrum needs to consist of ion cyclotron waves.

  9. TOWARD A THEORY OF ASTROPHYSICAL PLASMA TURBULENCE AT SUBPROTON SCALES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boldyrev, Stanislav; Horaites, Konstantinos; Xia, Qian; Perez, Jean Carlos

    2013-11-01

    We present an analytical study of subproton electromagnetic fluctuations in a collisionless plasma with a plasma beta of the order of unity. In the linear limit, a rigorous derivation from the kinetic equation is conducted focusing on the role and physical properties of kinetic-Alfvén and whistler waves. Then, nonlinear fluid-like equations for kinetic-Alfvén waves and whistler modes are derived, with special emphasis on the similarities and differences in the corresponding plasma dynamics. The kinetic-Alfvén modes exist in the lower-frequency region of phase space, ? << k v{sub Ti} , where they are described by the kinetic-Alfvén system. These modes exist both below and above the ion-cyclotron frequency. The whistler modes, which are qualitatively different from the kinetic-Alfvén modes, occupy a different region of phase space, k v{sub Ti} << ? << k{sub z}v{sub Te} , and they are described by the electron magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) system or the reduced electron MHD system if the propagation is oblique. Here, k{sub z} and k are the wavenumbers along and transverse to the background magnetic field, respectively, and v{sub Ti} and v{sub Te} are the ion and electron thermal velocities, respectively. The models of subproton plasma turbulence are discussed and the results of numerical simulations are presented. We also point out possible implications for solar-wind observations.

  10. THE FATE OF PLANETESIMALS IN TURBULENT DISKS WITH DEAD ZONES. I. THE TURBULENT STIRRING RECIPE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Okuzumi, Satoshi [Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 152-8551 (Japan); Ormel, Chris W., E-mail: okuzumi@geo.titech.ac.jp [Astronomy Department, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)

    2013-07-01

    Turbulence in protoplanetary disks affects planet formation in many ways. While small dust particles are mainly affected by the aerodynamical coupling with turbulent gas velocity fields, planetesimals and larger bodies are more affected by gravitational interaction with gas density fluctuations. For the latter process, a number of numerical simulations have been performed in recent years, but a fully parameter-independent understanding has not been yet established. In this study, we present simple scaling relations for the planetesimal stirring rate in turbulence driven by magnetorotational instability (MRI), taking into account the stabilization of MRI due to ohmic resistivity. We begin with order-of-magnitude estimates of the turbulence-induced gravitational force acting on solid bodies and associated diffusion coefficients for their orbital elements. We then test the predicted scaling relations using the results of recent ohmic-resistive MHD simulations by Gressel et al. We find that these relations successfully explain the simulation results if we properly fix order-of-unity uncertainties within the estimates. We also update the saturation predictor for the density fluctuation amplitude in MRI-driven turbulence originally proposed by Okuzumi and Hirose. Combination of the scaling relations and saturation predictor allows us to know how the turbulent stirring rate of planetesimals depends on disk parameters such as the gas column density, distance from the central star, vertical resistivity distribution, and net vertical magnetic flux. In Paper II, we apply our recipe to planetesimal accretion to discuss its viability in turbulent disks.

  11. Turbulent flow in graphene

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kumar S. Gupta; Siddhartha Sen

    2010-06-05

    We demonstrate the possibility of a turbulent flow of electrons in graphene in the hydrodynamic region, by calculating the corresponding turbulent probability density function. This is used to calculate the contribution of the turbulent flow to the conductivity within a quantum Boltzmann approach. The dependence of the conductivity on the system parameters arising from the turbulent flow is very different from that due to scattering.

  12. Quantum Gravity and Turbulence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vishnu Jejjala; Djordje Minic; Y. Jack Ng; Chia-Hsiung Tze

    2010-05-18

    We apply recent advances in quantum gravity to the problem of turbulence. Adopting the AdS/CFT approach we propose a string theory of turbulence that explains the Kolmogorov scaling in 3+1 dimensions and the Kraichnan and Kolmogorov scalings in 2+1 dimensions. In the gravitational context, turbulence is intimately related to the properties of spacetime, or quantum, foam.

  13. Fast wave evanescence in filamentary boundary plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Myra, J. R. [Lodestar Research Corporation, Boulder, Colorado 80027 (United States)] [Lodestar Research Corporation, Boulder, Colorado 80027 (United States)

    2014-02-15

    Radio frequency waves for heating and current drive of plasmas in tokamaks and other magnetic confinement devices must first traverse the scrape-off-layer (SOL) before they can be put to their intended use. The SOL plasma is strongly turbulent and intermittent in space and time. These turbulent properties of the SOL, which are not routinely taken into account in wave propagation codes, can have an important effect on the coupling of waves through an evanescent SOL or edge plasma region. The effective scale length for fast wave (FW) evanescence in the presence of short-scale field-aligned filamentary plasma turbulence is addressed in this paper. It is shown that although the FW wavelength or evanescent scale length is long compared with the dimensions of the turbulence, the FW does not simply average over the turbulent density; rather, the average is over the exponentiation rate. Implications for practical situations are discussed.

  14. Analysis of the effects of energy deposition on shock-driven turbulent mixing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Haines, Brian M.; Grinstein, Fernando F.; Welser-Sherrill, Leslie; Fincke, James R.; Doss, Forrest W. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, MS T087, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States)] [Los Alamos National Laboratory, MS T087, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States)

    2013-07-15

    We perform simulations of laser-driven turbulence experiments with energy deposition, modeling situations where energy is deposited in a mixing layer before or after it is reshocked. Such situations are experienced in, e.g., inertial confinement fusion capsules. We show that the timing of the energy deposition has a significant impact on the development of turbulent flow and corresponding turbulent material mixing. In particular, if the energy is deposited before the shock wave begins interacting with the mixing layer, the development of turbulence and turbulent mixing are inhibited. If, however, the energy is deposited after the shock wave has interacted with a portion of the mixing layer, turbulence generation and turbulent mixing are enhanced.

  15. LARGE EDDY SIMULATION OF TURBULENT BOUNDARY LAYERS OVER ROUGH BEDS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pawlak, Geno

    that determines the response of the boundary layer is not clear. One method to characterize the irregular nature with different spectral slopes using 2D 10 % loading square waves as basis functions. These square waves can) is then used to simulate the turbulent boundary layer over the rough beds. The LES solver is first validated

  16. On numerical turbulence generation for test-particle simulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tautz, R. C. [Zentrum fuer Astronomie und Astrophysik, Technische Universitaet Berlin, Hardenbergstrasse 36, D-10623 Berlin (Germany); Dosch, A. [Center for Space Plasmas and Aeronomic Research, University of Alabama in Huntsville, 320 Sparkman Drive, Huntsville, Alabama 35805 (United States)

    2013-02-15

    A modified method is presented to generate artificial magnetic turbulence that is used for test-particle simulations. Such turbulent fields are obtained from the superposition of a set of wave modes with random polarizations and random directions of propagation. First, it is shown that the new method simultaneously fulfils requirements of isotropy, equal mean amplitude and variance for all field components, and vanishing divergence. Second, the number of wave modes required for a stochastic particle behavior is investigated by using a Lyapunov approach. For the special case of slab turbulence, it is shown that already for 16 wave modes the particle behavior agrees with that shown for considerably larger numbers of wave modes.

  17. Statistical theory of turbulent incompressible multimaterial flow

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kashiwa, B.

    1987-10-01

    Interpenetrating motion of incompressible materials is considered. ''Turbulence'' is defined as any deviation from the mean motion. Accordingly a nominally stationary fluid will exhibit turbulent fluctuations due to a single, slowly moving sphere. Mean conservation equations for interpenetrating materials in arbitrary proportions are derived using an ensemble averaging procedure, beginning with the exact equations of motion. The result is a set of conservation equations for the mean mass, momentum and fluctuational kinetic energy of each material. The equation system is at first unclosed due to integral terms involving unknown one-point and two-point probability distribution functions. In the mean momentum equation, the unclosed terms are clearly identified as representing two physical processes. One is transport of momentum by multimaterial Reynolds stresses, and the other is momentum exchange due to pressure fluctuations and viscous stress at material interfaces. Closure is approached by combining careful examination of multipoint statistical correlations with the traditional physical technique of kappa-epsilon modeling for single-material turbulence. This involves representing the multimaterial Reynolds stress for each material as a turbulent viscosity times the rate of strain based on the mean velocity of that material. The multimaterial turbulent viscosity is related to the fluctuational kinetic energy kappa, and the rate of fluctuational energy dissipation epsilon, for each material. Hence a set of kappa and epsilon equations must be solved, together with mean mass and momentum conservation equations, for each material. Both kappa and the turbulent viscosities enter into the momentum exchange force. The theory is applied to (a) calculation of the drag force on a sphere fixed in a uniform flow, (b) calculation of the settling rate in a suspension and (c) calculation of velocity profiles in the pneumatic transport of solid particles in a pipe.

  18. Turbulent drag reduction through oscillating discs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wise, Daniel J

    2014-01-01

    The changes of a turbulent channel flow subjected to oscillations of wall flush-mounted rigid discs are studied by means of direct numerical simulations. The Reynolds number is $R_\\tau$=$180$, based on the friction velocity of the stationary-wall case and the half channel height. The primary effect of the wall forcing is the sustained reduction of wall-shear stress, which reaches a maximum of 20%. A parametric study on the disc diameter, maximum tip velocity, and oscillation period is presented, with the aim to identify the optimal parameters which guarantee maximum drag reduction and maximum net energy saving, computed by taking into account the power spent to actuate the discs. This may be positive and reaches 6%. The Rosenblat viscous pump flow is used to predict the power spent for disc motion in the turbulent channel flow and to estimate localized and transient regions over the disc surface subjected to the turbulent regenerative braking effect, for which the wall turbulence exerts work on the discs. The...

  19. A Bayesian Approach to Assess the Importance of Crustal Corrections in Global Anisotropic Surface Wave Tomography

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xing, Z; Beghein, C

    2015-01-01

    from measurements of surface wave phase velocity anomalies,boundary from surface wave dispersion data, J. Geophys.radially anisotropic surface wave tomography, J. Geophys.

  20. Recent Advances in Wave Travel Time Based Methodology for Structural Health Monitoring

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Southern California, University of

    identify wave velocity profiles of vertically propagating shear and torsional waves through the building monitoring, seismic interferometry, wave travel time 1. INTRODUCTION The ability to monitor the health

  1. Body Wave Tomography For Regional Scale Assessment Of Geothermal...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    wave tomography are two of the primary methods for estimation of regional scale seismic velocity variations. Seismic velocity is affected by temperature and rock composition...

  2. Evolution of turbulence in the expanding solar wind, a numerical study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dong, Yue; Grappin, Roland; Verdini, Andrea E-mail: verdini@arcetri.astro.it

    2014-10-01

    We study the evolution of turbulence in the solar wind by solving numerically the full three-dimensional (3D) magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) equations embedded in a radial mean wind. The corresponding equations (expanding box model or EBM) have been considered earlier but never integrated in 3D simulations. Here, we follow the development of turbulence from 0.2 AU up to about 1.5 AU. Starting with isotropic spectra scaling as k {sup –1}, we observe a steepening toward a k {sup –5/3} scaling in the middle of the wave number range and formation of spectral anisotropies. The advection of a plasma volume by the expanding solar wind causes a non-trivial stretching of the volume in directions transverse to radial and the selective decay of the components of velocity and magnetic fluctuations. These two effects combine to yield the following results. (1) Spectral anisotropy: gyrotropy is broken, and the radial wave vectors have most of the power. (2) Coherent structures: radial streams emerge that resemble the observed microjets. (3) Energy spectra per component: they show an ordering in good agreement with the one observed in the solar wind at 1 AU. The latter point includes a global dominance of the magnetic energy over kinetic energy in the inertial and f {sup –1} range and a dominance of the perpendicular-to-the-radial components over the radial components in the inertial range. We conclude that many of the above properties are the result of evolution during transport in the heliosphere, and not just the remnant of the initial turbulence close to the Sun.

  3. Boussinesq-equation and rans hybrid wave model 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sitanggang, Khairil Irfan

    2009-05-15

    This dissertation presents the development of a novel hybrid wave model, comprised of the irrotational, 1-D horizontal Boussinesq and 2-D vertical turbulence-closed Reynolds Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) wave models. The ...

  4. Turbulent density fluctuations in the solar wind

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ingale, Madhusudan

    2015-01-01

    Treatments of the radio scattering due to density turbulence in the solar wind typically employ asymptotic approximations to the phase structure function. We use a general structure function (GSF) that straddles the asymptotic limits and quantify the relative error introduced by the approximations. We show that the regimes where GSF predictions are accurate than those of its asymptotic approximations is not only of practical relevance, but are where inner scale effects influence the estimate of the scatter-broadening. Thus we propose that GSF should henceforth be used for scatter broadening calculations and estimates of quantities characterizing density turbulence in the solar corona and solar wind. In the next part of this thesis we use measurements of density turbulence in the solar wind from previously publish observations of radio wave scattering and interplanetary scintillations. Density fluctuations are inferred using the GSF for radio scattering data and existing analysis methods for IPS. Assuming that...

  5. New scenario for transition to slow turbulence. Turbulence like quantum chaos in three dimensional model of Euclidian quantum field theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Foukzon, Jaykov

    2008-01-01

    Advanced numerical-analytical study of the three-dimensional nonlinear stochastic partial differential equation, analogous to that proposed by V. N. Nikolaevski to describe longitudinal seismic waves, is presented. The equation has a threshold of short-wave instability and symmetry, providing long-wave dynamics. Proposed new mechanism for quantum "super chaos" generating in nonlinear dynamical systems. The hypothesis is said, that strong physical turbulence could be identified with quantum chaos of considered type.

  6. Subgrid models for mass and thermal diffusion in turbulent mixing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sharp, David H; Lim, Hyunkyung; Li, Xiao - Lin; Gilmm, James G

    2008-01-01

    We are concerned with the chaotic flow fields of turbulent mixing. Chaotic flow is found in an extreme form in multiply shocked Richtmyer-Meshkov unstable flows. The goal of a converged simulation for this problem is twofold: to obtain converged solutions for macro solution features, such as the trajectories of the principal shock waves, mixing zone edges, and mean densities and velocities within each phase, and also for such micro solution features as the joint probability distributions of the temperature and species concentration. We introduce parameterized subgrid models of mass and thermal diffusion, to define large eddy simulations (LES) that replicate the micro features observed in the direct numerical simulation (DNS). The Schmidt numbers and Prandtl numbers are chosen to represent typical liquid, gas and plasma parameter values. Our main result is to explore the variation of the Schmidt, Prandtl and Reynolds numbers by three orders of magnitude, and the mesh by a factor of 8 per linear dimension (up to 3200 cells per dimension), to allow exploration of both DNS and LES regimes and verification of the simulations for both macro and micro observables. We find mesh convergence for key properties describing the molecular level of mixing, including chemical reaction rates between the distinct fluid species. We find results nearly independent of Reynolds number for Re 300, 6000, 600K . Methodologically, the results are also new. In common with the shock capturing community, we allow and maintain sharp solution gradients, and we enhance these gradients through use of front tracking. In common with the turbulence modeling community, we include subgrid scale models with no adjustable parameters for LES. To the authors' knowledge, these two methodologies have not been previously combined. In contrast to both of these methodologies, our use of Front Tracking, with DNS or LES resolution of the momentum equation at or near the Kolmogorov scale, but without resolving the Batchelor scale, allows a feasible approach to the modeling of high Schmidt number flows.

  7. Rapidly Sheared Compressible Turbulence: Characterization of Different Pressure Regimes and Effect of Thermodynamic Fluctuations 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bertsch, Rebecca Lynne

    2011-10-21

    evolution shows three distinct stages. The physics of each stage is clearly explained. Next, the influence of initial velocity and thermodynamic fluctuations on the flow field are investigated. The evolution of turbulence is shown to be strongly dependent...

  8. Interpolation between DarcyWeisbach and Darcy for laminar and turbulent flows

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walter, M.Todd

    Interpolation between Darcy­Weisbach and Darcy for laminar and turbulent flows W.L. Hogarth a, *, J the square of the velocity is proportional to the hydraulic gradient and if the flow is laminar, which­Weisbach; Porous media; Open channels; Turbulent flow; Laminar flow 1. Introduction Grassed waterways

  9. Interpolation between DarcyWeisbach and Darcy for laminar and turbulent flows

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Interpolation between Darcy­Weisbach and Darcy for laminar and turbulent flows W.L. Hogarth a,*, J is laminar, which is the usual case, the velocity is proportional to the hydraulic gradient. This last result: Darcy; Darcy­Weisbach; Porous media; Open channels; Turbulent flow; Laminar flow 1. Introduction Grassed

  10. THE ORIGIN OF NON-MAXWELLIAN SOLAR WIND ELECTRON VELOCITY DISTRIBUTION FUNCTION: CONNECTION TO NANOFLARES IN THE SOLAR CORONA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Che, H.; Goldstein, M. L.

    2014-11-10

    The formation of the observed core-halo feature in the solar wind electron velocity distribution function is a long-time puzzle. In this Letter, based on the current knowledge of nanoflares, we show that the nanoflare-accelerated electron beams are likely to trigger a strong electron two-stream instability that generates kinetic Alfvén wave and whistler wave turbulence, as we demonstrated in a previous paper. We further show that the core-halo feature produced during the origin of kinetic turbulence is likely to originate in the inner corona and can be preserved as the solar wind escapes to space along open field lines. We formulate a set of equations to describe the heating processes observed in the simulation and show that the core-halo temperature ratio of the solar wind is insensitive to the initial conditions in the corona and is related to the core-halo density ratio of the solar wind and to the quasi-saturation property of the two-stream instability at the time when the exponential decay ends. This relation can be extended to the more general core-halo-strahl feature in the solar wind. The temperature ratio between the core and hot components is nearly independent of the heliospheric distance to the Sun. We show that the core-halo relative drift previously reported is a relic of the fully saturated two-stream instability. Our theoretical results are consistent with the observations while new tests for this model are provided.

  11. Turbulence and its effects upon neutrinos

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kneller, J. P.; McLaughlin, G. C.; Patton, K. M. [Department of Physics, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, North Carolina 27695 (United States)

    2014-06-24

    As a neutrino passes through turbulent matter, large amplitude transitions between its eigenstates can occur. These transitions can be modeled as like those of an irradiated polarized atom and we investigate this connection both analytically and numerically. We find a simple theory that makes use of the Rotating Wave Approximation can make predictions for the amplitudes and wavelengths of the transitions that agree very well with those from the numerical solutions.

  12. Wave Mechanics and the Fifth Dimension

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paul S. Wesson; James M. Overduin

    2013-01-28

    Replacing 4D Minkowski space by 5D canonical space leads to a clearer derivation of the main features of wave mechanics, including the wave function and the velocity of de Broglie waves. Recent tests of wave-particle duality could be adapted to investigate whether de Broglie waves are basically 4D or 5D in nature.

  13. Spark ignition of lifted turbulent jet flames

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ahmed, S.F.; Mastorakos, E. [Hopkinson Laboratory, Department of Engineering, University of Cambridge, Cambridge CB2 1PZ (United Kingdom)

    2006-07-15

    This paper presents experiments on ignition and subsequent edge flame propagation in turbulent nonpremixed methane jets in air. The spark position, energy, duration, electrode diameter and gap, and the jet velocity and air premixing of the fuel stream are examined to study their effects on the ignition probability defined as successful flame establishment. The flame is visualized by a high-speed camera and planar laser-induced fluorescence of OH. It was found that after an initially spherical shape, the flame took a cylindrical shape with a propagating edge upstream. The probability of successful ignition increases with high spark energy, thin electrode diameter and wide gap, but decreases with increasing dilution of the jet with air. The flame kernel growth rate is high when the ignition probability is high for all parameters, except for jet velocity. Increasing the jet velocity decreases the ignition probability at all locations. The average flame position as a function of time from the spark was measured and the data were used to estimate a net propagation speed, which then resulted in an estimate of the average edge flame speed relative to the incoming flow. This was about 3 to 6 laminar burning velocities of a stoichiometric mixture. The measurements can assist theoretical models for the probability of ignition of nonpremixed flames and for edge flame propagation in turbulent inhomogeneous mixtures, both of which determine the success of ignition in practical combustion systems. (author)

  14. Proceedings of the Combustion Institute, Volume 29, 2002/pp. 18091815 MEASUREMENTS OF INCOHERENT ACOUSTIC WAVE SCATTERING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lieuwen, Timothy C.

    OF INCOHERENT ACOUSTIC WAVE SCATTERING FROM TURBULENT PREMIXED FLAMES TIM LIEUWEN, RAJESH RAJARAM, YEDIDIA-0150, USA This paper presents measurements of acoustic wave scattering from turbulent, premixed flames Dinkelacker et al. [1]. Introduction This paper describes measurements of acoustic wave interactions

  15. IWA : an analysis program for isentropic wave measurements.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ao, Tommy

    2009-02-01

    IWA (Isentropic Wave Analysis) is a program for analyzing velocity profiles of isentropic compression experiments. IWA applies incremental impedance matching correction to measured velocity profiles to obtain in-situ particle velocity profiles for Lagrangian wave analysis. From the in-situ velocity profiles, material properties such as wave velocities, stress, strain, strain rate, and strength are calculated. The program can be run in any current version of MATLAB (2008a or later) or as a Windows XP executable.

  16. SCALING PROPERTIES OF SMALL-SCALE FLUCTUATIONS IN MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMIC TURBULENCE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Perez, Jean Carlos; Mason, Joanne; Boldyrev, Stanislav; Cattaneo, Fausto E-mail: j.mason@exeter.ac.uk E-mail: cattaneo@flash.uchicago.edu

    2014-09-20

    Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence in the majority of natural systems, including the interstellar medium, the solar corona, and the solar wind, has Reynolds numbers far exceeding the Reynolds numbers achievable in numerical experiments. Much attention is therefore drawn to the universal scaling properties of small-scale fluctuations, which can be reliably measured in the simulations and then extrapolated to astrophysical scales. However, in contrast with hydrodynamic turbulence, where the universal structure of the inertial and dissipation intervals is described by the Kolmogorov self-similarity, the scaling for MHD turbulence cannot be established based solely on dimensional arguments due to the presence of an intrinsic velocity scale—the Alfvén velocity. In this Letter, we demonstrate that the Kolmogorov first self-similarity hypothesis cannot be formulated for MHD turbulence in the same way it is formulated for the hydrodynamic case. Besides profound consequences for the analytical consideration, this also imposes stringent conditions on numerical studies of MHD turbulence. In contrast with the hydrodynamic case, the discretization scale in numerical simulations of MHD turbulence should decrease faster than the dissipation scale, in order for the simulations to remain resolved as the Reynolds number increases.

  17. Bi-Directional Energy Cascades and the Origin of Kinetic Alfv\\'enic and Whistler Turbulence in the Solar Wind

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Che, H; Viñas, A F

    2013-01-01

    The observed sub-proton scale turbulence spectrum in the solar wind raises the question of how that turbulence originates. Observations of keV energetic electrons during solar quite-time suggest them as possible source of free energy to drive the turbulence. Using particle-in-cell simulations, we explore how free energy in energetic electrons, released by an electron two-stream instability drives Weibel-like electromagnetic waves that excite wave-wave interactions. Consequently, both kinetic Alfv\\'enic and whistler waves are excited that evolve through inverse and forward magnetic energy cascades.

