Sample records for turbine power plants

  1. Combined Heat and Power Plant Steam Turbine

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rose, Michael R.

    Combined Heat and Power Plant Steam Turbine Steam Turbine Chiller Campus Heat Load Steam (recovered waste heat) Gas Turbine University Substation High Pressure Natural Gas Campus Electric Load Southern Generator Heat Recovery Alternative Uses: 1. Campus heating load 2. Steam turbine chiller to campus cooling

  2. Direct FuelCell/Turbine Power Plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hossein Ghezel-Ayagh

    2008-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes the progress made in development of Direct FuelCell/Turbine (DFC/T{reg_sign}) power plants for generation of clean power at very high efficiencies. The DFC/T system employs an indirectly heated Turbine Generator to supplement fuel cell generated power. The concept extends the high efficiency of the fuel cell by utilizing the fuel cell's byproduct heat in a Brayton cycle. Features of the DFC/T system include: electrical efficiencies of up to 75% on natural gas, minimal emissions, reduced carbon dioxide release to the environment, simplicity in design, direct reforming internal to the fuel cell, and potential cost competitiveness with existing combined cycle power plants. Proof-of-concept tests using a sub-MW-class DFC/T power plant at FuelCell Energy's (FCE) Danbury facility were conducted to validate the feasibility of the concept and to measure its potential for electric power production. A 400 kW-class power plant test facility was designed and retrofitted to conduct the tests. The initial series of tests involved integration of a full-size (250 kW) Direct FuelCell stack with a 30 kW Capstone microturbine. The operational aspects of the hybrid system in relation to the integration of the microturbine with the fuel cell, process flow and thermal balances, and control strategies for power cycling of the system, were investigated. A subsequent series of tests included operation of the sub-MW Direct FuelCell/Turbine power plant with a Capstone C60 microturbine. The C60 microturbine extended the range of operation of the hybrid power plant to higher current densities (higher power) than achieved in initial tests using the 30kW microturbine. The proof-of-concept test results confirmed the stability and controllability of operating a fullsize (250 kW) fuel cell stack in combination with a microturbine. Thermal management of the system was confirmed and power plant operation, using the microturbine as the only source of fresh air supply to the system, was demonstrated. System analyses of 40 MW DFC/T hybrid systems, approaching 75% efficiency on natural gas, were carried out using CHEMCAD simulation software. The analyses included systems for near-term and long-term deployment. A new concept was developed that was based on clusters of one-MW fuel cell modules as the building blocks. The preliminary design of a 40 MW power plant, including the key equipment layout and the site plan, was completed. The process information and operational data from the proof-of-concept tests were used in the design of 40 MW high efficiency DFC/T power plants. A preliminary cost estimate for the 40 MW DFC/T plant was also prepared. Pilot-scale tests of the cascaded fuel cell concept for achieving high fuel utilizations were conducted. The tests demonstrated that the concept has the potential to offer higher power plant efficiency. Alternate stack flow geometries for increased power output and fuel utilization capabilities were also evaluated. Detailed design of the packaged sub-MW DFC/T Alpha Unit was completed, including equipment and piping layouts, instrumentation, electrical, and structural drawings. The lessons learned from the proof-of-concept tests were incorporated in the design of the Alpha Unit. The sub-MW packaged unit was fabricated, including integration of the Direct FuelCell{reg_sign} (DFC{reg_sign}) stack module with the mechanical balance-of-plant and electrical balance-of-plant. Factory acceptance tests of the Alpha DFC/T power plant were conducted at Danbury, CT. The Alpha Unit achieved an unsurpassed electrical efficiency of 58% (LHV natural gas) during the factory tests. The resulting high efficiency in conversion of chemical energy to electricity far exceeded any sub-MW class power generation equipment presently in the market. After successful completion of the factory tests, the unit was shipped to the Billings Clinic in Billings, MT, for field demonstration tests. The DFC/T unit accomplished a major achievement by successfully completing 8000 hours of operation at the Billings site. The Alpha sub-MW DF

  3. Biennial Assessment of the Fifth Power Plan Gas Turbine Power Plant Planning Assumptions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    from the heat recovery steam generator powers an additional steam turbine, providing extra electricBiennial Assessment of the Fifth Power Plan Gas Turbine Power Plant Planning Assumptions October 17, 2006 Simple- and combined-cycle gas turbine power plants fuelled by natural gas are among the bulk

  4. Dynamic Models for Wind Turbines and Wind Power Plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Singh, M.; Santoso, S.

    2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The primary objective of this report was to develop universal manufacturer-independent wind turbine and wind power plant models that can be shared, used, and improved without any restrictions by project developers, manufacturers, and engineers. Manufacturer-specific models of wind turbines are favored for use in wind power interconnection studies. While they are detailed and accurate, their usages are limited to the terms of the non-disclosure agreement, thus stifling model sharing. The primary objective of the work proposed is to develop universal manufacturer-independent wind power plant models that can be shared, used, and improved without any restrictions by project developers, manufacturers, and engineers. Each of these models includes representations of general turbine aerodynamics, the mechanical drive-train, and the electrical characteristics of the generator and converter, as well as the control systems typically used. To determine how realistic model performance is, the performance of one of the models (doubly-fed induction generator model) has been validated using real-world wind power plant data. This work also documents selected applications of these models.

  5. Steam Turbine Materials for Ultrasupercritical Coal Power Plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Viswanathan, R.; Hawk, J.; Schwant, R.; Saha, D.; Totemeier, T.; Goodstine, S.; McNally, M.; Allen, D. B.; Purgert, Robert

    2009-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The Ultrasupercritical (USC) Steam Turbine Materials Development Program is sponsored and funded by the U.S. Department of Energy and the Ohio Coal Development Office, through grants to Energy Industries of Ohio (EIO), a non-profit organization contracted to manage and direct the project. The program is co-funded by the General Electric Company, Alstom Power, Siemens Power Generation (formerly Siemens Westinghouse), and the Electric Power Research Institute, each organization having subcontracted with EIO and contributing teams of personnel to perform the requisite research. The program is focused on identifying, evaluating, and qualifying advanced alloys for utilization in coal-fired power plants that need to withstand steam turbine operating conditions up to 760°C (1400°F) and 35 MPa (5000 psi). For these conditions, components exposed to the highest temperatures and stresses will need to be constructed from nickel-based alloys with higher elevated temperature strength than the highchromium ferritic steels currently used in today??s high-temperature steam turbines. In addition to the strength requirements, these alloys must also be weldable and resistant to environmental effects such as steam oxidation and solid particle erosion. In the present project, candidate materials with the required creep strength at desired temperatures have been identified. Coatings that can resist oxidation and solid particle erosion have also been identified. The ability to perform dissimilar welds between nickel base alloys and ferritic steels have been demonstrated, and the properties of the welds have been evaluated. Results of this three-year study that was completed in 2009 are described in this final report. Additional work is being planned and will commence in 2009. The specific objectives of the future studies will include conducting more detailed evaluations of the weld-ability, mechanical properties and repair-ability of the selected candidate alloys for rotors, casings and valves, and to perform scale-up studies to establish a design basis for commercial scale components. A supplemental program funded by the Ohio Coal Development Office will undertake supporting tasks such as testing and trials using existing atmospheric, vacuum and developmental pressure furnaces to define specific metal casting techniques needed for producing commercial scale components.

  6. How Gas Turbine Power Plants Work | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of Energy Power.pdf11-161-LNG | Department ofHTS Cable ProjectsHistory History On7,How Gas Turbine Power

  7. Effect of Gas Turbine Exhaust Temperature, Stack Temperature and Ambient Temperature on Overall Efficiency of Combine Cycle Power Plant

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    unknown authors

    AbstractThe gas turbine exhaust temperature, stack temperature and ambient temperature play a very important role during the predication of the performance of combine cycle power plant. This paper covers parametric analysis of effects of gas turbine exhaust temperature, stack temperature and ambient temperature on the overall efficiency of combine cycle power plant keeping the gas turbine efficiency as well as steam turbine efficiency constant. The results shows that out of three variables i.e. turbine exhaust temperature, stack temperature and ambient temperature, the most dominating factor of increasing the overall efficiency of the combine cycle power plant is the stack temperature.

  8. Gas turbine power plant with supersonic shock compression ramps

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lawlor, Shawn P. (Bellevue, WA); Novaresi, Mark A. (San Diego, CA); Cornelius, Charles C. (Kirkland, WA)

    2008-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

    A gas turbine engine. The engine is based on the use of a gas turbine driven rotor having a compression ramp traveling at a local supersonic inlet velocity (based on the combination of inlet gas velocity and tangential speed of the ramp) which compresses inlet gas against a stationary sidewall. The supersonic compressor efficiently achieves high compression ratios while utilizing a compact, stabilized gasdynamic flow path. Operated at supersonic speeds, the inlet stabilizes an oblique/normal shock system in the gasdynamic flow path formed between the rim of the rotor, the strakes, and a stationary external housing. Part load efficiency is enhanced by use of a lean pre-mix system, a pre-swirl compressor, and a bypass stream to bleed a portion of the gas after passing through the pre-swirl compressor to the combustion gas outlet. Use of a stationary low NOx combustor provides excellent emissions results.

  9. Cost effective designs for integrating new electronic turbine control systems into existing steam power plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nguyen, T.V. [Westinghouse Electric Corp., Orlando, FL (United States)

    1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Different cost-effective approaches have been developed for integrating new digital turbine control systems into existing power plants. The devices under consideration range from self contained actuators which replace the existing hydraulic and mechanical servomotor components, linear proportional actuators, which mechanically drive the original servomotor pilot relays, to electro-hydraulic converters which provide a control pressure to the existing hydraulic servomotor pilot relays. These devices significantly reduce the implementation cost, while still providing most of the benefits that can be gained through greater utilization of the new electronic control capabilities. These three design approaches are analyzed for control performance, failure modes, long-term maintenance issues, and applicability to specific turbine configurations.

  10. Operation and Performance of a Biphase Turbine Power Plant at the Cerro Prieto Geothermal Field (Final Report)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hays, Lance G. [Douglas Energy Company, Placentia, CA (United States)

    2000-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A full scale, wellhead Biphase turbine was manufactured and installed with the balance of plant at Well 103 of the Cerro Prieto geothermal resource in Baja, California. The Biphase turbine was first synchronized with the electrical grid of Comision Federal de Electricidad on August 20, 1997. The Biphase power plant was operated from that time until May 23, 2000, a period of 2 years and 9 months. A total of 77,549 kWh were delivered to the grid. The power plant was subsequently placed in a standby condition pending replacement of the rotor with a newly designed, higher power rotor and replacement of the bearings and seals. The maximum measured power output of the Biphase turbine, 808 kWe at 640 psig wellhead pressure, agreed closely with the predicted output, 840 kWe. When combined with the backpressure steam turbine the total output power from that flow would be increased by 40% above the power derived only from the flow by the present flash steam plant. The design relations used to predict performance and design the turbine were verified by these tests. The performance and durability of the Biphase turbine support the conclusion of the Economics and Application Report previously published, (Appendix A). The newly designed rotor (the Dual Pressure Rotor) was analyzed for the above power condition. The Dual Pressure Rotor would increase the power output to 2064 kWe by incorporating two pressure letdown stages in the Biphase rotor, eliminating the requirement for a backpressure steam turbine. The power plant availability was low due to deposition of solids from the well on the Biphase rotor and balance of plant problems. A great deal of plant down time resulted from the requirement to develop methods to handle the solids and from testing the apparatus in the Biphase turbine. Finally an online, washing method using the high pressure two-phase flow was developed which completely eliminated the solids problem. The availability of the Biphase turbine itself was 100% after implementations of this method in March 2000. However, failures of instrumentation and control system components led to additional plant down time and damage to the bearings and seals. The enthalpy and pressure of well 103 declined substantially from the inception of the project. When the project was started the wellhead pressure and enthalpy were 760 psig and 882 Btu/lb respectively. At the time the plant was placed in standby the corresponding values were only 525 psig and 658 Btu/lb. This reduced the available plant power to only 400 kWe making the project economically unfeasible. However, replacement of the existing rotor with the Dual Pressure Rotor and replacement of the bearings and seals will enable the existing Biphase turbine to produce 1190 kWe at the present well conditions without the backpressure steam turbine. Operation with the present staff can then be sustained by selling power under the existing Agreement with CFE. Implementation of this option is recommended with operation of the facility to continue as a demonstration plant. Biphase turbine theory, design and performance are reported herein. The construction of the Biphase turbine and power plant and operational experience are detailed. Improvements in the Biphase turbine are indicated and analyzed. The impact of Biphase techonology on geothermal power production is discussed and recommendations made.

  11. Modeling of Proposed Changes to SIUC Central Heating, Air-Conditioning, and Power Plant Incorporating Variable Frequency Drive (VFD) and High Efficiency Turbine.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Su, Heyin

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ??Currently, the Southern Illinois University Carbondale (SIUC) power plant produces steam at high pressure to drive a high pressure (HP) turbine to make a portion (more)

  12. A new coordinated control strategy for boiler-turbine system of coal-fired power plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, S.Y.; Liu, H.B.; Cai, W.J.; Soh, Y.C.; Xie, L.H. [Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai (China)

    2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents the new development of the boiler-turbine coordinated control strategy using fuzzy reasoning and autotuning techniques. The boiler-turbine system is a very complex process that is a multivariable, nonlinear, slowly time-varying plant with large settling time and a lot of uncertainties. As there exist strong couplings between the main steam pressure control loop and the power output control loop in the boiler-turbine unit with large time-delay and uncertainties, automatic coordinated control of the two loops is a very challenging problem. This paper presents a new coordinated control strategy (CCS) which is organized into two levels: a basic control level and a high supervision level. Proportional-integral derivative (PID) type controllers are used in the basic level to perform basic control functions while the decoupling between two control loops can be realized in the high level. A special subclass of fuzzy inference systems, called the Gaussian partition with evenly (GPE) spaced midpoints systems, is used to self-tune the main steam pressure PID controller's parameters online based on the error signal and its first difference, aimed at overcoming the uncertainties due to changing fuel calorific value, machine wear, contamination of the boiler heating surfaces and plant modeling errors. For the large variation of operating condition, a supervisory control level has been developed by autotuning technique. The developed CCS has been implemented in a power plant in China, and satisfactory industrial operation results demonstrate that the proposed control strategy has enhanced the adaptability and robustness of the process. Indeed, better control performance and economic benefit have been achieved.

  13. Incorporating supercritical steam turbines into molten-salt power tower plants : feasibility and performance.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pacheco, James Edward; Wolf, Thorsten [Siemens Energy, Inc., Orlando, FL; Muley, Nishant [Siemens Energy, Inc., Orlando, FL

    2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Sandia National Laboratories and Siemens Energy, Inc., examined 14 different subcritical and supercritical steam cycles to determine if it is feasible to configure a molten-salt supercritical steam plant that has a capacity in the range of 150 to 200 MWe. The effects of main steam pressure and temperature, final feedwater temperature, and hot salt and cold salt return temperatures were determined on gross and half-net efficiencies. The main steam pressures ranged from 120 bar-a (subcritical) to 260 bar-a (supercritical). Hot salt temperatures of 566 and 600%C2%B0C were evaluated, which resulted in main steam temperatures of 553 and 580%C2%B0C, respectively. Also, the effects of final feedwater temperature (between 260 and 320%C2%B0C) were evaluated, which impacted the cold salt return temperature. The annual energy production and levelized cost of energy (LCOE) were calculated using the System Advisory Model on 165 MWe subcritical plants (baseline and advanced) and the most promising supercritical plants. It was concluded that the supercritical steam plants produced more annual energy than the baseline subcritical steam plant for the same-size heliostat field, receiver, and thermal storage system. Two supercritical steam plants had the highest annual performance and had nearly the same LCOE. Both operated at 230 bar-a main steam pressure. One was designed for a hot salt temperature of 600%C2%B0C and the other 565%C2%B0C. The LCOEs for these plants were about 10% lower than the baseline subcritical plant operating at 120 bar-a main steam pressure and a hot salt temperature of 565%C2%B0C. Based on the results of this study, it appears economically and technically feasible to incorporate supercritical steam turbines in molten-salt power tower plants.

  14. SENSIBLE HEAT STORAGE FOR A SOLAR THERMAL POWER PLANT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baldwin, Thomas F.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Power Plant Solar Power Ideal Gas Turbine Topping Braytonwill require higher parasitic power for gas circulation. Theefficiency of a solar power plant with gas-turbine topping

  15. Power Plant Power Plant

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tingley, Joseph V.

    Basin Center for Geothermal Energy at University of Nevada, Reno (UNR) 2 Nevada Geodetic LaboratoryStillwater Power Plant Wabuska Power Plant Casa Diablo Power Plant Glass Mountain Geothermal Area Lassen Geothermal Area Coso Hot Springs Power Plants Lake City Geothermal Area Thermo Geothermal Area

  16. A RAM (Reliability Availability Maintainability) analysis of Consolidated Edison's Gowanus and Narrows gas turbine power plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, B.W.; Whitehead, T.J.; Derenthal, P.J. (Science Applications International Corp., Los Altos, CA (USA))

    1990-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A methodology is presented which accurately assesses the ability of gas turbine generating stations to perform their intended function (reliability) while operating in a peaking duty mode. The developed methodology alloys the RAM modeler to calculate the probability that a peaking unit will produce the energy demanded and in turn calculate the total energy lost during a given time period due to unavailability of individual components. The methodology was applied to Consolidated Edison's Narrows site which has 16 barge-mounted General Electric Frame 5 gas turbines operating under a peaking duty mode. The resulting RAM model was quantified using the Narrows site power demand and failure rate data. The model was also quantified using generic failure data from the Operational Reliability Analysis Program (ORAP) for General Electric Frame 5 peaking gas turbines. A problem description list and counter measures are offered for components contributing more than one percent to gas turbine energy loss. 3 refs., 18 figs., 12 tabs.

  17. Impact of Advanced Turbine Systems on coal-based power plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bechtel, T.F.

    1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The advanced power-generation products currently under development in our program show great promise for ultimate commercial use. Four of these products are referred to in this paper: Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC), Pressurized Fluidized Bed Combustion (PFBC), Externally Fired Combined Cycle (EFCC), and Integrated Gasification Fuel Cell (IGFC). Three of these products, IGCC, PFBC, and EFCC, rely on advanced gas turbines as a key enabling technology and the foundation for efficiencies in the range of 52 to 55 percent. DOE is funding the development of advanced gas turbines in the newly instituted Advanced Turbine Systems (ATS) Program, one of DOE`s highest priority natural gas initiatives. The turbines, which will have natural gas efficiencies of 60 percent, are being evaluated for coal gas compatibility as part of that program.

  18. Aging of turbine drives for safety-related pumps in nuclear power plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cox, D.F. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This study was performed to examine the relationship between time-dependent degradation and current industry practices in the areas of maintenance, surveillance, and operation of steam turbine drives for safety-related pumps. These pumps are located in the Auxiliary Feedwater (AFW) system for pressurized-water reactor plants and in the Reactor Core Isolation Cooling and High-Pressure Coolant Injection systems for boiling-water reactor plants. This research has been conducted by examination of failure data in the Nuclear Plant Reliability Data System, review of Licensee Event Reports, discussion of problems with operating plant personnel, and personal observation. The reported failure data were reviewed to determine the cause of the event and the method of discovery. Based on the research results, attempts have been made to determine the predictability of failures and possible preventive measures that may be implemented. Findings in a recent study of AFW systems indicate that the turbine drive is the single largest contributor to AFW system degradation. However, examination of the data shows that the turbine itself is a reliable piece of equipment with a good service record. Most of the problems documented are the result of problems with the turbine controls and the mechanical overspeed trip mechanism; these apparently stem from three major causes which are discussed in the text. Recent improvements in maintenance practices and procedures, combined with a stabilization of the design, have led to improved performance resulting in a reliable safety-related component. However, these improvements have not been universally implemented.

  19. Method of Equivalencing for a Large Wind Power Plant with Multiple Turbine Representation: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Muljadi, E.; Pasupulati, S.; Ellis, A.; Kosterov, D.

    2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper focuses on our effort to develop an equivalent representation of a Wind Power Plant collector system for power system planning studies.

  20. 3rd Int'l Workshop on Micro & Nano Tech. for Power Generation & Energy Conv. (PowerMEMS'03), Makuhari, Japan, 4-5 Dec. 2003. PRELIMINARY DESIGN OF A MEMS STEAM TURBINE POWER PLANT-ON-A-CHIP

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frechette, Luc G.

    ), Makuhari, Japan, 4-5 Dec. 2003. 1 PRELIMINARY DESIGN OF A MEMS STEAM TURBINE POWER PLANT-ON-A-CHIP Luc G-mail: lucf@alum.mit.edu ABSTRACT This paper presents the system-level and component design of a micro steam. The microfabricated device consists of a steam turbine that drives an integrated micropump and generator. Two

  1. Use of GTE-65 gas turbine power units in the thermal configuration of steam-gas systems for the refitting of operating thermal electric power plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lebedev, A. S.; Kovalevskii, V. P. ['Leningradskii Metallicheskii Zavod', branch of JSC 'Silovye mashiny' (Russian Federation); Getmanov, E. A.; Ermaikina, N. A. ['Institut Teploenergoproekt', branch of JSC 'Inzhenernyi tsentr EES' (Russian Federation)

    2008-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Thermal configurations for condensation, district heating, and discharge steam-gas systems (PGU) based on the GTE-65 gas turbine power unit are described. A comparative multivariant analysis of their thermodynamic efficiency is made. Based on some representative examples, it is shown that steam-gas systems with the GTE-65 and boiler-utilizer units can be effectively used and installed in existing main buildings during technical refitting of operating thermal electric power plants.

  2. SMART POWER TURBINE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nirm V. Nirmalan

    2003-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Gas turbines are the choice technology for high-performance power generation and are employed in both simple and combined cycle configurations around the world. The Smart Power Turbine (SPT) program has developed new technologies that are needed to further extend the performance and economic attractiveness of gas turbines for power generation. Today's power generation gas turbines control firing temperatures indirectly, by measuring the exhaust gas temperature and then mathematically calculating the peak combustor temperatures. But temperatures in the turbine hot gas path vary a great deal, making it difficult to control firing temperatures precisely enough to achieve optimal performance. Similarly, there is no current way to assess deterioration of turbine hot-gas-path components without shutting down the turbine. Consequently, maintenance and component replacements are often scheduled according to conservative design practices based on historical fleet-averaged data. Since fuel heating values vary with the prevalent natural gas fuel, the inability to measure heating value directly, with sufficient accuracy and timeliness, can lead to maintenance and operational decisions that are less than optimal. GE Global Research Center, under this Smart Power Turbine program, has developed a suite of novel sensors that would measure combustor flame temperature, online fuel lower heating value (LHV), and hot-gas-path component life directly. The feasibility of using the ratio of the integrated intensities of portions of the OH emission band to determine the specific average temperature of a premixed methane or natural-gas-fueled combustion flame was demonstrated. The temperature determined is the temperature of the plasma included in the field of view of the sensor. Two sensor types were investigated: the first used a low-resolution fiber optic spectrometer; the second was a SiC dual photodiode chip. Both methods worked. Sensitivity to flame temperature changes was remarkably high, that is a 1-2.5% change in ratio for an 11.1 C (20 F) change in temperature at flame temperatures between 1482.2 C (2700 F) and 1760 C (3200 F). Sensor ratio calibration was performed using flame temperatures determined by calculations using the amount of unburned oxygen in the exhaust and by the fuel/air ratio of the combustible gas mixture. The agreement between the results of these two methods was excellent. The sensor methods characterized are simple and viable. Experiments are underway to validate the GE Flame Temperature Sensor as a practical tool for use with multiburner gas turbine combustors. The lower heating value (LHV) Fuel Quality Sensor consists of a catalytic film deposited on the surface of a microhotplate. This micromachined design has low heat capacity and thermal conductivity, making it ideal for heating catalysts placed on its surface. Several methods of catalyst deposition were investigated, including micropen deposition and other proprietary methods, which permit precise and repeatable placement of the materials. The use of catalysts on the LHV sensor expands the limits of flammability (LoF) of combustion fuels as compared with conventional flames; an unoptimized LoF of 1-32% for natural gas (NG) in air was demonstrated with the microcombustor, whereas conventionally 4 to 16% is observed. The primary goal of this work was to measure the LHV of NG fuels. The secondary goal was to determine the relative quantities of the various components of NG mixes. This determination was made successfully by using an array of different catalysts operating at different temperatures. The combustion parameters for methane were shown to be dependent on whether Pt or Pd catalysts were used. In this project, significant effort was expended on making the LHV platform more robust by the addition of high-temperature stable materials, such as tantalum, and the use of passivation overcoats to protect the resistive heater/sensor materials from degradation in the combustion environment. Modeling and simulation were used to predict improved sensor designs.

  3. Modeling Creep-Fatigue-Environment Interactions in Steam Turbine Rotor Materials for Advanced Ultra-supercritical Coal Power Plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shen, Chen

    2014-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The goal of this project is to model creep-fatigue-environment interactions in steam turbine rotor materials for advanced ultra-supercritical (A-USC) coal power Alloy 282 plants, to develop and demonstrate computational algorithms for alloy property predictions, and to determine and model key mechanisms that contribute to the damages caused by creep-fatigue-environment interactions. The nickel based Alloy 282 is selected for this project because it is one of the leading candidate materials for the high temperature/pressure section of an A-USC steam turbine. The methods developed in the project are expected to be applicable to other metal alloys in similar steam/oxidation environments. The major developments are: ? failure mechanism and microstructural characterization ? atomistic and first principles modeling of crack tip oxygen embrittlement ? modeling of gamma prime microstructures and mesoscale microstructure-defect interactions ? microstructure and damage-based creep prediction ? multi-scale crack growth modeling considering oxidation, viscoplasticity and fatigue The technology developed in this project is expected to enable more accurate prediction of long service life of advanced alloys for A-USC power plants, and provide faster and more effective materials design, development, and implementation than current state-of-the-art computational and experimental methods. This document is a final technical report for the project, covering efforts conducted from January 2011 to January 2014.

  4. Thermionic combustor application to combined gas and steam turbine power plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miskolczy, G.; Wang, C.C.; Lieb, D.P.; Margulies, A.E.; Fusegni, L.J.; Lovell, B.J.

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The engineering and economic feasibility of a thermionic converter topped combustor for a gas turbine is evaluated in this paper. A combined gas and steam turbine system was chosen for this study with nominal outputs of the gas and steam turbines of 70 MW and 30 MW, respectively. 7 refs.

  5. Method of and apparatus for preheating pressurized fluidized bed combustor and clean-up subsystem of a gas turbine power plant

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cole, Rossa W. (E. Rutherford, NJ); Zoll, August H. (Cedar Grove, NJ)

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In a gas turbine power plant having a pressurized fluidized bed combustor, gas turbine-air compressor subsystem and a gas clean-up subsystem interconnected for fluid flow therethrough, a pipe communicating the outlet of the compressor of the gas turbine-air compressor subsystem with the interior of the pressurized fluidized bed combustor and the gas clean-up subsystem to provide for flow of compressed air, heated by the heat of compression, therethrough. The pressurized fluidized bed combustor and gas clean-up subsystem are vented to atmosphere so that the heated compressed air flows therethrough and loses heat to the interior of those components before passing to the atmosphere.

  6. Combined-cycle gas and steam turbine power plants. 2. edition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kehlhofer, R.; Bachmann, R.; Nielson, H.; Warner, J.

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    First published in 1991, this book is the leading reference on technical and economic factors of combined-cycle applications now leading the trend toward merchant plants and the peaking power needed in newly deregulated markets around the world, this long-awaited second edition is more important than ever. In it, Kehlhofer -- an internationally recognized authority in the field of new combined-cycle power plants -- and his co-authors widen the scope and detail found in the first edition. Included are tips on system layout, details on controls and automation, and operating instructions. Loaded with case studies, reference tables, and more than 150 figures, this text offers solid advice on system layout, controls and automation, and operating and maintenance instructions. The author provides real-world examples to apply to one`s own applications. The contents include: Introduction; The electricity market; Thermodynamic principles of combined-cycle plants; Combined-cycle concepts; Applications of combined-cycle; Components; Control and automation; Operating and part load behavior; Environmental considerations; Developmental trends; Typical combined-cycle plants already built; Conclusion; Appendices; Conversions; Calculation of the operating performance of combined-cycle installations; Definitions of terms and symbols; Bibliography; and Index.

  7. System study of an MHD/gas turbine combined-cycle baseload power plant. HTGL report No. 134

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Annen, K.D.

    1981-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The MHD/gas turbine combined-cycle system has been designed specifically for applications where the availability of cooling water is very limited. The base case systems which were studied consisted of an MHD plant with a gas turbine bottoming plant, and required no cooling water. The gas turbine plant uses only air as its working fluid and receives its energy input from the MHD exhaust gases by means of metal tube heat exchangers. In addition to the base case systems, vapor cycle variation systems were considered which included the addition of a vapor cycle bottoming plant to improve the thermal efficiency. These systems required a small amount of cooling water. The MHD/gas turbine systems were modeled with sufficient detail, using realistic component specifications and costs, so that the thermal and economic performance of the system could be accurately determined. Three cases of MHD/gas turbine systems were studied, with Case I being similar to an MHD/steam system so that a direct comparison of the performances could be made, with Case II being representative of a second generation MHD system, and with Case III considering oxygen enrichment for early commercial applications. The systems are nominally 800 MW/sub e/ to 1000 MW/sub e/ in size. The results show that the MHD/gas turbine system has very good thermal and economic performances while requiring either little or no cooling water. Compared to the MHD/steam system which has a cooling tower heat load of 720 MW, the Base Case I MHD/gas turbine system has a heat rate which is 13% higher and a cost of electricity which is only 7% higher while requiring no cooling water. Case II results show that an improved performance can be expected from second generation MHD/gas turbine systems. Case III results show that an oxygen enriched MHD/gas turbine system may be attractive for early commercial applications in dry regions of the country.

  8. Small Power Plant Exemption (06-SPPE-1) Imperial County

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Small Power Plant Exemption (06-SPPE-1) Imperial County NILAND GAS TURBINE PLANT COMMISSIONDECISION ENERGY COMMISSION Small Power Plant Exemption (06-SPPE-1) Imperial County NILAND GAS TURBINE PLANT GAS TURBINE PLANT SMALL POWER PLANT EXEMPTION DOCKET NO. 06-SPPE-1 The California Energy Commission

  9. Power plant including an exhaust gas recirculation system for injecting recirculated exhaust gases in the fuel and compressed air of a gas turbine engine

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Anand, Ashok Kumar; Nagarjuna Reddy, Thirumala Reddy; Shaffer, Jason Brian; York, William David

    2014-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

    A power plant is provided and includes a gas turbine engine having a combustor in which compressed gas and fuel are mixed and combusted, first and second supply lines respectively coupled to the combustor and respectively configured to supply the compressed gas and the fuel to the combustor and an exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) system to re-circulate exhaust gas produced by the gas turbine engine toward the combustor. The EGR system is coupled to the first and second supply lines and configured to combine first and second portions of the re-circulated exhaust gas with the compressed gas and the fuel at the first and second supply lines, respectively.

  10. La Spezia power plant: Conversion of units 1 and 2 to combined cycle with modification of steam turbines from cross compound to tandem compound

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Magneschi, P.; Gabiccini, S.; Bracaloni, N.; Fiaschi, C.

    1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Units 1 and 2 of ENEL's La Spezia power plant, rated 310 and 325 MW respectively, are going to be converted to combined cycle. This project will be accomplished by integrating components such as gas turbines and HRSGs with some of the existing components, particularly the steam turbines, which are of the cross compound type. Since the total power of each converted unit has to be kept at 335 MW because of permitting limitations, the power delivered by the steam turbine will be limited to about 115 MW. For this reason a study was carried out to verify the possibility of having only one shaft and modifying the turbine to tandem compound. As additional investments are required for this modification, a balance was performed that also took into account the incremental heat rate and, on the other hand, the benefits from decreased maintenance and increased availability and reliability calculated for the expected useful life. The result of this balance was in favor of the modification, and a decision was taken accordingly. The turbine modification will involve replacing the whole HP section with a new combined HP-IP section while retaining the corresponding LP rotor and cylinder and making the needed changes in the valve arrangements and piping. Work on the site began in the spring of 1997 by dismantling the existing boiler so as to have the space needed to install the GTs and HRSGs. The first synchronization of the converted unit 1 is scheduled for November 1999

  11. Improving the Capacity or Output of a Steam Turbine Generator at XYZ Power Plant in Illinois

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Amoo-Otoo, John Kweku

    2006-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

    and capacitance mapping ? Performed wedge tightness check by means of manual tap test ? Performed RTD functioning test ? Cleaned generator brush rigging ? Inspected generator brush rigging for signs of heating, arcing or other damage... turbine with a net generating rating of 366MW. The unit began commercial operation in 1976. Coal is received by rail and limestone by rail by rail or truck. Rail cars are unloaded in a rotary car dumper at a rate of 20-25 cars per hour. A 30 day...

  12. NREL Develops Simulations for Wind Plant Power and Turbine Loads (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    NREL researchers are the first to use a high-performance computing tool for a large-eddy simulation of an entire wind plant.

  13. Topping Turbines: Adding New Life to Older Plants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cadrecha, M.

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An existing power plant can be repowered at a modest investment cost through a topping turbine installation. Essentially, this consists of replacing the existing old, low pressure boilers with new, high pressure boilers and adding a new, high...

  14. NREL: Wind Research - Boosting Wind Plant Power Output by 4%...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Boosting Wind Plant Power Output by 4%-5% through Coordinated Turbine Controls July 30, 2014 Wind plant underperformance has plagued wind plant developers for years. To address...

  15. Next Generation Geothermal Power Plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brugman, John; Hattar, Mai; Nichols, Kenneth; Esaki, Yuri

    1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A number of current and prospective power plant concepts were investigated to evaluate their potential to serve as the basis of the next generation geothermal power plant (NGGPP). The NGGPP has been envisaged as a power plant that would be more cost competitive (than current geothermal power plants) with fossil fuel power plants, would efficiently use resources and mitigate the risk of reservoir under-performance, and minimize or eliminate emission of pollutants and consumption of surface and ground water. Power plant concepts were analyzed using resource characteristics at ten different geothermal sites located in the western United States. Concepts were developed into viable power plant processes, capital costs were estimated and levelized busbar costs determined. Thus, the study results should be considered as useful indicators of the commercial viability of the various power plants concepts that were investigated. Broadly, the different power plant concepts that were analyzed in this study fall into the following categories: commercial binary and flash plants, advanced binary plants, advanced flash plants, flash/binary hybrid plants, and fossil/geothed hybrid plants. Commercial binary plants were evaluated using commercial isobutane as a working fluid; both air-cooling and water-cooling were considered. Advanced binary concepts included cycles using synchronous turbine-generators, cycles with metastable expansion, and cycles utilizing mixtures as working fluids. Dual flash steam plants were used as the model for the commercial flash cycle. The following advanced flash concepts were examined: dual flash with rotary separator turbine, dual flash with steam reheater, dual flash with hot water turbine, and subatmospheric flash. Both dual flash and binary cycles were combined with other cycles to develop a number of hybrid cycles: dual flash binary bottoming cycle, dual flash backpressure turbine binary cycle, dual flash gas turbine cycle, and binary gas turbine cycle. Results of this study indicate that dual flash type plants are preferred at resources with temperatures above 400 F. Closed loop (binary type) plants are preferred at resources with temperatures below 400 F. A rotary separator turbine upstream of a dual flash plant can be beneficial at Salton Sea, the hottest resource, or at high temperature resources where there is a significant variance in wellhead pressures from well to well. Full scale demonstration is required to verify cost and performance. Hot water turbines that recover energy from the spent brine in a dual flash cycle improve that cycle's brine efficiency. Prototype field tests of this technology have established its technical feasibility. If natural gas prices remain low, a combustion turbine/binary hybrid is an economic option for the lowest temperature sites. The use of mixed fluids appear to be an attractive low risk option. The synchronous turbine option as prepared by Barber-Nichols is attractive but requires a pilot test to prove cost and performance. Dual flash binary bottoming cycles appear promising provided that scaling of the brine/working fluid exchangers is controllable. Metastable expansion, reheater, Subatmospheric flash, dual flash backpressure turbine, and hot dry rock concepts do not seem to offer any cost advantage over the baseline technologies. If implemented, the next generation geothermal power plant concept may improve brine utilization but is unlikely to reduce the cost of power generation by much more than 10%. Colder resources will benefit more from the development of a next generation geothermal power plant than will hotter resources. All values presented in this study for plant cost and for busbar cost of power are relative numbers intended to allow an objective and meaningful comparison of technologies. The goal of this study is to assess various technologies on an common basis and, secondarily, to give an approximate idea of the current costs of the technologies at actual resource sites. Absolute costs at a given site will be determined by the specifics of a given pr

  16. Combined cycle power plant incorporating coal gasification

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Liljedahl, Gregory N. (Tariffville, CT); Moffat, Bruce K. (Simsbury, CT)

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A combined cycle power plant incorporating a coal gasifier as the energy source. The gases leaving the coal gasifier pass through a liquid couplant heat exchanger before being used to drive a gas turbine. The exhaust gases of the gas turbine are used to generate both high pressure and low pressure steam for driving a steam turbine, before being exhausted to the atmosphere.

  17. High efficiency carbonate fuel cell/turbine hybrid power cycle

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steinfeld, G.; Maru, H.C. [Energy Research Corp., Danbury, CT (United States); Sanderson, R.A. [Sanderson (Robert) and Associates, Wethersfield, CT (United States)

    1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The hybrid power cycle studies were conducted to identify a high efficiency, economically competitive system. A hybrid power cycle which generates power at an LHV efficiency > 70% was identified that includes an atmospheric pressure direct carbonate fuel cell, a gas turbine, and a steam cycle. In this cycle, natural gas fuel is mixed with recycled fuel cell anode exhaust, providing water for reforming fuel. The mixed gas then flows to a direct carbonate fuel cell which generates about 70% of the power. The portion of the anode exhaust which is not recycled is burned and heat transferred through a heat exchanger (HX) to the compressed air from a gas turbine. The heated compressed air is then heated further in the gas turbine burner and expands through the turbine generating 15% of the power. Half the exhaust from the turbine provides air for the anode exhaust burner. All of the turbine exhaust eventually flows through the fuel cell cathodes providing the O2 and CO2 needed in the electrochemical reaction. Exhaust from the cathodes flows to a steam system (heat recovery steam generator, staged steam turbine generating 15% of the cycle power). Simulation of a 200 MW plant with a hybrid power cycle had an LHV efficiency of 72.6%. Power output and efficiency are insensitive to ambient temperature, compared to a gas turbine combined cycle; NOx emissions are 75% lower. Estimated cost of electricity for 200 MW is 46 mills/kWh, which is competitive with combined cycle where fuel cost is > $5.8/MMBTU. Key requirement is HX; in the 200 MW plant studies, a HX operating at 1094 C using high temperature HX technology currently under development by METC for coal gassifiers was assumed. A study of a near term (20 MW) high efficiency direct carbonate fuel cell/turbine hybrid power cycle has also been completed.

  18. Proceedings of a Topical Meeting On Small Scale Geothermal Power Plants and Geothermal Power Plant Projects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    1986-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

    These proceedings describe the workshop of the Topical Meeting on Small Scale Geothermal Power Plants and Geothermal Power Plant Projects. The projects covered include binary power plants, rotary separator, screw expander power plants, modular wellhead power plants, inflow turbines, and the EPRI hybrid power system. Active projects versus geothermal power projects were described. In addition, a simple approach to estimating effects of fluid deliverability on geothermal power cost is described starting on page 119. (DJE-2005)

  19. SENSIBLE HEAT STORAGE FOR A SOLAR THERMAL POWER PLANT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baldwin, Thomas F.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    insure constant output from a solar power plant. However. aoutput from the steam turbines is maintained. Equipment design for the proposed solar power

  20. Demonstration of a Variable Phase Turbine Power System for Low...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Demonstration of a Variable Phase Turbine Power System for Low Temperature Geothermal Resources Demonstration of a Variable Phase Turbine Power System for Low Temperature...

  1. Turbines

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    CO2 Power Cycles Advanced Combustion Turbines Advanced Research University Turbine Systems Research SBIR Program Plan Project Portfolio Project Information Publications...

  2. Impact of Wind Power Plants on Voltage and Transient Stability of Power Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Muljadi, E.; Nguyen, Tony B.; Pai, M. A.

    2008-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    A standard three-machine, nine-bus wind power system is studied and augmented by a radially connected wind power plant that contains 22 wind turbine generators.

