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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "turbine performance ampere-hour-a" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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1

Steam Turbine Performance Engineer's Guide  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Steam Turbine Performance Engineer's Guide is meant to present the steam turbine performance engineer with the expected and important functions and responsibilities necessary to succeed in this position that are not necessarily taught in college. The instructions and recommendations in this guide, when properly executed, will improve the effectiveness of steam turbine performance engineers, positively affecting both the performance and reliability of the steam turbines under their care.

2010-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

2

Gas Turbine World performance specs 1984  

SciTech Connect

The following topics are discussed: working insights into the performance specifications; performance and design characteristics of electric power plants, mechanical drive gas turbines, and marine propulsion gas turbines; and performance calculations.

1984-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

Charts estimate gas-turbine site performance  

SciTech Connect

Nomographs have been developed to simplify site performance estimates for various types of gas turbine engines used for industrial applications. The nomographs can provide valuable data for engineers to use for an initial appraisal of projects where gas turbines are to be considered. General guidelines for the selection of gas turbines are also discussed. In particular, site conditions that influence the performance of gas turbines are described.

Dharmadhikari, S.

1988-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

4

Performance optimization of gas turbine engine  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Performance optimization of a gas turbine engine can be expressed in terms of minimizing fuel consumption while maintaining nominal thrust output, maximizing thrust for the same fuel consumption and minimizing turbine blade temperature. Additional control ... Keywords: Fuel control, Gas turbines, Genetic algorithms, Optimization, Temperature control

Valceres V. R. Silva; Wael Khatib; Peter J. Fleming

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

Enhancing gas-turbine performance  

SciTech Connect

According to one report, around 80% of the large frame-size industrial and utility gas turbines (GTs) in service throughout the world were installed between 1965 and 1975. Because of substantial technology advancements since their commissioning, these older units make ideal candidates for capacity enhancements through such options as steam or water injection, inlet-air cooling, steam-cycle addition, hot-gas-path component uprates, and in the case of combined-cycles, supplementary firing of the heat-recovery steam generator (HRSG). This article reports that many gas-turbine owners are searching for upgrades that will enhance capacity or thermal efficiency--or both. Uprating hot-gas-path components is perhaps the most popular option, but economic evaluations must account for shortened hot-section life and higher O and M costs.

Swanekamp, R.

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Adaptive simulation of gas turbine performance  

SciTech Connect

A method is presented allowing the simulation of gas turbine performance with the possibility of adapting to engine particularities. Measurements along the gas path are used, in order to adapt a given performance model by appropriate modification of the component maps. The proposed method can provide accurate simulation for engines of the same type, differing due to manufacturing or assembly tolerances. It doesn't require accurate component maps, as they are derived during the adaptation process. It also can be used for health monitoring purposes, introducing thus a novel approach for component condition assessment. The effectiveness of the proposed method is demonstrated by application to an industrial gas turbine.

Stamatis, A.; Mathioudakis, K.; Papailiou, K.D. (Ethnikon Metsovion Polytechneion, Athens (Greece))

1990-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Theory and Performance of Tesla Turbines  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

through a Tesla turbine microchannel . . . . . . . . . . .1.2 History of the Tesla Turbine 1.3 BackgroundCFD) Solution of Flow Through a Tesla Turbine 4.1 Summary of

Romanin, Vincent D.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

Theory and Performance of Tesla Turbines  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

camera. Bottom: tested turbine rotor housing diameter isfound in Figure 1.1. The turbine rotor consists of severalpower was reached. The turbine rotor and nozzle can be seen

Romanin, Vincent D.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

Wind Turbine Generator System Power Performance Test Report for the ARE442 Wind Turbine  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report summarizes the results of a power performance test that NREL conducted on the ARE 442 wind turbine. This test was conducted in accordance with the International Electrotechnical Commission's (IEC) standard, Wind Turbine Generator Systems Part 12: Power Performance Measurements of Electricity Producing Wind Turbines, IEC 61400-12-1 Ed.1.0, 2005-12. However, because the ARE 442 is a small turbine as defined by IEC, NREL also followed Annex H that applies to small wind turbines. In these summary results, wind speed is normalized to sea-level air density.

van Dam, J.; Jager, D.

2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Power Performance Test Report for the SWIFT Wind Turbine  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report summarizes the results of a power performance test that NREL conducted on the SWIFT wind turbine. This test was conducted in accordance with the International Electrotechnical Commission's (IEC) standard, Wind Turbine Generator Systems Part 12: Power Performance Measurements of Electricity Producing Wind Turbines, IEC 61400-12-1 Ed.1.0, 2005-12. However, because the SWIFT is a small turbine as defined by IEC, NREL also followed Annex H that applies to small wind turbines. In these summary results, wind speed is normalized to sea-level air density.

Mendoza, I.; Hur, J.

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Effects of Changing Atmospheric Conditions on Wind Turbine Performance (Poster)  

SciTech Connect

Multi-megawatt, utility-scale wind turbines operate in turbulent and dynamic winds that impact turbine performance in ways that are gradually becoming better understood. This poster presents a study made using a turbulent flow field simulator (TurbSim) and a Turbine aeroelastic simulator (FAST) of the response of a generic 1.5 MW wind turbine to changing inflow. The turbine power output is found to be most sensitive to wind speed and turbulence intensity, but the relationship depends on the wind speed with respect to the turbine's rated wind speed. Shear is found to be poorly correlated to power. A machine learning method called 'regression trees' is used to create a simple model of turbine performance that could be used as part of the wind resource assessment process. This study has used simple flow fields and should be extended to more complex flows, and validated with field observations.

Clifton, A.