  18. Experimental Study of Current-Driven Turbulence During Magnetic Reconnection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miklos Porkolab; Jan Egedal-Pedersen; William Fox

    2010-08-31

    CMPD Final Report Experimental Study of Current-Driven Turbulence During Magnetic Reconnection Miklos Porkolab, PI, Jan Egedal, co-PI, William Fox, graduate student. This is the final report for Grant DE-FC02-04ER54786, �¢����MIT Participation in the Center for Multiscale Plasma Dynamics,�¢��� which was active from 8/1/2004 to 7/31/2010. This Grant supported the thesis work of one MIT graduate student, William Fox, The thesis research consisted of an experimental study of the fluctuations arising during magnetic reconnection in plasmas on the Versatile Toroidal Facility (VTF) at MIT Plasma Science and Fusion Center (PSFC). The thesis was submitted and accepted by the MIT physics Department, �¢����W. Fox, Experimental Study of Current-Driven Turbulence During Magnetic Reconnection, Ph.D. Thesis, MIT (2009)�¢���. In the VTF experiment reconnection and current-sheet formation is driven by quickly changing currents in a specially arranged set of internal conductors. Previous work on this device [Egedal, et al, PRL 98, 015003, (2007)] identified a �¢����spontaneous�¢��� reconnection regime. In this work fluctuations were studied using impedance-matched, high-bandwidth Langmuir probes. Strong, broadband fluctuations, with frequencies extending from near the lower-hybrid frequency [fLH = (fcefci)1/2] to the electron cyclotron frequency fce were found to arise during the reconnection events. Based on frequency and wavelength measurements, lower-hybrid waves and Trivelpiece-Gould waves were identified. The lower-hybrid waves are easiest to drive with strong perpendicular drifts or gradients which arise due to the reconnection events; an appealing possibility is strong temperature gradients. The Trivelpiece-Gould modes can result from kinetic, bump-on-tail instability of a runaway electron population energized by the reconnection events. We also observed that the turbulence is often spiky, consisting of discrete positive-potential spikes, which were identified as �¢����electron phase-space holes,�¢��� a class of nonlinear solitary wave known to evolve from a strong beam-on-tail instability. We established that fast electrons were produced by magnetic reconnection. Overall, these instabilities were found to be a consequence of reconnection, specifically the strong energization of electrons, leading to steep gradients in both coordinate- and velocity-space. Estimates (using quasi-linear theory) of the anomalous resistivity due to these modes did not appear large enough to substantially impact the reconnection process. Relevant publications: �¢���¢ W. Fox, M. Porkolab, et al, Phys. Rev. Lett. 101, 255003 (2008). �¢���¢ W. Fox, M. Porkolab, et al, Phys. Plasmas 17, 072303, (2010).

  19. The Effect of Magnetic Turbulence Energy Spectra and Pickup Ions on the Heating of the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ng, Chung-Sang

    The Effect of Magnetic Turbulence Energy Spectra and Pickup Ions on the Heating of the Solar Wind C, Durham, NH 03824, USA Abstract. In recent years, a phenomenological solar wind heating model based a shallower spectrum generates less waves and turbulence. Keywords: Pickup ions, Solar wind heating, MHD

  20. FliHy experimental facilities for studying open channel turbulent flows and heat transfer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abdou, Mohamed

    FliHy experimental facilities for studying open channel turbulent flows and heat transfer B. Freeze) facility was constructed at UCLA to study open channel turbulent flow and heat transfer of low supercritical flow regimes (Fr /1), in which the surface waves are amplified and heat transfer is enhanced due

  1. Pyrotechnic deflagration velocity and permeability

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Begeal, D R; Stanton, P L

    1982-01-01

    Particle size, porosity, and permeability of the reactive material have long been considered to be important factors in propellant burning rates and the deflagration-to-detonation transition in explosives. It is reasonable to assume that these same parameters will also affect the deflagration velocity of pyrotechnics. This report describes an experimental program that addresses the permeability of porous solids (particulate beds), in terms of particle size and porosity, and the relationship between permeability and the behavior of pyrotechnics and explosives. The experimental techniques used to acquire permeability data and to characterize the pyrotechnic burning are discussed. Preliminary data have been obtained on the burning characteristics of titanium hydride/potassium perchlorate (THKP) and boron/calcium chromate (BCCR). With THKP, the velocity of a pressure wave (from hot product gases) in the unburned region shows unsteady behavior which is related to the initial porosity or permeability. Simultaneous measurements with pressure gauges and ion gauges reveal that the pressure wave precedes the burn front. Steady burning of BCCR was observed with pressure gauge diagnostics and with a microwave interferometry technique.

  2. Inertial range turbulence in kinetic plasmas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Howes, G G

    2007-01-01

    The transfer of turbulent energy through an inertial range from the driving scale to dissipative scales in a kinetic plasma followed by the conversion of this energy into heat is a fundamental plasma physics process. A theoretical foundation for the study of this process is constructed, but the details of the kinetic cascade are not well understood. Several important properties are identified: (a) the conservation of a generalized energy by the cascade; (b) the need for collisions to increase entropy and realize irreversible plasma heating; and (c) the key role played by the entropy cascade--a dual cascade of energy to small scales in both physical and velocity space--to convert ultimately the turbulent energy into heat. A strategy for nonlinear numerical simulations of kinetic turbulence is outlined. Initial numerical results are consistent with the operation of the entropy cascade. Inertial range turbulence arises in a broad range of space and astrophysical plasmas and may play an important role in the ther...

  3. Inertial range turbulence in kinetic plasmas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. G. Howes

    2007-11-27

    The transfer of turbulent energy through an inertial range from the driving scale to dissipative scales in a kinetic plasma followed by the conversion of this energy into heat is a fundamental plasma physics process. A theoretical foundation for the study of this process is constructed, but the details of the kinetic cascade are not well understood. Several important properties are identified: (a) the conservation of a generalized energy by the cascade; (b) the need for collisions to increase entropy and realize irreversible plasma heating; and (c) the key role played by the entropy cascade--a dual cascade of energy to small scales in both physical and velocity space--to convert ultimately the turbulent energy into heat. A strategy for nonlinear numerical simulations of kinetic turbulence is outlined. Initial numerical results are consistent with the operation of the entropy cascade. Inertial range turbulence arises in a broad range of space and astrophysical plasmas and may play an important role in the thermalization of fusion energy in burning plasmas.

  4. Power-law wrinkling turbulence-flame interaction model for astrophysical flames

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jackson, Aaron P.; Townsley, Dean M.; Calder, Alan C.

    2014-04-01

    We extend a model for turbulence-flame interactions (TFI) to consider astrophysical flames with a particular focus on combustion in Type Ia supernovae. The inertial range of the turbulent cascade is nearly always under-resolved in simulations of astrophysical flows, requiring the use of a model in order to quantify the effects of subgrid-scale wrinkling of the flame surface. We provide implementation details to extend a well-tested TFI model to low-Prandtl number flames for use in the compressible hydrodynamics code FLASH. A local, instantaneous measure of the turbulent velocity is calibrated for FLASH and verification tests are performed. Particular care is taken to consider the relation between the subgrid rms turbulent velocity and the turbulent flame speed, especially for high-intensity turbulence where the turbulent flame speed is not expected to scale with the turbulent velocity. Finally, we explore the impact of different TFI models in full-star, three-dimensional simulations of Type Ia supernovae.

  5. Multipole seismoelectric logging while drilling (LWD) for acoustic velocity measurements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhu, Zhenya

    2012-01-01

    In seismoelectric well logging, an acoustic wave propagates along a borehole and induces electrical signals along the borehole wall. The apparent velocities of these seismoelectric signals are equal to the formation ...

  6. Seismic velocity and Q anisotropy in fractured poroelastic media

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The energy-velocity vector ve of the qP and qSV waves is ..... A., On the spatial variability of parameters of the unsaturated hydraulic conductivity, Water Res.

  7. The interaction of high-speed turbulence with flames: Global properties and internal flame structure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Poludnenko, A.Y.; Oran, E.S. [Laboratory for Computational Physics and Fluid Dynamics, Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375 (United States)

    2010-05-15

    We study the dynamics and properties of a turbulent flame, formed in the presence of subsonic, high-speed, homogeneous, isotropic Kolmogorov-type turbulence in an unconfined system. Direct numerical simulations are performed with Athena-RFX, a massively parallel, fully compressible, high-order, dimensionally unsplit, reactive flow code. A simplified reaction-diffusion model represents a stoichiometric H{sub 2}-air mixture. The system being modeled represents turbulent combustion with the Damkoehler number Da=0.05 and with the turbulent velocity at the energy injection scale 30 times larger than the laminar flame speed. The simulations show that flame interaction with high-speed turbulence forms a steadily propagating turbulent flame with a flame brush width approximately twice the energy injection scale and a speed four times the laminar flame speed. A method for reconstructing the internal flame structure is described and used to show that the turbulent flame consists of tightly folded flamelets. The reaction zone structure of these is virtually identical to that of the planar laminar flame, while the preheat zone is broadened by approximately a factor of two. Consequently, the system evolution represents turbulent combustion in the thin reaction zone regime. The turbulent cascade fails to penetrate the internal flame structure, and thus the action of small-scale turbulence is suppressed throughout most of the flame. Finally, our results suggest that for stoichiometric H{sub 2}-air mixtures, any substantial flame broadening by the action of turbulence cannot be expected in all subsonic regimes. (author)

  8. UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, Turbulent Transport of Energetic Ions and Thermal Plasma

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heidbrink, William W.

    UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, IRVINE Turbulent Transport of Energetic Ions and Thermal Plasma ............................................................................................................ 1 1.1 Fast Ion Transport in Microturbulence.................................................................................................1 1.2 Thermal Plasma Transport in Electrostatic Waves

  9. Astrophysical Gyrokinetics: Kinetic and Fluid Turbulent Cascades In Magentized Weakly Collisional Plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schekochihin, A. A.; Cowley, S. C.; Dorland, W.; Hammett, G. W.; Howes, G. G.; Quataert, E.; Tatsuno, T.

    2009-04-23

    This paper presents a theoretical framework for understanding plasma turbulence in astrophysical plasmas. It is motivated by observations of electromagnetic and density fluctuations in the solar wind, interstellar medium and galaxy clusters, as well as by models of particle heating in accretion disks. All of these plasmas and many others have turbulentmotions at weakly collisional and collisionless scales. The paper focuses on turbulence in a strong mean magnetic field. The key assumptions are that the turbulent fluctuations are small compared to the mean field, spatially anisotropic with respect to it and that their frequency is low compared to the ion cyclotron frequency. The turbulence is assumed to be forced at some system-specific outer scale. The energy injected at this scale has to be dissipated into heat, which ultimately cannot be accomplished without collisions. A kinetic cascade develops that brings the energy to collisional scales both in space and velocity. The nature of the kinetic cascade in various scale ranges depends on the physics of plasma fluctuations that exist there. There are four special scales that separate physically distinct regimes: the electron and ion gyroscales, the mean free path and the electron diffusion scale. In each of the scale ranges separated by these scales, the fully kinetic problem is systematically reduced to a more physically transparent and computationally tractable system of equations, which are derived in a rigorous way. In the "inertial range" above the ion gyroscale, the kinetic cascade separates into two parts: a cascade of Alfvenic fluctuations and a passive cascade of density and magnetic-fieldstrength fluctuations. The former are governed by the Reduced Magnetohydrodynamic (RMHD) equations at both the collisional and collisionless scales; the latter obey a linear kinetic equation along the (moving) field lines associated with the Alfvenic component (in the collisional limit, these compressive fluctuations become the slow and entropy modes of the conventional MHD). In the "dissipation range" below ion gyroscale, there are again two cascades: the kinetic-Alfven-wave (KAW) cascade governed by two fluid-like Electron Reduced Magnetohydrodynamic (ERMHD) equations and a passive cascade of ion entropy fluctuations both in space and velocity. The latter cascade brings the energy of the inertial-range fluctuations that was Landau-damped at the ion gyroscale to collisional scales in the phase space and leads to ion heating. The KAWenergy is similarly damped at the electron gyroscale and converted into electron heat. Kolmogorov-style scaling relations are derived for all of these cascades. The relationship between the theoretical models proposed in this paper and astrophysical applications and observations is discussed in detail.

  10. Three-fluid, three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic solar wind model with eddy viscosity and turbulent resistivity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Usmanov, Arcadi V.; Matthaeus, William H.; Goldstein, Melvyn L.

    2014-06-10

    We have developed a three-fluid, three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic solar wind model that incorporates turbulence transport, eddy viscosity, turbulent resistivity, and turbulent heating. The solar wind plasma is described as a system of co-moving solar wind protons, electrons, and interstellar pickup protons, with separate energy equations for each species. Numerical steady-state solutions of Reynolds-averaged solar wind equations coupled with turbulence transport equations for turbulence energy, cross helicity, and correlation length are obtained by the time relaxation method in the corotating with the Sun frame of reference in the region from 0.3 to 100 AU (but still inside the termination shock). The model equations include the effects of electron heat conduction, Coulomb collisions, photoionization of interstellar hydrogen atoms and their charge exchange with the solar wind protons, turbulence energy generation by pickup protons, and turbulent heating of solar wind protons and electrons. The turbulence transport model is based on the Reynolds decomposition and turbulence phenomenologies that describe the conversion of fluctuation energy into heat due to a turbulent cascade. In addition to using separate energy equations for the solar wind protons and electrons, a significant improvement over our previous work is that the turbulence model now uses an eddy viscosity approximation for the Reynolds stress tensor and the mean turbulent electric field. The approximation allows the turbulence model to account for driving of turbulence by large-scale velocity gradients. Using either a dipole approximation for the solar magnetic field or synoptic solar magnetograms from the Wilcox Solar Observatory for assigning boundary conditions at the coronal base, we apply the model to study the global structure of the solar wind and its three-dimensional properties, including embedded turbulence, heating, and acceleration throughout the heliosphere. The model results are compared with plasma and magnetic field observations on WIND, Ulysses, and Voyager 2 spacecraft.

  11. Extreme wave impinging and overtopping 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ryu, Yong Uk

    2009-06-02

    This investigates the velocity fields of a plunging breaking wave impinging on a structure through measurements in a two-dimensional wave tank. As the wave breaks and overtops the structure, so-called green water is generated. The flow becomes multi...

  12. 11. Acoustic waves and shocks 11.1 Acoustic waves of low amplitude

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pohl, Martin Karl Wilhelm

    11. Acoustic waves and shocks 11.1 Acoustic waves of low amplitude Let us consider an adiabatic (or velocity of sound waves is constant. Does that still hold for sound waves of finite amplitude? Equation 11. This is the result of the non-linear nature of the hydrodynamical equations. On should note that wave damping, e

  13. Transitions between turbulent and laminar superfluid vorticity states in the outer core of a neutron star

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. Peralta; A. Melatos; M. Giacobello; A. Ooi

    2006-07-08

    We investigate the global transition from a turbulent state of superfluid vorticity to a laminar state, and vice versa, in the outer core of a neutron star. By solving numerically the hydrodynamic Hall-Vinen-Bekarevich-Khalatnikov equations for a rotating superfluid in a differentially rotating spherical shell, we find that the meridional counterflow driven by Ekman pumping exceeds the Donnelly-Glaberson threshold throughout most of the outer core, exciting unstable Kelvin waves which disrupt the rectilinear vortex array, creating a vortex tangle. In the turbulent state, the torque exerted on the crust oscillates, and the crust-core coupling is weaker than in the laminar state. This leads to a new scenario for the rotational glitches observed in radio pulsars: a vortex tangle is sustained in the differentially rotating outer core by the meridional counterflow, a sudden spin-up event brings the crust and core into corotation, the vortex tangle relaxes back to a rectilinear vortex array, then the crust spins down electromagnetically until enough meridional counterflow builds up to reform a vortex tangle. The turbulent-laminar transition can occur uniformly or in patches; the associated time-scales are estimated from vortex filament theory. We calculate numerically the global structure of the flow with and without an inviscid superfluid component, for Hall-Vinen and Gorter-Mellink forms of the mutual friction. We also calculate the post-glitch evolution of the angular velocity of the crust and its time derivative, and compare the results with radio pulse timing data, predicting a correlation between glitch activity and Reynolds number.

  14. Observations of Edge Turbulence

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Edge Turbulence near the X-point of Alcator C-Mod APS-2007 (1) J.L. Terry, S.J. Zweben*, B. LaBombard, I. Cziegler, O. Grulke + , D.P. Stotler* MIT - Plasma Science and Fusion...

  15. Universality of the de Broglie-Einstein velocity equation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yusuf Z. Umul

    2007-12-06

    The de Broglie-Einstein velocity equation is derived for a relativistic particle by using the energy and momentum relations in terms of wave and matter properties. It is shown that the velocity equation is independent from the relativistic effects and is valid also for the non-relativistic case. The results of this property is discussed.

  16. Turbulent regimes in the tokamak scrape-off layer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mosetto, Annamaria; Halpern, Federico D.; Jolliet, Sébastien; Loizu, Joaquim; Ricci, Paolo [École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL), Centre de Recherches en Physique des Plasmas, Association Euratom-Confédération Suisse, CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland)] [École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL), Centre de Recherches en Physique des Plasmas, Association Euratom-Confédération Suisse, CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland)

    2013-09-15

    The non-linear turbulent regimes in the tokamak scrape-off layer (SOL) are identified according to the linear instability responsible for the perpendicular transport. Four regions of the SOL operational parameters are determined where turbulence is driven by the inertial or resistive branches of the ballooning mode or of drift waves. The analysis, based on the linear electrostatic drift-reduced Braginskii equations, evaluates the pressure scale length self-consistently from the balance between plasma losses at the vessel and perpendicular turbulent transport. The latter is estimated by assuming that turbulence saturation occurs due to a local flattening of the plasma gradients and associated removal of the linear instability drive; it is also shown that transport is led by the mode that maximizes the ratio of the linear growth to the poloidal wavenumber. The methodology used to identify the turbulent regimes is confirmed by the results of non-linear simulations of SOL turbulence. The identification of the turbulent regimes, the predicted pressure scale length, and the poloidal wavenumber of the leading mode are in reasonable agreement with non-linear simulation results.

  17. DIRECT OBSERVATION OF THE TURBULENT emf AND TRANSPORT OF MAGNETIC FIELD IN A LIQUID SODIUM EXPERIMENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rahbarnia, Kian; Brown, Benjamin P.; Clark, Mike M.; Kaplan, Elliot J.; Nornberg, Mark D.; Rasmus, Alex M.; Taylor, Nicholas Zane; Forest, Cary B. [Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 1150 University Ave, Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Jenko, Frank; Limone, Angelo [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik (IPP), EURATOM Association, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Pinton, Jean-Francois; Plihon, Nicolas; Verhille, Gautier, E-mail: kian.rahbarnia@ipp.mpg.de [Laboratoire de Physique de l'Ecole Normale Superieure de Lyon, CNRS and Universite de Lyon, F-69364 Lyon (France)

    2012-11-10

    For the first time, we have directly measured the transport of a vector magnetic field by isotropic turbulence in a high Reynolds number liquid metal flow. In analogy with direct measurements of the turbulent Reynolds stress (turbulent viscosity) that governs momentum transport, we have measured the turbulent electromotive force (emf) by simultaneously measuring three components of velocity and magnetic fields, and computed the correlations that lead to mean-field current generation. Furthermore, we show that this turbulent emf tends to oppose and cancel out the local current, acting to increase the effective resistivity of the medium, i.e., it acts as an enhanced magnetic diffusivity. This has important implications for turbulent transport in astrophysical objects, particularly in dynamos and accretion disks.

  18. Cosmic-ray pitch-angle scattering in imbalanced MHD turbulence simulations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weidl, Martin S; Teaca, Bogdan; Schlickeiser, Reinhard

    2015-01-01

    Pitch-angle scattering rates for cosmic-ray particles in magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations with imbalanced turbulence are calculated for fully evolving electromagnetic turbulence. We compare with theoretical predictions derived from the quasilinear theory of cosmic-ray diffusion for an idealized slab spectrum and demonstrate how cross helicity affects the shape of the pitch-angle diffusion coefficient. Additional simulations in evolving magnetic fields or static field configurations provide evidence that the scattering anisotropy in imbalanced turbulence is not primarily due to coherence with propagating Alfven waves, but an effect of the spatial structure of electric fields in cross-helical MHD turbulence.

  19. Electron distributions observed with Langmuir waves in the plasma sheet boundary layer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hwang, Junga [Solar and Space Weather Research Group, Korea Astronomy and Space Science Institute, Daejeon 305-348 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Astronomy and Space Science, University of Science and Technology, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Rha, Kicheol [Department of Physics, Pohang University of Science and Technology, Pohang 790-784 (Korea, Republic of); Seough, Jungjoon [Solar and Space Weather Research Group, Korea Astronomy and Space Science Institute, Daejeon 305-348 (Korea, Republic of); Yoon, Peter H. [School of Space Research, Kyung Hee University, Yongin-Si, Gyeonggi-Do 446-701 (Korea, Republic of); Institute for Physical Science and Technology, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland 20742 (United States)

    2014-09-15

    The present paper investigates the Langmuir turbulence driven by counter-streaming electron beams and its plausible association with observed features in the Earth's plasma sheet boundary layer region. A one-dimensional electrostatic particle-in-cell simulation code is employed in order to simulate broadband electrostatic waves with characteristic frequency in the vicinity of the electron plasma frequency ?/?{sub pe}?1.0. The present simulation confirms that the broadband electrostatic waves may indeed be generated by the counter-streaming electron beams. It is also found that the observed feature associated with low energy electrons, namely quasi-symmetric velocity space plateaus, are replicated according to the present simulation. However, the present investigation only partially succeeds in generating the suprathermal tails such that the origin of observed quasi power-law energetic population formation remains outstanding.

  20. Invariant solutions of two models of evolution of turbulent bursts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bath, University of

    -known equation of such type is the b{l model of the propagation of turbulent bursts from a horizontally uniform) represents a version arising in the so-called coal-coke problem. In the latter model, let us present a short]. Consider the heat wave propagation in a plane thin coal layer in R 2 generated by the initial amount

  1. Vortex Tubes of Turbulent Solar Convection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kitiashvili, I N; Mansour, N N; Lele, S K; Wray, A A

    2011-01-01

    Investigation of turbulent properties of solar convection is extremely important for understanding of the multi-scale dynamics observed on the solar surface. In particular, recent high-resolution observations revealed ubiquitous vortical structures, and numerical simulations demonstrated links between the vortex tube dynamics and magnetic field organization, and also importance of vortex tube interactions in the mechanism of acoustic wave excitation on the Sun. In this paper we investigate mechanisms of formation of vortex tubes in highly-turbulent convective flows near the solar surface by using realistic radiative hydrodynamic LES simulations. Analysis of data, obtained by the simulations, indicates two basic processes of the vortex tube formation: 1) development of small-scale convective instability inside convective granules, and 2) a Kelvin-Helmholtz type instability of shearing flows in intergranular lanes. Our analysis shows that vortex stretching during these processes is a primary source of generatio...

  2. Astrophysical gyrokinetics: kinetic and fluid turbulent cascades in magnetized weakly collisional plasmas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. A. Schekochihin; S. C. Cowley; W. Dorland; G. W. Hammett; G. G. Howes; E. Quataert; T. Tatsuno

    2009-05-09

    We present a theoretical framework for plasma turbulence in astrophysical plasmas (solar wind, interstellar medium, galaxy clusters, accretion disks). The key assumptions are that the turbulence is anisotropic with respect to the mean magnetic field and frequencies are low compared to the ion cyclotron frequency. The energy injected at the outer scale scale has to be converted into heat, which ultimately cannot be done without collisions. A KINETIC CASCADE develops that brings the energy to collisional scales both in space and velocity. Its nature depends on the physics of plasma fluctuations. In each of the physically distinct scale ranges, the kinetic problem is systematically reduced to a more tractable set of equations. In the "inertial range" above the ion gyroscale, the kinetic cascade splits into a cascade of Alfvenic fluctuations, which are governed by the RMHD equations at both the collisional and collisionless scales, and a passive cascade of compressive fluctuations, which obey a linear kinetic equation along the moving field lines associated with the Alfvenic component. In the "dissipation range" between the ion and electron gyroscales, there are again two cascades: the kinetic-Alfven-wave (KAW) cascade governed by two fluid-like Electron RMHD equations and a passive phase-space cascade of ion entropy fluctuations. The latter cascade brings the energy of the inertial-range fluctuations that was damped by collisionless wave-particle interaction at the ion gyroscale to collisional scales in the phase space and leads to ion heating. The KAW energy is similarly damped at the electron gyroscale and converted into electron heat. Kolmogorov-style scaling relations are derived for these cascades. Astrophysical and space-physical applications are discussed in detail.

  3. 43rd AIAA Aerospace Sciences Meeting and Exhibit, Jan 1013, Reno, Nevada Direct numerical simulation of turbulent jets in crossflow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mahesh, Krishnan

    simulation of turbulent jets in crossflow Suman Muppidi and Krishnan Mahesh University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN, 55455, USA Direct numerical simulations are used to study a round turbulent jet in a laminar crossflow. The velocity ratio of the jet to that of the crossflow is 5.7 and the Reynolds number based

  4. Universal decay of high Reynolds number Taylor-Couette turbulence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Verschoof, Ruben A; van der Veen, Roeland C A; Sun, Chao; Lohse, Detlef

    2015-01-01

    We study the decay of high-Reynolds number Taylor-Couette turbulence, i.e. the turbulent flow between two coaxial rotating cylinders. To do so, the rotation of the inner cylinder ($Re_i = 2 \\cdot 10^6$, the outer cylinder is at rest) was suddenly stopped. Using a combination of laser Doppler anemometry and particle image velocimetry measurements, six decay decades of the kinetic energy could be captured. First, in the absence of cylinder rotation, the flow-velocity during the decay does not develop any height dependence in contrast to the well-known Taylor vortex state. Next, the radial profile of the azimuthal velocity is found to be self-similar, i.e. when normalizing it with the mean velocity, it is universal. Nonetheless, the decay of this wall-bounded inhomogeneous turbulent flow does not follow a strict power law as for decaying turbulent homogeneous isotropic flows, but it is faster, due to the strong viscous drag applied by the bounding walls. We theoretically describe the decay in a quantitative way ...