  3. Operating experience feedback report-reliability of safety-related steam turbine-driven standby pumps used in US commerical nuclear power plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boardman, J.R. [Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC (United States)

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Pump failure experience is collected by two primary means: (1) Licensee Event Reports, and (2) Nuclear Plant Reliability Data System failure reports. Certain safety-related turbine-driven standby pumps were identified by these data systems as experiencing significant ongoing repetitive failures of their turbine drivers, resulting in low reliability of the pump units. The root causes of identified failures were determined, and actions to preclude these repetitive failures were identified. 5 refs., 1 tab.

  4. A Wood-Fired Gas Turbine Plant

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Powell, S. H.; Hamrick, J. T.

    A WOOD-FIRED GAS TURBINE PLANT Sam H. Powell, Tennessee Valley Authority, Chattanooga, Tennessee Joseph T. Hamrick, Aerospace Research Corporation, RBS Electric, Roanoke, VA Abstract This paper covers the research and development of a wood...-fired gas turbine unit that is used for generating electricity. The system uses one large cyclonic combustor and a cyclone cleaning system in series to provide hot gases to drive an Allison T-56 aircraft engine (the industrial version is the 50l-k). A...

  5. PowerJet Wind Turbine Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bartlett, Raymond J

    2008-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

    PROJECT OBJECTIVE The PowerJet wind turbine overcomes problems characteristic of the small wind turbines that are on the market today by providing reliable output at a wide range of wind speeds, durability, silent operation at all wind speeds, and bird-safe operation. Prime Energyâ??s objective for this project was to design and integrate a generator with an electrical controller and mechanical controls to maximize the generation of electricity by its wind turbine. The scope of this project was to design, construct and test a mechanical back plate to control rotational speed in high winds, and an electronic controller to maximize power output and to assist the base plate in controlling rotational speed in high winds. The test model will continue to operate beyond the time frame of the project, with the ultimate goal of manufacturing and marketing the PowerJet worldwide. Increased Understanding of Electronic & Mechanical Controls Integrated With Electricity Generator The PowerJet back plate begins to open as wind speed exceeds 13.5 mps. The pressure inside the turbine and the turbine rotational speed are held constant. Once the back plate has fully opened at approximately 29 mps, the controller begins pulsing back to the generator to limit the rotational speed of the turbine. At a wind speed in excess of 29 mps, the controller shorts the generator and brings the turbine to a complete stop. As the wind speed subsides, the controller releases the turbine and it resumes producing electricity. Data collection and instrumentation problems prevented identification of the exact speeds at which these events occur. However, the turbine, controller and generator survived winds in excess of 36 mps, confirming that the two over-speed controls accomplished their purpose. Technical Effectiveness & Economic Feasibility Maximum Electrical Output The output of electricity is maximized by the integration of an electronic controller and mechanical over-speed controls designed and tested during the course of this project. The output exceeds that of the PowerJetâ??s 3-bladed counterparts (see Appendix). Durability All components of the PowerJet turbine assemblyâ??including the electronic and mechanical controls designed, manufactured and field tested during the course of this projectâ??proved to be durable through severe weather conditions, with constant operation and no interruption in energy production. Low Cost Materials for the turbine, generator, tower, charge controllers and ancillary parts are available at reasonable prices. Fabrication of these parts is also readily available worldwide. The cost of assembling and installing the turbine is reduced because it has fewer parts and requires less labor to manufacture and assemble, making it competitively priced compared with turbines of similar output manufactured in the U.S. and Europe. The electronic controller is the unique part to be included in the turbine package. The controllers can be manufactured in reasonably-sized production runs to keep the cost below $250 each. The data logger and 24 sensors are for research only and will be unnecessary for the commercial product. Benefit To Public The PowerJet wind-electric system is designed for distributed wind generation in 3 and 4 class winds. This wind turbine meets DOEâ??s requirements for a quiet, durable, bird-safe turbine that eventually can be deployed as a grid-connected generator in urban and suburban settings. Results As described more fully below and illustrated in the Appendices, the goals and objectives outlined in 2060 SOPO were fully met. Electronic and mechanical controls were successfully designed, manufactured and integrated with the generator. The turbine, tower, controllers and generators operated without incident throughout the test period, surviving severe winter and summer weather conditions such as extreme temperatures, ice and sustained high winds. The electronic controls were contained in weather-proof electrical boxes and the elec

  6. Arabelle: The most powerful steam turbine in the world

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lamarque, F.; Deloroix, V.

    1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    On the 30th of August 1996 at the CHOOZ power station in the Ardennes, the first 1,500 MW turbine was started up under nuclear steam and connected to the grid. It will reach full power in the spring of 1997, followed shortly afterwards by a second identical machine. This turbine, known as ARABELLE, is currently the most powerful in the world, with a single line rotating at 1,500 rpm. It has been entirely designed, manufactured and installed by the teams of GEC ALSTHOM, within the framework of the Electricite de France N4 PWR program. It represents a new type of nuclear turbine, the fruit of much research and development work which started in the 1980s. It benefits from GEC ALSTHOM's considerable experience in the field of nuclear turbines: 143 machines with a total power output of 100,000 MW and more than ten million hours of operation. It should be remembered that the first 1,000 MW unit for a PWR plant was connected at Fessenheim in 1977, and since then the different EDF plants have been equipped with 58 GEC ALSTHOM turbines, ranging from 1,000 MW to 1,350 MW, this providing the company with a vast amount of information. The process which led to a new design for ARABELLE was based on: Feedback of service experience from previous machines; this provides precious learning material with a view to improving the performance of operating equipment. Research and development work resulting in significant technical advances which could then be integrated into the design of a new generation of turbines. Taking account of the major concerns of the customer-user: Electricite de France (EDF): Improved reliability and operating availability, increased efficiency, reduced investment and maintenance costs.

  7. Energy Saving in Ammonia Plant by Using Gas Turbine

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Uji, S.; Ikeda, M.

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An ammonia plant, in which the IHI-SULZER Type 57 Gas Turbine is integrated in order to achieve energy saving, has started successful operation. Tile exhaust gas of the gas turbine has thermal energy of relatively high temperature, therefore...

  8. World electric power plants database

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    2006-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This global database provides records for 104,000 generating units in over 220 countries. These units include installed and projected facilities, central stations and distributed plants operated by utilities, independent power companies and commercial and self-generators. Each record includes information on: geographic location and operating company; technology, fuel and boiler; generator manufacturers; steam conditions; unit capacity and age; turbine/engine; architect/engineer and constructor; and pollution control equipment. The database is issued quarterly.

  9. Control of Wind Turbines for Power Regulation and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Control of Wind Turbines for Power Regulation and Load Reduction Juan Jose Garcia Quirante Kongens regulation and load reduction and their ensemble in a variable-speed wind turbine. The power regulation aspects of mathematical modelling of wind turbines, and especially the control methods suited for power

  10. Stochastic Analysis of Wind Turbine Power Curves Edgar Anahua

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peinke, Joachim

    of the wind turbine to its desired power production; and ii) the stochastic force (noise), whichStochastic Analysis of Wind Turbine Power Curves Edgar Anahua Oldenburg 2007 Zur Homepage der Dissertation #12;#12;Stochastic Analysis of Wind Turbine Power Curves Edgar Anahua Von der Fakult¨at f

  11. Small Power Plant Exemption (06-SPPE-1) Imperial County

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Small Power Plant Exemption (06-SPPE-1) Imperial County NILAND GAS TURBINE PLANT PRESIDINGMEMBER Member STANLEY VALKOSKY Chief Hearing Adviser GARRET SHEAN Hearing Officer Small Power Plant Exemption to construct and operate large electric power plants, including the authority to exempt proposals under 100 MW

  12. Severe environment turbine powered steerable motors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gaynor, T.M. [Neyrfor-Weir Ltd., Aberdeen (United Kingdom). Dept. of Operations

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Turbine powered downhole motors have advantages for high temperature, high pressure, sour gas or hard formation drilling which stem from turbodrill construction rather than metallurgy, and from their power characteristics. The first part of the paper will discuss this, and compare turbine and Moineau powered motors in this context. The introduction in the last three years of new bearing materials, hydraulic thrust balancing devices and high performance flexible couplings have extended turbodrill performance and reliability margins in severe environment drilling. It is perfecting feasible to build steerable motors capable of drilling for 250 hours in 6-in. hole at 200 degrees Celsius (392 degrees Fahrenheit) in a deviated high pressure well since the individual problems in this ``Well from Hell`` have successfully been overcome. The second part of the paper will illustrate this through field examples.

  13. NREL: News - NREL Study: Active Power Control of Wind Turbines...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    414 NREL Study: Active Power Control of Wind Turbines Can Improve Power Grid Reliability January 20, 2014 The Energy Department's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), along...

  14. Dynamic wind turbine models in power system simulation tool

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dynamic wind turbine models in power system simulation tool DIgSILENT Anca D. Hansen, Florin Iov Iov, Poul Sørensen, Nicolaos Cutululis, Clemens Jauch, Frede Blaabjerg Title: Dynamic wind turbine system simulation tool PowerFactory DIgSILENT for different wind turbine concepts. It is the second

  15. Combustion Gas Turbine Power Enhancement by Refrigeration of Inlet Air

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meher-Homji, C. B.; Mani, G.

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Combustion gas turbines have gained widespread acceptance for mechanical drive and power generation applications. One key drawback of a combustion turbine is that its specific output and thermal efficiency vary quite significantly with variations...

  16. Tutorial of Wind Turbine Control for Supporting Grid Frequency through Active Power Control: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aho, J.; Buckspan, A.; Laks, J.; Fleming, P.; Jeong, Y.; Dunne, F.; Churchfield, M.; Pao, L.; Johnson, K.

    2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As wind energy becomes a larger portion of the world's energy portfolio and wind turbines become larger and more expensive, wind turbine control systems play an ever more prominent role in the design and deployment of wind turbines. The goals of traditional wind turbine control systems are maximizing energy production while protecting the wind turbine components. As more wind generation is installed there is an increasing interest in wind turbines actively controlling their power output in order to meet power setpoints and to participate in frequency regulation for the utility grid. This capability will be beneficial for grid operators, as it seems possible that wind turbines can be more effective at providing some of these services than traditional power plants. Furthermore, establishing an ancillary market for such regulation can be beneficial for wind plant owner/operators and manufacturers that provide such services. In this tutorial paper we provide an overview of basic wind turbine control systems and highlight recent industry trends and research in wind turbine control systems for grid integration and frequency stability.

  17. Power Plant Cycling Costs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kumar, N.; Besuner, P.; Lefton, S.; Agan, D.; Hilleman, D.

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report provides a detailed review of the most up to date data available on power plant cycling costs. The primary objective of this report is to increase awareness of power plant cycling cost, the use of these costs in renewable integration studies and to stimulate debate between policymakers, system dispatchers, plant personnel and power utilities.

  18. Fast Verification of Wind Turbine Power Summary of Project Results

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fast Verification of Wind Turbine Power Curves: Summary of Project Results by: Cameron Brown ­ s equation on high frequency wind turbine measurement data sampled at one sample per second or more. The aim's Nordtank wind turbine at the Risø site, the practical application of this new method was tested

  19. Power Performance Test Report for the SWIFT Wind Turbine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mendoza, I.; Hur, J.

    2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes the results of a power performance test that NREL conducted on the SWIFT wind turbine. This test was conducted in accordance with the International Electrotechnical Commission's (IEC) standard, Wind Turbine Generator Systems Part 12: Power Performance Measurements of Electricity Producing Wind Turbines, IEC 61400-12-1 Ed.1.0, 2005-12. However, because the SWIFT is a small turbine as defined by IEC, NREL also followed Annex H that applies to small wind turbines. In these summary results, wind speed is normalized to sea-level air density.

  20. Operating experience of single cylinder steam turbine with 40 inch last blade applied for combined cycle plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kishimoto, Masaru; Yamamoto, Tetsuya [Mitsubishi Heavy Industries, Ltd., Yokohama (Japan); Yokota, Hiroshi [Mitsubishi Heavy Industries, Ltd., Nagasaki (Northern Mariana Islands); Umaya, Masahide [Mitsubishi Heavy Industries, Ltd., Takasago (Japan)

    1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Inquiries and orders for combined cycle plant have increased recently because of the better efficiency of combined cycle plant in comparison with the usual fossil fuel power plant. The typical features of the steam turbine for combined cycle plant are the lower inlet steam conditions and the more driving steam flow quantity compared with the steam turbine for usual fossil fuel plants. This paper introduces the design and results of operation about 122 MW single cylinder steam turbine. Furthermore, the results of periodical overhaul inspection carried out after one year`s commercial operation is also presented.

  1. NREL Small Wind Turbine Test Project: Mariah Power's Windspire Wind Turbine Test Chronology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huskey, A.; Forsyth, T.

    2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents a chronology of tests conducted at NREL's National Wind Technology Center on Mariah Power's Windspire 1.2-kW wind turbine and a letter of response from Mariah Power.

  2. Using Auxiliary Gas Power for CCS Energy Needs in Retrofitted Coal Power Plants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 Using Auxiliary Gas Power for CCS Energy Needs in Retrofitted Coal Power Plants by Sarah Bashadi and Policy Program #12;2 #12;3 Using Auxiliary Gas Power for CCS Energy Needs in Retrofitted Coal Power, a significant amount of excess power was produced using both gas turbine configurations. This excess power could

  3. EFFECT OF PITCH CONTROL AND POWER CONDITIONING ON POWER QUALITY OF VARIABLE SPEED WIND TURBINE GENERATORS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    EFFECT OF PITCH CONTROL AND POWER CONDITIONING ON POWER QUALITY OF VARIABLE SPEED WIND TURBINE), Curtin University of Technology, WA Abstract: Variable speed wind turbine generators provide the opportunity to capture more power than fixed speed turbines. However the variable speed machine output can

  4. Application of the Concept of Exergy in the Selection of a Gas-Turbine Engine for Combined-Cycle Power Plant Design

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, F. F.; Naumowicz, T.

    It has been shown that the second-law efficiency of a gas-turbine engine may be calculated in a rational and simple manner by making use of an algebraic equation giving the exergy content of turbine exhaust as a function of exhaust temperature only...

  5. Wind Turbine Generator System Power Performance Test Report for the Entegrity EW50 Wind Turbine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, J.; Huskey, A.; Jager, D.; Hur, J.

    2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Report on the results of the power performance test that the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) conducted on Entegrity Wind System Inc.'s EW50 small wind turbine.

  6. CONCEPTUAL STUDIES OF A FUEL-FLEXIBLE LOW-SWIRL COMBUSTION SYSTEM FOR THE GAS TURBINE IN CLEAN COAL POWER PLANTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, K.O.; Littlejohn, David; Therkelsen, Peter; Cheng, Robert K.; Ali, S.

    2009-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper reports the results of preliminary analyses that show the feasibility of developing a fuel flexible (natural gas, syngas and high-hydrogen fuel) combustion system for IGCC gas turbines. Of particular interest is the use of Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory's DLN low swirl combustion technology as the basis for the IGCC turbine combustor. Conceptual designs of the combustion system and the requirements for the fuel handling and delivery circuits are discussed. The analyses show the feasibility of a multi-fuel, utility-sized, LSI-based, gas turbine engine. A conceptual design of the fuel injection system shows that dual parallel fuel circuits can provide range of gas turbine operation in a configuration consistent with low pollutant emissions. Additionally, several issues and challenges associated with the development of such a system, such as flashback and auto-ignition of the high-hydrogen fuels, are outlined.

  7. Combining Droop Curve Concepts with Control Systems for Wind Turbine Active Power Control: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Buckspan, A.; Aho, J.; Pao, L.; Fleming, P.; Jeong, Y.

    2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Wind energy is becoming a larger portion of the global energy portfolio and wind penetration has increased dramatically in certain regions of the world. This increasing wind penetration has driven the need for wind turbines to provide active power control (APC) services to the local utility grid, as wind turbines do not intrinsically provide frequency regulation services that are common with traditional generators. It is common for large scale wind turbines to be decoupled from the utility grid via power electronics, which allows the turbine to synthesize APC commands via control of the generator torque and blade pitch commands. Consequently, the APC services provided by a wind turbine can be more flexible than those provided by conventional generators. This paper focuses on the development and implementation of both static and dynamic droop curves to measure grid frequency and output delta power reference signals to a novel power set point tracking control system. The combined droop curve and power tracking controller is simulated and comparisons are made between simulations using various droop curve parameters and stochastic wind conditions. The tradeoffs involved with aggressive response to frequency events are analyzed. At the turbine level, simulations are performed to analyze induced structural loads. At the grid level, simulations test a wind plant's response to a dip in grid frequency.

  8. SHORT TERM PREDICTIONS FOR THE POWER OUTPUT OF ENSEMBLES OF WIND TURBINES AND PV-GENERATORS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heinemann, Detlev

    SHORT TERM PREDICTIONS FOR THE POWER OUTPUT OF ENSEMBLES OF WIND TURBINES AND PV-GENERATORS Hans. For the conventional power park, the power production of the wind turbines presents a fluctuating 'negative load PRODUCTION OF WIND TURBINES For the forecast of the power production of wind turbines two approaches may

  9. BIOMASS GASIFICATION AND POWER GENERATION USING ADVANCED GAS TURBINE SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David Liscinsky

    2002-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

    A multidisciplined team led by the United Technologies Research Center (UTRC) and consisting of Pratt & Whitney Power Systems (PWPS), the University of North Dakota Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC), KraftWork Systems, Inc. (kWS), and the Connecticut Resource Recovery Authority (CRRA) has evaluated a variety of gasified biomass fuels, integrated into advanced gas turbine-based power systems. The team has concluded that a biomass integrated gasification combined-cycle (BIGCC) plant with an overall integrated system efficiency of 45% (HHV) at emission levels of less than half of New Source Performance Standards (NSPS) is technically and economically feasible. The higher process efficiency in itself reduces consumption of premium fuels currently used for power generation including those from foreign sources. In addition, the advanced gasification process can be used to generate fuels and chemicals, such as low-cost hydrogen and syngas for chemical synthesis, as well as baseload power. The conceptual design of the plant consists of an air-blown circulating fluidized-bed Advanced Transport Gasifier and a PWPS FT8 TwinPac{trademark} aeroderivative gas turbine operated in combined cycle to produce {approx}80 MWe. This system uses advanced technology commercial products in combination with components in advanced development or demonstration stages, thereby maximizing the opportunity for early implementation. The biofueled power system was found to have a levelized cost of electricity competitive with other new power system alternatives including larger scale natural gas combined cycles. The key elements are: (1) An Advanced Transport Gasifier (ATG) circulating fluid-bed gasifier having wide fuel flexibility and high gasification efficiency; (2) An FT8 TwinPac{trademark}-based combined cycle of approximately 80 MWe; (3) Sustainable biomass primary fuel source at low cost and potentially widespread availability-refuse-derived fuel (RDF); (4) An overall integrated system that exceeds the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) goal of 40% (HHV) efficiency at emission levels well below the DOE suggested limits; and (5) An advanced biofueled power system whose levelized cost of electricity can be competitive with other new power system alternatives.

  10. Design Of Hydel Power Plant At Mid- Pennar Reservoir

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. Nagendra; Dr. G. Prasanthi

    Micro-hydro-electric power is both an efficient and reliable form of clean source of renewable energy. It can be an excellent method of harnessing renewable energy from small rivers and streams. The micro-hydro project designed to be a run-of-river type, because it requires very little or no reservoir in order to power the turbine. The water will run straight through the turbine and back into the river or stream to use it for the other purposes. This has a minimal environmental impact on the local ecosystem. The design procedure of micro-hydro power plant was implemented practically. The choice of the turbine type depending mainly on the site head and flow rate. The turbine power and speed were directly proportional with the site head, but there were specific points for maximum turbine power and speed with the variation of the site water flow rate. The head losses in the penstock could range from 5 to 10 percent of the gross head, depending on the length of the penstock, quantity of water flow rate and its velocity. The turbine efficiency could range from 80 to 95 percent depending on the turbine type, and the generator efficiency about 90 percent. The design study showed that construction of micro-hydroelectric project was feasible in the project site and there were no major problems apparent at the design and implementation stages of the micro-hydro-electric power plant.

  11. Diode laser measurement of H?O, CO?, and temperature in gas turbine exhaust through the application of wavelength modulation spectroscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leon, Marco E.

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    sensor for measurements of gas turbine exhaust temperature."O, CO 2 , and Temperature in Gas Turbine Exhaust through theview of UCSD power plant gas turbine systems 31

  12. Impact of Increasing Distributed Wind Power and Wind Turbine Siting on Rural Distribution Feeder Voltage Profiles: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Allen, A.; Zhang, Y. C.; Hodge, B. M.

    2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Many favorable wind energy resources in North America are located in remote locations without direct access to the transmission grid. Building transmission lines to connect remotely-located wind power plants to large load centers has become a barrier to increasing wind power penetration in North America. By connecting utility-sized megawatt-scale wind turbines to the distribution system, wind power supplied to consumers could be increased greatly. However, the impact of including megawatt-scale wind turbines on distribution feeders needs to be studied. The work presented here examined the impact that siting and power output of megawatt-scale wind turbines have on distribution feeder voltage. This is the start of work to present a general guide to megawatt-scale wind turbine impact on the distribution feeder and finding the amount of wind power that can be added without adversely impacting the distribution feeder operation, reliability, and power quality.

  13. Documentation, User Support, and Verification of Wind Turbine and Plant Models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robert Zavadil; Vadim Zheglov; Yuriy Kazachkov; Bo Gong; Juan Sanchez; Jun Li

    2012-09-18T23:59:59.000Z

    As part of the Utility Wind Energy Integration Group (UWIG) and EnerNex's Wind Turbine Modeling Project, EnerNex has received ARRA (federal stimulus) funding through the Department of Energy (DOE) to further the progress of wind turbine and wind plant models. Despite the large existing and planned wind generation deployment, industry-standard models for wind generation have not been formally adopted. Models commonly provided for interconnection studies are not adequate for use in general transmission planning studies, where public, non-proprietary, documented and validated models are needed. NERC MOD (North American Electric Reliability Corporation) reliability standards require that power flow and dynamics models be provided, in accordance with regional requirements and procedures. The goal of this project is to accelerate the appropriate use of generic wind turbine models for transmission network analysis by: (1) Defining proposed enhancements to the generic wind turbine model structures that would allow representation of more advanced; (2) Comparative testing of the generic models against more detailed (and sometimes proprietary) versions developed by turbine vendors; (3) Developing recommended parameters for the generic models to best mimic the performance of specific commercial wind turbines; (4) Documenting results of the comparative simulations in an application guide for users; (5) Conducting technology transfer activities in regional workshops for dissemination of knowledge and information gained, and to engage electric power and wind industry personnel in the project while underway; (6) Designing of a "living" homepage to establish an online resource for transmission planners.

  14. PRESSURIZED SOLID OXIDE FUEL CELL/GAS TURBINE POWER SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    W.L. Lundberg; G.A. Israelson; R.R. Moritz (Rolls-Royce Allison); S.E. Veyo; R.A. Holmes; P.R. Zafred; J.E. King; R.E. Kothmann (Consultant)

    2000-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Power systems based on the simplest direct integration of a pressurized solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) generator and a gas turbine (GT) are capable of converting natural gas fuel energy to electric power with efficiencies of approximately 60% (net AC/LHV), and more complex SOFC and gas turbine arrangements can be devised for achieving even higher efficiencies. The results of a project are discussed that focused on the development of a conceptual design for a pressurized SOFC/GT power system that was intended to generate 20 MWe with at least 70% efficiency. The power system operates baseloaded in a distributed-generation application. To achieve high efficiency, the system integrates an intercooled, recuperated, reheated gas turbine with two SOFC generator stages--one operating at high pressure, and generating power, as well as providing all heat needed by the high-pressure turbine, while the second SOFC generator operates at a lower pressure, generates power, and provides all heat for the low-pressure reheat turbine. The system cycle is described, major system components are sized, the system installed-cost is estimated, and the physical arrangement of system components is discussed. Estimates of system power output, efficiency, and emissions at the design point are also presented, and the system cost of electricity estimate is developed.

  15. New geothermal power plants in Azores and Kenya

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tahara, M.

    1981-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Two geothermal power plants were recently completed. One is 3 MW unit in Azores and another is 15 MW unit in Kenya. Both plants have very simple construction. For Azores, a packaged portable turbine generator is adopted to save the cost and installation term. 15 MW Olkaria plant which is adopted single flash cycle has produced first electricity by the geothermal energy in Africa. This turbine generator has been installed on a steel foundation. Special site conditions have been taken into consideration and both plants are successfully running with certification of the suitable design concept.

  16. GEOTHERMAL POWER GENERATION PLANT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boyd, Tonya

    2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Oregon Institute of Technology (OIT) drilled a deep geothermal well on campus (to 5,300 feet deep) which produced 196oF resource as part of the 2008 OIT Congressionally Directed Project. OIT will construct a geothermal power plant (estimated at 1.75 MWe gross output). The plant would provide 50 to 75 percent of the electricity demand on campus. Technical support for construction and operations will be provided by OITs Geo-Heat Center. The power plant will be housed adjacent to the existing heat exchange building on the south east corner of campus near the existing geothermal production wells used for heating campus. Cooling water will be supplied from the nearby cold water wells to a cooling tower or air cooling may be used, depending upon the type of plant selected. Using the flow obtained from the deep well, not only can energy be generated from the power plant, but the waste water will also be used to supplement space heating on campus. A pipeline will be construction from the well to the heat exchanger building, and then a discharge line will be construction around the east and north side of campus for anticipated use of the waste water by facilities in an adjacent sustainable energy park. An injection well will need to be drilled to handle the flow, as the campus existing injection wells are limited in capacity.

  17. Virginia Nuclear Profile - Power Plants

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net...

  18. Ohio Nuclear Profile - Power Plants

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Ohio nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net...

  19. Arkansas Nuclear Profile - Power Plants

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net...

  20. Michigan Nuclear Profile - Power Plants

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net...

  1. California Nuclear Profile - Power Plants

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    California nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State...

  2. Alabama Nuclear Profile - Power Plants

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net...

  3. Texas Nuclear Profile - Power Plants

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net...

  4. Pennsylvania Nuclear Profile - Power Plants

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Pennsylvania nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State...

  5. Tennessee Nuclear Profile - Power Plants

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Tennessee nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear...

  6. Georgia Nuclear Profile - Power Plants

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net...

  7. Nebraska Nuclear Profile - Power Plants

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Nebraska nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear...

  8. Arizona Nuclear Profile - Power Plants

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net...

  9. Connecticut Nuclear Profile - Power Plants

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Connecticut nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State...

  10. Maryland Nuclear Profile - Power Plants

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net...

  11. Illinois Nuclear Profile - Power Plants

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Illinois nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear...

  12. Florida Nuclear Profile - Power Plants

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Florida nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear...

  13. Wisconsin Nuclear Profile - Power Plants

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Wisconsin nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear...

  14. Minnesota Nuclear Profile - Power Plants

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Minnesota nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear...

  15. Nuclear Power Plant Design Project

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nuclear Power Plant Design Project A Response to the Environmental and Economic Challenge Of Global.............................................................................................................. 4 3. Assessment of the Issues and Needs for a New Plant

  16. Comparative Assessment of Coal-and Natural Gas-fired Power Plants under a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Comparative Assessment of Coal- and Natural Gas-fired Power Plants under a CO2 Emission Performance standard (EPS) for pulverized coal (PC) and natural gas combined cycle (NGCC) power plants; · Evaluate% · Natural Gas-fired Power Plant: Adv. 7F Gas Turbine Capacity Factor 75% · Cost Basis: 2007$, constant 7

  17. Energy harvesting to power sensing hardware onboard wind turbine blade

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carlson, Clinton P [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Schichting, Alexander D [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Quellette, Scott [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Faringolt, Kevin M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Park, Gyuhae [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Wind turbines are becoming a larger source of renewable energy in the United States. However, most of the designs are geared toward the weather conditions seen in Europe. Also, in the United States, manufacturers have been increasing the length of the turbine blades, often made of composite materials, to maximize power output. As a result of the more severe loading conditions in the United States and the material level flaws in composite structures, blade failure has been a more common occurrence in the U.S. than in Europe. Therefore, it is imperative that a structural health monitoring system be incorporated into the design of the wind turbines in order to monitor flaws before they lead to a catastrophic failure. Due to the rotation of the turbine and issues related to lightning strikes, the best way to implement a structural health monitoring system would be to use a network of wireless sensor nodes. In order to provide power to these sensor nodes, piezoelectric, thermoelectric and photovoltaic energy harvesting techniques are examined on a cross section of a CX-100 wind turbine blade in order to determine the feasibility of powering individual nodes that would compose the sensor network.

  18. System Definition and Analysis: Power Plant Design and Layout

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This is the Topical report for Task 6.0, Phase 2 of the Advanced Turbine Systems (ATS) Program. The report describes work by Westinghouse and the subcontractor, Gilbert/Commonwealth, in the fulfillment of completing Task 6.0. A conceptual design for critical and noncritical components of the gas fired combustion turbine system was completed. The conceptual design included specifications for the flange to flange gas turbine, power plant components, and balance of plant equipment. The ATS engine used in the conceptual design is an advanced 300 MW class combustion turbine incorporating many design features and technologies required to achieve ATS Program goals. Design features of power plant equipment and balance of plant equipment are described. Performance parameters for these components are explained. A site arrangement and electrical single line diagrams were drafted for the conceptual plant. ATS advanced features include design refinements in the compressor, inlet casing and scroll, combustion system, airfoil cooling, secondary flow systems, rotor and exhaust diffuser. These improved features, integrated with prudent selection of power plant and balance of plant equipment, have provided the conceptual design of a system that meets or exceeds ATS program emissions, performance, reliability-availability-maintainability, and cost goals.

  19. LIFE Power Plant Fusion Power Associates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    LIFE Power Plant Fusion Power Associates December 14, 2011 Mike Dunne LLNL #12;NIf-1111-23714.ppt LIFE power plant 2 #12;LIFE delivery timescale NIf-1111-23714.ppt 3 #12;Timely delivery is enabled dpa) Removes ion threat and mitigates x-ray threat allows simple steel piping No need

  20. Wind Power Plant Voltage Stability Evaluation: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Muljadi, E.; Zhang, Y. C.

    2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Voltage stability refers to the ability of a power system to maintain steady voltages at all buses in the system after being subjected to a disturbance from a given initial operating condition. Voltage stability depends on a power system's ability to maintain and/or restore equilibrium between load demand and supply. Instability that may result occurs in the form of a progressive fall or rise of voltages of some buses. Possible outcomes of voltage instability are the loss of load in an area or tripped transmission lines and other elements by their protective systems, which may lead to cascading outages. The loss of synchronism of some generators may result from these outages or from operating conditions that violate a synchronous generator's field current limit, or in the case of variable speed wind turbine generator, the current limits of power switches. This paper investigates the impact of wind power plants on power system voltage stability by using synchrophasor measurements.

  1. Xi an Nordex Wind Turbine Co Ltd aka Xi an Weide Wind Power Equipment...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Wind Turbine Co Ltd aka Xi an Weide Wind Power Equipment Co Ltd Jump to: navigation, search Name: Xi'an Nordex Wind Turbine Co Ltd (aka Xi'an Weide Wind Power Equipment Co Ltd)...

  2. Ancillary Frequency Control of Direct Drive Full-Scale Converter Based Wind Power Plants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Zhe

    presents a simulation model of a wind power plant based on a MW-level variable speed wind turbineAncillary Frequency Control of Direct Drive Full-Scale Converter Based Wind Power Plants Weihao Hu with a full-scale back-to-back power converter developed in the simulation tool of DIgSILENT Power Factory

  3. Hybrid solar central receiver for combined cycle power plant

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bharathan, D.; Bohn, M.S.; Williams, T.A.

    1995-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

    A hybrid combined cycle power plant is described including a solar central receiver for receiving solar radiation and converting it to thermal energy. The power plant includes a molten salt heat transfer medium for transferring the thermal energy to an air heater. The air heater uses the thermal energy to preheat the air from the compressor of the gas cycle. The exhaust gases from the gas cycle are directed to a steam turbine for additional energy production. 1 figure.

  4. Hybrid solar central receiver for combined cycle power plant

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bharathan, Desikan (Lakewood, CO); Bohn, Mark S. (Golden, CO); Williams, Thomas A. (Arvada, CO)

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A hybrid combined cycle power plant including a solar central receiver for receiving solar radiation and converting it to thermal energy. The power plant includes a molten salt heat transfer medium for transferring the thermal energy to an air heater. The air heater uses the thermal energy to preheat the air from the compressor of the gas cycle. The exhaust gases from the gas cycle are directed to a steam turbine for additional energy production.

  5. EA-1857: Wind Turbine Power Generation Complex at Idaho National Laboratory

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EA would evaluate the environmental impacts of the proposed wind turbine power generation complex at Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho.

  6. Analyzing Effects of Turbulence on Power Generation Using Wind Plant Monitoring Data: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, J.; Chowdhury, S.; Hodge, B. M.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper, a methodology is developed to analyze how ambient and wake turbulence affects the power generation of a single wind turbine within an array of turbines. Using monitoring data from a wind power plant, we selected two sets of wind and power data for turbines on the edge of the wind plant that resemble (i) an out-of-wake scenario (i.e., when the turbine directly faces incoming winds) and (ii) an in-wake scenario (i.e., when the turbine is under the wake of other turbines). For each set of data, two surrogate models were then developed to represent the turbine power generation (i) as a function of the wind speed; and (ii) as a function of the wind speed and turbulence intensity. Support vector regression was adopted for the development of the surrogate models. Three types of uncertainties in the turbine power generation were also investigated: (i) the uncertainty in power generation with respect to the published/reported power curve, (ii) the uncertainty in power generation with respect to the estimated power response that accounts for only mean wind speed; and (iii) the uncertainty in power generation with respect to the estimated power response that accounts for both mean wind speed and turbulence intensity. Results show that (i) under the same wind conditions, the turbine generates different power between the in-wake and out-of-wake scenarios, (ii) a turbine generally produces more power under the in-wake scenario than under the out-of-wake scenario, (iii) the power generation is sensitive to turbulence intensity even when the wind speed is greater than the turbine rated speed, and (iv) there is relatively more uncertainty in the power generation under the in-wake scenario than under the out-of-wake scenario.

  7. Cycle Analysis on Ocean Geothermal Power Generation using Multi-staged Turbine

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cycle Analysis on Ocean Geothermal Power Generation using Multi-staged Turbine 2013. 09. 11 Korea ORC #12;Cycle simulation Solver : HYSYS Basic simulation design T-S diagram Pump Turbine Evaporator & turbine : iso-entropic process Pump Turbine Evaporator Condenser 4 1 2 3 Geothermal water Deep seawater

  8. Real-Time Wind Turbine Emulator Suitable for Power Quality and Dynamic Control Studies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lehn, Peter W.

    1 Real-Time Wind Turbine Emulator Suitable for Power Quality and Dynamic Control Studies Dale S. L. Dolan, Student Member, IEEE, P. W. Lehn, Member IEEE Abstract-- Wind turbines are increasingly becoming-time Wind Turbine Emulator, which emulates the dynamic torque produced by an actual turbine has been

  9. Individual Pitch Control for Mitigation of Power Fluctuation of Variable Speed Wind Turbines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hu, Weihao

    Individual Pitch Control for Mitigation of Power Fluctuation of Variable Speed Wind Turbines, China mcheng@seu.edu.cn Abstract-- Grid connected wind turbines are the sources of power fluctuations presents an individual pitch control (IPC) strategy to mitigate the wind turbine power fluctuation at both

  10. Power optimization of wind turbines with data mining and evolutionary computation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kusiak, Andrew

    Power optimization of wind turbines with data mining and evolutionary computation Andrew Kusiak July 2009 Accepted 25 August 2009 Available online 17 September 2009 Keywords: Wind turbine Data mining for maximization of the power produced by wind turbines is presented. The power optimization objective

  11. Ris-R-Report Multi-MW wind turbine power curve

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Risø-R-Report Multi-MW wind turbine power curve measurements using remote sensing instruments Wagner, Michael Courtney Title: Multi-MW wind turbine power curve measurements using remote sensing (max. 2000 char.): Power curve measurement for large wind turbines requires taking into account more

  12. Hybrid Fuel Cell / Gas Turbine Systems Auxiliary Power Unit

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mease, Kenneth D.

    Hybrid Fuel Cell / Gas Turbine Systems Auxiliary Power Unit Abstract Recent interest in fuel cell fuel cell (SOFC) and fuel processor models have been developed and incorporated into the Numerical performance with experimental data is presented to demonstrate model validity. Introduction Fuel cell

  13. Advances in steam turbine technology for the power generation industry. PWR-Volume 26

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moore, W.G. [ed.

    1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This is a collection of the papers on advances in steam turbine technology for the power generation industry presented at the 1994 International Joint Power Generation Conference. The topics include advances in steam turbine design, application of computational fluid dynamics to turbine aerodynamic design, life extension of fossil and nuclear powered steam turbine generators, solid particle erosion control technologies, and artificial intelligence, monitoring and diagnostics.

  14. CONSTRUCTION OF NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CONSTRUCTION OF NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS A Workshop on "NUCLEAR ENERGY RENAISSANCE" Addressing WAS DEEPLY INVOLVED IN ALMOST EVERY ASPECT OF BUILDING THE PLANTS THROUGH Quality Assurance Nuclear IN CONSTRUCTION OF ST. LUCIE-2 #12;LESSONS LEARNED FROM St. Lucie-2 NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS CAN BE BUILT

  15. Method of optimizing performance of Rankine cycle power plants

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pope, William L. (Walnut Creek, CA); Pines, Howard S. (El Cerrito, CA); Doyle, Padraic A. (Oakland, CA); Silvester, Lenard F. (Richmond, CA)

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for efficiently operating a Rankine cycle power plant (10) to maximize fuel utilization efficiency or energy conversion efficiency or minimize costs by selecting a turbine (22) fluid inlet state which is substantially in the area adjacent and including the transposed critical temperature line (46).

  16. Understanding Inertial and Frequency Response of Wind Power Plants: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Muljadi, E.; Gevorgian, V.; Singh, M.; Santoso, S.

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this paper is to analyze and quantify the inertia and frequency responses of wind power plants with different wind turbine technologies (particularly those of fixed speed, variable slip with rotor-resistance controls, and variable speed with vector controls).

  17. Advanced Power Plant Development and Analysis Methodologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    A.D. Rao; G.S. Samuelsen; F.L. Robson; B. Washom; S.G. Berenyi

    2006-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Under the sponsorship of the U.S. Department of Energy/National Energy Technology Laboratory, a multi-disciplinary team led by the Advanced Power and Energy Program of the University of California at Irvine is defining the system engineering issues associated with the integration of key components and subsystems into advanced power plant systems with goals of achieving high efficiency and minimized environmental impact while using fossil fuels. These power plant concepts include 'Zero Emission' power plants and the 'FutureGen' H2 co-production facilities. The study is broken down into three phases. Phase 1 of this study consisted of utilizing advanced technologies that are expected to be available in the 'Vision 21' time frame such as mega scale fuel cell based hybrids. Phase 2 includes current state-of-the-art technologies and those expected to be deployed in the nearer term such as advanced gas turbines and high temperature membranes for separating gas species and advanced gasifier concepts. Phase 3 includes identification of gas turbine based cycles and engine configurations suitable to coal-based gasification applications and the conceptualization of the balance of plant technology, heat integration, and the bottoming cycle for analysis in a future study. Also included in Phase 3 is the task of acquiring/providing turbo-machinery in order to gather turbo-charger performance data that may be used to verify simulation models as well as establishing system design constraints. The results of these various investigations will serve as a guide for the U. S. Department of Energy in identifying the research areas and technologies that warrant further support.

  18. Advanced Power Plant Development and Analyses Methodologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    G.S. Samuelsen; A.D. Rao

    2006-02-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Under the sponsorship of the U.S. Department of Energy/National Energy Technology Laboratory, a multi-disciplinary team led by the Advanced Power and Energy Program of the University of California at Irvine is defining the system engineering issues associated with the integration of key components and subsystems into advanced power plant systems with goals of achieving high efficiency and minimized environmental impact while using fossil fuels. These power plant concepts include ''Zero Emission'' power plants and the ''FutureGen'' H{sub 2} co-production facilities. The study is broken down into three phases. Phase 1 of this study consisted of utilizing advanced technologies that are expected to be available in the ''Vision 21'' time frame such as mega scale fuel cell based hybrids. Phase 2 includes current state-of-the-art technologies and those expected to be deployed in the nearer term such as advanced gas turbines and high temperature membranes for separating gas species and advanced gasifier concepts. Phase 3 includes identification of gas turbine based cycles and engine configurations suitable to coal-based gasification applications and the conceptualization of the balance of plant technology, heat integration, and the bottoming cycle for analysis in a future study. Also included in Phase 3 is the task of acquiring/providing turbo-machinery in order to gather turbo-charger performance data that may be used to verify simulation models as well as establishing system design constraints. The results of these various investigations will serve as a guide for the U. S. Department of Energy in identifying the research areas and technologies that warrant further support.

