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1

Combined Heat and Power Plant Steam Turbine  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Combined Heat and Power Plant Steam Turbine Steam Turbine Chiller Campus Heat Load Steam (recovered waste heat) Gas Turbine University Substation High Pressure Natural Gas Campus Electric Load Southern Generator Heat Recovery Alternative Uses: 1. Campus heating load 2. Steam turbine chiller to campus cooling

Rose, Michael R.

2

Combined gas turbine-Rankine turbine power plant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A combined gas turbine-Rankine cycle powerplant with improved part load efficiency is disclosed. The powerplant has a gas turbine with an organic fluid Rankine bottoming cycle which features an inter-cycle regenerator acting between the superheated vapor leaving the Rankine turbine and the compressor inlet air. The regenerator is used selectively as engine power level is reduced below maximum rated power.

Earnest, E.R.

1981-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

3

How Gas Turbine Power Plants Work | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

How Gas Turbine Power Plants Work How Gas Turbine Power Plants Work How Gas Turbine Power Plants Work The combustion (gas) turbines being installed in many of today's natural-gas-fueled power plants are complex machines, but they basically involve three main sections: The compressor, which draws air into the engine, pressurizes it, and feeds it to the combustion chamber at speeds of hundreds of miles per hour. The combustion system, typically made up of a ring of fuel injectors that inject a steady stream of fuel into combustion chambers where it mixes with the air. The mixture is burned at temperatures of more than 2000 degrees F. The combustion produces a high temperature, high pressure gas stream that enters and expands through the turbine section. The turbine is an intricate array of alternate stationary and

4

An Evaluation of Gas Turbines for APFBC Power Plants  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

EVALUATION OF GAS TURBINES FOR APFBC POWER PLANTS EVALUATION OF GAS TURBINES FOR APFBC POWER PLANTS Donald L. Bonk U.S. DOE National Energy Technology Laboratory Morgantown, West Virginia eMail: dbonk@netl.doe.gov phone: (304) 285-4889 Richard E. Weinstein, P.E. Parsons Infrastructure & Technology Group Inc. Reading, Pennsylvania eMail: richard.e.weinstein@parsons.com phone: (610) 855-2699 Abstract This paper describes a concept screening evaluation of gas turbines from several manufacturers that assessed the merits of their respective gas turbines for advanced circulating pressurized fluidized bed combustion combined cycle (APFBC) applications. The following gas turbines were evaluated for the modifications expected for APFBC service: 2 x Rolls-Royce Industrial Trent aeroderivative gas turbine configurations; a 3 x Pratt & Whitney Turbo Power FT8 Twin-

5

Testing of power-generating gas-turbine plants at Russian electric power stations  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper cites results of thermal testing of various types and designs of power-generating gas-turbine plants (GTP), which have been placed in service at electric-power stations in Russia in recent years. Therm...

G. G. Ol’khovskii; A. V. Ageev; S. V. Malakhov…

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Dynamic Models for Wind Turbines and Wind Power Plants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The primary objective of this report was to develop universal manufacturer-independent wind turbine and wind power plant models that can be shared, used, and improved without any restrictions by project developers, manufacturers, and engineers. Manufacturer-specific models of wind turbines are favored for use in wind power interconnection studies. While they are detailed and accurate, their usages are limited to the terms of the non-disclosure agreement, thus stifling model sharing. The primary objective of the work proposed is to develop universal manufacturer-independent wind power plant models that can be shared, used, and improved without any restrictions by project developers, manufacturers, and engineers. Each of these models includes representations of general turbine aerodynamics, the mechanical drive-train, and the electrical characteristics of the generator and converter, as well as the control systems typically used. To determine how realistic model performance is, the performance of one of the models (doubly-fed induction generator model) has been validated using real-world wind power plant data. This work also documents selected applications of these models.

Singh, M.; Santoso, S.

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Novel integrated gas turbine solar cogeneration power plant  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Concentrating solar cogeneration power plants (CSCPP) may provide a key solution for the pressing freshwater deficits in the Middle East and North Africa (MENA) region and could be used in the future for export electricity to Europe. From this standpoint the current study was undertaken to include proposed schemes of CSCPP, that would fully exploit the potential of hybrid reverse osmosis (RO)/multi effect distillation (MED) seawater desalination. Thereby, the primary objective of the present study was to identify and investigate the effectiveness and thermodynamic performance of CSCPP schemes. To satisfy this objective, detailed computational model for key components in the plant has been developed and implemented on simulation computer code. The thermal effectiveness in the computational model was characterized by the condition of attaining a maximum fuel saving in the electrical power grid (EPG). The study result shows the effectiveness of proposed CSCPP schemes. Especially the integrated gas turbine solar cogeneration power plant (IGSCP) scheme seems to be an alternative of the most effective technologies in terms of technical, economic and environmental sustainability. For the case study (IGSCP and the design number of effects 10 for low-temperature MED unit) the economical effect amount 172.3 ton fuel/year for each MW design thermal energy of parabolic solar collector array (PSCA). The corresponding decrease in exhaust gases emission (nitrogen oxides (NOx) 0.681 ton/year MW, carbon dioxides (CO2) 539.5 ton/year MW). Moreover, the increase in the output of PSCA and, subsequently, in solar power generation, will also be useful to offset the normal reduction in performance experienced by gas turbine unit during the summer season. Hence, the influence of the most important design parameters on the effectiveness of ISGPP has been discussed in this paper.

Hussain Alrobaei

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

Chapter 4 - Natural Gas–fired Gas Turbines and Combined Cycle Power Plants  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Gas turbines can burn a range of liquid and gaseous fuels but most burn natural gas. Power plants based on gas turbines are one of the cheapest types of plant to build, but the cost of their electricity depends heavily on the cost of their fuel. Two types of gas turbine are used for power generation: aero-derivative gas turbines and heavy-duty gas turbines. The former are used to provide power to the grid at times of peak demand. The latter are most often found in combined cycle power stations. These are capable of more than 60% efficiency. There are a number of ways of modifying the gas turbine cycle to improve efficiency, including reheating and intercooling. Micro-turbines have been developed for very small-scale generation of both electricity and heat. The main atmospheric emissions from gas turbines are carbon dioxide and nitrogen oxide.

Paul Breeze

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

Supersaturated Turbine Expansions for Binary Geothermal Power Plants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Heat Cycle Research project is developing the technology base that will permit a much greater utilization of the moderate-temperature, liquid-dominated geothermal resources, particularly for the generation of electrical power. The emphasis in the project has been the improvement of the performance of binary power cycles. The investigations have been examining concepts projected to improve the brine utilization by 20% relative to a ''Heber-type'' binary plant; these investigations are nearing completion. preparations are currently underway in the project to conduct field investigations of the condensation behavior of supersaturated turbine expansions. These investigations will evaluate whether the projected additional 8% to 10% improvement in brine utilization can be realized by allowing these expansions. Future program efforts will focus on the problems associated with heat rejection and on the transfer of the technology being developed to industry.

Bliem, C.J.; Mines, G.L.

1992-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

10

Turbine Drive Gas Generator for Zero Emission Power Plants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Vision 21 Program seeks technology development that can reduce energy costs, reduce or eliminate atmospheric pollutants from power plants, provide choices of alternative fuels, and increase the efficiency of generating systems. Clean Energy Systems is developing a gas generator to replace the traditional boiler in steam driven power systems. The gas generator offers the prospects of lower electrical costs, pollution free plant operations, choices of alternative fuels, and eventual net plant efficiencies in excess of 60% with sequestration of carbon dioxide. The technology underlying the gas generator has been developed in the aerospace industry over the past 30 years and is mature in aerospace applications, but it is as yet unused in the power industry. This project modifies and repackages aerospace gas generator technology for power generation applications. The purposes of this project are: (1) design a 10 MW gas generator and ancillary hardware, (2) fabricate the gas generator and supporting equipment, (3) test the gas generator using methane as fuel, (4) submit a final report describing the project and test results. The principal test objectives are: (1) define start-up, shut down and post shutdown control sequences for safe, efficient operation; (2) demonstrate the production of turbine drive gas comprising steam and carbon dioxide in the temperature range 1500 F to 3000 F, at a nominal pressure of 1500 psia; (3) measure and verify the constituents of the drive gas; and (4) examine the critical hardware components for indications of life limitations. The 21 month program is in its 13th month. Design work is completed and fabrication is in process. The gas generator igniter is a torch igniter with sparkplug, which is currently under-going hot fire testing. Fabrication of the injector and body of the gas generator is expected to be completed by year-end, and testing of the full gas generator will begin in early 2002. Several months of testing are anticipated. When demonstrated, this gas generator will be the prototype for use in demonstration power plants planned to be built in Antioch, California and in southern California during 2002. In these plants the gas generator will demonstrate durability and its operational RAM characteristics. In 2003, it is expected that the gas generator will be employed in new operating plants primarily in clean air non-attainment areas, and in possible locations to provide large quantities of high quality carbon dioxide for use in enhanced oil recovery or coal bed methane recovery. Coupled with an emission free coal gasification system, the CES gas generator would enable the operation of high efficiency, non-polluting coal-fueled power plants.

Doyle, Stephen E.; Anderson, Roger E.

2001-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

11

Steam Turbine Materials for Ultrasupercritical Coal Power Plants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Ultrasupercritical (USC) Steam Turbine Materials Development Program is sponsored and funded by the U.S. Department of Energy and the Ohio Coal Development Office, through grants to Energy Industries of Ohio (EIO), a non-profit organization contracted to manage and direct the project. The program is co-funded by the General Electric Company, Alstom Power, Siemens Power Generation (formerly Siemens Westinghouse), and the Electric Power Research Institute, each organization having subcontracted with EIO and contributing teams of personnel to perform the requisite research. The program is focused on identifying, evaluating, and qualifying advanced alloys for utilization in coal-fired power plants that need to withstand steam turbine operating conditions up to 760°C (1400°F) and 35 MPa (5000 psi). For these conditions, components exposed to the highest temperatures and stresses will need to be constructed from nickel-based alloys with higher elevated temperature strength than the highchromium ferritic steels currently used in todayâ??s high-temperature steam turbines. In addition to the strength requirements, these alloys must also be weldable and resistant to environmental effects such as steam oxidation and solid particle erosion. In the present project, candidate materials with the required creep strength at desired temperatures have been identified. Coatings that can resist oxidation and solid particle erosion have also been identified. The ability to perform dissimilar welds between nickel base alloys and ferritic steels have been demonstrated, and the properties of the welds have been evaluated. Results of this three-year study that was completed in 2009 are described in this final report. Additional work is being planned and will commence in 2009. The specific objectives of the future studies will include conducting more detailed evaluations of the weld-ability, mechanical properties and repair-ability of the selected candidate alloys for rotors, casings and valves, and to perform scale-up studies to establish a design basis for commercial scale components. A supplemental program funded by the Ohio Coal Development Office will undertake supporting tasks such as testing and trials using existing atmospheric, vacuum and developmental pressure furnaces to define specific metal casting techniques needed for producing commercial scale components.

Viswanathan, R.; Hawk, J.; Schwant, R.; Saha, D.; Totemeier, T.; Goodstine, S.; McNally, M.; Allen, D. B.; Purgert, Robert

2009-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

12

The 700°C steam turbine power plant â?? status of development and outlook  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper appraises the current development status of the 700°C steam power plant under consideration of process optimisation as well as design aspects of the steam turbine and steam generator. The results for a compact arrangement of the steam turbine and steam generator are also presented. Based on a cycle analysis, a net efficiency between 49.3% and 51.4% can be achieved with the 700°C steam power plant â?? depending on the implementation and based on an inland plant site. No competing development activities for the 700°C steam power plant are known from the USA or Japan.

Heiner Edelmann; Martin Effert; Kai Wieghardt; Holger Kirchner

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Heat Exchanger Design for Solar Gas-Turbine Power Plant.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

?? The aim of this project is to select appropriate heat exchangers out of available gas-gas heat exchangers for used in a proposed power plant.… (more)

Yakah, Noah

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Solar steam reforming of natural gas integrated with a gas turbine power plant  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This paper shows a hybrid power plant wherein solar steam reforming of natural gas and a steam injected gas turbine power plant are integrated for solar syngas production and use. The gas turbine is fed by a mixture of natural gas and solar syngas (mainly composed of hydrogen and water steam) from mid-low temperature steam reforming reaction whose heat duty is supplied by a parabolic trough Concentrating Solar Power plant. A comparison is made between a traditional steam injected gas turbine and the proposed solution to underline the improvements introduced by the integration with solar steam reforming of the natural gas process. The paper also shows how solar syngas can be considered as an energy vector consequent to solar energy conversion effectiveness and the natural gas pipeline as a storage unit, thus accomplishing the idea of a smart energy grid.

Augusto Bianchini; Marco Pellegrini; Cesare Saccani

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Coordinated optimization of the parameters of the cooled gas-turbine flow path and the parameters of gas-turbine cycles and combined-cycle power plants  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In the present paper, we evaluate the effectiveness of the coordinated solution to the optimization problem for the parameters of cycles in gas turbine and combined cycle power plants and to the optimization prob...

A. M. Kler; Yu. B. Zakharov; Yu. M. Potanina

2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Gas turbine power plant with supersonic shock compression ramps  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A gas turbine engine. The engine is based on the use of a gas turbine driven rotor having a compression ramp traveling at a local supersonic inlet velocity (based on the combination of inlet gas velocity and tangential speed of the ramp) which compresses inlet gas against a stationary sidewall. The supersonic compressor efficiently achieves high compression ratios while utilizing a compact, stabilized gasdynamic flow path. Operated at supersonic speeds, the inlet stabilizes an oblique/normal shock system in the gasdynamic flow path formed between the rim of the rotor, the strakes, and a stationary external housing. Part load efficiency is enhanced by use of a lean pre-mix system, a pre-swirl compressor, and a bypass stream to bleed a portion of the gas after passing through the pre-swirl compressor to the combustion gas outlet. Use of a stationary low NOx combustor provides excellent emissions results.

Lawlor, Shawn P. (Bellevue, WA); Novaresi, Mark A. (San Diego, CA); Cornelius, Charles C. (Kirkland, WA)

2008-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

17

A modeling and control approach to advanced nuclear power plants with gas turbines  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Advanced nuclear power plants are currently being proposed with a number of various designs. However, there is a lack of modeling and control strategies to deal with load following operations. This research investigates a possible modeling approach and load following control strategy for gas turbine nuclear power plants in order to provide an assessment way to the concept designs. A load frequency control strategy and average temperature control mechanism are studied to get load following nuclear power plants. The suitability of the control strategies and concept designs are assessed through linear stability analysis methods. Numerical results are presented on an advanced molten salt reactor concept as an example nuclear power plant system to demonstrate the validity and effectiveness of the proposed modeling and load following control strategies.

Günyaz Ablay

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Numerical analysis of the optimal turbine pressure drop ratio in a solar chimney power plant  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract In a solar chimney power plant, only a fraction of the available total pressure difference can be used to run the turbine to generate electrical power. The optimal ratio of the turbine pressure drop to the available total pressure difference in a solar chimney system is investigated using theoretical analysis and 3D numerical simulations. The values found in the literature for the optimal ratio vary between 2/3 and 0.97. In this study, however, the optimal ratio was found to vary with the intensity of solar radiation, and to be around 0.9 for the Spanish prototype. In addition, the optimal ratios obtained from the analytical approach are close to those from the numerical simulation and their differences are mainly caused by the neglect of aerodynamic losses associated with skin friction, flow separation, and secondary flow in the theoretical analysis. This study may be useful for the preliminary estimation of power plant performance and the power-regulating strategy option for solar chimney turbines.

Penghua Guo; Jingyin Li; Yuan Wang; Yingwen Liu

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Performance evaluation and economic analysis of a gas turbine power plant in Nigeria  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract In this study, performance evaluation and economic analysis (in terms of power outage cost due to system downtime) of a gas turbine power plant in Nigeria have been carried out for the period 2001–2010. The thermal power station consists of nine gas turbine units with total capacity of 301 MW (9 × 31.5 MW). The study reveals that 64.3% of the installed capacity was available in the period. The percentage of shortfall of energy generated in the period ranged from 4.18% to 14.53% as against the acceptable value of 5–10%. The load factor of the plant is between 20.8% and 78.2% as against international best practice of 80%. The average availability of the plant for the period was about 64% as against industry best practice of 95%, while the average use factor was about 92%. The capacity factor of the plant ranged from 20.8% to 78.23% while the utilization factor ranged from 85.47% to 95.82%. For the ten years under review, there was energy generation loss of about 35.7% of expected energy generation of 26.411 TW h with consequent plant performance of 64.3%. The study further reveals that the 35.7% of generation loss resulted in revenue loss of about M$251 (approximately b40). The simple performance indicator developed to evaluate the performance indices and outage cost for the station can also be applicable to other power stations in Nigeria and elsewhere. Measures to improve the performance indices of the plant have been suggested such as training of operation and maintenance (O & M) personnel regularly, improvement in O & M practices, proper spare parts inventory and improvement in general housekeeping of the plant. From technical point of view, performance of the plant can be improved by retrofitting with a gas turbine air inlet cooling system, heat recovery system or adding modifications (inter-cooling or regeneration) to the simple gas turbine units.

S.O. Oyedepo; R.O. Fagbenle; S.S. Adefila; S.A. Adavbiele

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Effects of collector radius and chimney height on power output of a solar chimney power plant with turbines  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A comprehensive theoretical model is proposed for the performance evaluation of a solar chimney power plant (SCPP), and has been verified by the experimental data of the Spanish prototype. This model takes account of the effects of flow and heat losses, and the temperature lapse rates inside and outside the chimney. There is a maximum power output for a certain SCPP under a given solar radiation condition, due to flow and heat losses and the installation of the turbines. In addition, the design flow rate of the turbine in the SCPP system is found beneficial for power output when it is lower than that at the maximum power point. Furthermore, a limitation on the maximum collector radius exists for the maximum attainable power of the SCPP; whereas, no such limitation exists for chimney height in terms of contemporary construction technology.

Jing-yin Li; Peng-hua Guo; Yuan Wang

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "turbine power plants" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Optimization and the effect of steam turbine outlet quality on the output power of a combined cycle power plant  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract A narrow path exists to a sustainable solution which passes through careful steps of efficiency improvement (resource management) and provides environmental friendly energies. Thermal power plants are more common in many power production sites around the world. Therefore, in this current research study a comprehensive thermodynamic modeling of a combined cycle power plant with dual pressure heat recovery steam generator is presented. Since the steam turbine outlet quality is a restrictive parameter, optimization of three cases with different steam quality are conducted and discussed. In other hand, energy and exergy analysis of each components for these three different cases estimated and compared. Obtained results show that it is really important to keep the quality of the vapor at turbine outlet constant in 88% for the results to be more realistic and also optimization and data are more technically feasible and applicable.

A. Ganjehkaviri; M.N. Mohd Jaafar; S.E. Hosseini

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Cost effective designs for integrating new electronic turbine control systems into existing steam power plants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Different cost-effective approaches have been developed for integrating new digital turbine control systems into existing power plants. The devices under consideration range from self contained actuators which replace the existing hydraulic and mechanical servomotor components, linear proportional actuators, which mechanically drive the original servomotor pilot relays, to electro-hydraulic converters which provide a control pressure to the existing hydraulic servomotor pilot relays. These devices significantly reduce the implementation cost, while still providing most of the benefits that can be gained through greater utilization of the new electronic control capabilities. These three design approaches are analyzed for control performance, failure modes, long-term maintenance issues, and applicability to specific turbine configurations.

Nguyen, T.V. [Westinghouse Electric Corp., Orlando, FL (United States)

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Turbine repair at Nesjavellir geothermal power plant: An Icelandic case study  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract During a quadrennial inspection of a 30 MW Mitsubishi steam turbine at Nesjavellir geothermal power plant, corrosion products were found on the last set of labyrinth packing in the gland seal system which resulted in erosion corrosion of the turbine rotor. The rotor had worn by approximately 8 mm. Because of the tight timeframe of the overhaul, it was decided to repair this failure on site using the experience of the staff and domestic industry. Labyrinth seals were built by a domestic machine shop, decreasing cost and shutdown time dramatically. This article describes the occurring failure and how it was repaired within days with cooperation between the energy company and domestic industry. It further discusses probable causes for such failure and how it may be prevented. The article describes in essence how valuable it can prove to build maintenance knowledge domestically in the geothermal sector.

R.S. Atlason; A. Gunnarsson; R. Unnthorsson

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Effects of meteorological variables on exergetic efficiency of wind turbine power plants  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This present paper deals with exergy efficiency results of the Wind Turbine Power Plants (WTPPs). Effects of meteorological variables such as air density, pressure difference between state points, humidity, and ambient temperature on exergy efficiency are discussed in a satisfactory way. Some key parameters are given monthly for the three turbines. Exergy efficiency differs from 0.23 to 0.27 while temperature is changing from 268.15 K to 308.15 K with air density 1.368–1.146 (kg/m3). While pressure difference (?P) between inlet and outlet of the turbine differs from 100 to 1100 (Pa), exergy efficiency decreases fairly for different wind speeds. While specific humidity is changing from 0.001 to 0.015 (kgwater/kgdry air), exergy efficiency decreases gently. Generally these meteorological variables are neglected while planning WTPPs, but this neglect can cause important errors in calculations and energy plans. Obtained results indicate that while planning \\{WTPPs\\} meteorological variables must be taken into account.

Omer Baskut; Onder Ozgener; Leyla Ozgener

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Efficiency of production of additional condensation power at dual-purpose turbine plants  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Results of detailed computations (performed with the use of mathematical models of dual-purpose turbine plants) of the effect of the main operating factors on the energy and economic efficiency of the production ...

E. I. Éfros; N. V. Tatarinova

2006-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Incorporating supercritical steam turbines into molten-salt power tower plants : feasibility and performance.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Sandia National Laboratories and Siemens Energy, Inc., examined 14 different subcritical and supercritical steam cycles to determine if it is feasible to configure a molten-salt supercritical steam plant that has a capacity in the range of 150 to 200 MWe. The effects of main steam pressure and temperature, final feedwater temperature, and hot salt and cold salt return temperatures were determined on gross and half-net efficiencies. The main steam pressures ranged from 120 bar-a (subcritical) to 260 bar-a (supercritical). Hot salt temperatures of 566 and 600%C2%B0C were evaluated, which resulted in main steam temperatures of 553 and 580%C2%B0C, respectively. Also, the effects of final feedwater temperature (between 260 and 320%C2%B0C) were evaluated, which impacted the cold salt return temperature. The annual energy production and levelized cost of energy (LCOE) were calculated using the System Advisory Model on 165 MWe subcritical plants (baseline and advanced) and the most promising supercritical plants. It was concluded that the supercritical steam plants produced more annual energy than the baseline subcritical steam plant for the same-size heliostat field, receiver, and thermal storage system. Two supercritical steam plants had the highest annual performance and had nearly the same LCOE. Both operated at 230 bar-a main steam pressure. One was designed for a hot salt temperature of 600%C2%B0C and the other 565%C2%B0C. The LCOEs for these plants were about 10% lower than the baseline subcritical plant operating at 120 bar-a main steam pressure and a hot salt temperature of 565%C2%B0C. Based on the results of this study, it appears economically and technically feasible to incorporate supercritical steam turbines in molten-salt power tower plants.

Pacheco, James Edward; Wolf, Thorsten [Siemens Energy, Inc., Orlando, FL; Muley, Nishant [Siemens Energy, Inc., Orlando, FL

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

SENSIBLE HEAT STORAGE FOR A SOLAR THERMAL POWER PLANT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Power Plant Solar Power Ideal Gas Turbine Topping Braytonwill require higher parasitic power for gas circulation. Theefficiency of a solar power plant with gas-turbine topping

Baldwin, Thomas F.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Power Plant Power Plant  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Basin Center for Geothermal Energy at University of Nevada, Reno (UNR) 2 Nevada Geodetic LaboratoryStillwater Power Plant Wabuska Power Plant Casa Diablo Power Plant Glass Mountain Geothermal Area Lassen Geothermal Area Coso Hot Springs Power Plants Lake City Geothermal Area Thermo Geothermal Area

Tingley, Joseph V.

29

A RAM (Reliability Availability Maintainability) analysis of Consolidated Edison's Gowanus and Narrows gas turbine power plants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A methodology is presented which accurately assesses the ability of gas turbine generating stations to perform their intended function (reliability) while operating in a peaking duty mode. The developed methodology alloys the RAM modeler to calculate the probability that a peaking unit will produce the energy demanded and in turn calculate the total energy lost during a given time period due to unavailability of individual components. The methodology was applied to Consolidated Edison's Narrows site which has 16 barge-mounted General Electric Frame 5 gas turbines operating under a peaking duty mode. The resulting RAM model was quantified using the Narrows site power demand and failure rate data. The model was also quantified using generic failure data from the Operational Reliability Analysis Program (ORAP) for General Electric Frame 5 peaking gas turbines. A problem description list and counter measures are offered for components contributing more than one percent to gas turbine energy loss. 3 refs., 18 figs., 12 tabs.

Johnson, B.W.; Whitehead, T.J.; Derenthal, P.J. (Science Applications International Corp., Los Altos, CA (USA))

1990-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Aging of turbine drives for safety-related pumps in nuclear power plants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study was performed to examine the relationship between time-dependent degradation and current industry practices in the areas of maintenance, surveillance, and operation of steam turbine drives for safety-related pumps. These pumps are located in the Auxiliary Feedwater (AFW) system for pressurized-water reactor plants and in the Reactor Core Isolation Cooling and High-Pressure Coolant Injection systems for boiling-water reactor plants. This research has been conducted by examination of failure data in the Nuclear Plant Reliability Data System, review of Licensee Event Reports, discussion of problems with operating plant personnel, and personal observation. The reported failure data were reviewed to determine the cause of the event and the method of discovery. Based on the research results, attempts have been made to determine the predictability of failures and possible preventive measures that may be implemented. Findings in a recent study of AFW systems indicate that the turbine drive is the single largest contributor to AFW system degradation. However, examination of the data shows that the turbine itself is a reliable piece of equipment with a good service record. Most of the problems documented are the result of problems with the turbine controls and the mechanical overspeed trip mechanism; these apparently stem from three major causes which are discussed in the text. Recent improvements in maintenance practices and procedures, combined with a stabilization of the design, have led to improved performance resulting in a reliable safety-related component. However, these improvements have not been universally implemented.

Cox, D.F. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Diagrams of regimes of cogeneration steam turbines for combined-cycle power plants  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

General considerations regarding the form of the steam-consumption diagram for a three-loop cogeneration-type combined-cycle plant are formulated on the basis of ... 12.4 steam turbine for the PGU-410 combined-cycle

A. Yu. Kultyshev; M. Yu. Stepanov; T. Yu. Linder

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

SENSIBLE HEAT STORAGE FOR A SOLAR THERMAL POWER PLANT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Power Plant Solar Power Ideal Gas Turbine Topping Braytonefficiency of a solar power plant with gas-turbine toppingfor a solar power plant with Brayton-cycle gas turbine

Baldwin, Thomas F.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

SMART POWER TURBINE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Gas turbines are the choice technology for high-performance power generation and are employed in both simple and combined cycle configurations around the world. The Smart Power Turbine (SPT) program has developed new technologies that are needed to further extend the performance and economic attractiveness of gas turbines for power generation. Today's power generation gas turbines control firing temperatures indirectly, by measuring the exhaust gas temperature and then mathematically calculating the peak combustor temperatures. But temperatures in the turbine hot gas path vary a great deal, making it difficult to control firing temperatures precisely enough to achieve optimal performance. Similarly, there is no current way to assess deterioration of turbine hot-gas-path components without shutting down the turbine. Consequently, maintenance and component replacements are often scheduled according to conservative design practices based on historical fleet-averaged data. Since fuel heating values vary with the prevalent natural gas fuel, the inability to measure heating value directly, with sufficient accuracy and timeliness, can lead to maintenance and operational decisions that are less than optimal. GE Global Research Center, under this Smart Power Turbine program, has developed a suite of novel sensors that would measure combustor flame temperature, online fuel lower heating value (LHV), and hot-gas-path component life directly. The feasibility of using the ratio of the integrated intensities of portions of the OH emission band to determine the specific average temperature of a premixed methane or natural-gas-fueled combustion flame was demonstrated. The temperature determined is the temperature of the plasma included in the field of view of the sensor. Two sensor types were investigated: the first used a low-resolution fiber optic spectrometer; the second was a SiC dual photodiode chip. Both methods worked. Sensitivity to flame temperature changes was remarkably high, that is a 1-2.5% change in ratio for an 11.1 C (20 F) change in temperature at flame temperatures between 1482.2 C (2700 F) and 1760 C (3200 F). Sensor ratio calibration was performed using flame temperatures determined by calculations using the amount of unburned oxygen in the exhaust and by the fuel/air ratio of the combustible gas mixture. The agreement between the results of these two methods was excellent. The sensor methods characterized are simple and viable. Experiments are underway to validate the GE Flame Temperature Sensor as a practical tool for use with multiburner gas turbine combustors. The lower heating value (LHV) Fuel Quality Sensor consists of a catalytic film deposited on the surface of a microhotplate. This micromachined design has low heat capacity and thermal conductivity, making it ideal for heating catalysts placed on its surface. Several methods of catalyst deposition were investigated, including micropen deposition and other proprietary methods, which permit precise and repeatable placement of the materials. The use of catalysts on the LHV sensor expands the limits of flammability (LoF) of combustion fuels as compared with conventional flames; an unoptimized LoF of 1-32% for natural gas (NG) in air was demonstrated with the microcombustor, whereas conventionally 4 to 16% is observed. The primary goal of this work was to measure the LHV of NG fuels. The secondary goal was to determine the relative quantities of the various components of NG mixes. This determination was made successfully by using an array of different catalysts operating at different temperatures. The combustion parameters for methane were shown to be dependent on whether Pt or Pd catalysts were used. In this project, significant effort was expended on making the LHV platform more robust by the addition of high-temperature stable materials, such as tantalum, and the use of passivation overcoats to protect the resistive heater/sensor materials from degradation in the combustion environment. Modeling and simulation were used to predict improved sensor designs.

Nirm V. Nirmalan

2003-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Modeling Creep-Fatigue-Environment Interactions in Steam Turbine Rotor Materials for Advanced Ultra-supercritical Coal Power Plants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The goal of this project is to model creep-fatigue-environment interactions in steam turbine rotor materials for advanced ultra-supercritical (A-USC) coal power Alloy 282 plants, to develop and demonstrate computational algorithms for alloy property predictions, and to determine and model key mechanisms that contribute to the damages caused by creep-fatigue-environment interactions. The nickel based Alloy 282 is selected for this project because it is one of the leading candidate materials for the high temperature/pressure section of an A-USC steam turbine. The methods developed in the project are expected to be applicable to other metal alloys in similar steam/oxidation environments. The major developments are: ? failure mechanism and microstructural characterization ? atomistic and first principles modeling of crack tip oxygen embrittlement ? modeling of gamma prime microstructures and mesoscale microstructure-defect interactions ? microstructure and damage-based creep prediction ? multi-scale crack growth modeling considering oxidation, viscoplasticity and fatigue The technology developed in this project is expected to enable more accurate prediction of long service life of advanced alloys for A-USC power plants, and provide faster and more effective materials design, development, and implementation than current state-of-the-art computational and experimental methods. This document is a final technical report for the project, covering efforts conducted from January 2011 to January 2014.

Shen, Chen

2014-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

35

Thermionic combustor application to combined gas and steam turbine power plants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The engineering and economic feasibility of a thermionic converter topped combustor for a gas turbine is evaluated in this paper. A combined gas and steam turbine system was chosen for this study with nominal outputs of the gas and steam turbines of 70 MW and 30 MW, respectively. 7 refs.

Miskolczy, G.; Wang, C.C.; Lieb, D.P.; Margulies, A.E.; Fusegni, L.J.; Lovell, B.J.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Gas Turbine Plants  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In a cycle process of a gas turbine, the compressor load, as well as ... from the expansion of the hot pressurized flue gas. Either turbine, compressor and driven assembly are joined by ... shaft is thus divided,...

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Method of and apparatus for preheating pressurized fluidized bed combustor and clean-up subsystem of a gas turbine power plant  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

In a gas turbine power plant having a pressurized fluidized bed combustor, gas turbine-air compressor subsystem and a gas clean-up subsystem interconnected for fluid flow therethrough, a pipe communicating the outlet of the compressor of the gas turbine-air compressor subsystem with the interior of the pressurized fluidized bed combustor and the gas clean-up subsystem to provide for flow of compressed air, heated by the heat of compression, therethrough. The pressurized fluidized bed combustor and gas clean-up subsystem are vented to atmosphere so that the heated compressed air flows therethrough and loses heat to the interior of those components before passing to the atmosphere.

Cole, Rossa W. (E. Rutherford, NJ); Zoll, August H. (Cedar Grove, NJ)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Efficient steam turbines produced by the “Ural Turbine Plant” company  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Design features and efficiency of some steam turbines produced at present by a plant formed as a result of division of the “Turbine Motor Plant” Company into several enterprises are...

G. D. Barinberg; A. E. Valamin

39

Combined-cycle gas and steam turbine power plants. 2. edition  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

First published in 1991, this book is the leading reference on technical and economic factors of combined-cycle applications now leading the trend toward merchant plants and the peaking power needed in newly deregulated markets around the world, this long-awaited second edition is more important than ever. In it, Kehlhofer -- an internationally recognized authority in the field of new combined-cycle power plants -- and his co-authors widen the scope and detail found in the first edition. Included are tips on system layout, details on controls and automation, and operating instructions. Loaded with case studies, reference tables, and more than 150 figures, this text offers solid advice on system layout, controls and automation, and operating and maintenance instructions. The author provides real-world examples to apply to one`s own applications. The contents include: Introduction; The electricity market; Thermodynamic principles of combined-cycle plants; Combined-cycle concepts; Applications of combined-cycle; Components; Control and automation; Operating and part load behavior; Environmental considerations; Developmental trends; Typical combined-cycle plants already built; Conclusion; Appendices; Conversions; Calculation of the operating performance of combined-cycle installations; Definitions of terms and symbols; Bibliography; and Index.

Kehlhofer, R.; Bachmann, R.; Nielson, H.; Warner, J.

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

System study of an MHD/gas turbine combined-cycle baseload power plant. HTGL report No. 134  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The MHD/gas turbine combined-cycle system has been designed specifically for applications where the availability of cooling water is very limited. The base case systems which were studied consisted of an MHD plant with a gas turbine bottoming plant, and required no cooling water. The gas turbine plant uses only air as its working fluid and receives its energy input from the MHD exhaust gases by means of metal tube heat exchangers. In addition to the base case systems, vapor cycle variation systems were considered which included the addition of a vapor cycle bottoming plant to improve the thermal efficiency. These systems required a small amount of cooling water. The MHD/gas turbine systems were modeled with sufficient detail, using realistic component specifications and costs, so that the thermal and economic performance of the system could be accurately determined. Three cases of MHD/gas turbine systems were studied, with Case I being similar to an MHD/steam system so that a direct comparison of the performances could be made, with Case II being representative of a second generation MHD system, and with Case III considering oxygen enrichment for early commercial applications. The systems are nominally 800 MW/sub e/ to 1000 MW/sub e/ in size. The results show that the MHD/gas turbine system has very good thermal and economic performances while requiring either little or no cooling water. Compared to the MHD/steam system which has a cooling tower heat load of 720 MW, the Base Case I MHD/gas turbine system has a heat rate which is 13% higher and a cost of electricity which is only 7% higher while requiring no cooling water. Case II results show that an improved performance can be expected from second generation MHD/gas turbine systems. Case III results show that an oxygen enriched MHD/gas turbine system may be attractive for early commercial applications in dry regions of the country.

Annen, K.D.

1981-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "turbine power plants" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

The analysis and specification of large high-pressure, high-temperature valves for combustion turbine protection in second-generation PFB power plants: Topical report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this study was to provide a specification for the high-pressure/high-temperature valves for turbine overspeed protection in a commercial-scale second-generation pressurized fluidized bed combustion (PFBC) power plant. In the event of a loss of external (generator) load, the gas turbine rapidly accelerates from its normal operating speed. Protection from excessive overspeed can be maintained by actuation of fuel isolation and air bypass valves. A design specification for these valves was developed by analyses of the turbine/compressor interaction during a loss of load and analyses of pressure and flow transients during operation of the overspeed protection valves. The basis for these analyses was the Phase 1 plant conceptual design prepared in 1987.

Not Available

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Recuperative solar-driven multi-step gas turbine power plants  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

An analysis on the influence of the recuperator effectiveness in a multi-step solar-driven Brayton engine is presented. The solar collector model includes heat losses from convection and radiation. The Brayton engine includes an arbitrary number of turbines and compressors, regeneration, and several realistic irreversibility sources. It is stated that the combination of both systems makes the evolution of the overall efficiency with the effectiveness of the regenerator not trivial. Such behavior is associated to the losses arising from the coupling of the working fluid with the collector and the surroundings. The overall efficiency admits a simultaneous optimization in regards to the pressure and temperature ratios. When the system is designed to work close to the optimum values of those parameters an increase in the effectiveness of the recuperator is always associated with an increase in the overall optimum efficiency. This holds for configurations from the simplest solarized Brayton up to arrangements with several turbines and compressors.

S. Sánchez-Orgaz; A. Medina; A. Calvo Hernández

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Turbine Electric Power Inc | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Turbine Electric Power Inc Sector: Vehicles Product: US-based, holder of the 'exclusive worldwide rights' to install, sell, market and distribute a new 'high tech' micro turbine...

44

Power plant including an exhaust gas recirculation system for injecting recirculated exhaust gases in the fuel and compressed air of a gas turbine engine  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A power plant is provided and includes a gas turbine engine having a combustor in which compressed gas and fuel are mixed and combusted, first and second supply lines respectively coupled to the combustor and respectively configured to supply the compressed gas and the fuel to the combustor and an exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) system to re-circulate exhaust gas produced by the gas turbine engine toward the combustor. The EGR system is coupled to the first and second supply lines and configured to combine first and second portions of the re-circulated exhaust gas with the compressed gas and the fuel at the first and second supply lines, respectively.