  5. DIFFUSING ACOUSTIC WAVE TRANSPORT AND SPECTROSCOPY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Page, John

    1 Chapter DIFFUSING ACOUSTIC WAVE TRANSPORT AND SPECTROSCOPY J.H. PAGE, M.L. COWAN Dept. of Physics waves, multiple scattering, energy velocity, Diffusing Acoustic Wave Spectroscopy. Abstract the diffusive transport of ultrasonic waves, and then describe a new ultrasonic technique, Diffusing Acoustic

  6. Directed Relativistic Blast Wave

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andrei Gruzinov

    2007-04-23

    A spherically symmetrical ultra-relativistic blast wave is not an attractor of a generic asymmetric explosion. Spherical symmetry is reached only by the time the blast wave slows down to non-relativistic velocities, when the Sedov-Taylor-von Neumann attractor solution sets in. We show however, that a directed relativistic explosion, with the explosion momentum close to the explosion energy, produces a blast wave with a universal intermediate asymptotic -- a selfsimilar directed ultra-relativistic blast wave. This universality might be of interest for the astrophysics of gamma-ray burst afterglows.

  7. VOLUME 85, NUMBER 9 P H Y S I C A L R E V I E W L E T T E R S 28 AUGUST 2000 Turbulence and Wave Breaking Effects on Air-Water Gas Exchange

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fineberg, Jay

    -made systems. For instance, in waste water treatment where bioremediation is used in large man-made water Breaking Effects on Air-Water Gas Exchange Evelyn J. Boettcher,1 Jay Fineberg,1,2 and Daniel P. Lathrop1 1 gravity waves on air-water gas exchange in standing waves. We identify two regimes that govern aeration

  8. Surface wave array tomography in SE Tibet from ambient seismic noise and two-station analysis - II. Crustal and upper-mantle structure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yao, H; Beghein, C; Van Der Hilst, RD

    2008-01-01

    M.N. , 2006. Constraining P-wave velocity variations in2005. High- resolution surface wave tomography from ambienterror (? v ) of the shear wave speed along five vertical

  9. Subcritical transition to turbulence of a precessing flow in a cylindrical vessel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Herault, Johann; Giesecke, Andre; Stefani, Frank

    2015-01-01

    The transition to turbulence in a precessing cylindrical vessel is experimentally investigated. Our measurements are performed for a { nearly-resonant} configuration with an initially laminar flow dominated by an inertial mode with azimuthal wave number $m=1$ superimposed on a solid body rotation. By increasing the precession ratio, we observe a transition from the laminar to a non-linear regime, which then breakdowns to turbulence for larger precession ratio. Our measurements show that the transition to turbulence is subcritical, with a discontinuity of the wall-pressure and the power consumption at the threshold $\\epsilon_{LT}$. The turbulence is self-sustained below this threshold, describing a bifurcation diagram with a hysteresis. In this range of the control parameters, the turbulent flows can suddenly collapse after a finite duration, leading to a definitive relaminarization of the flow. The average lifetime $\\langle \\tau \\rangle$ of the turbulence increases rapidly when $\\epsilon$ tends to $\\epsilon_{...

  10. Flame Interactions in Turbulent Premixed Twin V-flames

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dunstan, T. D.; Swaminathan, N.; Bray, K. N. C.; Kingsbury, N. G.

    2013-01-16

    in Table 2, where u?in is the inlet rms velocity fluctuation, and l0 is the integral length scale in the frozen turbulence. The Karlovitz number is estimated from Ka ? (u?in/sL) 3 2 (l0/?)? 12 . The turbulent Reynolds and Damko¨hler numbers are Rel0 = u?inl... volume at a given location: ?c?=0.8 = (|?c|c?=0.8)P(c?), where P(c?) is the probability of finding c? = 0.8 at a given spatial location (Pope, 1988). The mean conditional gradient, |?c|c?=0.8, does not change significantly through 21 the flame brush...

  11. Modeling wind forcing in phase resolving simulation of nonlinear wind waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kalmikov, Alexander G

    2010-01-01

    Wind waves in the ocean are a product of complex interaction of turbulent air flow with gravity driven water surface. The coupling is strong and the waves are non-stationary, irregular and highly nonlinear, which restricts ...

  12. Multidimensional turbulence spectra -identifying properties of turbulent structures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kevlahan, Nicholas

    Sweden 2 Department of Mathematics and Statistics, McMaster University, Hamilton L8S 4K1, Canada * E turbulent structures are presented. Results from analysis of the turbulent kinetic energy in turbulent energy associated with a coherent vortex defined using different vortex identification methods

  13. Quantum ghost imaging through turbulence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dixon, P. Ben

    We investigate the effect of turbulence on quantum ghost imaging. We use entangled photons and demonstrate that for a specific experimental configuration the effect of turbulence can be greatly diminished. By decoupling ...

  14. Turbulence transmission in parallel modified shocks using ray tracing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Joni Tammi; Rami Vainio

    2006-09-14

    We apply a semi-classical approach of handling waves as quasiparticle gas in a slowly varying flow -- analogous to ray tracing -- to calculate the Alfven wave transmission parameters, the resulting cross-helicity of the waves and the scattering-centre compression ratio, for cases where the shock thickness is large enough for the turbulent waves in the plasma to see the transition of the background flow parameters as smooth and slowly varying. For nonrelativistic shocks the wave transmission produces similar effects on the downstream turbulence and the scattering-centre compression ratio as does the transmission through a step shock: the downstream Alfven waves propagate predominantly towards the shock in the local plasma frame and, thus, the scattering-centre compression ratio is larger than the gas compression ratio. For thick relativistic shocks, however, we find qualitative differences with respect to the step-shock case: for low-Alfvenic-Mach-number shocks the downstream waves propagate predominantly away from the shock, and the scattering-centre compression ratio is lower than that of the gas. Thus, when taken into account, the Alfven wave transmission can decrease the efficiency of the first-order Fermi acceleration in a thick relativistic shock.

  15. Chiral Heat Wave and wave mixing in chiral media

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chernodub, M N

    2015-01-01

    We show that a hot rotating fluid of relativistic chiral fermions possesses a new gapless collective excitation associated with coherent propagation of energy density and chiral density waves along the axis of rotation. This excitation, which we call the Chiral Heat Wave, emerges due to a mixed gauge-gravitational anomaly. At finite density the Chiral Heat Wave couples to the Chiral Vortical Wave while in the presence of an external magnetic field it mixes with the Chiral Magnetic Wave. We find that the coupled waves - which are coherent fluctuations of the vector, axial and energy currents - have generally different velocities compared to the velocities of the individual waves. We also demonstrate that rotating chiral systems subjected to external magnetic field possess non-propagating metastable thermal excitations, the Dense Hot Spots.

  16. DIRECT NUMERICAL SIMULATIONS OF REFLECTION-DRIVEN, REDUCED MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMIC TURBULENCE FROM THE SUN TO THE ALFVÉN CRITICAL POINT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Perez, Jean Carlos; Chandran, Benjamin D. G.

    2013-10-20

    We present direct numerical simulations of inhomogeneous reduced magnetohydrodynamic (RMHD) turbulence between the Sun and the Alfvén critical point. These are the first such simulations that take into account the solar-wind outflow velocity and the radial inhomogeneity of the background solar wind without approximating the nonlinear terms in the governing equations. RMHD turbulence is driven by outward-propagating Alfvén waves (z {sup +} fluctuations) launched from the Sun, which undergo partial non-WKB reflection to produce sunward-propagating Alfvén waves (z {sup –} fluctuations). We present 10 simulations with different values of the correlation time ?{sub c{sub sun}{sup +}} and perpendicular correlation length L{sub ?} of outward-propagating Alfvén waves at the coronal base. We find that between 15% and 33% of the z {sup +} energy launched into the corona dissipates between the coronal base and Alfvén critical point. Between 33% and 40% of this input energy goes into work on the solar-wind outflow, and between 22% and 36% escapes as z {sup +} fluctuations through the simulation boundary at r = r{sub A}. The z {sup ±} power spectra scale like k{sub perpendicular}{sup -?{sup ±}}, where k is the wavenumber in the plane perpendicular to B{sub 0}. In our simulation with the smallest value of ?{sub c{sub sun}{sup +}} (?2 minutes) and largest value of L{sub ?} (2 × 10{sup 4} km), we find that ?{sup +} decreases approximately linearly with increasing ln (r), reaching a value of 1.3 at r = 11.1 R{sub ?}. Our simulations with larger values of ?{sub c{sub sun}{sup +}} exhibit alignment between the contours of constant ?{sup +}, ?{sup –}, ?{sub 0}{sup +}, and ?{sub 0}{sup -}, where ?{sup ±} are the Elsässer potentials and ?{sub 0}{sup ±} are the outer-scale parallel Elsässer vorticities.

  17. VOLUME 79, NUMBER 17 P H Y S I C A L R E V I E W L E T T E R S 27 OCTOBER 1997 Energy Velocity of Diffusing Waves in Strongly Scattering Media

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in the vicinity of Mie resonances as a result of the temporary storage of wave energy inside the scatterer [4 R3T 2N2 2 Department of Physics, The Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, Clear Water Bay

  18. The interaction of high-speed turbulence with flames: Turbulent flame speed

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Poludnenko, A.Y.; Oran, E.S. [Laboratory for Computational Physics and Fluid Dynamics, Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375 (United States)

    2011-02-15

    Direct numerical simulations of the interaction of a premixed flame with driven, subsonic, homogeneous, isotropic, Kolmogorov-type turbulence in an unconfined system are used to study the mechanisms determining the turbulent flame speed, S{sub T}, in the thin reaction zone regime. High intensity turbulence is considered with the r.m.s. velocity 35 times the laminar flame speed, S{sub L}, resulting in the Damkoehler number Da=0.05. The simulations were performed with Athena-RFX, a massively parallel, fully compressible, high-order, dimensionally unsplit, reactive-flow code. A simplified reaction-diffusion model, based on the one-step Arrhenius kinetics, represents a stoichiometric H{sub 2}-air mixture under the assumption of the Lewis number Le=1. Global properties and the internal structure of the flame were analyzed in an earlier paper, which showed that this system represents turbulent combustion in the thin reaction zone regime. This paper demonstrates that: (1) The flame brush has a complex internal structure, in which the isosurfaces of higher fuel mass fractions are folded on progressively smaller scales. (2) Global properties of the turbulent flame are best represented by the structure of the region of peak reaction rate, which defines the flame surface. (3) In the thin reaction zone regime, S{sub T} is predominantly determined by the increase of the flame surface area, A{sub T}, caused by turbulence. (4) The observed increase of S{sub T} relative to S{sub L} exceeds the corresponding increase of A{sub T} relative to the surface area of the planar laminar flame, on average, by {approx}14%, varying from only a few percent to as high as {approx}30%. (5) This exaggerated response is the result of tight flame packing by turbulence, which causes frequent flame collisions and formation of regions of high flame curvature >or similar 1/{delta}{sub L}, or ''cusps,'' where {delta}{sub L} is the thermal width of the laminar flame. (6) The local flame speed in the cusps substantially exceeds its laminar value, which results in a disproportionately large contribution of cusps to S{sub T} compared with the flame surface area in them. (7) A criterion is established for transition to the regime significantly influenced by cusp formation. In particular, at Karlovitz numbers Ka >or similar 20, flame collisions provide an important mechanism controlling S{sub T}, in addition to the increase of A{sub T} by large-scale motions and the potential enhancement of diffusive transport by small-scale turbulence. (author)

  19. Modified definition of group velocity and electromagnetic energy conservation equation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Changbiao Wang

    2015-05-11

    The classical definition of group velocity has two flaws: (a) the group velocity can be greater than the phase velocity and break Fermat's principle in a non-dispersive, lossless, non-conducting, anisotropic uniform medium; (b) the definition is not consistent with the principle of relativity for a plane wave in a moving isotropic uniform medium. To remove the flaws, a modified definition is proposed. A criterion is set up to identify the justification of group velocity definition. A "superluminal power flow" is constructed to show that the electromagnetic energy conservation equation cannot uniquely define the power flow if the principle of Fermat is not taken into account.

  20. Neutrino oscillations in a turbulent plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mendonça, J. T.; Haas, F.

    2013-07-15

    A new model for the joint neutrino flavor and plasma oscillations is introduced, in terms of the dynamics of the neutrino flavor polarization vector in a plasma background. Fundamental solutions are found for both time-invariant and time-dependent media, considering slow and fast variations of the electron plasma density. The model is shown to be described by a generalized Hamiltonian formalism. In the case of a broad spectrum of electron plasma waves, a statistical approach indicates the shift of both equilibrium value and frequency oscillation of flavor coherence, due to the existence of a turbulent plasma background.

  1. Coherent structures in ion temperature gradient turbulence-zonal flow

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Singh, Rameswar; Singh, R.; Kaw, P.; Gürcan, Ö. D.; Diamond, P. H.

    2014-10-15

    Nonlinear stationary structure formation in the coupled ion temperature gradient (ITG)-zonal flow system is investigated. The ITG turbulence is described by a wave-kinetic equation for the action density of the ITG mode, and the longer scale zonal mode is described by a dynamic equation for the m?=?n?=?0 component of the potential. Two populations of trapped and untrapped drift wave trajectories are shown to exist in a moving frame of reference. This novel effect leads to the formation of nonlinear stationary structures. It is shown that the ITG turbulence can self-consistently sustain coherent, radially propagating modulation envelope structures such as solitons, shocks, and nonlinear wave trains.

  2. Particle dispersion in homogeneous turbulence using the one-dimensional turbulence model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sun, Guangyuan, E-mail: gysungrad@gmail.com; Lignell, David O., E-mail: davidlignell@byu.edu [Chemical Engineering Department, Brigham Young University, Provo, Utah 84602 (United States); Hewson, John C., E-mail: jchewso@sandia.gov [Fire Science and Technology Department, Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87123 (United States); Gin, Craig R., E-mail: cgin@math.tamu.edu [Department of Mathematics, Texas A and M University, College Station, Texas 77843 (United States)

    2014-10-15

    Lagrangian particle dispersion is studied using the one-dimensional turbulence (ODT) model in homogeneous decaying turbulence configurations. The ODT model has been widely and successfully applied to a number of reacting and nonreacting flow configurations, but only limited application has been made to multiphase flows. Here, we present a version of the particle implementation and interaction with the stochastic and instantaneous ODT eddy events. The model is characterized by comparison to experimental data of particle dispersion for a range of intrinsic particle time scales and body forces. Particle dispersion, velocity, and integral time scale results are presented. The particle implementation introduces a single model parameter ?{sub p}, and sensitivity to this parameter and behavior of the model are discussed. Good agreement is found with experimental data and the ODT model is able to capture the particle inertial and trajectory crossing effects. These results serve as a validation case of the multiphase implementations of ODT for extensions to other flow configurations.

  3. Acceleration of low energy charged particles by gravitational waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. Voyatzis; L. Vlahos; S. Ichtiaroglou; D. Papadopoulos

    2005-12-07

    The acceleration of charged particles in the presence of a magnetic field and gravitational waves is under consideration. It is shown that the weak gravitational waves can cause the acceleration of low energy particles under appropriate conditions. Such conditions may be satisfied close to the source of the gravitational waves if the magnetized plasma is in a turbulent state.

  4. Traveling-wave photodetector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hietala, Vincent M. (Placitas, NM); Vawter, Gregory A. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1993-01-01

    The traveling-wave photodetector of the present invention combines an absorptive optical waveguide and an electrical transmission line, in which optical absorption in the waveguide results in a photocurrent at the electrodes of the electrical transmission line. The optical waveguide and electrical transmission line of the electrically distributed traveling-wave photodetector are designed to achieve matched velocities between the light in the optical waveguide and electrical signal generated on the transmission line. This velocity synchronization provides the traveling-wave photodetector with a large electrical bandwidth and a high quantum efficiency, because of the effective extended volume for optical absorption. The traveling-wave photodetector also provides large power dissipation, because of its large physical size.

  5. Traveling-wave photodetector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hietala, V.M.; Vawter, G.A.

    1993-12-14

    The traveling-wave photodetector of the present invention combines an absorptive optical waveguide and an electrical transmission line, in which optical absorption in the waveguide results in a photocurrent at the electrodes of the electrical transmission line. The optical waveguide and electrical transmission line of the electrically distributed traveling-wave photodetector are designed to achieve matched velocities between the light in the optical waveguide and electrical signal generated on the transmission line. This velocity synchronization provides the traveling-wave photodetector with a large electrical bandwidth and a high quantum efficiency, because of the effective extended volume for optical absorption. The traveling-wave photodetector also provides large power dissipation, because of its large physical size. 4 figures.

  6. Characterization of Relativistic MHD Turbulence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Garrison, David

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this work is to understand if and how the characteristics of relativistic MHD turbulence may differ from those of nonrelativistic MHD turbulence. We accomplish this by studying the invariants in the relativistic case and comparing them to what we know of nonrelativistic turbulence. Although much work has been done to understand the dynamics of nonrelativistic systems (mostly for ideal incompressible fluids), there is minimal literature explicitly describing the dynamics of relativistic MHD turbulence. Many authors simply assume that relativistic turbulence has the same invariants and obeys the same inverse energy cascade as non-relativistic systems.

  7. Scaling Relations for Collision-less Dark Matter Turbulence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Akika Nakamichi; Masahiro Morikawa

    2009-06-15

    Many scaling relations are observed for self-gravitating systems in the universe. We explore the consistent understanding of them from a simple principle based on the proposal that the collision-less dark matter fluid terns into a turbulent state, i.e. dark turbulence, after crossing the caustic surface in the non-linear stage. The dark turbulence will not eddy dominant reflecting the collision-less property. After deriving Kolmogorov scaling laws from Navier-Stokes equation by the method similar to the one for Smoluchowski coagulation equation, we apply this to several observations such as the scale-dependent velocity dispersion, mass-luminosity ratio, magnetic fields, and mass-angular momentum relation, power spectrum of density fluctuations. They all point the concordant value for the constant energy flow per mass: $0.3 cm^2/sec^3$, which may be understood as the speed of the hierarchical coalescence process in the cosmic structure formation.

  8. Lagrangian view of time irreversibility of fluid turbulence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xu, Haitao; Bodenschatz, Eberhard

    2015-01-01

    A turbulent flow is maintained by an external supply of kinetic energy, which is eventually dissipated into heat at steep velocity gradients. The scale at which energy is supplied greatly differs from the scale at which energy is dissipated, the more so as the turbulent intensity (the Reynolds number) is larger. The resulting energy flux over the range of scales, intermediate between energy injection and dissipation, acts as a source of time irreversibility. As it is now possible to follow accurately fluid particles in a turbulent flow field, both from laboratory experiments and from numerical simulations, a natural question arises: how do we detect time irreversibility from these Lagrangian data? Here we discuss recent results concerning this problem. For Lagrangian statistics involving more than one fluid particle, the distance between fluid particles introduces an intrinsic length scale into the problem. The evolution of quantities dependent on the relative motion between these fluid particles, including t...

  9. Bottleneck effect in three-dimensional turbulence simulations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wolfgang Dobler; Nils Erland L. Haugen; Tarek A. Yousef; Axel Brandenburg

    2003-08-27

    At numerical resolutions around $512^3$ and above, three-dimensional energy spectra from turbulence simulations begin to show noticeably shallower spectra than $k^{-5/3}$ near the dissipation wavenumber (`bottleneck effect'). This effect is shown to be significantly weaker in one-dimensional spectra such as those obtained in wind tunnel turbulence. The difference can be understood in terms of the transformation between one-dimensional and three-dimensional energy spectra under the assumption that the turbulent velocity field is isotropic. Transversal and longitudinal energy spectra are similar and can both accurately be computed from the full three-dimensional spectra. Second-order structure functions are less susceptible to the bottleneck effect and may be better suited for inferring the scaling exponent from numerical simulation data.

  10. Can Protostellar Jets Drive Supersonic Turbulence in Molecular Clouds?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robi Banerjee; Ralf S. Klessen; Christian Fendt

    2007-06-25

    Jets and outflows from young stellar objects are proposed candidates to drive supersonic turbulence in molecular clouds. Here, we present the results from multi-dimensional jet simulations where we investigate in detail the energy and momentum deposition from jets into their surrounding environment and quantify the character of the excited turbulence with velocity probability density functions. Our study include jet--clump interaction, transient jets, and magnetised jets. We find that collimated supersonic jets do not excite supersonic motions far from the vicinity of the jet. Supersonic fluctuations are damped quickly and do not spread into the parent cloud. Instead subsonic, non-compressional modes occupy most of the excited volume. This is a generic feature which can not be fully circumvented by overdense jets or magnetic fields. Nevertheless, jets are able to leave strong imprints in their cloud structure and can disrupt dense clumps. Our results question the ability of collimated jets to sustain supersonic turbulence in molecular clouds.

  11. Developing de Broglie Wave

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J X Zheng-Johansson; P-I Johansson

    2006-08-27

    The electromagnetic component waves, comprising together with their generating oscillatory massless charge a material particle, will be Doppler shifted when the charge hence particle is in motion, with a velocity $v$, as a mere mechanical consequence of the source motion. We illustrate here that two such component waves generated in opposite directions and propagating at speed $c$ between walls in a one-dimensional box, superpose into a traveling beat wave of wavelength ${\\mit\\Lambda}_d$$=(\\frac{v}{c}){\\mit\\Lambda}$ and phase velocity $c^2/v+v$ which resembles directly L. de Broglie's hypothetic phase wave. This phase wave in terms of transporting the particle mass at the speed $v$ and angular frequency ${\\mit\\Omega}_d=2\\pi v /{\\mit\\Lambda}_d$, with ${\\mit\\Lambda}_d$ and ${\\mit\\Omega}_d$ obeying the de Broglie relations, represents a de Broglie wave. The standing-wave function of the de Broglie (phase) wave and its variables for particle dynamics in small geometries are equivalent to the eigen-state solutions to Schr\\"odinger equation of an identical system.

  12. Plasma Turbulence in the Local Bubble

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Steven R. Spangler

    2008-06-05

    Turbulence in the Local Bubble could play an important role in the thermodynamics of the gas that is there. The best astronomical technique for measuring turbulence in astrophysical plasmas is radio scintillation. Measurements of the level of scattering to the nearby pulsar B0950+08 by Philips and Clegg in 1992 showed a markedly lower value for the line-of-sight averaged turbulent intensity parameter $$ than is observed for other pulsars, consistent with radio wave propagation through a highly rarefied plasma. In this paper, we discuss the observational progress that has been made since that time. At present, there are four pulsars (B0950+08, B1133+16, J0437-4715, and B0809+74) whose lines of sight seem to lie mainly within the local bubble. The mean densities and line of sight components of the interstellar magnetic field along these lines of sight are smaller than nominal values for pulsars, but not by as much expected. Three of the four pulsars also have measurements of interstellar scintillation. The value of the parameter $$ is smaller than normal for two of them, but is completely nominal for the third. This inconclusive status of affairs could be improved by measurements and analysis of ``arcs'' in ``secondary spectra'' of pulsars.

  13. Static magnetic fields enhance turbulence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pothérat, Alban

    2015-01-01

    More often than not, turbulence occurs under the influence of external fields, mostly rotation and magnetic fields generated either by planets, stellar objects or by an industrial environment. Their effect on the anisotropy and the dissipative behaviour of turbulence is recognised but complex, and it is still difficult to even tell whether they enhance or dampen turbulence. For example, externally imposed magnetic fields suppress free turbulence in electrically conducting fluids (Moffatt 1967), and make it two-dimensional (2D) (Sommeria & Moreau 1982); but their effect on the intensity of forced turbulence, as in pipes, convective flows or otherwise, is not clear. We shall prove that since two-dimensionalisation preferentially affects larger scales, these undergo much less dissipation and sustain intense turbulent fluctuations. When higher magnetic fields are imposed, quasi-2D structures retain more kinetic energy, so that rather than suppressing forced turbulence, external magnetic fields indirectly enha...

  14. Average Angular Velocity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    H. Essen

    2004-01-28

    This paper addresses the problem of the separation of rotational and internal motion. It introduces the concept of average angular velocity as the moment of inertia weighted average of particle angular velocities. It extends and elucidates the concept of Jellinek and Li (1989) of separation of the energy of overall rotation in an arbitrary (non-linear) $N$-particle system. It generalizes the so called Koenig's theorem on the two parts of the kinetic energy (center of mass plus internal) to three parts: center of mass, rotational, plus the remaining internal energy relative to an optimally translating and rotating frame.