  19. E-Print Network 3.0 - advanced turbine power Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and the increased wind power penetration in power systems the main trend for modern wind turbines is clearly... variable speed operation and grid connection via ... Source: Ris...

  20. Louisiana Nuclear Profile - Power Plants

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Louisiana nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant NameTotal Reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear...

  1. Impact of DFIG wind turbines on transient stability of power systems a review

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pota, Himanshu Roy

    Impact of DFIG wind turbines on transient stability of power systems ­ a review Authors Na Abstract of wind farms are using variable speed wind turbines equipped with doubly-fed induction generators (DFIG) due to their advantages over other wind turbine generators. Therefore, the analysis of wind power

  2. Hydroelectric Power Plants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Purpose The Purpose

    Contents Purpose ..................... 1-1 1-1 Applicability .................. 1-2 1-1 References .................... 1-3 1-1 Limitations ................... 1-4 1-1 Contents ..................... 1-5 1-1 Design Procedures .............. 1-6 1-1 Other Design Information ......... 1-7 1-2 Deviations .................... 1-8 1-2 General Design Practices .......... 1-9 1-2 Safety Provisions ............... 1-10 1-2 Francis-Type Turbines ............ 2-2 2-1 Francis-Type Pump Turbines ....... 2-3 2-3 Kaplan-Type Turbines ............ 2-4 2-4 Turbine Considerations ........... 3-2 3-1 Handling Provisions ............. 3-3 3-1 Service Systems ................ 3-4 3-1 Considerations ................. 4-2 4-1 Penstock Shutoff Valves at the Valve Requirement ......... 5-2 5-1 Valve Selection ........... 5-3 5-1 Cranes .................. 6-2 6-1 Crane Lifting Accessories .... 6-3 6-6 Hoists .................. 6-4 6-8 Justification .............. 7-2 7-1 Loc

  3. A High Efficiency PSOFC/ATS-Gas Turbine Power System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    W.L. Lundberg; G.A. Israelson; M.D. Moeckel; S.E. Veyo; R.A. Holmes; P.R. Zafred; J.E. King; R.E. Kothmann

    2001-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A study is described in which the conceptual design of a hybrid power system integrating a pressurized Siemens Westinghouse solid oxide fuel cell generator and the Mercury{trademark} 50 gas turbine was developed. The Mercury{trademark} 50 was designed by Solar Turbines as part of the US. Department of Energy Advanced Turbine Systems program. The focus of the study was to develop the hybrid power system concept that principally would exhibit an attractively-low cost of electricity (COE). The inherently-high efficiency of the hybrid cycle contributes directly to achieving this objective, and by employing the efficient, power-intensive Mercury{trademark} 50, with its relatively-low installed cost, the higher-cost SOFC generator can be optimally sized such that the minimum-COE objective is achieved. The system cycle is described, major system components are specified, the system installed cost and COE are estimated, and the physical arrangement of the major system components is discussed. Estimates of system power output, efficiency, and emissions at the system design point are also presented. In addition, two bottoming cycle options are described, and estimates of their effects on overall-system performance, cost, and COE are provided.

  4. Power Plant Modeling and Simulation

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2010-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The National Energy Technology Laboratory's Office of Research and Development provides open source tools and expetise for modeling and simulating power plants and carbon sequestration technologies.

  5. Increased efficiency of topping cycle PCFB power plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robertson, A.; Domeracki, W.; Horazak, D. [and others

    1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Pressurized circulating fluidized bed (PCFB) power plants offer the power industry significantly increased efficiencies with reduced costs of electricity and lower emissions. When topping combustion is incorporated in the plant, these advantages are enhanced. In the plant, coal is fed to a pressurized carbonizer that produces a low-Btu fuel gas and char. After passing through a cyclone and ceramic barrier filter to remove gas-entrained particulates and a packed bed of emathelite pellets to remove alkali vapors. the fuel gas is burned in a topping combustor to produce the energy required to drive a gas turbine. The gas turbine drives a generator combustor, and a fluidized bed heat exchanger (FBHE). The carbonizer char is burned in the PCFB and the exhaust gas passes through its own cyclone, ceramic barrier filter, and alkali getter and supports combustion of the fuel gas in the topping combustor. Steam generated in a heat-recovery steam generator (HRSG) downstream of the gas turbine and in the FBHE associated with the PCFB drives the steam turbine generator that furnishes the balance of electric power delivered by the plant.

  6. Development of a PF Fired High Efficiency Power Plant (AD700)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Development of a PF Fired High Efficiency Power Plant (AD700) Rudolph Blum, Sven Kjr and Jrgen and nickel-based superalloys for the hottest sections of boilers, steam lines and turbines. Other targets were development of boiler and turbine designs for the more advanced conditions and finally economic

  7. Power control of a wind farm with active stall wind turbines and AC grid connection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Power control of a wind farm with active stall wind turbines and AC grid connection Anca D. Hansen1 controller for a wind farm made-up exclusively of active stall wind turbines with AC grid connection wind farm control involves both the control on wind turbine level as well as the central control

  8. Dynamic behaviour of a DFIG wind turbine subjected to power system faults

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of the dynamic interaction between variable speed DFIG wind turbines and the power system subjected by the Danish Transmission System Operator Energinet.dk. Keywords: doubly-fed induction generator (DFIG), wind turbines, the variable speed DFIG wind turbine with its dynamic behaviour and its ride-through capabil- ity

  9. The Use of Tall Tower Field Data for Estimating Wind Turbine Power Performance , J. Chapman1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Manuel, Lance

    The Use of Tall Tower Field Data for Estimating Wind Turbine Power Performance A. Swift1 , J wind speed measurements on the TTU WISE 200m and 78m towers. A hypothetical wind turbine is shown. At potential wind turbine sites, it is uncommon to have wind measurements available at multiple heights. Then

  10. Owners of nuclear power plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hudson, C.R.; White, V.S.

    1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Commercial nuclear power plants in this country can be owned by a number of separate entities, each with varying ownership proportions. Each of these owners may, in turn, have a parent/subsidiary relationship to other companies. In addition, the operator of the plant may be a different entity as well. This report provides a compilation on the owners/operators for all commercial power reactors in the United States. While the utility industry is currently experiencing changes in organizational structure which may affect nuclear plant ownership, the data in this report is current as of July 1996. The report is divided into sections representing different aspects of nuclear plant ownership.

  11. Power Electronics and Controls for Wind Turbine F. Blaabjerg, F. Iov, Z. Chen, K. Ma

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Zhe

    was in the beginning based on a squirrel-cage induction generator connected directly to the grid. Power pulsations technologies used in wind turbine systems. I. INTRODUCTION In classical power systems, large power generation such as wind turbines, wave generators, photovoltaic (PV) generators, small hydro, fuel cells and gas

  12. Massachusetts Nuclear Profile - Power Plants

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    (percent)","Owner" "Pilgrim Nuclear Power Station Unit 1",685,"5,918",100.0,"Entergy Nuclear Generation Co" "1 Plant 1 Reactor",685,"5,918",100.0 "Note: Totals may not equal...

  13. GEOTHERMAL POWER GENERATION PLANT | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    POWER GENERATION PLANT GEOTHERMAL POWER GENERATION PLANT Project objectives: Drilling a deep geothermal well on the Oregon Institute of Technology campus, Klamath Falls,...

  14. Power Quality Aspects in a Wind Power Plant: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Muljadi, E.; Butterfield, C. P.; Chacon, J.; Romanowitz, H.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Although many operational aspects affect wind power plant operation, this paper focuses on power quality. Because a wind power plant is connected to the grid, it is very important to understand the sources of disturbances that affect the power quality.

  15. 1. Introduction The efficiency of steam turbines can be improved by in-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cambridge, University of

    1. Introduction The efficiency of steam turbines can be improved by in- creasing the maximum-efficiency power plant. 2. Turbines, Steam, Efficiency and Power Plant A power plant has a steam generator which the operating pressure is below about 22 MPa, in which case the steam is separated and passed on to the turbine

  16. Power Plant Dams (Kansas)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This act states the provisions for erection and maintenance of dams. When any person, corporation or city may be desirous of erecting and maintaining a milldam or dam for generating power across...

  17. Multivariable Robust Control of a Simulated Hybrid Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Gas Turbine Plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tsai, Alex; Banta, Larry; Tucker, D.A.; Gemmen, R.S.

    2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents a systematic approach to the multivariable robust control of a hybrid fuel cell gas turbine plant. The hybrid configuration under investigation comprises a physical simulation of a 300kW fuel cell coupled to a 120kW auxiliary power unit single spool gas turbine. The facility provides for the testing and simulation of different fuel cell models that in turn help identify the key issues encountered in the transient operation of such systems. An empirical model of the facility consisting of a simulated fuel cell cathode volume and balance of plant components is derived via frequency response data. Through the modulation of various airflow bypass valves within the hybrid configuration, Bode plots are used to derive key input/output interactions in Transfer Function format. A multivariate system is then built from individual transfer functions, creating a matrix that serves as the nominal plant in an H-Infinity robust control algorithm. The controllers main objective is to track and maintain hybrid operational constraints in the fuel cells cathode airflow, and the turbo machinery states of temperature and speed, under transient disturbances. This algorithm is then tested on a Simulink/MatLab platform for various perturbations of load and fuel cell heat effluence.

  18. Ris-R-1400(EN) Dynamic wind turbine models in power

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Risø-R-1400(EN) Dynamic wind turbine models in power system simulation tool DIgSILENT Anca D December 2003 #12;#12;Contents Preface 5 1 Introduction 6 2 Wind turbine modelling in DIgSILENT 7 2.1 Power converters 14 2.2.3 Transformer 16 2.3 DSL models of wind turbine in DIgSILENT 18 2.3.1 Initialisation issues

  19. Practitioner Perspectives Matter: Public Policy and Private Investment in the U.S. Electric Power Sector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barradale, Merrill Jones

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    a boom-bust cycle in wind power plant investment in the U.S.tax credit for wind turbine power plants is an ineffectivewind power and became comfortable with turbine technology and plant

  20. Optimization of wind turbine energy and power factor with an evolutionary computation algorithm

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kusiak, Andrew

    Optimization of wind turbine energy and power factor with an evolutionary computation algorithm the energy capture from the wind and enhance the quality of the power produced by the wind turbine, and harmonic distortion. As the generation of wind energy on an industrial scale is relatively new, the area

  1. The Estimated Global Ocean Wind Power Potential from QuikSCAT Observations, Accounting for Turbine

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zender, Charles

    The Estimated Global Ocean Wind Power Potential from QuikSCAT Observations, Accounting for Turbine: (949) 824-3256 Abstract For the first time, global ocean usable wind power is evaluated for modern offshore turbine characteristics including hub height, usable portion of the wind speed distri- bution

  2. Structural responses and power output of a wind turbine are strongly affected by the wind field acting on the wind turbine. Knowledge about the wind field and its

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    ABSTRACT Structural responses and power output of a wind turbine are strongly affected by the wind field acting on the wind turbine. Knowledge about the wind field and its variations is essential not only for designing, but also for cost-efficiently managing wind turbines. Wind field monitoring

  3. Fiberglass plastics in power plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kelley, D. [Ashland Performance Materials (United States)

    2007-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Fiberglass reinforced plastics (FRPs) are replacing metal in FGDs, stacks, tanks, cooling towers, piping and other plant components. The article documents the use of FRP in power plants since the 1970s. The largest volume of FRP in North American power plants is for stack liners and ductwork. Absorber vessel shells and internal components comprise the third largest use. The most common FRP absorber vessels are known as jet bubbling reactors (JBRs). One of the largest JBRs at a plant on the Ohio River removes 99% of sulphur dioxide from high sulphur coal flue gas. FRPs last twice as long as wood structures when used for cooling towers and require less maintenance. 1 tab., 2 photos.

  4. Reliable Gas Turbine Output: Attaining Temperature Independent Performance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neeley, J. E.; Patton, S.; Holder, F.

    RELIABLE GAS TURBINE OUTPUT; ATTAINING TEMPERATURE INDEPENDENT PERFORMANCE James E. Neeley, P.E. Power Plant Engineer Public Utility Commission of Texas Austin, Texas ABSTRACT Improvements in gas turbine efficiency, coupled... with dropping gas prices, has made gas turbines a popular choice of utilities to supply peaking as well as base load power in the form of combined cycle power plants. Today, because of the gas turbine's compactness, low maintenance, and high levels...

  5. Test Cases for Wind Power Plant Dynamic Models on Real-Time Digital Simulator: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Singh, M.; Muljadi, E.; Gevorgian, V.

    2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this paper is to present test cases for wind turbine generator and wind power plant models commonly used during commissioning of wind power plants to ensure grid integration compatibility. In this paper, different types of wind power plant models based on the Western Electricity Coordinating Council Wind Generator Modeling Group's standardization efforts are implemented on a real-time digital simulator, and different test cases are used to gauge their grid integration capability. The low-voltage ride through and reactive power support capability and limitations of wind turbine generators under different grid conditions are explored. Several types of transient events (e.g., symmetrical and unsymmetrical faults, frequency dips) are included in the test cases. The differences in responses from different types of wind turbine are discussed in detail.

  6. Researching power plant water recovery

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A range of projects supported by NETl under the Innovations for Existing Plant Program are investigating modifications to power plant cooling systems for reducing water loss, and recovering water from the flue gas and the cooling tower. This paper discusses two technologies showing particular promise condense water that is typically lost to evaporation, SPX technologies' Air2Air{sup trademark} condenses water from a cooling tower, while Lehigh University's process condenses water and acid in flue gas. 3 figs.

  7. State power plant productivity programs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1981-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The findings of a working group formed to review the status of efforts by utilities and utility regulators to increase the availability and reliability of generating units are presented. Representatives from nine state regulatory agencies, NRRI, and DOE, participated on the Working Group. The Federal government has been working cooperatively with utilities, utility organizations, and with regulators to encourage and facilitate improvements in power plant productivity. Cooperative projects undertaken with regulatory and energy commissions in California, Illinois, New York, Ohio, Texas, North Carolina and Mighigan are described. Following initiation of these cooperative projects, DOE funded a survey to determine which states were explicitly addressing power plant productivity through the regulatory process. The Working Group was formed following completion of this survey. The Working Group emphasized the need for those power plant productivity improvements which are cost effective. The cost effectiveness of proposed availability improvement projects should be determined within the context of opportunities for operating and capital improvements available to an entire utility. The Working Group also identified the need for: allowing for plant designs that have a higher construction cost, but are also more reliable; allowing for recovery and reducing recovery lags for productivity-related capital expenditures; identifying and reducing disincentives in the regulatory process; ascertaining that utilities have sufficient money available to undertake timely maintenance; and support of EPRI and NERC to develop a relevant and accurate national data base. The DOE views these as extremely important aspects of any regulatory program to improve power plant productivity.

  8. Designing Micro Wind Turbines for Portable Power Generation Francois Hogan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barthelat, Francois

    to the design of a wind turbine rotor. Number of blades The number of blades does not have a significant impact on the efficiency of a wind turbine. We have chosen a two blade design because of ease of fabrication in order) (2) This two blade micro wind turbine meets the optimal specifications to ensure good efficiency

  9. Solar thermionic power plant (II)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abou-Elfotouh, F.; Almassary, M.; Fatmi, H.

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    It has been shown that the geometric configuration of a central receiver solar electric power plant (SEPP) can be optimized for the high power density and concentration required for the operation of a thermionic converter. The working period of a Thermionic Diode Converter constructed on the top of a SEPP in Riyadh area is found to be 5 to 6 hours per day in winter and 6 to 8 hours in summer. 17 refs.

  10. Power Smoothing and Limitation Control of a PMSG-Based Marine Current Turbine under Swell Waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Power Smoothing and Limitation Control of a PMSG-Based Marine Current Turbine under Swell Waves la puissance maximale (MPPT) nécessiterait d'accélérer ou de décélérer fréquemment la turbine à par une turbine marine associée à un générateur synchrone à aimants permanents (GSAP). Un algorithme

  11. Oktober 26. 2009 Prediction of Load and Power Fluctuations from Wind Turbine

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and into the tangential direction of rotation of the wind turbine given by 1 0tan 2 2 0 (1.6) This is because a lidarOktober 26. 2009 Vers 003 Prediction of Load and Power Fluctuations from Wind Turbine Spinner for the fluctuating loads on the blade tip: The lift force on a section of a wind turbine's blade is given by the lift

  12. Power Transmission, Distribution and Plants

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Power Transmission, Distribution and Plants A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z Abdel-Aal, Radwan E. - Computer Engineering Department, King Fahd University of...

  13. Multivariable Robust Control of a Simulated Hybrid Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Gas Turbine Plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tsai A, Banta L, Tucker D

    2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This work presents a systematic approach to the multivariable robust control of a hybrid fuel cell gas turbine plant. The hybrid configuration under investigation built by the National Energy Technology Laboratory comprises a physical simulation of a 300kW fuel cell coupled to a 120kW auxiliary power unit single spool gas turbine. The public facility provides for the testing and simulation of different fuel cell models that in turn help identify the key difficulties encountered in the transient operation of such systems. An empirical model of the built facility comprising a simulated fuel cell cathode volume and balance of plant components is derived via frequency response data. Through the modulation of various airflow bypass valves within the hybrid configuration, Bode plots are used to derive key input/output interactions in transfer function format. A multivariate system is then built from individual transfer functions, creating a matrix that serves as the nominal plant in an H{sub {infinity}} robust control algorithm. The controllers main objective is to track and maintain hybrid operational constraints in the fuel cells cathode airflow, and the turbo machinery states of temperature and speed, under transient disturbances. This algorithm is then tested on a Simulink/MatLab platform for various perturbations of load and fuel cell heat effluence. As a complementary tool to the aforementioned empirical plant, a nonlinear analytical model faithful to the existing process and instrumentation arrangement is evaluated and designed in the Simulink environment. This parallel task intends to serve as a building block to scalable hybrid configurations that might require a more detailed nonlinear representation for a wide variety of controller schemes and hardware implementations.

  14. North Carolina Nuclear Profile - Power Plants

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Carolina nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear...

  15. New Jersey Nuclear Profile - Power Plants

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net...

  16. South Carolina Nuclear Profile - Power Plants

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    South Carolina nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State...

  17. New York Nuclear Profile - Power Plants

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net...

  18. Different Factors Affecting Short Circuit Behavior of a Wind Power Plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Muljadi, E.; Samaan, Nader A.; Gevorgian, Vahan; Li, Jun; Pasupulati, Subbaiah

    2013-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

    A wind power plant consists of a large number of turbines interconnected by underground cable. A pad-mount transformer at each turbine steps up the voltage from generating voltage (690 V) to a medium voltage (34.5 kV). All turbines in the plant are connected to the substation transformer where the voltage is stepped up to the transmission level. An important aspect of wind power plant (WPP) impact studies is to evaluate the short-circuit (SC) current contribution of the plant into the transmission network under different fault conditions. This task can be challenging to protection engineers due to the topology differences between different types of wind turbine generators (WTGs) and the conventional generating units. This paper investigates the short circuit behavior of a wind power plant for different types of faults. The impact of wind turbine types, the transformer configuration, and the reactive compensation capacitor will be investigated. The voltage response at different buses will be observed. Finally, the SC line currents will be presented along with its symmetrical components.

  19. Stresa, Italy, 26-28 April 2006 A SILICON-BASED MICRO GAS TURBINE ENGINE FOR POWER GENERATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Stresa, Italy, 26-28 April 2006 A SILICON-BASED MICRO GAS TURBINE ENGINE FOR POWER GENERATION X. C. Our research aims to develop a micro power generation systems based on micro gas turbine engine and a piezoelectric converter, as illustrated in Fig. 1 [6]. The micro gas turbine engine is composed of a centrifugal

  20. Partial Oxidation Gas Turbine for Power and Hydrogen Co-Production from Coal-Derived Fuel in Industrial Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joseph Rabovitser

    2009-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The report presents a feasibility study of a new type of gas turbine. A partial oxidation gas turbine (POGT) shows potential for really high efficiency power generation and ultra low emissions. There are two main features that distinguish a POGT from a conventional gas turbine. These are associated with the design arrangement and the thermodynamic processes used in operation. A primary design difference of the POGT is utilization of a non?catalytic partial oxidation reactor (POR) in place of a conventional combustor. Another important distinction is that a much smaller compressor is required, one that typically supplies less than half of the air flow required in a conventional gas turbine. From an operational and thermodynamic point of view a key distinguishing feature is that the working fluid, fuel gas provided by the OR, has a much higher specific heat than lean combustion products and more energy per unit mass of fluid can be extracted by the POGT expander than in the conventional systems. The POGT exhaust stream contains unreacted fuel that can be combusted in different bottoming ycle or used as syngas for hydrogen or other chemicals production. POGT studies include feasibility design for conversion a conventional turbine to POGT duty, and system analyses of POGT based units for production of power solely, and combined production of power and yngas/hydrogen for different applications. Retrofit design study was completed for three engines, SGT 800, SGT 400, and SGT 100, and includes: replacing the combustor with the POR, compressor downsizing for about 50% design flow rate, generator replacement with 60 90% ower output increase, and overall unit integration, and extensive testing. POGT performances for four turbines with power output up to 350 MW in POGT mode were calculated. With a POGT as the topping cycle for power generation systems, the power output from the POGT ould be increased up to 90% compared to conventional engine keeping hot section temperatures, pressures, and volumetric flows practically identical. In POGT mode, the turbine specific power (turbine net power per lb mass flow from expander exhaust) is twice the value of the onventional turbine. POGT based IGCC plant conceptual design was developed and major components have been identified. Fuel flexible fluid bed gasifier, and novel POGT unit are the key components of the 100 MW IGCC plant for co producing electricity, hydrogen and/or yngas. Plant performances were calculated for bituminous coal and oxygen blown versions. Various POGT based, natural gas fueled systems for production of electricity only, coproduction of electricity and hydrogen, and co production of electricity and syngas for gas to liquid and hemical processes were developed and evaluated. Performance calculations for several versions of these systems were conducted. 64.6 % LHV efficiency for fuel to electricity in combined cycle was achieved. Such a high efficiency arise from using of syngas from POGT exhaust s a fuel that can provide required temperature level for superheated steam generation in HRSG, as well as combustion air preheating. Studies of POGT materials and combustion instabilities in POR were conducted and results reported. Preliminary market assessment was performed, and recommendations for POGT systems applications in oil industry were defined. POGT technology is ready to proceed to the engineering prototype stage, which is recommended.

  1. Distributed Low-Complexity Controller for Wind Power Plant in Derated Benjamin Biegel Daria Madjidian Vedrana Spudic Anders Rantzer Jakob Stoustrup

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Distributed Low-Complexity Controller for Wind Power Plant in Derated Operation Benjamin Biegel Daria Madjidian Vedrana Spudi´c Anders Rantzer Jakob Stoustrup Abstract-- We consider a wind power plant of megawatt wind turbines operating in derated mode. When operating in this mode, the wind power plant

  2. Modeling water use at thermoelectric power plants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rutberg, Michael J. (Michael Jacob)

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The withdrawal and consumption of water at thermoelectric power plants affects regional ecology and supply security of both water and electricity. The existing field data on US power plant water use, however, is of limited ...

  3. Power Plant Research and Siting Program (Maryland)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Power Plant Research and Siting Act of 1971 established the Power Plant Research Program (PPRP) to evaluate electric generation issues in the state and recommend responsible, long-term...

  4. Florida Electrical Power Plant Siting Act (Florida)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Power Plant Siting Act (PPSA) is the states centralized process for licensing large power plants. One licensea certification replaces local and state permits. Local governments and state...

  5. Integrated Coal Gasification Power Plant Credit (Kansas)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Integrated Coal Gasification Power Plant Credit states that an income taxpayer that makes a qualified investment in a new integrated coal gasification power plant or in the expansion of an existing...

  6. Acoustic and thermal packaging of small gas turbines for portable power

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tanaka, Shinji, S.M. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    To meet the increasing demand for advanced portable power units, for example for use in personal electronics and robotics, a number of studies have focused on portable small gas turbines. This research is concerned with ...

  7. Augmentation of Power Output of Axisymmetric Ducted Wind Turbines by Porous Trailing Edge Disks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    widnall, sheila

    2014-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents analytical and experimental results that demonstrated that the power output from a ducted wind turbine can be dramatically increased by the addition of a trailing edge device such as a porous disk. In ...

  8. PERFORMANCE ENHANCEMENT OF WIND TURBINE POWER REGULATION BY SWITCHED LINEAR CONTROL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Duffy, Ken

    W. It is anticipated that the next generation of wind turbines which are presently being developed will include large at high power levels, with a consequent reduction in drive-train loads. It achieves very similar

  9. ASSESSING POWER PLANT COOLING WATER INTAKE SYSTEM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ASSESSING POWER PLANT COOLING WATER INTAKE SYSTEM ENTRAINMENT IMPACTS Prepared For: California be obvious that large studies like these require the coordinated work of many people. We would first like from the Duke Energy South Bay and Morro Bay power plants and the PG&E Diablo Canyon Power Plant

  10. FUSION POWER PLANTS GOALS AND TECHNOLOGICAL CHALLENGES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Najmabadi, Farrokh

    FUSION POWER PLANTS GOALS AND TECHNOLOGICAL CHALLENGES Farrokh Najmabadi Dept. of Electrical for fusion power plants is given and their economic, safety, and environmental features are explored. Concep- tual design studies predict that fusion power plants will be capital intensive and will be used

  11. Composite turbine blade design options for Claude (open) cycle OTEC power systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Penney, T.R.

    1985-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Small-scale turbine rotors made from composites offer several technical advantages for a Claude (open) cycle ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) power system. Westinghouse Electric Corporation has designed a composite turbine rotor/disk using state-of-the-art analysis methods for large-scale (100-MW/sub e/) open cycle OTEC applications. Near-term demonstrations using conventional low-pressure turbine blade shapes with composite material would achieve feasibility and modern credibility of the open cycle OTEC power system. Application of composite blades for low-pressure turbo-machinery potentially improves the reliability of conventional metal blades affected by stress corrosion.

  12. Combustion Turbine CHP System for Food Processing Industry -...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    power grid. The fact sheet contains performance data from the plant after one year of operation. Combustion Turbine CHP System for Food Processing Industry More Documents &...

  13. Conservation Screening Curves to Compare Efficiency Investments to Power Plants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Koomey, J.G.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Efficiency Investments to Power Plants J. Koorney, A.H.Efficiency Investments to Power Plants Jonathan Koorney,Pollution, and Avoid Power Plant Construction. Testimony

  14. A Continuous Solar Thermochemical Hydrogen Production Plant Design

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Luc, Wesley Wai

    steam power plant is a large scale heat engine in which the working fluid flows through a boiler, turbine, condenser,

  15. Variable Frequency Operations of an Offshore Wind Power Plant with HVDC-VSC: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gevorgian, V.; Singh, M.; Muljadi, E.

    2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper, a constant Volt/Hz operation applied to the Type 1 wind turbine generator. Various control aspects of Type 1 generators at the plant level and at the turbine level will be investigated. Based on DOE study, wind power generation may reach 330 GW by 2030 at the level of penetration of 20% of the total energy production. From this amount of wind power, 54 GW of wind power will be generated at offshore wind power plants. The deployment of offshore wind power plants requires power transmission from the plant to the load center inland. Since this power transmission requires submarine cable, there is a need to use High-Voltage Direct Current (HVDC) transmission. Otherwise, if the power is transmitted via alternating current, the reactive power generated by the cable capacitance may cause an excessive over voltage in the middle of the transmission distance which requires unnecessary oversized cable voltage breakdown capability. The use of HVDC is usually required for transmission distance longer than 50 kilometers of submarine cables to be economical. The use of HVDC brings another advantage; it is capable of operating at variable frequency. The inland substation will be operated to 60 Hz synched with the grid, the offshore substation can be operated at variable frequency, thus allowing the wind power plant to be operated at constant Volt/Hz. In this paper, a constant Volt/Hz operation applied to the Type 1 wind turbine generator. Various control aspects of Type 1 generators at the plant level and at the turbine level will be investigated.

  16. SENSIBLE HEAT STORAGE FOR A SOLAR THERMAL POWER PLANT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baldwin, Thomas F.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    16.500 KW and Larger. General Electric Company Reprint GER-communication with General Electric Company. Power Genera-New York, (1960). General Electric Company, Steam Turbine-

  17. Impact of Wind Turbine Penetration on the Dynamic Performance of Interconnected Power Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pota, Himanshu Roy

    to stability problems caused by wind power integration. In the grid impact studies of wind power integrationImpact of Wind Turbine Penetration on the Dynamic Performance of Interconnected Power Systems M. J connected to a higher voltage level, their impact is becoming more widespread. The European Wind Energy

  18. Performance Characteristics of an Electrochemically Powered Turboprop: A Comparison with State of the Art Gas Turbines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, M. C.; Swan, D. H.

    /fuel cell power system be superior to a state of the art hydrogen/gas turbine power system? The systems are compared on a fuel consumption basis, a cost basis, and a reliability/ maintainability basis. The analysis show that both specific power...

  19. Internal combustion engine system having a power turbine with a broad efficiency range

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Whiting, Todd Mathew; Vuk, Carl Thomas

    2010-04-13T23:59:59.000Z

    An engine system incorporating an air breathing, reciprocating internal combustion engine having an inlet for air and an exhaust for products of combustion. A centripetal turbine receives products of the combustion and has a housing in which a turbine wheel is rotatable. The housing has first and second passages leading from the inlet to discrete, approximately 180.degree., portions of the circumference of the turbine wheel. The passages have fixed vanes adjacent the periphery of the turbine wheel and the angle of the vanes in one of the passages is different than those in the other so as to accommodate different power levels providing optimum approach angles between the gases passing the vanes and the blades of the turbine wheel. Flow through the passages is controlled by a flapper valve to direct it to one or the other or both passages depending upon the load factor for the engine.

  20. A Silicon-Based Micro Gas Turbine Engine for Power Generation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shan, X -C; Maeda, R; Sun, Y F; Wu, M; Hua, J S

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper reports on our research in developing a micro power generation system based on gas turbine engine and piezoelectric converter. The micro gas turbine engine consists of a micro combustor, a turbine and a centrifugal compressor. Comprehensive simulation has been implemented to optimal the component design. We have successfully demonstrated a silicon-based micro combustor, which consists of seven layers of silicon structures. A hairpin-shaped design is applied to the fuel/air recirculation channel. The micro combustor can sustain a stable combustion with an exit temperature as high as 1600 K. We have also successfully developed a micro turbine device, which is equipped with enhanced micro air-bearings and driven by compressed air. A rotation speed of 15,000 rpm has been demonstrated during lab test. In this paper, we will introduce our research results major in the development of micro combustor and micro turbine test device.

  1. A fusion power plant without plasma-material interactions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cohen, S.A.

    1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A steady-state fusion power plant is described which avoids the deleterious plasma-material interactions found in D-T fueled tokamaks. It is based on driven p-{sup 11}B fusion in a high-beta closed-field device, the field-reversed configuration (FRC), anchored in a gas-dynamic trap (GDT). The plasma outflow on the open magnetic-field lines is cooled by radiation in the GDT, then channeled through a magnetic nozzle, promoting 3-body recombination in the expansion region. The resulting supersonic neutral exhaust stream flows through a turbine, generating electricity.

  2. Indirect-fired gas turbine dual fuel cell power cycle

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Micheli, Paul L. (Sacramento, CA); Williams, Mark C. (Morgantown, WV); Sudhoff, Frederick A. (Morgantown, WV)

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A fuel cell and gas turbine combined cycle system which includes dual fuel cell cycles combined with a gas turbine cycle wherein a solid oxide fuel cell cycle operated at a pressure of between 6 to 15 atms tops the turbine cycle and is used to produce CO.sub.2 for a molten carbonate fuel cell cycle which bottoms the turbine and is operated at essentially atmospheric pressure. A high pressure combustor is used to combust the excess fuel from the topping fuel cell cycle to further heat the pressurized gas driving the turbine. A low pressure combustor is used to combust the excess fuel from the bottoming fuel cell to reheat the gas stream passing out of the turbine which is used to preheat the pressurized air stream entering the topping fuel cell before passing into the bottoming fuel cell cathode. The CO.sub.2 generated in the solid oxide fuel cell cycle cascades through the system to the molten carbonate fuel cell cycle cathode.

  3. Sabotage at Nuclear Power Plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Purvis, James W.

    1999-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Recently there has been a noted worldwide increase in violent actions including attempted sabotage at nuclear power plants. Several organizations, such as the International Atomic Energy Agency and the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission, have guidelines, recommendations, and formal threat- and risk-assessment processes for the protection of nuclear assets. Other examples are the former Defense Special Weapons Agency, which used a risk-assessment model to evaluate force-protection security requirements for terrorist incidents at DOD military bases. The US DOE uses a graded approach to protect its assets based on risk and vulnerability assessments. The Federal Aviation Administration and Federal Bureau of Investigation conduct joint threat and vulnerability assessments on high-risk US airports. Several private companies under contract to government agencies use formal risk-assessment models and methods to identify security requirements. The purpose of this paper is to survey these methods and present an overview of all potential types of sabotage at nuclear power plants. The paper discusses emerging threats and current methods of choice for sabotage--especially vehicle bombs and chemical attacks. Potential consequences of sabotage acts, including economic and political; not just those that may result in unacceptable radiological exposure to the public, are also discussed. Applicability of risk-assessment methods and mitigation techniques are also presented.

  4. Effects of turbulence on power generation for variable-speed wind turbines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Muljadi, E.; Butterfield, C.P.; Buhl, M.L. Jr.

    1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    One of the primary advantages of variable-speed wind turbines over fixed-speed turbines should be improved aerodynamic efficiency. With variable-speed generation, in order to maintain a constant ratio of wind speed to tip speed, the wind turbine changes rotor speed as the wind speed changes. In this paper we compare a stall-controlled, variable-speed wind turbine to a fixed-speed turbine. The focus of this paper is to investigate the effects of variable speed on energy capture and its ability to control peak power. We also show the impact of turbulence on energy capture in moderate winds. In this report, we use a dynamic simulator to apply different winds to a wind turbine model. This model incorporates typical inertial and aerodynamic performance characteristics. From this study we found a control strategy that makes it possible to operate a stall-controlled turbine using variable speed to optimize energy capture and to control peak power. We also found that turbulence does not have a significant impact on energy capture.

  5. Abstract--A bi-objective optimization model of power and power changes generated by a wind turbine is discussed in this

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kusiak, Andrew

    operating a variable-speed wind turbine with pitch control to maximize power while minimizing the loads prediction, power ramp rate, data mining, wind turbine operation strategy, generator torque, blade pitch1 Abstract--A bi-objective optimization model of power and power changes generated by a wind

  6. Method of optimizing performance of Rankine cycle power plants. [US DOE Patent

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pope, W.L.; Pines, H.S.; Doyle, P.A.; Silvester, L.F.

    1980-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

    A method is described for efficiently operating a Rankine cycle power plant to maximize fuel utilization efficiency or energy conversion efficiency or minimize costs by selecting a turbine fluid inlet state which is substantially on the area adjacent and including the transposed critical temperature line.

  7. PPPL-3245 -Preprint: April 1997, UC-420 A fusion power plant without plasma-material interactions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -1- PPPL-3245 - Preprint: April 1997, UC-420 A fusion power plant without plasma-material is described which avoids the deleterious plasma-material interactions found in D-T fueled tokamaks in the expansion region. The resulting supersonic neutral exhaust stream flows through a turbine, generating

  8. PPPL3245 Preprint: April 1997, UC420 A fusion power plant without plasmamaterial interactions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 PPPL3245 Preprint: April 1997, UC420 A fusion power plant without plasmamaterial is described which avoids the deleterious plasmamaterial interactions found in DT fueled tokamaks in the expansion region. The resulting supersonic neutral exhaust stream flows through a turbine, generating

  9. Turbines

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas ConchasPassiveSubmittedStatusButlerTransportation6/14/11 Page 1 of 17Turbines Hydrogen

  10. Nuclear power plants: structure and function

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hendrie, J.M.

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Topics discussed include: steam electric plants; BWR type reactors; PWR type reactors; thermal efficiency of light water reactors; other types of nuclear power plants; the fission process and nuclear fuel; fission products and reactor afterheat; and reactor safety.

  11. Minnesota Power Plant Siting Act (Minnesota)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This Act regulates the siting of large electric power generating plants, which are defined as plants designed for or capable of operating with a capacity of 50,000 kW or more. The policy of the...

  12. STATEMENT OF CONSIDERATIONS REQUEST BY SIEMENS WESTINGHOUSE POWER...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    electrical power, such as steam turbine technology, nuclear power, hydroelectric and wind facilities, represent competition to the global power plant mariket. Thus grant of...

  13. Demonstration of a Variable Phase Turbine Power System for Low Temperature Geothermal Resources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hays, Lance G

    2014-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

    A variable phase turbine assembly will be designed and manufactured having a turbine, operable with transcritical, two-phase or vapor flow, and a generator on the same shaft supported by process lubricated bearings. The assembly will be hermetically sealed and the generator cooled by the refrigerant. A compact plate-fin heat exchanger or tube and shell heat exchanger will be used to transfer heat from the geothermal fluid to the refrigerant. The demonstration turbine will be operated separately with two-phase flow and with vapor flow to demonstrate performance and applicability to the entire range of low temperature geothermal resources. The vapor leaving the turbine is condensed in a plate-fin refrigerant condenser. The heat exchanger, variable phase turbine assembly and condenser are all mounted on single skids to enable factory assembly and checkout and minimize installation costs. The system will be demonstrated using low temperature (237F) well flow from an existing large geothermal field. The net power generated, 1 megawatt, will be fed into the existing power system at the demonstration site. The system will demonstrate reliable generation of inexpensive power from low temperature resources. The system will be designed for mass manufacturing and factory assembly and should cost less than $1,200/kWe installed, when manufactured in large quantities. The estimated cost of power for 300F resources is predicted to be less than 5 cents/kWh. This should enable a substantial increase in power generated from low temperature geothermal resources.

  14. Ris-R-1117(EN) Power Control for Wind Turbines in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Risø-R-1117(EN) Power Control for Wind Turbines in Weak Grids: Project summary Henrik Bindner (Ed in Europe large areas exist where the wind resources are good or very good and the grid is relatively weak for the exploitation of the wind resource. There are two main problems concerned with wind power and weak grids

  15. Design of a High Temperature Small Particle Solar Receiver for Powering a Gas Turbine Engine

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ponce, V. Miguel

    Design of a High Temperature Small Particle Solar Receiver for Powering a Gas Turbine Engine Dr. Fletcher Miller SDSU Department of Mechanical Engineering Abstract Solar thermal power for electricity for the California desert and in other appro- priate regions worldwide. Current technology relies on steam Rankine

  16. Power Performance Test Report for the Viryd CS8 Wind Turbine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roadman, J.; Murphy, M.; van Dam, J.

    2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report contains the results of the power performance test that was performed on a Viryd CS8 wind turbine as part of the DOE Independent Testing project. The test is an accredited test to the IEC 61400-12-1 power performance standard.

  17. Energy Storage Technologies for Smoothing Power Fluctuations in Marine Current Turbines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Energy Storage Technologies for Smoothing Power Fluctuations in Marine Current Turbines Zhibin Zhou the marine current generation system more reliable, energy storage systems will play a crucial role. In this paper, the power fluctuation phenomenon is described and the state of art of energy storage technologies

  18. Methodology for Scaling Fusion Power Plant Availability

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lester M. Waganer

    2011-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Normally in the U.S. fusion power plant conceptual design studies, the development of the plant availability and the plant capital and operating costs makes the implicit assumption that the plant is a 10th of a kind fusion power plant. This is in keeping with the DOE guidelines published in the 1970s, the PNL report1, "Fusion Reactor Design Studies - Standard Accounts for Cost Estimates. This assumption specifically defines the level of the industry and technology maturity and eliminates the need to define the necessary research and development efforts and costs to construct a one of a kind or the first of a kind power plant. It also assumes all the "teething" problems have been solved and the plant can operate in the manner intended. The plant availability analysis assumes all maintenance actions have been refined and optimized by the operation of the prior nine or so plants. The actions are defined to be as quick and efficient as possible. This study will present a methodology to enable estimation of the availability of the one of a kind (one OAK) plant or first of a kind (1st OAK) plant. To clarify, one of the OAK facilities might be the pilot plant or the demo plant that is prototypical of the next generation power plant, but it is not a full-scale fusion power plant with all fully validated "mature" subsystems. The first OAK facility is truly the first commercial plant of a common design that represents the next generation plant design. However, its subsystems, maintenance equipment and procedures will continue to be refined to achieve the goals for the 10th OAK power plant.