Anand, Ashok Kumar; Nagarjuna Reddy, Thirumala Reddy; Shaffer, Jason Brian; York, William David

2014-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

45

La Spezia power plant: Conversion of units 1 and 2 to combined cycle with modification of steam turbines from cross compound to tandem compound  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Units 1 and 2 of ENEL's La Spezia power plant, rated 310 and 325 MW respectively, are going to be converted to combined cycle. This project will be accomplished by integrating components such as gas turbines and HRSGs with some of the existing components, particularly the steam turbines, which are of the cross compound type. Since the total power of each converted unit has to be kept at 335 MW because of permitting limitations, the power delivered by the steam turbine will be limited to about 115 MW. For this reason a study was carried out to verify the possibility of having only one shaft and modifying the turbine to tandem compound. As additional investments are required for this modification, a balance was performed that also took into account the incremental heat rate and, on the other hand, the benefits from decreased maintenance and increased availability and reliability calculated for the expected useful life. The result of this balance was in favor of the modification, and a decision was taken accordingly. The turbine modification will involve replacing the whole HP section with a new combined HP-IP section while retaining the corresponding LP rotor and cylinder and making the needed changes in the valve arrangements and piping. Work on the site began in the spring of 1997 by dismantling the existing boiler so as to have the space needed to install the GTs and HRSGs. The first synchronization of the converted unit 1 is scheduled for November 1999

Magneschi, P.; Gabiccini, S.; Bracaloni, N.; Fiaschi, C.

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

Improving the Capacity or Output of a Steam Turbine Generator at XYZ Power Plant in Illinois  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and capacitance mapping ? Performed wedge tightness check by means of manual tap test ? Performed RTD functioning test ? Cleaned generator brush rigging ? Inspected generator brush rigging for signs of heating, arcing or other damage... turbine with a net generating rating of 366MW. The unit began commercial operation in 1976. Coal is received by rail and limestone by rail by rail or truck. Rail cars are unloaded in a rotary car dumper at a rate of 20-25 cars per hour. A 30 day...

Amoo-Otoo, John Kweku

2006-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

47

Metallurgical failure analysis for a blade failed in a gas-turbine engine of a power plant  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The failed gas-turbine blades (first stage blades) (type Siemens V94.2 KWU) were acquired from TNB Research Sdn. Bhd: a subsidiary of Malaysian power-generation industry (TNB, Malaysia). The blades were sectioned for metallographic investigations. The microstructural characterization involved use of both optical as well as electron microscopes including application of EPMA technique. The Microstructures were compared for three spots selection i.e. leading edge of the blade (transverse and longitudinal), trailing edge of the blade (transverse and longitudinal), and centre (near the platform of the blade) (transverse and longitudinal). The material properties and behavior at high temperature were interpreted on the basis of the observed microstructures and the phases present in the alloy. The interpretations were related to the operating conditions of the turbine blade; and main cause of failure was found to be creep damage. Recommendations have been made for improved material performance.

Zainul Huda

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Process-circuit and layout solutions for steam-turbine units and performance efficiency of thermal power plants  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Criteria for evaluating process-circuit and layout solutions adopted in designing steam-turbine units are presented together with their values for a number of steam-turbine units produced by the Ural Turbine Work...

A. A. Gol’dberg; T. L. Shibaev

2014-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

High efficiency carbonate fuel cell/turbine hybrid power cycle  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The hybrid power cycle studies were conducted to identify a high efficiency, economically competitive system. A hybrid power cycle which generates power at an LHV efficiency > 70% was identified that includes an atmospheric pressure direct carbonate fuel cell, a gas turbine, and a steam cycle. In this cycle, natural gas fuel is mixed with recycled fuel cell anode exhaust, providing water for reforming fuel. The mixed gas then flows to a direct carbonate fuel cell which generates about 70% of the power. The portion of the anode exhaust which is not recycled is burned and heat transferred through a heat exchanger (HX) to the compressed air from a gas turbine. The heated compressed air is then heated further in the gas turbine burner and expands through the turbine generating 15% of the power. Half the exhaust from the turbine provides air for the anode exhaust burner. All of the turbine exhaust eventually flows through the fuel cell cathodes providing the O2 and CO2 needed in the electrochemical reaction. Exhaust from the cathodes flows to a steam system (heat recovery steam generator, staged steam turbine generating 15% of the cycle power). Simulation of a 200 MW plant with a hybrid power cycle had an LHV efficiency of 72.6%. Power output and efficiency are insensitive to ambient temperature, compared to a gas turbine combined cycle; NOx emissions are 75% lower. Estimated cost of electricity for 200 MW is 46 mills/kWh, which is competitive with combined cycle where fuel cost is > $5.8/MMBTU. Key requirement is HX; in the 200 MW plant studies, a HX operating at 1094 C using high temperature HX technology currently under development by METC for coal gassifiers was assumed. A study of a near term (20 MW) high efficiency direct carbonate fuel cell/turbine hybrid power cycle has also been completed.

Steinfeld, G.; Maru, H.C. [Energy Research Corp., Danbury, CT (United States); Sanderson, R.A. [Sanderson (Robert) and Associates, Wethersfield, CT (United States)

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Combined cycle power plant incorporating coal gasification  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A combined cycle power plant incorporating a coal gasifier as the energy source. The gases leaving the coal gasifier pass through a liquid couplant heat exchanger before being used to drive a gas turbine. The exhaust gases of the gas turbine are used to generate both high pressure and low pressure steam for driving a steam turbine, before being exhausted to the atmosphere.

Liljedahl, Gregory N. (Tariffville, CT); Moffat, Bruce K. (Simsbury, CT)

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Proceedings of a Topical Meeting On Small Scale Geothermal Power Plants and Geothermal Power Plant Projects  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

These proceedings describe the workshop of the Topical Meeting on Small Scale Geothermal Power Plants and Geothermal Power Plant Projects. The projects covered include binary power plants, rotary separator, screw expander power plants, modular wellhead power plants, inflow turbines, and the EPRI hybrid power system. Active projects versus geothermal power projects were described. In addition, a simple approach to estimating effects of fluid deliverability on geothermal power cost is described starting on page 119. (DJE-2005)

None

1986-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

52

NETL: News Release - Advanced Natural Gas Turbine Hailed as Top Power  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

December 30, 2003 December 30, 2003 Advanced Natural Gas Turbine Hailed as Top Power Project of 2003 Power Engineering Cites Product of Energy Department's Advanced Turbine Systems Program WASHINGTON, DC - A power plant featuring a next-generation gas turbine developed as part of the U.S. Department of Energy's advanced turbine systems program has been selected by Power Engineering magazine as one of three "2003 Projects of the Year." Baglan Bay Power Station Baglan Bay Power Station, South Wales, U.K. Photo courtesy of GE Power Systems The Baglan Bay Power Station near Cardiff, Wales, UK reached a major milestone for the global power industry when GE Power System's H System gas turbine debuted there earlier this year. The most advanced combustion turbine in the world, the H System is the first gas turbine combined-cycle

53

Comparative Analysis of Alternative Configurations of the Mercury 50 Recuperated Gas-Turbine-Based Biomass Integrated Gasification Combined Heat and Power (BIGCHP) Plant  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this paper, several original configurations of the cogeneration system based on different gasification technologies and Mercury 50 recuperated gas turbine are proposed and examined theoretically. ... (14) Another key problem of the successful commercialization of the technology is the commercial availability of reliable and efficient gas turbines (GTs) modified for syngas operation. ... In particular, the paper presents current development status and design challenges being addressed by Siemens Westinghouse Power Corp. for large industrial engines (>200 MW) and by Solar Turbines for smaller engines (Turbine Systems (ATS) program. ...

Jacek Kalina

2011-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

54

Steam turbines of the Ural Turbine Works for advanced projects of combined-cycle plants  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We describe the design features, basic thermal circuits, and efficiency of steam turbines developed on the basis of serially produced steam turbines of Ural Turbine Works and used as part of combined-cycle plants...

G. D. Barinberg; A. E. Valamin; A. Yu. Kultyshev

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Impact of Wind Power Plants on Voltage and Transient Stability of Power Systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A standard three-machine, nine-bus wind power system is studied and augmented by a radially connected wind power plant that contains 22 wind turbine generators.

Muljadi, E.; Nguyen, Tony B.; Pai, M. A.

2008-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

56

Gas Turbines  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

When the gas turbine generator was introduced to the power generation ... fossil-fueled power plant. Twenty years later, gas turbines were established as an important means of ... on utility systems. By the early...

Jeffrey M. Smith

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Coal-Fuelled Combined Cycle Power Plants  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Combined cycle power plant, when used as a generic ... which converts heat into mechanical energy in a combined gas and steam turbine process. Combined cycle processes with coal gasification or coal combustion .....

Dr. Hartmut Spliethoff

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

The Chena Hot Springs 400kw Geothermal Power Plant: Experience...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

efficiency requiresincreased power plant equipment size (turbine, condenser,pump and boiler) that can ordinarily become cost prohibitive.One of the main goals for the Chena...

59

The development of control strategy for solid oxide fuel cell and micro gas turbine hybrid power system in ship application  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) and micro gas turbine (MGT) hybrid power system is a newly developed and promising power technology for ship power systems. Compared to conventional power plants on commercial sh...

Jiqing He; Peilin Zhou; David Clelland

2014-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Binary Cycle Power Plant | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Binary Cycle Power Plant Binary Cycle Power Plant (Redirected from Binary Cycle Power Plants) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Binary Cycle Power Plant General List of Binary Plants Binary power plant process diagram - DOE EERE 2012 Binary cycle geothermal power generation plants differ from Dry Steam and Flash Steam systems in that the water or steam from the geothermal reservoir never comes in contact with the turbine/generator units. Low to moderately heated (below 400°F) geothermal fluid and a secondary (hence, "binary") fluid with a much lower boiling point that water pass through a heat exchanger. Heat from the geothermal fluid causes the secondary fluid to flash to vapor, which then drives the turbines and subsequently, the generators.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "turbine power plants" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Binary Cycle Power Plant | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Binary Cycle Power Plant Binary Cycle Power Plant (Redirected from Binary) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Binary Cycle Power Plant General List of Binary Plants Binary power plant process diagram - DOE EERE 2012 Binary cycle geothermal power generation plants differ from Dry Steam and Flash Steam systems in that the water or steam from the geothermal reservoir never comes in contact with the turbine/generator units. Low to moderately heated (below 400°F) geothermal fluid and a secondary (hence, "binary") fluid with a much lower boiling point that water pass through a heat exchanger. Heat from the geothermal fluid causes the secondary fluid to flash to vapor, which then drives the turbines and subsequently, the generators. Binary cycle power plants are closed-loop systems and virtually nothing

62

Arabelle: The most powerful steam turbine in the world  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

On the 30th of August 1996 at the CHOOZ power station in the Ardennes, the first 1,500 MW turbine was started up under nuclear steam and connected to the grid. It will reach full power in the spring of 1997, followed shortly afterwards by a second identical machine. This turbine, known as ARABELLE, is currently the most powerful in the world, with a single line rotating at 1,500 rpm. It has been entirely designed, manufactured and installed by the teams of GEC ALSTHOM, within the framework of the Electricite de France N4 PWR program. It represents a new type of nuclear turbine, the fruit of much research and development work which started in the 1980s. It benefits from GEC ALSTHOM's considerable experience in the field of nuclear turbines: 143 machines with a total power output of 100,000 MW and more than ten million hours of operation. It should be remembered that the first 1,000 MW unit for a PWR plant was connected at Fessenheim in 1977, and since then the different EDF plants have been equipped with 58 GEC ALSTHOM turbines, ranging from 1,000 MW to 1,350 MW, this providing the company with a vast amount of information. The process which led to a new design for ARABELLE was based on: Feedback of service experience from previous machines; this provides precious learning material with a view to improving the performance of operating equipment. Research and development work resulting in significant technical advances which could then be integrated into the design of a new generation of turbines. Taking account of the major concerns of the customer-user: Electricite de France (EDF): Improved reliability and operating availability, increased efficiency, reduced investment and maintenance costs.

Lamarque, F.; Deloroix, V.

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Ris-R-1330(EN) Wind Turbine Power Performance  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Risø-R-1330(EN) Wind Turbine Power Performance Verification in Complex Terrain and Wind Farms/EN 61400-12 Ed 1 standard for wind turbine power performance testing is being revised. The standard on power performance measurements on individual wind turbines. The second one is a power performance

64

Power Plant Analyser -- A computer code for power plant operation studies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper describes Power Plant Analyser (PPA), a computer code for power plant dynamic and steady-state performance analysis. Power Plant Analyser simulates fossil power plant systems, such as drum-type, once-through, gas turbine, and combined cycle plants in a user-friendly manner. It provides a convenient tool for power engineers to understand the complex and interrelated thermodynamic processes and operating characteristics of the plant. It can also be used for conceptual training of power plant operators, and as a test bed for control and operating strategies.

Lu, S.; Hogg, B.W. [Queen`s Univ. of Belfast, Northern Ireland (United Kingdom). Dept. of Electrical and Electronic Engineering] [Queen`s Univ. of Belfast, Northern Ireland (United Kingdom). Dept. of Electrical and Electronic Engineering

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Geothermal Steam Power Plant | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Jump to: navigation, search Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home General List of Dry Steam Plants List of Flash Steam Plants Steam Power Plants Dry Steam Power Plants Simple Dry Steam Powerplant process description - DOE EERE 2012 Dry steam plants use hydrothermal fluids that are primarily steam. The steam travels directly to a turbine, which drives a generator that produces electricity. The steam eliminates the need to burn fossil fuels to run the turbine (also eliminating the need to transport and store fuels). These plants emit only excess steam and very minor amounts of gases.[1] Dry steam power plants systems were the first type of geothermal power generation plants built (they were first used at Lardarello in Italy in 1904). Steam technology is still effective today at currently in use at The

66

Geothermal Steam Power Plant | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

(Redirected from Dry Steam) (Redirected from Dry Steam) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home General List of Dry Steam Plants List of Flash Steam Plants Steam Power Plants Dry Steam Power Plants Simple Dry Steam Powerplant process description - DOE EERE 2012 Dry steam plants use hydrothermal fluids that are primarily steam. The steam travels directly to a turbine, which drives a generator that produces electricity. The steam eliminates the need to burn fossil fuels to run the turbine (also eliminating the need to transport and store fuels). These plants emit only excess steam and very minor amounts of gases.[1] Dry steam power plants systems were the first type of geothermal power generation plants built (they were first used at Lardarello in Italy in 1904). Steam technology is still effective today at currently in use at The

67

World electric power plants database  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This global database provides records for 104,000 generating units in over 220 countries. These units include installed and projected facilities, central stations and distributed plants operated by utilities, independent power companies and commercial and self-generators. Each record includes information on: geographic location and operating company; technology, fuel and boiler; generator manufacturers; steam conditions; unit capacity and age; turbine/engine; architect/engineer and constructor; and pollution control equipment. The database is issued quarterly.

NONE

2006-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

68

Modeling and Performance Prediction of a Solar Powered Rankin Cycle/Gas Turbine Cycle  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The present study is dealing with the development and implementation of an integrated solar combined cycle power plant in which heat ... its energy from the waste heat of a gas turbine unit in additional to solar

Mohammed A. Elhaj; Kassim K. Matrawy…

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Control of Wind Turbines for Power Regulation and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Control of Wind Turbines for Power Regulation and Load Reduction Juan Jose Garcia Quirante Kongens regulation and load reduction and their ensemble in a variable-speed wind turbine. The power regulation aspects of mathematical modelling of wind turbines, and especially the control methods suited for power

70

Stochastic Analysis of Wind Turbine Power Curves Edgar Anahua  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the wind turbine to its desired power production; and ii) the stochastic force (noise), whichStochastic Analysis of Wind Turbine Power Curves Edgar Anahua Oldenburg 2007 Zur Homepage der Dissertation #12;#12;Stochastic Analysis of Wind Turbine Power Curves Edgar Anahua Von der Fakult¨at f

Peinke, Joachim

71

Geothermal/Power Plant | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geothermal/Power Plant Geothermal/Power Plant < Geothermal(Redirected from Power Plant) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Land Use Leasing Exploration Well Field Power Plant Transmission Environment Water Use Print PDF Geothermal Power Plants General List of Plants Map of Plants Regulatory Roadmap NEPA (19) Binary power system equipment and cooling towers at the ORMAT Ormesa Geothermal Power Complex in Southern California. Geothermal Power Plants discussion Electricity Generation Converting the energy from a geothermal resource into electricity is achieved by producing steam from the heat underground to spin a turbine which is connected to a generator to produce electricity. The type of energy conversion technology that is used depends on whether the resource is predominantly water or steam, the temperature of the resource, and the

72

Steam turbines produced by the Ural Turbine Works for combined-cycle plants  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The most interesting and innovative solutions adopted in the projects of steam turbines for combined-cycle plants with capacities from...

A. E. Valamin; A. Yu. Kultyshev; T. L. Shibaev; A. A. Gol’dberg…

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Sandia National Laboratories: wind turbines produce rated power  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

turbines produce rated power Increasing the Scaled Wind Farm Technology Facility's Power Production On April 7, 2014, in Energy, Facilities, News, News & Events, Partnership,...

74

Flash Steam Power Plant | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Flash Steam Power Plant Flash Steam Power Plant (Redirected from Flash Steam Power Plants) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Flash Steam Power Plants General List of Flash Steam Plants Flash Steam power plant process diagram - DOE EERE 2012 Flash steam plants are the most common type of geothermal power generation plants in operation in the world today. Fluid at temperatures greater than 360°F (182°C) is pumped under high pressure into a tank at the surface held at a much lower pressure, causing some of the fluid to rapidly vaporize, or "flash." The vapor then drives a turbine, which drives a generator. If any liquid remains in the tank, it can be flashed again in a second tank to extract even more energy.[1] Facility Name Owner Capacity (MW) Facility

75

Binary Cycle Power Plant | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Binary Cycle Power Plant General List of Binary Plants Binary power plant process diagram - DOE EERE 2012 Binary cycle geothermal power generation plants differ from Dry Steam and Flash Steam systems in that the water or steam from the geothermal reservoir never comes in contact with the turbine/generator units. Low to moderately heated (below 400°F) geothermal fluid and a secondary (hence, "binary") fluid with a much lower boiling point that water pass through a heat exchanger. Heat from the geothermal fluid causes the secondary fluid to flash to vapor, which then drives the turbines and subsequently, the generators. Binary cycle power plants are closed-loop systems and virtually nothing (except water vapor) is emitted to the atmosphere. Resources below 400°F

76

MHK Technologies/Morild Power Plant | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Morild Power Plant Morild Power Plant < MHK Technologies Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Morild Power Plant.jpg Technology Profile Primary Organization Hydra Tidal Energy Technology AS Project(s) where this technology is utilized *MHK Projects/MORILD Demonstration Plant Technology Resource Click here Current/Tidal Technology Type Click here Axial Flow Turbine Technology Readiness Level Click here TRL 5/6: System Integration and Technology Laboratory Demonstration Technology Description The Morild power plant is a floating, moored construction based on the same principle as horizontal axis wind turbines. The plant has 4 two-blade underwater turbines and can utilize the energy potential in tidal and ocean currents. The 4 turbines transmit power via hydraulic transmission to 2 synchronous generators. Can be pitched 180 degrees to utilize energy in both directions. A cable from the transformer on the prototype to shore transfers energy.

77

Steam turbines of the Ural Turbine Works for combined-cycle plants  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Matters concerned with selecting the equipment for combined-cycle plants within the framework of work on ... Works regarding the supplies of steam turbines for combined-cycle plants used at retrofitted and newly ...

G. D. Barinberg; A. E. Valamin; A. Yu. Kultyshev; T. Yu. Linder

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

NREL: Wind Research - Mariah Power's Windspire Wind Turbine Testing and  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Mariah Power's Windspire Wind Turbine Testing and Results Mariah Power's Windspire Wind Turbine Testing and Results A video of Mariah Power's Windspire wind turbine. Text Version As part of the National Renewable Energy Laboratory and U.S. Department of Energy (NREL/DOE) Independent Testing project, NREL tested Mariah Power's Windspire Giromill small wind turbine at the National Wind Technology Center (NWTC) through January 14, 2009 when NREL terminated its testing. Read a chronology of events and letter from Mariah Power to NREL. The Windspire is a 1.2-kilowatt (kW) vertical-axis small wind turbine. The turbine tower is 9.1 meters tall, and its rotor area is 1.2 by 6.1 meters. The turbine has a permanent-magnet generator with a single-phase output at 120 volts AC. Testing Summary Testing was terminated January 14, 2009. Published test reports include

79

A Wood-Fired Gas Turbine Plant  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-fired turbine, it probably seems that a wood gasification system must be involved. This is a proven and accepted method of producing gas to drive this type of power unit, but the fuel produced is a dirty fuel containing large amounts of me' ~ "'1 re, tars..., and other undesirable impurities that make it unsuitable for use as a fuel until a rather expensive cleanup process and residual waste disposal can take place. However, Aerospace Research felt that there must be a way to improve on the wood gasification...

Powell, S. H.; Hamrick, J. T.

80

Power Plant Cycling Costs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report provides a detailed review of the most up to date data available on power plant cycling costs. The primary objective of this report is to increase awareness of power plant cycling cost, the use of these costs in renewable integration studies and to stimulate debate between policymakers, system dispatchers, plant personnel and power utilities.

Kumar, N.; Besuner, P.; Lefton, S.; Agan, D.; Hilleman, D.

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "turbine power plants" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Chapter 3 - Coal-fired Power Plants  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Coal provides around 40% of the world’s electricity, more than any other source. Most modern coal-fired power stations burn pulverized coal in a boiler to raise steam for a steam turbine. High efficiency is achieved by using supercritical boilers made of advanced alloys that produce high steam temperatures, and large, high-efficiency steam turbines. Alternative types of coal-fired power plants include fluidized bed boilers that can burn a variety of poor fuels, as well as coal gasifiers that allow coal to be turned into a combustible gas that can be burned in a gas turbine. Emissions from coal plants include sulfur dioxide, nitrogen oxide, and trace metals, all of which must be controlled. Capturing carbon dioxide from a coal plant is also under consideration. This can be achieved using post-combustion capture, a pre-combustion gasification process, or by burning coal in oxygen instead of air.

Paul Breeze

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Efficiency combined cycle power plant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This patent describes a method of operating a combined cycle power plant. It comprises: flowing exhaust gas from a combustion turbine through a heat recovery steam generator (HRSG); flowing feed water through an economizer section of the HRSG at a flow rate and providing heated feed water; flowing a first portion of the heated feed water through an evaporator section of the HRSG and producing saturated steam at a production rate, the flow rate of the feed water through the economizer section being greater than required to sustain the production rate of steam in the evaporator section; flowing fuel for the turbine through a heat exchanger; and, flowing a second portion of the heated feed water provided by the economizer section through the heat exchanger then to an inlet of the economizer section, thereby heating the fuel flowing through the heat exchanger.

Pavel, J.; Meyers, G.A.; Baldwin, T.S.

1990-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

83

Preliminary experimental analysis of a small-scale prototype SWRO desalination plant, designed for continuous adjustment of its energy consumption to the widely varying power generated by a stand-alone wind turbine  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Given the significant water-energy problems associated with many remote and arid areas of the planet, most studies, projects and developments of installations for the production of fresh water using desalination technologies powered by renewable energy sources have focussed on small-scale stand-alone systems. The most commonly used energy sources have been solar photovoltaic and wind and the most widely applied desalination technology that of reverse osmosis (RO). Most of the systems use batteries as a means of mass energy storage and the RO plants normally operate at constant pressure and flow rate. This paper presents a small-scale prototype SWRO (seawater reverse osmosis) desalination plant designed to continuously adapt its energy consumption to the variable power supplied by a wind turbine (WT), dispensing with mass energy storage in batteries and proposing the use of a supercapacitor bank as a dynamic regulation system. A description is given of the tests performed to date with the SWRO desalination plant connected to the conventional grid while controlling the number of pressure vessels that are connected/disconnected to/from the system and regulating their operating pressures and flow rates (within predetermined admissible limits) to maintain a constant permeate recovery rate and adapt the energy consumption of the plant to a widely varying simulated wind energy supply. One of the most important conclusions that can be drawn from the studies undertaken is the feasibility of adapting the consumption of the prototype of the SWRO desalination plant to widely varying WT-generated power. Despite using various time interval lengths in which it was assumed that the WT output power remained constant, a perfect fit was not obtained between the theoretical WT-generated power and the power consumed by the SWRO desalination plant, nor was it possible to maintain a constant permeate recovery rate at each instant.

José A. Carta; Jaime González; Pedro Cabrera; Vicente J. Subiela

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Flash Steam Power Plant | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Flash Steam Power Plant Flash Steam Power Plant Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Flash Steam Power Plants General List of Flash Steam Plants Flash Steam power plant process diagram - DOE EERE 2012 Flash steam plants are the most common type of geothermal power generation plants in operation in the world today. Fluid at temperatures greater than 360°F (182°C) is pumped under high pressure into a tank at the surface held at a much lower pressure, causing some of the fluid to rapidly vaporize, or "flash." The vapor then drives a turbine, which drives a generator. If any liquid remains in the tank, it can be flashed again in a second tank to extract even more energy.[1] Facility Name Owner Capacity (MW) Facility Type Commercial Online Date Geothermal Area

85

Geothermal/Power Plant | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Geothermal/Power Plant < Geothermal Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Land Use Leasing Exploration Well Field Power Plant Transmission Environment Water Use Print PDF Geothermal Power Plants General List of Plants Map of Plants Regulatory Roadmap NEPA (20) Binary power system equipment and cooling towers at the ORMAT Ormesa Geothermal Power Complex in Southern California. Geothermal Power Plants discussion Electricity Generation Converting the energy from a geothermal resource into electricity is achieved by producing steam from the heat underground to spin a turbine

86

The cogeneration steam turbine of the T-63/76-8.8 type for a series of PGU-300 combined cycle power plants  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper describes in detail the design of the T-63/76–8.8 steam turbine manufactured by Ural Turbine Works (refurbished significantly), its electrohydraulic control and protection system made according to the ...

A. Ye. Valamin; A. Yu. Kultyshev; V. N. Bilan; A. A. Goldberg…

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Demonstration of a Variable Phase Turbine Power System for Low...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

turbine geothermal ORC system A Revolutionary Hybrid Thermodynamic Cycle for Bianary Geothermal Power Free Flow Energy (TRL 1 2 3 Component) - Design and Development of a...

88

Operating experience of single cylinder steam turbine with 40 inch last blade applied for combined cycle plant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Inquiries and orders for combined cycle plant have increased recently because of the better efficiency of combined cycle plant in comparison with the usual fossil fuel power plant. The typical features of the steam turbine for combined cycle plant are the lower inlet steam conditions and the more driving steam flow quantity compared with the steam turbine for usual fossil fuel plants. This paper introduces the design and results of operation about 122 MW single cylinder steam turbine. Furthermore, the results of periodical overhaul inspection carried out after one year`s commercial operation is also presented.

Kishimoto, Masaru; Yamamoto, Tetsuya [Mitsubishi Heavy Industries, Ltd., Yokohama (Japan); Yokota, Hiroshi [Mitsubishi Heavy Industries, Ltd., Nagasaki (Northern Mariana Islands); Umaya, Masahide [Mitsubishi Heavy Industries, Ltd., Takasago (Japan)

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

89

Mathematical Modeling and Computer Simulation of a Combined Cycle Power Plant  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper presents the simulation procedure developed to predict the performance of a combined cycle power plant from given performance characteristics of ... . Effects of gas turbine and steam turbine cycle par...

Nikhil Dev; Samsher; S. S. Kachhwaha; Mohit

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

NREL Small Wind Turbine Test Project: Mariah Power's Windspire Wind Turbine Test Chronology  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents a chronology of tests conducted at NREL's National Wind Technology Center on Mariah Power's Windspire 1.2-kW wind turbine and a letter of response from Mariah Power.

Huskey, A.; Forsyth, T.

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Using energy balances for processing the results from tests of a single-shaft combined-cycle power plant  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Application of the balance method for dividing the overall power output produced by a single-shaft combined-cycle power plant between the steam turbine and...

G. G. Ol’khovskii

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

HIGH EFFICIENCY FOSSIL POWER PLANT (HEFPP) CONCEPTUALIZATION PROGRAM  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study confirms the feasibility of a natural gas fueled, 20 MW M-C Power integrated pressurized molten carbonate fuel cell combined in a topping cycle with a gas turbine generator plant. The high efficiency fossil power plant (HEFPP) concept has a 70% efficiency on a LHV basis. The study confirms the HEFPP has a cost advantage on a cost of electricity basis over the gas turbine based combined cycle plants in the 20 MW size range. The study also identifies the areas of further development required for the fuel cell, gas turbine generator, cathode blower, inverter, and power module vessel. The HEFPP concept offers an environmentally friendly power plant with minuscule emission levels when compared with the combined cycle power plant.

J.L. Justice

1999-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

93

Fish-Friendly Turbine Making a Splash in Water Power  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

A revolutionary new turbine technology for hydropower plants is one step closer to its first commercial deployment. The Alden Fish-Friendly Turbine could change the game for hydropower generation in the United States, and it is likely to have significant export potential.

94

Operating experience feedback report -- turbine-generator overspeed protection systems: Commercial power reactors. Volume 11  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents the results of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission`s Office for Analysis and Evaluation of Operational Data (AEOD) review of operating experience of main turbine-generator overspeed and overspeed protection systems. It includes an indepth examination of the turbine overspeed event which occurred on November 9, 1991, at the Salem Unit 2 Nuclear Power Plant. It also provides information concerning actions taken by other utilities and the turbine manufacturers as a result of the Salem overspeed event. AEOD`s study reviewed operating procedures and plant practices. It noted differences between turbine manufacturer designs and recommendations for operations, maintenance, and testing, and also identified significant variations in the manner that individual plants maintain and test their turbine overspeed protection systems. AEOD`s study provides insight into the shortcomings in the design, operation, maintenance, testing, and human factors associated with turbine overspeed protection systems. Operating experience indicates that the frequency of turbine overspeed events is higher than previously thought and that the bases for demonstrating compliance with NRC`s General Design Criterion (GDC) 4, Environmental and dynamic effects design bases, may be nonconservative with respect to the assumed frequency.

Ornstein, H.L.

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

CONCEPTUAL STUDIES OF A FUEL-FLEXIBLE LOW-SWIRL COMBUSTION SYSTEM FOR THE GAS TURBINE IN CLEAN COAL POWER PLANTS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper reports the results of preliminary analyses that show the feasibility of developing a fuel flexible (natural gas, syngas and high-hydrogen fuel) combustion system for IGCC gas turbines. Of particular interest is the use of Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory's DLN low swirl combustion technology as the basis for the IGCC turbine combustor. Conceptual designs of the combustion system and the requirements for the fuel handling and delivery circuits are discussed. The analyses show the feasibility of a multi-fuel, utility-sized, LSI-based, gas turbine engine. A conceptual design of the fuel injection system shows that dual parallel fuel circuits can provide range of gas turbine operation in a configuration consistent with low pollutant emissions. Additionally, several issues and challenges associated with the development of such a system, such as flashback and auto-ignition of the high-hydrogen fuels, are outlined.

Smith, K.O.; Littlejohn, David; Therkelsen, Peter; Cheng, Robert K.; Ali, S.

2009-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

96

Combining Droop Curve Concepts with Control Systems for Wind Turbine Active Power Control: Preprint  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Wind energy is becoming a larger portion of the global energy portfolio and wind penetration has increased dramatically in certain regions of the world. This increasing wind penetration has driven the need for wind turbines to provide active power control (APC) services to the local utility grid, as wind turbines do not intrinsically provide frequency regulation services that are common with traditional generators. It is common for large scale wind turbines to be decoupled from the utility grid via power electronics, which allows the turbine to synthesize APC commands via control of the generator torque and blade pitch commands. Consequently, the APC services provided by a wind turbine can be more flexible than those provided by conventional generators. This paper focuses on the development and implementation of both static and dynamic droop curves to measure grid frequency and output delta power reference signals to a novel power set point tracking control system. The combined droop curve and power tracking controller is simulated and comparisons are made between simulations using various droop curve parameters and stochastic wind conditions. The tradeoffs involved with aggressive response to frequency events are analyzed. At the turbine level, simulations are performed to analyze induced structural loads. At the grid level, simulations test a wind plant's response to a dip in grid frequency.

Buckspan, A.; Aho, J.; Pao, L.; Fleming, P.; Jeong, Y.

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

An economic analysis of solar hybrid steam injected gas turbine (STIG) plant for Indian conditions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Steam injection for power augmentation is one of the significant modifications of gas turbines that has been commercialized for natural gas-fired applications. The primary objective of this work is to demonstrate that the installation of a solar hybrid steam injected gas turbine plant (STIG) for power generation could have a lower installed cost and lower solar levelized tariff compared to the solar-only thermal power plant while producing a comparable energy output. An economic evaluation is presented for the locations Indore and Jaipur in India under constant, variable power and mixed power scenarios. The levelized tariff (LT) of solar hybrid STIG plant ranges 0.24–0.26 $/kWh, and the levelized tariff (solar only) or solar levelized tariff (SLT) of solar STIG plant ranges from 0.29 to 0.4 $/kWh in constant power (CP) and variable power (VP) scenarios. In case of mixed power (MP) scenario, the range of LT varies from 0.16 to 0.21 $/kWh for CP and VP modes basis. In this analysis, size of the solar STIG plant varies from 48 MW to 212 MW based on the steam to air ratio. The IRR and payback period varies between 12%–17% and 6.3–8 years for both CP and VP scenarios at Jaipur and Indore. Sensitivity analysis reports that the performance of the power plants depends, to a large degree, on boundary conditions such as fuel and equipment costs.

A. Immanuel Selwynraj; S. Iniyan; Guy Polonsky; L. Suganthi; Abraham Kribus

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

SHORT TERM PREDICTIONS FOR THE POWER OUTPUT OF ENSEMBLES OF WIND TURBINES AND PV-GENERATORS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SHORT TERM PREDICTIONS FOR THE POWER OUTPUT OF ENSEMBLES OF WIND TURBINES AND PV-GENERATORS Hans. For the conventional power park, the power production of the wind turbines presents a fluctuating 'negative load PRODUCTION OF WIND TURBINES For the forecast of the power production of wind turbines two approaches may

Heinemann, Detlev

99

Design Of Hydel Power Plant At Mid- Pennar Reservoir  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Micro-hydro-electric power is both an efficient and reliable form of clean source of renewable energy. It can be an excellent method of harnessing renewable energy from small rivers and streams. The micro-hydro project designed to be a run-of-river type, because it requires very little or no reservoir in order to power the turbine. The water will run straight through the turbine and back into the river or stream to use it for the other purposes. This has a minimal environmental impact on the local ecosystem. The design procedure of micro-hydro power plant was implemented practically. The choice of the turbine type depending mainly on the site head and flow rate. The turbine power and speed were directly proportional with the site head, but there were specific points for maximum turbine power and speed with the variation of the site water flow rate. The head losses in the penstock could range from 5 to 10 percent of the gross head, depending on the length of the penstock, quantity of water flow rate and its velocity. The turbine efficiency could range from 80 to 95 percent depending on the turbine type, and the generator efficiency about 90 percent. The design study showed that construction of micro-hydroelectric project was feasible in the project site and there were no major problems apparent at the design and implementation stages of the micro-hydro-electric power plant.

P. Nagendra; Dr. G. Prasanthi

100

Optimizing the start-up operations of combined cycle power plants using soft computing methods  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......Energy, New technologies and sustainable Economic development Agency...Detection in Gas Turbines using Fuzzy...fusion for gas turbine power plants...Research Development Center Technical...Energy, New technologies and sustainable Economic development Agency...combination of a gas turbine and a steam......

Ilaria Bertini; Matteo De Felice; Alessandro Pannicelli; Stefano Pizzuti

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "turbine power plants" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Estimated global ocean wind power potential from QuikSCAT observations, accounting for turbine characteristics and siting  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

envisioned floating offshore wind turbines. Finally, global35 ] For the three turbines considered, offshore wind farmsusable wind power is evaluated for modern offshore turbine

Capps, Scott B; Zender, Charles S

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Impact of Increasing Distributed Wind Power and Wind Turbine Siting on Rural Distribution Feeder Voltage Profiles: Preprint  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Many favorable wind energy resources in North America are located in remote locations without direct access to the transmission grid. Building transmission lines to connect remotely-located wind power plants to large load centers has become a barrier to increasing wind power penetration in North America. By connecting utility-sized megawatt-scale wind turbines to the distribution system, wind power supplied to consumers could be increased greatly. However, the impact of including megawatt-scale wind turbines on distribution feeders needs to be studied. The work presented here examined the impact that siting and power output of megawatt-scale wind turbines have on distribution feeder voltage. This is the start of work to present a general guide to megawatt-scale wind turbine impact on the distribution feeder and finding the amount of wind power that can be added without adversely impacting the distribution feeder operation, reliability, and power quality.

Allen, A.; Zhang, Y. C.; Hodge, B. M.

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

PRESSURIZED SOLID OXIDE FUEL CELL/GAS TURBINE POWER SYSTEM  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Power systems based on the simplest direct integration of a pressurized solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) generator and a gas turbine (GT) are capable of converting natural gas fuel energy to electric power with efficiencies of approximately 60% (net AC/LHV), and more complex SOFC and gas turbine arrangements can be devised for achieving even higher efficiencies. The results of a project are discussed that focused on the development of a conceptual design for a pressurized SOFC/GT power system that was intended to generate 20 MWe with at least 70% efficiency. The power system operates baseloaded in a distributed-generation application. To achieve high efficiency, the system integrates an intercooled, recuperated, reheated gas turbine with two SOFC generator stages--one operating at high pressure, and generating power, as well as providing all heat needed by the high-pressure turbine, while the second SOFC generator operates at a lower pressure, generates power, and provides all heat for the low-pressure reheat turbine. The system cycle is described, major system components are sized, the system installed-cost is estimated, and the physical arrangement of system components is discussed. Estimates of system power output, efficiency, and emissions at the design point are also presented, and the system cost of electricity estimate is developed.