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Gas Turbine Technology, Part A: Overview, Cycles, and Thermodynamic Performance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The growth of cogeneration technology has accelerated in recent years, and it is estimated that fifty percent of the cogeneration market will involve gas turbines. To several energy engineers, gas turbine engines present a new and somewhat perplexing prime mover. This paper (Parts A & B) intends to treat the area of gas turbine technology to provide a broad overview and understanding of this subject. This paper (Part A) covers the basics of gas turbine cycles, thermodynamics and performance considerations that are important in cogeneration. Simple, regenerative and combined cycles will be discussed, along with important performance losses (inlet and exit losses and part load operation). Waste heat recovery, as it relates to gas turbine performance, will also be discussed. This paper will provide the basic equations enabling quick computations to be made. Topics such as typical efficiencies, evaporative cooling costs, emissions, etc. will be discussed. A brief discussion of advanced cycles such as the dual fluid cycle and close cycles is also made.

Meher-Homji, C. B.; Focke, A. B.

1985-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Turbine Technologies for High Performance Light Water Reactors  

SciTech Connect

Available turbine technologies for a High Performance Light Water Reactor (HPLWR) have been analysed. For the envisaged steam pressures and temperatures of 25 MPa and 500 deg. C, no further challenges in turbine technologies have to be expected. The results from a steam cycle analysis indicate a net plant efficiency of 43.9% for the current HPLWR design. (authors)

Bitterman, D. [Framatome ANP GmbH, P.O. Box 3220, 91050 Erlangen (Germany); Starflinger, J.; Schulenberg, T. [Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe, P.O. Box 3640, 76021 Karlsruhe (Germany)

2004-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Advanced multistage turbine blade aerodynamics, performance, cooling, and heat transfer  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The gas turbine has the potential for power production at the highest possible efficiency. The challenge is to ensure that gas turbines operate at the optimum efficiency so as to use the least fuel and produce minimum emissions. A key component to meeting this challenge is the turbine. Turbine performance, both aerodynamics and heat transfer, is one of the barrier advanced gas turbine development technologies. This is a result of the complex, highly three-dimensional and unsteady flow phenomena in the turbine. Improved turbine aerodynamic performance has been achieved with three-dimensional highly-loaded airfoil designs, accomplished utilizing Euler or Navier-Stokes Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) codes. These design codes consider steady flow through isolated blade rows. Thus they do not account for unsteady flow effects. However, unsteady flow effects have a significant impact on performance. Also, CFD codes predict the complete flow field. The experimental verification of these codes has traditionally been accomplished with point data - not corresponding plane field measurements. Thus, although advanced CFD predictions of the highly complex and three-dimensional turbine flow fields are available, corresponding data are not. To improve the design capability for high temperature turbines, a detailed understanding of the highly unsteady and three-dimensional flow through multi-stage turbines is necessary. Thus, unique data are required which quantify the unsteady three-dimensional flow through multi-stage turbine blade rows, including the effect of the film coolant flow. Also, as design CFD codes do not account for unsteady flow effects, the next logical challenge and the current thrust in CFD code development is multiple-stage analyses that account for the interactions between neighboring blade rows. Again, to verify and or direct the development of these advanced codes, complete three-dimensional unsteady flow field data are needed.

Fleeter, S.; Lawless, P.B. [Purdue Univ., West Lafayette, IN (United States). School of Mechanical Engineering

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

15

Wind Turbine Generator System Power Performance Test Report for the Entegrity EW50 Wind Turbine  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Report on the results of the power performance test that the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) conducted on Entegrity Wind System Inc.'s EW50 small wind turbine.

Smith, J.; Huskey, A.; Jager, D.; Hur, J.

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Performance and market evaluation of the bladeless turbine  

SciTech Connect

The three-inch diameter prototype bladeless turbine was tested with air over a range of inlet pressures from 20 to 100 psia and speeds of 10, 20, 30 and 40 thousand rpm. The peak efficiency of 22.5 percent was recorded at a pressure of 98 psia and a speed of 40,000 rpm. Efficiency increased slightly with speed and inlet pressure over the range of test conditions. The test program was somewhat hindered by mechanical failures. The turbine bearings in particular were unreliable, with two instances of outright failure and numerous cases of erratic performance. A model of the bladeless turbine was developed to aid in interpreting the experimental results. A macroscopic approach, incorporating several favorable assumptions, was taken to place a reasonable upper bound on turbine efficiency. The model analytically examines the flow through the air inlet nozzles and the interaction between the fluid jet and the turbine blades. The analysis indicates that the maximum possible efficiency of a tangential flow turbine with straight axial blades is 50 percent. This is a direct consequence of turning the fluid only 90 degrees relative to the turbine blade. The adoption of the bladeless turbine as the expander in an Organic Rankine Cycle (ORC) will depend to a great extent on the efficiency of the turbine. The market potential for ORC technology will also impact the adoption of the bladeless turbine. Other expanders have demonstrated efficiencies of 60 to 80% in ORC systems. The Gamell turbine had a peak test efficiency of 22.5% and a maximum theoretical efficiency of 50%. Costs of the turbine are highly uncertain, relying to a great extent on cost reductions achieved through quantity production and through learning.

Garrett-Price, B.A.; Barnhart, J.S.; Eschbach, E.J.

1982-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Design of wind turbines with Ultra-High Performance Concrete  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ultra-High Performance Concrete (UHPC) has proven an asset for bridge design as it significantly reduces costs. However, UHPC has not been applied yet to wind turbine technology. Design codes do not propose any recommendations ...