  19. Centralized wind power plant voltage control with optimal power flow algorithm.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kline, Jared Andrew

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ??This thesis presents a method of controlling the reactive power injected into a medium-voltage collection system by multiple wind turbine generators such that the voltage (more)

  20. Organizational learning at nuclear power plants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carroll, John S.

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Nuclear Power Plant Advisory Panel on Organizational Learning provides channels of communications between the management and organization research projects of the MIT International Program for Enhanced Nuclear Power ...

  1. TS Power Plant, Eureka County, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peltier, R. [DTE Energy Services (United States)

    2008-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Not all coal-fired power plants are constructed by investor-owned utilities or independent power producers selling to wholesale markets. When Newmont Mining Corp. recognised that local power supplies were inadequate and too expensive to meet long-term electricity needs for its major gold- and copper-mining operations in northern Nevada, it built its own generation. What is more, Newmont's privately owned 200-MW net coal-fired plant features power plant technologies that will surely become industry standards. Newmont's investment in power and technology is also golden: the capital cost will be paid back in about eight years. 4 figs.

  2. Compressor and Turbine Models of Brayton Units for Space Nuclear Power Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gallo, Bruno M.; El-Genk, Mohamed S.; Tournier, Jean-Michel [Institute for Space and Nuclear Power Studies, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM, 87131 (United States); Chemical and Nuclear Engineering Department, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM, 87131 (United States)

    2007-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Closed Brayton Cycles with centrifugal flow, single-shaft turbo-machines are being considered, with gas cooled nuclear reactors, to provide 10's to 100's of electrical power to support future space exploration missions and Lunar and Mars outposts. Such power system analysis is typically based on the cycle thermodynamics, for given operating pressures and temperatures and assumed polytropic efficiencies of the compressor and turbine of the Brayton energy conversion units. Thus the analysis results not suitable for modeling operation transients such as startup and changes in the electric load. To simulate these transients, accurate models of the turbine and compressor in the Brayton rotating unit, which calculate the changes in the compressor and turbine efficiencies with system operation are needed. This paper presents flow models that account for the design and dimensions of the compressor impeller and diffuser, and the turbine stator and rotor blades. These models calculate the various enthalpy losses and the polytropic efficiencies along with the pressure ratios of the turbine and compressor. The predictions of these models compare well with reported performance data of actual hardware. In addition, the results of a parametric analysis to map the operations of the compressor and turbine, as functions of the rotating shaft speed and inlet Mach number of the gas working fluid, are presented and discussed. The analysis used a binary mixture of He-Xe with a molecular weight of 40 g/mole as the working fluid.

  3. Air bottoming cycle: Use of gas turbine waste heat for power generation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bolland, O.; Foerde, M. [Norwegian Univ. of Science and Technology, Trondheim (Norway). Div. of Thermal Energy and Hydropower; Haande, B. [Oil Engineering Consultants, Sandvika (Norway)

    1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents a thermodynamic analysis of the Air Bottoming Cycle (ABC) as well as the results of a feasibility study for using the Air Bottoming Cycle for gas turbine waste heat recovery/power generation on oil/gas platforms in the North Sea. The basis for the feasibility study was to utilize the exhaust gas heat from an LM2500PE gas turbine. Installation of the ABC on both a new and an existing platform have been considered. A design reference case is presented, and the recommended ABC is a two-shaft engine with two compressor intercoolers. The compression pressure ratio was found optimal at 8:1. The combined gas turbine and ABC shaft efficiency wa/s calculated to 46.6 percent. The LM2500PE gas turbine contributes with 36.1 percent while the ABC adds 10.5 percent points to the gas turbine efficiency. The ABC shaft power output is 6.6 MW when utilizing the waste heat of an LM2500PE gas turbine. A preliminary thermal and hydraulic design of the ABC main components (compressor, turbine, intercoolers, and recuperator) was carried out. The recuperator is the largest and heaviest component (45 tons). A weight and cost breakdown of the ABC is presented. The total weight of the ABC package was calculated to 154 metric tons, and the ABC package cost to 9.4 million US$. An economical examination for three different cases was carried out. The results show that the ABC alternative (LM2500PE + ABC) is economical, with a rather good margin, compared to the other alternatives. The conclusion is that the Air Bottoming Cycle is an economical alternative for power generation on both new platforms and on existing platforms with demand for more power.

  4. It is not just a job its a WINDTEST! Wind Energy with Power Plant Properties?WINDTEST

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    It is not just a job ­ it´s a WINDTEST! Wind Energy with Power Plant Properties?WINDTEST Kaiser-21 Power Quality Measurement ·IEC 61400-123 Wind Farm Power Curve Measure. ·MEASNET Power Quality of a wind turbine test WINDTEST Kaiser-Wilhelm-Koog GmbH 10/25 #12;b) The WF is able to reduce active power

  5. Synergistic Effects of Turbine Wakes and Atmospheric Stability on Power Production at an Onshore Wind Farm

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wharton, S; Lundquist, J K; Marjanovic, N

    2012-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

    This report examines the complex interactions between atmospheric stability and turbine-induced wakes on downwind turbine wind speed and power production at a West Coast North American multi-MW wind farm. Wakes are generated when the upwind flow field is distorted by the mechanical movement of the wind turbine blades. This has two consequences for downwind turbines: (1) the downwind turbine encounters wind flows with reduced velocity and (2) the downwind turbine encounters increased turbulence across multiple length scales via mechanical turbulence production by the upwind turbine. This increase in turbulence on top of ambient levels may increase aerodynamic fatigue loads on the blades and reduce the lifetime of turbine component parts. Furthermore, ambient atmospheric conditions, including atmospheric stability, i.e., thermal stratification in the lower boundary layer, play an important role in wake dissipation. Higher levels of ambient turbulence (i.e., a convective or unstable boundary layer) lead to higher turbulent mixing in the wake and a faster recovery in the velocity flow field downwind of a turbine. Lower levels of ambient turbulence, as in a stable boundary layer, will lead to more persistent wakes. The wake of a wind turbine can be divided into two regions: the near wake and far wake, as illustrated in Figure 1. The near wake is formed when the turbine structure alters the shape of the flow field and usually persists one rotor diameter (D) downstream. The difference between the air inside and outside of the near wake results in a shear layer. This shear layer thickens as it moves downstream and forms turbulent eddies of multiple length scales. As the wake travels downstream, it expands depending on the level of ambient turbulence and meanders (i.e., travels in non-uniform path). Schepers estimates that the wake is fully expanded at a distance of 2.25 D and the far wake region begins at 2-5 D downstream. The actual distance traveled before the wake recovers to its inflow velocity is dependent on the amount ambient turbulence, the amount of wind shear, and topographical and structural effects. The maximum velocity deficit is estimated to occur at 1-2 D but can be longer under low levels of ambient turbulence. Our understanding of turbine wakes comes from wind tunnel experiments, field experiments, numerical simulations, and from studies utilizing both experimental and modeling methods. It is well documented that downwind turbines in multi-Megawatt wind farms often produce less power than upwind turbine rows. These wake-induced power losses have been estimated from 5% to up to 40% depending on the turbine operating settings (e.g., thrust coefficient), number of turbine rows, turbine size (e.g., rotor diameter and hub-height), wind farm terrain, and atmospheric flow conditions (e.g., ambient wind speed, turbulence, and atmospheric stability). Early work by Elliott and Cadogan suggested that power data for different turbulent conditions be segregated to distinguish the effects of turbulence on wind farm power production. This may be especially important for downwind turbines within wind farms, as chaotic and turbulent wake flows increase stress on downstream turbines. Impacts of stability on turbine wakes and power production have been examined for a flat terrain, moderate size (43 turbines) wind farm in Minnesota and for an offshore, 80 turbine wind farm off the coast of Denmark. Conzemius found it difficult to distinguish wakes (i.e., downwind velocity deficits) when the atmosphere was convective as large amounts of scatter were present in the turbine nacelle wind speed data. This suggested that high levels of turbulence broke-up the wake via large buoyancy effects, which are generally on the order of 1 km in size. On the other hand, they found pronounced wake effects when the atmosphere was very stable and turbulence was either suppressed or the length scale was reduced as turbulence in this case was mechanically produced (i.e., friction forces). This led to larger reductions at downwind turbines and maximum ve

  6. Soft-stall control versus furling control for small wind turbine power regulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Muljadi, E.; Forsyth, T.; Butterfield, C.P.

    1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Many small wind turbines are designed to furl (turn) in high winds to regulate power and provide overspeed protection. Furling control results in poor energy capture at high wind speeds. This paper proposes an alternative control strategy for small wind turbines -- the soft-stall control method. The furling and soft-stall control strategies are compared using steady state analysis and dynamic simulation analysis. The soft-stall method is found to offer several advantages: increased energy production at high wind speeds, energy production which tracks the maximum power coefficient at low to medium wind speeds, reducing furling noise, and reduced thrust.

  7. Soft-Stall Control versus Furling Control for Small Wind Turbine Power Regulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Muljadi, E.; Forsyth, T.; Butterfield, C. P.

    1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Many small wind turbines are designed to furl (turn) in high winds to regulate power and provide overspeed protection. Furling control results in poor energy capture at high wind speeds. This paper proposes an alternative control strategy for small wind turbines -- the soft-stall method. The furling and soft-stall control strategies are compared using steady state analysis and dynamic simulation analysis. The soft-stall method is found to offer several advantages: increased energy production at high wind speeds, energy production which tracks the maximum power coefficient at low to medium wind speeds, reduced furling noise, and reduced thrust.

  8. Lessons learned from existing biomass power plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wiltsee, G.

    2000-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

    This report includes summary information on 20 biomass power plants, which represent some of the leaders in the industry. In each category an effort is made to identify plants that illustrate particular points. The project experiences described capture some important lessons learned that lead in the direction of an improved biomass power industry.

  9. UNDERSTANDING ENTRAINMENT AT COASTAL POWER PLANTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    UNDERSTANDING ENTRAINMENT AT COASTAL POWER PLANTS: INFORMING A PROGRAM TO STUDY Landing Power Plant (at center). Image from the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Digital Visual Library. #12; #12;i Acknowledgments The authors would like to thank many people who assisted with locating

  10. Abstract--Wind power generation is growing rapidly. However, maintaining the wind turbine connection to grid is a real

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pota, Himanshu Roy

    1 Abstract--Wind power generation is growing rapidly. However, maintaining the wind turbine and the generator design. The fixed-speed wind turbine has the advantage of the low cost of A. F. Abdou and H. R advantages over the fixed-speed operation, such as maximum power capture, less mechanical stresses, and less

  11. Sensitivity Analysis of Wind Plant Performance to Key Turbine Design Parameters: A Systems Engineering Approach; Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dykes, K.; Ning, A.; King, R.; Graf, P.; Scott, G.; Veers, P.

    2014-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper introduces the development of a new software framework for research, design, and development of wind energy systems which is meant to 1) represent a full wind plant including all physical and nonphysical assets and associated costs up to the point of grid interconnection, 2) allow use of interchangeable models of varying fidelity for different aspects of the system, and 3) support system level multidisciplinary analyses and optimizations. This paper describes the design of the overall software capability and applies it to a global sensitivity analysis of wind turbine and plant performance and cost. The analysis was performed using three different model configurations involving different levels of fidelity, which illustrate how increasing fidelity can preserve important system interactions that build up to overall system performance and cost. Analyses were performed for a reference wind plant based on the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's 5-MW reference turbine at a mid-Atlantic offshore location within the United States.

  12. The design of future central receiver power plants based on lessons learned from the Solar One Pilot Plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kolb, G.J.

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The 10-MW{sub e} Solar One Pilot Plant was the world's largest solar central receiver power plant. During its power production years it delivered over 37,000 MWhrs (net) to the utility grid. In this type of electric power generating plant, large sun-tracking mirrors called heliostats reflect and concentrate sunlight onto a receiver mounted on top a of a tower. The receiver transforms the solar energy into thermal energy that heats water, turning it into superheated steam that drives a turbine to generate electricity. The Solar One Pilot Plant successfully demonstrated the feasibility of generating electricity with a solar central receiver power plant. During the initial 2 years the plant was tested and 4 years the plant was operated as a power plant, a great deal of data was collected relating to the efficiency and reliability of the plant's various systems. This paper summarizes these statistics and compares them to goals developed by the US Department of Energy. Based on this comparison, improvements in the design and operation of future central receiver plants are recommended. Research at Sandia National Laboratories and the US utility industry suggests that the next generation of central receiver power plants will use a molten salt heat transfer fluid rather than water/steam. Sandia has recently completed the development of the hardware needed in a molten salt power plant. Use of this new technology is expected to solve many of the performance problems encountered at Solar One. Projections for the energy costs from these future central receiver plants are also presented. For reference, these projections are compared to the current energy costs from the SEGS parabolic trough plants now operating in Southern California.

  13. Nuclear Power Plant Concrete Structures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Basu, Prabir [International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)] [International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA); Labbe, Pierre [Electricity of France (EDF)] [Electricity of France (EDF); Naus, Dan [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL)] [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL)

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A nuclear power plant (NPP) involves complex engineering structures that are significant items of the structures, systems and components (SSC) important to the safe and reliable operation of the NPP. Concrete is the commonly used civil engineering construction material in the nuclear industry because of a number of advantageous properties. The NPP concrete structures underwent a great degree of evolution, since the commissioning of first NPP in early 1960. The increasing concern with time related to safety of the public and environment, and degradation of concrete structures due to ageing related phenomena are the driving forces for such evolution. The concrete technology underwent rapid development with the advent of chemical admixtures of plasticizer/super plasticizer category as well as viscosity modifiers and mineral admixtures like fly ash and silica fume. Application of high performance concrete (HPC) developed with chemical and mineral admixtures has been witnessed in the construction of NPP structures. Along with the beneficial effect, the use of admixtures in concrete has posed a number of challenges as well in design and construction. This along with the prospect of continuing operation beyond design life, especially after 60 years, the impact of extreme natural events ( as in the case of Fukushima NPP accident) and human induced events (e.g. commercial aircraft crash like the event of September 11th 2001) has led to further development in the area of NPP concrete structures. The present paper aims at providing an account of evolution of NPP concrete structures in last two decades by summarizing the development in the areas of concrete technology, design methodology and construction techniques, maintenance and ageing management of concrete structures.

  14. Sandia National Laboratories: wind turbines produce rated power

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administrationcontroller systems controller systems Scaled Windwhite LEDwind turbines produce rated

  15. STANDARDS FOR MEASUREMENTS AND TESTING OF WIND TURBINE POWER QUALITY Poul Srensen, Ris National Laboratory, P.O.Box 49, DK-4000 Roskilde, Denmark.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heinemann, Detlev

    STANDARDS FOR MEASUREMENTS AND TESTING OF WIND TURBINE POWER QUALITY Poul Sørensen, Risø National and verification of wind turbine power quality. The work has been organised in three major activities. The first farm summation on the power quality of wind turbines with constant rotor speed. The third activity has

  16. Application of Flow Battery in Marine Current Turbine System for Daily Power Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brest, Université de

    focuses on a grid-connected MCT system and proposes using vanadium redox flow battery (VRB) energy storage/energy sizing. In this paper, one grid-connected MCT generation system with battery energy storage system (BESSApplication of Flow Battery in Marine Current Turbine System for Daily Power Management Zhibin Zhou

  17. The Future of Combustion Turbine Technology for Industrial and Utility Power Generation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Karp, A. D.; Simbeck, D. R.

    Low capital cost and ample low-cost natural gas supplies will make natural gas-fired combustion turbine systems the power generation technology of choice over the next decade. Against the background of earlier use by electric utilities, this paper...

  18. DEVELOPMENT AND ASSESSMENT OF COATINGS FOR FUTURE POWER GENERATION TURBINES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alvin, Maryanne; Klotz, K.; McMordie, B.; Gleeson, B.; Zhu, D.; Warnes, B.; Kang, B.; Tannenbaum, J.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The NETL-Regional University Alliance (RUA) continues to advance technology development critical to turbine manufacturer efforts for achieving DOE Fossil Energy (FE's) Advanced Turbine Program Goals. In conjunction with NETL, Coatings for Industry (CFI), the University of Pittsburgh, NASA GRC, and Corrosion Control Inc., efforts have been focused on development of composite thermal barrier coating (TBC) architectures that consist of an extreme temperature coating, a commercially applied 7-8 YSZ TBC, a reduced cost bond coat, and a diffusion barrier coating that are applied to nickel-based superalloys or single crystal airfoil substrate materials for use at temperatures >1450 C (> 2640 F). Additionally, construction of a unique, high temperature ({approx}1100 C; {approx}2010 F), bench-scale, micro-indentation, nondestructive (NDE) test facility at West Virginia University (WVU) was completed to experimentally address in-situ changes in TBC stiffness during extended cyclic oxidation exposure of coated single crystal coupons in air or steam containing environments. The efforts and technical accomplishments in these areas are presented in the following sections of this paper.

  19. SENSIBLE HEAT STORAGE FOR A SOLAR THERMAL POWER PLANT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baldwin, Thomas F.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    process configurations for solar power plants with sensible-heatsolar power plant with sensible-heat storage since the chemical~heat storage processsolar power plant with a sulfur-oxide storage process. chemical~heat

  20. SENSIBLE HEAT STORAGE FOR A SOLAR THERMAL POWER PLANT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baldwin, Thomas F.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Summary of the Proposed Solar Power Plant Design The ImpactGenerated by this Solar Power Plant The Impact of StorageVessel Design on the Solar Power Plant III I;l f> (I Q I)

  1. SENSIBLE HEAT STORAGE FOR A SOLAR THERMAL POWER PLANT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baldwin, Thomas F.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of the Proposed Solar Power Plant Design The Impact ofGenerated by this Solar Power Plant The Impact of StorageDesign on the Solar Power Plant III I;l f> (I Q I) II (I

  2. Requirements for Power Plant and Power Line Development (Wisconsin)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This page describes requirements for obtaining a Certificate of Public Convenience and Necessity (CPCN) or a Certificate of Authority (CA), one of which is required for any new power plant...

  3. Incorporating Both Undesirable Outputs and Uncontrollable Variables into DEA: the Performance of Chinese Coal-Fired Power Plants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Hongliang; Pollitt, Michael G.

    generated by the steam turbine, and the net heat rate is based on the amount of electricity sent to the grid from a power plant. The difference between these two accounts for the electricity consumed within the power plant itself to run auxiliary... or an exponential function model, is preferable. This model is easy to use and easy to interpret, and is also capable of accommodating both continuous and categorical uncontrollable variables without increasing the number of efficient DMUs. Furthermore, it does...

  4. Geothermal Power Plants Meeting Clean Air Standards

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Geothermal power plants can meet the most stringent clean air standards. They emit little carbon dioxide, very low amounts of sulfur dioxide, and no nitrogen oxides. See Charts 1, 2, and 3 below.

  5. Alloy Design for a Fusion Power Plant

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kemp, Richard

    Fusion power is generated when hot deuterium and tritium nuclei react, producing alpha particles and 14 MeV neutrons. These neutrons escape the reaction plasma and are absorbed by the surrounding material structure of the plant, transferring...

  6. PV Power Plants Conference USA 2012

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The 4th PV Power Plants conference will cover relevant topics for successful project development and sustainable business. This year's event will have an additional focus on certain distributed...

  7. Introducing WISDEM:An Integrated System Modeling for Wind Turbines and Plant (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dykes, K.; Graf, P.; Scott, G.; Ning, A.; King, R.; Guo, Y.; Parsons, T.; Damiani, R.; Felker, F.; Veers, P.

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The National Wind Technology Center wind energy systems engineering initiative has developed an analysis platform to leverage its research capabilities toward integrating wind energy engineering and cost models across wind plants. This Wind-Plant Integrated System Design & Engineering Model (WISDEM) platform captures the important interactions between various subsystems to achieve a better National Wind Technology Center wind energy systems engineering initiative has developed an analysis platform to leverage its research capabilities toward integrating wind energy engineering and cost models across wind plants. This Wind-Plant Integrated System Design & Engineering Model (WISDEM) platform captures the important interactions between various subsystems to achieve a better understanding of how to improve system-level performance and achieve system-level cost reductions. This work illustrates a few case studies with WISDEM that focus on the design and analysis of wind turbines and plants at different system levels.

  8. Saguargo Solar Power Plant Solar Power Plant | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia:FAQ < RAPID Jump to: navigation, searchVirginiaRooseveltVI Solar PowerSaft PowerSaguache County,

  9. A Review of Hazardous Chemical Species Associated with CO2 Capture from Coal-Fired Power Plants and Their Potential Fate in CO2 Geologic Storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Apps, J.A.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    with conventional steam turbine powered electric generation.used to boil water for steam turbine generation as a secondturbine) and Rankine (steam turbine) cycles, as illustrated

  10. Symmetrical and Unsymmetrical Fault Currents of a Wind Power Plant: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gevorgian, V.; Singh, M.; Muljadi, E.

    2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper investigates the short-circuit behavior of a wind power plant for different types of wind turbines. Both symmetrical faults and unsymmetrical faults are investigated. The size of wind power plants (WPPs) keeps getting bigger and bigger. The number of wind plants in the U.S. has increased very rapidly in the past 10 years. It is projected that in the U.S., the total wind power generation will reach 330 GW by 2030. As the importance of WPPs increases, planning engi-neers must perform impact studies used to evaluate short-circuit current (SCC) contribution of the plant into the transmission network under different fault conditions. This information is needed to size the circuit breakers, to establish the proper sys-tem protection, and to choose the transient suppressor in the circuits within the WPP. This task can be challenging to protec-tion engineers due to the topology differences between different types of wind turbine generators (WTGs) and the conventional generating units. This paper investigates the short-circuit behavior of a WPP for different types of wind turbines. Both symmetrical faults and unsymmetrical faults are investigated. Three different soft-ware packages are utilized to develop this paper. Time domain simulations and steady-state calculations are used to perform the analysis.

  11. Floating nuclear power plant safety assurance principles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zvonarev, B.M.; Kuchin, N.L.; Sergeev, I.V.

    1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    In the north regions of the Russian federation and low density population areas, there is a real necessity for ecological clean energy small power sources. For this purpose, floating nuclear power plants, designed on the basis of atomic ship building engineering, are being conceptualized. It is possible to use the ship building plants for the reactor purposes. Issues such as radioactive waste management are described.

  12. Dose reduction at nuclear power plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baum, J.W.; Dionne, B.J.

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The collective dose equivalent at nuclear power plants increased from 1250 rem in 1969 to nearly 54,000 rem in 1980. This rise is attributable primarily to an increase in nuclear generated power from 1289 MW-y to 29,155 MW-y; and secondly, to increased average plant age. However, considerable variation in exposure occurs from plant to plant depending on plant type, refueling, maintenance, etc. In order to understand the factors influencing these differences, an investigation was initiated to study dose-reduction techniques and effectiveness of as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA) planning at light water plants. Objectives are to: identify high-dose maintenance tasks and related dose-reduction techniques; investigate utilization of high-reliability, low-maintenance equipment; recommend improved radioactive waste handling equipment and procedures; examine incentives for dose reduction; and compile an ALARA handbook.

  13. Kansas Nuclear Profile - Power Plants

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    nuclear net generation (percent)","Owner" "Wolf Creek Generating Station Unit 1","1,160","9,556",100.0,"Wolf Creek Nuclear Optg Corp" "1 Plant 1 Reactor","1,160","9,556",100.0...

  14. Vermont Nuclear Profile - Power Plants

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    mwh)","Share of State nuclear net generation (percent)","Owner" "Vermont Yankee Unit 1",620,"4,782",100.0,"Entergy Nuclear Vermont Yankee" "1 Plant 1 Reactor",620,"4,782",100.0...

  15. Optimum Heat Power Cycles for Process Industrial Plants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Waterland, A. F.

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Electric power cogeneration is compared with direct mechanical drives emphasizing the technical aspects having the greatest impact on energy economics. Both steam and gas turbine applications are discussed and practical methods of developing...

  16. atomic power plants: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Denmark December 1991 12;Abstract. A computer model of a simplified pressurized nuclear power plant a compute simulation of a simplified pressurized nuclear power plant model...

  17. atomic power plant: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Denmark December 1991 12;Abstract. A computer model of a simplified pressurized nuclear power plant a compute simulation of a simplified pressurized nuclear power plant model...

  18. World's Largest Concentrating Solar Power Plant Opens in California...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    World's Largest Concentrating Solar Power Plant Opens in California World's Largest Concentrating Solar Power Plant Opens in California February 19, 2014 - 12:00am Addthis Ivanpah,...

  19. DOE Announces Loan Guarantee Applications for Nuclear Power Plant...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Loan Guarantee Applications for Nuclear Power Plant Construction DOE Announces Loan Guarantee Applications for Nuclear Power Plant Construction October 2, 2008 - 3:43pm Addthis...

  20. Closed loop air cooling system for combustion turbines

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Huber, David John (North Canton, OH); Briesch, Michael Scot (Orlando, FL)

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Convective cooling of turbine hot parts using a closed loop system is disclosed. Preferably, the present invention is applied to cooling the hot parts of combustion turbine power plants, and the cooling provided permits an increase in the inlet temperature and the concomitant benefits of increased efficiency and output. In preferred embodiments, methods and apparatus are disclosed wherein air is removed from the combustion turbine compressor and delivered to passages internal to one or more of a combustor and turbine hot parts. The air cools the combustor and turbine hot parts via convection and heat is transferred through the surfaces of the combustor and turbine hot parts.

  1. Closed loop air cooling system for combustion turbines

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Huber, D.J.; Briesch, M.S.

    1998-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Convective cooling of turbine hot parts using a closed loop system is disclosed. Preferably, the present invention is applied to cooling the hot parts of combustion turbine power plants, and the cooling provided permits an increase in the inlet temperature and the concomitant benefits of increased efficiency and output. In preferred embodiments, methods and apparatus are disclosed wherein air is removed from the combustion turbine compressor and delivered to passages internal to one or more of a combustor and turbine hot parts. The air cools the combustor and turbine hot parts via convection and heat is transferred through the surfaces of the combustor and turbine hot parts. 1 fig.

  2. Testing of a coal-fired diesel power plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wilson, R.P.; Balles, E.N.; Benedek, K.R.; Benson, C.E. (Little (Arthur D.), Inc., Cambridge, MA (United States)); Rao, K.; Schaub, F. (Cooper-Bessemer, Mount Vernon, OH (United States)); Kimberley, J. (AMBAC, West Springfield, MA (United States)); Itse, D. (PSI Technology Co., Andover, MA (United States))

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The POC coal-fired power plant consists of a Cooper-Bessemer LSC-6 engine (15.5 inch bore, 22 inch stroke) rated at 400 rev/min and 208 psi bmep producing approximately 1.8 MW of power. The power plant is fueled with 'engine grade' coal slurry which has been physically cleaned to an ash level of approximately 1.5 to 2% (dry basis) and has a mean particle size of approximately 12 micron. CWS is injected directly into the combustion chamber through a fuel injector (one per cylinder) which was designed and developed to be compatible with the fuel. Each injector is fitted with a 19 orifice nozzle tip made with sapphire inserts in each orifice. The combustion chambers are fitted with twin diesel pilot injectors which provide a positive ignition source and substantially shorten the ignition delay period of the CWS fuel. Durable coatings (typically tungsten carbide) are used for the piston rings and cylinder liners to reduce wear rates. The emission control system consists of SCR for NO[sub x] control, sodium sorbent injection for SO[sub x] control, and a cyclone plus baghouse for particulate capture. The cyclone is installed upstream of the engine turbocharger which helps protect the turbine blades.

  3. Testing of a coal-fired diesel power plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wilson, R.P.; Balles, E.N.; Benedek, K.R.; Benson, C.E. [Little (Arthur D.), Inc., Cambridge, MA (United States); Rao, K.; Schaub, F. [Cooper-Bessemer, Mount Vernon, OH (United States); Kimberley, J. [AMBAC, West Springfield, MA (United States); Itse, D. [PSI Technology Co., Andover, MA (United States)

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The POC coal-fired power plant consists of a Cooper-Bessemer LSC-6 engine (15.5 inch bore, 22 inch stroke) rated at 400 rev/min and 208 psi bmep producing approximately 1.8 MW of power. The power plant is fueled with `engine grade` coal slurry which has been physically cleaned to an ash level of approximately 1.5 to 2% (dry basis) and has a mean particle size of approximately 12 micron. CWS is injected directly into the combustion chamber through a fuel injector (one per cylinder) which was designed and developed to be compatible with the fuel. Each injector is fitted with a 19 orifice nozzle tip made with sapphire inserts in each orifice. The combustion chambers are fitted with twin diesel pilot injectors which provide a positive ignition source and substantially shorten the ignition delay period of the CWS fuel. Durable coatings (typically tungsten carbide) are used for the piston rings and cylinder liners to reduce wear rates. The emission control system consists of SCR for NO{sub x} control, sodium sorbent injection for SO{sub x} control, and a cyclone plus baghouse for particulate capture. The cyclone is installed upstream of the engine turbocharger which helps protect the turbine blades.

  4. Energy 101: Wind Turbines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    See how wind turbines generate clean electricity from the power of the wind. Highlighted are the various parts and mechanisms of a modern wind turbine.

  5. Energy 101: Wind Turbines

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2013-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

    See how wind turbines generate clean electricity from the power of the wind. Highlighted are the various parts and mechanisms of a modern wind turbine.

  6. Power plants development in Romania

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tanasescu, F.T. [Ministry of Research and Technology, Bucharest (Romania); Olariu, N. [Univ. Targoviste (Romania). Energy and Environment Research Dept.

    1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The Romanian PV research program initiated in 1980 has as its aim the development of the Romanian own PV network from solar cells production to demonstration projects and commercial applications. Concerning the PV grid connected systems the Romanian research program is financed by the Romanian Ministry for Research and Technology. Setting out the main objectives and the related stages of this project, in the paper are presented aspects concerning the plant configuration, its component characteristics and preliminary achieved results. The aspects which are going to be developed in the following stages of the grid-connected PV plant implementation in Romania are also underlined.

  7. Abstract--The offshore wind farm with installed back-to-back power converter in wind turbines is studied. As an

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bak, Claus Leth

    Abstract--The offshore wind farm with installed back-to- back power converter in wind turbines is studied. As an example the Burbo Bank offshore wind farm with Siemens Wind Power wind turbines is taken installed in wind turbines are presented. Harmonic load flow analysis and impedance frequency

  8. Foam Cleaning of Steam Turbines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Foster, C.; Curtis, G.; Horvath, J. W.

    The efficiency and power output of a steam turbine can be dramatically reduced when deposits form on the turbine blades. Disassembly and mechanical cleaning of the turbine is very time consuming and costly. Deposits can be removed from the turbine...

  9. Elevated Temperature Materials for Power Generation and Propulsion The energy industry is designing higher-efficiency land-based turbines for natural gas-fired

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Mo

    higher-efficiency land-based turbines for natural gas-fired power generation systems. The high inlet is significant for modeling cyclic deformation in directionally solidified and single crystal turbine blades

  10. Verification of hourly forecasts of wind turbine power output

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wegley, H.L.

    1984-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A verification of hourly average wind speed forecasts in terms of hourly average power output of a MOD-2 was performed for four sites. Site-specific probabilistic transformation models were developed to transform the forecast and observed hourly average speeds to the percent probability of exceedance of an hourly average power output. (This transformation model also appears to have value in predicting annual energy production for use in wind energy feasibility studies.) The transformed forecasts were verified in a deterministic sense (i.e., as continuous values) and in a probabilistic sense (based upon the probability of power output falling in a specified category). Since the smoothing effects of time averaging are very pronounced, the 90% probability of exceedance was built into the transformation models. Semiobjective and objective (model output statistics) forecasts were made compared for the four sites. The verification results indicate that the correct category can be forecast an average of 75% of the time over a 24-hour period. Accuracy generally decreases with projection time out to approx. 18 hours and then may increase due to the fairly regular diurnal wind patterns that occur at many sites. The ability to forecast the correct power output category increases with increasing power output because occurrences of high hourly average power output (near rated) are relatively rare and are generally not forecast. The semiobjective forecasts proved superior to model output statistics in forecasting high values of power output and in the shorter time frames (1 to 6 hours). However, model output statistics were slightly more accurate at other power output levels and times. Noticeable differences were observed between deterministic and probabilistic (categorical) forecast verification results.

  11. Steam Turbine Cogeneration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Quach, K.; Robb, A. G.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Steam turbines are widely used in most industrial facilities because steam is readily available and steam turbine is easy to operate and maintain. If designed properly, a steam turbine co-generation (producing heat and power simultaneously) system...

  12. A coal-fired power plant with zero-atmospheric emissions - article no. 023005

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martinez-Frias, J.; Aceves, S.M.; Smith, J.R.; Brandt, H. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA (United States)

    2008-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents the thermodynamic and cost analysis of a coal-based zero-atmospheric emissions electric power plant. The approach involves an oxygen-blown coal gasification unit. The resulting synthetic gas (syngas) is combusted with oxygen in a gas generator to produce the working fluid for the turbines. The combustion produces a gas mixture composed almost entirely of steam and carbon dioxide. These gases drive multiple turbines to produce electricity. The turbine discharge gases pass to a condenser where water is captured. A stream of carbon dioxide then results that can be used for enhanced oil recovery or for sequestration. The term zero emission steam technology is used to describe this technology We present the analysis of a 400 MW electric power plant. The power plant has a net thermal efficiency of 39%. This efficiency is based on the lower heating value of the coal, and includes the energy necessary for coal gasification, air separation, and for carbon dioxide separation and sequestration. This paper also presents an analysis of the cost of electricity and the cost of conditioning carbon dioxide for sequestration. Electricity cost is compared for three different gasification processes (Texaco, Shell, and Koppers-Totzek) and two types of coals (Illinois 6 and Wyodak). COE ranges from 5.95/kW h to 6.15/kW In, indicating a 3.4% sensitivity to the gasification processes considered and the coal types used.

  13. SENSIBLE HEAT STORAGE FOR A SOLAR THERMAL POWER PLANT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baldwin, Thomas F.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    HEAT STORAGE FOR A SOLAR THERMAL POWER PLANT Thomas F.CENTRAL RECEIVER SOLAR THERMAL POWER SYSTEM, PHASE progressCorporation, RECEIVER SOLAR THERMAL POWER SYSTEM, PHASE I,

  14. Simulation of the Visual Effects of Power Plant Plumes1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Standiford, Richard B.

    Simulation of the Visual Effects of Power Plant Plumes1 2 Evelyn F. Treiman, / 3 David B. Champion-fired power plant with six 500 MW coal-fired power plants located at hypothetical sites in southeastern Utah coal-fired power plants are greater than those from oil or natural gas. If we must use more coal, how

  15. Theoretical full power correction factors as related to changes in ambient temperature, pressure and absolute humidity for aircraft turbine engines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Raphael, Michel Antoun

    1969-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    IN AMBIENT TEMPERATURE, PRESSURF. AND ABSOLUTE HUMIDITY FOR AIRCRAFT TURBINE ENGINES (August 1969) Michael Antoun Raphael B. S. (Mechanical Engineering) Texas A&M University Directed by: Professor Stanley H, Lowy ABSTRACT Power losses in aircraft gas... rated at standard atmospheric conditions (i. e, ambient temperature 69 F 3'Fend atmospheric pressure 29. 92 in. Hg. dry) . Obviously this same turbine will not be exposed to such standard conditions; therefore we have a change in power directly...

  16. Variability of wind power near Oklahoma City and implications for siting of wind turbines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kessler, E.; Eyster, R.

    1987-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Data from five sites near Oklahoma City were examined to assess wind power availability. Wind turbines of identical manufacture were operated at three of the sites, one of which was also equipped with anemometers on a 100-ft tower. Comprehensive anemometric data were available from the other two sites. The study indicates that the average wind speed varies substantially over Oklahoma's rolling plains, which have often been nominally regarded as flat for purposes of wind power generation. Average wind differences may be as much as 5 mph at 20 ft above ground level, and 7 mph at 100 ft above ground level for elevation differences of about 200 ft above mean sea level, even in the absence of substantial features of local terrain. Local altitude above mean sea level seems to be as influential as the shape of local terrain in determining the average wind speed. The wind turbine used at a meteorologically instrumented site in the study produced the power expected from it for the wind regime in which it was situated. The observed variations of local wind imply variations in annual kWh of as much as a factor of four between identical turbines located at similar heights above ground level in shallow valleys and on hilltops or elevated extended flat areas. 17 refs., 39 figs., 11 tabs.

  17. MHD power plant instrumentation and control

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lofftus, D.; Rudberg, D. [MSE Inc., Butte, MT (United States); Johnson, R.; Hammerstrom, D. [Montana State Univ., Bozeman, MT (United States)

    1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) has awarded a contract to the MHD Development Corporation (MDC) to develop instrumentation and control requirements and strategies for commercial MHD power plants. MDC subcontracted MSE to do the technical development required. MSE is being assisted by Montana State University (MSU) for the topping cycle development. A computer model of a stand-alone MHD/steam plant is being constructed. The plant is based on the plant design set forth in the MDC proposal to the Federal Clean Coal Technology 5 solicitation. It consists of an MHD topping plant, a Heat Recovery Seed Recovery (HRSR) plant, and a steam turbo-generator. The model is based on the computer code used for a study of the Corette plant retrofitted with an MHD plant. Additional control strategies, based on MHD testing results and current steam bottoming plant control data, will be incorporated. A model will be devised and implemented for automatic control of the plant. Requirements regarding instrumentation and actuators will be documented. Instrumentation and actuators that are not commercially available will be identified. The role and desired characteristics of an expert system in the automated control scheme is being investigated. Start-up and shutdown procedures will be studied and load change dynamic performance will be evaluated. System response to abnormal topping cycle and off-design system operation will be investigated. This includes use of MHD topping cycle models which couple gasdynamic and electrical behavior for the study of controlling of the MHD topping cycle. A curvefitter, which uses cubic Hermitian spline interpolation functions in as many as five dimensions, allows much more accurate reproduction of nonlinear, multidimensional functions. This project will be the first to investigate plant dynamics and control using as many as seven independent variables or control inputs to the MHD topping cycle.

  18. Partial oxidation power plant with reheating and method thereof

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Newby, R.A.; Yang, W.C.; Bannister, R.L.

    1999-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

    A system and method are disclosed for generating power having an air compression/partial oxidation system, a turbine, and a primary combustion system. The air compression/partial oxidation system receives a first air stream and a fuel stream and produces a first partially oxidized fuel stream and a first compressed air stream therefrom. The turbine expands the first partially oxidized fuel stream while being cooled by the first compressed air stream to produce a heated air stream. The heated air stream is injected into the expanding first partially oxidized fuel stream, thereby reheating it in the turbine. A second partially oxidized fuel stream is emitted from the turbine. The primary combustion system receives said second partially oxidized fuel stream and a second air stream, combusts said second partially oxidized fuel stream, and produces rotating shaft power and an emission stream therefrom. 2 figs.

  19. Report on Hawaii geothermal power plant project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1983-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Hawaii Geothermal Generator Project is the first power plant in the State of Hawaii to be powered by geothermal energy. This plant, which is located in the Puna District on the Island of Hawaii, produces three (3) megawatts of electricity utilizing the steam phase from the geothermal well. This project represents the climax of the geophysical research efforts going on for two decades in the Hawaiian Islands which resulted in the discovery of a significant reservoir of geothermal energy which could be put to practical use. In 1978 the Department of Energy, in conjunction with the State of Hawaii, entered into negotiations to design and build a power plant. The purpose and objective of this plant was to demonstrate the feasibility of constructing and operating a geothermal power plant located in a remote volcanically active area. A contract was signed in mid 1978 between the Research Corporation of the University of Hawaii (RCUH) and the Department of Energy (DOE). To date, the DOE has provided 8.3 million dollars with the State of Hawaii and others contributing 2.1 million dollars. The cost of the project exceeded its original estimates by approximately 25%. These increases in cost were principally contributed to the higher cost for construction than was originally estimated. Second, the cost of procuring the various pieces of equipment exceed their estimates by 10 to 20 percent, and third, the engineering dollar per man hour rose 20 to 25 percent.

  20. Ris-R-1330(EN) Wind Turbine Power Performance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    .1 Background 8 2.2 Problems 8 2.3 Input by the Manufacturers 9 2.4 Methods 10 2.4.1Method A 10 2.4.1.1 Site.2 Experiences from production assessments - The Questionable On-site Power Curve Measurement 4.2.1Background wind speed 5.7 Types of wind speed sensors 35 5.7.1Vector scalar wind speed cup anemometer 35 5

  1. Virtual environments for nuclear power plant design

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown-VanHoozer, S.A.; Singleterry, R.C. Jr.; King, R.W. [and others

    1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the design and operation of nuclear power plants, the visualization process inherent in virtual environments (VE) allows for abstract design concepts to be made concrete and simulated without using a physical mock-up. This helps reduce the time and effort required to design and understand the system, thus providing the design team with a less complicated arrangement. Also, the outcome of human interactions with the components and system can be minimized through various testing of scenarios in real-time without the threat of injury to the user or damage to the equipment. If implemented, this will lead to a minimal total design and construction effort for nuclear power plants (NPP).