  15. Velocity pump reaction turbine

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    House, Palmer A. (Walnut Creek, CA)

    1984-01-01

    An expanding hydraulic/two-phase velocity pump reaction turbine including a dual concentric rotor configuration with an inter-rotor annular flow channel in which the inner rotor is mechanically driven by the outer rotor. In another embodiment, the inner rotor is immobilized and provided with gas recovery ports on its outer surface by means of which gas in solution may be recovered. This velocity pump reaction turbine configuration is capable of potential energy conversion efficiencies of up to 70%, and is particularly suited for geothermal applications.

  16. Velocity pump reaction turbine

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    House, Palmer A. (Walnut Creek, CA)

    1982-01-01

    An expanding hydraulic/two-phase velocity pump reaction turbine including a dual concentric rotor configuration with an inter-rotor annular flow channel in which the inner rotor is mechanically driven by the outer rotor. In another embodiment, the inner rotor is immobilized and provided with gas recovery ports on its outer surface by means of which gas in solution may be recovered. This velocity pump reaction turbine configuration is capable of potential energy conversion efficiencies of up to 70%, and is particularly suited for geothermal applications.

  17. Explosive plane-wave lens

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Marsh, S.P.

    1988-03-08

    An explosive plane-wave air lens which enables a spherical wave form to be converted to a planar wave without the need to specially machine or shape explosive materials is described. A disc-shaped impactor having a greater thickness at its center than around its periphery is used to convert the spherical wave into a plane wave. When the wave reaches the impactor, the center of the impactor moves first because the spherical wave reaches the center of the impactor first. The wave strikes the impactor later in time as one moves radially along the impactor. Because the impactor is thinner as one moves radially outward, the velocity of the impactor is greater at the periphery than at the center. An acceptor explosive is positioned so that the impactor strikes the acceptor simultaneously. Consequently, a plane detonation wave is propagated through the acceptor explosive. 4 figs.

  18. Explosive plane-wave lens

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Marsh, S.P.

    1987-03-12

    An explosive plane-wave air lens which enables a spherical wave form to be converted to a planar wave without the need to specially machine or shape explosive materials is described. A disc-shaped impactor having a greater thickness at its center than around its periphery is used to convert the spherical wave into a plane wave. When the wave reaches the impactor, the center of the impactor moves first because the spherical wave reaches the center of the impactor first. The wave strikes the impactor later in time as one moves radially along the impactor. Because the impactor is thinner as one moves radially outward, the velocity of the impactor is greater at the periphery than at the center. An acceptor explosive is positioned so that the impactor strikes the acceptor simultaneously. Consequently, a plane detonation wave is propagated through the acceptor explosive. 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  19. Tracking deep mantle reservoirs with ultra-low velocity zones Allen K. McNamara a,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rhoads, James

    Tracking deep mantle reservoirs with ultra-low velocity zones Allen K. McNamara a, , Edward J, that directly overlies the core-mantle boundary (CMB). These regions have been dubbed Ultra-Low Velocity Zones. Introduction For over 15 yrs seismologists have mapped regions of ultra-low P- and S-wave velocities

  20. Turbulence Investigation and Reproduction for Assisting Downstream Migrating Juvenile Salmonids, Part II of II; Effects of Induced Turbulence on Behavior of Juvenile Salmon, 2001-2005 Final Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Perry, Russell W.; Farley, M. Jared; Hansen, Gabriel S.

    2005-07-01

    Passage through dams is a major source of mortality of anadromous juvenile salmonids because some populations must negotiate up to eight dams in Columbia and Snake rivers. Dams cause direct mortality when fish pass through turbines, but dams may also cause indirect mortality by altering migration conditions in rivers. Forebays immediately upstream of dams have decreased the water velocity of rivers and may contribute substantially to the total migration delay of juvenile salmonids. Recently, Coutant (2001a) suggested that in addition to low water velocities, lack of natural turbulence may contribute to migration delay by causing fish to lose directional cues. Coutant (2001a) further hypothesized that restoring turbulence in dam forebays may reduce migration delay by providing directional cues that allow fish to find passage routes more quickly (Coutant 2001a). Although field experiments have yielded proof of the concept of using induced turbulence to guide fish to safe passage routes, little is known about mechanisms actually causing behavioral changes. To test hypotheses about how turbulence influences movement and behavior of migrating juvenile salmonids, we conducted two types of controlled experiments at Cowlitz Falls Dam, Washington. A common measure of migration delay is the elapsed time between arrival at, and passage through, a dam. Therefore, for the first set of experiments, we tested the effect of induced turbulence on the elapsed time needed for fish to traverse through a raceway and pass over a weir at its downstream end (time trial experiment). If turbulence helps guide fish to passage routes, then fish should pass through the raceway quicker in the presence of appropriately scaled and directed turbulent cues. Second, little is known about how the physical properties of water movement provide directional cues to migrating juvenile salmonids. To examine the feasibility of guiding fish with turbulence, we tested whether directed turbulence could guide fish into one of two channels in the raceway, and subsequently cause them to pass disproportionately over the weir where turbulent cues were aimed (guidance experiment). Last, we measured and mapped water velocity and turbulence during the experiments to understand water movement patterns and the spatial distribution of turbulence in the raceways.

  1. Cap Bubble Drift Velocity in a Confined Test Section

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xiaodong Sun; Seungjin Kim; Mamoru Ishii; Frank W. Lincoln; Stephen G. Beus

    2002-10-09

    In the two-group interfacial area transport equation, bubbles are categorized into two groups, i.e., spherical/distorted bubbles as group 1 and cap/slug/churn-turbulent bubbles as group 2. The bubble rise velocities for both groups of bubbles may be estimated by the drift flux model by applying different distribution parameters and drift velocities for both groups. However, the drift velocity for group 2 bubbles is not always applicable (when the wall effect becomes important) as in the current test loop of interest where the flow channel is confined by two parallel flat walls, with a dimension of 200-mm in width and 10-mm in gap. The previous experiments indicated that no stable slug flow existed in this test section, which was designed to permit visualization of the flow patterns and bubble characteristics without the distortion associated with curved surfaces. In fact, distorted cap bubbly and churn-turbulent flow was observed. Therefore, it is essential to developed a correlation for cap bubble drift velocity in this confined flow channel. Since the rise velocity of a cap bubble depends on its size, a high-speed movie camera is used to capture images of cap bubbles to obtain the bubble size information. Meanwhile, the rise velocity of cap and elongated bubbles (called cap bubbles hereafter) is investigated by examining the captured images frame by frame. As a result, the conventional correlation of drift velocity for slug bubbles is modified and acceptable agreements between the measurements and correlation estimation are achieved.

  2. Effects of polymer additives in the bulk of turbulent thermal convection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xie, Yi-Chao; Funfschilling, Denis; Li, Xiao-Ming; Ni, Rui; Xia, Ke-Qing

    2015-01-01

    We present experimental evidence that a minute amount of polymer additives can significantly enhance heat transport in the bulk region of turbulent thermal convection. The effects of polymer additives are found to be the \\textit{suppression} of turbulent background fluctuations that give rise to incoherent heat fluxes that make no net contribution to heat transport, and at the same time to \\textit{increase} the coherency of temperature and velocity fields. The suppression of small-scale turbulent fluctuations leads to more coherent thermal plumes that result in the heat transport enhancement. The fact that polymer additives can increase the coherency of thermal plumes is supported by the measurements of a number of local quantities, such as the extracted plume amplitude and width, the velocity autocorrelation functions and the velocity-temperature cross-correlation coefficient. The results from local measurements also suggest the existence of a threshold value for the polymer concentration, only above which c...

  3. Numerical simulations of the decay of primordial magnetic turbulence

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kahniashvili, Tina [McWilliams Center for Cosmology and Department of Physics, Carnegie Mellon University, 5000 Forbes Ave, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15213 (United States); Department of Physics, Laurentian University, Ramsey Lake Road, Sudbury, ON P3E 2C (Canada); Abastumani Astrophysical Observatory, Ilia State University, 2A Kazbegi Ave, Tbilisi, GE-0160 (Georgia); Brandenburg, Axel [Nordita, AlbaNova University Center, Roslagstullsbacken 23, 10691 Stockholm (Sweden); Department of Astronomy, Stockholm University, SE 10691 Stockholm (Sweden); Tevzadze, Alexander G. [Abastumani Astrophysical Observatory, Ilia State University, 2A Kazbegi Ave, Tbilisi, GE-0160 (Georgia); Faculty of Exact and Natural Sciences, Tbilisi State University, 1 Chavchavadze Avenue Tbilisi, GE-0128 (Georgia); Ratra, Bharat [Department of Physics, Kansas State University, 116 Cardwell Hall, Manhattan, Kansas 66506 (United States)

    2010-06-15

    We perform direct numerical simulations of forced and freely decaying 3D magnetohydrodynamic turbulence in order to model magnetic field evolution during cosmological phase transitions in the early Universe. Our approach assumes the existence of a magnetic field generated either by a process during inflation or shortly thereafter, or by bubble collisions during a phase transition. We show that the final configuration of the magnetic field depends on the initial conditions, while the velocity field is nearly independent of initial conditions.

  4. Measurement of entropy production rate in compressible turbulence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. M. Bandi; W. I. Goldburg; J. R. Cressman Jr

    2006-10-22

    The rate of change of entropy $\\dot S$ is measured for a system of particles floating on the surface of a fluid maintained in a turbulent steady state. The resulting coagulation of the floaters allows one to relate $\\dot S$ to the velocity divergence and to the Lyapunov exponents characterizing the behavior of this system. The quantities measured from experiments and simulations are found to agree well with the theoretical predictions.

  5. Experimental study of turbulent flame kernel propagation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mansour, Mohy [National Institute of Laser Enhanced Sciences, Cairo University, Giza (Egypt); Peters, Norbert; Schrader, Lars-Uve [Institute of Combustion Technology, Aachen (Germany)

    2008-07-15

    Flame kernels in spark ignited combustion systems dominate the flame propagation and combustion stability and performance. They are likely controlled by the spark energy, flow field and mixing field. The aim of the present work is to experimentally investigate the structure and propagation of the flame kernel in turbulent premixed methane flow using advanced laser-based techniques. The spark is generated using pulsed Nd:YAG laser with 20 mJ pulse energy in order to avoid the effect of the electrodes on the flame kernel structure and the variation of spark energy from shot-to-shot. Four flames have been investigated at equivalence ratios, {phi}{sub j}, of 0.8 and 1.0 and jet velocities, U{sub j}, of 6 and 12 m/s. A combined two-dimensional Rayleigh and LIPF-OH technique has been applied. The flame kernel structure has been collected at several time intervals from the laser ignition between 10 {mu}s and 2 ms. The data show that the flame kernel structure starts with spherical shape and changes gradually to peanut-like, then to mushroom-like and finally disturbed by the turbulence. The mushroom-like structure lasts longer in the stoichiometric and slower jet velocity. The growth rate of the average flame kernel radius is divided into two linear relations; the first one during the first 100 {mu}s is almost three times faster than that at the later stage between 100 and 2000 {mu}s. The flame propagation is slightly faster in leaner flames. The trends of the flame propagation, flame radius, flame cross-sectional area and mean flame temperature are related to the jet velocity and equivalence ratio. The relations obtained in the present work allow the prediction of any of these parameters at different conditions. (author)

  6. MAGNETIC HELICITY IN THE DISSIPATION RANGE OF STRONG IMBALANCED TURBULENCE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Markovskii, S. A.; Vasquez, Bernard J. E-mail: bernie.vasquez@unh.edu

    2013-05-01

    Hybrid numerical simulations of freely decaying two-dimensional turbulence are presented. The background magnetic field is perpendicular to the simulation plane, which eliminates linear kinetic Alfven waves from the system. The net magnetic helicity of the initial fluctuations at large scales is zero. The turbulence is set to be imbalanced in the sense that the net cross-helicity is not zero. As the turbulence evolves, it develops nonzero magnetic helicity at smaller scales, in the proton kinetic range. In the quasi-steady state of evolution, the magnetic helicity spectrum has a peak consistent with the solar wind observations. The peak position depends on the plasma beta and correlates with a sharp decline of the cross-helicity spectrum.

  7. Turbulence transport modeling of the temporal outer heliosphere

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adhikari, L.; Zank, G. P.; Hu, Q.; Dosch, A.

    2014-09-20

    The solar wind can be regarded as a turbulent magnetofluid, evolving in an expanding solar wind and subject to turbulent driving by a variety of in situ sources. Furthermore, the solar wind and the drivers of turbulence are highly time-dependent and change with solar cycle. Turbulence transport models describing low-frequency magnetic and velocity fluctuations in the solar wind have so far neglected solar cycle effects. Here we consider the effects of solar cycle variability on a turbulence transport model developed by Zank et al. This model is appropriate for the solar wind beyond about 1 AU, and extensions have described the steady-state dependence of the magnetic energy density fluctuations, correlation length, and solar wind temperature throughout the outer heliosphere. We find that the temporal solar wind introduces a periodic variability, particularly beyond ?10 AU, in the magnetic energy density fluctuations, correlation length, and solar wind temperature. The variability is insufficient to account for the full observed variability in these quantities, but we find that the time-dependent solutions trace the steady-state solutions quite well, suggesting that the steady-state models are reasonable first approximations.

  8. Daytime turbulent exchange between the Amazon forest and the atmosphere

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fitzjarrald, D.R.; Moore, K.E. ); Cabral, M.R. ); Scolar, J. ); Manzi, A.O.; de Abreau Sa, L.D. )

    1990-09-20

    Detailed observations of turbulence just above and below the crown of the Amazon rain forest during the wet season are presented. The forest canopy is shown to remove high-frequency turbulent fluctuations while passing lower frequencies. Filter characteristics of turbulent transfer into the Amazon rain forest canopy are quantified. In spite of the ubiquitous presence of clouds and frequent rain during this season, the average horizontal wind speed spectrum and the relationship between the horizontal wind speed and its standard deviation are well described by dry convective boundary layer similarity hypotheses originally found to apply in flat terrain. Diurnal changes in the sign of the vertical velocity skewness observed above and inside the canopy are shown to be plausibly explained by considering the skewness budget. Simple empirical formulas that relate observed turbulent heat fluxes to horizontal wind speed and variance are presented. Changes in the amount of turbulent coupling between the forest and the boundary layer associated with deep convective clouds are presented in three case studies. Even small raining clouds are capable of evacuating the canopy of substances normally trapped by persistent static stability near the forest floor. Recovery from these events can take more than an hour, even during midday.

  9. Wave-Particle Interactions in Electron Acoustic Waves in Pure Ion Plasmas F. Anderegg, C. F. Driscoll, D. H. E. Dubin, and T. M. O'Neil

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at San Diego, University of

    Wave-Particle Interactions in Electron Acoustic Waves in Pure Ion Plasmas F. Anderegg, C. F waves (EAW) with a phase velocity less than twice the plasma thermal velocity are observed on pure ion excitation the EAW is more frequency variable than typical Langmuir waves, and at large excitations resonance

  10. Kinematics of extreme waves in deep water John Grue*, Didier Clamond, Morten Huseby, Atle Jensen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clamond, Didier

    Kinematics of extreme waves in deep water John Grue*, Didier Clamond, Morten Huseby, Atle Jensen fluid velocity, e ffiffiffiffi g=k p is then defined. Deep water waves with a fluid velocity up to 75 2004 Abstract The velocity profiles under crest of a total of 62 different steep wave events in deep

  11. Seismic velocity estimation from time migration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cameron, Maria Kourkina

    2007-01-01

    Seismic images . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Algorithms producing the seismic velocities from thethe Dix velocities and the true seismic velocities in 2D . .

  12. Generation of acoustic-gravity waves in ionospheric HF heating experiments : simulating large-scale natural heat sources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pradipta, Rezy

    2012-01-01

    In this thesis, we investigate the potential role played by large-scale anomalous heat sources (e.g. prolonged heat wave events) in generating acoustic-gravity waves (AGWs) that might trigger widespread plasma turbulence ...

  13. Three-wave interactions of dispersive plasma waves propagating parallel to the magnetic field

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    F. Spanier; R. Vainio

    2008-10-31

    Three-wave interactions of plasma waves propagating parallel to the mean magnetic field at frequencies below the electron cyclotron frequency are considered. We consider Alfv\\'en--ion-cyclotron waves, fast-magnetosonic--whistler waves, and ion-sound waves. Especially the weakly turbulent low-beta plasmas like the solar corona are studied, using the cold-plasma dispersion relation for the transverse waves and the fluid-description of the warm plasma for the longitudinal waves. We analyse the resonance conditions for the wave frequencies $\\omega$ and wavenumbers $k$, and the interaction rates of the waves for all possible combinations of the three wave modes, and list those reactions that are not forbidden.

  14. Polymer Stretching by Turbulence

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chertkov, Michael

    2000-05-15

    The stretching of a polymer chain by a large-scale chaotic flow is considered. The steady state which emerges as a balance of the turbulent stretching and anharmonic resistance of the chain is quantitatively described, i.e., the dependency on the flow parameters (Lyapunov exponent statistics) and the chain characteristics (the number of beads and the interbead elastic potential) is made explicit. (c) 2000 The American Physical Society.

  15. Multicomponent seismic data, combining P-wave and converted P-to-SV wave (C-wave) wavefields, provide inde-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Texas at Austin, University of

    Multicomponent seismic data, combining P-wave and converted P-to-SV wave (C-wave) wavefields (fast and slow) with differing polarization. The 4C, 3D ocean-bottom cable (OBC) multicomponent seismic objectives were to evaluate seismic attributes, such as VP/VS velocity ratios and Poisson's ratio derived

  16. Eddy fluxes in baroclinic turbulence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thompson, Andrew F.

    2006-01-01

    cant dissipation of tidal energy in the deep ocean inferred2006: An estimate of tidal energy lost to turbulence at the

  17. Sandia Energy - Applied Turbulent Combustion

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and they form the basis for the creation of validated submodels that bridge fundamental energy sciences with applied device engineering and optimization. Turbulent-combustion-lab...

  18. Residual Energy Spectrum of Solar Wind Turbulence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, C H K; Salem, C S; Maruca, B A

    2013-01-01

    It has long been known that the energy in velocity and magnetic field fluctuations in the solar wind is not in equipartition. In this paper, we present an analysis of 5 years of Wind data at 1 AU to investigate the reason for this. The residual energy (difference between energy in velocity and magnetic field fluctuations) was calculated using both the standard magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) normalization for the magnetic field and a kinetic version, which includes temperature anisotropies and drifts between particle species. It was found that with the kinetic normalization, the fluctuations are closer to equipartition, with a mean normalized residual energy of sigma_r = -0.19 and mean Alfven ratio of r_A = 0.71. The spectrum of residual energy, in the kinetic normalization, was found to be steeper than both the velocity and magnetic field spectra, consistent with some recent MHD turbulence predictions and numerical simulations, having a spectral index close to -1.9. The local properties of residual energy and cros...

  19. Turbulence Dynamics based on Lagrange Mechanics and Geometrical Field Theory of Deformation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xiao Jianhua

    2009-03-16

    The turbulence field is stacked on the laminar flow. In this research, the laminar flow is described as a macro deformation which forms an instant curvature space. On such a curvature space, the turbulence is viewed as a micro deformation. So, the fluid flow is described by the geometrical field theory of finite deformation. Based on the Lagrange mechanics and the deformation energy concept, using the Least Action Principle, the Euler-Lagrange motion equations are obtained. According to A E Green formulation, the stress concept is introduced by deformation tensor. The fluid motion is described by the multiplication of a macro deformation tensor and a micro deformation tensor. By this way, the geometrical field of fluid motion is well constructed. Then, the spatial derivative of deformation energy is expressed by the gradient of deformation tensors. By this way, the deformation energy related items in the Euler-Lagrange motion equations are expressed by the stress tensor and deformation tensor. The obtained Euler-Lagrange motion equations, then, are decomposed into average deformation equations and turbulence equations. For several special cases, the new results are compared with the conventional Navier-Stokes equation with Reynolds stress modification.The comparisons also show that the Bernoulli Equation is a natural precondition for the conventional Navier-Stokes equation.Generally, the turbulence wave is an inward-traveling wave. Unlike the normal outward-traveling wave related with the average deformation, the inward-traveling wave is the intrinsic feature of turbulence. So, the turbulence is well defined by the equations obtained in this research. For several typical cases, the simplified turbulence wave equations are given out with simple discussion.

  20. A primitive kinetic-fluid model for quasi-parallel propagating magnetohydrodynamic waves

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nariyuki, Y. [Faculty of Human Development, University of Toyama, 3190 Toyama City, Toyama 930-8555 (Japan)] [Faculty of Human Development, University of Toyama, 3190 Toyama City, Toyama 930-8555 (Japan); Saito, S. [Graduate School of Science, Nagoya University, Nagoya, Aichi 464-8601 (Japan)] [Graduate School of Science, Nagoya University, Nagoya, Aichi 464-8601 (Japan); Umeda, T. [Solar-Terrestrial Environment Laboratory, Nagoya University, Nagoya, Aichi 464-8601 (Japan)] [Solar-Terrestrial Environment Laboratory, Nagoya University, Nagoya, Aichi 464-8601 (Japan)

    2013-07-15

    The extension and limitation of the existing one-dimensional kinetic-fluid model (Vlasov-MHD (magnetohydrodynamic) model), which has been used to analyze parametric instabilities of parallel propagating Alfvén waves, are discussed. The inconsistency among the given velocity distribution functions in the past studies is resolved through the systematic derivation of the multi-dimensional Vlasov-MHD model. The linear dispersion analysis of the present model indicates that the collisionless damping of the slow modes is adequately evaluated in low beta plasmas, although the deviation between the present model and the full-Vlasov theory increases with increasing plasma beta and increasing propagation angle. This is because the transit-time damping is not correctly evaluated in the present model. It is also shown that the ponderomotive density fluctuations associated with the envelope-modulated quasi-parallel propagating Alfvén waves derived from the present model is not consistent with those derived from the other models such as the Landau-fluid model, except for low beta plasmas. The result indicates the present model would be useful to understand the linear and nonlinear development of the Alfvénic turbulence in the inner heliosphere, whose condition is relatively low beta, while the existing model and the present model are insufficient to discuss the parametric instabilities of Alfvén waves in high beta plasmas and the obliquely propagating waves.

  1. Passive scalar in a large-scale velocity field I. Kolokolov

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lebedev, Vladimir

    Passive scalar in a large-scale velocity field I. Kolokolov Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics advection of a passive scalar (t,r) by an incompressible large-scale turbulent flow. In the framework of and for the passive scalar difference (r1) (r2) for separations r1 r2 lying in the convective interval are found

  2. HIGH-RESOLUTION OBSERVATIONS AND THE PHYSICS OF HIGH-VELOCITY CLOUD A0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Verschuur, Gerrit L.

    2013-04-01

    The neutral hydrogen structure of high-velocity cloud A0 (at about -180 km s{sup -1}) has been mapped with a 9.'1 resolution. Gaussian decomposition of the profiles is used to separately map families of components defined by similarities in center velocities and line widths. About 70% of the H I gas is in the form of a narrow, twisted filament whose typical line widths are of the order of 24 km s{sup -1}. Many bright features with narrow line widths of the order of 6 km s{sup -1}, clouds, are located in and near the filament. A third category with properties between those of the filament and clouds appears in the data. The clouds are not always co-located with the broader line width filament emission as seen projected on the sky. Under the assumption that magnetic fields underlie the presence of the filament, a theorem is developed for its stability in terms of a toroidal magnetic field generated by the flow of gas along field lines. It is suggested that the axial magnetic field strength may be derived from the excess line width of the H I emission over and above that due to kinetic temperature by invoking the role of Alfven waves that create what is in essence a form of magnetic turbulence. At a distance of 200 pc the axial and the derived toroidal magnetic field strengths in the filament are then about 6 {mu}G while for the clouds they are about 4 {mu}G. The dependence of the derived field strength on distance is discussed.

  3. Evidence for internal structures of spiral turbulence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2009-12-21

    Dec 22, 2009 ... ary laminar-turbulent pattern in plane Couette flow. ... flow internal to the turbulent and laminar spirals, and unique ... 2 ( is the fluid density).

  4. Supercomputers Capture Turbulence in the Solar Wind

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Capture Turbulence in the Solar Wind Supercomputers Capture Turbulence in the Solar Wind Berkeley Lab visualizations could help scientists forecast destructive space weather...