W.L. Lundberg; G.A. Israelson; R.R. Moritz (Rolls-Royce Allison); S.E. Veyo; R.A. Holmes; P.R. Zafred; J.E. King; R.E. Kothmann (Consultant)

2000-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Power Plant Cycling Costs  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Power Plant Cycling Costs Power Plant Cycling Costs April 2012 N. Kumar, P. Besuner, S. Lefton, D. Agan, and D. Hilleman Intertek APTECH Sunnyvale, California NREL Technical Monitor: Debra Lew Subcontract Report NREL/SR-5500-55433 July 2012 NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. National Renewable Energy Laboratory 15013 Denver West Parkway Golden, Colorado 80401 303-275-3000 * www.nrel.gov Contract No. DE-AC36-08GO28308 Power Plant Cycling Costs April 2012 N. Kumar, P. Besuner, S. Lefton, D. Agan, and D. Hilleman Intertek APTECH Sunnyvale, California NREL Technical Monitor: Debra Lew Prepared under Subcontract No. NFT-1-11325-01

105

Estimated global ocean wind power potential from QuikSCAT observations, accounting for turbine characteristics and siting  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A r ) and specific turbine efficiency value (C e , a maximumand individual turbine power and efficiency which maximizes

Capps, Scott B; Zender, Charles S

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Conservation Screening Curves to Compare Efficiency Investments to Power Plants  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

turbines powered by natural gas, distillate, or residualturbines (CTs) powered by natural gas, distillate, or residual

Koomey, J.G.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

An integrated solar thermal power system using intercooled gas turbine and Kalina cycle  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A new solar tower thermal power system integrating the intercooled gas turbine top cycle and the Kalina bottoming cycle is proposed in the present paper. The thermodynamic performance of the proposed system is investigated, and the irreversibility of energy conversion is disclosed using the energy–utilization diagram method. On the top cycle of the proposed system, the compressed air after being intercooled is heated at 1000 °C or higher at the solar tower receiver and is used to drive the gas turbine to generate power. The ammonia–water mixture as the working substance of the bottom cycle recovers the waste heat from the gas turbine to generate power. A concise analytical formula of solar-to-electric efficiency of the proposed system is developed. As a result, the peak solar-to-electric efficiency of the proposed system is 27.5% at a gas turbine inlet temperature of 1000 °C under the designed solar direct normal irradiance of 800 W/m2. Compared with a conventional solar power tower plant, the proposed integrated system conserves approximately 69% of consumed water. The results obtained in the current study provide an approach to improve solar-to-electric efficiency and offer a potential to conserve water for solar thermal power plants in arid area.

Shuo Peng; Hui Hong; Hongguang Jin; Zhifeng Wang

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Flexible Operation Scheduling of a Power Plant Integrated with PCC Processes under Market Dynamics  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Given the interaction of a power plant with PCC processes (especially sacrificing part of the power-plant load for the reboiler), it is techno-economically essential to study the behavior of power plants integrated with PCC processes with respect to dynamic electricity and carbon prices. ... Rather, the PCC process is powered by a natural gas combustion turbine and wind generation. ...

Rajab Khalilpour

2014-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

109

Hybrid Offshore Wind and Tidal Turbine Power System to Compensate for Fluctuation (HOTCF)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The hybrid system proposed in this study involves an offshore-wind turbine and a complementary tidal turbine that supplies grid power. The hybrid wind–tidal system consistently combines wind power and tidal power...

Mohammad Lutfur Rahman; Shunsuke Oka; Yasuyuki Shirai

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Dynamic gas bearing turbine technology in hydrogen plants  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Dynamic Gas Bearing Turbines - although applied for helium refrigerators and liquefiers for decades - experienced limitations for hydrogen applications due to restrictions in axial bearing capacity. With a new design concept for gas bearing turbines developed in 2004 axial bearing capacity was significantly improved enabling the transfer of this technology to hydrogen liquefiers. Prior to roll-out of the technology to industrial plants the turbine bearing technology passed numerous tests in R&D test benches and subsequently proved industrial scale demonstration at Linde Gas' hydrogen liquefier in Leuna Germany. Since its installation this turbine has gathered more than 16 000 successful operating hours and has outperformed its oil bearing brother in terms of performance maintainability as well as reliability. The present paper is based on Linde Kryotechnik AG's paper published in the proceedings of the CEC 2009 concerning the application of Dynamic Gas Bearing Turbines in hydrogen applications. In contrast to the former paper this publication focuses on the steps towards final market launch and more specifically on the financial benefits of this turbine technology both in terms of capital investment as well as operating expenses.

Klaus Ohlig; Stefan Bischoff

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

GEOTHERMAL POWER GENERATION PLANT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Oregon Institute of Technology (OIT) drilled a deep geothermal well on campus (to 5,300 feet deep) which produced 196oF resource as part of the 2008 OIT Congressionally Directed Project. OIT will construct a geothermal power plant (estimated at 1.75 MWe gross output). The plant would provide 50 to 75 percent of the electricity demand on campus. Technical support for construction and operations will be provided by OIT’s Geo-Heat Center. The power plant will be housed adjacent to the existing heat exchange building on the south east corner of campus near the existing geothermal production wells used for heating campus. Cooling water will be supplied from the nearby cold water wells to a cooling tower or air cooling may be used, depending upon the type of plant selected. Using the flow obtained from the deep well, not only can energy be generated from the power plant, but the “waste” water will also be used to supplement space heating on campus. A pipeline will be construction from the well to the heat exchanger building, and then a discharge line will be construction around the east and north side of campus for anticipated use of the “waste” water by facilities in an adjacent sustainable energy park. An injection well will need to be drilled to handle the flow, as the campus existing injection wells are limited in capacity.

Boyd, Tonya

2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Gas Turbine Cogeneration Plant for the Dade County Government Center  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

expansion plans, the system will efficiently produce additional electricity when chilled water demands are low. Houston, Texas The cogeneration plant consists of a Rolls-Royce gas turbine-generator set and a waste-heat recovery system which recovers... waste heat from the gas I tur bine exhaust. The waste-heat recovery syste~ con sists of a Zurn dual-pressure, heat recovery bpiler, a Thermo Electron dual-pressure, extraction /conden sing steam turbine generator set, and four Tra~e ab sorption...

Michalowski, R. W.; Malloy, M. K.

113

Tennessee Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Tennessee nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear...

114

Minnesota Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Minnesota nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear...

115

Massachusetts Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net...

116

Kansas Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Kansas nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear...

117

Missouri Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net...

118

Nebraska Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Nebraska nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear...

119

Arizona Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net...

120

California Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

California nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "turbine power plants" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Connecticut Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Connecticut nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State...

122

Georgia Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net...

123

Texas Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net...

124

Wisconsin Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Wisconsin nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear...

125

Ohio Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Ohio nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net...

126

Alabama Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net...

127

Virginia Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net...

128

Mississippi Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Mississippi nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State...

129

Washington Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Washington nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State...

130

Michigan Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net...

131

Iowa Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Iowa nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net...

132

Arkansas Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net...

133

Maryland Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net...

134

Vermont Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net...

135

Hydrogen Turbines | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Hydrogen Turbines Hydrogen Turbines Hydrogen Turbines Hydrogen Turbines The Turbines of Tomorrow Combustion (gas) turbines are key components of advanced systems designed for new electric power plants in the United States. With gas turbines, power plants will supply clean, increasingly fuel-efficient, and relatively low-cost energy. Typically, a natural gas-fired combustion turbine-generator operating in a "simple cycle" converts between 25 and 35 percent of the natural gas heating value to useable electricity. Today, most new smaller power plants also install a recuperator to capture waste heat from the turbine's exhaust to preheat combustion air and boost efficiencies. In most of the new larger plants, a "heat recovery steam generator" is installed to recover waste

136

Energy harvesting to power sensing hardware onboard wind turbine blade  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Wind turbines are becoming a larger source of renewable energy in the United States. However, most of the designs are geared toward the weather conditions seen in Europe. Also, in the United States, manufacturers have been increasing the length of the turbine blades, often made of composite materials, to maximize power output. As a result of the more severe loading conditions in the United States and the material level flaws in composite structures, blade failure has been a more common occurrence in the U.S. than in Europe. Therefore, it is imperative that a structural health monitoring system be incorporated into the design of the wind turbines in order to monitor flaws before they lead to a catastrophic failure. Due to the rotation of the turbine and issues related to lightning strikes, the best way to implement a structural health monitoring system would be to use a network of wireless sensor nodes. In order to provide power to these sensor nodes, piezoelectric, thermoelectric and photovoltaic energy harvesting techniques are examined on a cross section of a CX-100 wind turbine blade in order to determine the feasibility of powering individual nodes that would compose the sensor network.

Carlson, Clinton P [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Schichting, Alexander D [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Quellette, Scott [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Faringolt, Kevin M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Park, Gyuhae [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Experience with organic Rankine cycles in heat recovery power plants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Over the last 30 years, organic Rankine cycles (ORC) have been increasingly employed to produce power from various heat sources when other alternatives were either technically not feasible or economical. These power plants have logged a total of over 100 million turbine hours of experience demonstrating the maturity and field proven technology of the ORC cycle. The cycle is well adapted to low to moderate temperature heat sources such as waste heat from industrial plants and is widely used to recover energy from geothermal resources. The above cycle technology is well established and applicable to heat recovery of medium size gas turbines and offers significant advantages over conventional steam bottoming cycles.

Bronicki, L.Y.; Elovic, A.; Rettger, P.

1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Saguargo Solar Power Plant Solar Power Plant | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Saguargo Solar Power Plant Solar Power Plant Saguargo Solar Power Plant Solar Power Plant Jump to: navigation, search Name Saguargo Solar Power Plant Solar Power Plant Facility Saguargo Solar Power Plant Sector Solar Facility Type Concentrating Solar Power Facility Status In Service Developer Solargenix Location Red Rock, Arizona Coordinates 32.54795°, -111.292887° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":32.54795,"lon":-111.292887,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

139

Xi an Nordex Wind Turbine Co Ltd aka Xi an Weide Wind Power Equipment...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Wind Turbine Co Ltd aka Xi an Weide Wind Power Equipment Co Ltd Jump to: navigation, search Name: Xi'an Nordex Wind Turbine Co Ltd (aka Xi'an Weide Wind Power Equipment Co Ltd)...

140

Gas-turbine power stations on associated gas by Motor Sich OJSC  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Wide introduction of gas-turbine power stations working on associated oil gas is topical for Russia. Designing and operational ... ) and EG-6000 (6.0 MW) gas-turbine power stations on associated oil gas manufactu...

P. A. Gorbachev; V. G. Mikhailutsa

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "turbine power plants" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Minnkota Power Cooperative Wind Turbine (Petersburg) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Petersburg) Petersburg) Jump to: navigation, search Name Minnkota Power Cooperative Wind Turbine (Petersburg) Facility Minnkota Power Cooperative Wind Turbine (Petersburg) Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Minnkota Power Cooperative Developer Minnkota Power Cooperative Energy Purchaser Minnkota Power Cooperative Location East of Petersburg ND Coordinates 48.008793°, -97.930931° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":48.008793,"lon":-97.930931,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

142

Wind Power Plant Voltage Stability Evaluation: Preprint  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Voltage stability refers to the ability of a power system to maintain steady voltages at all buses in the system after being subjected to a disturbance from a given initial operating condition. Voltage stability depends on a power system's ability to maintain and/or restore equilibrium between load demand and supply. Instability that may result occurs in the form of a progressive fall or rise of voltages of some buses. Possible outcomes of voltage instability are the loss of load in an area or tripped transmission lines and other elements by their protective systems, which may lead to cascading outages. The loss of synchronism of some generators may result from these outages or from operating conditions that violate a synchronous generator's field current limit, or in the case of variable speed wind turbine generator, the current limits of power switches. This paper investigates the impact of wind power plants on power system voltage stability by using synchrophasor measurements.

Muljadi, E.; Zhang, Y. C.

2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

EA-1857: Wind Turbine Power Generation Complex at Idaho National Laboratory  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This EA would evaluate the environmental impacts of the proposed wind turbine power generation complex at Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho.

144

Hybrid solar central receiver for combined cycle power plant  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A hybrid combined cycle power plant including a solar central receiver for receiving solar radiation and converting it to thermal energy. The power plant includes a molten salt heat transfer medium for transferring the thermal energy to an air heater. The air heater uses the thermal energy to preheat the air from the compressor of the gas cycle. The exhaust gases from the gas cycle are directed to a steam turbine for additional energy production.

Bharathan, Desikan (Lakewood, CO); Bohn, Mark S. (Golden, CO); Williams, Thomas A. (Arvada, CO)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Ris-R-Report Multi-MW wind turbine power curve  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Risø-R-Report Multi-MW wind turbine power curve measurements using remote sensing instruments Wagner, Michael Courtney Title: Multi-MW wind turbine power curve measurements using remote sensing (max. 2000 char.): Power curve measurement for large wind turbines requires taking into account more

146

The available power from tidal stream turbines in the Pentland Firth  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...time-averaged available power of a wind turbine varies from...substantially greater power per swept area than a wind turbine at the upper...equivalent to an offshore wind turbine), the estimated maximum available power is about 1.9GW. To...

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Individual Pitch Control for Mitigation of Power Fluctuation of Variable Speed Wind Turbines  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Individual Pitch Control for Mitigation of Power Fluctuation of Variable Speed Wind Turbines, China mcheng@seu.edu.cn Abstract-- Grid connected wind turbines are the sources of power fluctuations presents an individual pitch control (IPC) strategy to mitigate the wind turbine power fluctuation at both

Hu, Weihao

148

Power optimization of wind turbines with data mining and evolutionary computation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Power optimization of wind turbines with data mining and evolutionary computation Andrew Kusiak July 2009 Accepted 25 August 2009 Available online 17 September 2009 Keywords: Wind turbine Data mining for maximization of the power produced by wind turbines is presented. The power optimization objective

Kusiak, Andrew

149

Sinomatech Wind Power Blade aka Sinoma Science Technology Wind Turbine  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Sinomatech Wind Power Blade aka Sinoma Science Technology Wind Turbine Sinomatech Wind Power Blade aka Sinoma Science Technology Wind Turbine Blade Co Ltd Jump to: navigation, search Name Sinomatech Wind Power Blade (aka Sinoma Science & Technology Wind Turbine Blade Co Ltd) Place Nanjing, Jiangsu Province, China Zip 210012 Sector Wind energy Product Jiangsu-based wind turbine blade manufactuer. Coordinates 32.0485°, 118.778969° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":32.0485,"lon":118.778969,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

150

Dispersal of measured sound power levels for wind turbines  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The standard IEC 61400?11 provides guidance in the measurement analysis and reporting of acoustic emissions(sound power levels) from wind turbine generator systems. The application of this standard aims to provide accurate results that can be replicated by others. We did several measurement operations according to this standard on various wind farms fitted with many turbine manufacturers on different ground types. Important differences have been noticed with equal working conditions between the most and the less noisy wind turbine on a single farm. We will present these results compared to the manufacturers' guaranteed values and initiate explanations (like the difficulties to link the wind speed at 10m above ground with the wind speed received at hub height; or the influence of wind incidence on blades).

René Gamba; Sébastien Garrigues

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Single stage rankine and cycle power plant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The specification describes a Rankine cycle power plant of the single stage type energized by gasified freon, the latter being derived from freon in the liquid state in a boiler provided in the form of a radio frequency heating cell adapted at low energy input to effect a rapid change of state from liquid freon at a given temperature and pressure to gaseous freon of relatively large volume, thereby to drive a Rankine cycle type of engine recognized in the prior art as a steam engine type of engine of the piston or turbine type.

Closs, J.J.

1981-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

152

Selective Exhaust Gas Recycle with Membranes for CO2 Capture from Natural Gas Combined Cycle Power Plants  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The combination of the combustion turbine (Brayton cycle) and steam turbine (Rankine cycle) yields a combined cycle power plant with efficiencies as high as 50%–55% (compared to 35%–40% in a typical subcritical pulverized coal power plant). ... Of course, it is also possible to combine these designs so that both parallel and series membranes are used. ...

Timothy C. Merkel; Xiaotong Wei; Zhenjie He; Lloyd S. White; J. G. Wijmans; Richard W. Baker

2012-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

153

Advances in steam turbine technology for the power generation industry. PWR-Volume 26  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This is a collection of the papers on advances in steam turbine technology for the power generation industry presented at the 1994 International Joint Power Generation Conference. The topics include advances in steam turbine design, application of computational fluid dynamics to turbine aerodynamic design, life extension of fossil and nuclear powered steam turbine generators, solid particle erosion control technologies, and artificial intelligence, monitoring and diagnostics.

Moore, W.G. [ed.

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

154

The Future of Combustion Turbine Technology for Industrial and Utility Power Generation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

gasification-based combustion turbine systems. The paper dmws heavily from a technical, economic, and business analysis, Combustion Turbine Power Systems, recently completed by SFA Pacific. The analysis was sponsored by an international group of energy...-14, 1994 Coupled with gasification, combustion turbine power generation also may provide attractive opportunities for other fuels, such as low-value residual oils and petroleum coke. Residual oil firing of boilers in large steam turbine-based power...

Karp, A. D.; Simbeck, D. R.

155

Turbines Off NYC East River Will Provide Power to 9,500 Residents |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Turbines Off NYC East River Will Provide Power to 9,500 Residents Turbines Off NYC East River Will Provide Power to 9,500 Residents Turbines Off NYC East River Will Provide Power to 9,500 Residents February 6, 2012 - 3:16pm Addthis Free Flow System turbine being installed in East River, New York, NY (Dec 2006). | Image Credit: Kris Unger/Verdant Power, Inc. Free Flow System turbine being installed in East River, New York, NY (Dec 2006). | Image Credit: Kris Unger/Verdant Power, Inc. Hoyt Battey Water Power Market Acceleration and Deployment Team Lead, Wind and Water Power Program What does this project do? The 30 turbines will generate 1,050 kilowatts of electricity -- this power will be delivered to 9,500 New York homes. As part of the Roosevelt Island Tidal Energy project, 30 turbines are being installed along the strait that connects the Long Island Sound with the

156

Advanced Power Plant Development and Analysis Methodologies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Under the sponsorship of the U.S. Department of Energy/National Energy Technology Laboratory, a multi-disciplinary team led by the Advanced Power and Energy Program of the University of California at Irvine is defining the system engineering issues associated with the integration of key components and subsystems into advanced power plant systems with goals of achieving high efficiency and minimized environmental impact while using fossil fuels. These power plant concepts include 'Zero Emission' power plants and the 'FutureGen' H2 co-production facilities. The study is broken down into three phases. Phase 1 of this study consisted of utilizing advanced technologies that are expected to be available in the 'Vision 21' time frame such as mega scale fuel cell based hybrids. Phase 2 includes current state-of-the-art technologies and those expected to be deployed in the nearer term such as advanced gas turbines and high temperature membranes for separating gas species and advanced gasifier concepts. Phase 3 includes identification of gas turbine based cycles and engine configurations suitable to coal-based gasification applications and the conceptualization of the balance of plant technology, heat integration, and the bottoming cycle for analysis in a future study. Also included in Phase 3 is the task of acquiring/providing turbo-machinery in order to gather turbo-charger performance data that may be used to verify simulation models as well as establishing system design constraints. The results of these various investigations will serve as a guide for the U. S. Department of Energy in identifying the research areas and technologies that warrant further support.

A.D. Rao; G.S. Samuelsen; F.L. Robson; B. Washom; S.G. Berenyi

2006-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

157

Advanced Power Plant Development and Analyses Methodologies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Under the sponsorship of the U.S. Department of Energy/National Energy Technology Laboratory, a multi-disciplinary team led by the Advanced Power and Energy Program of the University of California at Irvine is defining the system engineering issues associated with the integration of key components and subsystems into advanced power plant systems with goals of achieving high efficiency and minimized environmental impact while using fossil fuels. These power plant concepts include ''Zero Emission'' power plants and the ''FutureGen'' H{sub 2} co-production facilities. The study is broken down into three phases. Phase 1 of this study consisted of utilizing advanced technologies that are expected to be available in the ''Vision 21'' time frame such as mega scale fuel cell based hybrids. Phase 2 includes current state-of-the-art technologies and those expected to be deployed in the nearer term such as advanced gas turbines and high temperature membranes for separating gas species and advanced gasifier concepts. Phase 3 includes identification of gas turbine based cycles and engine configurations suitable to coal-based gasification applications and the conceptualization of the balance of plant technology, heat integration, and the bottoming cycle for analysis in a future study. Also included in Phase 3 is the task of acquiring/providing turbo-machinery in order to gather turbo-charger performance data that may be used to verify simulation models as well as establishing system design constraints. The results of these various investigations will serve as a guide for the U. S. Department of Energy in identifying the research areas and technologies that warrant further support.

G.S. Samuelsen; A.D. Rao

2006-02-06T23:59:59.000Z

158

Kemaliye Geothermal Power Plant | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Kemaliye Geothermal Power Plant Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Development Project: Kemaliye Geothermal Power Plant Project Location Information...

159

E-Print Network 3.0 - advanced turbine power Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

and the increased wind power penetration in power systems the main trend for modern wind turbines is clearly... variable speed operation and grid connection via ... Source: Ris...

160

Dynamic simulation of an oxygen mixed conducting membrane-based gas turbine power cycle for CO2 capture  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper investigates the transient behaviour of an oxygen mixed conducting membrane (OMCM)-based gas turbine (GT) power plant. Several operation and material constraints limit the operability of the power plant. For part-load operation two strategies are analysed: (i) reduction in mass flow of air to the GT in conjunction with reduced fuel supply to the afterburner while keeping the turbine exit temperature (TET) constant (TET control strategy), and (ii) reduction of fuel supply to the afterburner at constant air supply to the GT while the TET is allowed to vary (turbine inlet temperature (TIT) control strategy). Simulation reveals that this GT power plant shows rather slow dynamics because of the recirculation of large amount of gas. The OMCM-based GT power plant is compared to a simple GT power plant with respect to design, off-design as well as transient behaviour during load reduction. Information about controlled and manipulated variables in the GT power plant is given for the development of control strategy.

Konrad Eichhorn Colombo; Olav Bolland

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "turbine power plants" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Impact of DFIG wind turbines on transient stability of power systems a review  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Impact of DFIG wind turbines on transient stability of power systems ­ a review Authors Na Abstract of wind farms are using variable speed wind turbines equipped with doubly-fed induction generators (DFIG) due to their advantages over other wind turbine generators. Therefore, the analysis of wind power

Pota, Himanshu Roy

162

Reference value choice of the wind turbine active power with doubly-fed induction generator  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The variable speed wind turbine with doubly-fed induction generator (DFIG) is today widely used concept. This paper presents a control system of the DFIG wind turbine with focus on the control strategies and on active power reference value choice. The ... Keywords: DFIG, dynamic simulation, reference value of active power, wind turbine

J. Smajo; M. Smajo; D. Vukadinovic

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Power Smoothing Control in a Grid-Connected Marine Current Turbine System for Compensating  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Power Smoothing Control in a Grid-Connected Marine Current Turbine System for Compensating Swell d-axis and q-axis inductances g, g Grid inductance and resistance Pole pair number R Turbine blade-axis and q-axis voltages Turbine and generator power difference , g Rotor position, grid voltage angle

Boyer, Edmond

164

Louisiana Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Louisiana nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant NameTotal Reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear...

165

Test and evaluation of a solar powered gas turbine system  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper describes the test and the results of a first prototype solar powered gas turbine system, installed during 2002 in the CESA-1 tower facility at Plataforma Solar de Almería (PSA) in Spain. The main goals of the project were to develop a solar receiver cluster able to provide pressurized air of 1000 °C and solve the problems arising from the coupling of the receivers with a conventional gas turbine to demonstrate the operability of the system. The test set-up consists of the heliostat field of the CESA-1 facility providing the concentrated solar power, a pressurized solar receiver cluster of three modules of 400 kWth each which convert the solar power into heat, and a modified helicopter engine (OST3) with a generator coupled to the grid. The first test phase at PSA started in December 2002 with the goal to reach a temperature level of 800 °C at the combustor air inlet by the integration of solar energy. This objective was achieved by the end of this test phase in March 2003, and the system could be operated at 230 kWe power to grid without major problems. In the second test phase from June 2003 to August 2003 the temperature level was increased to almost 1000 °C. The paper describes the system configuration, the component efficiencies and the operation experiences of the first 100 h of solar operation of this very successful first test of a solar operated Brayton gas turbine system.

Peter Heller; Markus Pfänder; Thorsten Denk; Felix Tellez; Antonio Valverde; Jesús Fernandez; Arik Ring

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Coal-gasification/MHD/steam-turbine combined-cycle (GMS) power generation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The coal-gasification/MHD/steam-turbine combined cycle (GMS) refers to magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) systems in which coal gasification is used to supply a clean fuel (free of mineral matter and sulfur) for combustion in an MHD electrical power plant. Advantages of a clean-fuel system include the elimination of mineral matter or slag from all components other than the coal gasifier and gas cleanup system; reduced wear and corrosion on components; and increased seed recovery resulting from reduced exposure of seed to mineral matter or slag. Efficiencies in some specific GMS power plants are shown to be higher than for a comparably sized coal-burning MHD power plant. The use of energy from the MHD exhaust gas to gasify coal (rather than the typical approach of burning part of the coal) results in these higher efficiencies.

Lytle, J.M.; Marchant, D.D.

1980-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

Multivariable robust control of a simulated hybrid solid oxide fuel cell gas turbine plant.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??This work presents a systematic approach to the multivariable robust control of a hybrid fuel cell gas turbine plant. The hybrid configuration under investigation built… (more)

Tsai, Alex, 1973-

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Gas Turbine Based Power Cycles - A State-of-the-Art Review  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Gas turbines have been used in wide ranging applications ... This paper provides the historical evolution of the gas turbine (GT) based power cycles. A detailed ... , modified Brayton cycles under development by ...

R. K. Bhargava; M. Bianchi; A. De Pascale…

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Domestic equipment for the development of gas-turbine based power engineering  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A brief analysis of characteristics and specific features of foreign gas-turbine installations is presented. Prospects of introduction of combined-cycle and gas-turbine technologies in power engineering of Rus...

G. G. Ol’khovskii

2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Thermal Solar Power Plants Experience  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In parallel with rising interest in solar power generation, several solar thermal facilities of different configuration and size were ... were designed as modest-size experimental or prototype solar power plants ...

W. Grasse; H. P. Hertlein; C.-J. Winter; G. W. Braun

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Multi-point and Multi-level Solar Integration into a Conventional Coal-Fired Power Plant  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The integration assists the power plant to reduce coal (gas) consumption and pollution emission or to increase power output. ... The solar direct generated steam is used to replace part of the steam extractions from turbines. ... In other words, the solar heat carried by steam does not enter the turbine directly, different from that in other solar-power-generating systems. ...

Qin Yan; Yongping Yang; Akira Nishimura; Abbas Kouzani; Eric Hu

2010-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

172

Performance improvement of combined cycle power plant based on the optimization of the bottom cycle and heat recuperation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Many F class gas turbine combined cycle (GTCC) power plants are built in ... the efficiency improvement of GTCC plant. A combined cycle with three-pressure reheat heat recovery steam ... HRSG inlet gas temperatur...

Wenguo Xiang; Yingying Chen

2007-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Specific features of the schematic solutions adopted in the steam turbine units produced by the Ural Turbine Works and used as part of combined-cycle plants  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Specific features of the schematic solutions adopted in the steam turbine units designed and produced by the Ural Turbine Works for use as part of combined-cycle plants are considered.

A. A. Gol’dberg; T. L. Shibaev; H. C. Paneque Aguilera…

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Thermodynamics of combined-cycle electric power plants  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Published data imply an average thermal efficiency of about 0.34 for U.S. electricity generating plants. With clever use of thermodynamics and technology modern gas and steam turbines can be coupled to effect dramatic efficiency increases. These combined-cycle power plants now reach thermal efficiencies in excess of 0.60. It is shown how the laws of thermodynamics make this possible.

Harvey S. Leff

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Geothermal electric power plant status  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A status summary of the activity for the 44 proposed geothermal electric power plants in the United States as of March 31, 1981 is presented, as well as the power on-line electric plants to date. The information comes from the Department of Energy Geothermal Progress Monitor System (DOE, 1981).

Murphy, M.; Entingh, D.J.

1981-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

NETL Water and Power Plants  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Water and Power Plants Review Water and Power Plants Review A review meeting was held on June 20, 2006 of the NETL Water and Power Plants research program at the Pittsburgh NETL site. Thomas Feeley, Technology Manager for the Innovations for Existing Plants Program, gave background information and an overview of the Innovations for Existing Plants Water Program. Ongoing/Ending Projects Alternative Water Sources Michael DiFilippo, a consultant for EPRI, presented results from the project "Use of Produced Water in Recirculated Cooling Systems at Power Generating Facilities". John Rodgers, from Clemson University, presented results from the project "An Innovative System for the Efficient and Effective Treatment of Non-traditional Waters for Reuse in Thermoelectric Power Generation".

177

Minnkota Power Cooperative Wind Turbine (Valley City) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

City) City) Jump to: navigation, search Name Minnkota Power Cooperative Wind Turbine (Valley City) Facility Minnkota Power Cooperative Wind Turbine (Valley City) Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Minnkota Power Cooperative Developer Minnkota Power Cooperative Energy Purchaser Minnkota Power Cooperative Location East of Valley City - Oriska Hills ND Coordinates 46.918681°, -97.891581° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":46.918681,"lon":-97.891581,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

178

Thermodynamic analysis of a closed-cycle, solar gas-turbine plant  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Thermodynamic analysis of a closed-cycle, Brayton gas-turbine plant with a heat exchanger powered by the sun has been studied. A Brayton cycle is simpler than a Rankine cycle and has an advantage in places where water is scarce and expensive. A simple expression is derived for calculating the efficiency of the cycle in terms of the compression pressure ratio, the pressure loss coefficient and the ratio of the lower to higher temperature in the cycle with the efficiency of various components. The maximum permissible pressure loss coefficient has also been calculated.

P. Gandhidasan

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Power control of a wind farm with active stall wind turbines and AC grid connection  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Power control of a wind farm with active stall wind turbines and AC grid connection Anca D. Hansen1 controller for a wind farm made-up exclusively of active stall wind turbines with AC grid connection wind farm control involves both the control on wind turbine level as well as the central control

180

Power Limitation Control for a PMSG-Based Marine Current Turbine at High Tidal Speed and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Power Limitation Control for a PMSG-Based Marine Current Turbine at High Tidal Speed and Strong Sea Abstract--This paper deals with the control strategies for a fixed-pitch marine current turbine (MCT) when the nominal MPPT tracking speed during high speed marine currents. In the speed control strategy, the turbine

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "turbine power plants" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

The Use of Tall Tower Field Data for Estimating Wind Turbine Power Performance , J. Chapman1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Use of Tall Tower Field Data for Estimating Wind Turbine Power Performance A. Swift1 , J wind speed measurements on the TTU WISE 200m and 78m towers. A hypothetical wind turbine is shown. At potential wind turbine sites, it is uncommon to have wind measurements available at multiple heights. Then

Manuel, Lance

182

Owners of nuclear power plants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Commercial nuclear power plants in this country can be owned by a number of separate entities, each with varying ownership proportions. Each of these owners may, in turn, have a parent/subsidiary relationship to other companies. In addition, the operator of the plant may be a different entity as well. This report provides a compilation on the owners/operators for all commercial power reactors in the United States. While the utility industry is currently experiencing changes in organizational structure which may affect nuclear plant ownership, the data in this report is current as of July 1996. The report is divided into sections representing different aspects of nuclear plant ownership.

Hudson, C.R.; White, V.S.

1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Illinois Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Illinois nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" Illinois nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant name/total reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net generation (percent)","Owner" "Braidwood Generation Station Unit 1, Unit 2","2,330","19,200",20.0,"Exelon Nuclear" "Byron Generating Station Unit 1, Unit 2","2,300","19,856",20.6,"Exelon Nuclear" "Clinton Power Station Unit 1","1,065","8,612",9.0,"Exelon Nuclear" "Dresden Generating Station Unit 2, Unit 3","1,734","14,593",15.2,"Exelon Nuclear" "LaSalle Generating Station

184

Numerical Modeling and Optimization of Power Generation from Shrouded Wind Turbines.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??In recent years, it has been theoretically suggested by some researchers that the power coefficient of a wind turbine can be increased beyond the Betz… (more)

Foote, Tudor

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

DSM Power Plant in India  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

India is facing acute energy shortage that is likely to affect its economic development. There are severe supply side constraints in term of coal and gas shortages that are likely to continue in the near future. Hence, in its current focus to solving the energy shortage problem and sustaining the development trajectory, the country should aim at a balance between supply side and demand side measures. Energy Efficiency in end use is increasingly gaining importance as one of the most cost effective options for achieving short to medium term energy savings. India has initiated the National Mission for Enhanced Energy Efficiency under National Action Plan for Climate Change which addresses various aspects of energy efficiency such as technology, financing, fiscal incentive and also creation of energy efficiency as a market instrument. However, even though energy efficiency has substantial scope in the Indian subcontinent, the market for energy efficiency has been limited. This paper discusses the concept of mega Demand Side Management projects as a DSM Power Plant. A DSM Power Plant acts as an umbrella with multiple energy efficiency schemes under its ambit aimed at transforming energy efficiency into a business by providing a push to the scale of operation as well as financial sustenance to energy efficiency projects. This paper expounds on the various aspects of DSM Power Plant in terms of its policy and institutional mechanism for the large scale implementation of energy efficiency in India. This paper provides an illustration of the concept of DSM Power Plant model through a case study in one of the states (Rajasthan) of India. Further, a comparative analysis of the cost of generation from DSM Power Plant and a representative conventional power plant (CPP) in Rajasthan has been undertaken and the DSM Power Plant comes out to be a more cost effective option. The concept of DSM Power Plant will not only address the issue of energy shortages but will also help the financially thwarted utilities to reduce their revenue deficit in the near future.

Saurabh Gupta; Tanushree Bhattacharya

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Tuzla Geothermal Power Plant | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Tuzla Geothermal Power Plant Facility Power Plant Sector Geothermal energy Location Information Location Ayvacik, Canakkale Coordinates 39.553940696342, 26.161228192504 Loading...

187

Okeanskaya Geothermal Power Plant | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Plant Information Facility Type Single Flash Owner Ministry of Natural Resources of Russia Commercial Online Date 2007 Power Plant Data Type of Plant Number of Generating Units...

188

Mendeleevskaya Geothermal Power Plant | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Plant Information Facility Type Single Flash Owner Ministry of Natural Resources of Russia Commercial Online Date 2007 Power Plant Data Type of Plant Number of Generating Units...

189

Cooled turbine blades in the GTÉ-65 gas turbine power unit  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Experience with the development, study, and manufacturing of cooled blades for the GTÉ-65 high temperature gas turbine is described.

V. V. Rtishchev; V. V. Krivonosova; Yu. M. Sundukov…

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Rankine cycle power plant with improved organic working fluid  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In a Rankine cycle power plant having a boiler for vaporizing an organic working fluid which is applied to a turbine in which vaporized working fluid produced by the boiler expands and produces work, a condenser for condensing expanded vaporized working fluid exhausted by the turbine and producing condensate, and means for returning the condensate to the boiler, the improvement is described comprising: (a) operating the boiler so that the organic fluid vaporizes at substantially constant pressure and a temperature not exceeding 400/sup 0/C; (b) applying only vaporized working fluid to the turbine; and (c) using as the working fluid, a compound selected from the group consisting of bicyclic hydrocarbons, substituted bicyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, heterobicyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, substituted heterobicyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, bicyclic compounds where one ring is aromatic and the other condensed ring is nonaromatic, and their mixtures.

Yogev, A.; Mahlab, D.

1988-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

191

Turbines  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... with his torical notes and some explanations of the principles involved in the working of turbines. This is fol lowed by three chapters on water-wheels, ... . This is fol lowed by three chapters on water-wheels, turbine pumps, and water ...

1922-02-09T23:59:59.000Z

192

Optimization of wind turbine energy and power factor with an evolutionary computation algorithm  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Optimization of wind turbine energy and power factor with an evolutionary computation algorithm the energy capture from the wind and enhance the quality of the power produced by the wind turbine, and harmonic distortion. As the generation of wind energy on an industrial scale is relatively new, the area

Kusiak, Andrew

193

NETL: News Release - Premier Power Plant Test Facility Achieves Milestone,  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

May 8, 2000 May 8, 2000 Premier Power Plant Test Facility Achieves Milestone,Raises Hopes for New Clean Coal Technology The world's premier test facility for future power plants has achieved a major milestone - and in the process, raised prospects for a new class of coal technology that researchers now believe could lead to cleaner, more efficient and lower cost electric power generation. The Power System Development Facility The Power System Development Facility at Wilsonville, Alabama, is the Nation's state-of-the-art test facility for 21st century power generating technologies. The U.S. Department of Energy and Southern Company today jointly announced the first successful test of a new type of technology for turning coal into gas. The gas could then be used in future turbines or fuel cells to

194

Combined Cycle (CC) and Combined Heat and Power (CHP) Systems: An Introduction  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Combined Cycle (CC)...is a power plant system in which two types of turbines, namely a gas turbine and a steam turbine, are used to generate electricity. Moreover the turbines are combined in one cycle

Andrzej W. Ordys MScEE; PhD; A. W. Pike…

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Practitioner Perspectives Matter: Public Policy and Private Investment in the U.S. Electric Power Sector  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

a boom-bust cycle in wind power plant investment in the U.S.tax credit for wind turbine power plants is an ineffectivewind power and became comfortable with turbine technology and plant

Barradale, Merrill Jones

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

NETL: Turbines - Oxy-Fuel Turbines  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Oxy-Fuel Turbines Oxy-Fuel Turbines Oxy-fuel combustion potentially can be used in plants based on both conventional and advanced technology. Studies have shown that plants equipped with oxy-fuel systems could reach nominal efficiencies in the 30 percent range with today's steam turbines when fueled with natural gas and when capturing the CO2. With anticipated advances in gasification, oxygen separation, and steam turbine technology, plants using oxy-fuel systems are expected to achieve efficiencies in the mid-40 percent range, with near-100 percent CO2 capture and near-zero NOx emissions. By 2012: In the near-term, efforts are focused on the development of oxy- fuel turbine and combustor technologies for highly efficient (50-60 percent), near-zero emissions, coal-based power systems

197

Automating controller tuning for gas-turbine mini power stations in computer testing  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We justify the application of mathematical modeling methods for electric power systems in order to automate the tuning of controllers in control systems of gas-turbine power stations constructed on the basis of c...