  2. Slim Holes for Small Power Plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Finger, John T.

    1999-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Geothermal research study at Sandia National Laboratories has conducted a program in slimhole drilling research since 1992. Although our original interest focused on slim holes as an exploration method, it has also become apparent that they have substantial potential for driving small-scale, off-grid power plants. This paper summarizes Sandia's slim-hole research program, describes technology used in a ''typical'' slimhole drilling project, presents an evaluation of using slim holes for small power plants, and lists some of the research topics that deserve further investigation.

  3. SIGNAL GROUPING FOR CONDITION MONITORING OF NUCLEAR POWER PLANT COMPONENTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    SIGNAL GROUPING FOR CONDITION MONITORING OF NUCLEAR POWER PLANT COMPONENTS Piero Baraldi Chevalier EDF R&D ­ Simulation and information Technologies for Power generation system Department 6, Quai Monitoring, Empirical Modeling, Power Plants, Safety Critical Nuclear Instrumentation, Autoassociative models

  4. Economic Analysis of a 3MW Biomass Gasification Power Plant

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cattolica, Robert; Lin, Kathy

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Collaborative, Biomass gasification / power generationANALYSIS OF A 3MW BIOMASS GASIFICATION POWER PLANT R obert Cas a feedstock for gasification for a 3 MW power plant was

  5. Strategies in tower solar power plant optimization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ramos, A

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for optimizing a central receiver solar thermal electric power plant is studied. We parametrize the plant design as a function of eleven design variables and reduce the problem of finding optimal designs to the numerical problem of finding the minimum of a function of several variables. This minimization problem is attacked with different algorithms both local and global in nature. We find that all algorithms find the same minimum of the objective function. The performance of each of the algorithms and the resulting designs are studied for two typical cases. We describe a method to evaluate the impact of design variables in the plant performance. This method will tell us what variables are key to the optimal plant design and which ones are less important. This information can be used to further improve the plant design and to accelerate the optimization procedure.

  6. Order-of-magnitude enhancement of wind farm power density via counter-rotating vertical-axis wind turbine arrays

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dabiri, John O

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Modern wind farms require significant land resources to separate each wind turbine from the adjacent turbine wakes. These aerodynamic constraints limit the amount of power that can be extracted from a given wind farm footprint. We conducted full-scale field tests of vertical-axis wind turbines in counter-rotating configurations under natural wind conditions. Whereas wind farms consisting of propeller-style turbines produce 2 to 3 watts of power per square meter of land area, these field tests indicate that power densities approaching 100 W m^-2 can be achieved by arranging vertical-axis wind turbines in layouts that enable them to extract energy from adjacent wakes. In addition, we calculated that the global wind resource available to 10-m tall turbines based on the present approach is approximately 225 trillion watts (TW), which significantly exceeds the global wind resource available to 80-m tall, propeller-style wind turbines, approximately 75 TW. This improvement is due to the closer spacing that can be a...

  7. Development of model reference adaptive control theory for electric power plant control applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mabius, L.E.

    1982-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The scope of this effort includes the theoretical development of a multi-input, multi-output (MIMO) Model Reference Control (MRC) algorithm, (i.e., model following control law), Model Reference Adaptive Control (MRAC) algorithm and the formulation of a nonlinear model of a typical electric power plant. Previous single-input, single-output MRAC algorithm designs have been generalized to MIMO MRAC designs using the MIMO MRC algorithm. This MRC algorithm, which has been developed using Command Generator Tracker methodologies, represents the steady state behavior (in the adaptive sense) of the MRAC algorithm. The MRC algorithm is a fundamental component in the MRAC design and stability analysis. An enhanced MRC algorithm, which has been developed for systems with more controls than regulated outputs, alleviates the MRC stability constraint of stable plant transmission zeroes. The nonlinear power plant model is based on the Cromby model with the addition of a governor valve management algorithm, turbine dynamics and turbine interactions with extraction flows. An application of the MRC algorithm to a linearization of this model demonstrates its applicability to power plant systems. In particular, the generated power changes at 7% per minute while throttle pressure and temperature, reheat temperature and drum level are held constant with a reasonable level of control. The enhanced algorithm reduces significantly control fluctuations without modifying the output response.

  8. Estimated global ocean wind power potential from QuikSCAT observations, accounting for turbine characteristics and siting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zender, Charles

    Click Here for Full Article Estimated global ocean wind power potential from QuikSCAT observations. Zender (2010), Estimated global ocean wind power potential from QuikSCAT observations, accounting, global ocean usable wind power is evaluated for modern offshore turbine characteristics including hub

  9. Advanced combustion technologies for gas turbine power plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vandsburger, U. [Virginia Polytechnic Inst. and State Univ., Blacksburg, VA (United States). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering; Roe, L.A. [Arkansas Univ., Fayetteville, AR (United States). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering; Desu, S.B. [Virginia Polytechnic Inst. and State Univ., Blacksburg, VA (United States). Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Objectives are to develop actuators for enhancing the mixing between gas streams, increase combustion stability, and develop hgih-temperature materials for actuators and sensors in combustors. Turbulent kinetic energy maps of an excited jet with co-flow in a cavity with a partially closed exhaust end are given with and without a longitudinal or a transverse acoustic field. Dielectric constants and piezoelectric coefficients were determined for Sr{sub 2}(Nb{sub x}Ta{sub 1-x}){sub 2}O{sub 7} ceramics.

  10. Boiler Materials for Ultrasupercritical Coal Power Plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    R. Viswanathan; K. Coleman; J. Shingledecker; J. Sarver; G. Stanko; M. Borden; W. Mohn; S. Goodstine; I. Perrin

    2006-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the Ohio Coal Development Office (OCDO) have recently initiated a project aimed at identifying, evaluating, and qualifying the materials needed for the construction of the critical components of coal-fired boilers capable of operating at much higher efficiencies than current generation of supercritical plants. This increased efficiency is expected to be achieved principally through the use of ultrasupercritical steam conditions (USC). A limiting factor in this can be the materials of construction. The project goal is to assess/develop materials technology that will enable achieving turbine throttle steam conditions of 760 C (1400 F)/35 MPa (5000 psi). This goal seems achievable based on a preliminary assessment of material capabilities. The project is further intended to build further upon the alloy development and evaluation programs that have been carried out in Europe and Japan. Those programs have identified ferritic steels capable of meeting the strength requirements of USC plants up to approximately 620 C (1150 F) and nickel-based alloys suitable up to 700 C (1300 F). In this project, the maximum temperature capabilities of these and other available high-temperature alloys are being assessed to provide a basis for materials selection and application under a range of conditions prevailing in the boiler. This report provides a quarterly status report for the period of October 1 to December 30, 2005.

  11. BOILER MATERIALS FOR ULTRASUPERCRITICAL COAL POWER PLANTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    R. Viswanathan; K. Coleman; J. Shingledecker; J. Sarver; G. Stanko; M. Borden; W. Mohn; S. Goodstine; I. Perrin

    2005-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the Ohio Coal Development Office (OCDO) have recently initiated a project aimed at identifying, evaluating, and qualifying the materials needed for the construction of the critical components of coal-fired boilers capable of operating at much higher efficiencies than current generation of supercritical plants. This increased efficiency is expected to be achieved principally through the use of ultrasupercritical steam conditions (USC). The project goal initially was to assess/develop materials technology that will enable achieving turbine throttle steam conditions of 760 C (1400 F)/35 MPa (5000 psi), although this goal for the main steam temperature had to be revised down to 732 C (1350 F), based on a preliminary assessment of material capabilities. The project is intended to build further upon the alloy development and evaluation programs that have been carried out in Europe and Japan. Those programs have identified ferritic steels capable of meeting the strength requirements of USC plants up to approximately 620 C (1150 F) and nickel-based alloys suitable up to 700 C (1300 F). In this project, the maximum temperature capabilities of these and other available high-temperature alloys are being assessed to provide a basis for materials selection and application under a range of conditions prevailing in the boiler. This report provides a quarterly status report for the period of July 1 to September 30, 2004.

  12. Boiler Materials for Ultrasupercritical Coal Power Plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    R. Viswanathan; J. Sarver; M. Borden; K. Coleman; J. Blough; S. Goodstine; R.W. Swindeman; W. Mohn; I. Perrin

    2003-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the Ohio Coal Development Office (OCDO) have recently initiated a project aimed at identifying, evaluating, and qualifying the materials needed for the construction of the critical components of coal-fired boilers capable of operating at much higher efficiencies than current generation of supercritical plants. This increased efficiency is expected to be achieved principally through the use of ultrasupercritical steam conditions (USC). The project goal initially was to assess/develop materials technology that will enable achieving turbine throttle steam conditions of 760 C (1400 F)/35 MPa (5000 psi), although this goal for the main steam temperature had to be revised down to 732 C (1350 F), based on a preliminary assessment of material capabilities. The project is intended to build further upon the alloy development and evaluation programs that have been carried out in Europe and Japan. Those programs have identified ferritic steels capable of meeting the strength requirements of USC plants up to approximately 620 C (1150 F) and nickel-based alloys suitable up to 700 C (1300 F). In this project, the maximum temperature capabilities of these and other available high-temperature alloys are being assessed to provide a basis for materials selection and application under a range of conditions prevailing in the boiler. This report provides a quarterly status report for the period of July 1 to September 30, 2004.

  13. BOILER MATERIALS FOR ULTRASUPERCRITICAL COAL POWER PLANTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    R. Viswanathan; K. Coleman; J. Shingledecker; J. Sarver; G. Stanko; M. Borden; W. Mohn; S. Goodstine; I. Perrin

    2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the Ohio Coal Development Office (OCDO) have recently initiated a project aimed at identifying, evaluating, and qualifying the materials needed for the construction of the critical components of coal-fired boilers capable of operating at much higher efficiencies than current generation of supercritical plants. This increased efficiency is expected to be achieved principally through the use of ultrasupercritical steam conditions (USC). A limiting factor in this can be the materials of construction. The project goal is to assess/develop materials technology that will enable achieving turbine throttle steam conditions of 760 C (1400 F)/35 MPa (5000 psi). This goal seems achievable based on a preliminary assessment of material capabilities. The project is further intended to build further upon the alloy development and evaluation programs that have been carried out in Europe and Japan. Those programs have identified ferritic steels capable of meeting the strength requirements of USC plants up to approximately 620 C (1150 F) and nickel-based alloys suitable up to 700 C (1300 F). In this project, the maximum temperature capabilities of these and other available high-temperature alloys are being assessed to provide a basis for materials selection and application under a range of conditions prevailing in the boiler. This report provides a quarterly status report for the period of April 1 to June 30, 2005.

  14. Boiler Materials For Ultrasupercritical Coal Power Plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    R. Viswanathan; K. Coleman; J. Shingledecker; J. Sarver; G. Stanko; M. Borden; W. Mohn; S. Goodstine; I. Perrin

    2006-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the Ohio Coal Development Office (OCDO) have recently initiated a project aimed at identifying, evaluating, and qualifying the materials needed for the construction of the critical components of coal-fired boilers capable of operating at much higher efficiencies than current generation of supercritical plants. This increased efficiency is expected to be achieved principally through the use of ultrasupercritical steam conditions (USC). A limiting factor in this can be the materials of construction. The project goal is to assess/develop materials technology that will enable achieving turbine throttle steam conditions of 760 C (1400 F)/35 MPa (5000 psi). This goal seems achievable based on a preliminary assessment of material capabilities. The project is further intended to build further upon the alloy development and evaluation programs that have been carried out in Europe and Japan. Those programs have identified ferritic steels capable of meeting the strength requirements of USC plants up to approximately 620 C (1150 F) and nickel-based alloys suitable up to 700 C (1300 F). In this project, the maximum temperature capabilities of these and other available high-temperature alloys are being assessed to provide a basis for materials selection and application under a range of conditions prevailing in the boiler. This report provides a quarterly status report for the period of July 1 to September 30, 2006.

  15. Boiler Materials for Ultrasupercritical Coal Power Plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    R. Viswanathan; K. Coleman; J. Shingledecker; J. Sarver; G. Stanko; M. Borden; W. Mohn; S. Goodstine; I. Perrin

    2006-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the Ohio Coal Development Office (OCDO) have recently initiated a project aimed at identifying, evaluating, and qualifying the materials needed for the construction of the critical components of coal-fired boilers capable of operating at much higher efficiencies than current generation of supercritical plants. This increased efficiency is expected to be achieved principally through the use of ultrasupercritical steam conditions (USC). A limiting factor in this can be the materials of construction. The project goal is to assess/develop materials technology that will enable achieving turbine throttle steam conditions of 760 C (1400 F)/35 MPa (5000 psi). This goal seems achievable based on a preliminary assessment of material capabilities. The project is further intended to build further upon the alloy development and evaluation programs that have been carried out in Europe and Japan. Those programs have identified ferritic steels capable of meeting the strength requirements of USC plants up to approximately 620 C (1150 F) and nickel-based alloys suitable up to 700 C (1300 F). In this project, the maximum temperature capabilities of these and other available high-temperature alloys are being assessed to provide a basis for materials selection and application under a range of conditions prevailing in the boiler. This report provides a quarterly status report for the period of April 1 to June 30, 2006.

  16. Boiler Materials for Ultrasupercritical Coal Power Plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    R. Viswanathan; K. Coleman; J. Shingledecker; J. Sarver; G. Stanko; M. Borden; W. Mohn; S. Goodstine; I. Perrin

    2006-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the Ohio Coal Development Office (OCDO) have recently initiated a project aimed at identifying, evaluating, and qualifying the materials needed for the construction of the critical components of coal-fired boilers capable of operating at much higher efficiencies than current generation of supercritical plants. This increased efficiency is expected to be achieved principally through the use of ultrasupercritical steam conditions (USC). A limiting factor in this can be the materials of construction. The project goal is to assess/develop materials technology that will enable achieving turbine throttle steam conditions of 760 C (1400 F)/35 MPa (5000 psi). This goal seems achievable based on a preliminary assessment of material capabilities. The project is further intended to build further upon the alloy development and evaluation programs that have been carried out in Europe and Japan. Those programs have identified ferritic steels capable of meeting the strength requirements of USC plants up to approximately 620 C (1150 F) and nickel-based alloys suitable up to 700 C (1300 F). In this project, the maximum temperature capabilities of these and other available high-temperature alloys are being assessed to provide a basis for materials selection and application under a range of conditions prevailing in the boiler. This report provides a quarterly status report for the period of January 1 to March 31, 2006.

  17. BOILER MATERIALS FOR ULTRASUPERCRITICAL COAL POWER PLANTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    R. Viswanathan; K. Coleman; J. Shingledecker; J. Sarver; G. Stanko; M. Borden; W. Mohn; S. Goodstine; I. Perrin

    2005-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the Ohio Coal Development Office (OCDO) have recently initiated a project aimed at identifying, evaluating, and qualifying the materials needed for the construction of the critical components of coal-fired boilers capable of operating at much higher efficiencies than current generation of supercritical plants. This increased efficiency is expected to be achieved principally through the use of ultrasupercritical steam conditions (USC). A limiting factor in this can be the materials of construction. The project goal is to assess/develop materials technology that will enable achieving turbine throttle steam conditions of 760 C (1400 F)/35 MPa (5000 psi). This goal seems achievable based on a preliminary assessment of material capabilities. The project is further intended to build further upon the alloy development and evaluation programs that have been carried out in Europe and Japan. Those programs have identified ferritic steels capable of meeting the strength requirements of USC plants up to approximately 620 C (1150 F) and nickel-based alloys suitable up to 700 C (1300 F). In this project, the maximum temperature capabilities of these and other available high-temperature alloys are being assessed to provide a basis for materials selection and application under a range of conditions prevailing in the boiler. This report provides a quarterly status report for the period of July 1 to September 30, 2005.

  18. BOILER MATERIALS FOR ULTRASUPERCRITICAL COAL POWER PLANTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    R. Viswanathan; K. Coleman; J. Shingledecker; J. Sarver; G. Stanko; W. Mohn; M. Borden; S. Goodstine; I. Perrin

    2004-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the Ohio Coal Development Office (OCDO) have recently initiated a project aimed at identifying, evaluating, and qualifying the materials needed for the construction of the critical components of coal-fired boilers capable of operating at much higher efficiencies than current generation of supercritical plants. This increased efficiency is expected to be achieved principally through the use of ultrasupercritical steam conditions (USC). The project goal initially was to assess/develop materials technology that will enable achieving turbine throttle steam conditions of 760 C (1400 F)/35 MPa (5000 psi), although this goal for the main steam temperature had to be revised down to 732 C (1350 F), based on a preliminary assessment of material capabilities. The project is intended to build further upon the alloy development and evaluation programs that have been carried out in Europe and Japan. Those programs have identified ferritic steels capable of meeting the strength requirements of USC plants up to approximately 620 C (1150 F) and nickel-based alloys suitable up to 700 C (1300 F). In this project, the maximum temperature capabilities of these and other available high-temperature alloys are being assessed to provide a basis for materials selection and application under a range of conditions prevailing in the boiler. This report provides a quarterly status report for the period of October 1 to December 30, 2003.

  19. BOILER MATERIALS FOR ULTRASUPERCRITICAL COAL POWER PLANTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    K. Coleman; R. Viswanathan; J. Shingledecker; J. Sarver; G. Stanko; W. Mohn; M. Borden; S. Goodstine; I. Perrin

    2004-01-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the Ohio Coal Development Office (OCDO) have recently initiated a project aimed at identifying, evaluating, and qualifying the materials needed for the construction of the critical components of coal-fired boilers capable of operating at much higher efficiencies than current generation of supercritical plants. This increased efficiency is expected to be achieved principally through the use of ultrasupercritical steam conditions (USC). The project goal initially was to assess/develop materials technology that will enable achieving turbine throttle steam conditions of 760 C (1400 F)/35 MPa (5000 psi), although this goal for the main steam temperature had to be revised down to 732 C (1350 F), based on a preliminary assessment of material capabilities. The project is intended to build further upon the alloy development and evaluation programs that have been carried out in Europe and Japan. Those programs have identified ferritic steels capable of meeting the strength requirements of USC plants up to approximately 620 C (1150 F) and nickel-based alloys suitable up to 700 C (1300 F). In this project, the maximum temperature capabilities of these and other available high-temperature alloys are being assessed to provide a basis for materials selection and application under a range of conditions prevailing in the boiler. This report provides a quarterly status report for the period of October 1 to December 30, 2003.

  20. BOILER MATERIALS FOR ULTRASUPERCRITICAL COAL POWER PLANTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    R. Viswanathan; K. Coleman; J. Shingledecker; J. Sarver; G. Stanko; M. Borden; W. Mohn; S. Goodstine; I. Perrin

    2005-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the Ohio Coal Development Office (OCDO) have recently initiated a project aimed at identifying, evaluating, and qualifying the materials needed for the construction of the critical components of coal-fired boilers capable of operating at much higher efficiencies than current generation of supercritical plants. This increased efficiency is expected to be achieved principally through the use of ultrasupercritical steam conditions (USC). The project goal initially was to assess/develop materials technology that will enable achieving turbine throttle steam conditions of 760 C (1400 F)/35 MPa (5000 psi), although this goal for the main steam temperature had to be revised down to 732 C (1350 F), based on a preliminary assessment of material capabilities. The project is intended to build further upon the alloy development and evaluation programs that have been carried out in Europe and Japan. Those programs have identified ferritic steels capable of meeting the strength requirements of USC plants up to approximately 620 C (1150 F) and nickel-based alloys suitable up to 700 C (1300 F). In this project, the maximum temperature capabilities of these and other available high-temperature alloys are being assessed to provide a basis for materials selection and application under a range of conditions prevailing in the boiler. This report provides a quarterly status report for the period of July 1 to September 30, 2004.

  1. Reliable, Efficient and Cost-Effective Electric Power Converter for Small Wind Turbines Based on AC-link Technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Darren Hammell; Mark Holveck; DOE Project Officer - Keith Bennett

    2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Grid-tied inverter power electronics have been an Achilles heel of the small wind industry, providing opportunity for new technologies to provide lower costs, greater efficiency, and improved reliability. The small wind turbine market is also moving towards the 50-100kW size range. The unique AC-link power conversion technology provides efficiency, reliability, and power quality advantages over existing technologies, and Princeton Power will adapt prototype designs used for industrial asynchronous motor control to a 50kW small wind turbine design.

  2. Power Generation Asset Management Technology Roadmap M

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    be done to determine optimal sensor deployment to address these criteria. TC8 Incorporate turbine layouts, make efforts and operational status within wind power plants to have more...

  3. Automated Decision-Analytic Diagnosis of Thermal Performance in Gas Turbines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Horvitz, Eric

    Automated Decision-Analytic Diagnosis of Thermal Performance in Gas Turbines To be presented Abstract We have developed an expert system for diagno- sis of efficiency problems for large gas turbines the ultimate goal of applying the system in the day-to-day maintenance of gas- turbine power plants. A Overview

  4. Automated DecisionAnalytic Diagnosis of Thermal Performance in Gas Turbines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Horvitz, Eric

    Automated Decision­Analytic Diagnosis of Thermal Performance in Gas Turbines To be presented Abstract We have developed an expert system for diagno­ sis of e#ciency problems for large gas turbines the ultimate goal of applying the system in the day­to­day maintenance of gas­ turbine power plants. A Overview

  5. Forecast of Regional Power Output of Wind Turbines Hans Georg Beyer, Detlev Heinemann, Harald Mellinghoff, Kai Monnich, Hans-Peter Waldl

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heinemann, Detlev

    Forecast of Regional Power Output of Wind Turbines Hans Georg Beyer, Detlev Heinemann, Harald of wind turbines connected to the public electricity grid will be intro- duced. Using this procedure and Northern Germany. At the moment, the installed capacity of wind turbines is in the order of magnitude

  6. SELFMONITORING DISTRIBUTED MONITORING SYSTEM FOR NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS (PRELIMINARY VERSION)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    SELFMONITORING DISTRIBUTED MONITORING SYSTEM FOR NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS (PRELIMINARY VERSION) Aldo and identification are extremely important activities for the safety of a nuclear power plant. In particular inside huge and complex production plants. 1 INTRODUCTION Safety in nuclear power plants requires

  7. Refurbishing steam turbines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Valenti, M.

    1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Power-plant operators are reducing maintenance costs of their aging steam turbines by using wire-arc spray coating and shot peening to prolong the service life of components, and by replacing outmoded bearings and seals with newer designs. Steam-turbine operators are pressed with the challenge of keeping their aging machines functioning in the face of wear problems that are exacerbated by the demand for higher efficiencies. These problems include intense thermal cycling during both start-up and shutdown, water particles in steam and solid particles in the air that pit smooth surfaces, and load changes that cause metal fatigue.

  8. Catalytic combustor for integrated gasification combined cycle power plant

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bachovchin, Dennis M. (Mauldin, SC); Lippert, Thomas E. (Murrysville, PA)

    2008-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

    A gasification power plant 10 includes a compressor 32 producing a compressed air flow 36, an air separation unit 22 producing a nitrogen flow 44, a gasifier 14 producing a primary fuel flow 28 and a secondary fuel source 60 providing a secondary fuel flow 62 The plant also includes a catalytic combustor 12 combining the nitrogen flow and a combustor portion 38 of the compressed air flow to form a diluted air flow 39 and combining at least one of the primary fuel flow and secondary fuel flow and a mixer portion 78 of the diluted air flow to produce a combustible mixture 80. A catalytic element 64 of the combustor 12 separately receives the combustible mixture and a backside cooling portion 84 of the diluted air flow and allows the mixture and the heated flow to produce a hot combustion gas 46 provided to a turbine 48. When fueled with the secondary fuel flow, nitrogen is not combined with the combustor portion.

  9. Modeling Generator Power Plant Portfolios and Pollution Taxes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nagurney, Anna

    Modeling Generator Power Plant Portfolios and Pollution Taxes in Electric Power Supply Chain;Modeling Energy Taxes and Credits: The Genco's Choice Each Genco has a portfolio of power plants Each power plant can have different supply costs and transaction costs Supply costs can reflect capital

  10. Modeling Generator Power Plant Portfolios and Pollution Taxes in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nagurney, Anna

    Modeling Generator Power Plant Portfolios and Pollution Taxes in Electric Power Supply Chain-term solution (e.g.,are long-term solution (e.g., solar power and wind power (solar power and wind power Heavy user of fossil fuels:Heavy user of fossil fuels: Electric power industryElectric power industry

  11. BOILER MATERIALS FOR ULTRASUPERCRITICAL COAL POWER PLANTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    R. Viswanathan; K. Coleman; R.W. Swindeman; J. Sarver; J. Blough; W. Mohn; M. Borden; S. Goodstine; I. Perrin

    2003-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The principal objective of this project is to develop materials technology for use in ultrasupercritical (USC) plant boilers capable of operating with 760 C (1400 F), 35 MPa (5000 psi) steam. This project has established a government/industry consortium to undertake a five-year effort to evaluate and develop of advanced materials that allow the use of advanced steam cycles in coal-based power plants. These advanced cycles, with steam temperatures up to 760 C, will increase the efficiency of coal-fired boilers from an average of 35% efficiency (current domestic fleet) to 47% (HHV). This efficiency increase will enable coal-fired power plants to generate electricity at competitive rates (irrespective of fuel costs) while reducing CO{sub 2} and other fuel-related emissions by as much as 29%. Success in achieving these objectives will support a number of broader goals. First, from a national prospective, the program will identify advanced materials that will make it possible to maintain a cost-competitive, environmentally acceptable coal-based electric generation option. High sulfur coals will specifically benefit in this respect by having these advanced materials evaluated in high-sulfur coal firing conditions and from the significant reductions in waste generation inherent in the increased operational efficiency. Second, from a national prospective, the results of this program will enable domestic boiler manufacturers to successfully compete in world markets for building high-efficiency coal-fired power plants.

  12. Flash Steam Power Plant | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublicIDAPowerPlantSitingConstruction.pdfNotify98.pdf Jump to:Siting.pdfFiskdale,Five StarFlash Steam Power Plant

  13. Steam turbine upgrades: A utility based approach

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wakeley, G.R.

    1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the increasingly competitive power generation markets utilities must strive towards lower electricity generation costs, whilst relying on an aging steam turbine fleet. By the year 2000 more than 25% of the global steam turbine capacity will be older than 30 years. The heat rate of such units is generally considerably higher than that of equivalent new plant, and such equipment can be further disadvantaged by increased maintenance costs and forced outage rates. Over the past decade steam turbine conversion, modification, and upgrade packages have become an increasingly important part of the European steam turbine market. Furthermore, many utilities now realize that enhanced cost-effectiveness can often be obtained by moving away from the original equipment manufacturer (OEM), and the upgrading of other manufacturers' plant is now routine within the steam turbine industry. By working closely with customers, GE has developed a comprehensive range of steam turbine upgrade packages, including advanced design steampaths which can increase the performance of existing turbine installations to levels comparable with new plant. Such packages are tailor-made to the requirements of each customer, to ensure that the most cost-effective engineering solution is identified. This paper presents an overview of GE's state-of-the-art steam turbine technology, and continues to describe typical economic models for turbine upgrades.

  14. Capacity Value of Concentrating Solar Power Plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Madaeni, S. H.; Sioshansi, R.; Denholm, P.

    2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This study estimates the capacity value of a concentrating solar power (CSP) plant at a variety of locations within the western United States. This is done by optimizing the operation of the CSP plant and by using the effective load carrying capability (ELCC) metric, which is a standard reliability-based capacity value estimation technique. Although the ELCC metric is the most accurate estimation technique, we show that a simpler capacity-factor-based approximation method can closely estimate the ELCC value. Without storage, the capacity value of CSP plants varies widely depending on the year and solar multiple. The average capacity value of plants evaluated ranged from 45%?90% with a solar multiple range of 1.0-1.5. When introducing thermal energy storage (TES), the capacity value of the CSP plant is more difficult to estimate since one must account for energy in storage. We apply a capacity-factor-based technique under two different market settings: an energy-only market and an energy and capacity market. Our results show that adding TES to a CSP plant can increase its capacity value significantly at all of the locations. Adding a single hour of TES significantly increases the capacity value above the no-TES case, and with four hours of storage or more, the average capacity value at all locations exceeds 90%.

  15. Clean Power Plan: Reducing Carbon Pollution From Existing Power Plants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bremer,K.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Efficiency Improvements Efficiency improvements Co-firing or switching to natural gas Coal retirements Retrofit CCS (e.g.,WA Parish in Texas) 2. Use lower-emitting power sources more Dispatch changes to existing natural gas combined cycle (CC) Dispatch... that are high emitting. Energy conservation programs. Retrofitting units with partial CCS. Use of certain biomass. Efficiency improvements at higher- emitting plants.* Market-based trading programs. Building new renewables. Dispatch changes. Co...

  16. Boiler materials for ultra-supercritical coal power plants - steamside oxidation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Viswanathan, R.; Sarver, J.; Tanzosh, J.M. [Electric Power Research Institute, Palo Alto, CA (United States)

    2006-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The corrosion behavior of tubing materials carrying steam at high temperature is of great concern to fossil power plant operators. This is due to the fact that the oxide films formed on the steam side can lead to major failures and consequently to reduced plant availability. The wall loss of the pressure boundary caused by oxidation can increase the hoop stresses and cause premature creep failures; second, the increased insulation of the tubes due to the low thermal conductivity of the oxide film can lead to increased metal temperature, thereby exacerbating the fireside corrosion as well as creep problems. The third concern is that thicker oxides may spall more easily when the plant is cooled down. On restart, the spalled material may lodge somewhere in the system with the potential for causing tube blockages, or it may be swept out with the working fluid and enter the steam turbine causing erosion damage to the turbine nozzles and blades. Failures of tubing and turbine components by these mechanisms have been widely reported in the United States. In view of the importance of the steamside oxidation, a major study of the phenomenon is being carried out as part of a major national program sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy and the Ohio Coal Development Office. As a prelude to the experimental work, a literature survey was performed to document the state of the art. Results of the review are reported here.

  17. Geothermal Power Plants Minimizing Land Use and Impact

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    For energy production and development, geothermal power plants don't use much land compared to coal and nuclear power plants. And the environmental impact upon the land they use is minimal.

  18. Power Plant and Industrial Fuel Use Act | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Power Plant and Industrial Fuel Use Act Power Plant and Industrial Fuel Use Act Self Certifications Title II of the Powerplant and Industrial Fuel Use Act of 1978 (FUA), as amended...

  19. Construction Underway on First Geothermal Power Plant in New...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Construction Underway on First Geothermal Power Plant in New Mexico Construction Underway on First Geothermal Power Plant in New Mexico September 10, 2008 - 4:38pm Addthis Photo of...

  20. Power Smoothing Control in a Grid-Connected Marine Current Turbine System for Compensating

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    similar principles in wind generation systems can be applied in marine current turbine (MCT) systems due

  1. Computer application for design activity in power plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Giri, Parimal Kumar; Srivastava, Sonam [Apeejay College of Engineering, Sohna, Gurgaon (India)

    2010-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Software for Design Activity in Power Plants' helps the Power Plant engineers and managers to manage the development and design activities of equipments in the field of power plants. This paper is basically concerned with the computerization of the design activity of Condenser, vital equipment in Heat Exchanger Unit of Thermal Power Plant required for condensing the steam and for further reclaimable purposes to achieve economy. This software will also provide facilities to maintain user profile and the respective work details.

  2. Geothermal Power Plants Meeting Water Quality and Conservation Standards

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    U.S. geothermal power plants can easily meet federal, state, and local water quality and conservation standards.

  3. Hybrid Wet/Dry Cooling for Power Plants (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kutscher, C.; Buys, A.; Gladden, C.

    2006-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This presentation includes an overview of cooling options, an analysis of evaporative enhancement of air-cooled geothermal power plants, field measurements at a geothermal plant, a preliminary analysis of trough plant, and improvements to air-cooled condensers.

  4. Industrial Plant Objectives and Cogeneration System Development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kovacik, J. M.

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    HEAT 15% 48% BOILER CONOENSER ASSOC. LOSSES LOSSES FIG. 2 - FUEL UTILIZATION EFFECTIVENESS The three types of topping cogeneration cycles usually encountered in industrial practice are steam turbine, gas turbine, and combined cycles... more power than that avail able due to plant he t demands may provide an economically viable option. Gas Turbine and Combined Cycles Gas turbine cycles provide the opportunity to generate a larger power output per unit of heat 39~ required...

  5. Ris9-R-609(EN) Simulation ofa PWR Power Plant

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ris9-R-609(EN) Simulation ofa PWR Power Plant for Process Control and Diagnosis Finn Ravnsbjerg Nielsen Risø National Laboratory, Roskilde, Denmark December 1991 #12;Simulation of a PWR Power Plant *^R a compute simulation of a simplified pressurized nuclear power plant model directed towards process control

  6. Hybrid Modeling and Control of a Hydroelectric Power Plant

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ferrari-Trecate, Giancarlo

    Hybrid Modeling and Control of a Hydroelectric Power Plant Giancarlo Ferrari-Trecate, Domenico,mignone,castagnoli,morari}@aut.ee.ethz.ch Abstract In this work we present the model of a hydroelectric power plant in the framework of Mixed Logic with a model predictive control scheme. 1 Introduction The outflow control for hydroelectric power plants

  7. Optimisation of Concentrating Solar Thermal Power Plants with Neural Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ábrahám, Erika

    Optimisation of Concentrating Solar Thermal Power Plants with Neural Networks Pascal Richter1 introduce our tool for the optimisation of parameterised solar thermal power plants, and report the applicability of our approach. Keywords: Optimization, Solar thermal power plants, Neural networks, Genetic

  8. THE ARIES-CS COMPACT STELLARATOR FUSION POWER PLANT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Raffray, A. Ren

    THE ARIES-CS COMPACT STELLARATOR FUSION POWER PLANT F. NAJMABADI* and A. R. RAFFRAY Center stellarator power plants, ARIES-CS, has been conducted to explore attrac- tive compact stellarator by earlier stellarator power plant studies had led to cost projections much higher than those of the advanced

  9. COMMISSIONDECISION Small Power Plant Exemption (06-SPPE-2)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    COMMISSIONDECISION Small Power Plant Exemption (06-SPPE-2) Imperial County Order No: 07;COMMISSIONDECISION Small Power Plant Exemption (06-SPPE-2) Imperial County Order No: 07-0103-10 CALIFORNIA ENERGY, CA 95814 800-822-6228 www.energy.ca.gov EL CENTRO REPOWER PROJECT SMALL POWER PLANT EXEMPTION DOCKET

  10. Visual Sensitivity of River Recreation to Power Plants1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Standiford, Richard B.

    499 Visual Sensitivity of River Recreation to Power Plants1 David H. Blau and Michael C. Bowie 2/ 1 Green Street, San Francisco, California 94111. Abstract: The consultants were asked by the Power Plant the sensitivity of river-related recreational activities to visual intrusion by large coal-fired power plants

  11. Multi-objective optimization of solar tower power plants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ábrahám, Erika

    Multi-objective optimization of solar tower power plants Pascal Richter Center for Computational · Optimization of solar tower power plants 1/20 #12;Introduction ­ Solar tower power plants Solar tower PS10 (11 MW) in Andalusia, Spain · Solar tower with receiver · Heliostat field with self-aligning mirrors

  12. ADVANCED TURBINE SYSTEMS PROGRAM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gregory Gaul

    2004-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Natural gas combustion turbines are rapidly becoming the primary technology of choice for generating electricity. At least half of the new generating capacity added in the US over the next twenty years will be combustion turbine systems. The Department of Energy has cosponsored with Siemens Westinghouse, a program to maintain the technology lead in gas turbine systems. The very ambitious eight year program was designed to demonstrate a highly efficient and commercially acceptable power plant, with the ability to fire a wide range of fuels. The main goal of the Advanced Turbine Systems (ATS) Program was to develop ultra-high efficiency, environmentally superior and cost effective competitive gas turbine systems for base load application in utility, independent power producer and industrial markets. Performance targets were focused on natural gas as a fuel and included: System efficiency that exceeds 60% (lower heating value basis); Less than 10 ppmv NO{sub x} emissions without the use of post combustion controls; Busbar electricity that are less than 10% of state of the art systems; Reliability-Availability-Maintainability (RAM) equivalent to current systems; Water consumption minimized to levels consistent with cost and efficiency goals; and Commercial systems by the year 2000. In a parallel effort, the program was to focus on adapting the ATS engine to coal-derived or biomass fuels. In Phase 1 of the ATS Program, preliminary investigators on different gas turbine cycles demonstrated that net plant LHV based efficiency greater than 60% was achievable. In Phase 2 the more promising cycles were evaluated in greater detail and the closed-loop steam-cooled combined cycle was selected for development because it offered the best solution with least risk for achieving the ATS Program goals for plant efficiency, emissions, cost of electricity and RAM. Phase 2 also involved conceptual ATS engine and plant design and technology developments in aerodynamics, sealing, combustion, cooling, materials, coatings and casting development. The market potential for the ATS gas turbine in the 2000-2014 timeframe was assessed for combined cycle, simple cycle and integrated gasification combined cycle, for three engine sizes. The total ATS market potential was forecasted to exceed 93 GW. Phase 3 and Phase 3 Extension involved further technology development, component testing and W501ATS engine detail design. The technology development efforts consisted of ultra low NO{sub x} combustion, catalytic combustion, sealing, heat transfer, advanced coating systems, advanced alloys, single crystal casting development and determining the effect of steam on turbine alloys. Included in this phase was full-load testing of the W501G engine at the McIntosh No. 5 site in Lakeland, Florida.

  13. Ris-M-2190 DESCRIPTION OF THE POWER PLANT MODEL BWR-PLASIM OUTLINED

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    3 2. THE REACTOR MODEL 6 2.1. Neutron kinetics 6 2.2. Fuel dynamics 13 2.3. Hydraulic dynamics coolant flow 28 3. THE TURBINE AND FEEDWATER HEATERS 30 3.1. Flow and pressure calculations for the turbine . 33 3.2. Enthalpy and power calculations for the turbine 35 3.3. The reheater model 37 3

  14. Thermal Conductivity Enhancement of High Temperature Phase Change Materials for Concentrating Solar Power Plant Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roshandell, Melina

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    3 Fig. 1.2. Solar power plant operation [Materials for Concentrating Solar Power Plant Applications AMaterials for Concentrating Solar Power Plant Applications

  15. Phase Change Materials for Thermal Energy Storage in Concentrated Solar Thermal Power Plants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hardin, Corey Lee

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    STORAGE FOR CONCENTRATING SOLAR POWER PLANTS, Eurosun 2010,COST REDUCTION STUDY FOR SOLAR THERMAL POWER PLANTS, Ottawa,heat transfer in solar thermal power plants utilizing phase

  16. A Wavelet-Based Variability Model (WVM) for Solar PV Power Plants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lave, Matthew; Kleissl, Jan; Stein, Joshua S

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Model (WVM) for Solar PV Power Plants Matthew Lave, Jansolar photovoltaic (PV) power plant output given a singleproduce a simulated power plant output. The WVM is validated

  17. Use of experience curves to estimate the future cost of power plants with CO2 capture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rubin, Edward S.; Yeh, Sonia; Antes, Matt; Berkenpas, Michael; Davison, John

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    2004. Experience curves for power plant emission controlassessments of fossil fuel power plants with CO 2 capturethe future cost of power plants with CO 2 capture Edward S.

  18. A COMPUTATIONAL WORKBENCH ENVIRONMENT FOR VIRTUAL POWER PLANT SIMULATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mike Bockelie; Dave Swensen; Martin Denison; Adel Sarofim; Connie Senior

    2004-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

    In this report is described the work effort to develop and demonstrate a software framework to support advanced process simulations to evaluate the performance of advanced power systems. Integrated into the framework are a broad range of models, analysis tools, and visualization methods that can be used for the plant evaluation. The framework provides a tightly integrated problem-solving environment, with plug-and-play functionality, and includes a hierarchy of models, ranging from fast running process models to detailed reacting CFD models. The framework places no inherent limitations on the type of physics that can be modeled, numerical techniques, or programming languages used to implement the equipment models, or the type or amount of data that can be exchanged between models. Tools are provided to analyze simulation results at multiple levels of detail, ranging from simple tabular outputs to advanced solution visualization methods. All models and tools communicate in a seamless manner. The framework can be coupled to other software frameworks that provide different modeling capabilities. Three software frameworks were developed during the course of the project. The first framework focused on simulating the performance of the DOE Low Emissions Boiler System Proof of Concept facility, an advanced pulverized-coal combustion-based power plant. The second framework targeted simulating the performance of an Integrated coal Gasification Combined Cycle - Fuel Cell Turbine (IGCC-FCT) plant configuration. The coal gasifier models included both CFD and process models for the commercially dominant systems. Interfacing models to the framework was performed using VES-Open, and tests were performed to demonstrate interfacing CAPE-Open compliant models to the framework. The IGCC-FCT framework was subsequently extended to support Virtual Engineering concepts in which plant configurations can be constructed and interrogated in a three-dimensional, user-centered, interactive, immersive environment. The Virtual Engineering Framework (VEF), in effect a prototype framework, was developed through close collaboration with NETL supported research teams from Iowa State University Virtual Reality Applications Center (ISU-VRAC) and Carnegie Mellon University (CMU). The VEF is open source, compatible across systems ranging from inexpensive desktop PCs to large-scale, immersive facilities and provides support for heterogeneous distributed computing of plant simulations. The ability to compute plant economics through an interface that coupled the CMU IECM tool to the VEF was demonstrated, and the ability to couple the VEF to Aspen Plus, a commercial flowsheet modeling tool, was demonstrated. Models were interfaced to the framework using VES-Open. Tests were performed for interfacing CAPE-Open-compliant models to the framework. Where available, the developed models and plant simulations have been benchmarked against data from the open literature. The VEF has been installed at NETL. The VEF provides simulation capabilities not available in commercial simulation tools. It provides DOE engineers, scientists, and decision makers with a flexible and extensible simulation system that can be used to reduce the time, technical risk, and cost to develop the next generation of advanced, coal-fired power systems that will have low emissions and high efficiency. Furthermore, the VEF provides a common simulation system that NETL can use to help manage Advanced Power Systems Research projects, including both combustion- and gasification-based technologies.