Jammes, François-Xavier

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Using Machine Learning to Create Turbine Performance Models (Presentation)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Wind turbine power output is known to be a strong function of wind speed, but is also affected by turbulence and shear. In this work, new aerostructural simulations of a generic 1.5 MW turbine are used to explore atmospheric influences on power output. Most significant is the hub height wind speed, followed by hub height turbulence intensity and then wind speed shear across the rotor disk. These simulation data are used to train regression trees that predict the turbine response for any combination of wind speed, turbulence intensity, and wind shear that might be expected at a turbine site. For a randomly selected atmospheric condition, the accuracy of the regression tree power predictions is three times higher than that of the traditional power curve methodology. The regression tree method can also be applied to turbine test data and used to predict turbine performance at a new site. No new data is required in comparison to the data that are usually collected for a wind resource assessment. Implementing the method requires turbine manufacturers to create a turbine regression tree model from test site data. Such an approach could significantly reduce bias in power predictions that arise because of different turbulence and shear at the new site, compared to the test site.

Clifton, A.

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Combustion Turbine Diagnostic Health Monitoring: Combustion Turbine Performance and Fault Diagnostic Module (CTPFDM)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The industry-wide transition to condition-based maintenance strategies has prompted development of sophisticated, automated condition assessment tools. The Combustion Turbine Performance and Fault Diagnostic Module (CTPFDM) presented in this report is the second of a suite of intelligent software tools being developed by EPRI and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory as part of the Combustion Turbine Health Management (CTHM) System. The CTHM System will offer a signifi...

2004-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

20

The EPRI/DOE Utility Wind Turbine Performance Verification Program  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In 1992, the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) and the US Department of Energy (DOE) initiated the Utility Wind Turbine Performance Verification Program (TVP). This paper provides an overview of the TVP, its purpose and goals, and the participating utility projects. Improved technology has significantly reduced the cost of energy from wind turbines since the early 1980s. In 1992, turbines were producing electricity for about $0.07--$0.09/kilowatt-hour (kWh) (at 7 m/s [16 mph sites]), compared with more than $0.30/kWh in 1980. Further technology improvements were expected to lower the cost of energy from wind turbines to $0.05/kWh. More than 17,000 wind turbines, totaling more than 1,500 MW capacity, were installed in the US, primarily in California and Hawaii. The better wind plants had availabilities above 95%, capacity factors exceeding 30%, and operation and maintenance costs of $0.01/kWh. However, despite improving technology, EPRI and DOE recognized that utility use of wind turbines was still largely limited to turbines installed in California and Hawaii during the 1980s. Wind resource assessments showed that other regions of the US, particularly the Midwest, had abundant wind resources. EPRI and DOE sought to provide a bridge from utility-grade turbine development programs under way to commercial purchases of the wind turbines. The TVP was developed to allow utilities to build and operate enough candidate turbines to gain statistically significant operating and maintenance data.

Calvert, S.; Goldman, P. [Department of Energy, Washington, DC (United States); DeMeo, E.; McGowin, C. [Electric Power Research Inst., Palo Alto, CA (United States); Smith, B.; Tromly, K. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "turbine performance ampere-hour-a" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Computational Fluid Dynamics Framework for Turbine Biological Performance Assessment  

SciTech Connect

In this paper, a method for turbine biological performance assessment is introduced to bridge the gap between field and laboratory studies on fish injury and turbine design. Using this method, a suite of biological performance indicators is computed based on simulated data from a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model of a proposed turbine design. Each performance indicator is a measure of the probability of exposure to a certain dose of an injury mechanism. If the relationship between the dose of an injury mechanism and frequency of injury (dose-response) is known from laboratory or field studies, the likelihood of fish injury for a turbine design can be computed from the performance indicator. By comparing the values of the indicators from various turbine designs, the engineer can identify the more-promising designs. Discussion here is focused on Kaplan-type turbines, although the method could be extended to other designs. Following the description of the general methodology, we will present sample risk assessment calculations based on CFD data from a model of the John Day Dam on the Columbia River in the USA.

Richmond, Marshall C.; Serkowski, John A.; Carlson, Thomas J.; Ebner, Laurie L.; Sick, Mirjam; Cada, G. F.

2011-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

22

Turbine Surface Degradation with Service and Its Effects on Performance  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Jeffrey Bons Jeffrey Bons Co-PIs: Iowa State University - Drs. Tom Shih and ZJ Wang University of Cincinnati - Drs. Tafi Hamed and Widen Tabakoff Air Force Research Lab - Dr. Richard Rivir SCIES Project 02- 01- SR104 DOE COOPERATIVE AGREEMENT DE-FC26-02NT41431 Tom J. George, Program Manager, DOE/NETL Richard Wenglarz, Manager of Research, SCIES Project Awarded (06/01/02, 36 Month Duration) $563,712 Total Contract Value Turbine Surface Degradation with Service and Its Effects on Performance Brigham Young University JPB/BYU/29Oct2003 BYU-UTSR-Oct03, 29 Oct 2003, JPB The Gas Turbine Community NEEDS adequate tools to estimate the associated loss in engine performance with service time. ROUGH! ARE TURBINES Surface Degradation - Increases Heat Transfer - Reduces Efficiency GAS TURBINE NEED

23

Performance test of a bladeless turbine for geothermal applications  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Possell bladeless turbine was tested at the LLL Geothermal Test Facility to evaluate its potential for application in the total flow process. Test description and performance data are given for 3000, 3500, 4000, and 4500 rpm. The maximum engine efficiency observed was less than 7 percent. It is concluded that the Possell turbine is not a viable candidate machine for the conversion of geothermal fluids by the total flow process. (LBS)

Steidel, R.; Weiss, H.