A. I. Polulyakh; I. G. Lisovin; B. V. Kavalerov…

2014-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Conservation Screening Curves to Compare Efficiency Investments to Power Plants  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

yr) Combustion Turbine Combined- Cycle Oil Coal Steam A B oJ I J J J GAS TURBINE COMBINED-CYCLE (OIL) BASELOAD COAL I JB. Intermediate Combined-Cycle Oil This plant represents an

Koomey, J.G.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Power plant | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Power plant Power plant Dataset Summary Description No description given. Source Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Date Released January 26th, 2009 (5 years ago) Date Updated June 07th, 2010 (4 years ago) Keywords eGrid eGRID2007 EIA Electricity emissions epa Power plant Data application/zip icon eGRID2007_Version1-1.zip (zip, 18.7 MiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Some Review Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Time Period License License Other or unspecified, see optional comment below Comment Work of the U.S. Federal Government. Rate this dataset Usefulness of the metadata Average vote Your vote Usefulness of the dataset Average vote Your vote Ease of access Average vote Your vote Overall rating Average vote Your vote Comments Login or register to post comments

200

Researching power plant water recovery  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A range of projects supported by NETl under the Innovations for Existing Plant Program are investigating modifications to power plant cooling systems for reducing water loss, and recovering water from the flue gas and the cooling tower. This paper discusses two technologies showing particular promise condense water that is typically lost to evaporation, SPX technologies' Air2Air{sup trademark} condenses water from a cooling tower, while Lehigh University's process condenses water and acid in flue gas. 3 figs.

NONE

2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "turbine power plants" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Development of High-Capacity Desalination Plant Driven by Offshore Wind Turbine  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper presents a development of the desalination plant based on the concept of the Wind Energy Marine Unit (WEMU) which is the high-capacity offshore wind turbine with the floating rotor. The great potential...

Valery V. Cheboxarov; Victor V. Cheboxarov

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Floating axis wind turbines for offshore power generation—a conceptual study  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The cost of energy produced by offshore wind turbines is considered to be higher than land based ones because of the difficulties in construction, operation and maintenance on offshore sites. To solve the problem, we propose a concept of a wind turbine that is specially designed for an offshore environment. In the proposed concept, a floater of revolutionary shape supports the load of the wind turbine axis. The floater rotates with the turbine and the turbine axis tilts to balance the turbine thrust, buoyancy and gravity. The tilt angle is passively adjustable to wind force. The angle is 30° at rated power. The simplicity of the system leads to further cost reduction of offshore power generation.

Hiromichi Akimoto; Kenji Tanaka; Kiyoshi Uzawa

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Structural responses and power output of a wind turbine are strongly affected by the wind field acting on the wind turbine. Knowledge about the wind field and its  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ABSTRACT Structural responses and power output of a wind turbine are strongly affected by the wind affect the power output and structural responses of a wind turbine. Wind field characteristics are conventionally described by time averaged features, such as mean wind speed, turbulence intensity and power

Stanford University

204

Solar thermionic power plant (II)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

It has been shown that the geometric configuration of a central receiver solar electric power plant (SEPP) can be optimized for the high power density and concentration required for the operation of a thermionic converter. The working period of a Thermionic Diode Converter constructed on the top of a SEPP in Riyadh area is found to be 5 to 6 hours per day in winter and 6 to 8 hours in summer. 17 refs.

Abou-Elfotouh, F.; Almassary, M.; Fatmi, H.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Natural Gas Combined Cycle Power Plant Integrated to Capture Plant  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Natural Gas Combined Cycle Power Plant Integrated to Capture Plant ... A natural gas combined cycle (NGCC) power plant with capacity of about 430 MW integrated to a chemical solvent absorber/stripping capture plant is investigated. ... The natural gas combined cycle (NGCC) is an advanced power generation technology that improves the fuel efficiency of natural gas. ...

Mehdi Karimi; Magne Hillestad; Hallvard F. Svendsen

2012-01-19T23:59:59.000Z

206

Steady-state analysis of a conceptual offshore wind turbine driven electricity and thermocline energy extraction plant  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract A system for using offshore wind energy to generate electricity and simultaneously extract thermal energy is proposed. This concept is based on an offshore wind turbine driven hydraulic pump supplying deep seawater under high pressure to a land based plant consisting of a hydroelectric power generation unit and heat exchanger. A steady-state system model is developed using empirical formulae. The mathematical model comprises the fundamental system sub-models that are categorised as the rotor, hydraulic pump, pipeline, hydroelectric turbine and heat exchanger. A means for modelling the seawater temperature field across a two-dimensional bathymetry is also discussed. These mathematical models are integrated into a computational tool and a brief parametric static analysis is undertaken. The results illustrate the effect of pipeline diameter, rotational speed of the grid connected hydroelectric turbine, and the turbine distance from shore on the overall performance of the system. Through adequate parameter selection, the total rate of energy output for such a system, consisting of both electricity and thermal energy, is shown to increase by as much as 84%, when compared to a conventional wind turbine having an identical rotor diameter but which supplies only electrical energy.

Daniel Buhagiar; Tonio Sant

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

CERTIFICATION DOCKET WESTINGHOUSE ATOMIC POWER DEVELOPMENT PLANT  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

WESTINGHOUSE ATOMIC POWER DEVELOPMENT PLANT WESTINGHOUSE ATOMIC POWER DEVELOPMENT PLANT EAST PITTSBURGH PLANT FOREST HILLS PITTSBURGH, PENNSYLVANIA Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy Office of Terminal Waste Disposal and Remedial Action Division of Remedial Action Projects ..-.. --__- _".-.-l--_--l -_._ _- --- ~~~. . ..~ CONTENTS Page - - I NTRODUCTI ON 1 Purpose 1 Docket Contents 1 Exhibit I: Summary of Activities at Westinghouse Atomic Power Development Plant, East Pittsburgh Plant, Forest Hills, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania I-l Exhibit II: Documents Supporting the Certification of Westinghouse Atomic Power Development Plant, East Pittsburgh Plant, Forest Hills, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania iii II-1 . . .- .__.^ I ^_... _.-__^-____-. - CERTIFICATION DOCKET WESTINGHOUSE ATOMIC POWER DEVELOPMENT PLANT

208

Fuel Cell Power PlantsFuel Cell Power Plants Renewable and Waste Fuels  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of stationary fuel Premier developer of stationary fuel cell technology -- founded in 1969 · Over 50 efficiency 60% DFC-ERGDFC ERG DFC/Turbine 58 ­ 70% Direct FuelCell (DFC)* 47% Natural Gas Engines Small Gas 30 ­ 42% Turbines * Combined Heat & Power 25 ­35% Micro- (CHP)) fuel cell applications( pp

209

Multivariable Robust Control of a Simulated Hybrid Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Gas Turbine Plant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This work presents a systematic approach to the multivariable robust control of a hybrid fuel cell gas turbine plant. The hybrid configuration under investigation built by the National Energy Technology Laboratory comprises a physical simulation of a 300kW fuel cell coupled to a 120kW auxiliary power unit single spool gas turbine. The public facility provides for the testing and simulation of different fuel cell models that in turn help identify the key difficulties encountered in the transient operation of such systems. An empirical model of the built facility comprising a simulated fuel cell cathode volume and balance of plant components is derived via frequency response data. Through the modulation of various airflow bypass valves within the hybrid configuration, Bode plots are used to derive key input/output interactions in transfer function format. A multivariate system is then built from individual transfer functions, creating a matrix that serves as the nominal plant in an H{sub {infinity}} robust control algorithm. The controller’s main objective is to track and maintain hybrid operational constraints in the fuel cell’s cathode airflow, and the turbo machinery states of temperature and speed, under transient disturbances. This algorithm is then tested on a Simulink/MatLab platform for various perturbations of load and fuel cell heat effluence. As a complementary tool to the aforementioned empirical plant, a nonlinear analytical model faithful to the existing process and instrumentation arrangement is evaluated and designed in the Simulink environment. This parallel task intends to serve as a building block to scalable hybrid configurations that might require a more detailed nonlinear representation for a wide variety of controller schemes and hardware implementations.

Tsai A, Banta L, Tucker D

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Power Transmission, Distribution and Plants  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Power Transmission, Distribution and Plants A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z Abdel-Aal, Radwan E. - Computer Engineering Department, King Fahd University of...

211

Pennsylvania Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Pennsylvania nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" Pennsylvania nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant name/total reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net generation (percent)","Owner" "Beaver Valley Unit 1, Unit 2","1,777","14,994",19.3,"FirstEnergy Nuclear Operating Company" "Limerick Unit 1, Unit 2","2,264","18,926",24.3,"Exelon Nuclear" "PPL Susquehanna Unit 1, Unit 2","2,450","18,516",23.8,"PPL Susquehanna LLC" "Peach Bottom Unit 2, Unit 3","2,244","18,759",24.1,"Exelon Nuclear" "Three Mile Island Unit 1",805,"6,634",8.5,"Exelon Nuclear"

212

Offshore Floating Wind Turbine-driven Deep Sea Water Pumping for Combined Electrical Power and District Cooling  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A new concept utilising floating wind turbines to exploit the low temperatures of deep sea water for space cooling in buildings is presented. The approach is based on offshore hydraulic wind turbines pumping pressurised deep sea water to a centralised plant consisting of a hydro-electric power system coupled to a large-scale sea water-cooled air conditioning (AC) unit of an urban district cooling network. In order to investigate the potential advantages of this new concept over conventional technologies, a simplified model for performance simulation of a vapour compression AC unit was applied independently to three different systems, with the AC unit operating with (1) a constant flow of sea surface water, (2) a constant flow of sea water consisting of a mixture of surface sea water and deep sea water delivered by a single offshore hydraulic wind turbine and (3) an intermittent flow of deep sea water pumped by a single offshore hydraulic wind turbine. The analysis was based on one year of wind and ambient temperature data for the Central Mediterranean that is known for its deep waters, warm climate and relatively low wind speeds. The study confirmed that while the present concept is less efficient than conventional turbines utilising grid-connected electrical generators, a significant portion of the losses associated with the hydraulic transmission through the pipeline are offset by the extraction of cool deep sea water which reduces the electricity consumption of urban air-conditioning units.

T Sant; D Buhagiar; R N Farrugia

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Map of Solar Power Plants/Data | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Solar Power Plants/Data Solar Power Plants/Data < Map of Solar Power Plants Jump to: navigation, search Download a CSV file of the table below: CSV FacilityType Owner Developer EnergyPurchaser Place GeneratingCapacity NumberOfUnits CommercialOnlineDate HeatRate WindTurbineManufacturer FacilityStatus AV Solar Ranch I Solar Power Plant Photovoltaics NextLight Renewable Power Antelope Valley, California 230 MW230,000 kW 230,000,000 W 230,000,000,000 mW 0.23 GW 2.3e-4 TW Agua Caliente Solar Power Plant Photovoltaics NextLight Renewable Power Yuma County, Arizona 280 MW280,000 kW 280,000,000 W 280,000,000,000 mW 0.28 GW 2.8e-4 TW Agua Caliente Solar Project Utility scale solar First Solar Yuma County, Arizona 290 MW290,000 kW 290,000,000 W 290,000,000,000 mW

214

North Carolina Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Carolina nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear...

215

New Jersey Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net...

216

New Hampshire Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (nw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net...

217

Matsukawa Geothermal Power Plant | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Information Name Matsukawa Geothermal Power Plant Facility ower Plant Sector Geothermal energy Location Information Location Iwate, Japan Coordinates 39.980897288029,...

218

Gas Turbine Manufacturers Perspective  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Viability and Experience of IGCC From a Viability and Experience of IGCC From a Gas Turbine Manufacturers Perspective ASME - IGCC ASME - IGCC Turbo Turbo Expo Expo June 2001 June 2001 GE Power Systems g Klaus Brun, Ph.D. - Manager Process Power Plant Product & Market Development Robert M. Jones - Project Development Manager Process Power Plants Power Systems Power Systems General Electric Company General Electric Company ABSTRACT GE Power Systems g Economic Viability and Experience of IGCC From a Gas Turbine Manufacturers Perspective High natural gas fuel gas prices combined with new technology developments have made IGCC a competitive option when compared to conventional combined cycle or coal steam turbine cycles. Although the initial investment costs for an IGCC plant are still comparatively high, the low

219

MHK Technologies/Uldolmok Pilot Tidal Current Power Plant | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Uldolmok Pilot Tidal Current Power Plant Uldolmok Pilot Tidal Current Power Plant < MHK Technologies Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Uldolmok Pilot Tidal Current Power Plant.jpg Technology Profile Primary Organization Korea East West Power Co LTD Technology Resource Click here Current Technology Type Click here Overtopping Technology Readiness Level Click here TRL 9 Commercial Scale Production Application Technology Description The tidal current power plant uses current energy that can be differentiated from a typical tidal power plant using marine energy The latter confines water in a dam and when released it gets processed in a turbine to produce electric power The tidal current power plant on the other hand does not need a dam thus concerns of social dislocations and degradation of ecosystems primarily endangering marine life can be avoided

220

Turbine layout for and optimization of solar chimney power conversion units.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??ENGLISH ABSTRACT: The power conversion unit of a large solar chimney power plant converts the fluid power, first into mechanical power, and then into electrical… (more)

Fluri, Thomas Peter

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "turbine power plants" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Partial Oxidation Gas Turbine for Power and Hydrogen Co-Production from Coal-Derived Fuel in Industrial Applications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The report presents a feasibility study of a new type of gas turbine. A partial oxidation gas turbine (POGT) shows potential for really high efficiency power generation and ultra low emissions. There are two main features that distinguish a POGT from a conventional gas turbine. These are associated with the design arrangement and the thermodynamic processes used in operation. A primary design difference of the POGT is utilization of a non?catalytic partial oxidation reactor (POR) in place of a conventional combustor. Another important distinction is that a much smaller compressor is required, one that typically supplies less than half of the air flow required in a conventional gas turbine. From an operational and thermodynamic point of view a key distinguishing feature is that the working fluid, fuel gas provided by the OR, has a much higher specific heat than lean combustion products and more energy per unit mass of fluid can be extracted by the POGT expander than in the conventional systems. The POGT exhaust stream contains unreacted fuel that can be combusted in different bottoming ycle or used as syngas for hydrogen or other chemicals production. POGT studies include feasibility design for conversion a conventional turbine to POGT duty, and system analyses of POGT based units for production of power solely, and combined production of power and yngas/hydrogen for different applications. Retrofit design study was completed for three engines, SGT 800, SGT 400, and SGT 100, and includes: replacing the combustor with the POR, compressor downsizing for about 50% design flow rate, generator replacement with 60 90% ower output increase, and overall unit integration, and extensive testing. POGT performances for four turbines with power output up to 350 MW in POGT mode were calculated. With a POGT as the topping cycle for power generation systems, the power output from the POGT ould be increased up to 90% compared to conventional engine keeping hot section temperatures, pressures, and volumetric flows practically identical. In POGT mode, the turbine specific power (turbine net power per lb mass flow from expander exhaust) is twice the value of the onventional turbine. POGT based IGCC plant conceptual design was developed and major components have been identified. Fuel flexible fluid bed gasifier, and novel POGT unit are the key components of the 100 MW IGCC plant for co producing electricity, hydrogen and/or yngas. Plant performances were calculated for bituminous coal and oxygen blown versions. Various POGT based, natural gas fueled systems for production of electricity only, coproduction of electricity and hydrogen, and co production of electricity and syngas for gas to liquid and hemical processes were developed and evaluated. Performance calculations for several versions of these systems were conducted. 64.6 % LHV efficiency for fuel to electricity in combined cycle was achieved. Such a high efficiency arise from using of syngas from POGT exhaust s a fuel that can provide required temperature level for superheated steam generation in HRSG, as well as combustion air preheating. Studies of POGT materials and combustion instabilities in POR were conducted and results reported. Preliminary market assessment was performed, and recommendations for POGT systems applications in oil industry were defined. POGT technology is ready to proceed to the engineering prototype stage, which is recommended.

Joseph Rabovitser

2009-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

222

Xi an Nordex Wind Turbine Co Ltd aka Xi an Weide Wind Power Equipment Co  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Xi an Nordex Wind Turbine Co Ltd aka Xi an Weide Wind Power Equipment Co Xi an Nordex Wind Turbine Co Ltd aka Xi an Weide Wind Power Equipment Co Ltd Jump to: navigation, search Name Xi'an Nordex Wind Turbine Co Ltd (aka Xi'an Weide Wind Power Equipment Co Ltd) Place Xi An, Shaanxi Province, China Zip 710021 Sector Wind energy Product Subsidiary of Xiâ€(tm)an Aero-Engine that manufactures its 600kW wind turbines in Xi An, China. References Xi'an Nordex Wind Turbine Co Ltd (aka Xi'an Weide Wind Power Equipment Co Ltd)[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Xi'an Nordex Wind Turbine Co Ltd (aka Xi'an Weide Wind Power Equipment Co Ltd) is a company located in Xi An, Shaanxi Province, China . References ↑ "[ Xi'an Nordex Wind Turbine Co Ltd (aka Xi'an Weide Wind

223

Different Factors Affecting Short Circuit Behavior of a Wind Power Plant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A wind power plant consists of a large number of turbines interconnected by underground cable. A pad-mount transformer at each turbine steps up the voltage from generating voltage (690 V) to a medium voltage (34.5 kV). All turbines in the plant are connected to the substation transformer where the voltage is stepped up to the transmission level. An important aspect of wind power plant (WPP) impact studies is to evaluate the short-circuit (SC) current contribution of the plant into the transmission network under different fault conditions. This task can be challenging to protection engineers due to the topology differences between different types of wind turbine generators (WTGs) and the conventional generating units. This paper investigates the short circuit behavior of a wind power plant for different types of faults. The impact of wind turbine types, the transformer configuration, and the reactive compensation capacitor will be investigated. The voltage response at different buses will be observed. Finally, the SC line currents will be presented along with its symmetrical components.

Muljadi, E.; Samaan, Nader A.; Gevorgian, Vahan; Li, Jun; Pasupulati, Subbaiah

2010-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

224

Different Factors Affecting Short Circuit Behavior of a Wind Power Plant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A wind power plant consists of a large number of turbines interconnected by underground cable. A pad-mount transformer at each turbine steps up the voltage from generating voltage (690 V) to a medium voltage (34.5 kV). All turbines in the plant are connected to the substation transformer where the voltage is stepped up to the transmission level. An important aspect of wind power plant (WPP) impact studies is to evaluate the short-circuit (SC) current contribution of the plant into the transmission network under different fault conditions. This task can be challenging to protection engineers due to the topology differences between different types of wind turbine generators (WTGs) and the conventional generating units. This paper investigates the short circuit behavior of a wind power plant for different types of faults. The impact of wind turbine types, the transformer configuration, and the reactive compensation capacitor will be investigated. The voltage response at different buses will be observed. Finally, the SC line currents will be presented along with its symmetrical components.

Muljadi, E.; Samaan, Nader A.; Gevorgian, Vahan; Li, Jun; Pasupulati, Subbaiah

2013-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

225

Energeticals power plant engineering | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Energeticals power plant engineering Energeticals power plant engineering Jump to: navigation, search Name energeticals power plant engineering Place München, Bavaria, Germany Zip 81371 Sector Biomass, Geothermal energy Product Planning, design, installation and operation of turnkey plants for heat and electricity generation in the field of solid Biomass, deep and shallow geothermal energy and water power. References energeticals power plant engineering[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. energeticals power plant engineering is a company located in München, Bavaria, Germany . References ↑ "[ energeticals power plant engineering]" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Energeticals_power_plant_engineering&oldid=344770

226

Integrated Coal Gasification Power Plant Credit (Kansas)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Integrated Coal Gasification Power Plant Credit states that an income taxpayer that makes a qualified investment in a new integrated coal gasification power plant or in the expansion of an existing...

227

Augmentation of Power Output of Axisymmetric Ducted Wind Turbines by Porous Trailing Edge Disks  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This paper presents analytical and experimental results that demonstrated that the power output from a ducted wind turbine can be dramatically increased by the addition of a trailing edge device such as a porous disk. In ...

widnall, sheila

2014-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

228

Acoustic and thermal packaging of small gas turbines for portable power  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

To meet the increasing demand for advanced portable power units, for example for use in personal electronics and robotics, a number of studies have focused on portable small gas turbines. This research is concerned with ...

Tanaka, Shinji, S.M. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Dynamic modeling and direct power control of wind turbine driven DFIG under unbalanced network voltage conditions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper proposes an analysis and a direct power control (DPC) design of a wind turbine driven doubly-fed induction generator (DFIG) under unbalanced network voltage conditions. A DFIG model described in the po...

Jia-bing Hu; Yi-kang He; Lie Xu

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Distributed Low-Complexity Controller for Wind Power Plant in Derated Benjamin Biegel Daria Madjidian Vedrana Spudic Anders Rantzer Jakob Stoustrup  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Distributed Low-Complexity Controller for Wind Power Plant in Derated Operation Benjamin Biegel Daria Madjidian Vedrana Spudi´c Anders Rantzer Jakob Stoustrup Abstract-- We consider a wind power plant of megawatt wind turbines operating in derated mode. When operating in this mode, the wind power plant

231

Specialized Materials and Fluids and Power Plants  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Below are the project presentations and respective peer review results for Specialized Materials and Fluids and Power Plants.

232

Tracking New Coal-Fired Power Plants  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

New Coal-Fired Power Plants New Coal-Fired Power Plants (data update 1/13/2012) January 13, 2012 National Energy Technology Laboratory Office of Strategic Energy Analysis & Planning Erik Shuster 2 Tracking New Coal-Fired Power Plants This report is intended to provide an overview of proposed new coal-fired power plants that are under development. This report may not represent all possible plants under consideration but is intended to illustrate the potential that exists for installation of new coal-fired power plants. Additional perspective has been added for non-coal-fired generation additions in the U.S. and coal-fired power plant activity in China. Experience has shown that public announcements of power plant developments do not provide an accurate representation of eventually

233

Combustion Turbine CHP System for Food Processing Industry -...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

congestion on the constrained Northeast power grid. The fact sheet contains performance data from the plant after one year of operation. Combustion Turbine CHP System for Food...

234

Guadalupe Power Plant Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Power Plant Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Guadalupe Power Plant Biomass Facility Facility Guadalupe Power Plant Sector Biomass Facility Type Landfill Gas...

235

Evaluation of operational control strategies applicable to solar chimney power plants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Numerical simulations are carried out to study the performance of two schemes of power output control applicable to solar chimney power plants. Either the volume flow or the turbine pressure drop is used as independent control variable. Values found in the literature for the optimum ratio of turbine pressure drop to pressure potential vary between 2/3 and 0.97. It is shown that the optimum ratio is not constant during the whole day and it is dependent of the heat transfer coefficients applied to the collector. This study is a contribution towards understanding solar chimney power plant performance and control and may be useful in the design of solar chimney turbines. (author)

Bernardes, Marco Aurelio dos Santos [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Centro Federal de Educacao Tecnologica de Minas Gerais - CEFET-MG, Av. Amazonas, 7675, Nova Gameleira, 30510-000 Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); von Backstroem, Theodor W. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Stellenbosch, Private Bag X1, Matieland 7602 (South Africa)

2010-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

236

A numerical method for calculation of power output from ducted vertical axis hydro-current turbines  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This paper investigates effects of ducting on power output from vertical axis hydro-current turbines. A numerical two-dimensional method based on the potential flow theory is developed for calculation of non-dimensional power output from these turbines. In this method, the blades are represented by vortex filaments. The vortex shedding from the blades is modeled by discrete vortices. A boundary element method is used to incorporate the duct shape which is represented by a series of panels with constant distributions of sources and doublets. The aerodynamic loading on the blades are calculated using a quasi-steady modeling. A time-marching scheme is used for implementation of the numerical method. The results of this method are compared with experimental results for a turbine model. A good correlation between the numerical and experimental results is obtained for tip speed ratios equal and higher than 2.25. However due to a lack of dynamic stall modeling, the numerical method is not able to predict power output accurately at lower tip speed ratios wherein effects of dynamic stall are significant. Both numerical and experimental results also showed that the power output from a turbine can increase significantly when it is enclosed within a well-designed duct. The maximum power output of the turbine model investigated in this paper showed a 74% increase when the turbine is operating within the duct relative to the case it is in free-stream conditions.

Mahmoud Alidadi; Sander Calisal

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Steam turbines of the T-50/60-8.8, K-63-8.8, and Tp-100/110-8.8 types destined for modernization of thermal power plants with K-50-90 and K-100-90 turbines  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper describes the design, schemes of regulation, and control and protection of steam turbines of the T-50/60-8.8, ... of K-50-90 and K-100-90 turbines that have very low efficiency and exhausted...

A. Ye. Valamin; A. Yu. Kultyshev; Yu. A. Sakhnin; M. V. Shekhter…

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Indirect-fired gas turbine dual fuel cell power cycle  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A fuel cell and gas turbine combined cycle system which includes dual fuel cell cycles combined with a gas turbine cycle wherein a solid oxide fuel cell cycle operated at a pressure of between 6 to 15 atms tops the turbine cycle and is used to produce CO.sub.2 for a molten carbonate fuel cell cycle which bottoms the turbine and is operated at essentially atmospheric pressure. A high pressure combustor is used to combust the excess fuel from the topping fuel cell cycle to further heat the pressurized gas driving the turbine. A low pressure combustor is used to combust the excess fuel from the bottoming fuel cell to reheat the gas stream passing out of the turbine which is used to preheat the pressurized air stream entering the topping fuel cell before passing into the bottoming fuel cell cathode. The CO.sub.2 generated in the solid oxide fuel cell cycle cascades through the system to the molten carbonate fuel cell cycle cathode.

Micheli, Paul L. (Sacramento, CA); Williams, Mark C. (Morgantown, WV); Sudhoff, Frederick A. (Morgantown, WV)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

A Silicon-Based Micro Gas Turbine Engine for Power Generation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This paper reports on our research in developing a micro power generation system based on gas turbine engine and piezoelectric converter. The micro gas turbine engine consists of a micro combustor, a turbine and a centrifugal compressor. Comprehensive simulation has been implemented to optimal the component design. We have successfully demonstrated a silicon-based micro combustor, which consists of seven layers of silicon structures. A hairpin-shaped design is applied to the fuel/air recirculation channel. The micro combustor can sustain a stable combustion with an exit temperature as high as 1600 K. We have also successfully developed a micro turbine device, which is equipped with enhanced micro air-bearings and driven by compressed air. A rotation speed of 15,000 rpm has been demonstrated during lab test. In this paper, we will introduce our research results major in the development of micro combustor and micro turbine test device.

Shan, X -C; Maeda, R; Sun, Y F; Wu, M; Hua, J S

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Nuclear power pros and cons: A comparative analysis of radioactive emissions from nuclear power plants and thermal power plants  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

On the basis of the public data statistics of recent years on pollution and emissions from nuclear power plants (NPPs) and thermal power plants...

V. A. Gordienko; S. N. Brykin; R. E. Kuzin…

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "turbine power plants" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Coal Power Plant Database | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Power Plant Database Power Plant Database Jump to: navigation, search Name Coal Power Plant Database Data Format Excel Spreadsheet, Excel Pivot Table, Access Database Geographic Scope United States TODO: Import actual dataset contents into OpenEI The Coal Power Plant Database (CPPDB) is a dataset which "consolidates large quantities of information on coal-fired power plants in a single location."[1] It is produced by the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL). External links 2007 Edition Excel Spreadsheet Excel Pivot Table Access Database User's Manual (PDF) References ↑ "User's Manual: Coal Power Plant Database" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Coal_Power_Plant_Database&oldid=273301" Categories: Datasets Articles with outstanding TODO tasks

242

Trigeneration scheme for energy efficiency enhancement in a natural gas processing plant through turbine exhaust gas waste heat utilization  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The performance of Natural Gas Processing Plants (NGPPs) can be enhanced with the integration of Combined Cooling, Heating and Power (CCHP) generation schemes. This paper analyzes the integration of a trigeneration scheme within a NGPP, that utilizes waste heat from gas turbine exhaust gases to generate process steam in a Waste Heat Recovery Steam Generator (WHRSG). Part of the steam generated is used to power double-effect water–lithium bromide (H2O–LiBr) absorption chillers that provide gas turbine compressor inlet air-cooling. Another portion of the steam is utilized to meet part furnace heating load, and supplement plant electrical power in a combined regenerative Rankine cycle. A detailed techno-economic analysis of scheme performance is presented based on thermodynamic predictions obtained using Engineering Equation Solver (EES). The results indicate that the trigeneration system could recover 79.7 MW of gas turbine waste heat, 37.1 MW of which could be utilized by three steam-fired H2O–LiBr absorption chillers to provide 45 MW of cooling at 5 °C. This could save approximately 9 MW of electric energy required by a typical compression chiller, while providing the same amount of cooling. In addition, the combined cycle generates 22.6 MW of additional electrical energy for the plant, while process heating reduces furnace oil consumption by 0.23 MSCM per annum. Overall, the trigeneration scheme would result in annual natural gas fuel savings of approximately 1879 MSCM, and annual operating cost savings of approximately US$ 20.9 million, with a payback period of 1 year. This study highlights the significant economical and environmental benefits that could be achieved through implementation of the proposed integrated cogeneration scheme in NGPPs, particularly in elevated ambient temperature and humidity conditions such as encountered in Middle East facilities.

Sahil Popli; Peter Rodgers; Valerie Eveloy

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

NETL: Water-Energy Interface - Power Plant Water Management  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

An Innovative Fresh Water Production Process for Fossil Fired Power Plants An Innovative Fresh Water Production Process for Fossil Fired Power Plants Using Energy Stored in Main Condenser Cooling Water - University of Florida This project replaces the cooling tower in a fossil fired power plant with an innovative diffusion driven desalination (DDD) plant that will render the power plant a net producer of fresh water. The energy required to drive the desalination process comes from the main condenser cooling water, which would otherwise be discharged. Saline water is used to condense the low pressure steam exiting the turbine. The hot, saline water exiting the condenser is sprayed into the top of a diffusion tower. The diffusion tower is filled with high surface area packing material such as that used in air stripping towers to enhance the water/air surface area. Air is blown through the bottom of the tower and becomes humidified. The humidified air goes to a direct-contact condenser where the fresh water is condensed. This process has an advantage over conventional desalination technology in that it may be driven by waste heat with very low thermodynamic availability. Also, cold air is a byproduct of this process which can be used to cool buildings.

244

A fusion power plant without plasma-material interactions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A steady-state fusion power plant is described which avoids the deleterious plasma-material interactions found in D-T fueled tokamaks. It is based on driven p-{sup 11}B fusion in a high-beta closed-field device, the field-reversed configuration (FRC), anchored in a gas-dynamic trap (GDT). The plasma outflow on the open magnetic-field lines is cooled by radiation in the GDT, then channeled through a magnetic nozzle, promoting 3-body recombination in the expansion region. The resulting supersonic neutral exhaust stream flows through a turbine, generating electricity.

Cohen, S.A.

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Erosion-corrosion modelling of gas turbine materials for coal-fired combined cycle power generation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The development of coal-fired combined cycle power generation systems is receiving considerable worldwide interest. The successful development and commercialisation of these new systems require that all the component parts are manufactured from appropriate materials and that these materials give predictable in-service performance. Corrosion and erosion-corrosion, resulting from coal derived particulates, deposition and gaseous species, have been identified as potential life limiting factors for these systems. Models to predict these modes of materials degradation are under active development. This paper outlines the development and testing of models suitable for use in gas turbine environments. The complexity of the corrosion processes means that an empirical approach to model development is required whereas a more mechanistic approach can be applied to erosion processes. For hot corrosion conditions, statistically based corrosion models have been produced using laboratory tests for two coatings and a base alloy at typical type I and type II hot corrosion temperatures (900 and 700°C). These models use the parameters of alkali sulphate deposition flux and \\{SOx\\} partial pressure (at each temperature and for set \\{HCl\\} partial pressures), to predict the rate of the most likely localised damage associated with hot corrosion reactions. For erosion-corrosion modelling, a series of laboratory tests have been carried out to investigate erosion behaviour in corrosive conditions appropriate to coal-fired gas turbines. Materials performance data have been obtained from samples located in the hot gas path of the Grimethorpe PFBC pilot plant, under well characterised conditions, for testing the corrosion and erosion-corrosion models. The models successfully predict the materials damage observed in the pilot plant environments.

N.J. Simms; J.E. Oakey; D.J. Stephenson; P.J. Smith; J.R. Nicholls

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Power Plant Optimization Demonstration Projects Cover Photos:  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

5 SEPTEMBER 2007 5 SEPTEMBER 2007 Power Plant Optimization Demonstration Projects Cover Photos: * Top left: Coal Creek Station * Top right: Big Bend Power Station * Bottom left: Baldwin Energy Complex * Bottom right: Limestone Power Plant A report on four projects conducted under separate cooperative agreements between the U.S. Department of Energy and: * Great River Energy * Tampa Electric Company * Pegasus Technologies * NeuCo. , Inc.  Power Plant Optimization Demonstration Projects Executive Summary .......................................................................................4 Background: Power Plant Optimization ......................................................5 Lignite Fuel Enhancement Project ...............................................................8

247

Exergoeconomic analysis of a biomass post-firing combined-cycle power plant  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Biomass can be converted thermo- and bio-chemically to solid, liquid and gaseous biofuels. In this paper, energy, exergy and exergoeconomic analyses are applied to a biomass integrated post-firing combined-cycle power plant. The energy and exergy efficiencies of the cycle are found to be maximized at specific compressor pressure ratio values, and that higher pressure ratios reduce the total unit product cost. Increasing the gas turbine inlet temperature and decreasing the compressor pressure ratio decreases the CO2 mole fraction exiting the power plant. The exergoeconomic factor for the biomass integrated post-firing combined-cycle power plant at the optimum energy/exergy efficiency is 0.39. This implies that the major cost rate of this power plant configuration is attributable to the exergy destruction cost rate. Increasing the compressor pressure ratio decreases the mass of air per mass of steam in the power plant, implying a reduction in the gas turbine plant size. Increasing both the compressor pressure ratio and the heat recovery steam generator inlet gas temperature increases the capital investment cost compared with the exergy destruction cost. However, increasing the gas turbine inlet temperature decreases this ratio.

Hassan Athari; Saeed Soltani; Seyed Mohammad Seyed Mahmoudi; Marc A. Rosen; Tatiana Morosuk

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Turkerler Alasehir Geothermal Power Plant | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Turkerler Alasehir Geothermal Power Plant Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Development Project: Turkerler Alasehir Geothermal Power Plant Project...

249

Miravalles V Geothermal Power Plant | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Power Plant Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Development Project: Miravalles V Geothermal Power Plant Project Location Information Coordinates...

250

Method of optimizing performance of Rankine cycle power plants. [US DOE Patent  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method is described for efficiently operating a Rankine cycle power plant to maximize fuel utilization efficiency or energy conversion efficiency or minimize costs by selecting a turbine fluid inlet state which is substantially on the area adjacent and including the transposed critical temperature line.

Pope, W.L.; Pines, H.S.; Doyle, P.A.; Silvester, L.F.

1980-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

251

Multidisciplinary Modeling, Control, and Optimization of a Solid Oxide Fuel Cell/Gas Turbine Hybrid Power System.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??This thesis describes a systematical study, including multidisciplinary modeling, simulation, control, and optimization, of a fuel cell - gas turbine hybrid power system that aims… (more)

Abbassi Baharanchi, Atid

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Requirements for Power Plant and Power Line Development (Wisconsin) |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Requirements for Power Plant and Power Line Development (Wisconsin) Requirements for Power Plant and Power Line Development (Wisconsin) Requirements for Power Plant and Power Line Development (Wisconsin) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Developer Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Wind Solar Program Info State Wisconsin Program Type Siting and Permitting Provider Public Service Commission of Wisconsin

253

The 'value of research' methodology and hybrid power plant design  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Distributed power generation is one of the most powerful applications of fuel cell power plants. Several types of configurations have been hypothesized and tested for these kinds of applications at the conceptual level, but hybrid power plants are one of the most efficient. These are designs that combine the fuel cell cycle with other thermodynamic cycles to provide higher efficiency. The power plant in focus is the high-pressure (HP)-low-pressure (LP) solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC)/steam turbine (ST)/gas turbine (GT) configuration which is a part of the Vision-21 program in the USA. In this design, coal is gasified in an entrained bed gasifier and the syngas produced is cleaned in a transport bed desulfurizer and passed over to cascaded SOFC modules (at two pressure levels). This module is integrated with a reheat GT cycle. The heat of the exhaust from the GT cycle is used to convert water to steam, which is eventually used in a steam bottoming cycle. Since this hybrid technology is new and futuristic, the system level models used for predicting the fuel cells' performance and for other modules such as the desulfurizer have significant uncertainties in them. Also, the performance curves of the SOFC would differ depending on the materials used for the anode, cathode, and electrolyte. The accurate characterization and quantification of these uncertainties is crucial to the credibility of the model predictions. We have utilized the uncertainty analysis of the (HP-LP)SOFC/ST/GT conceptual design to illustrate the concept of 'value of research', which deals with the examination of tradeoffs inherent in allocating scarce resources to reduce uncertainty.

Subramanyan, K.; Diwekar, U.M. [Vishwamitra Research Institute, Westmont, IL (United States)

2006-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

254

Demonstration of a Variable Phase Turbine Power System for Low Temperature Geothermal Resources  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A variable phase turbine assembly will be designed and manufactured having a turbine, operable with transcritical, two-phase or vapor flow, and a generator – on the same shaft supported by process lubricated bearings. The assembly will be hermetically sealed and the generator cooled by the refrigerant. A compact plate-fin heat exchanger or tube and shell heat exchanger will be used to transfer heat from the geothermal fluid to the refrigerant. The demonstration turbine will be operated separately with two-phase flow and with vapor flow to demonstrate performance and applicability to the entire range of low temperature geothermal resources. The vapor leaving the turbine is condensed in a plate-fin refrigerant condenser. The heat exchanger, variable phase turbine assembly and condenser are all mounted on single skids to enable factory assembly and checkout and minimize installation costs. The system will be demonstrated using low temperature (237F) well flow from an existing large geothermal field. The net power generated, 1 megawatt, will be fed into the existing power system at the demonstration site. The system will demonstrate reliable generation of inexpensive power from low temperature resources. The system will be designed for mass manufacturing and factory assembly and should cost less than $1,200/kWe installed, when manufactured in large quantities. The estimated cost of power for 300F resources is predicted to be less than 5 cents/kWh. This should enable a substantial increase in power generated from low temperature geothermal resources.

Hays, Lance G

2014-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

255

Nuclear power plants: structure and function  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Topics discussed include: steam electric plants; BWR type reactors; PWR type reactors; thermal efficiency of light water reactors; other types of nuclear power plants; the fission process and nuclear fuel; fission products and reactor afterheat; and reactor safety.