  19. High-temperature turbine technology program. Turbine subsystem design report: Low-Btu gas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Horner, M.W.

    1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of the US Department of Energy High-Temperature Turbine Technology (DOE-HTTT) program is to bring to technology readiness a high-temperature (2600/sup 0/F to 3000/sup 0/F firing temperature) turbine within a 6- to 10-year duration, Phase II has addressed the performance of component design and technology testing in critical areas to confirm the design concepts identified in the earlier Phase I program. Based on the testing and support studies completed under Phase II, this report describes the updated turbine subsystem design for a coal-derived gas fuel (low-Btu gas) operation at 2600/sup 0/F turbine firing temperature. A commercial IGCC plant configuration would contain four gas turbines. These gas turbines utilize an existing axial flow compressor from the GE product line MS6001 machine. A complete description of the Primary Reference Design-Overall Plant Design Description has been developed and has been documented. Trends in overall plant performance improvement at higher pressure ratio and higher firing temperature are shown. It should be noted that the effect of pressure ratio on efficiency is significally enhanced at higher firing temperatures. It is shown that any improvement in overall plant thermal efficiency reflects about the same level of gain in Cost of Electricity (COE). The IGCC concepts are shown to be competitive in both performance and cost at current and near-term gas turbine firing temperatures of 1985/sup 0/F to 2100/sup 0/F. The savings that can be accumulated over a thirty-year plant life for a water-cooled gas turbine in an IGCC plant as compared to a state-of-the-art coal-fired steam plant are estimated. A total of $500 million over the life of a 1000 MW plant is projected. Also, this IGCC power plant has significant environmental advantages over equivalent coal-fired steam power plants.

  20. Operating experience feedback report: Reliability of safety-related steam turbine-driven standby pumps. Commercial power reactors, Volume 10

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boardman, J.R.

    1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report documents a detailed analysis of failure initiators, causes and design features for steam turbine assemblies (turbines with their related components, such as governors and valves) which are used as drivers for standby pumps in the auxiliary feedwater systems of US commercial pressurized water reactor plants, and in the high pressure coolant injection and reactor core isolation cooling systems of US commercial boiling water reactor plants. These standby pumps provide a redundant source of water to remove reactor core heat as specified in individual plant safety analysis reports. The period of review for this report was from January 1974 through December 1990 for licensee event reports (LERS) and January 1985 through December 1990 for Nuclear Plant Reliability Data System (NPRDS) failure data. This study confirmed the continuing validity of conclusions of earlier studies by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission and by the US nuclear industry that the most significant factors in failures of turbine-driven standby pumps have been the failures of the turbine-drivers and their controls. Inadequate maintenance and the use of inappropriate vendor technical information were identified as significant factors which caused recurring failures.

  1. STATEMENT OF CONSIDERATIONS REQUEST BY SIEMENS WESTINGHOUSE POWER...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    of improved reliability availability and maintainability (RAM) of existing and advanced gas turbine power plants by continuously monitoring the health of critical thermal barrier...

  2. Experience curves for power plant emission control technologies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rubin, Edward S.; Yeh, Sonia; Hounshell, David A

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    reduction in NO x emissions from coal-fired power plants tocombustion of coal, emissions from coal-fired power plantsemission control technologies now required on all new coal-fired power

  3. Binary Cycle Power Plant | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of InspectorConcentrating SolarElectricEnergyCTBarre Biomass FacilityOregon:Great EscapeBinary Cycle Power Plant

  4. Flash Steam Power Plant | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublicIDAPowerPlantSitingConstruction.pdfNotify98.pdf Jump to:Siting.pdfFiskdale,Five StarFlash Steam Power

  5. Geothermal/Power Plant | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revision hasInformation Earth's Heat Jump to: navigation, searchTo encourage the<Geothermal/Power Plant

  6. Nuclear power plant performance assessment pertaining to plant aging in France and the United States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guyer, Brittany (Brittany Leigh)

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The effect of aging on nuclear power plant performance has come under increased scrutiny in recent years. The approaches used to make an assessment of this effect strongly influence the economics of nuclear power plant ...

  7. SENSIBLE HEAT STORAGE FOR A SOLAR THERMAL POWER PLANT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baldwin, Thomas F.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    with Brayton-cycle gas turbine topping . , . . , , -Effect of Brayton Cycle. Gas Turbine Topping on the Grossof either Brayton-cycle gas turbines or Rankine-cycle steam

  8. SENSIBLE HEAT STORAGE FOR A SOLAR THERMAL POWER PLANT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baldwin, Thomas F.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the Performance of Steam Turbine Generators 16.500 KWPeriod, hours Steam Turbine Beat Rate, Discharging, !! WGeneral Electric Company, Steam Turbine-Generator Products

  9. Technical Report for the MVB (MSW & Biomass) Waste to Energy Plants and the AVG Hazardous WTE Plant in Hamburg, Germany

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Columbia University

    with a small steam-turbine producing 3 MW for the plant's internal needs · The filtration part of the plant is equipped with SNCR technology, baghouse filters, HCl & SO2 scrubbers Power Plant: Coal and Gas MVB Unit 3 per line, at 90 bar and 500° C · The plant is equipped with a steam turbine of 20 MWe · On 2009

  10. Optimal Endogenous Carbon Taxes Electric Power Supply Chains with Power Plants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nagurney, Anna

    Optimal Endogenous Carbon Taxes for Electric Power Supply Chains with Power Plants Anna Nagurney for the determination of optimal carbon taxes applied to electric power plants in the con- text of electric power supply portion of such policy inter- ventions directed at the electric power industry. The general framework

  11. BOILER MATERIALS FOR ULTRASUPERCRITICAL COAL POWER PLANTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    R. Viswanathan

    2002-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The principal objective of this project is to develop materials technology for use in ultrasupercritical (USC) plant boilers capable of operating with 760 C (1400 F), and up to 5500 psi with emphasis upon 35 MPa (5000 psi) steam. In the 21st century, the world faces the critical challenge of providing abundant, cheap electricity to meet the needs of a growing global population while at the same time preserving environmental values. Most studies of this issue conclude that a robust portfolio of generation technologies and fuels should be developed to assure that the United States will have adequate electricity supplies in a variety of possible future scenarios. The use of coal for electricity generation poses a unique set of challenges. On the one hand, coal is plentiful and available at low cost in much of the world, notably in the U.S., China, and India. Countries with large coal reserves will want to develop them to foster economic growth and energy security. On the other hand, traditional methods of coal combustion emit pollutants and CO{sub 2} at high levels relative to other generation options. Maintaining coal as a generation option in the 21st century will require methods for addressing these environmental issues. This project has established a government/industry consortium to undertake a five-year effort to evaluate and develop advanced materials that allow the use of advanced steam cycles in coal-based power plants. These advanced cycles, with steam temperatures up to 760 C, will increase the efficiency of coal-fired boilers from an average of 35% efficiency (current domestic fleet) to 47% (HHV). This efficiency increase will enable coal-fired power plants to generate electricity at competitive rates (irrespective of fuel costs) while reducing CO{sub 2} and other fuel-related emissions by as much as 29%. Success in achieving these objectives will support a number of broader goals. First, from a national prospective, the program will identify advanced materials that will make it possible to maintain a cost-competitive, environmentally-acceptable coal-based electric generation option. High sulfur coals will specifically benefit in this respect by having these advanced materials evaluated in high-sulfur coal firing conditions and from the significant reductions in waste generation inherent in the increased operational efficiency. Second, from a national perspective, the results of this program will enable domestic boiler manufacturers to successfully compete in world markets for building high-efficiency coal-fired power plants.

  12. Using auxiliary gas power for CCS energy needs in retrofitted coal power plants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bashadi, Sarah (Sarah Omer)

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Post-combustion capture retrofits are expected to a near-term option for mitigating CO 2 emissions from existing coal-fired power plants. Much of the literature proposes using power from the existing coal plant and thermal ...

  13. The need for high density energy storage for wind turbine and solar power has proven to be a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Botea, Adi

    1 The need for high density energy storage for wind turbine and solar power has proven cost of these components but also considerably improve their lifetime and reliability as it removes. New breakthrough for single-layer ceramic capacitors with high performance #12;2 Benefits ANU has

  14. Valuation of a Spark Spread: an LM6000 Power Plant

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saskatchewan, University of

    report in the form of this academic paper. We have modified the plant- specific results in Section 8 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16 5 Monte Carlo Simulations 17 6 Modeling the Operating Characteristics 19 6.1 Plant Operating Modes power plant that can offer peaking capacity, and some baseload power delivery. We consider 4 operating

  15. E-Print Network 3.0 - axis wind turbines Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    turbines Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: axis wind turbines...

  16. Oscillation Damping: A Comparison of Wind and Photovoltaic Power Plant Capabilities: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Singh, M.; Allen, A.; Muljadi, E.; Gevorgian, V.

    2014-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This work compares and contrasts strategies for providing oscillation damping services from wind power plants and photovoltaic power plants.

  17. Development of standardized air-blown coal gasifier/gas turbine concepts for future electric power systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sadowski, R.S.; Brown, M.J.; Harriz, J.T.; Ostrowski, E.

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The cost estimate provided for the DOE sponsored study of Air Blown Coal Gasification was developed from vendor quotes obtained directly for the equipment needed in the 50 MW, 100 MW, and 200 MW sized plants and from quotes from other jobs that have been referenced to apply to the particular cycle. Quotes were generally obtained for the 100 MW cycle and a scale up/down factor was used to generate the cost estimates for the 200 MW and 50 MW cycles, respectively. Information from GTPro (property of Thermoflow, Inc.) was used to estimate the cost of the 200 MW and 50 MW gas turbine, HRSG, and steam turbines. To available the use of GTPro's estimated values for this equipment, a comparison was made between the quotes obtained for the 100 MW cycle (ABB GT 11N combustion turbine and a HSRG) against the estimated values by GTPro.

  18. Progress in Decommissioning the Humboldt Bay Power Plant - 13604

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rod, Kerry [PG and E Utility, Humboldt Bay Power Plant, 1000 King Salmon Ave. Eureka, CA 95503 (United States)] [PG and E Utility, Humboldt Bay Power Plant, 1000 King Salmon Ave. Eureka, CA 95503 (United States); Shelanskey, Steven K. [Anata Management Solutions, 5180 South Commerce Dr,, Suite F Murray, UT 84107 (United States)] [Anata Management Solutions, 5180 South Commerce Dr,, Suite F Murray, UT 84107 (United States); Kristofzski, John [CH2MHILL, 295 Bradley Blvd. Suite 300, Richland WA 99353 (United States)] [CH2MHILL, 295 Bradley Blvd. Suite 300, Richland WA 99353 (United States)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Decommissioning of the Pacific Gas and Electric (PG and E) Company Humboldt Bay Power Plant (HBPP) Unit 3 nuclear facility has now, after more than three decades of SAFSTOR and initial decommissioning work, transitioned to full-scale decommissioning. Decommissioning activities to date have been well orchestrated and executed in spite of an extremely small work site with space constricted even more by other concurrent on-site major construction projects including the demolition of four fossil units, construction of a new generating station and 60 KV switchyard upgrade. Full-scale decommissioning activities - now transitioning from Plant Systems Removal (PG and E self-perform) to Civil Works Projects (contractor performed) - are proceeding in a safe, timely, and cost effective manner. As a result of the successful decommissioning work to date (approximately fifty percent completed) and the intense planning and preparations for the remaining work, there is a high level of confidence for completion of all HBPP Unit 3 decommissions activities in 2018. Strategic planning and preparations to transition into full-scale decommissioning was carried out in 2008 by a small, highly focused project team. This planning was conducted concurrent with other critical planning requirements such as the loading of spent nuclear fuel into dry storage at the Independent Spent Fuel Storage Installation (ISFSI) finishing December 2008. Over the past four years, 2009 through 2012, the majority of decommissioning work has been installation of site infrastructure and removal of systems and components, known as the Plant System Removal Phase, where work scope was dynamic with significant uncertainty, and it was self-performed by PG and E. As HBPP Decommissioning transitions from the Plant System Removal Phase to the Civil Works Projects Phase, where work scope is well defined, a contracting plan similar to that used for Fossil Decommissioning will be implemented. Award of five major work scopes in various stages of development are planned as they include: Turbine Building Demolition, Nuclear Facilities Demolition and Excavation, Intake and Discharge Canal Remediation, Office Facility Demobilization, and Final Site Restoration. Benefits realized by transitioning to the Civil Works Projects Phase with predominant firm fixed-price/fixed unit price contracting include single civil works contractor who can coordinate concrete shaving, liner removal, structural removal, and other demolition activities; streamline financial control; reduce PG and E overhead staffing; and provide a specialized Bidder Team with experience from other similar projects. (authors)

  19. Optimizing Dam Operations for Power and for Fish: an Overview of the US Department of Energy and US Army Corps of Engineers ADvanced Turbine Development R&D. A Pre-Conference Workshop at HydroVision 2006, Oregon Convention Center, Portland, Oregon July 31, 2006

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dauble, Dennis D.

    2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This booklet contains abstracts of presentations made at a preconference workshop on the US Department of Energy and US Army Corps of Engineers hydroturbine programs. The workshop was held in conjunction with Hydrovision 2006 July 31, 2006 at the Oregon Convention Center in Portland Oregon. The workshop was organized by the Corps of Engineers, PNNL, and the DOE Wind and Hydropower Program. Presenters gave overviews of the Corps' Turbine Survival Program and the history of the DOE Advanced Turbine Development Program. They also spoke on physical hydraulic models, biocriteria for safe fish passage, pressure investigations using the Sensor Fish Device, blade strike models, optimization of power plant operations, bioindex testing of turbine performance, approaches to measuring fish survival, a systems view of turbine performance, and the Turbine Survival Program design approach.

  20. Apparatus and methods of reheating gas turbine cooling steam and high pressure steam turbine exhaust in a combined cycle power generating system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tomlinson, Leroy Omar (Niskayuna, NY); Smith, Raub Warfield (Ballston Lake, NY)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In a combined cycle system having a multi-pressure heat recovery steam generator, a gas turbine and steam turbine, steam for cooling gas turbine components is supplied from the intermediate pressure section of the heat recovery steam generator supplemented by a portion of the steam exhausting from the HP section of the steam turbine, steam from the gas turbine cooling cycle and the exhaust from the HP section of the steam turbine are combined for flow through a reheat section of the HRSG. The reheated steam is supplied to the IP section inlet of the steam turbine. Thus, where gas turbine cooling steam temperature is lower than optimum, a net improvement in performance is achieved by flowing the cooling steam exhausting from the gas turbine and the exhaust steam from the high pressure section of the steam turbine in series through the reheater of the HRSG for applying steam at optimum temperature to the IP section of the steam turbine.

  1. Electromagnetic Compatibility in Nuclear Power Plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ewing, P.D.; Kercel, S.W.; Korsah, K.; Wood, R.T.

    1999-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Electromagnetic compatibility (EMC) has long been a key element of qualification for mission critical instrumentation and control (I&C) systems used by the U.S. military. The potential for disruption of safety-related I&C systems by electromagnetic interference (EMI), radio-frequency interference (RFI), or power surges is also an issue of concern for the nuclear industry. Experimental investigations of the potential vulnerability of advanced safety systems to EMI/RFI, coupled with studies of reported events at nuclear power plants (NPPs) that are attributed to EMI/RFI, confirm the safety significance of EMC for both analog and digital technology. As a result, Oak Ridge National Laboratory has been engaged in the development of the technical basis for guidance that addresses EMC for safety-related I&C systems in NPPs. This research has involved the identification of engineering practices to minimize the potential impact of EMI/RFI and power surges and an evaluation of the ambient electromagnetic environment at NPPs to tailor those practices for use by the nuclear industry. Recommendations for EMC guidance have been derived from these research findings and are summarized in this paper.

  2. Corrosion Investigations at Masned Combined Heat and Power Plant

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Corrosion Investigations at Masnedø Combined Heat and Power Plant Part VI Melanie Montgomery AT MASNED? COMBINED HEAT AND POWER PLANT PART VI CONTENTS 1. Introduction Department for Manufacturing Engineering Technical University of Denmark Asger Karlsson Energi E2 Power

  3. Camargo Waste to Energy Power Plant Hamed Zamenian1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhou, Yaoqi

    Camargo Waste to Energy Power Plant Hamed Zamenian1 , Eminou Nasser 1 , Matt Ray2 , Tom Iseley3 1 and Technology, IUPUI The Camargo Waste to Energy Power plant project is being proposed to dispose of Municipal are discarded in landfills. The Camargo Waste to Energy (WTE) power station is an opportunity to continue

  4. Steam Turbine Materials and Corrosion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Holcomb, G.H.; Hsu, D.H.

    2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ultra-supercritical (USC) power plants offer the promise of higher efficiencies and lower emissions. Current goals of the U.S. Department of Energys Advanced Power Systems Initiatives include coal generation at 60% efficiency, which would require steam temperatures of up to 760 C. In prior years this project examined the steamside oxidation of alloys for use in high- and intermediate-pressure USC turbines. This steamside oxidation research is continuing and progress is presented, with emphasis on chromia evaporation.

  5. Risk-informed incident management for nuclear power plants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, Curtis Lee, 1966-

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Decision making as a part of nuclear power plant operations is a critical, but common, task. Plant management is forced to make decisions that may have safety and economic consequences. Formal decision theory offers the ...

  6. Microstructural Evolution in Power Plant Steels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cambridge, University of

    steam is condensed and recirculated. The Carnot efficiency E of such a cycle is given by: E = T1 - T2 T1, then superheated. It is injected through nozzles onto the blades of the high pressure (HP) turbines. Following this. It is therefore desirable from both economic and environ- mental points of view to use as high an operating

  7. Steam-Electric Power-Plant-Cooling Handbook

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sonnichsen, J.C.; Carlson, H.A.; Charles, P.D.; Jacobson, L.D.; Tadlock, L.A.

    1982-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Steam-Electric Power Plant Cooling Handbook provides summary data on steam-electric power plant capacity, generation and number of plants for each cooling means, by Electric Regions, Water Resource Regions and National Electric Reliability Council Areas. Water consumption by once-through cooling, cooling ponds and wet evaporative towers is discussed and a methodology for computation of water consumption is provided for a typical steam-electric plant which uses a wet evaporative tower or cooling pond for cooling.

  8. Power plant report (EIA-759), current (for microcomputers). Data file

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of Form EIA-759, formerly FPC-4, Power Plant Report, is to collect data necessary to fulfill regulatory responsibility; ensure power reliability; and measure fuel consumption and power production. The data diskette contains data collected by the survey. Specific ownership code, prime mover code, fuel code, company code, plant name, current capacity, fuel name, old capacity, effective date - month/year, status, multistate code, current year, generation, consumption, stocks, electric plant code, and NERC code are included.

  9. Next generation geothermal power plants. Draft final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brugman, John; Hattar, John; Nichols, Kenneth; Esaki, Yuri

    1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The goal of this project is to develop concepts for the next generation geothermal power plant(s) (NGGPP). This plant, compared to existing plants, will generate power for a lower levelized cost and will be more competitive with fossil fuel fired power plants. The NGGPP will utilize geothermal resources efficiently and will be equipped with contingencies to mitigate the risk of reservoir performance. The NGGPP design will attempt to minimize emission of pollutants and consumption of surface water and/or geothermal fluids for cooling service.

  10. Maryland Nuclear Profile - Calvert Cliffs Nuclear Power Plant

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Calvert Cliffs Nuclear Power Plant" "Unit","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Summer capacity factor (percent)","Type","Commercial operation date","License...

  11. New York Nuclear Profile - R E Ginna Nuclear Power Plant

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    R E Ginna Nuclear Power Plant" "Unit","Summer Capacity (MW)","Net Generation (Thousand MWh)","Summer Capacity Factor (Percent)","Type","Commercial Operation Date","License...

  12. advanced power plant: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    . . . . 18 3.4.1 Heat Exchanger - Code description . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 3.4.2 Simulation ResultsADVANCED POWER PLANT MODELING WITH APPLICATIONS TO THE ADVANCED BOILING...

  13. advanced power plants: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    . . . . 18 3.4.1 Heat Exchanger - Code description . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 3.4.2 Simulation ResultsADVANCED POWER PLANT MODELING WITH APPLICATIONS TO THE ADVANCED BOILING...

  14. Virtual Power Plant Simulation and Control Scheme Design.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Zhenwei

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ?? Virtual Power Plant (VPP) is a concept that aggregate Distributed Energy Resources (DER) together, aims to overcome the capacity limits of single DER and (more)

  15. Sensitivity analysis for the outages of nuclear power plants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kengy Barty

    2012-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Feb 17, 2012 ... Abstract: Nuclear power plants must be regularly shut down in order to perform refueling and maintenance operations. The scheduling of the...

  16. Reducing Peak Demand to Defer Power Plant Construction in Oklahoma

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Reducing Peak Demand to Defer Power Plant Construction in Oklahoma Located in the heart of "Tornado Alley," Oklahoma Gas & Electric Company's (OG&E) electric grid faces significant...

  17. Parabolic Trough Solar Thermal Electric Power Plants (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This fact sheet provides an overview of the potential for parabolic trough solar thermal electric power plants, especially in the Southwestern U.S.

  18. Geothermal Power Plants Minimizing Solid Waste and Recovering Minerals

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Although many geothermal power plants generate no appreciable solid waste, the unique characteristics of some geothermal fluids require special attention to handle entrained solid byproducts.

  19. Simplified Methodology for Designing Parabolic Trough Solar Power Plants.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vasquez Padilla, Ricardo

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ?? The performance of parabolic trough based solar power plants over the last 25 years has proven that this technology is an excellent alternative for (more)

  20. Simplified Methodology for Designing Parabolic Trough Solar Power Plants.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vasquez Padilla, Ricardo

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ??The performance of parabolic trough based solar power plants over the last 25 years has proven that this technology is an excellent alternative for the (more)

  1. Rock bed thermal storage for concentrating solar power plants.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Allen, Kenneth Guy

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ??ENGLISH ABSTRACT: Concentrating solar power plants are a promising means of generating electricity. However, they are dependent on the sun as a source of energy, (more)

  2. E-Print Network 3.0 - aube storage plant Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    James E. Mason* and Cristina L. Archer1 Summary: supply with electricity from compressed air energy storage combustion turbine (CAES CT) power plants... compressed air energy...

  3. E-Print Network 3.0 - atomic plant gathers Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    to balance and firm variable wind electricity... supply with electricity from compressed air energy storage combustion turbine (CAES CT) power plants... . The findings indicate...

  4. E-Print Network 3.0 - atomic plant project Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    to balance and firm variable wind electricity... supply with electricity from compressed air energy storage combustion turbine (CAES CT) power plants... . The findings indicate...

  5. Benchmarking Variable Cost Performance in an Industrial Power Plant

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kane, J. F.; Bailey, W. F.

    One of the most perplexing problems for industrial power plants committed to improving competitiveness is measuring variable cost performance over time. Because variable costs like fuel and electricity represent the overwhelming majority of power...

  6. SENSIBLE HEAT STORAGE FOR A SOLAR THERMAL POWER PLANT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baldwin, Thomas F.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Design. Propofied Solar Cooling Tower Type Wet-Cooled Powerdry-cooling tower was used in the proposed solar power plantTower Power-Generation Subsystem Summary An Overall Summary of the Proposed Solar

  7. Can New Nuclear Power Plants be Project Financed?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taylor, Simon

    This paper considers the prospects for financing a wave of new nuclear power plants (NPP) using project financing, which is used widely in large capital intensive infrastructure investments, including the power and gas sectors, but has...

  8. A Wavelet-Based Variability Model (WVM) for Solar PV Power Plants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lave, Matthew; Kleissl, Jan; Stein, Joshua S

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the WVM and other power plant simulation methods highlightedpower plant output clear-sky index agrees with the simulationscale power plant in Copper Mountain, NV. The WVM simulation

  9. A test case for implementing feedback control in a micro hydro power plant.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Suliman, Ahmad

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ??Micro-hydro turbines generate power for small villages and industries in Afghanistan. They usually produce less than 100 kW of power. Currently the flow into the (more)

  10. Streamlining the Certification Process for New Power Plants in Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Treadway, N.

    resource alternatives and sets up barriers to others. There is general agreement that the financial incentives differ for traditional power plant investments, purchased power, small power production, and demand-side management. The current debate... to construct 1,200 megawatts of base-load capacity to replaced purchased power. Coal and lignite fuel options were proposed in two plant sizes: three 400-megawatt units or two 600-megawatt units. A hearing was set to begin in March 1985. TNP witnesses...

  11. Conceptual Design of a 100 MWe Modular Molten Salt Power Tower Plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    James E. Pacheco; Carter Moursund, Dale Rogers, David Wasyluk

    2011-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

    A conceptual design of a 100 MWe modular molten salt solar power tower plant has been developed which can provide capacity factors in the range of 35 to 75%. Compared to single tower plants, the modular design provides a higher degree of flexibility in achieving the desired customer's capacity factor and is obtained simply by adjusting the number of standard modules. Each module consists of a standard size heliostat field and receiver system, hence reengineering and associated unacceptable performance uncertainties due to scaling are eliminated. The modular approach with multiple towers also improves plant availability. Heliostat field components, receivers and towers are shop assembled allowing for high quality and minimal field assembly. A centralized thermal-storage system stores hot salt from the receivers, allowing nearly continuous power production, independent of solar energy collection, and improved parity with the grid. A molten salt steam generator converts the stored thermal energy into steam, which powers a steam turbine generator to produce electricity. This paper describes the conceptual design of the plant, the advantages of modularity, expected performance, pathways to cost reductions, and environmental impact.

  12. Quantifying the Impact of Wind Turbine Wakes on Power Output at Offshore R. J. BARTHELMIE,*,1 S. C. PRYOR,*,1 S. T. FRANDSEN,1 K. S. HANSEN,# J. G. SCHEPERS,@

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pryor, Sara C.

    Quantifying the Impact of Wind Turbine Wakes on Power Output at Offshore Wind Farms R. J. This research is focused on improving the understanding of, and modeling of, wind turbine wakes in order to make. Differences in turbine spacing (10.5 versus 7 rotor diameters) are not differentiable in wake-related power

  13. Wood Burning Combined Cycle Power Plant

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Culley, J. W.; Bourgeois, H. S.

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . Portland General Electric ~f Portland, Oregon was sponsored to perform the design study with project management provided by F. W. Braun Engineers of Hillsboro, Oregon. rpe Fern Engineering Division of Thomassen U.S. of Bourne, Massachusetts provided... the gas turbin~, process evaluation and control support. Hauge International of Portland, Maine provided tre design input for the ceramic heat exchanger. 782 ESL-IE-84-04-136 Proceedings from the Sixth Annual Industrial Energy Technology Conference...

  14. Inspection of Nuclear Power Plant Containment Structures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Graves, H.L.; Naus, D.J.; Norris, W.E.

    1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Safety-related nuclear power plant (NPP) structures are designed to withstand loadings from a number of low-probability external and interval events, such as earthquakes, tornadoes, and loss-of-coolant accidents. Loadings incurred during normal plant operation therefore generally are not significant enough to cause appreciable degradation. However, these structures are susceptible to aging by various processes depending on the operating environment and service conditions. The effects of these processes may accumulate within these structures over time to cause failure under design conditions, or lead to costly repair. In the late 1980s and early 1990s several occurrences of degradation of NPP structures were discovered at various facilities (e.g., corrosion of pressure boundary components, freeze- thaw damage of concrete, and larger than anticipated loss of prestressing force). Despite these degradation occurrences and a trend for an increasing rate of occurrence, in-service inspection of the safety-related structures continued to be performed in a somewhat cursory manner. Starting in 1991, the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (USNRC) published the first of several new requirements to help ensure that adequate in-service inspection of these structures is performed. Current regulatory in-service inspection requirements are reviewed and a summary of degradation experience presented. Nondestructive examination techniques commonly used to inspect the NPP steel and concrete structures to identify and quantify the amount of damage present are reviewed. Finally, areas where nondestructive evaluation techniques require development (i.e., inaccessible portions of the containment pressure boundary, and thick heavily reinforced concrete sections are discussed.

  15. Development of standardized air-blown coal gasifier/gas turbine concepts for future electric power systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    CRS Sirrine (CRSS) is evaluating a novel IGCC process in which gases exiting the gasifier are burned in a gas turbine combustion system. The turbine exhaust gas is used to generate additional power in a conventional steam generator. This results in a significant increase in efficiency. However, the IGCC process requires development of novel approaches to control SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} emissions and alkali vapors which can damage downstream turbine components. Ammonia is produced from the reaction of coal-bound nitrogen with steam in the reducing zone of any fixed bed coal gasifier. This ammonia can be partially oxidized to NO{sub x} when the product gas is oxidized in a gas turbine combustor. Alkali metals vaporize in the high-temperature combustion zone of the gasifier and laser condense on the surface of small char or ash particles or on cooled metal surfaces. It these alkali-coated materials reach the gas turbine combustor, the alkali will revaporize condense on turbine blades and cause rapid high temperature corrosion. Efficiency reduction will result. PSI Technology Company (PSIT) was contracted by CRSS to evaluate and recommend solutions for NO{sub x} emissions and for alkali metals deposition. Various methods for NO{sub x} emission control and the potential process and economic impacts were evaluated. This included estimates of process performance, heat and mass balances around the combustion and heat transfer units and a preliminary economic evaluation. The potential for alkali metal vaporization and condensation at various points in the system was also estimated. Several control processes and evaluated, including an order of magnitude cost for the control process.

  16. Voltage/Pitch Control for Maximization and Regulation of Active/Reactive Powers in Wind Turbines with Uncertainties

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guo, Yi; Jiang, John N; Tang, Choon Yik; Ramakumar, Rama G

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper addresses the problem of controlling a variable-speed wind turbine with a Doubly Fed Induction Generator (DFIG), modeled as an electromechanically-coupled nonlinear system with rotor voltages and blade pitch angle as its inputs, active and reactive powers as its outputs, and most of the aerodynamic and mechanical parameters as its uncertainties. Using a blend of linear and nonlinear control strategies (including feedback linearization, pole placement, uncertainty estimation, and gradient-based potential function minimization) as well as time-scale separation in the dynamics, we develop a controller that is capable of maximizing the active power in the Maximum Power Tracking (MPT) mode, regulating the active power in the Power Regulation (PR) mode, seamlessly switching between the two modes, and simultaneously adjusting the reactive power to achieve a desired power factor. The controller consists of four cascaded components, uses realistic feedback signals, and operates without knowledge of the C_p-...

  17. Test Program for High Efficiency Gas Turbine Exhaust Diffuser

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Norris, Thomas R.

    2009-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This research relates to improving the efficiency of flow in a turbine exhaust, and thus, that of the turbine and power plant. The Phase I SBIR project demonstrated the technical viability of strutlets to control stalls on a model diffuser strut. Strutlets are a novel flow-improving vane concept intended to improve the efficiency of flow in turbine exhausts. Strutlets can help reduce turbine back pressure, and incrementally improve turbine efficiency, increase power, and reduce greenhouse gas emmission. The long-term goal is a 0.5 percent improvement of each item, averaged over the US gas turbine fleet. The strutlets were tested in a physical scale model of a gas turbine exhaust diffuser. The test flow passage is a straight, annular diffuser with three sets of struts. At the end of Phase 1, the ability of strutlets to keep flow attached to struts was demonstrated, but the strutlet drag was too high for a net efficiency advantage. An independently sponsored followup project did develop a highly-modified low-drag strutlet. In combination with other flow improving vanes, complicance to the stated goals was demonstrated for for simple cycle power plants, and to most of the goals for combined cycle power plants using this particular exhaust geometry. Importantly, low frequency diffuser noise was reduced by 5 dB or more, compared to the baseline. Appolicability to other diffuser geometries is yet to be demonstrated.

  18. Baca geothermal demonstration project. Power plant detail design document

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1981-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Baca Geothermal Demonstration Power Plant document presents the design criteria and detail design for power plant equipment and systems, as well as discussing the rationale used to arrive at the design. Where applicable, results of in-house evaluations of alternatives are presented.

  19. A New Wind Turbine Control Method to Smooth Power Generation. Modelling and Comparison to Wind Turbine Frequency Control.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Solberg, Olov

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ??Following the significant increase of world wide installed wind power during the first decade of the 21st century, transmission system operators are faced with new (more)

  20. A Disturbance Margin For Quantifying Limits on Power Smoothing by Wind Turbines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maggiore, Manfredi

    wind variation a wind turbine can absorb in variable speed mode while still being guaranteed to operate speed and generator torque to store and release energy. This ability must be constrained by turbine speed and generator torque limits. To date, work in the literature is conceptual and does not indicate

  1. Advanced intelligent coordinated control of coal fired power plant based on fuzzy reasoning and auto-tuning

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, S.Y.; Liu, H.B.; Cai, W.J.; Soh, Y.C.; Xie, L.H. [Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai (China)

    2004-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The load following operation of coal-fired boiler-turbine unit in power plants can lead to changes in operating points, and it results in nonlinear variations of the plant variables and parameters. As there exist strong couplings between the main steam pressure control loop and the power output control loop in the boiler-turbine unit with large time-delay and uncertainties, automatic coordinated control of the two loops is a very challenging problem. This paper presents a new coordinated control strategy (CCS) which is organized into two levels: a basic control level and a high supervision level. PID-type controllers are used in the basic level to perform basic control functions while the decoupling between two control loops can be realized in the high level. Moreover, PID-type controllers can be auto-tuned to achieve a better control performance in the whole operating range and to reject the unmeasurable disturbances. A special subclass of fuzzy inference systems, namely the Gaussian partition system with evenly spaced midpoints, is also proposed to auto-tune the PID controller in the main steam pressure loop based on the error signal and its first difference to overcome uncertainties caused by changing fuel calorific value, machine wear, contamination of the boiler heating surfaces and plant modeling errors, etc. The developed CCS has been implemented in a power plant in China, and satisfactory industrial operation results demonstrate that the proposed control strategy has enhanced the adaptability and robustness of the process.

  2. Brady Power Plant steam quality and purity enhancement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hoffman, A. [ESI Energy, West Palm Beach, FL (United States); Jung, D. [Two-Phase Engineering & Research, Inc., Santa Rosa, CA (United States)

    1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Brine carry-over from the high pressure and low pressure separators was causing heavy scale build-up on the turbine nozzles and components. This resulted in higher maintenance, reduced power generation and contributed to premature failures of a turbine rotor. Several options to mitigate the impurity laden steam problem, including conventional and experimental methods, were investigated. ESI, seeking cost-effective technology to improve the bottom line, chose a promising but unconventional low-cost, fast track alternative to revamp the facility. This commitment resulted in up to a 25 fold improvement in steam quality and purity; and was engineered and installed in one half (50%) the time, for one third (33%) the cost of a conventional geothermal design.

  3. Compressor discharge bleed air circuit in gas turbine plants and related method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Anand, Ashok Kumar (Niskayuna, NY); Berrahou, Philip Fadhel (Latham, NY); Jandrisevits, Michael (Clifton Park, NY)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A gas turbine system that includes a compressor, a turbine component and a load, wherein fuel and compressor discharge bleed air are supplied to a combustor and gaseous products of combustion are introduced into the turbine component and subsequently exhausted to atmosphere. A compressor discharge bleed air circuit removes bleed air from the compressor and supplies one portion of the bleed air to the combustor and another portion of the compressor discharge bleed air to an exhaust stack of the turbine component in a single cycle system, or to a heat recovery steam generator in a combined cycle system. In both systems, the bleed air diverted from the combustor may be expanded in an air expander to reduce pressure upstream of the exhaust stack or heat recovery steam generator.

  4. Compressor discharge bleed air circuit in gas turbine plants and related method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Anand, Ashok Kumar (Niskayuna, NY); Berrahou, Philip Fadhel (Latham, NY); Jandrisevits, Michael (Clifton Park, NY)

    2003-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

    A gas turbine system that includes a compressor, a turbine component and a load, wherein fuel and compressor discharge bleed air are supplied to a combustor and gaseous products of combustion are introduced into the turbine component and subsequently exhausted to atmosphere. A compressor discharge bleed air circuit removes bleed air from the compressor and supplies one portion of the bleed air to the combustor and another portion of the compressor discharge bleed air to an exhaust stack of the turbine component in a single cycle system, or to a heat recovery steam generator in a combined cycle system. In both systems, the bleed air diverted from the combustor may be expanded in an air expander to reduce pressure upstream of the exhaust stack or heat recovery steam generator.

  5. Computer-Aided Design Reveals Potential of Gas Turbine Cogeneration in Chemical and Petrochemical Plants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nanny, M. D.; Koeroghlian, M. M.; Baker, W. J.

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Gas turbine cogeneration cycles provide a simple and economical solution to the problems created by rising fuel and electricity costs. These cycles can be designed to accommodate a wide range of electrical, steam, and process heating demands...

  6. Simulating solar power plant variability : a review of current methods.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lave, Matthew; Ellis, Abraham [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM; Stein, Joshua S. [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM

    2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    It is important to be able to accurately simulate the variability of solar PV power plants for grid integration studies. We aim to inform integration studies of the ease of implementation and application-specific accuracy of current PV power plant output simulation methods. This report reviews methods for producing simulated high-resolution (sub-hour or even sub-minute) PV power plant output profiles for variability studies and describes their implementation. Two steps are involved in the simulations: estimation of average irradiance over the footprint of a PV plant and conversion of average irradiance to plant power output. Six models are described for simulating plant-average irradiance based on inputs of ground-measured irradiance, satellite-derived irradiance, or proxy plant measurements. The steps for converting plant-average irradiance to plant power output are detailed to understand the contributions to plant variability. A forthcoming report will quantify the accuracy of each method using application-specific validation metrics.

  7. An acoustic energy framework for predicting combustion- driven acoustic instabilities in premixed gas-turbines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ibrahim, Zuhair M. A.

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of Engineering for Gas Turbines and Power, 2000. Vol. 122:of Engineering for Gas Turbines and Power, 2000. Vol. 122:in Lean Premixed Gas Turbine Combustors," Journal of

  8. Thermoeconomic design optimization of a KRW-based IGCC power plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tsatsaronis, G.; Lin, L.; Pisa, J.; Tawfik, T. (Tennessee Technological Univ., Cookeville, TN (United States). Center for Electric Power)

    1991-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report discussed the cost and efficiency optimization of an integrated gasification-combined-cycle (IGCC) power plant design and the effects of important design options and parameters. Advanced thermoeconomic techniques were used to evaluate and optimize a given IGCC concept which uses Illinois No. 6 bituminous coal, air-blown KRW coal gasifiers, a hot gas cleanup system, and GE MS7001F gas turbines. Three optimal design concepts are presented and discussed in the report. Two of the concepts are characterized by minimum cost of electricity at two different values of the steam high pressure. The third concept represents the thermodynamic optimum. This study identified several differences between the original design and the design of the optimized cases. Compared with the original concept, significant annual savings are achieved in the cost optimal cases. Comparisons were made between results obtained using both the old and the new performance data for the MS7001F gas turbine. This report discusses the effects of gasification temperature, steam high pressure, coal moisture, and various design options on the overall plant efficiency and cost of electricity. Cost sensitivity studies were conducted and recommendations for future studies were made.