  5. Simulation of lean premixed turbulent combustion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2008-01-01

    turbulent methane combustion. Proc. Combust. Inst. , 29:in premixed turbulent combustion. Proc. Combust. Inst. ,for zero Mach number combustion. Combust. Sci. Technol. ,

  6. Spectral evolution of two-dimensional kinetic plasma turbulence in the wavenumber-frequency domain

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Comi?el, H.; Institute for Space Sciences, Atomi?tilor 409, P.O. Box MG-23, Bucharest-M?gurele RO-077125 ; Verscharen, D.; Narita, Y.; Motschmann, U.; Deutsches Zentrum für Luft- und Raumfahrt, Institut für Planetenforschung, Rutherfordstr. 2, D-12489 Berlin

    2013-09-15

    We present a method for studying the evolution of plasma turbulence by tracking dispersion relations in the energy spectrum in the wavenumber-frequency domain. We apply hybrid plasma simulations in a simplified two-dimensional geometry to demonstrate our method and its applicability to plasma turbulence in the ion kinetic regime. We identify four dispersion relations: ion-Bernstein waves, oblique whistler waves, oblique Alfvén/ion-cyclotron waves, and a zero-frequency mode. The energy partition and frequency broadening are evaluated for these modes. The method allows us to determine the evolution of decaying plasma turbulence in our restricted geometry and shows that it cascades along the dispersion relations during the early phase with an increasing broadening around the dispersion relations.

  7. Nonlinear and linear timescales near kinetic scales in solar wind turbulence

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Matthaeus, W. H.; Wan, M.; Shay, M. A.; Oughton, S.; Osman, K. T.; Chapman, S. C.; Servidio, S.; Valentini, F.; Gary, S. P.; Roytershteyn, V.; Karimabadi, H.

    2014-08-01

    The application of linear kinetic treatments to plasma waves, damping, and instability requires favorable inequalities between the associated linear timescales and timescales for nonlinear (e.g., turbulence) evolution. In the solar wind these two types of timescales may be directly compared using standard Kolmogorov-style analysis and observational data. The estimated local (in scale) nonlinear magnetohydrodynamic cascade times, evaluated as relevant kinetic scales are approached, remain slower than the cyclotron period, but comparable to or faster than the typical timescales of instabilities, anisotropic waves, and wave damping. The variation with length scale of the turbulence timescales is supported by observations and simulations. On this basis the use of linear theory—which assumes constant parameters to calculate the associated kinetic rates—may be questioned. It is suggested that the product of proton gyrofrequency and nonlinear time at the ion gyroscales provides a simple measure of turbulence influence on proton kinetic behavior.

  8. A comparison of weak-turbulence and particle-in-cell simulations of weak electron-beam plasma interaction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ratcliffe, H. Brady, C. S.; Che Rozenan, M. B.; Nakariakov, V. M.

    2014-12-15

    Quasilinear theory has long been used to treat the problem of a weak electron beam interacting with plasma and generating Langmuir waves. Its extension to weak-turbulence theory treats resonant interactions of these Langmuir waves with other plasma wave modes, in particular, ion-sound waves. These are strongly damped in plasma of equal ion and electron temperatures, as sometimes seen in, for example, the solar corona and wind. Weak turbulence theory is derived in the weak damping limit, with a term describing ion-sound wave damping then added. In this paper, we use the EPOCH particle-in-cell code to numerically test weak turbulence theory for a range of electron-ion temperature ratios. We find that in the cold ion limit, the results agree well, but for increasing ion temperature the three-wave resonance becomes broadened in proportion to the ion-sound wave damping rate. Additionally, we establish lower limits on the number of simulation particles needed to accurately reproduce the electron and wave distributions in their saturated states and to reproduce their intermediate states and time evolution. These results should be taken into consideration in, for example, simulations of plasma wave generation in the solar corona of Type III solar radio bursts from the corona to the solar wind and in weak turbulence investigations of ion-acoustic lines in the ionosphere.

  9. Discrimination of porosity and fluid saturation using seismic velocity analysis

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Berryman, James G. (Danville, CA)

    2001-01-01

    The method of the invention is employed for determining the state of saturation in a subterranean formation using only seismic velocity measurements (e.g., shear and compressional wave velocity data). Seismic velocity data collected from a region of the formation of like solid material properties can provide relatively accurate partial saturation data derived from a well-defined triangle plotted in a (.rho./.mu., .lambda./.mu.)-plane. When the seismic velocity data are collected over a large region of a formation having both like and unlike materials, the method first distinguishes the like materials by initially plotting the seismic velocity data in a (.rho./.lambda., .mu./.lambda.)-plane to determine regions of the formation having like solid material properties and porosity.

  10. Dark Matter Velocity Spectroscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eric G. Speckhard; Kenny C. Y. Ng; John F. Beacom; Ranjan Laha

    2015-07-31

    Dark matter decays or annihilations that produce line-like spectra may be smoking-gun signals. However, even such distinctive signatures can be mimicked by astrophysical or instrumental causes. We show that velocity spectroscopy-the measurement of energy shifts induced by relative motion of source and observer-can separate these three causes with minimal theoretical uncertainties. The principal obstacle has been energy resolution, but upcoming experiments will reach the required 0.1% level. As an example, we show that the imminent Astro-H mission can use Milky Way observations to separate possible causes of the 3.5-keV line. We discuss other applications.

  11. Excitation of kinetic geodesic acoustic modes by drift waves in nonuniform plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Qiu, Z.; Chen, L.; Dept. Physics and Astronomy, Univ. of California, Irvine, California 92697-4575 ; Zonca, F.; Associazione Euratom-ENEA sulla Fusione, C.P. 65 - I-00044 - Frascati

    2014-02-15

    Effects of system nonuniformities and kinetic dispersiveness on the spontaneous excitation of Geodesic Acoustic Mode (GAM) by Drift Wave (DW) turbulence are investigated based on nonlinear gyrokinetic theory. The coupled nonlinear equations describing parametric decay of DW into GAM and DW lower sideband are derived and then solved both analytically and numerically to investigate the effects on the parametric decay process due to system nonuniformities, such as nonuniform diamagnetic frequency, finite radial envelope of DW pump, and kinetic dispersiveness. It is found that the parametric decay process is a convective instability for typical tokamak parameters when finite group velocities of DW and GAM associated with kinetic dispersiveness and finite radial envelope are taken into account. When, however, nonuniformity of diamagnetic frequency is taken into account, the parametric decay process becomes, time asymptotically, a quasi-exponentially growing absolute instability.

  12. Dispersion relations for acoustic waves in heterogeneous multi-layered structures contacting with

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Turova, Varvara

    Dispersion relations for acoustic waves in heterogeneous multi-layered structures contacting application for the computation of the velocity of acoustic waves excited in complicated multi: Multi-layered structures, Surface acoustic waves, Dispersion relations, Homogenization, Biosensor

  13. A comparison of weak-turbulence and PIC simulations of weak electron-beam plasma interaction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ratcliffe, Heather; Rozenan, Mohammed B Che; Nakariakov, Valery

    2014-01-01

    Quasilinear theory has long been used to treat the problem of a weak electron beam interacting with plasma and generating Langmuir waves. Its extension to weak-turbulence theory treats resonant interactions of these Langmuir waves with other plasma wave modes, in particular ion-sound waves. These are strongly damped in plasma of equal ion and electron temperatures, as sometimes seen in, for example, the solar corona and wind. Weak turbulence theory is derived in the weak damping limit, with a term describing ion-sound wave damping then added. In this paper we use the EPOCH particle-in-cell code to numerically test weak turbulence theory for a range of electron-ion temperature ratios. We find that in the cold ion limit the results agree well, but increasing ion temperature the three-wave resonance becomes broadened in proportion to the ion-sound wave damping rate. This may be important in, for example, the theory of solar radio bursts, where the spectrum of Langmuir waves is critical. Additionally we establish...

  14. Resonance Van Hove Singularities in Wave Kinetics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shi, Yi-Kang

    2015-01-01

    Wave kinetic theory has been developed to describe the statistical dynamics of weakly nonlinear, dispersive waves. However, we show that systems which are generally dispersive can have resonant sets of wave modes with identical group velocities, leading to a local breakdown of dispersivity. This shows up as a geometric singularity of the resonant manifold and possibly as an infinite phase measure in the collision integral. Such singularities occur widely for classical wave systems, including acoustical waves, Rossby waves, helical waves in rotating fluids, light waves in nonlinear optics and also in quantum transport, e.g. kinetics of electron-hole excitations (matter waves) in graphene. These singularities are the exact analogue of the critical points found by Van Hove in 1953 for phonon dispersion relations in crystals. The importance of these singularities in wave kinetics depends on the dimension of phase space $D=(N-2)d$ ($d$ physical space dimension, $N$ the number of waves in resonance) and the degree ...

  15. Turbulence structure of drag-reducing surfactant solution in two-dimensional channel with additional heat transfer enhancement method

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, P.W.; Daisaka, H.; Kawaguchi, Y.; Yabe, A.; Hishida, K.; Maeda, M.

    1999-07-01

    The turbulent characteristics of a surfactant water solution in changing from drag-reducing flow to turbulent flow inside a two-dimensional smooth channel and in changing from turbulent flow to drag-reducing flow in the same channel with a mesh plug were investigated through LDV measurement in this study. The mesh plug was used to exert high shear stress to destroy micelle structures in the surfactant solution so that turbulence could be produced for better heat transfer. The two-component LDV system was installed on a movable platform, which could be moved streamwise of the flow to measure the two-dimensional velocity at different stations downstream from the mesh plug. The surfactant tested was Cetyltrimethyl ammonium chloride (C{sub 16}H{sub 33}N(CH{sub 3}){sub 3}Cl, abbreviated as CTAC). Local tap water was used as solvent and same weight concentration of sodium salicylate was used as the counter-ion material. The investigation of turbulent parameters for the drag-reducing flow with increasing Reynolds number showed that when the Reynolds number exceeded the drag-reducing region, the turbulent character was the same as that of water. The turbulent parameters of surfactant flow downstream the mesh plug showed that the high heat transfer region had the same turbulent intensity as that of water flow. As the critical Reynolds number was approached, it became easier to obtain such a turbulent region by mesh plug. In such cases, the mesh helped to create high wall shear stress and therefore to destroy the super-ordered structures of rod-like micelles for introducing turbulence. However, it was found that the turbulent intensities of the velocity gradually decreased to the same as those of drag-reducing flow downstream from the mesh because the mesh plug only produced a local high shear stress.

  16. Impact loads and wave kinematics on a fixed truncated circular cylinder due to nonlinear waves in a 2-D tank 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zou, Jun

    1995-01-01

    . Simultaneous measurements of the particle velocities under the crest, the wave elevation at the energy concentrated location, the wave elevation on the cylinder surface, dynamic pressure distribution and impact force were performed to study the relationships...

  17. The turbulent/non-turbulent interface at the outer boundary of a self-similar turbulent jet

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hunt, Julian

    The turbulent/non-turbulent interface at the outer boundary of a self-similar turbulent jet J-similar turbulent jet at Re=2·103 is investigated ex- perimentally by means of combined particle image velo- cimetry (PIV) laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) measurements. The jet fluid contains a fluorescent dye so

  18. White light velocity interferometer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Erskine, D.J.

    1999-06-08

    The invention is a technique that allows the use of broadband and incoherent illumination. Although denoted white light velocimetry, this principle can be applied to any wave phenomenon. For the first time, powerful, compact or inexpensive sources can be used for remote target velocimetry. These include flash and arc lamps, light from detonations, pulsed lasers, chirped frequency lasers, and lasers operating simultaneously in several wavelengths. The technique is demonstrated with white light from an incandescent source to measure a target moving at 16 m/s. 41 figs.

  19. Wave merging mechanism: formation of low-frequency Alfven and magnetosonic waves in cosmic plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tishchenko, V N; Shaikhislamov, I F

    2014-02-28

    We investigate the merging mechanism for the waves produced by a pulsating cosmic plasma source. A model with a separate background/source description is used in our calculations. The mechanism was shown to operate both for strong and weak source – background interactions. We revealed the effect of merging of individual Alfven waves into a narrow low-frequency wave, whose amplitude is maximal for a plasma expansion velocity equal to 0.5 – 1 of the Alfven Mach number. This wave is followed along the field by a narrow low-frequency magnetosonic wave, which contains the bulk of source energy. For low expansion velocities the wave contains background and source particles, but for high velocities it contains only the background particles. The wave lengths are much greater than their transverse dimension. (letters)

  20. Nonlinear three-wave interaction in marine sediments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pushkina, N I

    2015-01-01

    Nonlinear interaction of three acoustic waves in a sandy sediment is studied in the frequency range where there is a considerable wave velocity dispersion. The possibility of an experimental observation of the generation of a sound wave by two pump waves propagating at an angle to each other is estimated.

  1. Nonlinear three-wave interaction in marine sediments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    N. I. Pushkina

    2015-03-18

    Nonlinear interaction of three acoustic waves in a sandy sediment is studied in the frequency range where there is a considerable wave velocity dispersion. The possibility of an experimental observation of the generation of a sound wave by two pump waves propagating at an angle to each other is estimated.

  2. An electromagnetic analog of gravitational wave memory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lydia Bieri; David Garfinkle

    2013-09-10

    We present an electromagnetic analog of gravitational wave memory. That is, we consider what change has occurred to a detector of electromagnetic radiation after the wave has passed. Rather than a distortion in the detector, as occurs in the gravitational wave case, we find a residual velocity (a "kick") to the charges in the detector. In analogy with the two types of gravitational wave memory ("ordinary" and "nonlinear") we find two types of electromagnetic kick.

  3. Mass Transport and Turbulence in Gravitationally Unstable Disk Galaxies. I: The Case of Pure Self-Gravity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goldbaum, Nathan J; Forbes, John C

    2015-01-01

    The role of gravitational instability-driven turbulence in determining the structure and evolution of disk galaxies, and the extent to which gravity rather than feedback can explain galaxy properties, remains an open question. To address it, we present high resolution adaptive mesh refinement simulations of Milky Way-like isolated disk galaxies, including realistic heating and cooling rates and a physically motivated prescription for star formation, but no form of star formation feedback. After an initial transient, our galaxies reach a state of fully-nonlinear gravitational instability. In this state, gravity drives turbulence and radial inflow. Despite the lack of feedback, the gas in our galaxy models shows substantial turbulent velocity dispersions, indicating that gravitational instability alone may be able to power the velocity dispersions observed in nearby disk galaxies on 100 pc scales. Moreover, the rate of mass transport produced by this turbulence approaches $\\sim 1$ $M_\\odot$ yr$^{-1}$ for Milky ...

  4. Simulating Astro-E2 Observations of Galaxy Clusters: the Case of Turbulent Cores Affected by Tsunamis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yutaka Fujita; Tomoaki Matsumoto; Keiichi Wada; Tae Furusho

    2004-12-14

    This is the first attempt to construct detailed X-ray spectra of clusters of galaxies from the results of high-resolution hydrodynamic simulations and simulate X-ray observations in order to study velocity fields of the intracluster medium (ICM). The hydrodynamic simulations are based on the recently proposed tsunami model, in which cluster cores are affected by bulk motions of the ICM and turbulence is produced. We note that most other solutions of the cooling flow problem also involve the generation of turbulence in cluster cores. From the mock X-ray observations with Astro-E2 XRS, we find that turbulent motion of the ICM in cluster cores could be detected with the satellite. The Doppler shifts of the metal lines could be used to discriminate among turbulence models. The gas velocities measured through the mock observations are consistent with the line-emission weighted values inferred directly from hydrodynamic simulations.

  5. Unitaxial constant velocity microactuator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McIntyre, Timothy J. (Knoxville, TN)

    1994-01-01

    A uniaxial drive system or microactuator capable of operating in an ultra-high vacuum environment. The mechanism includes a flexible coupling having a bore therethrough, and two clamp/pusher assemblies mounted in axial ends of the coupling. The clamp/pusher assemblies are energized by voltage-operated piezoelectrics therewithin to operatively engage the shaft and coupling causing the shaft to move along its rotational axis through the bore. The microactuator is capable of repeatably positioning to sub-manometer accuracy while affording a scan range in excess of 5 centimeters. Moreover, the microactuator generates smooth, constant velocity motion profiles while producing a drive thrust of greater than 10 pounds. The system is remotely controlled and piezoelectrically driven, hence minimal thermal loading, vibrational excitation, or outgassing is introduced to the operating environment.

  6. Unitaxial constant velocity microactuator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McIntyre, T.J.

    1994-06-07

    A uniaxial drive system or microactuator capable of operating in an ultra-high vacuum environment is disclosed. The mechanism includes a flexible coupling having a bore therethrough, and two clamp/pusher assemblies mounted in axial ends of the coupling. The clamp/pusher assemblies are energized by voltage-operated piezoelectrics therewithin to operatively engage the shaft and coupling causing the shaft to move along its rotational axis through the bore. The microactuator is capable of repeatably positioning to sub-nanometer accuracy while affording a scan range in excess of 5 centimeters. Moreover, the microactuator generates smooth, constant velocity motion profiles while producing a drive thrust of greater than 10 pounds. The system is remotely controlled and piezoelectrically driven, hence minimal thermal loading, vibrational excitation, or outgassing is introduced to the operating environment. 10 figs.

  7. Understanding and modeling turbulent fluxes and entrainment in a gravity current

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Odier, P; Ecke, R E

    2015-01-01

    We present an experimental study of the mixing processes in a gravity current flowing on an inclined plane. The turbulent transport of momentum and density can be described in a very direct and compact form by a Prandtl mixing length model: the turbulent vertical fluxes of momentum and density are found to scale quadratically with the vertical mean gradients of velocity and density. The scaling coefficient, the square of the mixing length, is approximately constant over the mixing zone of the stratified shear layer. We show how, in different flow configurations, this length can be related to the shear length of the flow ($\\epsilon$/$\\partial$ z u^3)^1/2. We also study the fluctuations of the momentum and density turbulent fluxes, showing how they relate to mixing and to the entrainment/detrainment balance. We suggest a quantitative measure of local entrainment and detrainment derived from observed conditional correlations of density flux and density or vertical velocity fluctuations.

  8. Simulations on the Nonlinear Mode Coupling in Multiple-scale Drift-type Turbulence with Coherent Flow Structures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, Zhihong

    and electron transport. Furthermore, the effect of ITG generated zonal flows regarded as a wave-type mean flow are generated as a beat wave or a modulational instability. Meanwhile, they act back on the turbulence, China 2) Graduate School of Energy Science, Kyoto University, 611-0011 Gokasho, Uji, Japan 3) Department

  9. PHYSICS OF FLUIDS 24, 103306 (2012) Numerical simulation of turbulent sediment transport,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Claudin, Philippe

    2012-01-01

    PHYSICS OF FLUIDS 24, 103306 (2012) Numerical simulation of turbulent sediment transport, from bed October 2012) Sediment transport is studied as a function of the grain to fluid density ratio using two), vertical velocities are so small that sediment transport occurs in a thin layer at the surface

  10. Non-Gaussian Invariant Measures for the Majda Model of Decaying Turbulent Transport

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Van Den Eijnden, Eric

    challenges for an even- tual statistical theory of hydrodynamic turbulence. In this context, many recent, the scalar can experience rare but very large fluctuations in amplitude, and its statistics can depart.1) in the large time limit in terms of the velocity field u and the initial Communications on Pure and Applied

  11. Diffusive radiation in one-dimensional Langmuir turbulence G. D. Fleishman1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -dimensional Langmuir turbulence which might be generated by a streaming instability in the plasma, in particular sensi- tively on the angle between the particle velocity and electric field direction. The radiation as gamma-ray bursts and collimated jets. DOI: 10.1103/PhysRevE.76.017401 PACS number s : 52.25.Os, 52.35.Ra

  12. PLASMA PHYSICS:Turbulence and Sheared Flow --Burrell 281 (5384): 1816 --Science q My Science

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, Zhihong

    About the Journal Home > Science Magazine > 18 September 1998 > Burrell , pp. 1816 - 1817 Article Views with reduced turbulence and transport when an additional source of free energy is applied to it. Usually heating or fueling. Although there are a few cases where neutral fluids exhibit velocity shear

  13. Emergence of Jets from Turbulence in the Shallow-Water Equations on an Equatorial Beta Plane

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Farrell, Brian F.

    Emergence of Jets from Turbulence in the Shallow-Water Equations on an Equatorial Beta Plane BRIAN (Manuscript received 2 September 2008, in final form 24 April 2009) ABSTRACT Coherent jets, such as the Jovian the essential mechanism of jet formation, which is systematic eddy mo- mentum flux directed up the mean velocity

  14. Response of flame thickness and propagation speed under intense turbulence in spatially developing lean premixed methane–air jet flames

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Sankaran, Ramanan; Hawkes, Evatt R.; Yoo, Chun Sang; Chen, Jacqueline H.

    2015-06-22

    Direct numerical simulations of three-dimensional spatially-developing turbulent Bunsen flames were performed at three different turbulence intensities. We performed these simulations using a reduced methane–air chemical mechanism which was specifically tailored for the lean premixed conditions simulated here. A planar-jet turbulent Bunsen flame configuration was used in which turbulent preheated methane–air mixture at 0.7 equivalence ratio issued through a central jet and was surrounded by a hot laminar coflow of burned products. The turbulence characteristics at the jet inflow were selected such that combustion occured in the thin reaction zones (TRZ) regime. At the lowest turbulence intensity, the conditions fall onmore »the boundary between the TRZ regime and the corrugated flamelet regime, and progressively moved further into the TRZ regime by increasing the turbulent intensity. The data from the three simulations was analyzed to understand the effect of turbulent stirring on the flame structure and thickness. Furthermore, statistical analysis of the data showed that the thermal preheat layer of the flame was thickened due to the action of turbulence, but the reaction zone was not significantly affected. A global and local analysis of the burning velocity of the flame was performed to compare the different flames. Detailed statistical averages of the flame speed were also obtained to study the spatial dependence of displacement speed and its correlation to strain rate and curvature.« less

  15. Response of flame thickness and propagation speed under intense turbulence in spatially developing lean premixed methane air jet flames

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Sankaran, Ramanan; Hawkes, Evatt R.; Yoo, Chun Sang; Chen, Jacqueline H.

    2015-06-22

    Direct numerical simulations of three-dimensional spatially-developing turbulent Bunsen flames were performed at three different turbulence intensities. We performed these simulations using a reduced methane–air chemical mechanism which was specifically tailored for the lean premixed conditions simulated here. A planar-jet turbulent Bunsen flame configuration was used in which turbulent preheated methane–air mixture at 0.7 equivalence ratio issued through a central jet and was surrounded by a hot laminar coflow of burned products. The turbulence characteristics at the jet inflow were selected such that combustion occured in the thin reaction zones (TRZ) regime. At the lowest turbulence intensity, the conditions fall onmore »the boundary between the TRZ regime and the corrugated flamelet regime, and progressively moved further into the TRZ regime by increasing the turbulent intensity. The data from the three simulations was analyzed to understand the effect of turbulent stirring on the flame structure and thickness. Furthermore, statistical analysis of the data showed that the thermal preheat layer of the flame was thickened due to the action of turbulence, but the reaction zone was not significantly affected. A global and local analysis of the burning velocity of the flame was performed to compare the different flames. Detailed statistical averages of the flame speed were also obtained to study the spatial dependence of displacement speed and its correlation to strain rate and curvature.« less

  16. STATISTICS OF TURBULENT FIELD VARIATIONS, NON-GAUSSIANITY AND INTERMITTENCY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ragot, B. R

    2009-05-10

    Statistics of magnetic field and velocity variations are important to the study of turbulence. Their departure from Gaussianity on the short separation scales has long been recognized and ascribed to intermittency. Non-Gaussian log-normal statistics of field-line separations are now predicted, however, from simple nonfluctuating turbulence Fourier spectra that do not model any intermittency, and one may wonder how this result may impact our interpretation of the statistics of field variations. It is shown in this paper how the intermittency of the turbulence can be taken into account to estimate the distributions of field-line separations and of field variations from the simple Fourier-spectra calculations. The first accurate theory/modeling predictions for the observed in situ distributions of turbulent field variations are thereby made, free of parameter adjustment. Magnetic field data from Helios 2 and Wind are used for the validation. Because the field variations are measured between points of constant separation and not between real field lines, intermittency remains the main cause for the observed non-Gaussianity of the statistics of field variations on the short scales, even if spatial limitations and/or short-scale phase correlations could also contribute to the deviations from Gaussianity.