Hendrie, J.M.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Coal-Fired Power Plants  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Impacts of TMDLs on Impacts of TMDLs on Coal-Fired Power Plants April 2010 DOE/NETL-2010/1408 Disclaimer This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference therein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise does not necessarily constitute or imply its endorsement, recommendation, or favoring by the United States Government or any agency thereof. The

257

Solana Generating Plant Solar Power Plant | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Plant Solar Power Plant Plant Solar Power Plant Jump to: navigation, search Name Solana Generating Plant Solar Power Plant Facility Solana Generating Plant Sector Solar Facility Type Concentrating Solar Power Facility Status Under Construction Developer Abengoa Solar Location Gila Bend, Arizona Coordinates 32.916163°, -112.968727° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":32.916163,"lon":-112.968727,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

258

Ris-R-1117(EN) Power Control for Wind Turbines in  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Risø-R-1117(EN) Power Control for Wind Turbines in Weak Grids: Project summary Henrik Bindner (Ed in Europe large areas exist where the wind resources are good or very good and the grid is relatively weak for the exploitation of the wind resource. There are two main problems concerned with wind power and weak grids

259

Design of a High Temperature Small Particle Solar Receiver for Powering a Gas Turbine Engine  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Design of a High Temperature Small Particle Solar Receiver for Powering a Gas Turbine Engine Dr. Fletcher Miller SDSU Department of Mechanical Engineering Abstract Solar thermal power for electricity for the California desert and in other appro- priate regions worldwide. Current technology relies on steam Rankine

Ponce, V. Miguel

260

Methodology for Scaling Fusion Power Plant Availability  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Normally in the U.S. fusion power plant conceptual design studies, the development of the plant availability and the plant capital and operating costs makes the implicit assumption that the plant is a 10th of a kind fusion power plant. This is in keeping with the DOE guidelines published in the 1970s, the PNL report1, "Fusion Reactor Design Studies - Standard Accounts for Cost Estimates. This assumption specifically defines the level of the industry and technology maturity and eliminates the need to define the necessary research and development efforts and costs to construct a one of a kind or the first of a kind power plant. It also assumes all the "teething" problems have been solved and the plant can operate in the manner intended. The plant availability analysis assumes all maintenance actions have been refined and optimized by the operation of the prior nine or so plants. The actions are defined to be as quick and efficient as possible. This study will present a methodology to enable estimation of the availability of the one of a kind (one OAK) plant or first of a kind (1st OAK) plant. To clarify, one of the OAK facilities might be the pilot plant or the demo plant that is prototypical of the next generation power plant, but it is not a full-scale fusion power plant with all fully validated "mature" subsystems. The first OAK facility is truly the first commercial plant of a common design that represents the next generation plant design. However, its subsystems, maintenance equipment and procedures will continue to be refined to achieve the goals for the 10th OAK power plant.

Lester M. Waganer

2011-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "turbine power plants" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Tracking New Coal-Fired Power Plants  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

January 8, 2010 National Energy Technology Laboratory Office of Systems Analyses and Planning Erik Shuster 2 Tracking New Coal-Fired Power Plants This report is intended to...

262

Uenotai Geothermal Power Plant | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Facility Power Plant Sector Geothermal energy Location Information Location Akita, Japan Coordinates 39.001204660867, 140.60390925355 Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mapp...

263

Advances in the integration of solar thermal energy with conventional and non-conventional power plants  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Pollution and increasing fuel prices are the main focus for governments today. The main cause of pollution is existing electricity power plants that use huge quantities of fossil fuel. A new strategy should be applied in the coming decades based on the integration of existing power plants with renewable energy sources, such as solar and wind energy. Hybridization of existing power plants with solar energy is one proven option to overcome the problems of pollution and increasing fuel prices. In this paper, a review of the previous studies and papers for integrating solar thermal energy with conventional and non-conventional power plants was carried out. The focus on hybrid solar conventional power plants includes: the review of studies of hybrid solar–steam cycle power plants, integrated solar combined-cycle systems (ISCCS) and hybrid solar–gas turbine power plants, while for hybrid solar non-conventional power plants the focus of study is hybrid solar–geothermal power plants. The most successful option is ISCCS due to their advantages and the plans for implementation at various power plants in the world like in Tunisia, Egypt, Spain, and Iran.

M.S. Jamel; A. Abd Rahman; A.H. Shamsuddin

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

E-Print Network 3.0 - assessing plant response Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Power Plants Summary: gas plant technologies. The three technologies assessed are the gas turbine (GT) with heat recovery... 1 Using Auxiliary Gas Power for CCS Energy Needs in...

265

Technical and Economic Analysis of Chemical Looping Combustion with Humid Air Turbine Power Cycle  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Chemical looping combustion (CLC) is an innovative concept that offers potentially attractive option to capture CO2 with appreciably lower thermal efficiency penalties when compared to the tradition approaches. This paper presents process simulation, technical and economic analysis of the CLC integrated with humid air turbine (HAT) cycle for natural gas-fired power plant with CO2 capture. Aspen Plus® process simulator and Aspen Process Economic Analyzer® were employed for technical and economic analysis of the CLC-HAT and conventional HAT cycle.The analysis shows the CLC- HAT cycle has a thermal efficiency of 57 % at oxidizing temperature of 1,200 oC and reducer inlet temperature of 530 oC. The economic evaluation performed shows that a 50 MWth CLC-HAT plant with a projected lifetime of 30 y has a payback period of 6 y compared to 7 y for conventional HAT cycle. This indicates that CLC-HAT cycle is commercially viable with respect to CO2 capture cost.

Akeem Olaleye; Meihong Wang

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Energy and exergy analyses of an externally fired gas turbine (EFGT) cycle integrated with biomass gasifier for distributed power generation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Biomass based decentralized power generation using externally fired gas turbine (EFGT) can be a technically feasible option. In this work, thermal performance and sizing of such plants have been analyzed at different cycle pressure ratio (rp = 2?8), turbine inlet temperature (TIT = 1050–1350 K) and the heat exchanger cold end temperature difference (CETD = 200–300 K). It is found that the thermal efficiency of the EFGT plant reaches a maximum at an optimum pressure ratio depending upon the TIT and heat exchanger CETD. For a particular pressure ratio, thermal efficiency increases either with the increase in TIT or with the decrease in heat exchanger CETD. The specific air flow, associated with the size of the plant equipment, decreases with the increase in pressure ratio. This decrease is rapid at the lower end of the pressure ratio (rp < 4) but levels-off at higher rp values. An increase in the TIT reduces the specific air flow, while a change in the heat exchanger CETD has no influence on it. Based on this comparison, the performance of a 100 kW EFGT plant has been analyzed for three sets of operating parameters and a trade-off in the operating condition is reached.

Amitava Datta; Ranjan Ganguly; Luna Sarkar

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Compressor and Turbine Models of Brayton Units for Space Nuclear Power Systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Closed Brayton Cycles with centrifugal flow, single-shaft turbo-machines are being considered, with gas cooled nuclear reactors, to provide 10's to 100's of electrical power to support future space exploration missions and Lunar and Mars outposts. Such power system analysis is typically based on the cycle thermodynamics, for given operating pressures and temperatures and assumed polytropic efficiencies of the compressor and turbine of the Brayton energy conversion units. Thus the analysis results not suitable for modeling operation transients such as startup and changes in the electric load. To simulate these transients, accurate models of the turbine and compressor in the Brayton rotating unit, which calculate the changes in the compressor and turbine efficiencies with system operation are needed. This paper presents flow models that account for the design and dimensions of the compressor impeller and diffuser, and the turbine stator and rotor blades. These models calculate the various enthalpy losses and the polytropic efficiencies along with the pressure ratios of the turbine and compressor. The predictions of these models compare well with reported performance data of actual hardware. In addition, the results of a parametric analysis to map the operations of the compressor and turbine, as functions of the rotating shaft speed and inlet Mach number of the gas working fluid, are presented and discussed. The analysis used a binary mixture of He-Xe with a molecular weight of 40 g/mole as the working fluid.

Gallo, Bruno M.; El-Genk, Mohamed S.; Tournier, Jean-Michel [Institute for Space and Nuclear Power Studies, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM, 87131 (United States); Chemical and Nuclear Engineering Department, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM, 87131 (United States)

2007-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

268

Wave Power Plant Inc | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Powered Compressed Air Stations This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleWavePowerPlantInc&oldid76915...

269

STATEMENT OF CONSIDERATIONS REQUEST BY SIEMENS WESTINGHOUSE POWER...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

electrical power, such as steam turbine technology, nuclear power, hydroelectric and wind facilities, represent competition to the global power plant mariket. Thus grant of...

270

Voltage and Frequency Control in Offshore Wind Turbines Connected to Isolated Oil Platform Power Systems  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Offshore wind turbines have potential to supply offshore oil and gas platforms in the North Sea with electric energy. For remote located facilities it is attractive to pursue a solution where the wind turbines and oil platform operate in an isolated system. To study the operational properties of a system with these characteristics is necessary to identify possible advantages and disadvantages. This paper demonstrates how added voltage and frequency control in wind turbines equipped with full power electronic converters can improve the voltage and frequency stability in offshore oil and gas installations. The work is based on an electrical simulation model built in the PSCAD software. In the proposed transient simulation scenarios, the voltage dip is reduced from 16% to 6%, while the frequency overshoot is reduced from 97% to 25%. These are significant improvements that should be taken into consideration when offshore wind power is evaluated as power supply to oil installations.

Atle Rygg Årdal; Tore Undeland; Kamran Sharifabadi

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Power performance of canted blades for a vertical axis wind turbine  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Small scale vertical axis wind turbines have a number of advantages for deployment in an urban environment but are subject to highly varying thrust and radial aerodynamic forces. Helical blade shapes for vertical axis wind turbines can reduce load fluctuations during turbine operation; however a helix has complicated three-dimensional geometry that can be difficult to manufacture resulting in expensive blades. A new blade configuration based on twisted straight blades that are mounted at an angle to the vertical a cant has been developed and tested in a wind tunnel in a number of different configurations and conditions. They offer the benefits of distributing the fluctuating aerodynamic loads but incorporate a linear axis so that they can be manufactured at a comparable cost to simple straight blades. The power performance data from the tunnel testing show that canted blades have comparable power output to similar straight blades and that aerodynamic fences can be used to improve power performance.

Shawn Armstrong; Stephen Tullis

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Air bottoming cycle: Use of gas turbine waste heat for power generation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper presents a thermodynamic analysis of the Air Bottoming Cycle (ABC) as well as the results of a feasibility study for using the Air Bottoming Cycle for gas turbine waste heat recovery/power generation on oil/gas platforms in the North Sea. The basis for the feasibility study was to utilize the exhaust gas heat from an LM2500PE gas turbine. Installation of the ABC on both a new and an existing platform have been considered. A design reference case is presented, and the recommended ABC is a two-shaft engine with two compressor intercoolers. The compression pressure ratio was found optimal at 8:1. The combined gas turbine and ABC shaft efficiency wa/s calculated to 46.6 percent. The LM2500PE gas turbine contributes with 36.1 percent while the ABC adds 10.5 percent points to the gas turbine efficiency. The ABC shaft power output is 6.6 MW when utilizing the waste heat of an LM2500PE gas turbine. A preliminary thermal and hydraulic design of the ABC main components (compressor, turbine, intercoolers, and recuperator) was carried out. The recuperator is the largest and heaviest component (45 tons). A weight and cost breakdown of the ABC is presented. The total weight of the ABC package was calculated to 154 metric tons, and the ABC package cost to 9.4 million US$. An economical examination for three different cases was carried out. The results show that the ABC alternative (LM2500PE + ABC) is economical, with a rather good margin, compared to the other alternatives. The conclusion is that the Air Bottoming Cycle is an economical alternative for power generation on both new platforms and on existing platforms with demand for more power.

Bolland, O.; Foerde, M. [Norwegian Univ. of Science and Technology, Trondheim (Norway). Div. of Thermal Energy and Hydropower; Haande, B. [Oil Engineering Consultants, Sandvika (Norway)

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Specifications for fuel for a gas-turbine plant on a marine platform  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Specifications for liquid and gaseous fuel obtained directly on a marine platform for a power plant based on...

E. P. Fedorov; L. S. Yanovskii…

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Centralized wind power plant voltage control with optimal power flow algorithm.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??This thesis presents a method of controlling the reactive power injected into a medium-voltage collection system by multiple wind turbine generators such that the voltage… (more)

Kline, Jared Andrew

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Deming Solar Plant Solar Power Plant | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Deming Solar Plant Solar Power Plant Deming Solar Plant Solar Power Plant Jump to: navigation, search Name Deming Solar Plant Solar Power Plant Facility Deming Solar Plant Sector Solar Facility Type Photovoltaic Developer New Solar Ventures/ Solar Torx 50/50 Location New Mexico Coordinates 34.9727305°, -105.0323635° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":34.9727305,"lon":-105.0323635,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

276

Prescott Airport Solar Plant Solar Power Plant | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Prescott Airport Solar Plant Solar Power Plant Prescott Airport Solar Plant Solar Power Plant Jump to: navigation, search Name Prescott Airport Solar Plant Solar Power Plant Facility Prescott Airport Solar Plant Sector Solar Facility Type Photovoltaic Developer APS Location Prescott, Arizona Coordinates 34.5400242°, -112.4685025° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":34.5400242,"lon":-112.4685025,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

277

Aluto-Langano Geotermal Power Plant | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

System - Ethiopian Rift Valley Plant Information Facility Type Binary Cycle Power Plant, ORC Owner Ethiopian Electric Power Corporation Developer Ethiopian Electric Power...

278

Sensitivity Analysis of Wind Plant Performance to Key Turbine Design Parameters: A Systems Engineering Approach; Preprint  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper introduces the development of a new software framework for research, design, and development of wind energy systems which is meant to 1) represent a full wind plant including all physical and nonphysical assets and associated costs up to the point of grid interconnection, 2) allow use of interchangeable models of varying fidelity for different aspects of the system, and 3) support system level multidisciplinary analyses and optimizations. This paper describes the design of the overall software capability and applies it to a global sensitivity analysis of wind turbine and plant performance and cost. The analysis was performed using three different model configurations involving different levels of fidelity, which illustrate how increasing fidelity can preserve important system interactions that build up to overall system performance and cost. Analyses were performed for a reference wind plant based on the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's 5-MW reference turbine at a mid-Atlantic offshore location within the United States.

Dykes, K.; Ning, A.; King, R.; Graf, P.; Scott, G.; Veers, P.

2014-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

It is not just a job its a WINDTEST! Wind Energy with Power Plant Properties?WINDTEST  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

It is not just a job ­ it´s a WINDTEST! Wind Energy with Power Plant Properties?WINDTEST Kaiser-21 Power Quality Measurement ·IEC 61400-123 Wind Farm Power Curve Measure. ·MEASNET Power Quality of a wind turbine test WINDTEST Kaiser-Wilhelm-Koog GmbH 10/25 #12;b) The WF is able to reduce active power

280

Competitiveness of Wind Power with the Conventional Thermal Power Plants Using Oil and Natural Gas as Fuel in Pakistan  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The fossil fuels mainly imported oil and natural gas are major sources of electricity generation in Pakistan. The combustion of fossil fuels in thermal power plants has greater environmental impacts like air pollution and global warming. Additionally, the import of oil is a heavy burden on the poor economy of the country. Pakistan is a country with huge renewable sources; wind energy being the major one. This paper elucidate the cost-competitiveness of wind power with the conventional thermal power plants. In this regard, Levelized estimated cost of a 15MW wind power plant is compared with three types of conventional thermal power plants, namely (i) Oil-fired thermal power plant (ii) Natural gas-fire combine cycle power plant (iii) Diesel oil- fired gas turbine cycle 100MW each. The results show that the cost of wind energy is lowest with Rs. 3/kWh. It is concluded that the wind power is cost-competitive to the conventional thermal power plants in Pakistan. The cost estimation for wind energy is lowest of all others with Rs. 3/kWh.

A. Mengal; M.A. Uqaili; K. Harijan; Abdul Ghafoor Memon

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "turbine power plants" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Lessons learned from existing biomass power plants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report includes summary information on 20 biomass power plants, which represent some of the leaders in the industry. In each category an effort is made to identify plants that illustrate particular points. The project experiences described capture some important lessons learned that lead in the direction of an improved biomass power industry.

Wiltsee, G.

2000-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

282

Abstract--Wind power generation is growing rapidly. However, maintaining the wind turbine connection to grid is a real  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Abstract--Wind power generation is growing rapidly. However, maintaining the wind turbine and the generator design. The fixed-speed wind turbine has the advantage of the low cost of A. F. Abdou and H. R advantages over the fixed-speed operation, such as maximum power capture, less mechanical stresses, and less

Pota, Himanshu Roy

283

1 - An Overview of Gas Turbines  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Publisher Summary The gas turbine is a power plant that produces a great amount of energy depending on its size and weight. The gas turbine has found increasing service in the past 60 years in the power industry among both utilities and merchant plants as well as the petrochemical industry throughout the world. The utilization of gas turbine exhaust gases, for steam generation or the heating of other heat transfer mediums, or the use of cooling or heating buildings or parts of cities is not a new concept and is currently being exploited to its full potential. The aerospace engines have been leaders in most of the technology in the gas turbine. The design criteria for these engines were high reliability, high performance, with many starts and flexible operation throughout the flight envelope. The industrial gas turbine has always emphasized long life and this conservative approach has resulted in the industrial gas turbine in many aspects giving up high performance for rugged operation. The gas turbine produces various pollutants in the combustion of the gases in the combustor. These include smoke, unburnt hydrocarbons, carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, and oxides of nitrogen. The gas turbine is a power plant that produces a great amount of energy depending on its size and weight. It has found increasing service in the past 60 years in the power industry among both utilities and merchant plants, as well as in the petrochemical industry. Its compactness, low weight and multiple fuel application make it a natural power plant for offshore platforms. Today there are gas turbines that run on natural gas, diesel fuel, naphtha, methane, crude, low-BTU gases, vaporized fuel oils and biomass gases. The last 20 years have seen a large growth in gas turbine technology, spearheaded by the growth in materials technology, new coatings, new cooling schemes and combined cycle power plants. This chapter presents an overview of the development of modern gas turbines and gas turbine design considerations. The six categories of simple-cycle gas turbines (frame type heavy-duty; aircraft-derivative; industrial-type; small; vehicular; and micro) are described. The major gas turbine components (compressors; regenerators/recuperators; fuel type; and combustors) are outlined. A gas turbine produces various pollutants in the combustion of the gases in the combustor and the potential environmental impact of gas turbines is considered. The two different types of combustor (diffusion; dry low NOx, (DLN) or dry low emission (DLE)), the different methods to arrange combustors on a gas turbine, and axial-flow and radial-inflow turbines are described. Developments in materials and coatings are outlined.

Meherwan P. Boyce

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

New York Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant name/total reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net generation (percent)","Owner" "Indian Point Unit 2, Unit 3","2,063","16,321",39.0,"Entergy Nuclear Indian Point" "James A Fitzpatrick Unit 1",855,"6,361",15.2,"Entergy Nuc Fitzpatrick LLC" "Nine Mile Point Nuclear Station Unit 1, Unit 2","1,773","14,239",34.0,"Nine Mile Point Nuclear Sta LLC" "R E Ginna Nuclear Power Plant Unit 1",581,"4,948",11.8,"R.E. Ginna Nuclear Power Plant, LLC" "4 Plants

285

Line-Fault Ride-Through (LFRT) Capabilities of DFIG Wind Turbine Connected to the Power System  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract With increased penetration of wind power into electrical grids, DFIG wind turbines are largely deployed due to their variable speed feature and hence influencing system dynamics. According to grid codes issued by utilities, tripping of wind turbines following power system faults is not allowed. Besides, to provide voltage support to the grid, reactive current supply is necessary. This paper studies the power flow (PF) of two different networks, the first is a transmission network and the second is a distribution one, A wind Doubly-Fed Induction Generator (DFIG) turbine is injected to these different networks. A line fault right through (LFRT) is applied on each network and the power flow results are given and compared, then a new solution is proposed to connect the wind turbine to the distribution network with a down transformer to not disconnect the wind turbine during the LFRT, the power system analysis toolbox (PSAT) is used in this work.

A. Khattara; M. Bahri; A. Aboubou; M. Becherif; M.Y. Ayad

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

Power Performance Measurements of the NREL CART-2 Wind Turbine Using a Nacelle-Based Lidar Scanner  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Different certification procedures in wind energy, such as power performance testing or load estimation, require measurements of the wind speed, which is set in relation to the electrical power output or the turbine loading. The wind shear affects ...

Andreas Rettenmeier; David Schlipf; Ines Würth; Po Wen Cheng

2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Management System for Operations Mantenanace in Offshore Wind Turbine Plant.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

?? Management system for enhancing transfer of knowledge in wind power industry has not received sufficient research attention in recent times. In some cases, the… (more)

Ghanbari, Ahmad

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

The Cascaded Humidified Advanced Turbine (CHAT)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper introduces the Cascaded Humidified Advanced Turbine (CHAT) plant, a gas turbine based power generation plant utilizing intercooling, reheat, and humidification. It is based upon the integration of an existing heavy duty gas turbine with an additional shaft comprising industrial compressors and high pressure expander. CHAT capitalizes on the latest proven gas turbine technology, which, combined with a sophisticated thermal cycle configuration, results in substantial improvement in gas turbine efficiency, compared to a simple cycle, while still maintaining typical advantages and merits of a combustion turbine plant. Built with a commercial combustion turbine and available industrial compressors and expanders, the CHAT plant does not require extensive product development and testing. As a result, the CHAT power plant can be offered with specific capital costs up to 20 percent lower than the combined cycle plant, and with competing efficiency. Compared to a combined cycle plant, the CHAT plant offers lower emissions (due to air humidification) and other significant operating advantages with regard to start-up time and costs, better efficiency at part load, lower power degradation at higher ambient temperatures, and simpler operations and maintenance due to elimination of the complexities and costs associated with steam production. The CHAT plant also integrates very effectively with coal gasification and particularly well with the water quench design. This feature has been discussed in previous publications.

Nakhamkin, M.; Swensen, E.C. [Energy Storage and Power Consultants, Inc., Mountainside, NJ (United States); Wilson, J.M.; Gaul, G. [Westinghouse Electric Corp., Orlando, FL (United States); Polsky, M. [Polsky Energy Corp., Northbrook, IL (United States)

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Electric power generation from a geothermal source utilizing a low-temperature organic Rankine cycle turbine  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A demonstration project to generate electricity with a geothermal source and low-temperature organic Rankine cycle turbine in a rural Alaskan location is described. Operating data and a set of conclusions are presented detailing problems and recommendations for others contemplating this approach to electric power generation.

Aspnes, J.D.; Zarling, J.P.

1982-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Status of Power Generation by Domestic Scale Wind Turbines in Australia  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The world's fossil fuel energy resources are diminishing at a faster rate and most importantly the liquid fossil fuel is expected to be finished by 2060s. Moreover, the fossil fuel is directly related to air pollution, land and water degradation. The danger of climate change due to global warming caused by greenhouse gas emissions compels the policy makers, scientists and researchers globally to explore power generation from renewable sources such as wind. Despite significant progresses have been made in power generation using large scale wind turbines recently, domestic scale wind turbines that have immense potentials for standalone power generation are not explored and adequately researched. Therefore, the primary objective of this study is to review and analyse the potentials for power generation by domestic scale wind turbines for the residential and semi-commercial applications. The study reviews the current status of wind characteristics in built-up areas, economic feasibility, aerodynamic and technological limits, local government planning requirement, local and foreign small scale wind turbine manufacturers.

Firoz Alam; Abdulkadir Ali; Iftekhar Khan; Saleh Mobin

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Direct Power Control of Doubly-Fed Generator Based Wind Turbine Converters to Improve Low Voltage  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Control (DPC) is discussed for Low Voltage Ride Through (LVRT) of DFIG based wind turbine converters power integration state that doubly fed induction generator (DFIG) controllers should be capable and maintaining dc bus voltage, then the DFIG will stay online during the disturbance. A fast acting controller

Kimball, Jonathan W.

292

Chapter 9 - Hydraulic Turbines  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This chapter covers the following topics: Features of hydraulic turbines; Early history and development; Efficiency of various types of turbine; Size of the various turbine types; The Pelton wheel turbine and controlling its speed; Energy losses; Reaction turbines; The Francis and the Kaplan turbines; Calculation of performance; Effect of size on the performance of hydraulic turbines; Cavitation and its avoidance; Calculation of the various specific speeds of turbines; The Wells turbine- Design and performance variables; Tidal power turbines- The SeaGen tidal turbine and its operational principles.

S.L. Dixon; C.A. Hall

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Desalination study of Florida Power and Light power plants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report documents the results of a project to determine the viability of converting existing power plants to large scale, dual-purpose cogeneration of power and fresh water from desalination. The work involved evaluating suitable desalination technologies, developing utility based dual-product economic methods, screening FPL plant and desalination system combinations for promising candidates, and performing three case studies in greater detail to illustrate the viability of producing water at a utility power plant. The study was motivated by the fact that certain synergisms can be obtained by combining or co-locating power and desalination plants at a common site. Economic synergisms are obtained from better use of available energy, sharing common facilities and sharing staff. In addition, environmental synergisms are achieved by using existing industrial sites, common intake/outfalls, and combining thermal with brine effluents to obtain neutral buoyance and achieve more rapid dispersion.

Labar, M.P.; Loh, G.T.; Schleicher, R.W.; Sinha, A.K. (General Atomics International Services Corp., San Diego, CA (United States))

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

Modeling of residual service life of gas turbine rotors for minimizing replacement costs  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

One of the most catastrophic failures observed in gas turbine powered electrical powerplants is the fracture of the turbine rotor. A simplified model consisting of 3 macro-elements is suggested to model the dynamical behavior of the shaft with a propagating ... Keywords: crack propagation, gas-turbine, modeling, power-plant, replacement costs

Eusebia Zouridaki; Vasilios Spitas; Christos Spitas

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Brawley Power Plant Abandoned | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Abandoned Abandoned Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: Brawley Power Plant Abandoned Abstract N/A Authors California Division of Oil, Gas and and Geothermal Resources Published Journal Geothermal Hot Line, 1985 DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http://crossref.org Online Internet link for Brawley Power Plant Abandoned Citation California Division of Oil, Gas, and Geothermal Resources. 1985. Brawley Power Plant Abandoned. Geothermal Hot Line. 15(2):76-77. Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Brawley_Power_Plant_Abandoned&oldid=682727" Categories: References Uncited References Geothermal References What links here Related changes Special pages Printable version Permanent link Browse properties

296

Cost Analysis of Solar Power Plants  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The factors influencing the desirability of solar power plants (SPPs), and of SPP investment decisions, will be discussed in this chapter. The numerical details presented axe based, as far as possible, on actu...

H. P. Hertlein; H. Klaiss; J. Nitsch

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Geothermal Power Plants — Meeting Clean Air Standards  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Geothermal power plants can meet the most stringent clean air standards. They emit little carbon dioxide, very low amounts of sulfur dioxide, and no nitrogen oxides. See Charts 1, 2, and 3 below.

298

Beta Dosimetry at Nuclear Power Plants  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......function of gamma dose and energy of the beta rays. Measurements...radiation and effective beta energy obtained in the working environment at nuclear power plants during the shut-down...decommissioning. The effective beta energy is most frequently between......

P. Carný; M. Lieskovsky

1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Dynamic wind turbine models in power system simulation tool  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.2.1.2 Doubly-fed induction generator (DFIG) 13 2.2.1.3 Synchronous generator 15 2.2.2 Power converters 18 2

300

Study of auxiliary power systemsfor offshore wind turbines.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

?? Until today the offshore wind power has grown in a steady pace and many new wind farms are being constructed around the globe. An… (more)

Berggren, Joakim

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "turbine power plants" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Micro Hydro Kinetic Turbines from Smart Hydro Power | Open Energy...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

to the MHK database homepage Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleMicroHydroKineticTurbinesfromSmartHydroPower&oldid720939" Category: Marine and...

302

Cabell on Nuclear Energy Power Plants  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Cabell on Nuclear Energy Power Plants ... IN EXPLAINING the function of his research group t o the new works superintendent of a nuclear power plant at a mining and reduction installation in the Alaskan mountains, Dr. Blank, of the United Nations Inspection and Research Laboratories, said, "We can't inspect what we don't know. ... In order to know what you're doing, we have to know more about atomic energy than you do—more than anybody does. ...

1947-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

303

Optimal tracking and robust power control of the DFIG wind turbine  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In the present paper, an optimal operation of a grid-connected variable speed wind turbine equipped with a Doubly Fed Induction Generator (DFIG) is presented. The proposed cascaded nonlinear controller is designed to perform two main objectives. In the outer loop, a maximum power point tracking (MPPT) algorithm based on fuzzy logic theory is designed to permanently extract the optimal aerodynamic energy, whereas in the inner loop, a second order sliding mode control (2-SM) is applied to achieve smooth regulation of both stator active and reactive powers quantities. The obtained simulation results show a permanent track of the MPP point regardless of the turbine power-speed slope moreover the proposed sliding mode control strategy presents attractive features such as chattering-free, compared to the conventional first order sliding technique (1-SM).

S. Abdeddaim; A. Betka

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Optimum Heat Power Cycles for Process Industrial Plants  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Electric power cogeneration is compared with direct mechanical drives emphasizing the technical aspects having the greatest impact on energy economics. Both steam and gas turbine applications are discussed and practical methods of developing...

Waterland, A. F.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Parabolic Trough Organic Rankine Cycle Power Plant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Arizona Public Service (APS) is required to generate a portion of its electricity from solar resources in order to satisfy its obligation under the Arizona Environmental Portfolio Standard (EPS). In recent years, APS has installed and operates over 4.5 MWe of fixed, tracking, and concentrating photovoltaic systems to help meet the solar portion of this obligation and to develop an understanding of which solar technologies provide the best cost and performance to meet utility needs. During FY04, APS began construction of a 1-MWe parabolic trough concentrating solar power plant. This plant represents the first parabolic trough plant to begin construction since 1991. The plant will also be the first commercial deployment of the Solargenix parabolic trough collector technology developed under contract to the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL). The plant will use an organic Rankine cycle (ORC) power plant, provided by Ormat. The ORC power plant is much simpler than a conventional steam Rankine cycle power plant and allows unattended operation of the facility.

Canada, S.; Cohen, G.; Cable, R.; Brosseau, D.; Price, H.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

A Review of Hazardous Chemical Species Associated with CO2 Capture from Coal-Fired Power Plants and Their Potential Fate in CO2 Geologic Storage  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

with conventional steam turbine powered electric generation.used to boil water for steam turbine generation as a secondturbine) and Rankine (steam turbine) cycles, as illustrated

Apps, J.A.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

SENSIBLE HEAT STORAGE FOR A SOLAR THERMAL POWER PLANT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

with Sensible- Heat Storage Solar Power Plant with Sulfurof the Solar Power Plant Storage-Vessel Design, . . . . .System for Chemical Storage of Solar Energy. UC Berkeley,

Baldwin, Thomas F.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Dora-3 Geothermal Power Plant | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Information Name Dora-3 Geothermal Power Plant Facility Power Plant Sector Geothermal energy Location Information Coordinates 37.875046144284, 28.102602480794 Loading...

309

Zhangbei Guotou Wind Power Plant | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Zhangbei Guotou Wind Power Plant Jump to: navigation, search Name: Zhangbei Guotou Wind Power Plant Place: Beijing Municipality, China Zip: 100037 Sector: Wind energy Product: A...

310

MHK Technologies/Yongsoo Wave Power Plant | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Yongsoo Wave Power Plant < MHK Technologies Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Yongsoo Wave Power Plant.jpg Technology Profile Technology Type Click...

311

World's Largest Concentrating Solar Power Plant Opens in California...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

World's Largest Concentrating Solar Power Plant Opens in California World's Largest Concentrating Solar Power Plant Opens in California February 19, 2014 - 12:00am Addthis Ivanpah,...

312

RAPID/Geothermal/Power Plant | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

for compensation. Geothermal Power Plant in Federal Bureau of Land Management Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Geothermal Power Plant in New Mexico None NA Every person...

313

DOE Announces Loan Guarantee Applications for Nuclear Power Plant...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Loan Guarantee Applications for Nuclear Power Plant Construction DOE Announces Loan Guarantee Applications for Nuclear Power Plant Construction October 2, 2008 - 3:43pm Addthis...

314

Saradambika Power Plant Pvt Ltd | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Saradambika Power Plant Pvt Ltd Jump to: navigation, search Name: Saradambika Power Plant Pvt. Ltd Place: Hyderabad, Andhra Pradesh, India Zip: 500082 Sector: Biomass Product:...

315

Closed loop air cooling system for combustion turbines  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Convective cooling of turbine hot parts using a closed loop system is disclosed. Preferably, the present invention is applied to cooling the hot parts of combustion turbine power plants, and the cooling provided permits an increase in the inlet temperature and the concomitant benefits of increased efficiency and output. In preferred embodiments, methods and apparatus are disclosed wherein air is removed from the combustion turbine compressor and delivered to passages internal to one or more of a combustor and turbine hot parts. The air cools the combustor and turbine hot parts via convection and heat is transferred through the surfaces of the combustor and turbine hot parts.

Huber, David John (North Canton, OH); Briesch, Michael Scot (Orlando, FL)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Energy 101: Wind Turbines  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

See how wind turbines generate clean electricity from the power of the wind. Highlighted are the various parts and mechanisms of a modern wind turbine.

None

2013-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

317

Energy 101: Wind Turbines  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

See how wind turbines generate clean electricity from the power of the wind. Highlighted are the various parts and mechanisms of a modern wind turbine.

None

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Testing of a coal-fired diesel power plant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The POC coal-fired power plant consists of a Cooper-Bessemer LSC-6 engine (15.5 inch bore, 22 inch stroke) rated at 400 rev/min and 208 psi bmep producing approximately 1.8 MW of power. The power plant is fueled with 'engine grade' coal slurry which has been physically cleaned to an ash level of approximately 1.5 to 2% (dry basis) and has a mean particle size of approximately 12 micron. CWS is injected directly into the combustion chamber through a fuel injector (one per cylinder) which was designed and developed to be compatible with the fuel. Each injector is fitted with a 19 orifice nozzle tip made with sapphire inserts in each orifice. The combustion chambers are fitted with twin diesel pilot injectors which provide a positive ignition source and substantially shorten the ignition delay period of the CWS fuel. Durable coatings (typically tungsten carbide) are used for the piston rings and cylinder liners to reduce wear rates. The emission control system consists of SCR for NO[sub x] control, sodium sorbent injection for SO[sub x] control, and a cyclone plus baghouse for particulate capture. The cyclone is installed upstream of the engine turbocharger which helps protect the turbine blades.

Wilson, R.P.; Balles, E.N.; Benedek, K.R.; Benson, C.E. (Little (Arthur D.), Inc., Cambridge, MA (United States)); Rao, K.; Schaub, F. (Cooper-Bessemer, Mount Vernon, OH (United States)); Kimberley, J. (AMBAC, West Springfield, MA (United States)); Itse, D. (PSI Technology Co., Andover, MA (United States))

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

Testing of a coal-fired diesel power plant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The POC coal-fired power plant consists of a Cooper-Bessemer LSC-6 engine (15.5 inch bore, 22 inch stroke) rated at 400 rev/min and 208 psi bmep producing approximately 1.8 MW of power. The power plant is fueled with `engine grade` coal slurry which has been physically cleaned to an ash level of approximately 1.5 to 2% (dry basis) and has a mean particle size of approximately 12 micron. CWS is injected directly into the combustion chamber through a fuel injector (one per cylinder) which was designed and developed to be compatible with the fuel. Each injector is fitted with a 19 orifice nozzle tip made with sapphire inserts in each orifice. The combustion chambers are fitted with twin diesel pilot injectors which provide a positive ignition source and substantially shorten the ignition delay period of the CWS fuel. Durable coatings (typically tungsten carbide) are used for the piston rings and cylinder liners to reduce wear rates. The emission control system consists of SCR for NO{sub x} control, sodium sorbent injection for SO{sub x} control, and a cyclone plus baghouse for particulate capture. The cyclone is installed upstream of the engine turbocharger which helps protect the turbine blades.

Wilson, R.P.; Balles, E.N.; Benedek, K.R.; Benson, C.E. [Little (Arthur D.), Inc., Cambridge, MA (United States); Rao, K.; Schaub, F. [Cooper-Bessemer, Mount Vernon, OH (United States); Kimberley, J. [AMBAC, West Springfield, MA (United States); Itse, D. [PSI Technology Co., Andover, MA (United States)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

NETL: News Release - Enabling Turbine Technologies for Hydrogen Fuels  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

September 8, 2005 September 8, 2005 Enabling Turbine Technologies for Hydrogen Fuels Turbine Program Advances Ultra-Clean, Coal-Based Systems WASHINGTON, DC - The Department of Energy's Office of Fossil Energy Turbine Technology R&D Program was recently expanded with the selection of 10 new projects valued at $130 million. The new program will advance turbines and turbine subsystems for integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power plants, and address the use of hydrogen in small-scale turbines for industrial applications. Resulting technologies will operate cleanly and efficiently when fueled with coal-derived hydrogen or synthesis gas. Turbines can generate electrical power on a large scale-in central power stations sized 250 megawatts and larger-or on a small scale-in local, industrial power systems sized 1-100 megawatts. Small-scale systems also produce mechanical power for jet engines, compressors, heating systems, and other applications.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "turbine power plants" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Modelling power output at nuclear power plant by neural networks  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this paper, we propose two different neural network (NN) approaches for industrial process signal forecasting. Real data is available for this research from boiling water reactor type nuclear power reactors. NNs are widely used for time series prediction, ... Keywords: evaluation methods, model input selection, neural networks, nuclear power plant, one-step ahead prediction

Jaakko Talonen; Miki Sirola; Eimontas Augilius

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

FUSION POWER PLANTS GOALS AND TECHNOLOGICAL CHALLENGES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

FUSION POWER PLANTS ­ GOALS AND TECHNOLOGICAL CHALLENGES Farrokh Najmabadi Dept. of Electrical & Computer Eng. and Fusion Energy Research Program, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA 92093-0417 619-534-7869 (619-534-7716, Fax) ABSTRACT Fusion is one of a few future power sources with the poten

Najmabadi, Farrokh

323

Evolution of Nuclear Power Plant Design  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... research is expensive, and applied research and development on atomic energy is so expensive that expenditure should be justified either by the needs of defence or by the expectation of a ... per cent) have risen, and this rise reacts against nuclear power with its high capital cost. The result of these changes is that nuclear power from the plants which ...