  9. Thermoeconomic design optimization of a KRW-based IGCC power plant. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tsatsaronis, G.; Lin, L.; Pisa, J.; Tawfik, T. [Tennessee Technological Univ., Cookeville, TN (United States). Center for Electric Power

    1991-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report discussed the cost and efficiency optimization of an integrated gasification-combined-cycle (IGCC) power plant design and the effects of important design options and parameters. Advanced thermoeconomic techniques were used to evaluate and optimize a given IGCC concept which uses Illinois No. 6 bituminous coal, air-blown KRW coal gasifiers, a hot gas cleanup system, and GE MS7001F gas turbines. Three optimal design concepts are presented and discussed in the report. Two of the concepts are characterized by minimum cost of electricity at two different values of the steam high pressure. The third concept represents the thermodynamic optimum. This study identified several differences between the original design and the design of the optimized cases. Compared with the original concept, significant annual savings are achieved in the cost optimal cases. Comparisons were made between results obtained using both the old and the new performance data for the MS7001F gas turbine. This report discusses the effects of gasification temperature, steam high pressure, coal moisture, and various design options on the overall plant efficiency and cost of electricity. Cost sensitivity studies were conducted and recommendations for future studies were made.

  10. COMPOUND H Y B R I D GEOTHERMAL-FOSSIL POWER PLANTS BY Ronald...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    a case might opt to consider hybrid plants of a different generic type such as the gas turbine topping system described elsewhere 6 , in an effort to obtain even higher values...

  11. Development of passive dry cooling system for power plants in arid land

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sabbagh, J.A.; Khalifa, A.M.A.; Olwi, I.A. (King Abdulaziz Univ., Jeddah (Saudi Arabia))

    1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Availability of large amounts of cooling water is essential for steam power plants. In inland arid areas, gas turbines are usually used for electric power generation at low efficiency and high operation costs. Dry cooling towers are another option but they are not effective with high ambient temperature. This work explores the use of radiative cooling for power plants and large refrigeration plants in inland arid areas. The work done consists of small scale experiments, mathematical models, a survey of the suitable materials, and a prototype experiment. This article presents the prototype experiment. The mathematical modeling was presented by the authors in Solar Energy 48(5), 279-286 (1992). A prototype experimental pond, 10m x 25m x 1m, covered with a painted white aluminum sheet was designed, constructed, and tested. The pond was divided into two layers. The experiment was carried out from January to June. Temperatures in the pond at different sections and depths, net radiation, and weather data were measured. At night the results showed an average heat rejection by radiation of 50 W/m[sup 2]. These results were comparable with the results of the mathematical model. The net result of the experiment was positive. It demonstrated the suitability of the covered pond as a heat rejection system in place where a sufficient amount of cooling water was not available.

  12. Optimal Scheduling of Industrial Combined Heat and Power Plants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grossmann, Ignacio E.

    Optimal Scheduling of Industrial Combined Heat and Power Plants under Time-sensitive Electricity Prices Sumit Mitra , Lige Sun , Ignacio E. Grossmann December 24, 2012 Abstract Combined heat and power companies. However, under-utilization can be a chance for tighter interaction with the power grid, which

  13. The Cost of CCS forThe Cost of CCS for Natural GasNatural Gas--Fired Power PlantsFired Power Plants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 The Cost of CCS forThe Cost of CCS for Natural GasNatural Gas--Fired Power PlantsFired Power Estimates for Natural GasNatural Gas--Fired Power PlantsFired Power Plants · 2007: Rubin, et al., Energy utilities again looking to natural gas combined cycle (NGCC) plants for new or replacement capacity

  14. Preconstruction of the Honey Lake Hybrid Power Plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1988-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The work undertaken under this Contract is the prosecution of the preconstruction activities, including preliminary engineering design, well field development, completion of environmental review and prosecution of permits, and the economic and financial analysis of the facility. The proposed power plant is located in northeastern California in Lassen County, approximately 25 miles east of the town of Susanville. The power plant will use a combination of wood residue and geothermal fluids for power generation. The plant, when fully constructed, will generate a combined net output of approximately 33 megawatts which will be sold to Pacific Gas and Electric Company (PG E) under existing long-term power sales contracts. Transfer of electricity to the PG E grid will require construction of a 22-mile transmission line from the power plant to Susanville. 11 refs., 12 figs., 7 tabs.

  15. Preconstruction of the Honey Lake Hybrid Power Plant: Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1988-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The work undertaken under this Contract is the prosecution of the preconstruction activities, including preliminary engineering design, well field development, completion of environmental review and prosecution of permits, and the economic and financial analysis of the facility. The proposed power plant is located in northeastern California in Lassen County, approximately 25 miles east of the town of Susanville. The power plant will use a combination of wood residue and geothermal fluids for power generation. The plant, when fully constructed, will generate a combined net output of approximately 33 megawatts which will be sold to Pacific Gas and Electric Company (PGandE) under existing long-term power sales contracts. Transfer of electricity to the PGandE grid will require construction of a 22-mile transmission line from the power plant to Susanville. 11 refs., 12 figs., 4 tabs.

  16. COOLING WATER ISSUES AND OPPORTUNITIES AT U.S. NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gary Vine

    2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report has been prepared for the Department of Energy, Office of Nuclear Energy (DOE-NE), for the purpose of providing a status report on the challenges and opportunities facing the U.S. commercial nuclear energy industry in the area of plant cooling water supply. The report was prompted in part by recent Second Circuit and Supreme Court decisions regarding cooling water system designs at existing thermo-electric power generating facilities in the U.S. (primarily fossil and nuclear plants). At issue in the courts have been Environmental Protection Agency regulations that define what constitutes Best Technology Available for intake structures that withdraw cooling water that is used to transfer and reject heat from the plants steam turbine via cooling water systems, while minimizing environmental impacts on aquatic life in nearby water bodies used to supply that cooling water. The report was also prompted by a growing recognition that cooling water availability and societal use conflicts are emerging as strategic energy and environmental issues, and that research and development (R&D) solutions to emerging water shortage issues are needed. In particular, cooling water availability is an important consideration in siting decisions for new nuclear power plants, and is an under-acknowledged issue in evaluating the pros and cons of retrofitting cooling towers at existing nuclear plants. Because of the significant ongoing research on water issues already being performed by industry, the national laboratories and other entities, this report relies heavily on ongoing work. In particular, this report has relied on collaboration with the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), including its recent work in the area of EPA regulations governing intake structures in thermoelectric cooling water systems.

  17. On Line Power Plant Performance Monitoring

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ahner, D. J.; Priestley, R. R.

    in achieving the best operation of the plant 3. To evaluate component performance and deterioration for use in a maintenance program 4. To develop cost data and incremental cost characteristics for the economic operation or dispatch of the unit... ? Analyze current plant?eQuipment status and diagnostics for preventive maintenance and equipment damage ? Provide current energy management and system dispatch operation information ? Capability for plant and equipment acceptance and periodic...

  18. The AP1000{sup R} nuclear power plant innovative features for extended station blackout mitigation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vereb, F.; Winters, J.; Schulz, T.; Cummins, E.; Oriani, L. [Westinghouse Electric Company LLC, 1000 Westinghouse Drive, Cranberry Township, PA 16066 (United States)

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Station Blackout (SBO) is defined as 'a condition wherein a nuclear power plant sustains a loss of all offsite electric power system concurrent with turbine trip and unavailability of all onsite emergency alternating current (AC) power system. Station blackout does not include the loss of available AC power to buses fed by station batteries through inverters or by alternate AC sources as defined in this section, nor does it assume a concurrent single failure or design basis accident...' in accordance with Reference 1. In this paper, the innovative features of the AP1000 plant design are described with their operation in the scenario of an extended station blackout event. General operation of the passive safety systems are described as well as the unique features which allow the AP1000 plant to cope for at least 7 days during station blackout. Points of emphasis will include: - Passive safety system operation during SBO - 'Fail-safe' nature of key passive safety system valves; automatically places the valve in a conservatively safe alignment even in case of multiple failures in all power supply systems, including normal AC and battery backup - Passive Spent Fuel Pool cooling and makeup water supply during SBO - Robustness of AP1000 plant due to the location of key systems, structures and components required for Safe Shutdown - Diverse means of supplying makeup water to the Passive Containment Cooling System (PCS) and the Spent Fuel Pool (SFP) through use of an engineered, safety-related piping interface and portable equipment, as well as with permanently installed onsite ancillary equipment. (authors)

  19. CERTIFICATION DOCKET WESTINGHOUSE ATOMIC POWER DEVELOPMENT PLANT

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    PITTSBURGH PLANT FOREST HILLS PITTSBURGH, PENNSYLVANIA Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy Office of Terminal Waste Disposal and Remedial Action Division of Remedial...

  20. Reactive power interconnection requirements for PV and wind plants : recommendations to NERC.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McDowell, Jason (General Electric, Schenectady, NY); Walling, Reigh (General Electric, Schenectady, NY); Peter, William (SunPower, Richmond, CA); Von Engeln, Edi (NV Energy, Reno, NV); Seymour, Eric (AEI, Fort Collins, CO); Nelson, Robert (Siemens Wind Turbines, Orlando, FL); Casey, Leo (Satcon, Boston, MA); Ellis, Abraham; Barker, Chris. (SunPower, Richmond, CA)

    2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Voltage on the North American bulk system is normally regulated by synchronous generators, which typically are provided with voltage schedules by transmission system operators. In the past, variable generation plants were considered very small relative to conventional generating units, and were characteristically either induction generator (wind) or line-commutated inverters (photovoltaic) that have no inherent voltage regulation capability. However, the growing level of penetration of non-traditional renewable generation - especially wind and solar - has led to the need for renewable generation to contribute more significantly to power system voltage control and reactive power capacity. Modern wind-turbine generators, and increasingly PV inverters as well, have considerable dynamic reactive power capability, which can be further enhanced with other reactive support equipment at the plant level to meet interconnection requirements. This report contains a set of recommendations to the North-America Electricity Reliability Corporation (NERC) as part of Task 1-3 (interconnection requirements) of the Integration of Variable Generation Task Force (IVGTF) work plan. The report discusses reactive capability of different generator technologies, reviews existing reactive power standards, and provides specific recommendations to improve existing interconnection standards.

  1. Advanced virtual energy simulation training and research: IGCC with CO2 capture power plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zitney, S.; Liese, E.; Mahapatra, P.; Bhattacharyya, D.; Provost, G.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this presentation, we highlight the deployment of a real-time dynamic simulator of an integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power plant with CO{sub 2} capture at the Department of Energy's (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory's (NETL) Advanced Virtual Energy Simulation Training and Research (AVESTARTM) Center. The Center was established as part of the DOE's accelerating initiative to advance new clean coal technology for power generation. IGCC systems are an attractive technology option, generating low-cost electricity by converting coal and/or other fuels into a clean synthesis gas mixture in a process that is efficient and environmentally superior to conventional power plants. The IGCC dynamic simulator builds on, and reaches beyond, conventional power plant simulators to merge, for the first time, a 'gasification with CO{sub 2} capture' process simulator with a 'combined-cycle' power simulator. Fueled with coal, petroleum coke, and/or biomass, the gasification island of the simulated IGCC plant consists of two oxygen-blown, downward-fired, entrained-flow, slagging gasifiers with radiant syngas coolers and two-stage sour shift reactors, followed by a dual-stage acid gas removal process for CO{sub 2} capture. The combined cycle island consists of two F-class gas turbines, steam turbine, and a heat recovery steam generator with three-pressure levels. The dynamic simulator can be used for normal base-load operation, as well as plant start-up and shut down. The real-time dynamic simulator also responds satisfactorily to process disturbances, feedstock blending and switchovers, fluctuations in ambient conditions, and power demand load shedding. In addition, the full-scope simulator handles a wide range of abnormal situations, including equipment malfunctions and failures, together with changes initiated through actions from plant field operators. By providing a comprehensive IGCC operator training system, the AVESTAR Center is poised to develop a workforce well-prepared to operate and control commercial-scale gasification-based power plants capable of 90% pre-combustion CO{sub 2} capture and compression, as well as low sulfur, mercury, and NOx emissions. With additional support from the NETL-Regional University Alliance (NETL-RUA), the Center will educate and train engineering students and researchers by providing hands-on 'learning by operating' experience The AVESTAR Center also offers unique collaborative R&D opportunities in high-fidelity dynamic modeling, advanced process control, real-time optimization, and virtual plant simulation. Objectives and goals are aimed at safe and effective management of power generation systems for optimal efficiency, while protecting the environment. To add another dimension of realism to the AVESTAR experience, NETL will introduce an immersive training system with innovative three-dimensional virtual reality technology. Wearing a stereoscopic headset or eyewear, trainees will enter an interactive virtual environment that will allow them to move freely throughout the simulated 3-D facility to study and learn various aspects of IGCC plant operation, control, and safety. Such combined operator and immersive training systems go beyond traditional simulation and include more realistic scenarios, improved communication, and collaboration among co-workers.

  2. Microsoft PowerPoint - Turbine Generator Study 14-06-17

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    SWPA Engineering Analysis Program Turbine Replacement and Generator p Rewind Lee Beverly- SWL Project Manager D B j h SWT P j t M Dan Brueggenjohann SWT Project Manager Dan Ramirez...

  3. The Hybrid Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (SOFC) and Gas Turbine (GT) Systems Steady State Modeling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Universit de

    The Hybrid Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (SOFC) and Gas Turbine (GT) Systems Steady State Modeling Penyarat Fuel Cells (SOFCs) are of great interest nowadays. The feature of SOFCs makes them suitable for hybrid plants offer high cycle efficiencies. In this work a hybrid solid oxide fuel cell and gas turbine power

  4. Latest advances in steam turbine design, blading, repairs, condition assessment, and condenser interaction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rasmussen, D.M. (Turbine Consultants, Inc., Milwaukee, WI (US))

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This book contains papers presented at a conference on power generation. Topics covered include: a life extension approach for steam turbine blading in Electricite de France fossil plants, and on site 430 MW high pressure reheat turbine shell cracking and distortion repairs.

  5. M. Bahrami ENSC 461 (S 11) Brayton Cycle 1 Open GasTurbine Cycle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bahrami, Majid

    generation. High thermal efficiencies up to 44%. Suitable for combined cycles (with steam power plantM. Bahrami ENSC 461 (S 11) Brayton Cycle 1 Open GasTurbine Cycle Fig.1: Schematic for an open gas-turbine cycle. Working Principal Fresh air enters the compressor at ambient temperature where its pressure

  6. Assessment of Inlet Cooling to Enhance Output of a Fleet of Gas Turbines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, T.; Braquet, L.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An analysis was made to assess the potential enhancement of a fleet of 14 small gas turbines' power output by employing an inlet air cooling scheme at a gas process plant. Various gas turbine (GT) inlet air cooling schemes were reviewed. The inlet...

  7. turbine thermal index | netl.doe.gov

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    obtained through this project can directly benefit the U.S. power and utility turbine industry by improving product development that specifically meets DOE advanced turbine program...

  8. Wind Power Variability, Its Cost, and Effect on Power Plant Emissions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wind Power Variability, Its Cost, and Effect on Power Plant Emissions A Dissertation Submitted The recent growth in wind power is transforming the operation of electricity systems by introducing. As a result, system operators are learning in real-time how to incorporate wind power and its variability

  9. Modeling Generator Power Plant Portfolios and Pollution Taxes Electric Power Supply Chain Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nagurney, Anna

    , natural gas, uranium, and oil), or approximately 40 quadrillion BTU (see Edison Electric Institute (2000Modeling Generator Power Plant Portfolios and Pollution Taxes in Electric Power Supply Chain at the electric power industry with taxes applied according to the type of fuel used by the power generators

  10. A Survey of Power Plant Designs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ervin, Elizabeth K.

    is mixed with compressed air in the combustion chamber and burned. High-pressure combustion gases spin;Sustainable Energy, MIT 2005. #12;Allen Fossil Plant is on the Mississippi River five miles southwest (TVA), http://www.tva.gov #12;Coal fired Plant Otpco.com Fuel handling (1) Rotary dumper (2) Storage

  11. Development of a dynamic simulator for a natural gas combined cycle (NGCC) power plant with post-combustion carbon capture

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liese, E.; Zitney, S.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The AVESTAR Center located at the U.S. Department of Energys National Energy Technology Laboratory and West Virginia University is a world-class research and training environment dedicated to using dynamic process simulation as a tool for advancing the safe, efficient and reliable operation of clean energy plants with CO{sub 2} capture. The AVESTAR Center was launched with a high-fidelity dynamic simulator for an Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) power plant with pre-combustion carbon capture. The IGCC dynamic simulator offers full-scope Operator Training Simulator (OTS) Human Machine Interface (HMI) graphics for realistic, real-time control room operation and is integrated with a 3D virtual Immersive Training Simulator (ITS), thus allowing joint control room and field operator training. The IGCC OTS/ITS solution combines a gasification with CO{sub 2} capture process simulator with a combined cycle power simulator into a single high-performance dynamic simulation framework. This presentation will describe progress on the development of a natural gas combined cycle (NGCC) dynamic simulator based on the syngas-fired combined cycle portion of AVESTARs IGCC dynamic simulator. The 574 MW gross NGCC power plant design consisting of two advanced F-class gas turbines, two heat recovery steam generators (HRSGs), and a steam turbine in a multi-shaft 2x2x1 configuration will be reviewed. Plans for integrating a post-combustion carbon capture system will also be discussed.

  12. Water recovery using waste heat from coal fired power plants.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Webb, Stephen W.; Morrow, Charles W.; Altman, Susan Jeanne; Dwyer, Brian P.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The potential to treat non-traditional water sources using power plant waste heat in conjunction with membrane distillation is assessed. Researchers and power plant designers continue to search for ways to use that waste heat from Rankine cycle power plants to recover water thereby reducing water net water consumption. Unfortunately, waste heat from a power plant is of poor quality. Membrane distillation (MD) systems may be a technology that can use the low temperature waste heat (<100 F) to treat water. By their nature, they operate at low temperature and usually low pressure. This study investigates the use of MD to recover water from typical power plants. It looks at recovery from three heat producing locations (boiler blow down, steam diverted from bleed streams, and the cooling water system) within a power plant, providing process sketches, heat and material balances and equipment sizing for recovery schemes using MD for each of these locations. It also provides insight into life cycle cost tradeoffs between power production and incremental capital costs.

  13. Phase Change Materials for Thermal Energy Storage in Concentrated Solar Thermal Power Plants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hardin, Corey Lee

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    COST REDUCTION STUDY FOR SOLAR THERMAL POWER PLANTS, Ottawa,Storage in Concentrated Solar Thermal Power Plants A ThesisStorage in Concentrated Solar Thermal Power Plants by Corey

  14. Fuel option for gas turbine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tantayakom, S. [Electricity Generating Authority of Thailand, Nonthaburi (Thailand). Chemical and Analysis Dept.

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Growth in electricity demand is an average of 10% per year. Energy, emission, and economy are importance of critical concerns for generating systems. Therefore, combined cycle power plant is preferred to Electricity Generating Authority of Thailand (EGAT) new power generating capacity. The various option of available fuel for gas turbine are natural gas, liquid fuel and coal fuel. Particularly with the tremendous price increases in imported and domestic fuel supplies, natural gas is an attractive low cost alternative for power generation. EGAT has researched using heavy fuel instead of natural gas since the year 1991. The problems of various corrosion characteristics have been found. In addition, fuel treatment for gas turbine are needed, and along with it, the environmental consideration are options that provide the limitation of environmental regulation.

  15. analysis increases power: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Plant in Iran will be studied, in this article, focus is made mostly on computerized simulation of power plant sites for optimized configuration of wind farm turbines by using...

  16. Risk Framework for the Next Generation Nuclear Power Plant Construction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yeon, Jaeheum 1981-

    2012-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

    sector projects, and recently elevated to Best Practice status. However, its current format is inadequate to address the unique challenges of constructing the next generation of nuclear power plants (NPP). To understand and determine the risks...

  17. Hybrid Cooling for Geothermal Power Plants: Final ARRA Project...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    (NREL) at www.nrel.govpublications. Executive Summary Many binary-cycle geothermal power plants use air as the heat rejection medium. An air-cooled condenser (ACC) system is...

  18. Power plant emissions verified remotely at Four Corners sites

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Juan and Four Corners coal-fired power plants, the Los Alamos team deployed ground-based solar spectrometers and point sensors to measure atmospheric concentrations of gases at a...

  19. Mapping complexity sources in nuclear power plant domains

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sasangohar, Farzan

    Understanding the sources of complexity in advanced Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) control rooms and their effects on human reliability is critical for ensuring safe performance of both operators and the entire system. New ...

  20. Feasibility study of a VirtualPower Plant for Ludvika.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lundkvist, Johanna

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ?? This thesis is a feasibility study of avirtual power plant (VPP) in centralSweden and part of a project withInnoEnergy Instinct and STRI. The VPPconsists (more)

  1. EIS-0377: Big Stone II Power Plant and Transmission Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A systems study was carried out to identify the most appropriate locations to interconnect the proposed Big Stone II power plant to the regional utility grid. The study also identified transmission...

  2. Reducing water freshwater consumption at coal-fired power plants : approaches used outside the United States.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elcock, D. (Environmental Science Division)

    2011-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Coal-fired power plants consume huge quantities of water, and in some water-stressed areas, power plants compete with other users for limited supplies. Extensive use of coal to generate electricity is projected to continue for many years. Faced with increasing power demands and questionable future supplies, industries and governments are seeking ways to reduce freshwater consumption at coal-fired power plants. As the United States investigates various freshwater savings approaches (e.g., the use of alternative water sources), other countries are also researching and implementing approaches to address similar - and in many cases, more challenging - water supply and demand issues. Information about these non-U.S. approaches can be used to help direct near- and mid-term water-consumption research and development (R&D) activities in the United States. This report summarizes the research, development, and deployment (RD&D) status of several approaches used for reducing freshwater consumption by coal-fired power plants in other countries, many of which could be applied, or applied more aggressively, at coal-fired power plants in the United States. Information contained in this report is derived from literature and Internet searches, in some cases supplemented by communication with the researchers, authors, or equipment providers. Because there are few technical, peer-reviewed articles on this topic, much of the information in this report comes from the trade press and other non-peer-reviewed references. Reducing freshwater consumption at coal-fired power plants can occur directly or indirectly. Direct approaches are aimed specifically at reducing water consumption, and they include dry cooling, dry bottom ash handling, low-water-consuming emissions-control technologies, water metering and monitoring, reclaiming water from in-plant operations (e.g., recovery of cooling tower water for boiler makeup water, reclaiming water from flue gas desulfurization [FGD] systems), and desalination. Some of the direct approaches, such as dry air cooling, desalination, and recovery of cooling tower water for boiler makeup water, are costly and are deployed primarily in countries with severe water shortages, such as China, Australia, and South Africa. Table 1 shows drivers and approaches for reducing freshwater consumption in several countries outside the United States. Indirect approaches reduce water consumption while meeting other objectives, such as improving plant efficiency. Plants with higher efficiencies use less energy to produce electricity, and because the greater the energy production, the greater the cooling water needs, increased efficiency will help reduce water consumption. Approaches for improving efficiency (and for indirectly reducing water consumption) include increasing the operating steam parameters (temperature and pressure); using more efficient coal-fired technologies such as cogeneration, IGCC, and direct firing of gas turbines with coal; replacing or retrofitting existing inefficient plants to make them more efficient; installing high-performance monitoring and process controls; and coal drying. The motivations for increasing power plant efficiency outside the United States (and indirectly reducing water consumption) include the following: (1) countries that agreed to reduce carbon emissions (by ratifying the Kyoto protocol) find that one of the most effective ways to do so is to improve plant efficiency; (2) countries that import fuel (e.g., Japan) need highly efficient plants to compensate for higher coal costs; (3) countries with particularly large and growing energy demands, such as China and India, need large, efficient plants; (4) countries with large supplies of low-rank coals, such as Germany, need efficient processes to use such low-energy coals. Some countries have policies that encourage or mandate reduced water consumption - either directly or indirectly. For example, the European Union encourages increased efficiency through its cogeneration directive, which requires member states to assess their

  3. Novel Dry Cooling Technology for Power Plants

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This presentation was delivered at the SunShot Concentrating Solar Power (CSP) Program Review 2013, held April 2325, 2013 near Phoenix, Arizona.

  4. Ground-based testing of space nuclear power plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McDonald, T.G.

    1990-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Small nuclear power plants for space applications are evaluated according to their testability in this two part report. The first part introduces the issues involved in testing these power plants. Some of the concerns include oxygen embrittlement of critical components, the test environment, the effects of a vacuum environment on materials, the practically of racing an activated test chamber, and possible testing alternative the SEHPTR, king develop at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. 10 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  5. The Industrial Power Plant Management System - An Engineering Approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aarnio, S. E.; Tarvainen, H. J.; Tinnis, V.

    1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    THE INDUSTRIAL POWER PLANT MANAGEMENT SYSTEM AN ENGINEERING APPROACH Seppo E. Aarnio, Heikki J. Tarvainen and Valentin Tinnis EKONO Oy, Helsinki, Finland EKONO Inc., Bellevue, Washington ABSTRACT Based on energy studies in over 70 plants... in Finland. The results of the optimization calculations are used for two types of operations guidance. The first duty of the operators is to adjust the determined set points for the most economic loading, fuel firing and purchasing of power. This is done...

  6. Utility & Regulatory Factors Affecting Cogeneration & Independent Power Plant Design & Operation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Felak, R. P.

    UTILITY & REGULATORY FACTORS AFFECTiNG COGENERATION & INDEPENDENT POWER PLANT DESIGN & OPERATION Richard P. Felak General Electric Company Schenectady, New York ABSTRACT In specifying a cogeneration or independent power plant, the owner... should be especially aware of the influences which electric utilities and regulatory bodies will have on key parameters such as size, efficiency, design. reliability/ availabilitY, operating capabilities and modes, etc. This paper will note examples...

  7. Development of decontamination techniques for decommissioning commercial nuclear power plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ishikura, T.; Miwa, T.; Onozawa, T.; Ohtsuka, H. [Nuclear Power Engineering Corp., Tokyo (Japan). Plant and Components Dept.; Ishigure, K. [Univ. of Tokyo (Japan). Dept. of Quantum Engineering and System Science

    1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    NUPEC has been developing various techniques to safely and efficiently decommission large commercial nuclear power plants. The development work, referred to as the verification tests, has been performed since 1982. The verification tests on decontamination techniques have focused on the reduction of both occupational radiation exposure and radioactive waste volume. Experiments on various decontamination methods have been carried out. Prospects of applying efficient decontamination techniques to commercial nuclear power plant decommissioning are bright due to the experimental results.

  8. Power Plant Report (EIA-759): Historic, 1989. Data file

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of the form is to collect data necessary to fulfill regulatory responsibility; ensure power reliability; and measure fuel consumption and power production. The data tape contains data collected by the survey. Specific Ownership Code, Prime Mover Code, Fuel Code, Company Code, Plant Name, Current Capacity, Fuel Name, Old Capacity, Effective Date - Month/Year, Status, Multistate Code, Current Year, Generation, Consumption, Stocks, Electric Plant Code, and NERC Code are included.

  9. Fault Analysis at a Wind Power Plant for One Year of Observation: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Muljadi, E.; Mills, Z.; Foster, R.; Conto, J.; Ellis, A.

    2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper analyzes the fault characteristics observed at a wind power plant, and the behavior of the wind power plant under fault events.

  10. Emissions estimation for lignite-fired power plants in Turkey

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nurten Vardar; Zehra Yumurtaci [Yildiz Technical University Mechanical Engineering Faculty, Istanbul (Turkey)

    2010-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The major gaseous emissions (e.g. sulfur dioxide, nitrogen oxides, carbon dioxide, and carbon monoxide), some various organic emissions (e.g. benzene, toluene and xylenes) and some trace metals (e.g. arsenic, cobalt, chromium, manganese and nickel) generated from lignite-fired power plants in Turkey are estimated. The estimations are made separately for each one of the thirteen plants that produced electricity in 2007, because the lignite-fired thermal plants in Turkey are installed near the regions where the lignite is mined, and characteristics and composition of lignite used in each power plant are quite different from a region to another. Emission factors methodology is used for the estimations. The emission factors obtained from well-known literature are then modified depending on local moisture content of lignite. Emission rates and specific emissions (per MWh) of the pollutants from the plants without electrostatic precipitators and flue-gas desulfurization systems are found to be higher than emissions from the plants having electrostatic precipitators and flue -gas desulfurization systems. Finally a projection for the future emissions due to lignite-based power plants is given. Predicted demand for the increasing generation capacity based on the lignite-fired thermal power plant, from 2008 to 2017 is around 30%. 39 refs., 13 figs., 10 tabs.

  11. STARFIRE: a commercial tokamak fusion power plant study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This volume contains chapters on each of the following topics: (1) radioactivity, (2) heat transport and energy conversion, (3) tritium systems, (4) electrical storage and power supplies, (5) support structure, (6) cryogenics, (7) instrumentation and control, (8) maintenance and operation, (9) balance of plant design, (10) safety and environmental analysis, (11) economic analysis, and (12) plant construction.

  12. Model Predictive Control of Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle Power Plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    B. Wayne Bequette; Priyadarshi Mahapatra

    2010-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The primary project objectives were to understand how the process design of an integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power plant affects the dynamic operability and controllability of the process. Steady-state and dynamic simulation models were developed to predict the process behavior during typical transients that occur in plant operation. Advanced control strategies were developed to improve the ability of the process to follow changes in the power load demand, and to improve performance during transitions between power levels. Another objective of the proposed work was to educate graduate and undergraduate students in the application of process systems and control to coal technology. Educational materials were developed for use in engineering courses to further broaden this exposure to many students. ASPENTECH software was used to perform steady-state and dynamic simulations of an IGCC power plant. Linear systems analysis techniques were used to assess the steady-state and dynamic operability of the power plant under various plant operating conditions. Model predictive control (MPC) strategies were developed to improve the dynamic operation of the power plants. MATLAB and SIMULINK software were used for systems analysis and control system design, and the SIMULINK functionality in ASPEN DYNAMICS was used to test the control strategies on the simulated process. Project funds were used to support a Ph.D. student to receive education and training in coal technology and the application of modeling and simulation techniques.

  13. Reducing emissions by addressing steam turbine inefficiencies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harris, J.C. (Georgia Power Co., Atlanta, GA (United States)); Cioffi, D.H. (Encotech, Inc., Schenectady, NY (United States))

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper reports that inefficient steam turbines increase fossil plant emissions because additional fuel must be burned to meet the power output requirements. During a turbine outage, plant performance and maintenance staff make and prioritize repair decisions within tight time and budget constraints. This paper describes how Georgia Power identifies performance losses of degraded components in the steam path and determines their impact on heat rate. Turbine performance is assessed by a steam path audit program that Encotech has developed and make available to utilities. Georgia Power has conducted several operating tests that give good correlation with audit results. Georgia Power uses the audit information to make the most cost-effective repairs to maintain a low heat rate and to reduce emissions. The Clean Air Act presents electric utilities with the challenge of reducing emissions from fossil plants in the most cost-effective way possible. Meeting the stack emissions limitations often translates to large capital expenditures and increased cycle heat rate. One resource the electric utilities have to reduce the costly impact of compliance with the Clean Air Act is control over the efficiency of their steam turbines.

  14. A Simulated Field Trip: "The Visual Aspects of Power Plant Sitings1"

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Standiford, Richard B.

    A Simulated Field Trip: "The Visual Aspects of Power Plant Sitings1" Bill Bottom 2 Alex Young 3 of conventional thermal (fossil fuel and nuclear), geo- thermal, wind and solar power plants. There are several be dependent on conventional thermal power plants to generate electricity. These power plants are powered

  15. Sweeney LUBRICATION OF STEAM, GAS AND WATER TURBINES IN POWER GENERATION- A CHEVRONTEXACO EXPERIENCE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peter James Sweeney

    On 9 October 2001 two US oil companies Chevron and Texaco merged. Their long-term joint venture operation, known as Caltex (formed in 1936 and operating in East and Southern Africa, Middle East, Asia and Australasia), was incorporated into the one global energy company. This global enterprise will be highly competitive across all energy sectors, as the new company brings together a wealth of talents, shared values and a strong commitment to developing vital energy resources around the globe. Worldwide, ChevronTexaco is the third largest publicly traded company in terms of oil and gas reserves, with some 11.8 billion barrels of oil and gas equivalent. It is the fourth largest producer, with daily production of 2.7 million barrels. The company also has 22 refineries and more than 21,000 branded service stations worldwide. This paper will review the fundamentals of lubrication as they apply to the components of turbines. It will then look at three turbine types, steam, gas and water, to address the different needs of lubricating oils and the appropriate specifications for each. The significance of oil testing both for product development and in-service oil monitoring will be reviewed, together with the supporting field experience of ChevronTexaco. The environmental emissions controls on turbines and any impact on the lubricants will be discussed. Finally, the trends in specifications for lubricating oils to address the modern turbines designs will be reviewed. Key Words: geothermal, lubrication, turbines, in-service testing 1.

  16. Advanced Hydrogen Turbine Development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joesph Fadok

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Siemens has developed a roadmap to achieve the DOE goals for efficiency, cost reduction, and emissions through innovative approaches and novel technologies which build upon worldwide IGCC operational experience, platform technology, and extensive experience in G-class operating conditions. In Phase 1, the technologies and concepts necessary to achieve the program goals were identified for the gas turbine components and supporting technology areas and testing plans were developed to mitigate identified risks. Multiple studies were conducted to evaluate the impact in plant performance of different gas turbine and plant technologies. 2015 gas turbine technologies showed a significant improvement in IGCC plant efficiency, however, a severe performance penalty was calculated for high carbon capture cases. Thermodynamic calculations showed that the DOE 2010 and 2015 efficiency targets can be met with a two step approach. A risk management process was instituted in Phase 1 to identify risk and develop mitigation plans. For the risks identified, testing and development programs are in place and the risks will be revisited periodically to determine if changes to the plan are necessary. A compressor performance prediction has shown that the design of the compressor for the engine can be achieved with additional stages added to the rear of the compressor. Tip clearance effects were studied as well as a range of flow and pressure ratios to evaluate the impacts to both performance and stability. Considerable data was obtained on the four candidate combustion systems: diffusion, catalytic, premix, and distributed combustion. Based on the results of Phase 1, the premixed combustion system and the distributed combustion system were chosen as having the most potential and will be the focus of Phase 2 of the program. Significant progress was also made in obtaining combustion kinetics data for high hydrogen fuels. The Phase 1 turbine studies indicate initial feasibility of the advanced hydrogen turbine that meets the aggressive targets set forth for the advanced hydrogen turbine, including increased rotor inlet temperature (RIT), lower total cooling and leakage air (TCLA) flow, higher pressure ratio, and higher mass flow through the turbine compared to the baseline. Maintaining efficiency with high mass flow Syngas combustion is achieved using a large high AN2 blade 4, which has been identified as a significant advancement beyond the current state-of-the-art. Preliminary results showed feasibility of a rotor system capable of increased power output and operating conditions above the baseline. In addition, several concepts were developed for casing components to address higher operating conditions. Rare earth modified bond coat for the purpose of reducing oxidation and TBC spallation demonstrated an increase in TBC spallation life of almost 40%. The results from Phase 1 identified two TBC compositions which satisfy the thermal conductivity requirements and have demonstrated phase stability up to temperatures of 1850 C. The potential to join alloys using a bonding process has been demonstrated and initial HVOF spray deposition trials were promising. The qualitative ranking of alloys and coatings in environmental conditions was also performed using isothermal tests where significant variations in alloy degradation were observed as a function of gas composition. Initial basic system configuration schematics and working system descriptions have been produced to define key boundary data and support estimation of costs. Review of existing materials in use for hydrogen transportation show benefits or tradeoffs for materials that could be used in this type of applications. Hydrogen safety will become a larger risk than when using natural gas fuel as the work done to date in other areas has shown direct implications for this type of use. Studies were conducted which showed reduced CO{sub 2} and NOx emissions with increased plant efficiency. An approach to maximize plant output is needed in order to address the DOE turbine goal for 20-30% reduction o

  17. Nuclear Power Plant Containment Pressure Boundary Research

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cherry, J.L.; Chokshi, N.C.; Costello, J.F.; Ellingwood, B.R.; Naus, D.J.

    1999-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Research to address aging of the containment pressure boundary in light-water reactor plants is summarized. This research is aimed at understanding the significant factors relating occurrence of corrosion, efficacy of inspection, and structural capacity reduction of steel containment and liners of concrete containment. This understanding will lead to improvements in risk-informed regulatory decision making. Containment pressure boundary components are described and potential aging factors identified. Quantitative tools for condition assessments of aging structures to maintain an acceptable level of reliability over the service life of the plant are discussed. Finally, the impact of aging (i.e., loss of shell thickness due to corrosion) on steel containment fragility for a pressurized water reactor ice-condenser plant is presented.

  18. Wind Power Plant Prediction by Using Neural Networks: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Z.; Gao, W.; Wan, Y. H.; Muljadi, E.

    2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper introduces a method of short-term wind power prediction for a wind power plant by training neural networks based on historical data of wind speed and wind direction. The model proposed is shown to achieve a high accuracy with respect to the measured data.

  19. EEE 463 Electrical Power Plants (3) [F] Course (Catalog) Description

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Junshan

    . Environmental impact of electric generation (3 lectures) 9. Advanced energy conversion systems (geothermalEEE 463 Electrical Power Plants (3) [F] Course (Catalog) Description: Generation of electric power using fossil, nuclear and renewable, including solar, geothermal, wind, hydroelectric, biomass and ocean

  20. UNSUPERVISED CLUSTERING FOR FAULT DIAGNOSIS IN NUCLEAR POWER PLANT COMPONENTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    1 UNSUPERVISED CLUSTERING FOR FAULT DIAGNOSIS IN NUCLEAR POWER PLANT COMPONENTS Piero Baraldi1 of prototypical behaviors. Its performance is tested with respect to an artificial case study and then applied on transients originated by different faults in the pressurizer of a nuclear power reactor. Key Words: Fault

  1. Recommended values for the distribution coefficient (Kd) to be used in dose assessments for decommissioning the Zion Nuclear Power Plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sullivan T.

    2014-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

    ZionSolutions is in the process of decommissioning the Zion Nuclear Power Plant. The site contains two reactor Containment Buildings, a Fuel Building, an Auxiliary Building, and a Turbine Building that may be contaminated. The current decommissioning plan involves removing all above grade structures to a depth of 3 feet below grade. The remaining underground structures will be backfilled. The remaining underground structures will contain low amounts of residual licensed radioactive material. An important component of the decommissioning process is the demonstration that any remaining activity will not cause a hypothetical individual to receive a dose in excess of 25 mrem/y as specified in 10CFR20 SubpartE.

  2. A Wavelet-Based Variability Model (WVM) for Solar PV Power Plants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lave, Matthew; Kleissl, Jan; Stein, Joshua S

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    simulating solar photovoltaic (PV) power plant output givenfor simulating the power output of a solar photovoltaic (PV)

  3. State regulation and power plant productivity: background and recommendations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report was prepared by representatives of several state regulatory agencies. It is a guide to some of the activities currently under way in state agencies to promote increased availability of electrical generating power plants. Standard measures of plant performance are defined and the nature of data bases that report such measures is discussed. It includes reviews of current state, federal, and industry programs to enhance power plant productivity and provides detailed outlines of programs in effect in California, Illinois, Michigan, New York, North Carolina, Ohio, and Texas. A number of actions are presented that could be adopted by state regulatory agencies, depending on local conditions. They include: develop a commission position or policy statement to encourage productivity improvements by utilities; coordinate state efforts with ongoing industry and government programs to improve the acquisition of power plant performance data and the maintenance of quality information systems; acquire the capability to perform independent analyses of power plant productivity; direct the establishment of productivity improvement programs, including explicit performance objectives for both existing and planned power plants, and a performance program; establish a program of incentives to motivate productivity improvement activities; and participate in ongoing efforts at all levels and initiate new actions to promote productivity improvements.

  4. Some aspects of the decommissioning of nuclear power plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khvostova, M. S., E-mail: marinakhvostova@list.ru [St. Petersburg State Maritime Technical University (Sevmashvtuz), Severodvinsk Branch (Russian Federation)

    2012-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The major factors influencing the choice of a national concept for the decommissioning of nuclear power plants are examined. The operating lifetimes of power generating units with nuclear reactors of various types (VVER-1000, VVER-440, RBMK-1000, EGP-6, and BN-600) are analyzed. The basic approaches to decommissioning Russian nuclear power plants and the treatment of radioactive waste and spent nuclear fuel are discussed. Major aspects of the ecological and radiation safety of personnel, surrounding populations, and the environment during decommissioning of nuclear installations are identified.

  5. Marine Hydrokinetic Turbine Power-Take-Off Design for Optimal Performance and Low Impact on Cost-of-Energy: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beam, M.; Kline, B.; Elbing, B.; Straka, W.; Fontaine, A.; Lawson, M.; Li, Y.; Thresher, R.; Previsic, M.