1976-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

24

Standards of performance for new stationary sources gas turbines  

SciTech Connect

In order to implement the Clean Air Act, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency establishes standards of performance which limit emissions of nitrogen oxides and sulfur dioxide from new, modified, and reconstructed stationary gas turbines. The intended effect of this regulation is to require new, modified, and reconstructed stationary gas turbines to use the best demonstrated system of continuous emission reduction. There are no emission limits for gas turbines below 10.7 gigaj/hr. For all gas turbines 10.7 gigaj/hr and larger, the sulfur dioxide emission limit is 150 ppm; alternatively, a fuel with less than 0.8Vertical Bar3< sulfur can be fired. For gas turbines between 10.7 and 107.2 giga8/hr used for gas and oil transportation or production not located in a Metropolitan Statistical Area (MSA), the nitrogen oxides emission limit is 150 ppm. For gas turbines larger than 107.2 gigaj/hr used for gas and oil transportation or production located in an MSA, and for all other uses, the nitrogen oxides emission limit is 75 ppm. These regulations are effective as of 9/10/79.

1979-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

25

Gas turbine performance versus time in service. Final report  

SciTech Connect

Gas turbine performance deterioration is accompanied by changes to the parameter relationships of the gas turbine components and mostly to those parameters that are significantly affected by changes to the gas turbine's components efficiencies, namely power output and heat rate. Deterioration, therefore, is characterized by a decrease in power and an increase in heat rate at constant turbine temperature, and an increase in fuel flow and heat rate at constant engine or compressor pressure ratio or at constant power output. The loss in component efficiency is normally caused by changes in the gas path configuration of the compressor(s) and/or turbine(s). These changes are normally characterized by erosion and/or corrosion of air foils, air or gas seals, or deposits on air foils which significantly affect the flow characteristics of these parts. In any case, we are talking about the introduction of fouling, corrosion, and erosion agents into the gas path through the air inlet system and the fuel system. Since the environment and fuels are the major sources of gas path contamination, such things as air filters, fuel quality, duty cycle, gas path configuration, geographic consideration, cleaning techniques and frequency should influence the rate at which deterioration takes place. Data from single shaft gas turbines operated at continuous base load power, and baseload peaking duty cycle, was used to quantify typical deterioration curves for these machines. Power deviation differences at 10,000 hours chargeable to natural gas vs distillate fuel is six percentage points in favor of natural gas. The effect of evaporative coolers, airwashers and high efficiency filters in terms of power deviation at 10,000 hours is approximately five percentage points in favor of the filtered or airwashed inlet.

Brazel, W.N.

1985-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Summary of currently used wind turbine performance prediction computer codes  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Informaion on currently used wind turbine aerodynamic/economic performance prediction codes is compiled and presented. Areas of interest to wind energy researchers that are not included in the reported codes are identified. Areas which are weak in experimental support are also identified.

Perkins, F.

1979-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Aerodynamic performance measurements of a film-cooled turbine stage  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The goal of this research is to measure the aerodynamic performance of a film-cooled turbine stage and to quantify the loss caused by film-cooling. A secondary goal of the research is to provide a detailed breakdown of the ...

Keogh, Rory (Rory Colm), 1968-

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Optimizing small wind turbine performance in battery charging applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Many small wind turbine generators (10 kW or less) consist of a variable speed rotor driving a permanent magnet synchronous generator (alternator). One application of such wind turbines is battery charging, in which the generator is connected through a rectifier to a battery bank. The wind turbine electrical interface is essentially the same whether the turbine is part of a remote power supply for telecommunications, a standalone residential power system, or a hybrid village power system, in short, any system in which the wind generator output is rectified and fed into a DC bus. Field experience with such applications has shown that both the peak power output and the total energy capture of the wind turbine often fall short of expectations based on rotor size and generator rating. In this paper, the authors present a simple analytical model of the typical wind generator battery charging system that allows one to calculate actual power curves if the generator and rotor properties are known. The model clearly illustrates how the load characteristics affect the generator output. In the second part of this paper, the authors present four approaches to maximizing energy capture from wind turbines in battery charging applications. The first of these is to determine the optimal battery bank voltage for a given WTG. The second consists of adding capacitors in series with the generator. The third approach is to place an optimizing DC/DC voltage converter between the rectifier and the battery bank. The fourth is a combination of the series capacitors and the optimizing voltage controller. They also discuss both the limitations and the potential performance gain associated with each of the four configurations.

Drouilhet, S; Muljadi, E; Holz, R [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States). Wind Technology Div.; Gevorgian, V [State Engineering Univ. of Armenia, Yerevan (Armenia)

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Turbine-Turbine Interaction and Performance Detailed (Fact Sheet), NREL Highlights, Science  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Next-generation modeling capability assesses wind turbine array fluid dynamics and aero-elastic simulations.

Not Available

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Performance Testing of a Small Vertical-Axis Wind Turbine , S. Tullis2  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Performance Testing of a Small Vertical-Axis Wind Turbine R. Bravo1 , S. Tullis2 , S. Ziada3 of electric production [1]. Although most performance testing for small-scale wind turbines is conducted vertical-axis wind turbines (VAWT) in urban settings, full-scale wind tunnel testing of a prototype 3.5 k

Tullis, Stephen

31

A comparison between the performance of different silencer designs for gas turbine exhaust systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A comparison between the performance of different silencer designs for gas turbine exhaust systems in more specialist applications, such as the exhaust systems of gas turbines, different silencer experiments are carried out with the aim of investigating performance of silencers used on gas turbines

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

32

Performance and supply of fluids in a modern gas turbine.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This thesis considers the role fluids play in improving the efficiency and reducing the environmental impact of modern gas turbines. This includes gas turbines used… (more)