CHRISTOPHER HINTON

1960-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

324

Abstract--The offshore wind farm with installed back-to-back power converter in wind turbines is studied. As an  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Abstract--The offshore wind farm with installed back-to- back power converter in wind turbines is studied. As an example the Burbo Bank offshore wind farm with Siemens Wind Power wind turbines is taken installed in wind turbines are presented. Harmonic load flow analysis and impedance frequency

Bak, Claus Leth

325

Maximum power point tracking of permanent magnet wind turbines equipped with direct matrix converter  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper presents a novel control method for Maximum Power Point Tracking of wind turbines (WTs) equipped with a Permanent Magnet Synchronous Generator (PMSG) and a Direct Matrix Converter (DMC). The method calculates the optimum wind turbine speed and maximizes the extracted power from wind turbine. This is done by Hill Climb Search method which is simple and does not need to know the generator parameters and no need to solve the complicated differential equations of generator. WT rotor speed is compared with its optimal value and then DMC controls WT until its rotor speed reaches its optimum value. Under this situation maximum power is extracted from WT and is injected to the grid with unity power factor. It is implemented by controlling the phase and the amplitude of the DMC output voltage by Venturini switching method. Simulations are done on a 2?MW PMSG WT in MATLAB/SIMULINK to obtain the results the wind speed was varied both using the Van Der Hoven method and changing the wind step. The obtained results verify the accuracy and simplicity of proposed method.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Optimization of Fog Inlet Air Cooling System for Combined Cycle Power Plants using Genetic Algorithm  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract In this research paper, a comprehensive thermodynamic modeling of a combined cycle power plant is first conducted and the effects of gas turbine inlet fogging system on the first and second law efficiencies and net power outputs of combined cycle power plants are investigated. The combined cycle power plant (CCPP) considered for this study consist of a double pressure heat recovery steam generator (HRSG) to utilize the energy of exhaust leaving the gas turbine and produce superheated steam to generate electricity in the Rankine cycle. In order to enhance understanding of this research and come up with optimum performance assessment of the plant, a complete optimization is using a genetic algorithm conducted. In order to achieve this goal, a new objective function is defined for the system optimization including social cost of air pollution for the power generation systems. The objective function is based on the first law efficiency, energy cost and the external social cost of air pollution for an operational system. It is concluded that using inlet air cooling system for the CCPP system and its optimization results in an increase in the average output power, first and second law efficiencies by 17.24%, 3.6% and 3.5%, respectively, for three warm months of year.

Mehdi A. Ehyaei; Mojtaba Tahani; Pouria Ahmadi; M. Esfandiari

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Video camera use at nuclear power plants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A survey of US nuclear power plants was conducted to evaluate video camera use in plant operations, and determine equipment used and the benefits realized. Basic closed circuit television camera (CCTV) systems are described and video camera operation principles are reviewed. Plant approaches for implementing video camera use are discussed, as are equipment selection issues such as setting task objectives, radiation effects on cameras, and the use of disposal cameras. Specific plant applications are presented and the video equipment used is described. The benefits of video camera use --- mainly reduced radiation exposure and increased productivity --- are discussed and quantified. 15 refs., 6 figs.

Estabrook, M.L.; Langan, M.O.; Owen, D.E. (ENCORE Technical Resources, Inc., Middletown, PA (USA))

1990-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

Power Plant Dams (Kansas) | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Power Plant Dams (Kansas) Power Plant Dams (Kansas) Power Plant Dams (Kansas) < Back Eligibility Commercial Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Municipal/Public Utility Rural Electric Cooperative Utility Savings Category Water Buying & Making Electricity Program Info State Kansas Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider Health and Environment This act states the provisions for erection and maintenance of dams. When any person, corporation or city may be desirous of erecting and maintaining a milldam or dam for generating power across any watercourse, the party so desiring to do the same may run the stream over the land of any other person by ditching or otherwise, and he, she or it may obtain the right to erect and maintain said dam and keep up and maintain the necessary ditches

329

Foam Cleaning of Steam Turbines  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The efficiency and power output of a steam turbine can be dramatically reduced when deposits form on the turbine blades. Disassembly and mechanical cleaning of the turbine is very time consuming and costly. Deposits can be removed from the turbine...

Foster, C.; Curtis, G.; Horvath, J. W.

330

Steam Turbine Cogeneration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Steam turbines are widely used in most industrial facilities because steam is readily available and steam turbine is easy to operate and maintain. If designed properly, a steam turbine co-generation (producing heat and power simultaneously) system...

Quach, K.; Robb, A. G.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

Ris-M-2190 DESCRIPTION OF THE POWER PLANT MODEL BWR-PLASIM OUTLINED  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, the turbine connected via the steam line, the feedwater system and three control systems. #12;- 4 - #12;- 5 coolant flow 28 3. THE TURBINE AND FEEDWATER HEATERS 30 3.1. Flow and pressure calculations for the turbine . 33 3.2. Enthalpy and power calculations for the turbine 35 3.3. The reheater model 37 3

332

A concept of power generator using wind turbine, hydrodynamic retarder, and organic Rankine cycle drive  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper describes a concept of electric power generating system that uses a wind turbine to generate kinetic energy which converts heat through a hydrodynamic retarder. The heat so generated is utilized to drive an organic Rankine cycle that converts thermal energy into electricity power for continuous and undisrupted supply during the year. A hydrodynamic retarder converts kinetic energy into heat through hot fluid by directing the flow of the fluid into the hydrodynamic retarder in a manner that resists rotation of blades of the wind turbine. The hot fluid circulating in the hydrodynamic retarder is a thermal heat source for vapor regeneration of organic heat exchange fluid mixture(s) used in the Rankine cycle. The expansion of the organic heat exchange fluid gets converted into rotation of the generator rotor.

Samuel Sami

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Femtosecond laser-inscribed fiber Bragg gratings for strain monitoring in power cables of offshore wind turbines  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A fiber Bragg grating sensor system used for monitoring the effects of strain on the power cable of an offshore wind turbine is presented. The Bragg grating structure was inscribed...

Burgmeier, Jörg; Schippers, Wolfgang; Emde, Nico; Funken, Peter; Schade, Wolfgang

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Ris-R-1400(EN) Dynamic wind turbine models in power  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.2.1.1 Squirrel cage induction generator (SCIG) 9 2.2.1.2 Doubly-fed induction generator (DFIG) 12 2.2.2 Power of a variable speed wind turbine with DFIG 54 4.4 Doubly-fed induction generator control 57 4.4.1 System reference frames 57 Risø-R-1400(EN) 3 #12;4.4.2 Control configuration of DFIG in DIgSILENT 58 4.4.3 Rotor

335

Dynamic modeling of IGCC power plants  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) power plants are an effective option to reduce emissions and implement carbon-dioxide sequestration. The combination of a very complex fuel-processing plant and a combined cycle power station leads to challenging problems as far as dynamic operation is concerned. Dynamic performance is extremely relevant because recent developments in the electricity market push toward an ever more flexible and varying operation of power plants. A dynamic model of the entire system and models of its sub-systems are indispensable tools in order to perform computer simulations aimed at process and control design. This paper presents the development of the lumped-parameters dynamic model of an entrained-flow gasifier, with special emphasis on the modeling approach. The model is implemented into software by means of the Modelica language and validated by comparison with one set of data related to the steady operation of the gasifier of the Buggenum power station in the Netherlands. Furthermore, in order to demonstrate the potential of the proposed modeling approach and the use of simulation for control design purposes, a complete model of an exemplary IGCC power plant, including its control system, has been developed, by re-using existing models of combined cycle plant components; the results of a load dispatch ramp simulation are presented and shortly discussed.

F. Casella; P. Colonna

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

Proceedings of the Department of Energy advanced gas turbine central power systems workshop  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The basic objective of the DOE Central Power Systems group is the development of technology for increasing the use of coal in central station electric power generation in an economical and environmentally acceptable manner. The two major research and development areas of this program are the Open Cycle Gas Turbine System and the Closed Cycle Gas Turbine System. Recognizing that the ultimate success of the DOE program is measured by end-user acceptance of the technology developed, the workshop was held to obtain utility industry comments and suggestions on the development of these systems and their potential use by electric power utilities. Representatives of equipment manufacturers, architect and engineering firms, and universities were also invited as participants to provide a comprehensive review of the technology development and implementation process. The 65 participants and observers examined the following topics: technical considerations of the Open Cycle and of the Closed Cycle Gas Turbine program; commercialization of both systems; and regulatory impacts on the development of both systems. Each group evaluated the existing program, indicating R and D objectives that they supported and cited recommendations for modifications and expansion of future R and D work.

D'Angelo, S. (ed.)

1980-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Power Performance Testing Activities in the DOE-EPRI Turbine Verification Program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As part of the US Department of Energy/Electric Power Research Institute (DOE-EPRI) Wind Turbine Verification Program, Global Energy Concepts (GEC) is engaged in planning and conducting power performance tests for wind turbines in Searsburg, Vermont; Glenmore, Wisconsin; Algona, Iowa; Springview, Nebraska; Kotzebue, Alaska; and Big Spring, Texas. The turbines under investigation include a 550-kW Zond Z-40 FS, a 600-kW Tacke 600e, two 750-kW Zond Z-50s, a 66-kW AOC 15/50, a 660-kW Vestas V-47, and a 1.65-MW Vestas V-66. The testing is performed in a variety of terrain types, including mountains, plains, deserts, and coastal tundra; and under a wide range of atmospheric conditions from arid to arctic. Because one goal of this testing program is to gain experience with the new International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC) 61400-12 standard, all of the measurements are being performed in accordance with this new standard. This paper presents the status of the power performance testing at each site, the methodologies employed, test results available, and lessons learned from the application of the IEC standard. Any sources of uncertainty are discussed, and attention is given to the relative importance of each aspect of the IEC standard in terms of its contribution to the overall measurement uncertainty.

VandenBosche, J.; McCoy, T.; Rhoads, H. (Global Energy Concepts, LLC); McNiff, B. (McNiff Light Industry); Smith, B. (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)

2000-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

338

The Evolution of Nuclear Power Plant Design: Synopsis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

1 April 1961 research-article The Evolution of Nuclear Power Plant Design: Synopsis Christopher Hinton

1961-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Fossil Power Plant Applications of Expert Systems: An EPRI Perspective  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the role of expert systems in the electric power industry, with particular emphasis on six fossil power plant applications currently under development by the Electric Power Research Institute....

Divakaruni, S. M.

340

SENSIBLE HEAT STORAGE FOR A SOLAR THERMAL POWER PLANT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

HEAT STORAGE FOR A SOLAR THERMAL POWER PLANT Thomas F.CENTRAL RECEIVER SOLAR THERMAL POWER SYSTEM, PHASE progressCorporation, RECEIVER SOLAR THERMAL POWER SYSTEM, PHASE I,

Baldwin, Thomas F.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "turbine power plants" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

New draft projects of steam turbines for combined-cycle plants  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We describe the design features, basic thermal circuits, and efficiency of steam turbines developed on the basis of serially produced steam turbines at the Ural Turbine Works and intended for use as part of combined

G. D. Barinberg; A. E. Valamin; A. Yu. Kultyshev; A. A. Ivanovskii…

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Ocean Thermal Gradient Hydraulic Power Plant  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...for the probable life of the earth, only...low-pressure steam turbines pSrhaps hun-dreds...con-ventional hydraulic turbine under gravity flow...horizontally and the remaining available energy...through a hydraulic turbine to generatepower...between the liquid and gas-eous phases, with...

Earl J. Beck

1975-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

343

power plant | OpenEI Community  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

plant plant Home Kyoung's picture Submitted by Kyoung(155) Contributor 12 November, 2012 - 09:17 Legal Reviews are Underway BHFS Legal review permitting power plant roadmap transmission The legal review of the Regulatory Roadmap flowcharts and supporting content is well underway and will continue for the next several months with our legal team at [www.bhfs.com Brownstein Hyatt Farber and Schreck]. The BHFS has been meeting with the NREL roadmap team during weekly 2-3 hour meetings to provide comments and suggestions on each flowchart at the federal and state levels. They have had some fantastic recommendations for updates - particularly for Sections 7 and 8 of the roadmap, pertaining to the permitting of power plants and transmission lines. Syndicate content 429 Throttled (bot load)

344

South Carolina Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

South Carolina nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" South Carolina nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant name/total reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net generation (percent)","Owner" "Catawba Unit 1, Unit 2","2,258","18,964",36.5,"Duke Energy Carolinas, LLC" "H B Robinson Unit 2",724,"3,594",6.9,"Progress Energy Carolinas Inc" "Oconee Unit 1, Unit 2, Unit 3","2,538","20,943",40.3,"Duke Energy Carolinas, LLC" "V C Summer Unit 1",966,"8,487",16.3,"South Carolina Electric&Gas Co" "4 Plants 7 Reactors","6,486","51,988",100.0

345

Stateline Solar Power Plant | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Stateline Solar Power Plant Stateline Solar Power Plant Jump to: navigation, search Name Stateline Solar Power Plant Facility Stateline Sector Solar Facility Type Photovoltaic Developer First Solar Location San Bernardino County, California Coordinates 34.9592083°, -116.419389° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":34.9592083,"lon":-116.419389,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

346

Blythe Solar Power Plant | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Blythe Solar Power Plant Blythe Solar Power Plant Jump to: navigation, search Name Blythe Solar Power Plant Facility Blythe Sector Solar Facility Type Photovoltaic Developer First Solar Location Blythe, California Coordinates 33.6172329°, -114.5891744° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":33.6172329,"lon":-114.5891744,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

347

NREL: TroughNet - Parabolic Trough Power Plant System Technology  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Parabolic Trough Power Plant System Technology Parabolic Trough Power Plant System Technology A parabolic trough solar power plant uses a large field of collectors to supply thermal energy to a conventional power plant. Because they use conventional power cycles, parabolic trough power plants can be hybridized-other fuels can be used to back up the solar power. Like all power cycles, trough power plants also need a cooling system to transfer waste heat to the environment. Parabolic trough power plant technologies include: Direct steam generation Fossil-fired (hybrid) backup Operation and maintenance Power cycles Steam Rankine Organic Rankine Combined Wet and dry cooling Power Cycles A photo of an aerial view of a power plant in the middle of a solar field with rows and rows of parabolic troughs tracking. The cooling towers can be seen with the water plume rising into the air. The white water tanks can be seen in the background.

348

MHD power plant instrumentation and control  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) has awarded a contract to the MHD Development Corporation (MDC) to develop instrumentation and control requirements and strategies for commercial MHD power plants. MDC subcontracted MSE to do the technical development required. MSE is being assisted by Montana State University (MSU) for the topping cycle development. A computer model of a stand-alone MHD/steam plant is being constructed. The plant is based on the plant design set forth in the MDC proposal to the Federal Clean Coal Technology 5 solicitation. It consists of an MHD topping plant, a Heat Recovery Seed Recovery (HRSR) plant, and a steam turbo-generator. The model is based on the computer code used for a study of the Corette plant retrofitted with an MHD plant. Additional control strategies, based on MHD testing results and current steam bottoming plant control data, will be incorporated. A model will be devised and implemented for automatic control of the plant. Requirements regarding instrumentation and actuators will be documented. Instrumentation and actuators that are not commercially available will be identified. The role and desired characteristics of an expert system in the automated control scheme is being investigated. Start-up and shutdown procedures will be studied and load change dynamic performance will be evaluated. System response to abnormal topping cycle and off-design system operation will be investigated. This includes use of MHD topping cycle models which couple gasdynamic and electrical behavior for the study of controlling of the MHD topping cycle. A curvefitter, which uses cubic Hermitian spline interpolation functions in as many as five dimensions, allows much more accurate reproduction of nonlinear, multidimensional functions. This project will be the first to investigate plant dynamics and control using as many as seven independent variables or control inputs to the MHD topping cycle.

Lofftus, D.; Rudberg, D. [MSE Inc., Butte, MT (United States); Johnson, R.; Hammerstrom, D. [Montana State Univ., Bozeman, MT (United States)

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

349

Report on Hawaii geothermal power plant project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Hawaii Geothermal Generator Project is the first power plant in the State of Hawaii to be powered by geothermal energy. This plant, which is located in the Puna District on the Island of Hawaii, produces three (3) megawatts of electricity utilizing the steam phase from the geothermal well. This project represents the climax of the geophysical research efforts going on for two decades in the Hawaiian Islands which resulted in the discovery of a significant reservoir of geothermal energy which could be put to practical use. In 1978 the Department of Energy, in conjunction with the State of Hawaii, entered into negotiations to design and build a power plant. The purpose and objective of this plant was to demonstrate the feasibility of constructing and operating a geothermal power plant located in a remote volcanically active area. A contract was signed in mid 1978 between the Research Corporation of the University of Hawaii (RCUH) and the Department of Energy (DOE). To date, the DOE has provided 8.3 million dollars with the State of Hawaii and others contributing 2.1 million dollars. The cost of the project exceeded its original estimates by approximately 25%. These increases in cost were principally contributed to the higher cost for construction than was originally estimated. Second, the cost of procuring the various pieces of equipment exceed their estimates by 10 to 20 percent, and third, the engineering dollar per man hour rose 20 to 25 percent.

Not Available

1983-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Slim Holes for Small Power Plants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Geothermal research study at Sandia National Laboratories has conducted a program in slimhole drilling research since 1992. Although our original interest focused on slim holes as an exploration method, it has also become apparent that they have substantial potential for driving small-scale, off-grid power plants. This paper summarizes Sandia's slim-hole research program, describes technology used in a ''typical'' slimhole drilling project, presents an evaluation of using slim holes for small power plants, and lists some of the research topics that deserve further investigation.

Finger, John T.

1999-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

351

Advanced combustion technologies for gas turbine power plants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Objectives are to develop actuators for enhancing the mixing between gas streams, increase combustion stability, and develop hgih-temperature materials for actuators and sensors in combustors. Turbulent kinetic energy maps of an excited jet with co-flow in a cavity with a partially closed exhaust end are given with and without a longitudinal or a transverse acoustic field. Dielectric constants and piezoelectric coefficients were determined for Sr{sub 2}(Nb{sub x}Ta{sub 1-x}){sub 2}O{sub 7} ceramics.

Vandsburger, U. [Virginia Polytechnic Inst. and State Univ., Blacksburg, VA (United States). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering; Roe, L.A. [Arkansas Univ., Fayetteville, AR (United States). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering; Desu, S.B. [Virginia Polytechnic Inst. and State Univ., Blacksburg, VA (United States). Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

352

Order-of-magnitude enhancement of wind farm power density via counter-rotating vertical-axis wind turbine arrays  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Modern wind farms require significant land resources to separate each wind turbine from the adjacent turbine wakes. These aerodynamic constraints limit the amount of power that can be extracted from a given wind farm footprint. We conducted full-scale field tests of vertical-axis wind turbines in counter-rotating configurations under natural wind conditions. Whereas wind farms consisting of propeller-style turbines produce 2 to 3 watts of power per square meter of land area, these field tests indicate that power densities approaching 100 W m^-2 can be achieved by arranging vertical-axis wind turbines in layouts that enable them to extract energy from adjacent wakes. In addition, we calculated that the global wind resource available to 10-m tall turbines based on the present approach is approximately 225 trillion watts (TW), which significantly exceeds the global wind resource available to 80-m tall, propeller-style wind turbines, approximately 75 TW. This improvement is due to the closer spacing that can be a...

Dabiri, John O

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Strategies in tower solar power plant optimization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A method for optimizing a central receiver solar thermal electric power plant is studied. We parametrize the plant design as a function of eleven design variables and reduce the problem of finding optimal designs to the numerical problem of finding the minimum of a function of several variables. This minimization problem is attacked with different algorithms both local and global in nature. We find that all algorithms find the same minimum of the objective function. The performance of each of the algorithms and the resulting designs are studied for two typical cases. We describe a method to evaluate the impact of design variables in the plant performance. This method will tell us what variables are key to the optimal plant design and which ones are less important. This information can be used to further improve the plant design and to accelerate the optimization procedure.

Ramos, A

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Automation of hydroelectric power plants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper describes how the author's company has been automating its hydroelectric generating plants. The early automations were achieved with a relay-type supervisory control system, relay logic, dc tachometer, and a pneumatic gate-position controller. While this system allowed the units to be started and stopped from a remote location, they were operated at an output that was preset by the pneumatic control at the generating site. The supervisory control system at the site provided such information as unit status, generator breaker status, and a binary coded decimal (BCD) value of the pond level. The generating units are started by energizing an on-site relay that sets the pneumatic gate controller to a preset value above the synchronous speed of the hydroelectric generator. The pneumatic controller then opens the water-wheel wicket gates to the preset startup position. As the hydroelectric generator starts to turn, the machine-mounted dc tachometer produces a voltage. At a dc voltage equivalent to synchronous speed, the generator main breaker closes, and a contact from the main breaker starts a field-delay timer. Within a few seconds, the field breaker closes. Once the cycle is complete, a relay changes the pneumatic setpoint to a preset operating point of about 8/10 wicket gate opening.

Grasser, H.S. (Consolidated Papers, Inc., Wisconsin Rapids, WI (US))

1990-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

Economic Analysis of a 3MW Biomass Gasification Power Plant  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Collaborative, Biomass gasification / power generationANALYSIS OF A 3MW BIOMASS GASIFICATION POWER PLANT R obert Cas a feedstock for gasification for a 3 MW power plant was

Cattolica, Robert; Lin, Kathy

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

Estimation of Wind Speed in Connection to a Wind Turbine  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

horizontal axis wind power plant with rated power 750 KW. The plant has a three bladed rotor and an automatic is shown in Figure 1 demand Drive train Generator Rotor Wind speed Power demand Grid Power Controller PitchEstimation of Wind Speed in Connection to a Wind Turbine X. Ma #3; , N. K. Poulsen #3; , H. Bindner

357

Tsiklauri-Durst combined cycle (T-D Cycle{trademark}) application for nuclear and fossil-fueled power generating plants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Tsiklauri-Durst combined cycle is a combination of the best attributes of both nuclear power and combined cycle gas power plants. A technology patented in 1994 by Battelle Memorial Institute offers a synergistic approach to power generation. A typical combined cycle is defined as the combination of gas turbine Brayton Cycle, topping steam turbine Rankine Cycle. Exhaust from the gas turbine is used in heat recovery steam generators to produce steam for a steam turbine. In a standard combined cycle gas turbine-steam turbine application, the gas turbine generates about 65 to 70 percent of system power. The thermal efficiency for such an installation is typically about 45 to 50 percent. A T-D combined cycle takes a new, creative approach to combined cycle design by directly mixing high enthalpy steam from the heat recovery steam generator, involving the steam generator at more than one pressure. Direct mixing of superheated and saturated steam eliminates the requirement for a large heat exchanger, making plant modification simple and economical.

Tsiklauri, B.; Korolev, V.N.; Durst, B.M.; Shen, P.K.

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

Gas turbine noise control  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The use of gas turbine powered generators and pumping stations are likely to increase over the next two decades. Alternative fuel systems utilizing fluidized coal beds are likely in the near future and direct combustion of pulverized coal is also a possibility. The primary problem of generally unacceptable noise levels from gas turbine powered equipment affects both community noise and hearing conservation alike. The noise criteria of such plant remain a significant design factor. The paper looks at the technical and historical aspects associated with the noise generation process and examines past present and possible future approaches to the problem of silencing gas turbine units; adequately specifying the acoustical criteria and ratings; evaluates the techniques by which these criteria should be measured; and correlates these with the typical results achieved in the field.

Louis A. Challis and Associates Pty. Ltd.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Risk-based decision making method for maintenance policy selection of thermal power plant equipment  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This study presents a decision-making method for maintenance policy selection of power plants equipment. The method is based on risk analysis concepts. The method first step consists in identifying critical equipment both for power plant operational performance and availability based on risk concepts. The second step involves the proposal of a potential maintenance policy that could be applied to critical equipment in order to increase its availability. The costs associated with each potential maintenance policy must be estimated, including the maintenance costs and the cost of failure that measures the critical equipment failure consequences for the power plant operation. Once the failure probabilities and the costs of failures are estimated, a decision-making procedure is applied to select the best maintenance policy. The decision criterion is to minimize the equipment cost of failure, considering the costs and likelihood of occurrence of failure scenarios. The method is applied to the analysis of a lubrication oil system used in gas turbines journal bearings. The turbine has more than 150 MW nominal output, installed in an open cycle thermoelectric power plant. A design modification with the installation of a redundant oil pump is proposed for lubricating oil system availability improvement.

F.G. Carazas; G.F.M. Souza

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

E-Print Network 3.0 - advanced power plants Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

plants Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: advanced power plants...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "turbine power plants" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

E-Print Network 3.0 - atomic power plant Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

plant Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: atomic power plant...

362

E-Print Network 3.0 - advanced power plant Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

plant Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: advanced power plant...

363

E-Print Network 3.0 - atomic power plants Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

plants Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: atomic power plants...

364

BOILER MATERIALS FOR ULTRASUPERCRITICAL COAL POWER PLANTS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the Ohio Coal Development Office (OCDO) have recently initiated a project aimed at identifying, evaluating, and qualifying the materials needed for the construction of the critical components of coal-fired boilers capable of operating at much higher efficiencies than current generation of supercritical plants. This increased efficiency is expected to be achieved principally through the use of ultrasupercritical steam conditions (USC). The project goal initially was to assess/develop materials technology that will enable achieving turbine throttle steam conditions of 760 C (1400 F)/35 MPa (5000 psi), although this goal for the main steam temperature had to be revised down to 732 C (1350 F), based on a preliminary assessment of material capabilities. The project is intended to build further upon the alloy development and evaluation programs that have been carried out in Europe and Japan. Those programs have identified ferritic steels capable of meeting the strength requirements of USC plants up to approximately 620 C (1150 F) and nickel-based alloys suitable up to 700 C (1300 F). In this project, the maximum temperature capabilities of these and other available high-temperature alloys are being assessed to provide a basis for materials selection and application under a range of conditions prevailing in the boiler. This report provides a quarterly status report for the period of July 1 to September 30, 2004.

R. Viswanathan; K. Coleman; J. Shingledecker; J. Sarver; G. Stanko; M. Borden; W. Mohn; S. Goodstine; I. Perrin

2005-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

365

BOILER MATERIALS FOR ULTRASUPERCRITICAL COAL POWER PLANTS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the Ohio Coal Development Office (OCDO) have recently initiated a project aimed at identifying, evaluating, and qualifying the materials needed for the construction of the critical components of coal-fired boilers capable of operating at much higher efficiencies than current generation of supercritical plants. This increased efficiency is expected to be achieved principally through the use of ultrasupercritical steam conditions (USC). The project goal initially was to assess/develop materials technology that will enable achieving turbine throttle steam conditions of 760 C (1400 F)/35 MPa (5000 psi), although this goal for the main steam temperature had to be revised down to 732 C (1350 F), based on a preliminary assessment of material capabilities. The project is intended to build further upon the alloy development and evaluation programs that have been carried out in Europe and Japan. Those programs have identified ferritic steels capable of meeting the strength requirements of USC plants up to approximately 620 C (1150 F) and nickel-based alloys suitable up to 700 C (1300 F). In this project, the maximum temperature capabilities of these and other available high-temperature alloys are being assessed to provide a basis for materials selection and application under a range of conditions prevailing in the boiler. This report provides a quarterly status report for the period of July 1 to September 30, 2004.

R. Viswanathan; K. Coleman; J. Shingledecker; J. Sarver; G. Stanko; M. Borden; W. Mohn; S. Goodstine; I. Perrin

2005-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

366

Boiler Materials for Ultrasupercritical Coal Power Plants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the Ohio Coal Development Office (OCDO) have recently initiated a project aimed at identifying, evaluating, and qualifying the materials needed for the construction of the critical components of coal-fired boilers capable of operating at much higher efficiencies than current generation of supercritical plants. This increased efficiency is expected to be achieved principally through the use of ultrasupercritical steam conditions (USC). The project goal initially was to assess/develop materials technology that will enable achieving turbine throttle steam conditions of 760 C (1400 F)/35 MPa (5000 psi), although this goal for the main steam temperature had to be revised down to 732 C (1350 F), based on a preliminary assessment of material capabilities. The project is intended to build further upon the alloy development and evaluation programs that have been carried out in Europe and Japan. Those programs have identified ferritic steels capable of meeting the strength requirements of USC plants up to approximately 620 C (1150 F) and nickel-based alloys suitable up to 700 C (1300 F). In this project, the maximum temperature capabilities of these and other available high-temperature alloys are being assessed to provide a basis for materials selection and application under a range of conditions prevailing in the boiler. This report provides a quarterly status report for the period of July 1 to September 30, 2004.

R. Viswanathan; J. Sarver; M. Borden; K. Coleman; J. Blough; S. Goodstine; R.W. Swindeman; W. Mohn; I. Perrin

2003-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

367

BOILER MATERIALS FOR ULTRASUPERCRITICAL COAL POWER PLANTS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the Ohio Coal Development Office (OCDO) have recently initiated a project aimed at identifying, evaluating, and qualifying the materials needed for the construction of the critical components of coal-fired boilers capable of operating at much higher efficiencies than current generation of supercritical plants. This increased efficiency is expected to be achieved principally through the use of ultrasupercritical steam conditions (USC). A limiting factor in this can be the materials of construction. The project goal is to assess/develop materials technology that will enable achieving turbine throttle steam conditions of 760 C (1400 F)/35 MPa (5000 psi). This goal seems achievable based on a preliminary assessment of material capabilities. The project is further intended to build further upon the alloy development and evaluation programs that have been carried out in Europe and Japan. Those programs have identified ferritic steels capable of meeting the strength requirements of USC plants up to approximately 620 C (1150 F) and nickel-based alloys suitable up to 700 C (1300 F). In this project, the maximum temperature capabilities of these and other available high-temperature alloys are being assessed to provide a basis for materials selection and application under a range of conditions prevailing in the boiler. This report provides a quarterly status report for the period of July 1 to September 30, 2005.

R. Viswanathan; K. Coleman; J. Shingledecker; J. Sarver; G. Stanko; M. Borden; W. Mohn; S. Goodstine; I. Perrin

2005-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

368

BOILER MATERIALS FOR ULTRASUPERCRITICAL COAL POWER PLANTS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the Ohio Coal Development Office (OCDO) have recently initiated a project aimed at identifying, evaluating, and qualifying the materials needed for the construction of the critical components of coal-fired boilers capable of operating at much higher efficiencies than current generation of supercritical plants. This increased efficiency is expected to be achieved principally through the use of ultrasupercritical steam conditions (USC). The project goal initially was to assess/develop materials technology that will enable achieving turbine throttle steam conditions of 760 C (1400 F)/35 MPa (5000 psi), although this goal for the main steam temperature had to be revised down to 732 C (1350 F), based on a preliminary assessment of material capabilities. The project is intended to build further upon the alloy development and evaluation programs that have been carried out in Europe and Japan. Those programs have identified ferritic steels capable of meeting the strength requirements of USC plants up to approximately 620 C (1150 F) and nickel-based alloys suitable up to 700 C (1300 F). In this project, the maximum temperature capabilities of these and other available high-temperature alloys are being assessed to provide a basis for materials selection and application under a range of conditions prevailing in the boiler. This report provides a quarterly status report for the period of October 1 to December 30, 2003.

R. Viswanathan; K. Coleman; J. Shingledecker; J. Sarver; G. Stanko; W. Mohn; M. Borden; S. Goodstine; I. Perrin

2004-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

369

BOILER MATERIALS FOR ULTRASUPERCRITICAL COAL POWER PLANTS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the Ohio Coal Development Office (OCDO) have recently initiated a project aimed at identifying, evaluating, and qualifying the materials needed for the construction of the critical components of coal-fired boilers capable of operating at much higher efficiencies than current generation of supercritical plants. This increased efficiency is expected to be achieved principally through the use of ultrasupercritical steam conditions (USC). The project goal initially was to assess/develop materials technology that will enable achieving turbine throttle steam conditions of 760 C (1400 F)/35 MPa (5000 psi), although this goal for the main steam temperature had to be revised down to 732 C (1350 F), based on a preliminary assessment of material capabilities. The project is intended to build further upon the alloy development and evaluation programs that have been carried out in Europe and Japan. Those programs have identified ferritic steels capable of meeting the strength requirements of USC plants up to approximately 620 C (1150 F) and nickel-based alloys suitable up to 700 C (1300 F). In this project, the maximum temperature capabilities of these and other available high-temperature alloys are being assessed to provide a basis for materials selection and application under a range of conditions prevailing in the boiler. This report provides a quarterly status report for the period of April to June 30, 2004.

R. Viswanathan; K. Coleman; J. Shingledecker; J. Sarver; G. Stanko; W. Mohn; M. Borden; S. Goodstine; I. Perrin

2004-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

370

Boiler Materials For Ultrasupercritical Coal Power Plants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the Ohio Coal Development Office (OCDO) have recently initiated a project aimed at identifying, evaluating, and qualifying the materials needed for the construction of the critical components of coal-fired boilers capable of operating at much higher efficiencies than current generation of supercritical plants. This increased efficiency is expected to be achieved principally through the use of ultrasupercritical steam conditions (USC). A limiting factor in this can be the materials of construction. The project goal is to assess/develop materials technology that will enable achieving turbine throttle steam conditions of 760 C (1400 F)/35 MPa (5000 psi). This goal seems achievable based on a preliminary assessment of material capabilities. The project is further intended to build further upon the alloy development and evaluation programs that have been carried out in Europe and Japan. Those programs have identified ferritic steels capable of meeting the strength requirements of USC plants up to approximately 620 C (1150 F) and nickel-based alloys suitable up to 700 C (1300 F). In this project, the maximum temperature capabilities of these and other available high-temperature alloys are being assessed to provide a basis for materials selection and application under a range of conditions prevailing in the boiler. This report provides a quarterly status report for the period of July 1 to September 30, 2006.

R. Viswanathan; K. Coleman; J. Shingledecker; J. Sarver; G. Stanko; M. Borden; W. Mohn; S. Goodstine; I. Perrin

2006-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

371

BOILER MATERIALS FOR ULTRASUPERCRITICAL COAL POWER PLANTS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the Ohio Coal Development Office (OCDO) have recently initiated a project aimed at identifying, evaluating, and qualifying the materials needed for the construction of the critical components of coal-fired boilers capable of operating at much higher efficiencies than current generation of supercritical plants. This increased efficiency is expected to be achieved principally through the use of ultrasupercritical steam conditions (USC). The project goal initially was to assess/develop materials technology that will enable achieving turbine throttle steam conditions of 760 C (1400 F)/35 MPa (5000 psi), although this goal for the main steam temperature had to be revised down to 732 C (1350 F), based on a preliminary assessment of material capabilities. The project is intended to build further upon the alloy development and evaluation programs that have been carried out in Europe and Japan. Those programs have identified ferritic steels capable of meeting the strength requirements of USC plants up to approximately 620 C (1150 F) and nickel-based alloys suitable up to 700 C (1300 F). In this project, the maximum temperature capabilities of these and other available high-temperature alloys are being assessed to provide a basis for materials selection and application under a range of conditions prevailing in the boiler. This report provides a quarterly status report for the period of October 1 to December 30, 2003.

K. Coleman; R. Viswanathan; J. Shingledecker; J. Sarver; G. Stanko; W. Mohn; M. Borden; S. Goodstine; I. Perrin

2004-01-23T23:59:59.000Z

372

BOILER MATERIALS FOR ULTRASUPERCRITICAL COAL POWER PLANTS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the Ohio Coal Development Office (OCDO) have recently initiated a project aimed at identifying, evaluating, and qualifying the materials needed for the construction of the critical components of coal-fired boilers capable of operating at much higher efficiencies than current generation of supercritical plants. This increased efficiency is expected to be achieved principally through the use of ultrasupercritical steam conditions (USC). A limiting factor in this can be the materials of construction. The project goal is to assess/develop materials technology that will enable achieving turbine throttle steam conditions of 760 C (1400 F)/35 MPa (5000 psi). This goal seems achievable based on a preliminary assessment of material capabilities. The project is further intended to build further upon the alloy development and evaluation programs that have been carried out in Europe and Japan. Those programs have identified ferritic steels capable of meeting the strength requirements of USC plants up to approximately 620 C (1150 F) and nickel-based alloys suitable up to 700 C (1300 F). In this project, the maximum temperature capabilities of these and other available high-temperature alloys are being assessed to provide a basis for materials selection and application under a range of conditions prevailing in the boiler. This report provides a quarterly status report for the period of April 1 to June 30, 2005.

R. Viswanathan; K. Coleman; J. Shingledecker; J. Sarver; G. Stanko; M. Borden; W. Mohn; S. Goodstine; I. Perrin

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

Boiler Materials for Ultrasupercritical Coal Power Plants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the Ohio Coal Development Office (OCDO) have recently initiated a project aimed at identifying, evaluating, and qualifying the materials needed for the construction of the critical components of coal-fired boilers capable of operating at much higher efficiencies than current generation of supercritical plants. This increased efficiency is expected to be achieved principally through the use of ultrasupercritical steam conditions (USC). A limiting factor in this can be the materials of construction. The project goal is to assess/develop materials technology that will enable achieving turbine throttle steam conditions of 760 C (1400 F)/35 MPa (5000 psi). This goal seems achievable based on a preliminary assessment of material capabilities. The project is further intended to build further upon the alloy development and evaluation programs that have been carried out in Europe and Japan. Those programs have identified ferritic steels capable of meeting the strength requirements of USC plants up to approximately 620 C (1150 F) and nickel-based alloys suitable up to 700 C (1300 F). In this project, the maximum temperature capabilities of these and other available high-temperature alloys are being assessed to provide a basis for materials selection and application under a range of conditions prevailing in the boiler. This report provides a quarterly status report for the period of October 1 to December 30, 2005.