  17. The Effect of Magnetic Turbulence Energy Spectral

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ng, Chung-Sang

    The Effect of Magnetic Turbulence Energy Spectral Scaling on the Heating of the Solar Wind C. S. Ng), Kraichnan (1965) #12;Solar wind turbulence model The steady state solar wind turbulence model developed wind with uniform speed Vsw 1D (radial position r) Turbulence characterized by two fields

  18. Wave-current interaction in water of finite depth

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Zhenhua, 1967-

    2004-01-01

    In this thesis, the nonlinear interaction of waves and current in water of finite depth is studied. Wind is not included. In the first part, a 2D theory for the wave effect on a turbulent current over rough or smooth bottom ...

  19. Memory effects in turbulent transport

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alexander Hubbard; Axel Brandenburg

    2009-11-13

    In the mean-field theory of magnetic fields, turbulent transport, i.e. the turbulent electromotive force, is described by a combination of the alpha effect and turbulent magnetic diffusion, which are usually assumed to be proportional respectively to the mean field and its spatial derivatives. For a passive scalar there is just turbulent diffusion, where the mean flux of concentration depends on the gradient of the mean concentration. However, these proportionalities are approximations that are valid only if the mean field or the mean concentration vary slowly in time. Examples are presented where turbulent transport possesses memory, i.e. where it depends crucially on the past history of the mean field. Such effects are captured by replacing turbulent transport coefficients with time integral kernels, resulting in transport coefficients that depend effectively on the frequency or the growth rate of the mean field itself. In this paper we perform numerical experiments to find the characteristic timescale (or memory length) of this effect as well as simple analytical models of the integral kernels in the case of passive scalar concentrations and kinematic dynamos. The integral kernels can then be used to find self-consistent growth or decay rates of the mean fields. In mean-field dynamos the growth rates and cycle periods based on steady state values of alpha effect and turbulent diffusivity can be quite different from the actual values.

  20. Compound cooling flow turbulator for turbine component

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lee, Ching-Pang; Jiang, Nan; Marra, John J; Rudolph, Ronald J

    2014-11-25

    Multi-scale turbulation features, including first turbulators (46, 48) on a cooling surface (44), and smaller turbulators (52, 54, 58, 62) on the first turbulators. The first turbulators may be formed between larger turbulators (50). The first turbulators may be alternating ridges (46) and valleys (48). The smaller turbulators may be concave surface features such as dimples (62) and grooves (54), and/or convex surface features such as bumps (58) and smaller ridges (52). An embodiment with convex turbulators (52, 58) in the valleys (48) and concave turbulators (54, 62) on the ridges (46) increases the cooling surface area, reduces boundary layer separation, avoids coolant shadowing and stagnation, and reduces component mass.

  1. Thermoplastic waves in magnetars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beloborodov, Andrei M

    2014-01-01

    Magnetar activity is generated by shear motions of the neutron star surface, which relieve internal magnetic stresses. An analogy with earthquakes and faults is problematic, as the crust is permeated by strong magnetic fields, which greatly constrain crustal displacements. We describe a new deformation mechanism that is specific to strongly magnetized neutron stars. The magnetically stressed crust begins to move because of a thermoplastic instability, which launches a wave that shears the crust and burns its magnetic energy. The propagating wave front resembles the deflagration front in combustion physics. We describe the conditions for the instability, the front structure and velocity, and discuss implications for observed magnetar activity.

  2. Relating turbulent pressure and macroturbulence across the HR diagram with a possible link to \\gamma-Dor stars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grassitelli, Luca; Langer, Norbert; Miglio, Andrea; Istrate, Alina Georgiana; Sanyal, Debashis

    2015-01-01

    A significant fraction of the envelope of low- and intermediate-mass stars is unstable to convection, leading to sub-surface turbulent motion. Here, we consider and include the effects of turbulence pressure in our stellar evolution calculations. In search of an observational signature, we compare the fractional contribution of turbulent pressure to the observed macroturbulent velocities in stars at different evolutionary stages. We find a strong correlation between the two quantities, similar to what was previously found for massive OB stars. We therefore argue that turbulent pressure fluctuations of finite amplitude may excite high-order, high-angular degree stellar oscillations, which manifest themselves at the surface an additional broadening of the spectral lines, i.e., macroturbulence, across most of the HR diagram. When considering the locations in the HR diagram where we expect high-order oscillations to be excited by stochastic turbulent pressure fluctuations, we find a close match with the observati...

  3. Turbulent flame speeds and NOx kinetics of HHC fuels with contaminants and high dilution levels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Petersen, Eric; Krejci, Michael; Mathieu, Olivier; Vissotski, Andrew; Ravi, Sankar; Plichta, Drew; Sikes, Travis; Levacque, Anthony; Aul, Christopher; Petersen, Eric

    2012-09-30

    This progress report documents the second year of the project, from October 1, 2011 through September 30, 2012. Characterization of the new turbulent flame speed vessel design was completed. Turbulence statistics of three impellers with different geometric features were measured using particle image velocimetry inside a Plexiglas model (~1:1 scale) of a cylindrical flame speed vessel (30.5 cm ID × 35.6 cm L). With four impellers arranged in a central-symmetric configuration, turbulence intensities between 1.2 and 1.7 m/s with negligible mean flow (0.1u´) were attained at the lowest fan speeds. Acceptable ranges for homogeneity and isotropy ratios of the velocity fields were set within a narrow bandwidth near unity (0.9-1.1). Homogeneity ratios were unaffected by changes to the impeller geometry, and the prototype with the higher number of blades caused the flow to become anisotropic. The integral length scale of the flow fields varied between 27 and 20 mm, which correlates well with those typically observed inside a gas turbine combustor. The mechanism to independently vary the intensity level and the integral length scale was established, where turbulence intensity level was dependent on the rotational speed of the fan, and the integral length scale decreased with increasing blade pitch angle. Ignition delay times of H?/O? mixtures highly diluted with Ar and doped with various amounts of N?O (100, 400, 1600, 3200 ppm) were measured in a shock tube behind reflected shock waves over a wide range of temperatures (940-1675 K). The pressure range investigated during this work (around 1.6, 13, and 30 atm) allows studying the effect of N?O on hydrogen ignition at pressure conditions that have never been heretofore investigated. Ignition delay times were decreased when N?O was added to the mixture only for the higher nitrous oxide concentrations, and some changes in the activation energy were also observed at 1.5 and 30 atm. When it occurred, the decrease in the ignition delay time was proportional to the amount of N?O added and depended on pressure and temperature conditions. A detailed chemical kinetics model was developed using kinetic mechanisms from the literature. This model predicts well the experimental data obtained during this study and from the literature. The chemical analysis using this model showed that the decrease in the ignition delay time was mainly due to the reaction N?O +M ? N? + O +M which provides O atoms to strengthen the channel O + H? ? OH + H. Ignition delay times have been measured behind reflected shock waves at 1.5, 12 and 30 atm for a mixture representative of a syngas produced from biomass (0.29659% CO / 0.29659% H? / 0.15748% CO? / 0.08924% CH? / 0.20997% H?O / 0.95013% O? in 98% Ar (mol.%)) and for the same biomass-derived syngas mixture doped with 200 ppm of NH?. The importance of the various constituents on the ignition delay time was investigated by comparing the results with data from various baseline mixtures (H?/O?/Ar, H?/CO/O?/Ar and H?/CO/O?/Ar with one of the other constituent of the syngas (i.e. CO?, H?O, CH? or NH?)). The equivalence ratio was set to 0.5 during this study. Several recent detailed kinetics mechanisms from the literature were computed against these data, with fair agreement. Results showed that the mixture composition can have an important effect on the ignition delay time, with most of the effect being due to CH? addition through the reaction CH?+OH?CH?+H?O. The ammonia impurity had very little effect on the ignition delay time over the range of conditions studied.

  4. Rotation Rate of Particle Pairs in Homogeneous Isotropic Turbulence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daddi-Moussa-Ider, Abdallah

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the dynamics of particles in turbulent flow is important in many environmental and industrial applications. In this paper, the statistics of particle pair orientation is numerically studied in homogeneous isotropic turbulent flow, with Taylor microscale Rynolds number of 300. It is shown that the Kolmogorov scaling fails to predict the observed probability density functions (PDFs) of the pair rotation rate and the higher order moments accurately. Therefore, a multifractal formalism is derived in order to include the intermittent behavior that is neglected in the Kolmogorov picture. The PDFs of finding the pairs at a given angular velocity for small relative separations, reveals extreme events with stretched tails and high kurtosis values. Additionally, The PDFs are found to be less intermittent and follow a complementary error function distribution for larger separations.

  5. Dissipative structures of diffuse molecular gas III -- Small-scale intermittency of intense velocity-shears

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pierre Hily-Blant; Edith Falgarone; Jerome Pety

    2008-02-06

    We further characterize the structures tentatively identified on thermal and chemical grounds as the sites of dissipation of turbulence in molecular clouds (Papers I and II). Our study is based on two-point statistics of line centroid velocities (CV), computed from three large 12CO maps of two fields. Probability density functions (PDF) of the CO line centroid velocity increments (CVI) over lags varying by an order of magnitude and structure functions of the line CV, up to the 6th order, are computed. We show that the line CV bear the three signatures of intermittency in a turbulent velocity field: (1) the non-Gaussian tails in the CVI PDF grow as the lag decreases, (2) the departure from Kolmogorov scaling of the high-order structure functions is more pronounced in the more turbulent field, (3) the positions contributing to the CVI PDF tails delineate narrow filamentary structures (thickness ~ 0.02 pc), uncorrelated to dense gas structures and spatially coherent with thicker ones (~0.18 pc) observed on larger scales. The confrontation with theoretical predictions leads us to identify these small-scale filamentary structures with extrema of velocity-shears associated with gas warmer than the bulk. Last, their average direction is parallel (or close) to that of the local magnetic field projection. Turbulence in these translucent fields exhibits the statistical and structural signatures of small-scale and inertial-range intermittency. The more turbulent field on the 30 pc-scale is also the more intermittent on small scales. The small-scale intermittent structures coincide with those formerly identified as sites of enhanced dissipation. They are organized into parsec-scale coherent structures, coupling a broad range of scales.

  6. Mode-coupling and nonlinear Landau damping effects in auroral Farley-Buneman turbulence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hamza, Abdelaziz M

    2015-01-01

    The fundamental problem of Farley-Buneman turbulence in the auroral $E$-region has been discussed and debated extensively in the past two decades. In the present paper we intend to clarify the different steps that the auroral $E$-region plasma has to undergo before reaching a steady state. The mode-coupling calculation, for Farley-Buneman turbulence, is developed in order to place it in perspective and to estimate its magnitude relative to the anomalous effects which arise through the nonlinear wave-particle interaction. This nonlinear effect, known as nonlinear ``Landau damping'' is due to the coupling of waves which produces other waves which in turn lose energy to the bulk of the particles by Landau damping. This leads to a decay of the wave energy and consequently a heating of the plasma. An equation governing the evolution of the field spectrum is derived and a physical interpration for each of its terms is provided.

  7. Relation between plasma plume density and gas flow velocity in atmospheric pressure plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yambe, Kiyoyuki; Taka, Shogo; Ogura, Kazuo [Graduate School of Science and Technology, Niigata University, Niigata 950-2181 (Japan)] [Graduate School of Science and Technology, Niigata University, Niigata 950-2181 (Japan)

    2014-04-15

    We have studied atmospheric pressure plasma generated using a quartz tube, helium gas, and copper foil electrode by applying RF high voltage. The atmospheric pressure plasma in the form of a bullet is released as a plume into the atmosphere. To study the properties of the plasma plume, the plasma plume current is estimated from the difference in currents on the circuit, and the drift velocity is measured using a photodetector. The relation of the plasma plume density n{sub plu}, which is estimated from the current and the drift velocity, and the gas flow velocity v{sub gas} is examined. It is found that the dependence of the density on the gas flow velocity has relations of n{sub plu} ? log(v{sub gas}). However, the plasma plume density in the laminar flow is higher than that in the turbulent flow. Consequently, in the laminar flow, the density increases with increasing the gas flow velocity.

  8. Mode 2 waves on the continental shelf: Ephemeral components of the nonlinear internal wavefield

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    waves appear sporadically in mooring records obtained off the coast of New Jersey in the summer of 2006. Turbulent dissipation in the mixed layer and radiation of the short mode 1 waves contributed to rapid energy a few hours. The energy in the leading mode 2 wave was 10­100 times smaller than the energy of mode 1

  9. A Novel Statistical Channel Model for Turbulence-Induced Fading in Free-Space Optical Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aminikashani, Mohammadreza; Kavehrad, Mohsen

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a new probability distribution function which accurately describes turbulence-induced fading under a wide range of turbulence conditions. The proposed model, termed Double Generalized Gamma (Double GG), is based on a doubly stochastic theory of scintillation and developed via the product of two Generalized Gamma (GG) distributions. The proposed Double GG distribution generalizes many existing turbulence channel models and provides an excellent fit to the published plane and spherical waves simulation data. Using this new statistical channel model, we derive closed form expressions for the outage probability and the average bit error as well as corresponding asymptotic expressions of free-space optical communication systems over turbulence channels. We demonstrate that our derived expressions cover many existing results in the literature earlier reported for Gamma-Gamma, Double-Weibull and K channels as special cases.

  10. A Novel Statistical Channel Model for Turbulence-Induced Fading in Free-Space Optical Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohammadreza Aminikashani; Murat Uysal; Mohsen Kavehrad

    2015-02-02

    In this paper, we propose a new probability distribution function which accurately describes turbulence-induced fading under a wide range of turbulence conditions. The proposed model, termed Double Generalized Gamma (Double GG), is based on a doubly stochastic theory of scintillation and developed via the product of two Generalized Gamma (GG) distributions. The proposed Double GG distribution generalizes many existing turbulence channel models and provides an excellent fit to the published plane and spherical waves simulation data. Using this new statistical channel model, we derive closed form expressions for the outage probability and the average bit error as well as corresponding asymptotic expressions of free-space optical communication systems over turbulence channels. We demonstrate that our derived expressions cover many existing results in the literature earlier reported for Gamma-Gamma, Double-Weibull and K channels as special cases.

  11. Analysis of the influence of external biasing on Texas Helimak turbulence

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Toufen, D. L. [Institute of Physics, University of Sao Paulo, C.P. 66318, 05315-970 Sao Paulo, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Federal Institute of Education, Science and Technology of Sao Paulo-IFSP, 07115-000 Guarulhos, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Guimaraes-Filho, Z. O.; Caldas, I. L. [Institute of Physics, University of Sao Paulo, C.P. 66318, 05315-970 Sao Paulo, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Szezech, J. D. [Department of Physics, State University of Ponta Grossa, 84030-900 Parana (Brazil); Lopes, S.; Viana, R. L. [Department of Physics, Federal University of Parana, 81531-990 Curitiba, Parana (Brazil); Gentle, K. W. [Department of Physics and Institute for Fusion Studies, The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas 78712 (United States)

    2013-02-15

    We analyze alterations on the electrostatic turbulence in experiments with imposed bias to control the plasma radial electric field in Texas Helimak (K. W. Gentle and H. He, Plasma Sci. Technol. 10, 284 (2008)), a toroidal plasma device with a one-dimensional equilibrium, magnetic curvature, and shear. Comparing discharges from different biased potentials, we identify, in a roughly uniform gradient region, a continuous variation from low turbulence level and narrower frequency spectra, for negative bias, to high turbulence level and broadband spectra for positive bias. Overall, we distinguish two kinds of perturbed turbulence, classified according to their intensity, spectral, statistical, and recurrence properties. When the bias is positive, the turbulence shows enhanced and broadband spectra with non Gaussian probability distribution functions having noticeable long tails (extreme events) similar to the turbulence in tokamak scrape-off layer. On the other hand, negative bias reduces the turbulence level and decreases the spectrum widths. Also for negative bias, we found large frequency widths whenever the coupling between drift waves and the sheared plasma flow is fast enough to allow the enhancement of sidebands modes.

  12. Critical regimes of internal gravity wave generation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vitaly V. Bulatov; Yuriy V. Vladimirov; Vasily A. Vakorin

    2005-11-27

    The problem of constructing an asymptotic representation of the solution of the internal gravity wave field exited by a source moving at a velocity close to the maximum group velocity of the individual wave mode is considered. For the critical regimes of individual mode generation the asymptotic representation of the solution obtained is expressed in terms of a zero-order Macdonald function. The results of numerical calculations based on the exact and asymptotic formulas are given.

  13. Broadband extended emission in gravitational waves from core-collapse supernovae

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Levinson, Amir; Pick, Guy

    2015-01-01

    Black holes in core-collapse of massive stars are expected to surge in mass and angular momentum by hyper-accretion immediately following their formation. We here describe a general framework of extended emission in gravitational waves from non-axisymmetric accretion flows from fallback matter of the progenitor envelope. It shows (a) a maximum efficiency in conversion of accretion energy into gravitational waves at hyper-accretion rates exceeding a critical value set by the ratio of the quadrupole mass inhomogeneity and viscosity with (b) a peak characteristic strain amplitude at the frequency $f_b=\\Omega_b/\\pi$, where $\\Omega_b$ is the Keplerian angular velocity at which viscous torques equal angular momentum loss in gravitational radiation, with $h_{char}\\propto f^{1/6}$ at $ff_b$. Upcoming gravitational wave observations may probe this scaling by extracting broadband spectra using time-sliced matched filtering with chirp templates, recently developed for identifying turbulence in noisy time series.

  14. A flowing plasma model to describe drift waves in a cylindrical helicon discharge

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chang, L.; Hole, M. J.; Corr, C. S.

    2011-04-15

    A two-fluid model developed originally to describe wave oscillations in the vacuum arc centrifuge, a cylindrical, rapidly rotating, low temperature, and confined plasma column, is applied to interpret plasma oscillations in a RF generated linear magnetized plasma [WOMBAT (waves on magnetized beams and turbulence)], with similar density and field strength. Compared to typical centrifuge plasmas, WOMBAT plasmas have slower normalized rotation frequency, lower temperature, and lower axial velocity. Despite these differences, the two-fluid model provides a consistent description of the WOMBAT plasma configuration and yields qualitative agreement between measured and predicted wave oscillation frequencies with axial field strength. In addition, the radial profile of the density perturbation predicted by this model is consistent with the data. Parameter scans show that the dispersion curve is sensitive to the axial field strength and the electron temperature, and the dependence of oscillation frequency with electron temperature matches the experiment. These results consolidate earlier claims that the density and floating potential oscillations are a resistive drift mode, driven by the density gradient. To our knowledge, this is the first detailed physics model of flowing plasmas in the diffusion region away from the RF source. Possible extensions to the model, including temperature nonuniformity and magnetic field oscillations, are also discussed.

  15. Onset of Wave Drag due to Generation of Capillary-Gravity Waves by a Moving Object as a Critical Phenomenon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Teodor Burghelea; Victor Steinberg

    2001-04-21

    The onset of the {\\em wave resistance}, via generation of capillary gravity waves, of a small object moving with velocity $V$, is investigated experimentally. Due to the existence of a minimum phase velocity $V_c$ for surface waves, the problem is similar to the generation of rotons in superfluid helium near their minimum. In both cases waves or rotons are produced at $V>V_c$ due to {\\em Cherenkov radiation}. We find that the transition to the wave drag state is continuous: in the vicinity of the bifurcation the wave resistance force is proportional to $\\sqrt{V-V_c}$ for various fluids.

  16. Wave Motion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Carcione, F. Cavallini, Simulation of waves in porn-viscoelastic rocks Saturated by immiscible ?uids. Numerical evidence ofa second slow wave,]. Comput.

  17. Pore fluid effects on seismic velocity in anisotropic rocks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mukerji, T.; Mavko, G. (Stanford Univ., CA (United States). Dept. of Geophysics)

    1994-02-01

    A simple new technique predicts the high- and low-frequency saturated velocities in anisotropic rocks entirely in terms of measurable dry rock properties without the need for idealized crack geometries. Measurements of dry velocity versus pressure and porosity versus pressure contain all of the necessary information for predicting the frequency-dependent effects of fluid saturation. Furthermore, these measurements automatically incorporate all pore interaction, so there is no limitation to low crack density. The velocities are found to depend on five key interrelated variables: frequency, the distribution of compliant crack-like porosity, the intrinsic or noncrack anisotropy, fluid viscosity and compressibility, and effective pressure. The sensitivity of velocities to saturation is generally greater at high frequencies than low frequencies. The magnitude of the differences from dry to saturated and from low frequency to high frequency is determined by the compliant or crack-like porosity. Predictions of saturated velocities based on dry data for sandstone and granite show that compressional velocities generally increase with saturation and with frequency. However, the degree of compressional wave anisotropy may either increase or decrease upon saturation depending on the crack distribution, the effective pressure, and the frequency at which the measurements are made. Shear-wave velocities can either increase or decrease with saturation, and the degree of anisotropy depends on the microstructure, pressure, and frequency. Consequently great care must be taken when interpreting observed velocity anisotropy for measurements at low frequencies, typical of in situ observations, will generally be different from those at high frequencies, typical of the laboratory.

  18. Development of a thermoacoustic travelling-wave refrigerator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    mean pressure. By that way, conduction losses on the cold heat exchanger are minimized. However to an acoustic wave. Thereby, gas particle pressure and velocity oscillate around a mean value. According of a travelling-wave, acoustic pressure and velocity are in phase inducing a Stirling type cycle. Over an acoustic

  19. The impact of pedestal turbulence and electron inertia on edge-localized-mode crashes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xi, P. W.; Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 ; Xu, X. Q.; Diamond, P. H.; Center for Astrophysics and Space Sciences and Department of Physics, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093-0429

    2014-05-15

    We demonstrate that the occurrence of Edge-Localized-Modes (ELM) crashes does not depend only on the linear peeling-ballooning threshold, but also relies on nonlinear processes. Wave-wave interaction constrains the growth time of a mode, thus inducing a shift in the criterion for triggering an ELM crash. An ELM crash requires the P-B growth rate to exceed a critical value ?>?{sub c}, where ?{sub c} is set by 1/?{sup ¯}{sub c}, and ?{sup ¯}{sub c} is the averaged mode phase coherence time. For 0turbulence develops but drives enhanced turbulent transport. We also show that electron inertia dramatically changes the instability threshold when density is low. However, P-B turbulence alone cannot generate enough current transport to allow fast reconnection during an ELM crash.

  20. Kirchhoff prestack depth migration in velocity models with and without rotation of the tensor of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cerveny, Vlastislav

    Kirchhoff prestack depth migration in velocity models with and without rotation of the tensor-mail: bucha@seis.karlov.mff.cuni.cz Summary We use the Kirchhoff prestack depth migration to calculate is limited to P-waves. Keywords 3-D Kirchhoff prestack depth migration, anisotropic velocity model, rotation

  1. On the role of stochastic Fermi acceleration in setting the dissipation scale of turbulence in the interstellar medium

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Selkowitz, Robert I

    2007-01-01

    We consider the dissipation by Fermi acceleration of magnetosonic turbulence in the Reynolds Layer of the interstellar medium. The scale in the cascade at which electron acceleration via stochastic Fermi acceleration (STFA) becomes comparable to further cascade of the turbulence defines the inner scale. For any magnetic turbulent spectra equal to or shallower than Goldreich-Sridhar this turns out to be $\\ge 10^{12}$cm, which is much larger than the shortest length scales observed in radio scintillation measurements. While STFA for such spectra then contradict models of scintillation which appeal directly to an extended, continuous turbulent cascade, such a separation of scales is consistent with the recent work of \\citet{Boldyrev2} and \\citet{Boldyrev3} suggesting that interstellar scintillation may result from the passage of radio waves through the galactic distribution of thin ionized boundary surfaces of HII regions, rather than density variations from cascading turbulence. The presence of STFA dissipation...

  2. Characterizing the convective velocity fields in massive stars

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chatzopoulos, Emmanouil; Graziani, Carlo; Couch, Sean M., E-mail: manolis@astro.as.utexas.edu [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Flash Center for Computational Science, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States)

    2014-11-01

    We apply the mathematical formalism of vector spherical harmonics decomposition to convective stellar velocity fields from multidimensional hydrodynamics simulations and show that the resulting power spectra furnish a robust and stable statistical description of stellar convective turbulence. Analysis of the power spectra helps identify key physical parameters of the convective process such as the dominant scale of the turbulent motions that influence the structure of massive evolved pre-supernova stars. We introduce the numerical method that can be used to calculate vector spherical harmonics power spectra from two-dimensional (2D) and three-dimensional (3D) convective shell simulation data. Using this method we study the properties of oxygen shell burning and convection for a 15 M {sub ?} star simulated by the hydrodynamics code FLASH in 2D and 3D. We discuss the importance of realistic initial conditions to achieving successful core-collapse supernova explosions in multidimensional simulations. We show that the calculated power spectra can be used to generate realizations of the velocity fields of presupernova convective shells. We find that the slope of the solenoidal mode power spectrum remains mostly constant throughout the evolution of convection in the oxygen shell in both 2D and 3D simulations. We also find that the characteristic radial scales of the convective elements are smaller in 3D than in 2D, while the angular scales are larger in 3D.