Askins, John Stephen

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Plasma Aerodynamic Control Effectors for Improved Wind Turbine Performance  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Orbital Research Inc is developing an innovative Plasma Aerodynamic Control Effectors (PACE) technology for improved performance of wind turbines. The PACE system is aimed towards the design of "smart" rotor blades to enhance energy capture and reduce aerodynamic loading and noise using flow-control. The PACE system will provide ability to change aerodynamic loads and pitch distribution across the wind turbine blade without any moving surfaces. Additional benefits of the PACE system include reduced blade structure weight and complexity that should translate into a substantially reduced initial cost. During the Phase I program, the ORI-UND Team demonstrated (proof-of-concept) performance improvements on select rotor blade designs using PACE concepts. Control of both 2-D and 3-D flows were demonstrated. An analytical study was conducted to estimate control requirements for the PACE system to maintain control during wind gusts. Finally, independent laboratory experiments were conducted to identify promising dielectric materials for the plasma actuator, and to examine environmental effects (water and dust) on the plasma actuator operation. The proposed PACE system will be capable of capturing additional energy, and reducing aerodynamic loading and noise on wind turbines. Supplementary benefits from the PACE system include reduced blade structure weight and complexity that translates into reduced initial capital costs.

Mehul P. Patel; Srikanth Vasudevan; Robert C. Nelson; Thomas C. Corke

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

DOE-Sponsored Research Improves Gas Turbine Performance  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Small Business Innovative Research Grants Achieve Commercialization Goals for Novel Gas Turbine Manufacturing Technology

35

PERFORMANCE ENHANCEMENT OF WIND TURBINE POWER REGULATION BY SWITCHED LINEAR CONTROL  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PERFORMANCE ENHANCEMENT OF WIND TURBINE POWER REGULATION BY SWITCHED LINEAR CONTROL D.J.Leith W Power regulation of horizontal-axis grid-connected up-wind constant-speed pitch-regulated wind turbines, switched linear control is more suited for application to wind turbines than the nonlinear control strategy

Duffy, Ken

36

American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics PERFORMANCE INVESTIGATION OF SMALL GAS TURBINE ENGINES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics 1 PERFORMANCE INVESTIGATION OF SMALL GAS TURBINE and topped engines. INTRODUCTION Gas turbines are typical power sources used in a wide size range, development, and application of small gas turbines yielding high power density and enabling low-cost air

Müller, Norbert

37

Automated DecisionAnalytic Diagnosis of Thermal Performance in Gas Turbines  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Automated Decision­Analytic Diagnosis of Thermal Performance in Gas Turbines To be presented Abstract We have developed an expert system for diagno­ sis of e#ciency problems for large gas turbines the ultimate goal of applying the system in the day­to­day maintenance of gas­ turbine power plants. A Overview

Horvitz, Eric

38

Automated Decision-Analytic Diagnosis of Thermal Performance in Gas Turbines  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Automated Decision-Analytic Diagnosis of Thermal Performance in Gas Turbines To be presented Abstract We have developed an expert system for diagno- sis of efficiency problems for large gas turbines the ultimate goal of applying the system in the day-to-day maintenance of gas- turbine power plants. A Overview

Horvitz, Eric

39

Turbine Surface Degradation with Service and Its Effects on Performance  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Peer Review Workshop III Peer Review Workshop III 18-20 October 2005 Jeffrey Bons BYU Z.J. Wang (3-D) Tom Shih (2-D) Iowa State University IOWA STATE UNIVERSITY Aerospace Engineering Turbine Surface Degradation with Service and Its Effects on Performance - 2-D/3-D CFD Simulations of Rough Surfaces- * Perform detailed CFD simulations to generate understanding of flow and heat transfer phenomena over rough surfaces. * Use understanding generated to develop engineering models to predict heat transfer and friction on rough surfaces. Objectives IOWA STATE UNIVERSITY Aerospace Engineering Accomplishments * Performed 2-D and 3-D CFD simulations. * Generated a preliminary engineering model. 3-D CFD: Z.J. Wang * 1/6 -1/3 of the span (from Jeffrey Bons' experiment) selected for the computational domain; * 2 mm, 1 mm and 0.5 mm resolutions for coarse, medium and

40

The effects of manufacturing variability on turbine vane performance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Gas turbine vanes have airfoil shapes optimized to deliver specific flow conditions to turbine rotors. The limitations of the manufacturing process with regards to accuracy and precision mean that no vane will exactly match ...

Duffner, John D

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "turbine performance ampere-hour-a" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

The effects of manufacturing variability on turbine vane performance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Gas turbine vanes have airfoil shapes optimized to deliver specific flow conditions to turbine rotors. The limitations of the manufacturing process with regards to accuracy and precision mean that no vane will exactly match ...

Duffner, John D.

42

Processing of High Performance Alloys for A-USC Steam Turbine ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fracture Toughness Evaluation of Polymeric Materials for Wind Turbine Blades Using the Spiral Notch Torsion Test · High Performance Alloys for Advanced ...

43

Fuel Cell/Gas Turbine System Performance Studies  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

METC/C-97/7278 METC/C-97/7278 Title: Fuel Cell/Gas Turbine System Performance STudies Authors: George T. Lee (METC) Frederick A. Sudhoff (METC) Conference: Fuel Cells '96 Review Meeting Conference Location: Morgantown, West Virginia Conference Dates: August 20-21, 1996 Conference Sponsor: U.S. DOE, Morgantown Energy Technology Center Disclaimer This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference

44

Turbine Research Program Cold Weather Turbine Project: Period of Performance May 27, 1999 -- March 31, 2004  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Northern Power Systems completed the Cold Weather Turbine (CWT) project, which was funded by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), under subcontract XAT-9-29200-01. The project's primary goal is to develop a 100-kW wind turbine suited for deployment in remote villages in cold regions. The contract required testing and certification of the turbine to the International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC) 61400-1 international standard through Underwriters Laboratories (UL). The contract also required Northern Power Systems to study design considerations for operation in extreme cold (-80F at the South Pole, for example). The design was based on the successful proof of concept (POC) turbine (developed under NREL and NASA contracts), considered the prototype turbine that would be refined and manufactured to serve villages in cold regions around the world.