R. Viswanathan; K. Coleman; J. Shingledecker; J. Sarver; G. Stanko; M. Borden; W. Mohn; S. Goodstine; I. Perrin

2006-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

374

Boiler Materials for Ultrasupercritical Coal Power Plants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the Ohio Coal Development Office (OCDO) have recently initiated a project aimed at identifying, evaluating, and qualifying the materials needed for the construction of the critical components of coal-fired boilers capable of operating at much higher efficiencies than current generation of supercritical plants. This increased efficiency is expected to be achieved principally through the use of ultrasupercritical steam conditions (USC). A limiting factor in this can be the materials of construction. The project goal is to assess/develop materials technology that will enable achieving turbine throttle steam conditions of 760 C (1400 F)/35 MPa (5000 psi). This goal seems achievable based on a preliminary assessment of material capabilities. The project is further intended to build further upon the alloy development and evaluation programs that have been carried out in Europe and Japan. Those programs have identified ferritic steels capable of meeting the strength requirements of USC plants up to approximately 620 C (1150 F) and nickel-based alloys suitable up to 700 C (1300 F). In this project, the maximum temperature capabilities of these and other available high-temperature alloys are being assessed to provide a basis for materials selection and application under a range of conditions prevailing in the boiler. This report provides a quarterly status report for the period of April 1 to June 30, 2006.

R. Viswanathan; K. Coleman; J. Shingledecker; J. Sarver; G. Stanko; M. Borden; W. Mohn; S. Goodstine; I. Perrin

2006-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

375

BOILER MATERIALS FOR ULTRASUPERCRITICAL COAL POWER PLANTS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the Ohio Coal Development Office (OCDO) have recently initiated a project aimed at identifying, evaluating, and qualifying the materials needed for the construction of the critical components of coal-fired boilers capable of operating at much higher efficiencies than current generation of supercritical plants. This increased efficiency is expected to be achieved principally through the use of ultrasupercritical steam conditions (USC). The project goal initially was to assess/develop materials technology that will enable achieving turbine throttle steam conditions of 760 C (1400 F)/35 MPa (5000 psi), although this goal for the main steam temperature had to be revised down to 732 C (1350 F), based on a preliminary assessment of material capabilities. The project is intended to build further upon the alloy development and evaluation programs that have been carried out in Europe and Japan. Those programs have identified ferritic steels capable of meeting the strength requirements of USC plants up to approximately 620 C (1150 F) and nickel-based alloys suitable up to 700 C (1300 F). In this project, the maximum temperature capabilities of these and other available high-temperature alloys are being assessed to provide a basis for materials selection and application under a range of conditions prevailing in the boiler. This report provides a quarterly status report for the period of April to June 30, 2004.

R. Viswanathan; K. Coleman; J. Shingledecker; J. Sarver; G. Stanko; M. Borden; W. Mohn; S. Goodstine; I. Perrin

2004-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

376

Boiler Materials for Ultrasupercritical Coal Power Plants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the Ohio Coal Development Office (OCDO) have recently initiated a project aimed at identifying, evaluating, and qualifying the materials needed for the construction of the critical components of coal-fired boilers capable of operating at much higher efficiencies than current generation of supercritical plants. This increased efficiency is expected to be achieved principally through the use of ultrasupercritical steam conditions (USC). A limiting factor in this can be the materials of construction. The project goal is to assess/develop materials technology that will enable achieving turbine throttle steam conditions of 760 C (1400 F)/35 MPa (5000 psi). This goal seems achievable based on a preliminary assessment of material capabilities. The project is further intended to build further upon the alloy development and evaluation programs that have been carried out in Europe and Japan. Those programs have identified ferritic steels capable of meeting the strength requirements of USC plants up to approximately 620 C (1150 F) and nickel-based alloys suitable up to 700 C (1300 F). In this project, the maximum temperature capabilities of these and other available high-temperature alloys are being assessed to provide a basis for materials selection and application under a range of conditions prevailing in the boiler. This report provides a quarterly status report for the period of January 1 to March 31, 2006.

R. Viswanathan; K. Coleman; J. Shingledecker; J. Sarver; G. Stanko; M. Borden; W. Mohn; S. Goodstine; I. Perrin

2006-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

377

Reliable, Efficient and Cost-Effective Electric Power Converter for Small Wind Turbines Based on AC-link Technology  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Grid-tied inverter power electronics have been an Achilles heel of the small wind industry, providing opportunity for new technologies to provide lower costs, greater efficiency, and improved reliability. The small wind turbine market is also moving towards the 50-100kW size range. The unique AC-link power conversion technology provides efficiency, reliability, and power quality advantages over existing technologies, and Princeton Power will adapt prototype designs used for industrial asynchronous motor control to a 50kW small wind turbine design.

Darren Hammell; Mark Holveck; DOE Project Officer - Keith Bennett

2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Simulation of a flexible wind turbine response to a grid fault Anca D. Hansen*, Nicolaos A. Cutululis*, Poul Srensen*,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

similar to that of conventional power plants. Especially the requirements for wind turbines to stay possible new directions in the certification process of future power plant wind turbines, namely wind industries nowadays. The increased penetration of wind energy into the power system over the last years

379

ASSESSING POWER PLANT COOLING WATER INTAKE SYSTEM  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ASSESSING POWER PLANT COOLING WATER INTAKE SYSTEM ENTRAINMENT IMPACTS Prepared For: California, Center for Ocean Health, Long Marine Lab GREGOR CAILLIET, Moss Landing Marine Laboratories DAVID MAYER be obvious that large studies like these require the coordinated work of many people. We would first like

380

Large-Eddy Simulation Study of Wake Propagation and Power Production in an Array of Tidal-Current Turbines: Preprint  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper presents our initial work in performing large-eddy simulations of tidal turbine array flows. First, a horizontally-periodic precursor simulation is performed to create turbulent flow data. Then that data is used to determine the inflow into a tidal turbine array two rows deep and infinitely wide. The turbines are modeled using rotating actuator lines, and the finite-volume method is used to solve the governing equations. In studying the wakes created by the turbines, we observed that the vertical shear of the inflow combined with wake rotation causes lateral wake asymmetry. Also, various turbine configurations are simulated, and the total power production relative to isolated turbines is examined. Staggering consecutive rows of turbines in the simulated configurations allows the greatest efficiency using the least downstream row spacing. Counter-rotating consecutive downstream turbines in a non-staggered array shows a small benefit. This work has identified areas for improvement, such as the use of a larger precursor domain to better capture elongated turbulent structures, the inclusion of salinity and temperature equations to account for density stratification and its effect on turbulence, improved wall shear stress modeling, and the examination of more array configurations.

Churchfield, M. J.; Li, Y.; Moriarty, P. J.

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "turbine power plants" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Large-Eddy Simulation Study of Wake Propagation and Power Production in an Array of Tidal-Current Turbines: Preprint  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper presents our initial work in performing large-eddy simulations of tidal turbine array flows. First, a horizontally-periodic precursor simulation is performed to create turbulent flow data. Then that data is used as inflow into a tidal turbine array two rows deep and infinitely wide. The turbines are modeled using rotating actuator lines, and the finite-volume method is used to solve the governing equations. In studying the wakes created by the turbines, we observed that the vertical shear of the inflow combined with wake rotation causes lateral wake asymmetry. Also, various turbine configurations are simulated, and the total power production relative to isolated turbines is examined. Staggering consecutive rows of turbines in the simulated configurations allows the greatest efficiency using the least downstream row spacing. Counter-rotating consecutive downstream turbines in a non-staggered array shows a small benefit. This work has identified areas for improvement, such as the use of a larger precursor domain to better capture elongated turbulent structures, the inclusion of salinity and temperature equations to account for density stratification and its effect on turbulence, improved wall shear stress modelling, and the examination of more array configurations.

Churchfield, M. J.; Li, Y.; Moriarty, P. J.

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Forecast of Regional Power Output of Wind Turbines Hans Georg Beyer, Detlev Heinemann, Harald Mellinghoff, Kai Monnich, Hans-Peter Waldl  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Forecast of Regional Power Output of Wind Turbines Hans Georg Beyer, Detlev Heinemann, Harald of wind turbines connected to the public electricity grid will be intro- duced. Using this procedure and Northern Germany. At the moment, the installed capacity of wind turbines is in the order of magnitude

Heinemann, Detlev

383

Refurbishing steam turbines  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Power-plant operators are reducing maintenance costs of their aging steam turbines by using wire-arc spray coating and shot peening to prolong the service life of components, and by replacing outmoded bearings and seals with newer designs. Steam-turbine operators are pressed with the challenge of keeping their aging machines functioning in the face of wear problems that are exacerbated by the demand for higher efficiencies. These problems include intense thermal cycling during both start-up and shutdown, water particles in steam and solid particles in the air that pit smooth surfaces, and load changes that cause metal fatigue.

Valenti, M.

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Participation of wind power plants in system frequency control: Review of grid code requirements and control methods  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Active power reserves are needed for the proper operation of an electrical system. These reserves are continuously regulated in order to match the generation and consumption in the system and thus, to maintain a constant electrical frequency. They are usually provided by synchronized conventional generating units such as hydraulic or thermal power plants. With the progressive displacement of these generating plants by non-synchronized renewable-based power plants (e.g. wind and solar) the net level of synchronous power reserves in the system becomes reduced. Therefore, wind power plants are required, according to some European Grid Codes, to also provide power reserves like conventional generating units do. This paper focuses not only on the review of the requirements set by Grid Codes, but also on control methods of wind turbines for their participation in primary frequency control and synthetic inertia.

Francisco Díaz-González; Melanie Hau; Andreas Sumper; Oriol Gomis-Bellmunt

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Mohave Solar Power Plant | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Mohave Solar Power Plant Mohave Solar Power Plant Facility Mojave Solar Sector Solar Facility Type Concentrating Solar Power Facility Status Under Construction Owner Mojave Solar LLC, Developer Abengoa Solar, Mohave Sun LLC Location Mohave County, Arizona Coordinates 35.017264°, -117.316607° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":35.017264,"lon":-117.316607,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

386

SELFMONITORING DISTRIBUTED MONITORING SYSTEM FOR NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS (PRELIMINARY VERSION)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SELF­MONITORING DISTRIBUTED MONITORING SYSTEM FOR NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS (PRELIMINARY VERSION) Aldo and identification are extremely important activities for the safety of a nuclear power plant. In particular inside huge and complex production plants. 1 INTRODUCTION Safety in nuclear power plants requires

387

Gas-dynamic characteristics of a noise and heat insulating jacket on a gas turbine in a gas pumping plant on emergency disconnection of the cooling fans  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The paper discusses the operation of a gas turbine plant (GTP) when the fans in ... NHJ by a fan. The operation of gas-pumping plant involves working with brief (10 ... describing the motion of an ideal thermally...

P. V. Trusov; D. A. Charntsev; I. R. Kats…

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Configuration management in nuclear power plants  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Configuration management (CM) is the process of identifying and documenting the characteristics of a facility's structures, systems and components of a facility, and of ensuring that changes to these characteristics are properly developed, assessed, approved, issued, implemented, verified, recorded and incorporated into the facility documentation. The need for a CM system is a result of the long term operation of any nuclear power plant. The main challenges are caused particularly by ageing plant technology, plant modifications, the application of new safety and operational requirements, and in general by human factors arising from migration of plant personnel and possible human failures. The IAEA Incident Reporting System (IRS) shows that on average 25% of recorded events could be caused by configuration errors or deficiencies. CM processes correctly applied ensure that the construction, operation, maintenance and testing of a physical facility are in accordance with design requirements as expressed in the d...

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Sustainability in the power plant choice  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

International literature presents several studies on the economics of power plants based on cash flows. However there are sustainability factors (e.g., environmental and social aspects, etc.) able to heavily bear on the sustainability of certain investments. This paper lists and quantifies these factors and ranks under different scenarios the following technologies: hydro, coal, oil, gas and nuclear. Then an overall multi-attribute model, based on the quality function deployment approach, delivers a weight for each factor, dividing its impact in the three different sustainability dimensions: economic, environmental and social. Finally the factor weights and their performances are coupled to obtain an overall ranking. The results show that hydroelectric plants are usually the best solution. Coal and nuclear could be a good choice even if each type of plant has its strengths and weaknesses. On the contrary, the oil and gas-fired plants are always the worst choice.

Giorgio Locatelli; Mauro Mancini

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Catalytic combustor for integrated gasification combined cycle power plant  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A gasification power plant 10 includes a compressor 32 producing a compressed air flow 36, an air separation unit 22 producing a nitrogen flow 44, a gasifier 14 producing a primary fuel flow 28 and a secondary fuel source 60 providing a secondary fuel flow 62 The plant also includes a catalytic combustor 12 combining the nitrogen flow and a combustor portion 38 of the compressed air flow to form a diluted air flow 39 and combining at least one of the primary fuel flow and secondary fuel flow and a mixer portion 78 of the diluted air flow to produce a combustible mixture 80. A catalytic element 64 of the combustor 12 separately receives the combustible mixture and a backside cooling portion 84 of the diluted air flow and allows the mixture and the heated flow to produce a hot combustion gas 46 provided to a turbine 48. When fueled with the secondary fuel flow, nitrogen is not combined with the combustor portion.

Bachovchin, Dennis M. (Mauldin, SC); Lippert, Thomas E. (Murrysville, PA)

2008-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

391

BOILER MATERIALS FOR ULTRASUPERCRITICAL COAL POWER PLANTS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The principal objective of this project is to develop materials technology for use in ultrasupercritical (USC) plant boilers capable of operating with 760 C (1400 F), 35 MPa (5000 psi) steam. This project has established a government/industry consortium to undertake a five-year effort to evaluate and develop of advanced materials that allow the use of advanced steam cycles in coal-based power plants. These advanced cycles, with steam temperatures up to 760 C, will increase the efficiency of coal-fired boilers from an average of 35% efficiency (current domestic fleet) to 47% (HHV). This efficiency increase will enable coal-fired power plants to generate electricity at competitive rates (irrespective of fuel costs) while reducing CO{sub 2} and other fuel-related emissions by as much as 29%. Success in achieving these objectives will support a number of broader goals. First, from a national prospective, the program will identify advanced materials that will make it possible to maintain a cost-competitive, environmentally acceptable coal-based electric generation option. High sulfur coals will specifically benefit in this respect by having these advanced materials evaluated in high-sulfur coal firing conditions and from the significant reductions in waste generation inherent in the increased operational efficiency. Second, from a national prospective, the results of this program will enable domestic boiler manufacturers to successfully compete in world markets for building high-efficiency coal-fired power plants.

R. Viswanathan; K. Coleman; R.W. Swindeman; J. Sarver; J. Blough; W. Mohn; M. Borden; S. Goodstine; I. Perrin

2003-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

392

BOILER MATERIALS FOR ULTRASUPERCRITICAL COAL POWER PLANTS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The principal objective of this project is to develop materials technology for use in ultrasupercritical (USC) plant boilers capable of operating with 760 C (1400 F), 35 MPa (5000 psi) steam. This project has established a government/industry consortium to undertake a five-year effort to evaluate and develop of advanced materials that allow the use of advanced steam cycles in coal-based power plants. These advanced cycles, with steam temperatures up to 760 C, will increase the efficiency of coal-fired boilers from an average of 35% efficiency (current domestic fleet) to 47% (HHV). This efficiency increase will enable coal-fired power plants to generate electricity at competitive rates (irrespective of fuel costs) while reducing CO{sub 2} and other fuel-related emissions by as much as 29%. Success in achieving these objectives will support a number of broader goals. First, from a national prospective, the program will identify advanced materials that will make it possible to maintain a cost-competitive, environmentally acceptable coal-based electric generation option. High sulfur coals will specifically benefit in this respect by having these advanced materials evaluated in high-sulfur coal firing conditions and from the significant reductions in waste generation inherent in the increased operational efficiency. Second, from a national prospective, the results of this program will enable domestic boiler manufacturers to successfully compete in world markets for building high-efficiency coal-fired power plants.

R. Viswanathan; K. Coleman; R.W. Swindeman; J. Sarver; J. Blough; W. Mohn; M. Borden; S. Goodstine; I. Perrin

2003-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

393

A review of studies on central receiver solar thermal power plants  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The use of central receiver system (CRS) for electricity production promises to be one of the most viable options to replace fossil fuel power plants. Indeed, research and development activities on its basic subsystems have been booming rapidly since 1980s. This paper reviews the most important studies on the major components of central receiver solar thermal power plants including the heliostat field, the solar receiver and the power conversion system. After an overview of Concentrating Solar Power (CSP) technology, current status and applications of the \\{CRSs\\} are highlighted. Next, a detailed literature survey of existing design comprising optical, thermal and thermodynamic analysis, and techniques used to assess components have been arranged. This is followed by experimental investigations in which design concepts are established. The last section contains recent subsequent improvement of such key components as heliostat, receiver and hybrid solar gas turbine that are boosting in many R&D activities merging international collaboration during the past 30 years.

Omar Behar; Abdallah Khellaf; Kamal Mohammedi

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

Ahuachapan Geothermal Power Plant, El Salvador  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Ahuachapan geothermal power plant has been the subject of several recent reports and papers (1-7). This article is a condensation of the author's earlier writings (5-7), and incorporates new information on the geothermal activities in El Salvador obtained recently through a telephone conversation with Ing. R. Caceres of the Comision Ejecutiva Hidroelectrica del Rio Lempa (C.E.L.) who has been engaged in the design and engineering of the newest unit at Ahuachapan. El Salvador is the first of the Central American countries to construct and operate a geothermal electric generating station. Exploration began in the mid-1960's at the geothermal field near Ahuachapan in western El Salvador. The first power unit, a separated-steam or so-called ''single-flash'' plant, was started up in June 1975, and was followed a year later by an identical unit. In July 1980, the Comision Ejecutiva Hidroelectrica del Rio Lempa (C.E.L.) will complete the installation of a third unit, a dual-pressure (or ''double-flash'') unit rated at 35 MW. The full Ahuachapan plant will then constitute about 20% of the total installed electric generating capacity of the country. During 1977, the first two units generated nearly one-third of all the electricity produced in El Salvador. C.E.L. is actively pursuing several other promising sites for additional geothermal plants. There is the possibility that eventually geothermal energy will contribute about 450 MW of electric generating capacity. In any event it appears that by 1985 El Salvador should be able to meet its domestic needs for electricity by means of its indigenous geothermal and hydroelectric power plants, thus eliminating any dependence on imported petroleum for power generation.

DiPippo, Ronald

1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

Modeling Generator Power Plant Portfolios and Pollution Taxes in  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Modeling Generator Power Plant Portfolios and Pollution Taxes in Electric Power Supply Chain-term solution (e.g.,are long-term solution (e.g., solar power and wind power (solar power and wind power Heavy user of fossil fuels:Heavy user of fossil fuels: Electric power industryElectric power industry

Nagurney, Anna

396

A numerical study for the optimal arrangement of ocean current turbine generators in the ocean current power parks  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The present paper deals with the investigation of the flow distribution in the ocean current power park in order to optimize the arrangement of the turbine generators in the sea and the lake sides. To produce more reliable results, the detailed geometry of the ocean current generators is included in the computational domain with frozen rotor method to consider rotating effect. The numerical results show the details of flow distribution in the ocean current power park and propose the appropriate arrangement of the turbine generators for the efficient operation, which is essential for possible maximum power generation.

Seung Ho Lee; Sang Hyuk Lee; Kyungsoo Jang; Jungeun Lee; Nahmkeon Hur

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Steam turbine upgrades: A utility based approach  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the increasingly competitive power generation markets utilities must strive towards lower electricity generation costs, whilst relying on an aging steam turbine fleet. By the year 2000 more than 25% of the global steam turbine capacity will be older than 30 years. The heat rate of such units is generally considerably higher than that of equivalent new plant, and such equipment can be further disadvantaged by increased maintenance costs and forced outage rates. Over the past decade steam turbine conversion, modification, and upgrade packages have become an increasingly important part of the European steam turbine market. Furthermore, many utilities now realize that enhanced cost-effectiveness can often be obtained by moving away from the original equipment manufacturer (OEM), and the upgrading of other manufacturers' plant is now routine within the steam turbine industry. By working closely with customers, GE has developed a comprehensive range of steam turbine upgrade packages, including advanced design steampaths which can increase the performance of existing turbine installations to levels comparable with new plant. Such packages are tailor-made to the requirements of each customer, to ensure that the most cost-effective engineering solution is identified. This paper presents an overview of GE's state-of-the-art steam turbine technology, and continues to describe typical economic models for turbine upgrades.

Wakeley, G.R.

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

Life Cycle Assessment of a Parabolic Trough Concentrating Solar Power Plant and the Impacts of Key Design Alternatives  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

To inform capacity expansion decisions, hybrid life cycle assessment is used to evaluate a reference design of a parabolic trough concentrating solar power (CSP) facility located in Daggett, CA, along four sustainability metrics: life cycle (LC) greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, water consumption, cumulative energy demand (CED), and energy payback time (EPBT). ... Power plant system: components typically associated with the power block (e.g., turbine generator set), in addition to other balance-of-plant components, such as buildings, roads, and parking lots. ... The majority of the remaining water consumption is attributed to water consumed during the manufacturing phase (10% of LC or 0.47 L/kWh). ...

John J. Burkhardt; III; Garvin A. Heath; Craig S. Turchi

2011-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

399

Capacity Value of Concentrating Solar Power Plants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study estimates the capacity value of a concentrating solar power (CSP) plant at a variety of locations within the western United States. This is done by optimizing the operation of the CSP plant and by using the effective load carrying capability (ELCC) metric, which is a standard reliability-based capacity value estimation technique. Although the ELCC metric is the most accurate estimation technique, we show that a simpler capacity-factor-based approximation method can closely estimate the ELCC value. Without storage, the capacity value of CSP plants varies widely depending on the year and solar multiple. The average capacity value of plants evaluated ranged from 45%?90% with a solar multiple range of 1.0-1.5. When introducing thermal energy storage (TES), the capacity value of the CSP plant is more difficult to estimate since one must account for energy in storage. We apply a capacity-factor-based technique under two different market settings: an energy-only market and an energy and capacity market. Our results show that adding TES to a CSP plant can increase its capacity value significantly at all of the locations. Adding a single hour of TES significantly increases the capacity value above the no-TES case, and with four hours of storage or more, the average capacity value at all locations exceeds 90%.

Madaeni, S. H.; Sioshansi, R.; Denholm, P.

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

Ris9-R-609(EN) Simulation ofa PWR Power Plant  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

with steam line, turbine and condenser, interconnected with pumps, valves and controllers. The model can system consists of a condenser connected to the steam generator via a single pump. A single by the traditional PWR plant components, primary circuit with reactor, prcssurizer and steam generator, steam circuit

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "turbine power plants" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

NETL: Coal-Fired Power Plants (CFPPs)  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

NOx Sources NOx Sources Coal-Fired Power Plants (CFPPs) Causes of greenhouse gases, Including NOx What is NOx? Environmental Impacts NOx Sources Reduction Efforts Several greenhouse gases, including NOx, are increasing due to human activities in the following areas: Burning of fossil fuel (for example, coal-fired power plants), Logging (mainly contributes to carbon monoxide), Agriculture processes, Use of chlorofluorocarbons (CFC) in holon fire suppression and refrigeration The chart below shows the three major gases contributing to greenhouse gas emissions along with their source by sector. Annual Greenhouse Gas Emissions by Sector Note: This figure was created and copyrighted by Robert A. Rohde from published data and is part of the Global Warming Art project. This image is an original work created for Global Warming Art Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this image under either:

402

Clean Power Plan: Reducing Carbon Pollution From Existing Power Plants  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Efficiency Improvements Efficiency improvements Co-firing or switching to natural gas Coal retirements Retrofit CCS (e.g.,WA Parish in Texas) 2. Use lower-emitting power sources more Dispatch changes to existing natural gas combined cycle (CC) Dispatch... that are high emitting. • Energy conservation programs. • Retrofitting units with partial CCS. • Use of certain biomass. • Efficiency improvements at higher- emitting plants.* • Market-based trading programs. • Building new renewables. • Dispatch changes. • Co...

Bremer,K.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Power and Frequency Control as it Relates to Wind-Powered Generation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Wind-Powered Generation Examples are: The rough running bands of hydro turbines Loadings of coal burning steam plants at which coal mills

Lacommare, Kristina S H

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

An overview of current and future sustainable gas turbine technologies  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this work an overview of current and future sustainable gas turbine technologies is presented. In particular, the various gas turbine technologies are described and compared. Emphasis has been given to the various advance cycles involving heat recovery from the gas turbine exhaust, such as, the gas to gas recuperation cycle, the combined cycle, the chemical recuperation cycle, the Cheng cycle, the humid air turbine cycle, etc. The thermodynamic characteristics of the various cycles are considered in order to establish their relative importance to future power generation markets. The combined cycle technology is now well established and offers superior to any of the competing gas turbine based systems, which are likely to be available in the medium term for large-scale power generation applications. In small-scale generation, less than 50 MWe, it is more cost effective to install a less complex power plant, due to the adverse effect of the economics of scale. Combined cycle plants in this power output range normally have higher specific investment costs and lower electrical efficiencies but also offer robust and reliable performance. Mixed air steam turbines (MAST) technologies are among the possible ways to improve the performance of gas turbine based power plants at feasible costs (e.g. peak load gas turbine plants).

Andreas Poullikkas

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Running dry at the power plant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the future, competition for water will require electricity generators in the United States to address conservation of fresh water. There are a number of avenues to consider. One is to use dry-cooling and dry-scrubbing technologies. Another is to find innovative ways to recycle water within the power plant itself. A third is to find and use alternative sources of water, including wastewater supplies from municipalities, agricultural runoff, blackish groundwater, or seawater. Dry technologies are usually more capital intensive and typically exact a penalty in terms of plant performance, which in turn raises the cost of power generation. On the other hand, if the cost of water increases in response to greater demand, the cost differences between dry and wet technologies will be reduced. EPRI has a substantial R & D programme evaluating new water-conserving power plant technologies, improving dry and hybrid cooling technologies, reducing water losses in cooling towers, using degraded water sources and developing resource assessment and management decision support tools. 5 refs., 10 figs.

Barker, B.

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Boiler materials for ultra-supercritical coal power plants - steamside oxidation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The corrosion behavior of tubing materials carrying steam at high temperature is of great concern to fossil power plant operators. This is due to the fact that the oxide films formed on the steam side can lead to major failures and consequently to reduced plant availability. The wall loss of the pressure boundary caused by oxidation can increase the hoop stresses and cause premature creep failures; second, the increased insulation of the tubes due to the low thermal conductivity of the oxide film can lead to increased metal temperature, thereby exacerbating the fireside corrosion as well as creep problems. The third concern is that thicker oxides may spall more easily when the plant is cooled down. On restart, the spalled material may lodge somewhere in the system with the potential for causing tube blockages, or it may be swept out with the working fluid and enter the steam turbine causing erosion damage to the turbine nozzles and blades. Failures of tubing and turbine components by these mechanisms have been widely reported in the United States. In view of the importance of the steamside oxidation, a major study of the phenomenon is being carried out as part of a major national program sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy and the Ohio Coal Development Office. As a prelude to the experimental work, a literature survey was performed to document the state of the art. Results of the review are reported here.

Viswanathan, R.; Sarver, J.; Tanzosh, J.M. [Electric Power Research Institute, Palo Alto, CA (United States)

2006-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

407

Aspects Regarding Design of Wind Power Plants Foundation System  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

During the past years wind power plants projects have become very important all over ... must be calculated for dynamic loads, especially wind charge. The article present the particularities of the wind power plants

Vasile Farcas; Nicoleta Ilies

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Power Plant and Industrial Fuel Use Act | Department of Energy  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Power Plant and Industrial Fuel Use Act Power Plant and Industrial Fuel Use Act Self Certifications Title II of the Powerplant and Industrial Fuel Use Act of 1978 (FUA), as amended...

409

1 INTRODUCTION In Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) systems, effective  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 INTRODUCTION In Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) systems, effective prediction methods are sought for Nuclear Power Plant Failure Scenarios Using an Ensemble-based Approach J. Liu & V. Vitelli Chair

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

410

SENSIBLE HEAT STORAGE FOR A SOLAR THERMAL POWER PLANT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

provide solar power plant energy storage for a reasonablefor Chemical Storage of Solar Energy. UC Berkeley, M.S.for a solar power plant without energy storage for nighttime

Baldwin, Thomas F.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

A study of a commercial MHD power plant scheme  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper is devoted to an investigation of one of the possible process flow diagrams of MHD electrical power plants. The structure of MHD electrical power plants, the interrelation between the ... theoretical a...

S. A. Pashkov; E. V. Shishkov

1980-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Unusual Condition Mining for Risk Management of Hydroelectric Power Plants  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Kyushu Electric Power Co.,Inc. collects different sensor data and weather information to maintain the safety of hydroelectric power plants while the plants are running. In this paper, we consider that the abnormal condition sign may be unusual condition. ...

Takashi Onoda; Norihiko Ito; Hironobu Yamasaki

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

SENSIBLE HEAT STORAGE FOR A SOLAR THERMAL POWER PLANT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for concentrating solar-thermal energy use a large number ofBoth solar power plants absorb thermal energy in high-of a solar power plant that converts thermal energy into

Baldwin, Thomas F.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

How a Geothermal Power Plant Works (Simple) | Department of Energy  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Plant Works (Simple) Most power plants-whether fueled by coal, gas, nuclear power, or geothermal energy-have one feature in common: they convert heat to electricity. Heat from...

415

SENSIBLE HEAT STORAGE FOR A SOLAR THERMAL POWER PLANT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Cecil. E. A. , Research on Dry-Type Cooling _T_o_w_e_r~s~f~oTower Type Wet-Cooled Power Plant Solar-Power Plant Dry-Cool

Baldwin, Thomas F.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Loan Guarantee Recipient Awarded Power Plant of the Year  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Ivanpah Solar Electric Generating System, a DOE loan guarantee recipient, won 2014 Plant of the Year from POWER Magazine.

417

Geothermal Power Plants — Meeting Water Quality and Conservation Standards  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

U.S. geothermal power plants can easily meet federal, state, and local water quality and conservation standards.

418

World's Largest Concentrating Solar Power Plant Opens in California  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Ivanpah Solar Electric Generating System, the world’s largest concentrating solar power plant, officially opened on February 13.

419

Modeling mercury in power plant plumes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Measurements of speciated mercury (Hg) downwind of coal-fired power plants suggest that the Hg{sup II}/(Hg{sup 0} + Hg{sup II}) ratio decreases significantly between the point of emission and the downwind ground-level measurement site, but that the SO{sub 2}/(Hg{sup 0} + Hg{sup II}) ratio is conserved. The authors simulated nine power plant plume events with the Reactive & Optics Model of Emissions (ROME), a reactive plume model that includes a comprehensive treatment of plume dispersion, transformation, and deposition. The model simulations fail to reproduce such a depletion in Hg{sup II}. A sensitivity study of the impact of the Hg{sup II} dry deposition velocity shows that a difference in dry deposition alone cannot explain the disparity. Similarly, a sensitivity study of the impact of cloud chemistry on results shows that the effect of clouds on Hg chemistry has only minimal impact. Possible explanations include Hg{sup II} reduction to Hg{sup 0} in the plume, rapid reduction of Hg{sup II} to Hg{sup 0} on ground surfaces, and/or an overestimation of the Hg{sup II} fraction in the power plant emissions. The authors propose that a chemical reaction not included in current models of atmospheric mercury reduces Hg{sup II} to Hg{sup 0} in coal-fired power plant plumes. The incorporation of two possible reduction pathways for Hg{sup II} shows better agreement between the model simulations and the ambient measurements. These potential Hg{sup II} to Hg{sup 0} reactions need to be studied in the laboratory to investigate this hypothesis. Because the speciation of Hg has a significant effect on Hg deposition, models of the fate and transport of atmospheric Hg may need to be modified to account for the reduction of Hg{sup II} in coal-fired power plant plumes if such a reaction is confirmed in further experimental investigations. 31 refs., 2 figs., 6 tabs.

Kristen Lohman; Christian Seigneur; Eric Edgerton; John Jansen [Atmospheric & Environmental Research, Inc., San Ramon, CA (United States)

2006-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

420

ADVANCED TURBINE SYSTEMS PROGRAM  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Natural gas combustion turbines are rapidly becoming the primary technology of choice for generating electricity. At least half of the new generating capacity added in the US over the next twenty years will be combustion turbine systems. The Department of Energy has cosponsored with Siemens Westinghouse, a program to maintain the technology lead in gas turbine systems. The very ambitious eight year program was designed to demonstrate a highly efficient and commercially acceptable power plant, with the ability to fire a wide range of fuels. The main goal of the Advanced Turbine Systems (ATS) Program was to develop ultra-high efficiency, environmentally superior and cost effective competitive gas turbine systems for base load application in utility, independent power producer and industrial markets. Performance targets were focused on natural gas as a fuel and included: System efficiency that exceeds 60% (lower heating value basis); Less than 10 ppmv NO{sub x} emissions without the use of post combustion controls; Busbar electricity that are less than 10% of state of the art systems; Reliability-Availability-Maintainability (RAM) equivalent to current systems; Water consumption minimized to levels consistent with cost and efficiency goals; and Commercial systems by the year 2000. In a parallel effort, the program was to focus on adapting the ATS engine to coal-derived or biomass fuels. In Phase 1 of the ATS Program, preliminary investigators on different gas turbine cycles demonstrated that net plant LHV based efficiency greater than 60% was achievable. In Phase 2 the more promising cycles were evaluated in greater detail and the closed-loop steam-cooled combined cycle was selected for development because it offered the best solution with least risk for achieving the ATS Program goals for plant efficiency, emissions, cost of electricity and RAM. Phase 2 also involved conceptual ATS engine and plant design and technology developments in aerodynamics, sealing, combustion, cooling, materials, coatings and casting development. The market potential for the ATS gas turbine in the 2000-2014 timeframe was assessed for combined cycle, simple cycle and integrated gasification combined cycle, for three engine sizes. The total ATS market potential was forecasted to exceed 93 GW. Phase 3 and Phase 3 Extension involved further technology development, component testing and W501ATS engine detail design. The technology development efforts consisted of ultra low NO{sub x} combustion, catalytic combustion, sealing, heat transfer, advanced coating systems, advanced alloys, single crystal casting development and determining the effect of steam on turbine alloys. Included in this phase was full-load testing of the W501G engine at the McIntosh No. 5 site in Lakeland, Florida.

Gregory Gaul

2004-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "turbine power plants" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Carbon Capture by Fossil Fuel Power Plants: An Economic Analysis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Carbon Capture by Fossil Fuel Power Plants: An Economic Analysis ¨Ozge I¸slegen Graduate School excellent research assistance. #12;Carbon Capture by Fossil Fuel Power Plants: An Economic Analysis Abstract: For fossil fuel power plants to be built in the future, carbon capture and storage (CCS) technologies offer

Silver, Whendee

422

Multi-objective optimization of solar tower power plants  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Multi-objective optimization of solar tower power plants Pascal Richter Center for Computational · Optimization of solar tower power plants 1/20 #12;Introduction ­ Solar tower power plants Solar tower PS10 (11 MW) in Andalusia, Spain · Solar tower with receiver · Heliostat field with self-aligning mirrors

Ábrahám, Erika

423

Hybrid Modeling and Control of a Hydroelectric Power Plant  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Hybrid Modeling and Control of a Hydroelectric Power Plant Giancarlo Ferrari-Trecate, Domenico,mignone,castagnoli,morari}@aut.ee.ethz.ch Abstract In this work we present the model of a hydroelectric power plant in the framework of Mixed Logic with a model predictive control scheme. 1 Introduction The outflow control for hydroelectric power plants

Ferrari-Trecate, Giancarlo

424

Work of the Leningrad Metal Factory Industrial Association toward modernizing hydraulic turbines at existing hydroelectric plants  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

1. At the present time there are tested, reliable solutions for modernization of different hydraulic turbine ass...

V. M. Malyshev

1978-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

Optimizing the start-up operations of combined cycle power plants using soft computing methods  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......megawatts. Industrial turbines produce high-quality...recovered to improve the efficiency of power generation...steam and drive a steam turbine in a combined-cycle...either gas or steam turbine alone because it performs...generation by their high efficiency and possibility to operate......

Ilaria Bertini; Matteo De Felice; Alessandro Pannicelli; Stefano Pizzuti

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

NPO Turboatom steam turbine design features and modifications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Since its foundation in 1934, the Kharkov Turbine Works, parent of Turboatom has developed, manufactured, adjusted and operated steam turbine plants for thermal and nuclear power stations. More than 300 steam turbines for thermal power stations with a total capacity over 100,000 MW have been manufactured. Steam turbines rated 25 to 500 MW for pressures of 2.9 to 23.5 MPa for stations operating on fossil fuel and turbines rated 30 to 1100 MW for nuclear power stations (NPS) have been produced. unique experience was gained during building and operation of the SKR-100 turbine rated 100 MW for initial steam conditions of 29.4 MPa, 650{sup o}C with steam cooling and minimum use of high-temperature materials. In addition to the turbine plants made for the power stations of the former USSR, Turboatom has manufactured 95 steam turbines for export. These are installed at 7 nuclear and 16 thermal power stations throughout the world, including Bulgaria, China, Cuba, Finland, Germany, Hungary, Korea and Rumania. Turboatom produces turbines operating at 25; 50 or 60 l/s speed of rotation.

Levchenko, E.V. [NPO Turboatom, Kharkov (Ukraine)

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

Reduction of Film Coolant in High Pressure Turbines  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Institute of Propulsion Technology, German Aerospace Center #12;Abstract Gas turbine development has been Wirsum Institute of Power Plant Technology, Steam and Gas Turbines, RWTH Aachen Prof. Dr.-Ing. Ingo Röhle) developed at the Institute of Propulsion Technology of the German Aerospace Center. Furthermore

428

DOE Technology Successes - "Breakthrough" Gas Turbines | Department of  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

DOE Technology Successes - "Breakthrough" Gas Turbines DOE Technology Successes - "Breakthrough" Gas Turbines DOE Technology Successes - "Breakthrough" Gas Turbines For years, gas turbine manufacturers faced a barrier that, for all practical purposes, capped power generating efficiencies for turbine-based power generating systems. The barrier was temperature. Above 2300 degrees F, available cooling technologies were insufficient to protect the turbine blades and other internal components from heat degradation. Since higher temperatures are the key to higher efficiencies, this effectively limited the generating efficiency at which a turbine power plant could convert the energy in the fuel into electricity. The Department of Energy's Office of Fossil Energy took on the challenge of turbine temperatures in 1992, and nine years later, its private sector

429

Thermal Conductivity Enhancement of High Temperature Phase Change Materials for Concentrating Solar Power Plant Applications  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

3 Fig. 1.2. Solar power plant operation [Materials for Concentrating Solar Power Plant Applications AMaterials for Concentrating Solar Power Plant Applications

Roshandell, Melina

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

Advanced coal-fueled gas turbine systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Several technology advances since the early coal-fueled turbine programs that address technical issues of coal as a turbine fuel have been developed in the early 1980s: Coal-water suspensions as fuel form, improved methods for removing ash and contaminants from coal, staged combustion for reducing NO{sub x} emissions from fuel-bound nitrogen, and greater understanding of deposition/erosion/corrosion and their control. Several Advanced Coal-Fueled Gas Turbine Systems programs were awarded to gas turbine manufacturers for for components development and proof of concept tests; one of these was Allison. Tests were conducted in a subscale coal combustion facility and a full-scale facility operating a coal combustor sized to the Allison Model 501-K industrial turbine. A rich-quench-lean (RQL), low nitrogen oxide combustor design incorporating hot gas cleanup was developed for coal fuels; this should also be applicable to biomass, etc. The combustor tests showed NO{sub x} and CO emissions {le} levels for turbines operating with natural gas. Water washing of vanes from the turbine removed the deposits. Systems and economic evaluations identified two possible applications for RQL turbines: Cogeneration plants based on Allison 501-K turbine (output 3.7 MW(e), 23,000 lbs/hr steam) and combined cycle power plants based on 50 MW or larger gas turbines. Coal-fueled cogeneration plant configurations were defined and evaluated for site specific factors. A coal-fueled turbine combined cycle plant design was identified which is simple, compact, and results in lower capital cost, with comparable efficiency and low emissions relative to other coal technologies (gasification, advanced PFBC).