  3. Weak turbulence and collapses in the Majda-McLaughlin-Tabak equation: Fluxes in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Biven, Laura J.

    ., New York, NY, 10002, USA Preprint submitted to Elsevier Preprint 28 February 2005 #12;[4][5]. Important cases of weak turbulence have been found in the dynamics of Langmuir waves in plasmas [6, with the existence of a small parameter, the nonlinear coupling is much smaller than the linear dispersive effects

  4. Energy dynamics in a simulation of LAPD turbulence B. Friedman,1,a)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carter, Troy

    in a 3D fluid simulation of drift wave turbulence in the linear Large Plasma Device [W. Gekelman et al of magnetically confined plasmas that neglect stable branches of the linear dispersion relation often miss details, USA 3 Department of Physics, University of York, Heslington, York YO10 5DD, United Kingdom (Received 5

  5. Inversion Of Travel Time For Velocity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Willis, M.E.

    1983-01-01

    Common source velocities and borehole compensated (BC) estimates have been used to obtain formation velocity estimates from full waveform acoustic

  6. Numerical Simulation of Fault Zone Guided Waves: Accuracy and 3-D Effects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ben-Zion, Yehuda

    seismic velocity. When sources are located in or close to these low-velocity zones, guided seismic head for seismic fault zone head and trapped waves. Fault zone head waves propagate along material discontinuity Pure and Applied Geophysics #12;traveling inside low velocity fault zone layers with dispersive

  7. Chemical Wave Packet Propagation, Reflection, and Spreading Lingfa Yang and Irving R. Epstein*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Epstein, Irving R.

    or away from an initiating perturbation, are found in a reaction-diffusion model with a finite wave. The phase velocity, group velocity, and spreading velocity calculated by linear stability analysis packets in reaction-diffusion systems are rarely seen, even though wave packets have been intensively

  8. Converted wave imaging in anisotropic media using sea-floor seismic data 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mancini, Fabio

    velocity ratio is derived conventionally by event matching in the P-wave and converted wave stacks. I present an attempt to use well-log derived velocity ratios to avoid this interpretative step. The velocity ratio derived from 4C seismic data is about 30...

  9. Dissipation-Scale Turbulence in the Solar Wind

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gregory G. Howes; Steven C. Cowley; William Dorland; Gregory W. Hammett; Eliot Quataert; Alexander A. Schekochihin

    2007-07-20

    We present a cascade model for turbulence in weakly collisional plasmas that follows the nonlinear cascade of energy from the large scales of driving in the MHD regime to the small scales of the kinetic Alfven wave regime where the turbulence is dissipated by kinetic processes. Steady-state solutions of the model for the slow solar wind yield three conclusions: (1) beyond the observed break in the magnetic energy spectrum, one expects an exponential cut-off; (2) the widely held interpretation that this dissipation range obeys power-law behavior is an artifact of instrumental sensitivity limitations; and, (3) over the range of parameters relevant to the solar wind, the observed variation of dissipation range spectral indices from -2 to -4 is naturally explained by the varying effectiveness of Landau damping, from an undamped prediction of -7/3 to a strongly damped index around -4.

  10. Universal statistics of density of inertial particles sedimenting in turbulence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Itzhak Fouxon; Yongnam Park; Roei Harduf; Changhoon Lee

    2014-10-30

    We solve the problem of spatial distribution of inertial particles that sediment in Navier-Stokes turbulence with small ratio $Fr$ of acceleration of fluid particles to acceleration of gravity $g$. The particles are driven by linear drag and have arbitrary inertia. We demonstrate that independently of the particles' size or density the particles distribute over fractal set with log-normal statistics determined completely by the Kaplan-Yorke dimension $D_{KY}$. When inertia is not small $D_{KY}$ is proportional to the ratio of integral of spectrum of turbulence multiplied by wave-number and $g$. This ratio is independent of properties of particles so that the particles concentrate on fractal with universal, particles-independent statistics. We find Lyapunov exponents and confirm predictions numerically. The considered case includes typical situation of water droplets in clouds.

  11. Numerical Simulations of MHD Turbulence in Accretion Disks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Steven A. Balbus; John F. Hawley

    2002-03-20

    We review numerical simulations of MHD turbulence. The last decade has witnessed fundamental advances both in the technical capabilities of direct numerical simulation, and in our understanding of key physical processes. Magnetic fields tap directly into the free energy sources in a sufficiently ionized gas. The result is that adverse angular velocity and adverse temperature gradients, not the classical angular momentum and entropy gradients, destabilize laminar and stratified flow. This has profound consequences for astrophysical accretion flows, and has opened the door to a new era of numerical simulation experiments.}

  12. Turbulent AGN tori

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Schartmann; K. Meisenheimer; H. Klahr; M. Camenzind; S. Wolf; Th. Henning

    2008-08-05

    Recently, the MID-infrared Interferometric instrument (MIDI) at the VLTI has shown that dust tori in the two nearby Seyfert galaxies NGC 1068 and the Circinus galaxy are geometrically thick and can be well described by a thin, warm central disk, surrounded by a colder and fluffy torus component. By carrying out hydrodynamical simulations with the help of the TRAMP code (Klahr et al. 1999), we follow the evolution of a young nuclear star cluster in terms of discrete mass-loss and energy injection from stellar processes. This naturally leads to a filamentary large scale torus component, where cold gas is able to flow radially inwards. The filaments open out into a dense and very turbulent disk structure. In a post-processing step, we calculate observable quantities like spectral energy distributions or images with the help of the 3D radiative transfer code MC3D (Wolf 2003). Good agreement is found in comparisons with data due to the existence of almost dust-free lines of sight through the large scale component and the large column densities caused by the dense disk.

  13. Time-resolved heat transfer in the oscillating turbulent flow of a pulse-combustor tail pipe

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dec, J.E.

    1988-01-01

    The need for efficient combustion systems has led to active research in pulse combustion. One advantage of pulse combustor heating systems is a high rate of heat transfer in the tail pipe. These high heat transfer rates result from large velocity oscillations, which occur in the tailpipe as a result of the acoustic resonance of the pulse combustor. Past research on the effects of flow oscillations on heat transfer rates is inconclusive; however, some oscillating turbulent flows have been shown to have Nusselt numbers, which are much higher than those to steady turbulent flow at the same mean Reynolds number. An experimental study of the heat transfer rates and convective transport processes in a pulse combustor tail pipe was conducted. A test combustor was used, in which the oscillation frequencies could be varied from 54 to 101 Hz, with peak-to-peak velocity oscillations from zero (steady flow) to 10 times the mean velocity, and mean Reynolds numbers from 3100 to 4750. Nusselt numbers in the tail pipe are enhanced by the oscillations up to a factor of 2.5 times the expected value for steady turbulent flow. The Nusselt number enhancement increases with both oscillation frequency and velocity oscillation amplitude. Increases in the mean Reynolds number decreased the enhancement. Possible causes for the heat-transfer enhancement in oscillating flows are discussed. The data indicate that the heat transfer enhancement results from a combination of increased turbulence intensity and transverse flows generated during the streamwise velocity reversals.

  14. Quantitative imaging of turbulent and reacting flows

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paul, P.H. [Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA (United States)

    1993-12-01

    Quantitative digital imaging, using planar laser light scattering techniques is being developed for the analysis of turbulent and reacting flows. Quantitative image data, implying both a direct relation to flowfield variables as well as sufficient signal and spatial dynamic range, can be readily processed to yield two-dimensional distributions of flowfield scalars and in turn two-dimensional images of gradients and turbulence scales. Much of the development of imaging techniques to date has concentrated on understanding the requisite molecular spectroscopy and collision dynamics to be able to determine how flowfield variable information is encoded into the measured signal. From this standpoint the image is seen as a collection of single point measurements. The present effort aims at realizing necessary improvements in signal and spatial dynamic range, signal-to-noise ratio and spatial resolution in the imaging system as well as developing excitation/detection strategies which provide for a quantitative measure of particular flowfield scalars. The standard camera used for the study is an intensified CCD array operated in a conventional video format. The design of the system was based on detailed modeling of signal and image transfer properties of fast UV imaging lenses, image intensifiers and CCD detector arrays. While this system is suitable for direct scalar imaging, derived quantities (e.g. temperature or velocity images) require an exceptionally wide dynamic range imaging detector. To apply these diagnostics to reacting flows also requires a very fast shuttered camera. The authors have developed and successfully tested a new type of gated low-light level detector. This system relies on fast switching of proximity focused image-diode which is direct fiber-optic coupled to a cooled CCD array. Tests on this new detector show significant improvements in detection limit, dynamic range and spatial resolution as compared to microchannel plate intensified arrays.

  15. Dynamic Multiscale Averaging (DMA) of Turbulent Flow

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Richard W. Johnson

    2012-09-01

    A new approach called dynamic multiscale averaging (DMA) for computing the effects of turbulent flow is described. The new method encompasses multiple applications of temporal and spatial averaging, that is, multiscale operations. Initially, a direct numerical simulation (DNS) is performed for a relatively short time; it is envisioned that this short time should be long enough to capture several fluctuating time periods of the smallest scales. The flow field variables are subject to running time averaging during the DNS. After the relatively short time, the time-averaged variables are volume averaged onto a coarser grid. Both time and volume averaging of the describing equations generate correlations in the averaged equations. These correlations are computed from the flow field and added as source terms to the computation on the next coarser mesh. They represent coupling between the two adjacent scales. Since they are computed directly from first principles, there is no modeling involved. However, there is approximation involved in the coupling correlations as the flow field has been computed for only a relatively short time. After the time and spatial averaging operations are applied at a given stage, new computations are performed on the next coarser mesh using a larger time step. The process continues until the coarsest scale needed is reached. New correlations are created for each averaging procedure. The number of averaging operations needed is expected to be problem dependent. The new DMA approach is applied to a relatively low Reynolds number flow in a square duct segment. Time-averaged stream-wise velocity and vorticity contours from the DMA approach appear to be very similar to a full DNS for a similar flow reported in the literature. Expected symmetry for the final results is produced for the DMA method. The results obtained indicate that DMA holds significant potential in being able to accurately compute turbulent flow without modeling for practical engineering applications.

  16. High Order Hybrid Numerical Simulations of Two Dimensional Detonation Waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cai, Wei

    reaction time U1 = t + ux + vy contravariant velocity U2 = t + ux + vy contravariant velocity a0 = local. The detonation waves are assumed to un- dergo an irreversible, unimolecular reaction A B. Several cases T = temperature T = v u U = conservative variables in curvilinear (, ) coordinates 2 #12;u = flow x- velocity u

  17. Velocity oscillations in the outer heliosphere: A signature of pickup ion temperature variability?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richardson, John

    unusual long-wavelength, low- frequency velocity oscillations in the solar wind with periods of $2.3 daysÃ?1 and characteristic length scales that range from 0.5 to 1 AU. The amplitudes of the waves these waves are seen can be attributed to their unusually long wavelength, since the only sources capable

  18. A Bragg grating on LiNbO? waveguide for velocity-matching of electrooptic modulators 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Ruiyu

    2001-01-01

    An experimental study of the fabrication of a surface grating in a TiO? film on a LiNbO? substrate is described. Such a grating can be used to achieve velocity-matching between an optical wave and a RF signal in a slow-wave modulator structure. A 1...

  19. Imaging seismic velocity structure beneath the Iceland hot spot: A finite frequency approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shen, Yang

    Imaging seismic velocity structure beneath the Iceland hot spot: A finite frequency approach Shu and S wave speeds extending from shallow mantle to 400 km depth beneath Iceland. In reality, seismic waves anomaly beneath Iceland and its geodynamic implications. We developed a tomographic method that utilizes

  20. Seismic Velocity Inversion with Genetic Algorithms Sushil J. Louis Qinxue Chen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Louis, Sushil J.

    Seismic Velocity Inversion with Genetic Algorithms Sushil J. Louis Qinxue Chen Genetic Adaptive­surface models from seismic travel­time data. Given a sub­surface model, the physics of wave propagation through refractive media can be used to compute travel times for seismic waves. How­ ever, in practice, we have

  1. P wave velocity variations in the Coso region, California, derived...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    for station elevation, weighted, and back-projected along their ray paths through models defined with layers of blocks. Slowness variations in the surface layer reflect...

  2. Longshore sediment transport rate calculated incorporating wave orbital velocity fluctuations 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, Ernest Ray

    2006-10-30

    Laboratory experiments were performed to study and improve longshore sediment transport rate predictions. Measured total longshore transport in the laboratory was approximately three times greater for plunging breakers ...

  3. Simultaneous use of camera and probe diagnostics to unambiguously identify and study the dynamics of multiple underlying instabilities during the route to plasma turbulence

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thakur, S. C. Tynan, G. R.; Brandt, C.; Cui, L.; Gosselin, J. J.; Light, A.

    2014-11-15

    We use multiple-tip Langmuir probes and fast imaging to unambiguously identify and study the dynamics of underlying instabilities during the controlled route to fully-developed plasma turbulence in a linear magnetized helicon plasma device. Langmuir probes measure radial profiles of electron temperature, plasma density and potential; from which we compute linear growth rates of instabilities, cross-phase between density and potential fluctuations, Reynold's stress, particle flux, vorticity, time-delay estimated velocity, etc. Fast imaging complements the 1D probe measurements by providing temporally and spatially resolved 2D details of plasma structures associated with the instabilities. We find that three radially separated plasma instabilities exist simultaneously. Density gradient driven resistive drift waves propagating in the electron diamagnetic drift direction separate the plasma into an edge region dominated by strong, velocity shear driven Kelvin-Helmholtz instabilities and a central core region which shows coherent Rayleigh-Taylor modes propagating in the ion diamagnetic drift direction. The simultaneous, complementary use of both probes and camera was crucial to identify the instabilities and understand the details of the very rich plasma dynamics.

  4. Fermi velocity renormalization and dynamical gap generation in graphene

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. Popovici; C. S. Fischer; L. von Smekal

    2015-01-12

    We study the renormalization of the Fermi velocity by the long-range Coulomb interactions between the charge carriers in the Dirac-cone approximation for the effective low-energy description of the electronic excitations in graphene at half filling. Solving the coupled system of Dyson-Schwinger equations for the dressing functions in the corresponding fermion propagator with various approximations for the particle-hole polarization we observe that Fermi velocity renormalization effects generally lead to a considerable increase of the critical coupling for dynamical gap generation and charge-density wave formation at the semimetal-insulator transition.

  5. HIGH-REDSHIFT STAR-FORMING GALAXIES: ANGULAR MOMENTUM AND BARYON FRACTION, TURBULENT PRESSURE EFFECTS, AND THE ORIGIN OF TURBULENCE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burkert, A.; Naab, T. [University Observatory Munich (USM), Scheinerstrasse 1, 81679 Munich (Germany); Genzel, R.; Bouche, N.; Cresci, G.; Khochfar, S.; Schreiber, N. Foerster; Tacconi, L.; Hicks, E.; Lutz, D.; Davies, R.; Buschkamp, P.; Genel, S. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer extraterrestrische Physik (MPE), Giessenbachstr. 1, 85748 Garching (Germany); Sommer-Larsen, J. [Dark Cosmology Centre, Niels Bohr Institute, University of Copenhagen, Juliane Marie Vej 30, 2100 Copenhagen (Denmark); Sternberg, A. [School of Physics and Astronomy, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv 69978 (Israel); Shapiro, K., E-mail: burkert@usm.uni-muenchen.d, E-mail: genzel@mpe.mpg.d [Department of Astronomy, Campbell Hall, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)

    2010-12-20

    The structure of a sample of high-redshift (z {approx} 2), rotating galaxies with high star formation rates and turbulent gas velocities of {sigma} {approx} 40-80 km s{sup -1} is investigated. Fitting the observed disk rotational velocities and radii with a Mo et al. (MMW) model requires unusually large disk spin parameters {lambda}{sub d}>0.1 and disk-to-dark halo mass fractions of m{sub d} {approx} 0.2, close to the cosmic baryon fraction. The galaxies segregate into dispersion-dominated systems with 1 {<=} v{sub max}/{sigma} {<=} 3, maximum rotational velocities v{sub max{<=}} 200 km s{sup -1}, and disk half-light radii r{sub 1/2{approx}} 1-3 kpc, and rotation-dominated systems with v{sub max}> 200 km s{sup -1}, v{sub max}/{sigma}>3, and r{sub 1/2{approx}} 4-8 kpc. For the dispersion-dominated sample, radial pressure gradients partly compensate the gravitational force, reducing the rotational velocities. Including this pressure effect in the MMW model, dispersion-dominated galaxies can be fitted well with spin parameters of {lambda}{sub d} = 0.03-0.05 for high disk mass fractions of m{sub d} {approx} 0.2 and with {lambda}{sub d} = 0.01-0.03 for m{sub d} {approx} 0.05. These values are in good agreement with cosmological expectations. For the rotation-dominated sample, however, pressure effects are small and better agreement with theoretically expected disk spin parameters can only be achieved if the dark halo mass contribution in the visible disk regime (2-3 x r{sub 1/2}) is smaller than predicted by the MMW model. We argue that these galaxies can still be embedded in standard cold dark matter halos if the halos do not contract adiabatically in response to disk formation. In this case, the data favor models with small disk mass fractions of m{sub d} = 0.05 and disk spin parameters of {lambda}{sub d} {approx} 0.035. It is shown that the observed high turbulent gas motions of the galaxies are consistent with a Toomre instability parameter Q = 1 which is equal to the critical value, expected for gravitational disk instability to be the major driver of turbulence. The dominant energy source of turbulence is then the potential energy of the gas in the disk.

  6. Dissipation of parallel and oblique Alfv\\'en-cyclotron waves: implications for minor ion heating in the solar wind

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maneva, Y G; Moya, Pablo S; Wicks, R; Poedts, S

    2015-01-01

    We perform 2.5D hybrid simulations with massless fluid electrons and kinetic particle-in-cell ions to study the temporal evolution of ion temperatures, temperature anisotropies and velocity distribution functions in relation to the dissipation and turbulent evolution of a broad-band spectrum of parallel and obliquely propagating Alfv\\'en-cyclotron waves. The purpose of this paper is to study the relative role of parallel versus oblique Alfv\\'en-cyclotron waves in the observed heating and acceleration of minor ions in the fast solar wind. We consider collisionless homogeneous multi-species plasma, consisting of isothermal electrons, isotropic protons and a minor component of drifting $\\alpha$ particles in a finite-$\\beta$ fast stream near the Earth. The kinetic ions are modeled by initially isotropic Maxwellian velocity distribution functions, which develop non-thermal features and temperature anisotropies when a broad-band spectrum of low-frequency non-resonant, $\\omega \\leq 0.34 \\Omega_p$, Alfv\\'en-cyclotron...

  7. Fast Computation Algorithm for Discrete Resonances among Gravity Waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Elena Kartashova

    2006-05-25

    Traditionally resonant interactions among short waves, with large real wave-numbers, were described statistically and only a small domain in spectral space with integer wave-numbers, discrete resonances, had to be studied separately in resonators. Numerical simulations of the last few years showed unambiguously the existence of some discrete effects in the short-waves part of the wave spectrum. Newly presented model of laminated turbulence explains theoretically appearance of these effects thus putting a novel problem - construction of fast algorithms for computation of solutions of resonance conditions with integer wave-numbers of order $10^3$ and more. Example of such an algorithm for 4-waves interactions of gravity waves is given. Its generalization on the different types of waves is briefly discussed.

  8. Geometric phases of water waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Francesco Fedele

    2014-08-08

    Recently, Banner et al. (2014) highlighted a new fundamental property of open ocean wave groups, the so-called crest slowdown. For linear narrowband waves, this is related to the geometric and dynamical phase velocities $U_d$ and $U_g$ associated with the parallel transport through the principal fiber bundle of the wave motion with $\\mathit{U}(1)$ symmetry. The theoretical predictions are shown to be in fair agreement with ocean field observations, from which the average crest speed $c=U_d+U_g$ with $c/U_d\\approx0.8$ and $U_{g}/U_d\\approx-0.2$.

  9. Fundamental Statistical Descriptions of Plasma Turbulence in Magnetic Fields

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    John A. Krommes

    2001-02-16

    A pedagogical review of the historical development and current status (as of early 2000) of systematic statistical theories of plasma turbulence is undertaken. Emphasis is on conceptual foundations and methodology, not practical applications. Particular attention is paid to equations and formalism appropriate to strongly magnetized, fully ionized plasmas. Extensive reference to the literature on neutral-fluid turbulence is made, but the unique properties and problems of plasmas are emphasized throughout. Discussions are given of quasilinear theory, weak-turbulence theory, resonance-broadening theory, and the clump algorithm. Those are developed independently, then shown to be special cases of the direct-interaction approximation (DIA), which provides a central focus for the article. Various methods of renormalized perturbation theory are described, then unified with the aid of the generating-functional formalism of Martin, Siggia, and Rose. A general expression for the renormalized dielectric function is deduced and discussed in detail. Modern approaches such as decimation and PDF methods are described. Derivations of DIA-based Markovian closures are discussed. The eddy-damped quasinormal Markovian closure is shown to be nonrealizable in the presence of waves, and a new realizable Markovian closure is presented. The test-field model and a realizable modification thereof are also summarized. Numerical solutions of various closures for some plasma-physics paradigms are reviewed. The variational approach to bounds on transport is developed. Miscellaneous topics include Onsager symmetries for turbulence, the interpretation of entropy balances for both kinetic and fluid descriptions, self-organized criticality, statistical interactions between disparate scales, and the roles of both mean and random shear. Appendices are provided on Fourier transform conventions, dimensional and scaling analysis, the derivations of nonlinear gyrokinetic and gyrofluid equations, stochasticity criteria for quasilinear theory, formal aspects of resonance-broadening theory, Novikov's theorem, the treatment of weak inhomogeneity, the derivation of the Vlasov weak-turbulence wave kinetic equation from a fully renormalized description, some features of a code for solving the direct-interaction approximation and related Markovian closures, the details of the solution of the EDQNM closure for a solvable three-wave model, and the notation used in the article.

  10. The various manifestations of collisionless dissipation in wave propagation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Benisti, Didier; Morice, Olivier; Gremillet, Laurent

    2012-06-15

    The propagation of an electrostatic wave packet inside a collisionless and initially Maxwellian plasma is always dissipative because of the irreversible acceleration of the electrons by the wave. Then, in the linear regime, the wave packet is Landau damped, so that in the reference frame moving at the group velocity, the wave amplitude decays exponentially with time. In the nonlinear regime, once phase mixing has occurred and when the electron motion is nearly adiabatic, the damping rate is strongly reduced compared to the Landau one, so that the wave amplitude remains nearly constant along the characteristics. Yet, we show here that the electrons are still globally accelerated by the wave packet, and in one dimension, this leads to a non local amplitude dependence of the group velocity. As a result, a freely propagating wave packet would shrink, and therefore, so would its total energy. In more than one dimension, not only does the magnitude of the group velocity nonlinearly vary, but also its direction. In the weakly nonlinear regime, when the collisionless damping rate is still significant compared to its linear value, the group velocity is directed towards the outside of the wave packet and tends to increase its transverse extent, while the opposite is true once the wave is essentially undamped. The impact of the nonlinear variation of the group velocity on the transverse size of the wave packet is quantified, and compared to that induced by the self-focussing due to wave front bowing.

  11. Anomalous spectral laws in differential models of turbulence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Simon Thalabard; Sergey Nazarenko; Sebastien Galtier; Sergey Medvedev

    2015-05-27

    Differential models for hydrodynamic, passive-scalar and wave turbulence given by nonlinear first- and second-order evolution equations for the energy spectrum in the $k$-space were analysed. Both types of models predict formation an anomalous transient power-law spectra. The second-order models were analysed in terms of self-similar solutions of the second kind, and a phenomenological formula for the anomalous spectrum exponent was constructed using numerics for a broad range of parameters covering all known physical examples. The first-order models were examined analytically, including finding an analytical prediction for the anomalous exponent of the transient spectrum and description of formation of the Kolmogorov-type spectrum as a reflection wave from the dissipative scale back into the inertial range. The latter behaviour was linked to pre-shock/shock singularities similar to the ones arising in the Burgers equation. Existence of the transient anomalous scaling and the reflection-wave scenario are argued to be a robust feature common to the finite-capacity turbulence systems. The anomalous exponent is independent of the initial conditions but varies for for different models of the same physical system.