Lynch, J.; Bywaters, G.; Costin, D.; Hoskins, S.; Mattila, P.; Stowell, J.

2004-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Evaluation of Blade-Strike Models for Estimating the Biological Performance of Large Kaplan Hydro Turbines  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

BioIndex testing of hydro-turbines is sought as an analog to the hydraulic index testing conducted on hydro-turbines to optimize their power production efficiency. In BioIndex testing the goal is to identify those operations within the range identified by Index testing where the survival of fish passing through the turbine is maximized. BioIndex testing includes the immediate tailrace region as well as the turbine environment between a turbine's intake trashracks and the exit of its draft tube. The US Army Corps of Engineers and the Department of Energy have been evaluating a variety of means, such as numerical and physical turbine models, to investigate the quality of flow through a hydro-turbine and other aspects of the turbine environment that determine its safety for fish. The goal is to use these tools to develop hypotheses identifying turbine operations and predictions of their biological performance that can be tested at prototype scales. Acceptance of hypotheses would be the means for validation of new operating rules for the turbine tested that would be in place when fish were passing through the turbines. The overall goal of this project is to evaluate the performance of numerical blade strike models as a tool to aid development of testable hypotheses for bioIndexing. Evaluation of the performance of numerical blade strike models is accomplished by comparing predictions of fish mortality resulting from strike by turbine runner blades with observations made using live test fish at mainstem Columbia River Dams and with other predictions of blade strike made using observations of beads passing through a 1:25 scale physical turbine model.

Deng, Zhiqun; Carlson, Thomas J.; Ploskey, Gene R.; Richmond, Marshall C.

2005-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

46

Reliable Gas Turbine Output: Attaining Temperature Independent Performance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Improvements in gas turbine efficiency, coupled with dropping gas prices, has made gas turbines a popular choice of utilities to supply peaking as well as base load power in the form of combined cycle power plants. Today, because of the gas turbine's compactness, low maintenance, and high levels of availability, it is the major option for future power generation. One inherent disadvantage of gas turbines is the degradation of output as the ambient air temperature increases. This reduction in output during times of peak load create a reliability concern as more gas turbines are added to the electric system. A 10% reduction in gas turbine output, when it comprises only 10% of the electric system, does not cause reliability concerns. A 10% reduction in gas turbine output, when it comprises 50% of the electric system, could create reliability and operational problems. This paper explores the potential for maintaining constant, reliable outputs from gas turbines by cooling ambient air temperatures before the air is used in the compressor section of the gas turbine.

Neeley, J. E.; Patton, S.; Holder, F.

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Numerical performance prediction for FAU's first generation ocean current turbine.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This thesis presents the analytically predicted position, motion, attitude, power output and forces on Florida Atlantic University's (FAU) first generation ocean current turbine for a… (more)

Vanrietvelde, Nicolas.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Numerical performance prediction for FAU's first generation ocean current turbine.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? This thesis presents the analytically predicted position, motion, attitude, power output and forces on Florida Atlantic University's (FAU) first generation ocean current turbine for… (more)

Vanrietvelde, Nicolas

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Applicability of Nacelle Anemometer Measurements for Use in Turbine Power Performance Tests: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Collection of accurate wind speed data is one of the more problematic elements in conducting wind turbine power performance tests. IEC 61400-12 specifies meteorological tower placement between two and four rotor diameters upwind of the test turbine. However, use of an upwind meteorological tower can be difficult at some sites. In some cases, complex terrain near the turbine may make placement of an upwind tower impossible. In addition, purchase and erection of a meteorological tower can be expensive, particularly as the hub height of large turbines increases. Because of these concerns, wind farm owners and turbine manufacturers have expressed interest in the use of turbine nacelle-mounted anemometers for collection of wind speed data. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)-Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) Wind Turbine Verification Program (TVP) has performed data collection and power performance tests at wind energy facilities located in the United States. The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the data gathered from the Big Spring, Texas; Algona, Iowa; and Springview, Nebraska, facilities to determine whether a meaningful relationship can be derived between meteorological-tower and nacelle-anemometer wind speed measurements for Vestas V47 and V66 turbines (Big Spring) and Enron Z-50 turbines (Algona and Springview).

Smith, B.; Link, H.; Randall, G.; McCoy, T.

2002-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Wind Turbine Generator System Power Performance Test Report for the Gaia-Wind 11-kW Wind Turbine  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This test was conducted as part of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Independent Testing project. It is a power performance test that the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) conducted on the Gaia-Wind 11-kW small wind turbine.

Huskey, A.; Bowen, A.; Jager, D.

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Wind Turbine Generator System Power Performance Test Report for the Gaia-Wind 11-kW Wind Turbine  

SciTech Connect

This test was conducted as part of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Independent Testing project. It is a power performance test that the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) conducted on the Gaia-Wind 11-kW small wind turbine.

Huskey, A.; Bowen, A.; Jager, D.

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Free-air performance tests of a 5-metre-diameter Darrieus turbine  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A five-meter-diameter vertical-axis wind turbine has been tested at the Sandia Laboratories Wind Turbine Site. The results of these tests and some of the problems associated with free-air testing of wind turbines are presented. The performance data obtained follow the general trend of data obtained in extensive wind tunnel tests of a 2-meter-diameter turbine. However, the power coefficient data are slightly lower than anticipated. The reasons for this discrepancy are explored along with comparisons between experimental data and a computerized aerodynamic prediction model.

Sheldahl, R.E.; Blackwell, B.F.