    2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Marine hydrokinetic devices are becoming a popular method for generating marine renewable energy worldwide. These devices generate electricity by converting the kinetic energy of moving water, wave motion or currents, into electrical energy through the use of a Power-Take-Off (PTO) system. Most PTO systems incorporate a mechanical or hydraulic drive train, power generator and electric control/conditioning system to deliver the generated electric power to the grid at the required state. Like wind turbine applications, the PTO system must be designed for high reliability, good efficiency, and long service life with reasonable maintenance requirements, low cost and an appropriate mechanical design for anticipated applied steady and unsteady loads. The ultimate goal of a PTO design is high efficiency, low maintenance and cost with a low impact on the device Cost-of-Energy (CoE).

  6. Marine Hydrokinetic Turbine Power-Take-Off Design for Optimal Performance and Low Impact on Cost-of-Energy: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beam, M.; Kline, B.; Elbing, B.; Straka, W.; Fontaine, A.; Lawson, M.; Li, Y.; Thresher, R.; Previsic, M.

    2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Marine hydrokinetic devices are becoming a popular method for generating marine renewable energy worldwide. These devices generate electricity by converting the kinetic energy of moving water, wave motion or currents, into electrical energy through the use of a power-take-off (PTO) system. Most PTO systems incorporate a mechanical or hydraulic drivetrain, power generator, and electric control/conditioning system to deliver the generated electric power to the grid at the required state. Like wind turbine applications, the PTO system must be designed for high reliability, good efficiency, and long service life with reasonable maintenance requirements, low cost, and an appropriate mechanical design for anticipated applied steady and unsteady loads. The ultimate goal of a PTO design is high efficiency and low maintenance and cost, with a low impact on the device cost-of-energy (CoE).

  7. Cornell's conversion of a coal fired heating plant to natural Gas -BACKGROUND: In December 2009, the Combined Heat and Power Plant

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Keinan, Alon

    - BACKGROUND: In December 2009, the Combined Heat and Power Plant at Cornell Cornell's conversion of a coal fired heating plant to natural Gas the power plant #12;

  8. Parabolic Trough Solar Power Plant Simulation Model: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Price, H.

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As interest for clean renewable electric power technologies grows, a number of parabolic trough power plants of various configurations are being considered for deployment around the globe. It is essential that plant designs be optimized for each specific application. The optimum design must consider the capital cost, operations and maintenance cost, annual generation, financial requirements, and time-of-use value of the power generated. Developers require the tools for evaluating tradeoffs between these various project elements. This paper provides an overview of a computer model that is being used by scientists and developers to evaluate the tradeoff between cost, performance, and economic parameters for parabolic trough solar power plant technologies. An example is included that shows how this model has been used for a thermal storage design optimization.

  9. Oxidation of advanced steam turbine alloys

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Holcomb, G.R.; Covino, B.S., Jr.; Bullard, S.J.; Ziomek-Moroz, M.

    2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Advanced or ultra supercritical (USC) steam power plants offer the promise of higher efficiencies and lower emissions. Current goals of the U.S. Department of Energys Advanced Power Systems Initiatives include coal generation at 60% efficiency, which would require steam temperatures of up to 760C. This research examines the steamside oxidation of advanced alloys for use in USC systems, with emphasis placed on alloys for high- and intermediate-pressure turbine sections.

  10. Solana Generating Plant Solar Power Plant | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of Inspector GeneralDepartmentAUDIT REPORTOpenWende New EnergyAnatoliaSciraShenhuaWindPowerSoham

  11. Theory and Performance of Tesla Turbines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Romanin, Vincent D.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    gas turbines for combined heat and power. In: Ap- plied10.1115/1.4001356. [3] Combined Heat and Power. Tech. rep.of Tesla Turbines for Combined Heat and Power Applications.

  12. IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON POWER SYSTEMS, VOL. 27, NO. 1, FEBRUARY 2012 465 Dynamics of Type-3 Wind Turbine Generator Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hiskens, Ian A.

    Turbine Generator Models Ian A. Hiskens, Fellow, IEEE Abstract--The influence of wind turbine generators, singular systems, small disturbance analysis, switching deadlock, wind turbine generator modeling. I. INTRODUCTION THE dynamic behavior of wind turbine generators (WTGs) is quite different to that of synchronous

  13. ADVANCED TURBINE SYSTEM CONCEPTUAL DESIGN AND PRODUCT DEVELOPMENT - Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Albrecht H. Mayer

    2000-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Asea Brown Boveri (ABB) has completed its technology based program. The results developed under Work Breakdown Structure (WBS) 8, concentrated on technology development and demonstration have been partially implemented in newer turbine designs. A significant improvement in heat rate and power output has been demonstrated. ABB will use the knowledge gained to further improve the efficiency of its Advanced Cycle System, which has been developed and introduced into the marked out side ABB's Advanced Turbine System (ATS) activities. The technology will lead to a power plant design that meets the ATS performance goals of over 60% plant efficiency, decreased electricity costs to consumers and lowest emissions.

  14. Submerged passively-safe power plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Herring, J.S.

    1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The invention as presented consists of a submerged passively-safe power station including a pressurized water reactor capable of generating at least 600 MW of electricity, encased in a double hull vessel, and provides fresh water by using the spent thermal energy in a multistage flash desalination process.

  15. Submerged passively-safe power plant

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Herring, J. Stephen (Idaho Falls, ID)

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The invention as presented consists of a submerged passively-safe power station including a pressurized water reactor capable of generating at least 600 MW of electricity, encased in a double hull vessel, and provides fresh water by using the spent thermal energy in a multistage flash desalination process.

  16. Submerged passively-safe power plant

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Herring, J.S.

    1993-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

    The invention as presented consists of a submerged passively-safe power station including a pressurized water reactor capable of generating at least 600 MW of electricity, encased in a double hull vessel, and provides fresh water by using the spent thermal energy in a multistage flash desalination process. 8 figures.

  17. Nuclear Power Plant NDE Challenges - Past, Present, and Future

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Doctor, S. R. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, P.O. Box 999, Richland, WA 99352 (United States)

    2007-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

    The operating fleet of U.S. nuclear power plants was built to fossil plant standards (of workmanship, not fitness for service) and with good engineering judgment. Fortuitously, those nuclear power plants were designed using defense-in-depth concepts, with nondestructive examination (NDE) an important layer, so they can tolerate almost any component failure and still continue to operate safely. In the 30+ years of reactor operation, many material failures have occurred. Unfortunately, NDE has not provided the reliability to detect degradation prior to initial failure (breaching the pressure boundary). However, NDE programs have been improved by moving from prescriptive procedures to performance demonstrations that quantify inspection effectiveness for flaw detection probability and sizing accuracy. Other improvements include the use of risk-informed strategies to ensure that reactor components contributing the most risk receive the best and most frequent inspections. Another challenge is the recent surge of interest in building new nuclear power plants in the United States to meet increasing domestic energy demand. New construction will increase the demand for NDE but also offers the opportunity for more proactive inspections. This paper reviews the inception and evolution of NDE for nuclear power plants over the past 40 years, recounts lessons learned, and describes the needs remaining as existing plants continue operation and new construction is contemplated.

  18. Prescott Airport Solar Plant Solar Power Plant | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revision hasInformation Earth'sOklahoma/GeothermalOrangePeru:Job CorpPowerVerde

  19. Regulatory guidance for lightning protection in nuclear power plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kisner, R. A.; Wilgen, J. B.; Ewing, P. D.; Korsah, K. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, P. O. Box 2008, Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6007 (United States); Antonescu, C. E. [U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC 20555 (United States)

    2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) was engaged by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research (RES) to develop the technical basis for regulatory guidance to address design and implementation practices for lightning protection systems in nuclear power plants (NPPs). Lightning protection is becoming increasingly important with the advent of digital and low-voltage analog systems in NPPs. These systems have the potential to be more vulnerable than older analog systems to the resulting power surges and electromagnetic interference (EMI) when lightning strikes facilities or power lines. This paper discusses the technical basis for guidance to licensees and applicants covered in Regulatory Guide (RG) 1.204, Guidelines for Lightning Protection of Nuclear Power Plants, issued August 2005. RG 1.204 describes guidance for practices that are acceptable to the NRC staff for protecting nuclear power structures and systems from direct lightning strikes and the resulting secondary effects. (authors)

  20. Regulatory Guidance for Lightning Protection in Nuclear Power Plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kisner, Roger A [ORNL; Wilgen, John B [ORNL; Ewing, Paul D [ORNL; Korsah, Kofi [ORNL; Antonescu, Christina E [ORNL

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Abstract - Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) was engaged by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research (RES) to develop the technical basis for regulatory guidance to address design and implementation practices for lightning protection systems in nuclear power plants (NPPs). Lightning protection is becoming increasingly important with the advent of digital and low-voltage analog systems in NPPs. These systems have the potential to be more vulnerable than older analog systems to the resulting power surges and electromagnetic interference (EMI) when lightning strikes facilities or power lines. This paper discusses the technical basis for guidance to licensees and applicants covered in Regulatory Guide (RG) 1.204, Guidelines for Lightning Protection of Nuclear Power Plants, issued August 2005. RG 1.204 describes guidance for practices that are acceptable to the NRC staff for protecting nuclear power structures and systems from direct lightning strikes and the resulting secondary effects.

  1. Capture-Ready Power Plants -Options, Technologies and Economics Mark C. Bohm

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 Capture-Ready Power Plants - Options, Technologies and Economics by Mark C. Bohm Bachelor and Policy Program #12;2 #12;3 Capture-ready Power Plants Options, Technologies and Costs by Mark C. Bohm of a plant. Power plant owners and policymakers are interested in capture-ready plants because they may offer

  2. STRUCTURAL HEALTH MONITORING SOLUTIONS FOR POWER PLANTS Benoit Jouan, Jurgen Rudolph, Steffen Bergholz

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    but also in the context of conventional power plants and renewables such as wind power plants. ConsequentlySTRUCTURAL HEALTH MONITORING SOLUTIONS FOR POWER PLANTS Benoit Jouan, J¨urgen Rudolph, Steffen solutions gain in importance not only as part of the ageing management of nuclear power plant components

  3. Coal Power Plant Database | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of InspectorConcentrating SolarElectricEnergyCTBarreisVolcanicPower Address:Climatic SolarInformation

  4. Binary Cycle Power Plant | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of InspectorConcentrating SolarElectricEnergyCTBarre Biomass FacilityOregon:Great EscapeBinary Cycle Power

  5. Control system design for maintaining CO{sub 2} capture in IGCC power plants while loading-following

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bhattacharyya, D.; Turton, R.; Zitney, S.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Load-following requirements for future integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power plants with precombustion CO{sub 2} capture are expected to be far more challenging as electricity produced by renewable energy is connected to the grid and strict environmental limits become mandatory requirements. In this work, loadfollowing studies are performed using a comprehensive dynamic model of an IGCC plant with pre-combustion CO{sub 2} capture developed in Aspen Engineering Suite (AES). Considering multiple single-loop controllers for power demand load following, the preferred IGCC control strategy from the perspective of a power producer is gas turbine (GT) lead with gasifier follow. In this strategy, the GT controls the load by manipulating its firing rate while the slurry feed flow to the gasifier is manipulated to control the syngas pressure at the GT inlet. The syngas pressure control is an integrating process with significant time delay mainly because of the large piping and equipment volumes between the gasifier and the GT inlet. A modified proportionalintegralderivative (PID) control is considered for IGCC syngas pressure control. The desired CO{sub 2} capture rate must be maintained while the IGCC plant follows the load. For maintaining the desired CO{sub 2} capture rate, the control performance of PID control is compared with linear model predictive control (LMPC). The results show that the LMPC outperforms PID control for maintaining CO{sub 2} capture rates in an IGCC power plant while load following.

  6. Fiber optic sensors for nuclear power plant applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kasinathan, Murugesan; Sosamma, Samuel; BabuRao, Chelamchala; Murali, Nagarajan; Jayakumar, Tammana [Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam, Tamil Nadu-603102 (India)

    2012-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Studies have been carried out for application of Raman Distributed Temperature Sensor (RDTS) in Nuclear Power Plants (NPP). The high temperature monitoring in sodium circuits of Fast Breeder Reactor (FBR) is important. It is demonstrated that RDTS can be usefully employed in monitoring sodium circuits and in tracking the percolating sodium in the surrounding insulation in case of any leak. Aluminum Conductor Steel Reinforced (ACSR) cable is commonly used as overhead power transmission cable in power grid. The suitability of RDTS for detecting defects in ACSR overhead power cable, is also demonstrated.

  7. Innovative applications of technology for nuclear power plant productivity improvements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Naser, J. A. [Electric Power Research Inst., 3420 Hillview Avenue, Palo Alto, CA 94303 (United States)

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The nuclear power industry in several countries is concerned about the ability to maintain high plant performance levels due to aging and obsolescence, knowledge drain, fewer plant staff, and new requirements and commitments. Current plant operations are labor-intensive due to the vast number of operational and support activities required by commonly used technology in most plants. These concerns increase as plants extend their operating life. In addition, there is the goal to further improve performance while reducing human errors and increasingly focus on reducing operations and maintenance costs. New plants are expected to perform more productively than current plants. In order to achieve and increase high productivity, it is necessary to look at innovative applications of modern technologies and new concepts of operation. The Electric Power Research Inst. is exploring and demonstrating modern technologies that enable cost-effectively maintaining current performance levels and shifts to even higher performance levels, as well as provide tools for high performance in new plants. Several modern technologies being explored can provide multiple benefits for a wide range of applications. Examples of these technologies include simulation, visualization, automation, human cognitive engineering, and information and communications technologies. Some applications using modern technologies are described. (authors)

  8. Nexant Parabolic Trough Solar Power Plant Systems Analysis; Task 1: Preferred Plant Size, 20 January 2005 - 31 December 2005

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kelly, B.

    2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Rankine cycles for commercial parabolic trough solar projects range in capacity from 13.5 MWe at the Solar Electric Generating Station I (SEGS I) plant, to a maximum of 89 MWe at the SEGS VIII/IX plants. The series of SEGS projects showed a consistent reduction in the levelized energy cost due to a combination of improvements in collector field technology and economies of scale in both the Rankine cycle and the operation and maintenance costs. Nonetheless, the question of the optimum Rankine cycle capacity remains an open issue. The capacities of the SEGS VIII/IX plants were limited by Federal Energy Regulatory Commission and Public Utility Regulatory Policy Act requirements to a maximum net output of 80 MWe. Further improvements in the Rankine cycle efficiency, and economies of scale in both the capital and the operating cost, should be available at larger plant sizes. An analysis was conducted to determine the effect of Rankine cycle capacities greater than 80 MWe on the levelized energy cost. The study was conducted through the following steps: (1) Three gross cycle capacities of 88 MWe, 165 MWe, and 220 MWe were selected. (2) Three Rankine cycle models were developed using the GateCycle program. The models were based on single reheat turbine cycles, with main steam conditions of 1,450 lb{sub f}/in{sup 2} and 703 F, and reheat steam conditions of 239 lb{sub f}/in{sup 2} and 703 F. The feedwater heater system consisted of 5 closed heaters and 1 open deaerating heater. The design condenser pressure was 2.5 in. HgA. (3) The optimization function within Excelergy was used to determine the preferred solar multiple for each plant. Two cases were considered for each plant: (a) a solar-only project without thermal storage, and (b) a solar-fossil hybrid project, with 3 hours of thermal storage and a heat transport fluid heater fired by natural gas. (4) For each of the 6 cases, collector field geometries, heat transport fluid pressure losses, and heat transport pump power requirements were calculated with a field piping optimization model. (5) Annual electric energy outputs, capital costs, and annual operating costs were calculated for each case using the default methods within Excelergy, from which estimates of the levelized energy costs were developed. The plant with the lowest energy cost was considered the optimum.

  9. Aging management of containment structures in nuclear power plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Naus, D.J.; Oland, C.B. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Ellingwood, B.R. [The Johns Hopkins Univ., Baltimore, MD (United States); Graves, H.L. III; Norris, W.E. [US Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC (United States)

    1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Research is being conducted by ORNL under US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (USNRC) sponsorship to address aging management of nuclear power plant containment and other safety-related structures. Documentation is being prepared to provide the USNRC with potential structural safety issues and acceptance criteria for use in continued service evaluations of nuclear power plants. Accomplishments include development of a Structural Materials Information Center containing data and information on the time variation of 144 material properties under the influence of pertinent environmental stressors or aging factors, evaluation of models for potential concrete containment degradation factors, development of a procedure to identify critical structures and degradation factors important to aging management, evaluations of nondestructive evaluation techniques. assessments of European and North American repair practices for concrete, review of parameters affecting corrosion of metals embedded in concrete, and development of methodologies for making current condition assessments and service life predictions of new or existing reinforced concrete structures in nuclear power plants.

  10. Gasification CFD Modeling for Advanced Power Plant Simulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zitney, S.E.; Guenther, C.P.

    2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper we have described recent progress on developing CFD models for two commercial-scale gasifiers, including a two-stage, coal slurry-fed, oxygen-blown, pressurized, entrained-flow gasifier and a scaled-up design of the PSDF transport gasifier. Also highlighted was NETLs Advanced Process Engineering Co-Simulator for coupling high-fidelity equipment models with process simulation for the design, analysis, and optimization of advanced power plants. Using APECS, we have coupled the entrained-flow gasifier CFD model into a coal-fired, gasification-based FutureGen power and hydrogen production plant. The results for the FutureGen co-simulation illustrate how the APECS technology can help engineers better understand and optimize gasifier fluid dynamics and related phenomena that impact overall power plant performance.

  11. Using auxiliary gas power for CCS energy needs in retrofitted coal power plants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bashadi, Sarah O.

    Adding post-combustion capture technology to existing coal-fired power plants is being considered as a near-term option for mitigating CO[subscript 2] emissions. To supply the thermal energy needed for CO[subscript 2] ...

  12. Dynamic response analysis of a 900 kW wind turbine subject to ground excitation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Caudillo, Adrian Felix

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    powered by wind energy, wind turbines themselves stillWind Energy and Earthquake Activity Wind Turbines areTurbines. Det Norsk Veritas, Copen- hagen and Wind Energy

  13. Yangbajain Geothrmal Power Plant | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia:FAQ < RAPID Jump to:SeadovCooperative JumpWilliamsonWoodsonCounty is a countyYancey County,Geothrmal Power

  14. Kamojang Geothermal Power Plant | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: Energy Resources Jump to:46 - 429 Throttled (botOpen6 ClimateKamas, Utah: Energy Resources Jump to:KamkorpPower

  15. NEXT GENERATION TURBINE PROGRAM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    William H. Day

    2002-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

    The Next Generation Turbine (NGT) Program's technological development focused on a study of the feasibility of turbine systems greater than 30 MW that offer improvement over the 1999 state-of-the-art systems. This program targeted goals of 50 percent turndown ratios, 15 percent reduction in generation cost/kW hour, improved service life, reduced emissions, 400 starts/year with 10 minutes to full load, and multiple fuel usage. Improvement in reliability, availability, and maintainability (RAM), while reducing operations, maintenance, and capital costs by 15 percent, was pursued. This program builds on the extensive low emissions stationary gas turbine work being carried out by Pratt & Whitney (P&W) for P&W Power Systems (PWPS), which is a company under the auspices of the United Technologies Corporation (UTC). This study was part of the overall Department of Energy (DOE) NGT Program that extends out to the year 2008. A follow-on plan for further full-scale component hardware testing is conceptualized for years 2002 through 2008 to insure a smooth and efficient transition to the marketplace for advanced turbine design and cycle technology. This program teamed the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), P&W, United Technologies Research Center (UTRC), kraftWork Systems Inc., a subcontractor on-site at UTRC, and Multiphase Power and Processing Technologies (MPPT), an off-site subcontractor. Under the auspices of the NGT Program, a series of analyses were performed to identify the NGT engine system's ability to serve multiple uses. The majority were in conjunction with a coal-fired plant, or used coal as the system fuel. Identified also was the ability of the NGT system to serve as the basis of an advanced performance cycle: the humid air turbine (HAT) cycle. The HAT cycle is also used with coal gasification in an integrated cycle HAT (IGHAT). The NGT systems identified were: (1) Feedwater heating retrofit to an existing coal-fired steam plant, which could supply both heat and peaking power (Block 2 engine); (2) Repowering of an older coal-fired plant (Block 2 engine); (3) Gas-fired HAT cycle (Block 1 and 2 engines); (4) Integrated gasification HAT (Block 1 and 2 engines). Also under Phase I of the NGT Program, a conceptual design of the combustion system has been completed. An integrated approach to cycle optimization for improved combustor turndown capability has been employed. The configuration selected has the potential for achieving single digit NO{sub x}/CO emissions between 40 percent and 100 percent load conditions. A technology maturation plan for the combustion system has been proposed. Also, as a result of Phase I, ceramic vane technology will be incorporated into NGT designs and will require less cooling flow than conventional metallic vanes, thereby improving engine efficiency. A common 50 Hz and 60 Hz power turbine was selected due to the cost savings from eliminating a gearbox. A list of ceramic vane technologies has been identified for which the funding comes from DOE, NASA, the U.S. Air Force, and P&W.

  16. Repowering a small coal-fired power plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miell, R.

    2007-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The Arkansas River Power Authority (ARPA) Lamar Repowering Project is moving forward. The new generator, capable of producing 18 MW of electricity, is scheduled to be online in June 2008 bringing the total generation to 43 MW. New coal handling equipment, with infrared fire detectors, is almost complete. The new 18 MW steam turbine will be cooled by an air-cooled condenser. Coal will be delivered in a railroad spur to an unloading site then be unloaded onto a conveyor under the tracks and conveyed to two storage domes each holding 6000 tons of coal. It will be drawn out of these through an underground conveyor system, brought into a crusher, conveyed through overhead conveyors and fed into the new coal- fired fluidized bed boilers. 1 photo.

  17. Method and system to provide thermal power for a power plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ostlie, L.D.

    1987-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for providing thermal power to generate electricity in a power plant is described comprising: delivering substantially uncut and untrimmed whole trees into a combustion chamber; burning the substantially whole trees in the combustion chamber to generate heat; and absorbing the heat of combustion of the trees in a device for providing power to an electrical power generator. A system for providing power to an electrical generating power plant is described comprising: means for defining a combustion chamber within which substantially uncut and untrimmed whole trees are received for burning; conveyor means for delivering the substantially whole trees for combustion into the combustion chamber; and heat absorbing means for absorbing the heat of combustion of the substantially whole trees, the heat absorbing means being adapted to be operatively connected to means for converting the absorbed heat into electrical power.

  18. Aging of concrete structures in nuclear power plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Naus, D.J.; Pland, C.B. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (USA)); Arndt, E.G. (Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC (USA))

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Structural Aging (SAG) Program, sponsored by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (USNRC) and conducted by the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), had the overall objective of providing the USNRC with an improved basis for evaluating nuclear power plant structures for continued service. The program consists of three technical tasks: materials property data base, structural component assessment/repair technology, and quantitative methodology for continued service determinations. Major accomplishments under the SAG Program during the first two years of its planned five-year duration have included: development of a Structural Materials Information Center and formulation of a Structural Aging Assessment Methodology for Concrete Structures in Nuclear Power Plants. 9 refs.

  19. Nuclear power plant fire protection: philosophy and analysis. [PWR; BWR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berry, D. L.

    1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report combines a fire severity analysis technique with a fault tree methodology for assessing the importance to nuclear power plant safety of certain combinations of components and systems. Characteristics unique to fire, such as propagation induced by the failure of barriers, have been incorporated into the methodology. By applying the resulting fire analysis technique to actual conditions found in a representative nuclear power plant, it is found that some safety and nonsafety areas are both highly vulnerable to fire spread and impotant to overall safety, while other areas prove to be of marginal importance. Suggestions are made for further experimental and analytical work to supplement the fire analysis method.

  20. A methodology for evaluating ``new`` technologies in nuclear power plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Korsah, K.; Clark, R.L.; Holcomb, D.E.

    1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As obsolescence and spare parts issues drive nuclear power plants to upgrade with new technology (such as optical fiber communication systems), the ability of the new technology to withstand stressors present where it is installed needs to be determined. In particular, new standards may be required to address qualification criteria and their application to the nuclear power plants of tomorrow. This paper discusses the failure modes and age-related degradation mechanisms of fiber optic communication systems, and suggests a methodology for identifying when accelerated aging should be performed during qualification testing.

  1. Miravalles V Geothermal Power Plant | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: Energy Resources Jump to:46 -Energieprojekte GmbHMilo, Maine: EnergyMinnErgy LLCMinwindPower PlantPower Plant

  2. Combined Thermal and Power Energy Management Optimization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ahner, D. J.; Priestley, R. R.

    , 'various types of prime movers (e.g. boilers, waste heat recovery, steam and gas turbines, etc.), and varying requirements for process heat and electrical power, particularly if bulk power is being dispatched to a utility grid. The ability... plants are generally characterized by multiple sources of energy, 'various types of prime movers (e.g. boilers, waste heat recovery. steam and gas turbines. etc.), and varying requirements for process heat and electrical power, particularly if bulk power...

  3. Steam turbine upgrading: low-hanging fruit

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peltier, R.

    2006-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The thermodynamic performance of the steam turbine, more than any other plant component, determines overall plant efficiency. Upgrading steam path components and using computerized design tools and manufacturing techniques to minimise internal leaks are two ways to give tired steam turbines a new lease on life. The article presents three case studies that illustrate how to do that. These are at Unit 1 of Dairyland's J.P. Madgett Station in Alma, WI, a coal-fired subcritical steam plant; the four units at AmerenUE's 600 MW coal-fired Labadie plant west of St. Louis; and Unit 3 of KeyPlan Corp's Northport Power Station on Long Island. 8 figs.

  4. Direct drive wind turbine

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bywaters, Garrett; Danforth, William; Bevington, Christopher; Jesse, Stowell; Costin, Daniel

    2006-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

    A wind turbine is provided that minimizes the size of the drive train and nacelle while maintaining the power electronics and transformer at the top of the tower. The turbine includes a direct drive generator having an integrated disk brake positioned radially inside the stator while minimizing the potential for contamination. The turbine further includes a means for mounting a transformer below the nacelle within the tower.

  5. Direct drive wind turbine

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bywaters, Garrett; Danforth, William; Bevington, Christopher; Stowell, Jesse; Costin, Daniel

    2006-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

    A wind turbine is provided that minimizes the size of the drive train and nacelle while maintaining the power electronics and transformer at the top of the tower. The turbine includes a direct drive generator having an integrated disk brake positioned radially inside the stator while minimizing the potential for contamination. The turbine further includes a means for mounting a transformer below the nacelle within the tower.

  6. Direct drive wind turbine

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bywaters, Garrett Lee; Danforth, William; Bevington, Christopher; Stowell, Jesse; Costin, Daniel

    2006-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

    A wind turbine is provided that minimizes the size of the drive train and nacelle while maintaining the power electronics and transformer at the top of the tower. The turbine includes a direct drive generator having an integrated disk brake positioned radially inside the stator while minimizing the potential for contamination. The turbine further includes a means for mounting a transformer below the nacelle within the tower.

  7. Direct drive wind turbine

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bywaters, Garrett; Danforth, William; Bevington, Christopher; Jesse, Stowell; Costin, Daniel

    2007-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

    A wind turbine is provided that minimizes the size of the drive train and nacelle while maintaining the power electronics and transformer at the top of the tower. The turbine includes a direct drive generator having an integrated disk brake positioned radially inside the stator while minimizing the potential for contamination. The turbine further includes a means for mounting a transformer below the nacelle within the tower.

  8. Power System Modeling of 20percent Wind-Generated Electricity by 2030

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hand, Maureen

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    generation by 18%. Natural gas combustion turbine capacitycycle natural gas plants, combustion turbine natural gasnuclear plants, combustion turbine natural gas plants, and

  9. Greenhouse Gas emissions from California Geothermal Power Plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sullivan, John

    2014-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The information given in this file represents GHG emissions and corresponding emission rates for California flash and dry steam geothermal power plants. This stage of the life cycle is the fuel use component of the fuel cycle and arises during plant operation. Despite that no fossil fuels are being consumed during operation of these plants, GHG emissions nevertheless arise from GHGs present in the geofluids and dry steam that get released to the atmosphere upon passing through the system. Data for the years of 2008 to 2012 are analyzed.

  10. Greenhouse Gas emissions from California Geothermal Power Plants

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Sullivan, John

    The information given in this file represents GHG emissions and corresponding emission rates for California flash and dry steam geothermal power plants. This stage of the life cycle is the fuel use component of the fuel cycle and arises during plant operation. Despite that no fossil fuels are being consumed during operation of these plants, GHG emissions nevertheless arise from GHGs present in the geofluids and dry steam that get released to the atmosphere upon passing through the system. Data for the years of 2008 to 2012 are analyzed.

  11. Aging management guideline for commercial nuclear power plants - heat exchangers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Booker, S.; Lehnert, D.; Daavettila, N.; Palop, E.

    1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Aging Management Guideline (AMG) describes recommended methods for effective detection and mitigation of age-related degradation mechanisms in commercial nuclear power plant heat exchangers important to license renewal. The intent of this AMG is to assist plant maintenance and operations personnel in maximizing the safe, useful life of these components. It also supports the documentation of effective aging management programs required under the License Renewal Rule 10 CFR 54. This AMG is presented in a manner that allows personnel responsible for performance analysis and maintenance to compare their plant-specific aging mechanisms (expected or already experienced) and aging management program activities to the more generic results and recommendations presented herein.

  12. Active Power Controls from Wind Power: Bridging the Gaps

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ela, E.; Gevorgian, V.; Fleming, P.; Zhang, Y. C.; Singh, M.; Muljadi, E.; Scholbrook, A.; Aho, J.; Buckspan, A.; Pao, L.; Singhvi, V.; Tuohy, A.; Pourbeik, P.; Brooks, D.; Bhatt, N.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper details a comprehensive study undertaken by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Electric Power Research Institute, and the University of Colorado to understand how the contribution of wind power providing active power control (APC) can benefit the total power system economics, increase revenue streams, improve the reliability and security of the power system, and provide superior and efficient response while reducing any structural and loading impacts that may reduce the life of the wind turbine or its components. The study includes power system simulations, control simulations, and actual field tests using turbines at NREL's National Wind Technology Center (NWTC). The study focuses on synthetic inertial control, primary frequency control, and automatic generation control, and analyzes timeframes ranging from milliseconds to minutes to the lifetime of wind turbines, locational scope ranging from components of turbines to large wind plants to entire synchronous interconnections, and additional topics ranging from economics to power system engineering to control design.

  13. POWER PLANT RELIABILITY-AVAILABILITY AND STATE REGULATION. VOLUME 7 OF THE FINAL REPORT ON HEALTH AND SAFETY IMPACTS OF NUCLEAR, GEOTHERMAL, AND FOSSIL-FUEL ELECTRIC GENERATION IN CALIFORNIA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nero, A.V.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Removal Equipment (nuclear plant) Turbine Building ClosedCooling Water System (nuclear plant) SteamReheater (nuclear plant) Inspection Water Induction

  14. Water vulnerabilities for existing coal-fired power plants.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elcock, D.; Kuiper, J.; Environmental Science Division

    2010-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

    This report was funded by the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) Existing Plants Research Program, which has an energy-water research effort that focuses on water use at power plants. This study complements the Existing Plants Research Program's overall research effort by evaluating water issues that could impact power plants. Water consumption by all users in the United States over the 2005-2030 time period is projected to increase by about 7% (from about 108 billion gallons per day [bgd] to about 115 bgd) (Elcock 2010). By contrast, water consumption by coal-fired power plants over this period is projected to increase by about 21% (from about 2.4 to about 2.9 bgd) (NETL 2009b). The high projected demand for water by power plants, which is expected to increase even further as carbon-capture equipment is installed, combined with decreasing freshwater supplies in many areas, suggests that certain coal-fired plants may be particularly vulnerable to potential water demand-supply conflicts. If not addressed, these conflicts could limit power generation and lead to power disruptions or increased consumer costs. The identification of existing coal-fired plants that are vulnerable to water demand and supply concerns, along with an analysis of information about their cooling systems and related characteristics, provides information to help focus future research and development (R&D) efforts to help ensure that coal-fired generation demands are met in a cost-effective manner that supports sustainable water use. This study identified coal-fired power plants that are considered vulnerable to water demand and supply issues by using a geographical information system (GIS) that facilitated the analysis of plant-specific data for more than 500 plants in the NETL's Coal Power Plant Database (CPPDB) (NETL 2007a) simultaneously with 18 indicators of water demand and supply. Two types of demand indicators were evaluated. The first type consisted of geographical areas where specific conditions can generate demand vulnerabilities. These conditions include high projected future water consumption by thermoelectric power plants, high projected future water consumption by all users, high rates of water withdrawal per square mile (mi{sup 2}), high projected population increases, and areas projected to be in a water crisis or conflict by 2025. The second type of demand indicator was plant specific. These indicators were developed for each plant and include annual water consumption and withdrawal rates and intensities, net annual power generation, and carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) emissions. The supply indictors, which are also area based, include areas with low precipitation, high temperatures, low streamflow, and drought. The indicator data, which were in various formats (e.g., maps, tables, raw numbers) were converted to a GIS format and stored, along with the individual plant data from the CPPDB, in a single GIS database. The GIS database allowed the indicator data and plant data to be analyzed and visualized in any combination. To determine the extent to which a plant would be considered 'vulnerable' to a given demand or supply concern (i.e., that the plant's operations could be affected by water shortages represented by a potential demand or supply indicator), criteria were developed to categorize vulnerability according to one of three types: major, moderate, or not vulnerable. Plants with at least two major demand indicator values and/or at least four moderate demand indicator values were considered vulnerable to demand concerns. By using this approach, 144 plants were identified as being subject to demand concerns only. Plants with at least one major supply indicator value and/or at least two moderate supply indicator values were considered vulnerable to supply concerns. By using this approach, 64 plants were identified as being subject to supply concerns only. In addition, 139 plants were identified as subject to both demand and supply concerns. Therefore, a total of 347 plants were considere

  15. Active Power Control from Wind Power (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ela, E.; Brooks, D.

    2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In order to keep the electricity grid stable and the lights on, the power system relies on certain responses from its generating fleet. This presentation evaluates the potential for wind turbines and wind power plants to provide these services and assist the grid during critical times.

  16. Decentralised optimisation of cogeneration in virtual power plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wille-Haussmann, Bernhard; Erge, Thomas; Wittwer, Christof [Fraunhofer Institute for Solar Energy Systems ISE, Heidenhofstrasse 2, 79110 Freiburg (Germany)

    2010-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Within several projects we investigated grid structures and management strategies for active grids with high penetration of renewable energy resources and distributed generation (RES and DG). Those ''smart grids'' should be designed and managed by model based methods, which are elaborated within these projects. Cogeneration plants (CHP) can reduce the greenhouse gas emissions by locally producing heat and electricity. The integration of thermal storage devices is suitable to get more flexibility for the cogeneration operation. If several power plants are bound to centrally managed clusters, it is called ''virtual power plant''. To operate smart grids optimally, new optimisation and model reduction techniques are necessary to get rid with the complexity. There is a great potential for the optimised management of CHPs, which is not yet used. Due to the fact that electrical and thermal demands do not occur simultaneously, a thermally driven CHP cannot supply electrical peak loads when needed. With the usage of thermal storage systems it is possible to decouple electric and thermal production. We developed an optimisation method based on mixed integer linear programming (MILP) for the management of local heat supply systems with CHPs, heating boilers and thermal storages. The algorithm allows the production of thermal and electric energy with a maximal benefit. In addition to fuel and maintenance costs it is assumed that the produced electricity of the CHP is sold at dynamic prices. This developed optimisation algorithm was used for an existing local heat system with 5 CHP units of the same type. An analysis of the potential showed that about 10% increase in benefit is possible compared to a typical thermally driven CHP system under current German boundary conditions. The quality of the optimisation result depends on an accurate prognosis of the thermal load which is realised with an empiric formula fitted with measured data by a multiple regression method. The key functionality of a virtual power plant is to increase the value of the produced power by clustering different plants. The first step of the optimisation concerns the local operation of the individual power generator, the second step is to calculate the contribution to the virtual power plant. With small extensions the suggested MILP algorithm can be used for an overall EEX (European Energy Exchange) optimised management of clustered CHP systems in form of the virtual power plant. This algorithm has been used to control cogeneration plants within a distribution grid. (author)

  17. Safeguard Requirements for Fusion Power Plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robert J. Goldston and Alexander Glaser

    2012-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Nuclear proliferation risks from magnetic fusion energy associated with access to fissile materials can be divided into three main categories: 1) clandestine production of fissile material in an undeclared facility, 2) covert production and diversion of such material in a declared and safeguarded facility, and 3) use of a declared facility in a breakout scenario, in which a state openly produces fissile material in violation of international agreements. The degree of risk in each of these categories is assessed, taking into account both state and non-state actors, and it is found that safeguards are required for fusion energy to be highly attractive from a non-proliferation standpoint. Specific safeguard requirements and R&D needs are outlined for each category of risk, and the technical capability of the ITER experiment, under construction, to contribute to this R&D is noted. A preliminary analysis indicates a potential legal pathway for fusion power systems to be brought under the Treaty for the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons. "Vertical" proliferation risks associated with tritium and with the knowledge that can be gained from inertial fusion energy R&D are outlined.

  18. Second-Generation Pressurized Fluidized Bed Combustion: Small gas turbine induustrial plant study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shenker, J.; Garland, R.; Horazak, D.; Seifert, F.; Wenglarz, R.

    1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Second-Generation Pressurized Fluidized Bed Combustion (PFBC) plants provide a coal-fired, high-efficiency, combined-cycle system for the generation of electricity and steam. The plants use lime-based sorbents in PFB combustors to meet environmental air standards without back-end gas desulfurization equipment. The second-generation system is an improvement over earlier PFBC concepts because it can achieve gas temperatures of 2100[degrees]F and higher for improved cycle efficiency while maintaining the fluidized beds at 1600[degrees]F for enhanced sulfur capture and minimum alkali release. Second-generation PFBC systems are capable of supplying the electric and steam process needs of industrial plants. The basic second-generation system can be applied in different ways to meet a variety of process steam and electrical requirements. To evaluate the potential of these systems in the industrial market, conceptual designs have been developed for six second-generation PFBC plants. These plants cover a range of electrical outputs from 6.3 to 41.5 MWe and steam flows from 46,067 to 442,337 lb/h. Capital and operating costs have been estimated for these six plants and for equivalent (in size) conventional, coal-fired atmospheric fluidized bed combustion cogeneration plants. Economic analyses were conducted to compare the cost of steam for both the second-generation plants and the conventional plants.

  19. Second-Generation Pressurized Fluidized Bed Combustion: Small gas turbine industrial plant study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shenker, J.; Garland, R.; Horazak, D.; Seifert, F.; Wenglarz, R.

    1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Second-Generation Pressurized Fluidized Bed Combustion (PFBC) plants provide a coal-fired, high-efficiency, combined-cycle system for the generation of electricity and steam. The plants use lime-based sorbents in PFB combustors to meet environmental air standards without back-end gas desulfurization equipment. The second-generation system is an improvement over earlier PFBC concepts because it can achieve gas temperatures of 2100{degrees}F and higher for improved cycle efficiency while maintaining the fluidized beds at 1600{degrees}F for enhanced sulfur capture and minimum alkali release. Second-generation PFBC systems are capable of supplying the electric and steam process needs of industrial plants. The basic second-generation system can be applied in different ways to meet a variety of process steam and electrical requirements. To evaluate the potential of these systems in the industrial market, conceptual designs have been developed for six second-generation PFBC plants. These plants cover a range of electrical outputs from 6.3 to 41.5 MWe and steam flows from 46,067 to 442,337 lb/h. Capital and operating costs have been estimated for these six plants and for equivalent (in size) conventional, coal-fired atmospheric fluidized bed combustion cogeneration plants. Economic analyses were conducted to compare the cost of steam for both the second-generation plants and the conventional plants.

  20. US nuclear power plant operating cost and experience summaries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kohn, W.E.; Reid, R.L.; White, V.S.

    1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    NUREG/CR-6577, U.S. Nuclear Power Plant Operating Cost and Experience Summaries, has been prepared to provide historical operating cost and experience information on U.S. commercial nuclear power plants. Cost incurred after initial construction are characterized as annual production costs, representing fuel and plant operating and maintenance expenses, and capital expenditures related to facility additions/modifications which are included in the plant capital asset base. As discussed in the report, annual data for these two cost categories were obtained from publicly available reports and must be accepted as having different degrees of accuracy and completeness. Treatment of inconclusive and incomplete data is discussed. As an aid to understanding the fluctuations in the cost histories, operating summaries for each nuclear unit are provided. The intent of these summaries is to identify important operating events; refueling, major maintenance, and other significant outages; operating milestones; and significant licensing or enforcement actions. Information used in the summaries is condensed from annual operating reports submitted by the licensees, plant histories contained in Nuclear Power Experience, trade press articles, and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) web site (www.nrc.gov).