  12. Acoustic Kappa-Density Fluctuation Waves in Suprathermal Kappa Function Fluids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michael R. Collier; Aaron Roberts; Adolfo Vinas

    2007-10-20

    We describe a new wave mode similar to the acoustic wave in which both density and velocity fluctuate. Unlike the acoustic wave in which the underlying distribution is Maxwellian, this new wave mode occurs when the underlying distribution is a suprathermal kappa function and involves fluctuations in the power law index, kappa. This wave mode always propagates faster than the acoustic wave with an equivalent effective temperature and becomes the acoustic wave in the Maxwellian limit as kappa goes to infinity.

  13. Effect of Turbulence Fluctuations on Surface Heating Rate in Hypersonic Turbulent

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martín, Pino

    Effect of Turbulence Fluctuations on Surface Heating Rate in Hypersonic Turbulent Boundary Layers the effect of turbulence fluctuations on surface heating rate by conducting direct numerical simulations (DNS subtle influence on the mean heating rate. We also find that the effect of turbulence

  14. Effect of Finite-rate Chemical Reactions on Turbulence in Hypersonic Turbulent Boundary Layers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martín, Pino

    Effect of Finite-rate Chemical Reactions on Turbulence in Hypersonic Turbulent Boundary Layers Lian reaction. The influence of chemical reactions on temperature fluctuation variance, Reynolds stresses that the recombination reaction enhances turbulence, while the dissociation reaction damps turbulence. Chemical reactions

  15. Active skin for turbulent drag reduction 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mani, Raghavendran

    2002-01-01

    capitalizes on recent advances in active turbulent drag reduction and active material based actuation to develop an active or "smart" skin for turbulent drag reduction in realistic flight conditions. The skin operation principle is based on computational...

  16. Transport relaxation time and length scales in turbulent suspensions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. Claudin; F. Charru; B. Andreotti

    2010-11-03

    We show that in a turbulent flow transporting suspended sediment, the unsaturated sediment flux $q(x,t)$ can be described by a first-order relaxation equation. From a mode analysis of the advection-diffusion equation for the particle concentration, the relaxation length and time scales of the dominant mode are shown to be the deposition length $H U/V_{\\rm fall}$ and deposition time $H/V_{\\rm fall}$, where $H$ is the flow depth, $U$ the mean flow velocity and $V_{\\rm fall}$ the sediment settling velocity. This result is expected to be particularly relevant for the case of sediment transport in slowly varying flows, where the flux is never far from saturation. Predictions are shown to be in quantitative agreement with flume experiments, for both net erosion and net deposition situations.

  17. Predicted Impacts of Proton Temperature Anisotropy on Solar Wind Turbulence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Klein, Kristopher G

    2015-01-01

    Particle velocity distributions measured in the weakly collisional solar wind are frequently found to be non-Maxwellian, but how these non-Maxwellian distributions impact the physics of plasma turbulence in the solar wind remains unanswered. Using numerical solutions of the linear dispersion relation for a collisionless plasma with a bi-Maxwellian proton velocity distribution, we present a unified framework for the four proton temperature anisotropy instabilities, identifying the associated stable eigenmodes, highlighting the unstable region of wavevector space, and presenting the properties of the growing eigenfunctions. Based on physical intuition gained from this framework, we address how the proton temperature anisotropy impacts the nonlinear dynamics of the \\Alfvenic fluctuations underlying the dominant cascade of energy from large to small scales and how the fluctuations driven by proton temperature anisotropy instabilities interact nonlinearly with each other and with the fluctuations of the large-scal...

  18. Velocity and attenuation in partially molten rocks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mavko, G.M.

    1980-10-10

    Interpretation of seismic velocity and attenuation in partially molten rocks has been limited, with few exceptions, to models that assume the melt to be distributed either as spheres or as thin films. However, other melt phase geometries, such as interconnected tubes along grain edges, might equally well account for seismic observations if there is a much larger fraction of melt. Seismic velocity and attenuation are estimated in rocks in which the melt phase has the tube geometry, and the results are compared with results expected for the more familiar film model under similar conditions. For a given melt fraction, tubes are found to give moduli intermediate between moduli for rigid spherical inclusions and compliant films. For example, in polycrystalline olivine at 20 kbar the model predicts a decrease in V/sub s/ of 10% and a decrease in V/sub p/ of 5% at 0.05 melt fraction, without considering inelastic relaxation. Shear attenuation appears to be dominated by viscous flow of melt between the tubes and/or films. For olivine the tube model predicts the increment of relaxation due to melt, ..delta mu../..mu.., to be 0.01 at 0.05 melt fraction. Relaxation of the bulk modulus is dominated by flow between melt pockets of different shape, heat flow, and solid-melt phase change. If melt is present, considerable bulk attenuation is expected, although the relaxation may be observable only at long periods, outside the seismic body wave band.

  19. Taylor-Couette turbulence at radius ratio $\\eta=0.5$: scaling, flow structures and plumes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van der Veen, Roeland C A; Merbold, Sebastian; Harlander, Uwe; Egbers, Christoph; Lohse, Detlef; Sun, Chao

    2015-01-01

    Using high-resolution particle image velocimetry we measure velocity profiles, the wind Reynolds number and characteristics of turbulent plumes in Taylor-Couette flow for a radius ratio of 0.5 and Taylor number of up to $6.2\\cdot10^9$. The extracted angular velocity profiles follow a log-law more closely than the azimuthal velocity profiles due to the strong curvature of this $\\eta=0.5$ setup. The scaling of the wind Reynolds number with the Taylor number agrees with the theoretically predicted 3/7-scaling for the classical turbulent regime, which is much more pronounced than for the well-explored $\\eta=0.71$ case, for which the ultimate regime sets in at much lower Ta. By measuring at varying axial positions, roll structures are found for counter-rotation while no clear coherent structures are seen for pure inner cylinder rotation. In addition, turbulent plumes coming from the inner and outer cylinder are investigated. For pure inner cylinder rotation, the plumes in the radial velocity move away from the inn...

  20. Structure of turbulent hydrogen jet diffusion flames with or without swirl

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Takahashi, Fumiaki; Vangsness, M.D.; Durbin, M.D.; Schmoll, W.J.

    1995-12-31

    The aerodynamic and thermal structure of double-concentric turbulent hydrogen jet diffusion flames with or without swirl has been investigated using three-component laser-Doppler velocimetry (LDV) and coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy. The LDV data were conditionally sampled upon the origin of the fluid (jet, annulus, or external) to avoid the velocity-bias problem and to gain more detailed information on the turbulent structure. As the mean jet velocity was increased, the turbulent flame zone shifted inward and the thermal layer became thinner, whereas swirl created a radial velocity even at the annulus air exit, thereby shifting the flame zone outward and broadening the thermal layer. The probability-density functions (pdf) of velocity components,m their 21 moments (up to fourth order), temperature pdf, mean, and root-mean-square fluctuation temperature were determined at numerous radial locations at seven axial heights in the near field (<26.5 jet diameters). The data can be used to validate computational models.

  1. Anisotropic Formation of Magnetized Cores in Turbulent Clouds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Che-Yu

    2015-01-01

    In giant molecular clouds (GMCs), shocks driven by converging turbulent flows create high-density, strongly-magnetized regions that are locally sheetlike. In previous work, we showed that within these layers, dense filaments and embedded self-gravitating cores form by gathering material along the magnetic field lines. Here, we extend the parameter space of our three-dimensional, turbulent MHD core formation simulations. We confirm the anisotropic core formation model we previously proposed, and quantify the dependence of median core properties on the pre-shock inflow velocity and upstream magnetic field strength. Our results suggest that bound core properties are set by the total dynamic pressure (dominated by large-scale turbulence) and thermal sound speed c_s in GMCs, independent of magnetic field strength. For models with Mach number between 5 and 20, the median core masses and radii are comparable to the critical Bonnor-Ebert mass and radius defined using the dynamic pressure for P_ext. Our results corres...

  2. Magnetohydrodynamic turbulent cascade of coronal loop magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rappazzo, A. F. [Instituto de Astrofisica de Canarias, E-38200 La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain); Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California 91109 (United States); Bartol Research Institute, Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Delaware, Delaware 19716 (United States); Velli, M. [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California 91109 (United States)

    2011-06-15

    The Parker model for coronal heating is investigated through a high resolution simulation. An inertial range is resolved where fluctuating magnetic energy E{sub M}(k{sub perpendicular}){proportional_to}k{sub perpendicular}{sup -2.7} exceeds kinetic energy E{sub K}(k{sub perpendicular}){proportional_to}k{sub perpendicular}{sup -0.6}. Increments scale as {delta}b{sub l}{approx_equal}l{sup -0.85}and {delta}u{sub l}{approx_equal}l{sup +0.2} with velocity increasing at small scales, indicating that magnetic reconnection plays a prime role in this turbulent system. We show that spectral energy transport is akin to standard magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence even for a system of reconnecting current sheets sustained by the boundary. In this new MHD turbulent cascade, kinetic energy flows are negligible while cross-field flows are enhanced, and through a series of ''reflections'' between the two fields, cascade more than half of the total spectral energy flow.

  3. Helical mode interactions and spectral transfer processes in magnetohydrodynamic turbulence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moritz F. Linkmann; Arjun Berera; Mairi E. McKay; Julia Jäger

    2015-08-22

    Spectral transfer processes in magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence are investigated analytically by decomposition of the velocity and magnetic fields in Fourier space into helical modes. Steady solutions of the dynamical system which governs the evolution of the helical modes are determined, and a stability analysis of these solutions is carried out. The interpretation of the analysis is that unstable solutions lead to energy transfer between the interacting modes while stable solutions do not. From this, a dependence of possible interscale energy and helicity transfers on the helicities of the interacting modes is derived. As expected from the inverse cascade of magnetic helicity in 3D MHD turbulence, mode interactions with like helicities lead to transfer of energy and magnetic helicity to smaller wavenumbers. However, some interactions of modes with unlike helicities also contribute to an inverse energy transfer. As such, an inverse energy cascade for nonhelical magnetic fields is shown to be possible. Furthermore, it is found that high values of the cross-helicity may have an asymmetric effect on forward and reverse transfer of energy, where forward transfer is more quenched in regions of high cross-helicity than reverse transfer. This conforms with recent observations of solar wind turbulence. For specific helical interactions the relation to dynamo action is established.

  4. Mixing at the external boundary of a submerged turbulent jet

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Eidelman; T. Elperin; N. Kleeorin; G. Hazak; I. Rogachevskii; O. Sadot; I. Sapir-Katiraie

    2009-05-11

    We study experimentally and theoretically mixing at the external boundary of a submerged turbulent jet. In the experimental study we use Particle Image Velocimetry and an Image Processing Technique based on the analysis of the intensity of the Mie scattering to determine the spatial distribution of tracer particles. An air jet is seeded with the incense smoke particles which are characterized by large Schmidt number and small Stokes number. We determine the spatial distributions of the jet fluid characterized by a high concentration of the particles and of the ambient fluid characterized by a low concentration of the tracer particles. In the data analysis we use two approaches, whereby one approach is based on the measured phase function for the study of the mixed state of two fluids. The other approach is based on the analysis of the two-point second-order correlation function of the particle number density fluctuations generated by tangling of the gradient of the mean particle number density by the turbulent velocity field. This gradient is formed at the external boundary of a submerged turbulent jet. We demonstrate that PDF of the phase function of a jet fluid penetrating into an external flow and the two-point second-order correlation function of the particle number density do not have universal scaling and cannot be described by a power-law function. The theoretical predictions made in this study are in a qualitative agreement with the obtained experimental results.

  5. Helical mode interactions and spectral transfer processes in magnetohydrodynamic turbulence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moritz F. Linkmann; Arjun Berera; Mairi E. McKay; Julia Jäger

    2015-09-01

    Spectral transfer processes in magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence are investigated analytically by decomposition of the velocity and magnetic fields in Fourier space into helical modes. Steady solutions of the dynamical system which governs the evolution of the helical modes are determined, and a stability analysis of these solutions is carried out. The interpretation of the analysis is that unstable solutions lead to energy transfer between the interacting modes while stable solutions do not. From this, a dependence of possible interscale energy and helicity transfers on the helicities of the interacting modes is derived. As expected from the inverse cascade of magnetic helicity in 3D MHD turbulence, mode interactions with like helicities lead to transfer of energy and magnetic helicity to smaller wavenumbers. However, some interactions of modes with unlike helicities also contribute to an inverse energy transfer. As such, an inverse energy cascade for nonhelical magnetic fields is shown to be possible. Furthermore, it is found that high values of the cross-helicity may have an asymmetric effect on forward and reverse transfer of energy, where forward transfer is more quenched in regions of high cross-helicity than reverse transfer. This conforms with recent observations of solar wind turbulence. For specific helical interactions the relation to dynamo action is established.

  6. MACCS2/Deposition Velocity Workshop

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    The Department of Energy’s Chief of Nuclear Safety hosted a MACCS2/Deposition Velocity Workshop on June 5-6, 2012, in Germantown, Maryland. Approximately 70 participants attended. The purpose of...

  7. Trapping and Frequency Variability in Electron Acoustic Waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at San Diego, University of

    Trapping and Frequency Variability in Electron Acoustic Waves C.F. Driscoll, F. Anderegg, D 92093 USA Abstract. Electron Acoustic Waves (EAWs) with a phase velocity less than twice the plasma. Keywords: add some here PACS: 52.27.Jt, 52.35.Fp, 52.35.Sb Electron Acoustic Waves (EAWs) are the low

  8. Diffusing acoustic wave spectroscopy M. L. Cowan,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Page, John

    Diffusing acoustic wave spectroscopy M. L. Cowan,1 I. P. Jones,1, * J. H. Page,1,2, and D. A. Weitz called diffusing acoustic wave spec- troscopy DAWS . In this technique, the motion of the scatterers e the particle velocity correlation function. Potential appli- cations of diffusing acoustic wave spectroscopy

  9. Development of an acoustic wave sensor for biological

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Turova, Varvara

    -Jacobi equation can be rewritten as or Application to the propagation of surface acoustic waves Velocity contour . Comparison with the eikonal equation yields the condition Acoustic waves in anisotropic crystals obeyMotivation Development of an acoustic wave sensor for biological and medical applications

  10. Inwardly Rotating Spiral Waves in a Reaction-Diffusion System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Epstein, Irving R.

    in an autocatalytic reaction. The local curvature near the open wave ends is high, making the velocity of the endInwardly Rotating Spiral Waves in a Reaction-Diffusion System Vladimir K. Vanag and Irving R in the spatially extended Belousov-Zhabotinsky (BZ) reaction. Since then, rotating spirals and target waves have

  11. Development of Interfacial Structure in a Confined Air-Water Cap-Turbulent and Churn-Turbulent Flow

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xiaodong Sun; Seungjin Kim; Ling Cheng; Mamoru Ishii [Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907 (United States); Beus, Stephen G. [Bechtel Bettis, Inc., Bettis Atomic Power Laboratory, Post Office Box 79, West Mifflin, PA 15122-0079 (United States)

    2002-07-01

    The objective of the present work is to study and model the interfacial structure development of air-water two-phase flow in a confined test section. Experiments of a total of 9 flow conditions in cap-turbulent and churn-turbulent flow regimes are carried out in a vertical air-water upward two-phase flow experimental loop with a test section of 200-mm in width and 10-mm in gap. Miniaturized four-sensor conductivity probes are used to measure local two-phase parameters at three different elevations for each flow condition. The bubbles captured by the probes are categorized into two groups in view of the two-group interfacial area transport equation, i.e., spherical/distorted bubbles as Group 1 and cap/churn-turbulent bubbles as Group 2. The acquired parameters are time-averaged local void fraction, interfacial velocity, bubble number frequency, interfacial area concentration, and bubble Sauter mean diameter for both groups of bubbles. Also, the line-averaged and area-averaged data are presented and discussed. The comparisons of these parameters at different elevations demonstrate the development of interfacial structure along the flow direction due to bubble interactions. (authors)

  12. Development of Interfacial Structure in a Confined Air-Water Cap-Turbulent and Churn-Turbulent Flow

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    X. Sun; S. Kim; L. Cheng; M. Ishii; S.G. Beus

    2001-10-31

    The objective of the present work is to study and model the interfacial structure development of air-water two-phase flow in a confined test section. Experiments of a total of 9 flow conditions in a cap-turbulent and churn-turbulent flow regimes are carried out in a vertical air-water upward two-phase flow experimental loop with a test section of 20-cm in width and 1-cm in gap. The miniaturized four-sensor conductivity probes are used to measure local two-phase parameters at three different elevations for each flow condition. The bubbles captured by the probes are categorized into two groups in view of the two-group interfacial area transport equation, i.e., spherical/distorted bubbles as Group 1 and cap/churn-turbulent bubbles as Group 2. The acquired parameters are time-averaged local void fraction, interfacial velocity, bubble number frequency, interfacial area concentration, and bubble Sauter mean diameter for both groups of bubbles. Also, the line-averaged and area-averaged data are presented and discussed. The comparisons of these parameters at different elevations demonstrate the development of interfacial structure along the flow direction due to bubble interactions.

  13. The effects of a magnetic field on planetary migration in laminar and turbulent discs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Comins, M L; Koldoba, A V; Ustyugova, G V; Lovelace, R V E

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the migration of low-mass planets ($5 M_{\\oplus}$ and $20 M_{\\oplus}$) in accretion discs threaded with a magnetic field using 2D MHD code in polar coordinates. We observed that, in the case of a strong azimuthal magnetic field where the plasma parameter is $\\beta\\sim 1-2$, density waves at the magnetic resonances exert a positive torque on the planet and may slow down or reverse its migration. However, when the magnetic field is weaker (i.e., the plasma parameter $\\beta$ is relatively large), then non-axisymmetric density waves excited by the planet lead to growth of the radial component of the field and, subsequently, to development of the magneto-rotational instability, such that the disc becomes turbulent. Migration in a turbulent disc is stochastic, and the migration direction may change as such. To understand migration in a turbulent disc, both the interaction between a planet and individual turbulent cells, as well as the interaction between a planet and ordered density waves, have been ...

  14. Turbulence patterns and neutrino flavor transitions in high-resolution supernova models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Borriello, Enrico; Mirizzi, Alessandro [II. Institut für Theoretische Physik, Universität Hamburg, Luruper Chaussee 149, D-22761 Hamburg (Germany); Chakraborty, Sovan [Max-Planck-Institut für Physik (Werner-Heisenberg-Institut), Föhringer Ring 6, D-80805 München (Germany); Janka, Hans-Thomas [Max-Planck-Institut für Astrophysik, Karl-Schwarzschild-Str. 1, 85748 Garching (Germany); Lisi, Eligio, E-mail: enrico.borriello@desy.de, E-mail: sovan@mppmu.mpg.de, E-mail: thj@mpa-garching.mpg.de, E-mail: eligio.lisi@ba.infn.it, E-mail: alessandro.mirizzi@desy.de [INFN—Sezione di Bari, Via Orabona 4, 70126 Bari (Italy)

    2014-11-01

    During the shock-wave propagation in a core-collapse supernova (SN), matter turbulence may affect neutrino flavor conversion probabilities. Such effects have been usually studied by adding parametrized small-scale random fluctuations (with arbitrary amplitude) on top of coarse, spherically symmetric matter density profiles. Recently, however, two-dimensional (2D) SN models have reached a space resolution high enough to directly trace anisotropic density profiles, down to scales smaller than the typical neutrino oscillation length. In this context, we analyze the statistical properties of a large set of SN matter density profiles obtained in a high-resolution 2D simulation, focusing on a post-bounce time (2 s) suited to study shock-wave effects on neutrino propagation on scales as small as O(100) km and possibly below. We clearly find the imprint of a broken (Kolmogorov-Kraichnan) power-law structure, as generically expected in 2D turbulence spectra. We then compute the flavor evolution of SN neutrinos along representative realizations of the turbulent matter density profiles, and observe no or modest damping of the neutrino crossing probabilities on their way through the shock wave. In order to check the effect of possibly unresolved fluctuations at scales below O(100) km, we also apply a randomization procedure anchored to the power spectrum calculated from the simulation, and find consistent results within ± 1? fluctuations. These results show the importance of anchoring turbulence effects on SN neutrinos to realistic, fine-grained SN models.

  15. Direct Evidence of the Transition from Weak to Strong MHD Turbulence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Romain Meyrand; Sebastien Galtier; Khurom H. Kiyani

    2015-09-21

    One of the most important predictions in magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) is that in the presence of a uniform magnetic field $\\textbf{b}_{0}$ a transition from weak to strong wave turbulence should occur when going from large to small perpendicular scales. This transition is believed to be a universal property of several anisotropic turbulent systems. We present for the first time direct evidence of such a transition thanks to a three-dimensional direct numerical simulation of incompressible balanced MHD turbulence with a grid resolution of $3072^2 \\times 256$. From large to small-scales, the change of regime is characterized by i) a change of slope in the energy spectrum going from approximately $-2$ to $-3/2$; ii) an increase of the ratio between the wave and nonlinear times, with a critical ratio of $\\chi_{c}\\sim0.35$; iii) an absence followed by a dramatic increase of the communication between Alfv\\'en modes; and iv) a modification of the iso-contours of energy revealing a transition from a purely perpendicular cascade to a cascade compatible with the critical balance type phenomenology. All these changes happen at approximately the same transition scale and therefore can be seen as manifest signatures of the transition from weak to strong wave turbulence.

  16. Magnetic helicity signature produced by cross-field 2D turbulence

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Markovskii, S. A.; Vasquez, Bernard J.

    2013-06-13

    Hybrid numerical simulations of freely decaying 2D turbulence are presented. The background magnetic field is perpendicular to the simulation plane, which eliminates linear kinetic Alfven waves from the system. The normalized magnetic helicity of the initial large-scale fluctuations is zero, while the normalized cross-helicity is not. As the turbulence evolves, it develops nonzero magnetic helicity at smaller scales, in the proton kinetic range. In the quasi-steady state of evolution, the magnetic helicity spectrum has a peak consistent with the solar wind observations.

  17. Internal wave and boundary current generation by tidal flow over topography Amadeus Dettner, Harry L. Swinney, and M. S. Paoletti

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Texas at Austin. University of

    Internal wave and boundary current generation by tidal flow over topography Amadeus Dettner, Harry turbulence and small-scale internal waves above deep-ocean topography Phys. Fluids 25, 106604 (2013); 10.1063/1.4826888 Topographically induced internal solitary waves in a pycnocline: Secondary generation and selection criteria Phys

  18. Multi-Scale Gradient Expansion of the Turbulent Stress Tensor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gregory L. Eyink

    2005-12-10

    We develop an expansion of the turbulent stress tensor into a double series of contributions from different scales of motion and different orders of space-derivatives of velocity, a Multi-Scale Gradient (MSG) expansion. The expansion is proved to converge to the exact stress, as a consequence of the locality of cascade both in scale and in space. Simple estimates show, however, that the convergence rate may be slow for the expansion in spatial gradients of very small scales. Therefore, we develop an approximate expansion, based upon an assumption that similar or `coherent' contributions to turbulent stress are obtained from disjoint subgrid regions. This Coherent-Subregions Approximation (CSA) yields an MSG expansion that can be proved to converge rapidly at all scales and is hopefully still reasonably accurate. As an application, we consider the cascades of energy and helicity in three-dimensional turbulence. To first order in velocity-gradients, the stress has three contributions: a tensile stress along principal directions of strain, a contractile stress along vortex lines, and a shear stress proportional to `skew-strain.' While vortex-stretching plays the major role in energy cascade, there is a second, less scale-local contribution from `skew-strain'. For helicity cascade the situation is reversed, and it arises scale-locally from `skew-strain' while the stress along vortex-lines gives a secondary, less scale-local contribution. These conclusions are illustrated with simple exact solutions of 3D Euler equations. In the first, energy cascade occurs by Taylor's mechanism of stretching and spin-up of small-scale vortices due to large-scale strain. In the second, helicity cascade occurs by `twisting' of small-scale vortex filaments due to a large-scale screw.

  19. Evolution and lifetimes of flow topology in a turbulent boundary layer G. E. Elsinga and I. Marusic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marusic, Ivan

    Evolution and lifetimes of flow topology in a turbulent boundary layer G. E. Elsinga and I. Marusic of Physics. Related Articles Lagrangian evolution of the invariants of the velocity gradient tensor subject to AIP license or copyright; see http://pof.aip.org/about/rights_and_permissions #12;Evolution

  20. Experimental Analysis of the Effect of Vibrational Non-Equilibrium on the Decay of Grid-Generated Turbulence 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fuller, T. J.

    2010-10-12

    fundamental decaying mesh turbulent flow field with passive grids. Vibrational non-equilibrium was achieved via a capacitively-coupled radio-frequency (RF) plasma discharge which required an operating pressure of 30 Torr. The flow velocity was 30 m/s. Data...