1977-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Aerodynamic and Performance Measurements on a SWT-2.3-101 Wind Turbine  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper provides an overview of a detailed wind turbine field experiment being conducted at NREL under U.S. Department of Energy sponsorship. The purpose of the experiment is to obtain knowledge about the aerodynamics, performance, noise emission and structural characteristics of the Siemens SWT-2.3-101 wind turbine.

Medina, P.; Singh, M.; Johansen, J.; Jove, A.R.; Machefaux, E.; Fingersh, L. J.; Schreck, S.

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

User's manual for the vertical axis wind turbine performance computer code darter  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The computer code DARTER (DARrieus, Turbine, Elemental Reynolds number) is an aerodynamic performance/loads prediction scheme based upon the conservation of momentum principle. It is the latest evolution in a sequence which began with a model developed by Templin of NRC, Canada and progressed through the Sandia National Laboratories-developed SIMOSS (SSImple MOmentum, Single Streamtube) and DART (SARrieus Turbine) to DARTER.

Klimas, P. C.; French, R. E.

1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Feasibility Study of Economics and Performance of Wind Turbine...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Wind Turbine Generators at the Newport Indiana Chemical Depot Site Joseph Owen Roberts and Gail Mosey Produced under direction of U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) by the...

56

Gas Turbine Combustor Performance on Synthetic Fuels, Volume 1  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This volume presents complete data from a test program to determine the behavior of several coal-derived and shale-derived liquid fuels when burned in state-of-the-art combustion turbine engines. The methods used in analyzing the test results are described. The heat transfer effects on gas turbine combustors are discussed, as well as NOx and other emissions effects and predictions.

1980-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Fuel cell/gas turbine system performance studies  

SciTech Connect

Because of the synergistic effects (higher efficiencies, lower emissions) of combining a fuel cell and a gas turbine into a power generation system, many potential system configurations were studied. This work is focused on novel power plant systems by combining gas turbines, solid oxide fuel cells, and a high-temperature heat exchanger; these systems are ideal for the distributed power and on- site markets in the 1-5 MW size range.

Lee, G.T.; Sudhoff, F.A.

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

58

Performance of a Wind-Profiling Lidar in the Region of Wind Turbine Rotor Disks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As the wind energy sector continues to grow, so does the need for reliable vertical wind profiles in the assessment of wind resources and turbine performance. In situ instrumentation mounted on meteorological towers can rarely probe the atmosphere ...

Matthew L. Aitken; Michael E. Rhodes; Julie K. Lundquist

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Gas Turbine Combustor Performance on Synthetic Fuels, Volume 2  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This volume presents a summary of a project to determine the effects of burning currently available coal-derived and shale-derived synthetic liquid fuels in state-of-the-art gas turbine combustors. It describes the fuels tested, the effects of NO emission and of smoke formation and reduction, and a comparison of surrogate and synthetic fuels. The project concluded that a number of selected coal and shale oil fuels can be used in current turbines as soon as these fuels become available.

1981-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Verification of creep performance of a ceramic gas turbine blade  

SciTech Connect

Tensile creep tests were carried out on a Norton NT164 silicon nitride ceramic turbine blade containing 4 wt. % Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} sintering additive at 1,370 C in air under selected stress levels. The objective of this study was to measure the creep properties of test specimens extracted from a complex shaped ceramic gas turbine blade to verify the response of actual components. The creep results indicated that specimens from both the airfoil and dovetail sections exhibited creep rates that were about 4 to 100 times higher than those obtained from both the buttonhead and dogbone creep specimens machined from the developmental billets fabricated with the same composition and processing procedures. Electron microscopy analyses suggested that high creep rates and short lifetimes observed in specimens extracted from the turbine blade resulted from a higher glassy phase(s) content and smaller number density of elongated grain microstructure. Silicon nitride ceramics with an in-situ reinforced elongated microstructure have been the primary candidates for both advanced automotive and land-based gas turbine engine applications.

Lin, H.T.; Becher, P.F.; Ferber, M.K. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Metals and Ceramics Div.; Parthasarathy, V. [Solar Turbines Inc., San Diego, CA (United States)

1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "turbine performance ampere-hour-a" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Wind Turbinie Generator System Power Performance Test Report for the Mariah Windspire 1-kW Wind Turbine  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report summarizes the results of a power performance test that NREL conducted on the Mariah Windspire 1-kW wind turbine. During this test, two configurations were tested on the same turbine. In the first configuration, the turbine inverter was optimized for power production. In the second configuration, the turbine inverter was set for normal power production. In both configurations, the inverter experienced failures and the tests were not finished.

Huskey, A.; Bowen, A.; Jager, D.

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Power Performance Test Report for the Viryd CS8 Wind Turbine  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report contains the results of the power performance test that was performed on a Viryd CS8 wind turbine as part of the DOE Independent Testing project. The test is an accredited test to the IEC 61400-12-1 power performance standard.

Roadman, J.; Murphy, M.; van Dam, J.

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Comparison of Projections to Actual Performance in the DOE-EPRI Wind Turbine Verification Program  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

As part of the US Department of Energy/Electric Power Research Institute (DOE-EPRI) Wind Turbine Verification Program (TVP), Global Energy Concepts (GEC) worked with participating utilities to develop a set of performance projections for their projects based on historical site atmospheric conditions, turbine performance data, operation and maintenance (O and M) strategies, and assumptions about various energy losses. After a preliminary operation period at each project, GEC compared the actual performance to projections and evaluated the accuracy of the data and assumptions that formed the performance projections. This paper presents a comparison of 1999 power output, turbine availability, and other performance characteristics to the projections for TVP projects in Texas, Vermont, Iowa, Nebraska, Wisconsin, and Alaska. Factors that were overestimated or underestimated are quantified. Actual wind speeds are compared to projections based on long-term historical measurements. Turbine power curve measurements are compared with data provided by the manufacturers, and loss assumptions are evaluated for accuracy. Overall, the projects performed well, particularly new commercial turbines in the first few years of operation. However, some sites experienced below average wind resources and greater than expected losses. The TVP project owners successfully developed and constructed wind power plants that are now in full commercial operation, serving a total of approximately 12,000 households.