Wenglarz, R.A.

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

A COMPUTATIONAL WORKBENCH ENVIRONMENT FOR VIRTUAL POWER PLANT SIMULATION  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this report is described the work effort to develop and demonstrate a software framework to support advanced process simulations to evaluate the performance of advanced power systems. Integrated into the framework are a broad range of models, analysis tools, and visualization methods that can be used for the plant evaluation. The framework provides a tightly integrated problem-solving environment, with plug-and-play functionality, and includes a hierarchy of models, ranging from fast running process models to detailed reacting CFD models. The framework places no inherent limitations on the type of physics that can be modeled, numerical techniques, or programming languages used to implement the equipment models, or the type or amount of data that can be exchanged between models. Tools are provided to analyze simulation results at multiple levels of detail, ranging from simple tabular outputs to advanced solution visualization methods. All models and tools communicate in a seamless manner. The framework can be coupled to other software frameworks that provide different modeling capabilities. Three software frameworks were developed during the course of the project. The first framework focused on simulating the performance of the DOE Low Emissions Boiler System Proof of Concept facility, an advanced pulverized-coal combustion-based power plant. The second framework targeted simulating the performance of an Integrated coal Gasification Combined Cycle - Fuel Cell Turbine (IGCC-FCT) plant configuration. The coal gasifier models included both CFD and process models for the commercially dominant systems. Interfacing models to the framework was performed using VES-Open, and tests were performed to demonstrate interfacing CAPE-Open compliant models to the framework. The IGCC-FCT framework was subsequently extended to support Virtual Engineering concepts in which plant configurations can be constructed and interrogated in a three-dimensional, user-centered, interactive, immersive environment. The Virtual Engineering Framework (VEF), in effect a prototype framework, was developed through close collaboration with NETL supported research teams from Iowa State University Virtual Reality Applications Center (ISU-VRAC) and Carnegie Mellon University (CMU). The VEF is open source, compatible across systems ranging from inexpensive desktop PCs to large-scale, immersive facilities and provides support for heterogeneous distributed computing of plant simulations. The ability to compute plant economics through an interface that coupled the CMU IECM tool to the VEF was demonstrated, and the ability to couple the VEF to Aspen Plus, a commercial flowsheet modeling tool, was demonstrated. Models were interfaced to the framework using VES-Open. Tests were performed for interfacing CAPE-Open-compliant models to the framework. Where available, the developed models and plant simulations have been benchmarked against data from the open literature. The VEF has been installed at NETL. The VEF provides simulation capabilities not available in commercial simulation tools. It provides DOE engineers, scientists, and decision makers with a flexible and extensible simulation system that can be used to reduce the time, technical risk, and cost to develop the next generation of advanced, coal-fired power systems that will have low emissions and high efficiency. Furthermore, the VEF provides a common simulation system that NETL can use to help manage Advanced Power Systems Research projects, including both combustion- and gasification-based technologies.

Mike Bockelie; Dave Swensen; Martin Denison; Adel Sarofim; Connie Senior

2004-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

432

Definition: Wind turbine | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

turbine turbine Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Wind turbine A machine that converts wind energy to mechanical energy; typically connected to a generator to produce electricity.[1][2] View on Wikipedia Wikipedia Definition A wind turbine is a device that converts kinetic energy from the wind, also called wind energy, into mechanical energy in a process known as wind power. If the mechanical energy is used to produce electricity, the device may be called a wind turbine or wind power plant. If the mechanical energy is used to drive machinery, such as for grinding grain or pumping water, the device is called a windmill or wind pump. Similarly, it may be referred to as a wind charger when used for charging batteries. The result of over a millennium of windmill development and modern engineering,

433

High-temperature turbine technology program. Turbine subsystem design report: Low-Btu gas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of the US Department of Energy High-Temperature Turbine Technology (DOE-HTTT) program is to bring to technology readiness a high-temperature (2600/sup 0/F to 3000/sup 0/F firing temperature) turbine within a 6- to 10-year duration, Phase II has addressed the performance of component design and technology testing in critical areas to confirm the design concepts identified in the earlier Phase I program. Based on the testing and support studies completed under Phase II, this report describes the updated turbine subsystem design for a coal-derived gas fuel (low-Btu gas) operation at 2600/sup 0/F turbine firing temperature. A commercial IGCC plant configuration would contain four gas turbines. These gas turbines utilize an existing axial flow compressor from the GE product line MS6001 machine. A complete description of the Primary Reference Design-Overall Plant Design Description has been developed and has been documented. Trends in overall plant performance improvement at higher pressure ratio and higher firing temperature are shown. It should be noted that the effect of pressure ratio on efficiency is significally enhanced at higher firing temperatures. It is shown that any improvement in overall plant thermal efficiency reflects about the same level of gain in Cost of Electricity (COE). The IGCC concepts are shown to be competitive in both performance and cost at current and near-term gas turbine firing temperatures of 1985/sup 0/F to 2100/sup 0/F. The savings that can be accumulated over a thirty-year plant life for a water-cooled gas turbine in an IGCC plant as compared to a state-of-the-art coal-fired steam plant are estimated. A total of $500 million over the life of a 1000 MW plant is projected. Also, this IGCC power plant has significant environmental advantages over equivalent coal-fired steam power plants.

Horner, M.W.

1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

District Cooling Using Central Tower Power Plant  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract During the operation of solar power towers there are occasions, commonly in the summer season, where some of the heliostats have to stop focusing at the central receiver, located at the top of the tower, because the maximum temperature that the receiver can withstand has been reached. The highest demands of cooling for air conditioning take place at these same occasions. In the present paper, we have analyzed the possibility of focusing the exceeding heliostats to the receiver increasing the mass flow rate of the heat transfer fluid over the nominal value and using the extra heat as a source of an absorption chiller. The chilled water would be used to cool buildings and offices, using a district cooling network. Using the extra heat of the solar power tower plant would greatly reduce the electricity usage. In this work we have analyzed the case of a circular field of heliostats focusing at a circular receiver, such as the case of Gemasolar plant. We have quantified the thermal power that can be obtained from the unused heliostats, the cooling capacity of the absorption system as well as the heat losses through the insulated pipes that distribute the chilled water to the buildings of the network.

C. Marugán-Cruz; S. Sánchez-Delgado; M.R. Rodríguez-Sánchez; M. Venegas

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

Estimated global ocean wind power potential from QuikSCAT observations, accounting for turbine characteristics and siting  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

estimate of future floating turbine depths. [ 32 ] Theenvisioned floating offshore wind turbines. Finally, global

Capps, Scott B; Zender, Charles S

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) power plant interface engineering  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes the results of EPRI Research Project 2466-10. The objective of this project was to identify the preliminary interface requirements and characteristics for a coal-fired magnetohydrodynamic retrofit power plant located at the Scholz Generating Station, Sneads, Florida. An initial building arrangement has been developed and incorporated into the plot plan of the Scholz Generating Station. An MHD process flow diagram was generated and integrated with the existing plant process flow diagram. The electrical interface schematic for the MHD system was also developed. A preliminary list of process flow, electrical, and physical interfaces was produced and the respective interface requirements defined. The existing facilities were inspected and the necessary modifications imposed by the MHD system have been identified. 6 refs., 24 figs., 11 tabs.

Van Bibber, L.E.; Wiseman, D.A. (Westinghouse Electric Corp., Pittsburgh, PA (USA). Advanced Energy Systems Div.); Cuchens, J.W. (Southern Electric International, Birmingham, AL (USA))

1990-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

(Nuclear power plant control and instrumentation technology)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

While on vacation, the traveler attended the European Nuclear Conference in Lyon, France. This trip was part of an outside activity approved by DOE. The traveler is a consultant to Loyola College, serving as chairman of a panel to assess the state of the art in the controls and instrumentation technology in the European nuclear community. This study is being conducted by Loyola College under subcontract to the National Science Foundation. The traveler was surprised by the level of automation claimed (by the company Siemens AG KWU) to be present in the German Konvoi nuclear power plants. The claim was that this was done to improve the safety of the plant by keeping the operator out of the loop'' for the first 30 minutes of some transients or accidents.

White, J.D.

1990-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

438

CFD analysis for solar chimney power plants  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Solar chimney power plants are investigated numerically using ANSYS Fluent and an in-house developed Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) code. Analytical scaling laws are verified by considering a large range of scales with tower heights between 1 m (sub-scale laboratory model) and 1000 m (largest envisioned plant). A model with approximately 6 m tower height is currently under construction at the University of Arizona. Detailed time-dependent high-resolution simulations of the flow in the collector and chimney of the model provide detailed insight into the fluid dynamics and heat transfer mechanisms. Both transversal and longitudinal convection rolls are identified in the collector, indicating the presence of a Rayleigh–Bénard–Poiseuille instability. Local separation is observed near the chimney inflow. The flow inside the chimney is fully turbulent.

Hermann F. Fasel; Fanlong Meng; Ehsan Shams; Andreas Gross

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

Wind Plant Collector System Fault Protection and Coordination  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper presents a summary of the most important protection and coordination considerations for wind power plants. Short-circuit characteristics of both aggregate wind plant and individual wind turbine genera- tors, as well as general interconnection protection requirements are discussed. Many factors such as security, reliability, and safety are considered for proper conservative protection of the wind power plant and individual turbines.

Bradt, M. [IEEE PES Wind Plant Collector System Design Working Group; Behnke, M. R. [IEEE PES Wind Plant Collector System Design Working Group; Bloethe, W.G. [IEEE PES Wind Plant Collector System Design Working Group; Brooks, C. [IEEE PES Wind Plant Collector System Design Working Group; Camm, E H [IEEE PES Wind Plant Collector System Design Working Group; Dilling, W. [IEEE PES Wind Plant Collector System Design Working Group; Goltz, B. [IEEE PES Wind Plant Collector System Design Working Group; Li, J. [IEEE PES Wind Plant Collector System Design Working Group; Niemira, J. [IEEE PES Wind Plant Collector System Design Working Group; Nuckles, K. [IEEE PES Wind Plant Collector System Design Working Group; Patino, J. [IEEE PES Wind Plant Collector System Design Working Group; Reza, M [IEEE PES Wind Plant Collector System Design Working Group; Richardson, B. [IEEE PES Wind Plant Collector System Design Working Group; Samaan, N. [IEEE PES Wind Plant Collector System Design Working Group; Schoene, Jens [IEEE PES Wind Plant Collector System Design Working Group; Smith, Travis M [ORNL; Snyder, Isabelle B [ORNL; Starke, Michael R [ORNL; Walling, R. [IEEE PES Wind Plant Collector System Design Working Group; Zahalka, G. [IEEE PES Wind Plant Collector System Design Working Group

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

Relative Movements for Design of Commodities in Nuclear Power Plants  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Relative Movements for Design of Commodities in Nuclear Power Plants Javad Moslemian, Vice President, Nuclear Power Technologies, Sargent & Lundy LLC Nezar Abraham, Senior Associate II, Nuclear Power Technologies, Sargent & Lundy LLC

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "turbine power plants" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Fuel Cell Power Plant Experience Naval Applications  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

clean clean Fuel Cell Power Plant Experience Naval Applications US Department of Energy/ Office of Naval Research Shipboard Fuel Cell Workshop Washington, DC March 29, 2011 FuelCell Energy, the FuelCell Energy logo, Direct FuelCell and "DFC" are all registered trademarks (®) of FuelCell Energy, Inc. *FuelCell Energy, Inc. *Renewable and Liquid Fuels Experience *HTPEM Fuel Cell Stack for Shipboard APU *Solid Oxide Experience and Applications DOE-ONR Workshop FuelCell Energy, the FuelCell Energy logo, Direct FuelCell and "DFC" are all registered trademarks (®) of FuelCell Energy, Inc. FuelCell Energy, Inc. * Premier developer of fuel cell technology - founded in 1969 * Over 50 power installations in North America, Europe, and Asia * Industrial, commercial, utility

442

NSR and the Power Plant Improvement Initiative  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

SOURCE REVIEW (NSR) and the CLEAN COAL SOURCE REVIEW (NSR) and the CLEAN COAL POWER INITIATIVE (CCPI) Summary Changes which result in increases in emissions of air pollutants from existing industrial facilities, such as power plants, can invoke stringent and costly new regulations. However, it is not the intent of such requirements to present a barrier to the installation of environmentally beneficial pollution control projects, or to projects demonstrating new methods to burn coal cleanly under the DOE Clean Coal Technology Program. Special provisions are included in the Clean Air Act and its implementing regulations to address potential exemptions of such projects from new source review regulations. This paper provides a general review of those provisions, and encourages project managers to

443

Variable speed wind turbine for maximum power capture using adaptive fuzzy integral sliding mode control  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper presents a nonlinear control approach to variable speed wind turbine (VSWT) with a wind speed estimator. The dynamics of the wind turbine (WT) is derived from single ... has been considered for exact e...

Saravanakumar Rajendran…

2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

Power System Frequency Control Characteristics as a Function of Nuclear Power Plant Participation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

When the participation of nuclear power plants in electric power system increases then they have to be ... take an increasing part in the frequency and power control of the power system. However there are specifi...

Z. Domachowski

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

STATEMENT OF CONSIDERATIONS REQUEST BY SIEMENS WESTINGHOUSE POWER...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

of improved reliability availability and maintainability (RAM) of existing and advanced gas turbine power plants by continuously monitoring the health of critical thermal barrier...

446

Tribology in coal-fired power plants  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Material wear and degradation is of great importance to the economy of South Africa especially within the mining, agriculture, manufacturing and power generation fields. It has been found that unexpected and high rates of fly-ash erosion occur at certain sections of power plants, this is particularly evident at the Majuba power station. The loss of small amounts of material due to erosion can be enough to cause serious damage and significantly reduce the working lifetime of, for, e.g. hopper liners. This study investigated the long-term solid particle erosion of a range of oxide and nitride-fired SiC-based ceramics and alumina with the aim of reducing erosive wear damage in power plants. This entailed carrying out experimental tests on an in-house built erosion testing machine that simulate the problems encountered in the industry. The target materials were eroded with 125–180 ?m silica sand at shallow and high impact angles. The surface wear characteristics were studied using both light and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The results obtained indicate that the erosion rates of the materials remain fairly constant from the onset. It was found that prolonged exposure to erosion results in the progressive removal of the matrix and subsequent loss of unsupported SiC particulates. The fact that the particles were relatively small did not have a significant effect on the erosion rate. This would explain the observed constant rates of erosion for longer periods. These behaviours can be further explained in terms of the composition and mechanical properties of the erodents and target ceramics.

D.O. Moumakwa; K. Marcus

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

MSC Power Corporation | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

company working on the Perpetual Pyramid Power Plant (P4), a system which uses sun-heated rising air to turn small turbines to generate power. References: MSC Power...

448

Demonstration of a Variable Phase Turbine Power System for Low Temperature Geothermal Resources  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Project objectives: Demonstrate a 1 megawatt Variable Phase Turbine and Variable Phase Cycle with low temperature brine.

449

A stochastic model for the daily coordination of pumped storage hydro plants and wind power plants  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We propose a stochastic model for the daily operation scheduling of a generation system including pumped storage hydro plants and wind power plants, where the uncertainty is represented by the hourly wind power p...

Maria Teresa Vespucci; Francesca Maggioni…

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

SENSIBLE HEAT STORAGE FOR A SOLAR THERMAL POWER PLANT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the Performance of Steam Turbine Generators 16.500 KWPeriod, hours Steam Turbine Beat Rate, Discharging, !! WGeneral Electric Company, Steam Turbine-Generator Products

Baldwin, Thomas F.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

Use of experience curves to estimate the future cost of power plants with CO2 capture  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

economics of the combined cycle gas turbine—an experiencePC) and natural gas combined cycle (NGCC) plants with post-integrated gasi?cation combined cycle (IGCC) plants with

Rubin, Edward S.; Yeh, Sonia; Antes, Matt; Berkenpas, Michael; Davison, John

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

452

Turbulence effects on the wake flow and power production of a horizontal-axis wind turbine  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This study experimentally investigated the effects of ambient turbulence on the wake flows and power production of a horizontal-axis wind turbine. The approaching flows included low-turbulence smooth flow and grid-generated turbulent flow. The profiles of time-averaged velocity, turbulence intensity and Reynolds stress from the intermediate to the far-wake regions were measured and compared for smooth and turbulent flows. Based on the measured data, prediction models for the centerline velocity deficit, turbulence intensity, wake radius and velocity profile were proposed. In addition, the experimental results showed that the power productions in the grid-generated turbulent flows were slightly higher than that in the smooth flow. But the power loss due to the velocity deficit in the wake flow was larger than 50% when the downwind distance was less than 12D (D is the rotor diameter). An empirical relation between the power production and the downwind distance x and lateral distance y was proposed.

Chia-Ren Chu; Pei-Hung Chiang

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

453

The need for high density energy storage for wind turbine and solar power has proven to be a  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 The need for high density energy storage for wind turbine and solar power has proven cost of these components but also considerably improve their lifetime and reliability as it removes. New breakthrough for single-layer ceramic capacitors with high performance #12;2 Benefits ANU has

Botea, Adi

454

Optimal Endogenous Carbon Taxes Electric Power Supply Chains with Power Plants  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Optimal Endogenous Carbon Taxes for Electric Power Supply Chains with Power Plants Anna Nagurney for the determination of optimal carbon taxes applied to electric power plants in the con- text of electric power supply portion of such policy inter- ventions directed at the electric power industry. The general framework

Nagurney, Anna

455

BOILER MATERIALS FOR ULTRASUPERCRITICAL COAL POWER PLANTS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The principal objective of this project is to develop materials technology for use in ultrasupercritical (USC) plant boilers capable of operating with 760 C (1400 F), 35 MPa (5000 psi) steam. In the 21st century, the world faces the critical challenge of providing abundant, cheap electricity to meet the needs of a growing global population while at the same time preserving environmental values. Most studies of this issue conclude that a robust portfolio of generation technologies and fuels should be developed to assure that the United States will have adequate electricity supplies in a variety of possible future scenarios. The use of coal for electricity generation poses a unique set of challenges. On the one hand, coal is plentiful and available at low cost in much of the world, notably in the U.S., China, and India. Countries with large coal reserves will want to develop them to foster economic growth and energy security. On the other hand, traditional methods of coal combustion emit pollutants and CO{sub 2} at high levels relative to other generation options. Maintaining coal as a generation option in the 21st century will require methods for addressing these environmental issues. This project has established a government/industry consortium to undertake a five-year effort to evaluate and develop of advanced materials that allow the use of advanced steam cycles in coal-based power plants. These advanced cycles, with steam temperatures up to 760 C, will increase the efficiency of coal-fired boilers from an average of 35% efficiency (current domestic fleet) to 47% (HHV). This efficiency increase will enable coal-fired power plants to generate electricity at competitive rates (irrespective of fuel costs) while reducing CO{sub 2} and other fuel-related emissions by as much as 29%. Success in achieving these objectives will support a number of broader goals. First, from a national prospective, the program will identify advanced materials that will make it possible to maintain a cost-competitive, environmentally acceptable coal-based electric generation option. High sulfur coals will specifically benefit in this respect by having these advanced materials evaluated in high-sulfur coal firing conditions and from the significant reductions in waste generation inherent in the increased operational efficiency. Second, from a national prospective, the results of this program will enable domestic boiler manufacturers to successfully compete in world markets for building high-efficiency coal-fired power plants.

R. Viswanathan; K. Coleman

2003-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

456

BOILER MATERIALS FOR ULTRASUPERCRITICAL COAL POWER PLANTS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The principal objective of this project is to develop materials technology for use in ultrasupercritical (USC) plant boilers capable of operating with 760 C (1400 F), 35 MPa (5000 psi) steam. In the 21st century, the world faces the critical challenge of providing abundant, cheap electricity to meet the needs of a growing global population while at the same time preserving environmental values. Most studies of this issue conclude that a robust portfolio of generation technologies and fuels should be developed to assure that the United States will have adequate electricity supplies in a variety of possible future scenarios. The use of coal for electricity generation poses a unique set of challenges. On the one hand, coal is plentiful and available at low cost in much of the world, notably in the U.S., China, and India. Countries with large coal reserves will want to develop them to foster economic growth and energy security. On the other hand, traditional methods of coal combustion emit pollutants and CO{sub 2} at high levels relative to other generation options. Maintaining coal as a generation option in the 21st century will require methods for addressing these environmental issues. This project has established a government/industry consortium to undertake a five-year effort to evaluate and develop of advanced materials that allow the use of advanced steam cycles in coal-based power plants. These advanced cycles, with steam temperatures up to 760 C, will increase the efficiency of coal-fired boilers from an average of 35% efficiency (current domestic fleet) to 47% (HHV). This efficiency increase will enable coal-fired power plants to generate electricity at competitive rates (irrespective of fuel costs) while reducing CO{sub 2} and other fuel-related emissions by as much as 29%. Success in achieving these objectives will support a number of broader goals. First, from a national prospective, the program will identify advanced materials that will make it possible to maintain a cost-competitive, environmentally acceptable coal-based electric generation option. High sulfur coals will specifically benefit in this respect by having these advanced materials evaluated in high-sulfur coal firing conditions and from the significant reductions in waste generation inherent in the increased operational efficiency. Second, from a national prospective, the results of this program will enable domestic boiler manufacturers to successfully compete in world markets for building high-efficiency coal-fired power plants.

R. Viswanathan; K. Coleman

2002-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

457

BOILER MATERIALS FOR ULTRASUPERCRITICAL COAL POWER PLANTS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The principal objective of this project is to develop materials technology for use in ultrasupercritical (USC) plant boilers capable of operating with 760 C (1400 F), and up to 5500 psi with emphasis upon 35 MPa (5000 psi) steam. In the 21st century, the world faces the critical challenge of providing abundant, cheap electricity to meet the needs of a growing global population while at the same time preserving environmental values. Most studies of this issue conclude that a robust portfolio of generation technologies and fuels should be developed to assure that the United States will have adequate electricity supplies in a variety of possible future scenarios. The use of coal for electricity generation poses a unique set of challenges. On the one hand, coal is plentiful and available at low cost in much of the world, notably in the U.S., China, and India. Countries with large coal reserves will want to develop them to foster economic growth and energy security. On the other hand, traditional methods of coal combustion emit pollutants and CO{sub 2} at high levels relative to other generation options. Maintaining coal as a generation option in the 21st century will require methods for addressing these environmental issues. This project has established a government/industry consortium to undertake a five-year effort to evaluate and develop advanced materials that allow the use of advanced steam cycles in coal-based power plants. These advanced cycles, with steam temperatures up to 760 C, will increase the efficiency of coal-fired boilers from an average of 35% efficiency (current domestic fleet) to 47% (HHV). This efficiency increase will enable coal-fired power plants to generate electricity at competitive rates (irrespective of fuel costs) while reducing CO{sub 2} and other fuel-related emissions by as much as 29%. Success in achieving these objectives will support a number of broader goals. First, from a national prospective, the program will identify advanced materials that will make it possible to maintain a cost-competitive, environmentally-acceptable coal-based electric generation option. High sulfur coals will specifically benefit in this respect by having these advanced materials evaluated in high-sulfur coal firing conditions and from the significant reductions in waste generation inherent in the increased operational efficiency. Second, from a national perspective, the results of this program will enable domestic boiler manufacturers to successfully compete in world markets for building high-efficiency coal-fired power plants.

R. Viswanathan

2002-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

458

BOILER MATERIALS FOR ULTRASUPERCRITICAL COAL POWER PLANTS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The principal objective of this project is to develop materials technology for use in ultrasupercritical (USC) plant boilers capable of operating with 760 C (1400 F), 35 MPa (5000 psi) steam. In the 21st century, the world faces the critical challenge of providing abundant, cheap electricity to meet the needs of a growing global population while at the same time preserving environmental values. Most studies of this issue conclude that a robust portfolio of generation technologies and fuels should be developed to assure that the United States will have adequate electricity supplies in a variety of possible future scenarios. The use of coal for electricity generation poses a unique set of challenges. On the one hand, coal is plentiful and available at low cost in much of the world, notably in the U.S., China, and India. Countries with large coal reserves will want to develop them to foster economic growth and energy security. On the other hand, traditional methods of coal combustion emit pollutants and CO{sub 2} at high levels relative to other generation options. Maintaining coal as a generation option in the 21st century will require methods for addressing these environmental issues. This project has established a government/industry consortium to undertake a five-year effort to evaluate and develop of advanced materials that allow the use of advanced steam cycles in coal-based power plants. These advanced cycles, with steam temperatures up to 760 C, will increase the efficiency of coal-fired boilers from an average of 35% efficiency (current domestic fleet) to 47% (HHV). This efficiency increase will enable coal-fired power plants to generate electricity at competitive rates (irrespective of fuel costs) while reducing CO{sub 2} and other fuel-related emissions by as much as 29%. Success in achieving these objectives will support a number of broader goals. First, from a national prospective, the program will identify advanced materials that will make it possible to maintain a cost-competitive, environmentally acceptable coal-based electric generation option. High sulfur coals will specifically benefit in this respect by having these advanced materials evaluated in high-sulfur coal firing conditions and from the significant reductions in waste generation inherent in the increased operational efficiency. Second, from a national prospective, the results of this program will enable domestic boiler manufacturers to successfully compete in world markets for building high-efficiency coal-fired power plants.

R. Viswanathan; K. Coleman

2002-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

459

Alternative off-site power supply improves nuclear power plant safety  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract A reliable power system is important for safe operation of the nuclear power plants. The station blackout event is of great importance for nuclear power plant safety. This event is caused by the loss of all alternating current power supply to the safety and non-safety buses of the nuclear power plant. In this study an independent electrical connection between a pumped-storage hydro power plant and a nuclear power plant is assumed as a standpoint for safety and reliability analysis. The pumped-storage hydro power plant is considered as an alternative power supply. The connection with conventional accumulation type of hydro power plant is analysed in addition. The objective of this paper is to investigate the improvement of nuclear power plant safety resulting from the consideration of the alternative power supplies. The safety of the nuclear power plant is analysed through the core damage frequency, a risk measure assess by the probabilistic safety assessment. The presented method upgrades the probabilistic safety assessment from its common traditional use in sense that it considers non-plant sited systems. The obtained results show significant decrease of the core damage frequency, indicating improvement of nuclear safety if hydro power plant is introduced as an alternative off-site power source.

Blaže Gjorgiev; Andrija Volkanovski; Duško Kan?ev; Marko ?epin

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

460

Apparatus and methods of reheating gas turbine cooling steam and high pressure steam turbine exhaust in a combined cycle power generating system  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

In a combined cycle system having a multi-pressure heat recovery steam generator, a gas turbine and steam turbine, steam for cooling gas turbine components is supplied from the intermediate pressure section of the heat recovery steam generator supplemented by a portion of the steam exhausting from the HP section of the steam turbine, steam from the gas turbine cooling cycle and the exhaust from the HP section of the steam turbine are combined for flow through a reheat section of the HRSG. The reheated steam is supplied to the IP section inlet of the steam turbine. Thus, where gas turbine cooling steam temperature is lower than optimum, a net improvement in performance is achieved by flowing the cooling steam exhausting from the gas turbine and the exhaust steam from the high pressure section of the steam turbine in series through the reheater of the HRSG for applying steam at optimum temperature to the IP section of the steam turbine.

Tomlinson, Leroy Omar (Niskayuna, NY); Smith, Raub Warfield (Ballston Lake, NY)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "turbine power plants" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Power/desal plant evolves to meet changing needs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This article reviews the design and operation of a dual purpose power/desalination plant in the Virgin Islands. The topics of the article include a description of the original plant design and operation, combined-cycle integration with existing power/desalination plant, system design, operating experience and incorporation of the St. Croix design at St. Thomas.

Atkins, T.E.; Rothgeb, G.

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

462

Study on The Effect of Regenerative System on Power Type Relative Internal Efficiency of Nuclear Steam Turbine  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Nuclear steam turbine use wet steam as working medium, which is unable to determine the enthalpy drop type relative internal efficiency through exhaust enthalpy of steam, but the power type relative internal efficiency avoids this question. This paper introduced the calculate method of power type relative internal efficience, and then took a 900MW nuclear steam turbine for example, calculated the power type relative internal efficiency when the factors of regenerative system are changed. The result shows that when the factors of regenerative system are changed in a large range, the power type relative internal efficiency is nearly changeless, so the effect of regenerative system on relative internal efficiency can be neglected. At last, the independence between relative internal efficiency and ideal cycle heat efficiency is calculated and analyzed.

Yong Li; Chao Wang

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

463

New England Wind Forum: Wind Power Technology  

Wind Powering America (EERE)

Wind Power Technology Wind Power Technology Modern wind turbines have become sophisticated power plants while the concept of converting wind energy to electrical energy remains quite simple. Follow these links to learn more about the science behind wind turbine technology. Wind Power Animation An image of a scene from the wind power animation. The animation shows how moving air rotates a wind turbine's blades and describes how the internal components work to produce electricity. It shows small and large wind turbines and the differences between how they are used, as stand alone or connected to the utility grid. How Wind Turbines Work Learn how wind turbines make electricity; what are the types, sizes, and applications of wind turbines; and see an illustration of the components inside a wind turbine.

464

Progress in Decommissioning the Humboldt Bay Power Plant - 13604  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Decommissioning of the Pacific Gas and Electric (PG and E) Company Humboldt Bay Power Plant (HBPP) Unit 3 nuclear facility has now, after more than three decades of SAFSTOR and initial decommissioning work, transitioned to full-scale decommissioning. Decommissioning activities to date have been well orchestrated and executed in spite of an extremely small work site with space constricted even more by other concurrent on-site major construction projects including the demolition of four fossil units, construction of a new generating station and 60 KV switchyard upgrade. Full-scale decommissioning activities - now transitioning from Plant Systems Removal (PG and E self-perform) to Civil Works Projects (contractor performed) - are proceeding in a safe, timely, and cost effective manner. As a result of the successful decommissioning work to date (approximately fifty percent completed) and the intense planning and preparations for the remaining work, there is a high level of confidence for completion of all HBPP Unit 3 decommissions activities in 2018. Strategic planning and preparations to transition into full-scale decommissioning was carried out in 2008 by a small, highly focused project team. This planning was conducted concurrent with other critical planning requirements such as the loading of spent nuclear fuel into dry storage at the Independent Spent Fuel Storage Installation (ISFSI) finishing December 2008. Over the past four years, 2009 through 2012, the majority of decommissioning work has been installation of site infrastructure and removal of systems and components, known as the Plant System Removal Phase, where work scope was dynamic with significant uncertainty, and it was self-performed by PG and E. As HBPP Decommissioning transitions from the Plant System Removal Phase to the Civil Works Projects Phase, where work scope is well defined, a contracting plan similar to that used for Fossil Decommissioning will be implemented. Award of five major work scopes in various stages of development are planned as they include: Turbine Building Demolition, Nuclear Facilities Demolition and Excavation, Intake and Discharge Canal Remediation, Office Facility Demobilization, and Final Site Restoration. Benefits realized by transitioning to the Civil Works Projects Phase with predominant firm fixed-price/fixed unit price contracting include single civil works contractor who can coordinate concrete shaving, liner removal, structural removal, and other demolition activities; streamline financial control; reduce PG and E overhead staffing; and provide a specialized Bidder Team with experience from other similar projects. (authors)

Rod, Kerry [PG and E Utility, Humboldt Bay Power Plant, 1000 King Salmon Ave. Eureka, CA 95503 (United States)] [PG and E Utility, Humboldt Bay Power Plant, 1000 King Salmon Ave. Eureka, CA 95503 (United States); Shelanskey, Steven K. [Anata Management Solutions, 5180 South Commerce Dr,, Suite F Murray, UT 84107 (United States)] [Anata Management Solutions, 5180 South Commerce Dr,, Suite F Murray, UT 84107 (United States); Kristofzski, John [CH2MHILL, 295 Bradley Blvd. Suite 300, Richland WA 99353 (United States)] [CH2MHILL, 295 Bradley Blvd. Suite 300, Richland WA 99353 (United States)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

465

E-Print Network 3.0 - axis wind turbines Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

turbines Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: axis wind turbines...

466

E-Print Network 3.0 - aircraft gas turbines Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

turbines Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: aircraft gas turbines...

467

E-Print Network 3.0 - advanced gas turbines Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

turbines Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: advanced gas turbines...

468

E-Print Network 3.0 - aviation gas turbines Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

turbines Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: aviation gas turbines...

469

E-Print Network 3.0 - axial flow turbines Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

turbines Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: axial flow turbines...

470

E-Print Network 3.0 - axial flow turbine Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

turbine Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: axial flow turbine...

471

E-Print Network 3.0 - axis wind turbine Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

turbine Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: axis wind turbine...

472

Electromagnetic Compatibility in Nuclear Power Plants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Electromagnetic compatibility (EMC) has long been a key element of qualification for mission critical instrumentation and control (I&C) systems used by the U.S. military. The potential for disruption of safety-related I&C systems by electromagnetic interference (EMI), radio-frequency interference (RFI), or power surges is also an issue of concern for the nuclear industry. Experimental investigations of the potential vulnerability of advanced safety systems to EMI/RFI, coupled with studies of reported events at nuclear power plants (NPPs) that are attributed to EMI/RFI, confirm the safety significance of EMC for both analog and digital technology. As a result, Oak Ridge National Laboratory has been engaged in the development of the technical basis for guidance that addresses EMC for safety-related I&C systems in NPPs. This research has involved the identification of engineering practices to minimize the potential impact of EMI/RFI and power surges and an evaluation of the ambient electromagnetic environment at NPPs to tailor those practices for use by the nuclear industry. Recommendations for EMC guidance have been derived from these research findings and are summarized in this paper.

Ewing, P.D.; Kercel, S.W.; Korsah, K.; Wood, R.T.

1999-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

473

Oscillation Damping: A Comparison of Wind and Photovoltaic Power Plant Capabilities: Preprint  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This work compares and contrasts strategies for providing oscillation damping services from wind power plants and photovoltaic power plants.

Singh, M.; Allen, A.; Muljadi, E.; Gevorgian, V.

2014-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

474

Brilliant Wind Turbine | GE Global Research  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Brilliant(tm) Wind Turbines Push Power and Efficient Boundaries Brilliant(tm) Wind Turbines Push Power and Efficient Boundaries The conventional wisdom around wind is that the...

475

Optimizing Dam Operations for Power and for Fish: an Overview of the US Department of Energy and US Army Corps of Engineers ADvanced Turbine Development R&D. A Pre-Conference Workshop at HydroVision 2006, Oregon Convention Center, Portland, Oregon July 31, 2006  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This booklet contains abstracts of presentations made at a preconference workshop on the US Department of Energy and US Army Corps of Engineers hydroturbine programs. The workshop was held in conjunction with Hydrovision 2006 July 31, 2006 at the Oregon Convention Center in Portland Oregon. The workshop was organized by the Corps of Engineers, PNNL, and the DOE Wind and Hydropower Program. Presenters gave overviews of the Corps' Turbine Survival Program and the history of the DOE Advanced Turbine Development Program. They also spoke on physical hydraulic models, biocriteria for safe fish passage, pressure investigations using the Sensor Fish Device, blade strike models, optimization of power plant operations, bioindex testing of turbine performance, approaches to measuring fish survival, a systems view of turbine performance, and the Turbine Survival Program design approach.

Dauble, Dennis D.

2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

476

Steam Turbine Materials and Corrosion  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Ultra-supercritical (USC) power plants offer the promise of higher efficiencies and lower emissions. Current goals of the U.S. Department of Energy’s Advanced Power Systems Initiatives include coal generation at 60% efficiency, which would require steam temperatures of up to 760 °C. In prior years this project examined the steamside oxidation of alloys for use in high- and intermediate-pressure USC turbines. This steamside oxidation research is continuing and progress is presented, with emphasis on chromia evaporation.

Holcomb, G.H.; Hsu, D.H.

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

477

Automated Decision-Analytic Diagnosis of Thermal Performance in Gas Turbines  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the ultimate goal of applying the system in the day-to-day maintenance of gas- turbine power plants. A Overview to diagnose difficult problems with power generation, medicine, aerospace, and manufac- turing. In 1991 for diagnos- ing efficiency-related problems in large gas and oil-fired turbines. The management of operat

Horvitz, Eric

478

UNSUPERVISED CLUSTERING FOR FAULT DIAGNOSIS IN NUCLEAR POWER PLANT COMPONENTS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 UNSUPERVISED CLUSTERING FOR FAULT DIAGNOSIS IN NUCLEAR POWER PLANT COMPONENTS Piero Baraldi1 on transients originated by different faults in the pressurizer of a nuclear power reactor. Key Words: Fault of Nuclear Power Plants (NPPs) [Cheon et al., 1993; Kim et al., 1996; Reifman, 1997; Zio et al., 2006a; Zio

Boyer, Edmond

479

Corrosion Investigations at Masned Combined Heat and Power Plant  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Corrosion Investigations at Masnedø Combined Heat and Power Plant Part VI Melanie Montgomery AT MASNED� COMBINED HEAT AND POWER PLANT PART VI CONTENTS 1. Introduction Department for Manufacturing Engineering Technical University of Denmark Asger Karlsson Energi E2 Power