Rhoads, H.; VandenBosche, J.; McCoy, T.; Compton, A. (Global Energy Concepts, LLC); Smith, B. (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)

2000-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

64

Power Performance Testing Progress in the DOE/EPRI Turbine Verification Program  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

As part of the U.S. Department of Energy/Electric Power Research Institute (DOE-EPRI) Wind Turbine Verification Program (TVP), tests are conducted to characterize the power performance of individual wind turbines at each wind project. The testing is performed in a variety of terrain types, including mountains, plains, deserts, and coastal tundra; and under a wide range of atmospheric conditions, from arid to arctic. Initial results and experiences of the testing were reported the WindPower 2000 conference. This paper presents the status of the power performance testing and new results from the past year.

Smith, B. (National Renewable Energy Laboratory); Randall, G.; McCoy, T; Vandenbosche, J. (Global Energy Concepts, LLC)

2001-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

65

Wind Turbines Under Atmospheric Icing Conditions - Ice Accretion Modeling, Aerodynamics, and Control Strategies for Mitigating Performance Degradation.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This thesis presents a combined engineering methodology of ice accretion, airfoil data, and rotor performance analysis of wind turbines subject to moderate atmospheric icing conditions.… (more)

Brillembourg, Dwight

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Inter-stage and Performance Tests of a Two-stage High-pressure Turbine  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The existing 3-stage research turbine at Turbomachinery Performance and Flow Research Laboratory (TPFL) facility, Texas A & M University (TAMU) was replaced with a newly designed and manufactured 2-stage turbine in accordance with the design requirements as per DooSan, DHI. This new design of turbine consisted of bowed stator and rotor blades to study the effect on reduction of secondary ow losses and thus improvement in turbine efficiency if any. The new design also incorporated labyrinth seals on both inner and outer shrouds. Extensive Inter-stage and Performance experiments were carried out on this new turbine. Inter-stage measurements were accomplished by traversing three 5-hole probes radially and circumferentially, using the existing probe traverse system in TPFL. Performance tests were conducted for varying pressure ratio, at fixed rotational speed and for varying rotational speed with fixed pressure ratio and the efficiency was plotted against u/c_0. Each condition was tested and measured two to three times to check for reproducibility of the data. The results from inter-stage experiments show that the rotor row loss coefficient is about four times higher than the stator row loss coefficient. This high rotor loss coefficient reduces the total to static efficiency. From the performance tests, the maximum total-to-static efficiency observed was 85.2 percent located at around u/c_0 = 0.75. This relatively low efficiency is in consonance with the inter-stage results (high rotor loss coefficient).

Sharma, Kapil

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Field investigations examining the impact of supersaturated vapor expansions on turbine performance  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Investigators in the Heat Cycle Research project are developing a technology base which will permit the increased utilization of the moderate-temperature, liquid-dominated geothermal resource for the production of electrical power. The project investigations have focused upon power cycles which have the potential for the increased utilization (power produced per unit quantity of fluid) of the hydrothermal resource. The investigations to date have confirmed the viability of technology required to incorporate concepts which will allow the binary power cycle to have a performance approaching practical thermodynamic maximums. Investigations in progress are examining the potential improvements that result from allowing super-saturated turbine expansions. During these metastable expansions, the working fluid is maintained as a supersaturated vapor during the turbine expansion process; if at equilibrium conditions, liquid condensate would be present. If it can be shown that these expansions proceed without a degradation in turbine performance or damage to the turbine internals by any condensate which forms, a projected 8% improvement in the performance of the advanced cycle could be realized. Investigators are presently examining the condensation behavior of these expansions, as well as determining the impact of these expansions on turbine performance.

Mines, G.L.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Investigation of vortex generators for augmentation of wind turbine power performance  

SciTech Connect

This study focuses on the use of vortex generators (VGs) for performance augmentation of the stall-regulated AWT-26 wind turbine. The goal was to design a VG array which would increase annual energy production (AEP) by increasing power output at moderate wind speeds, without adversely affecting the loads or stall-regulation performance of the turbine. Wind tunnel experiments were conducted at the University of Washington to evaluate the effect of VGs on the AWT-26 blade, which is lofted from National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) S-series airfoils. Based on wind-tunnel results and analysis, a VG array was designed and then tested on the AWT-26 prototype, designated P1. Performance and loads data were measured for P1, both with and without VGs installed. the turbine performance with VGs met most of the design requirements; power output was increased at moderate wind speeds with a negligible effect on peak power. However, VG drag penalties caused a loss in power output for low wind speeds, such that performance with VGs resulted in a net decrease in AEP for sites having annual average wind speeds up to 8.5 m/s. While the present work did not lead to improved AEP for the AWT-2 turbine, it does provide insight into performance augmentation of wind turbines with VGs. The safe design of a VG array for a stall-regulated turbine has been demonstrated, and several issues involving optimal performance with VGs have been identified and addressed. 15 refs., 34 figs., 10 tabs.

Griffin, D.A. [Lynette (R.) and Associates, Seattle, WA (United States)

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

WIND-TUNNEL STUDY ON AERODYNAMIC PERFORMANCE OF SMALL VERTICAL-AXIS WIND TURBINES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of a building was explored [2]. Referred to such applications, a VAWT can be so small in physical size that its by the present authors to study the aerodynamic performance of small VAWTs using the experimental and numerical1 WIND-TUNNEL STUDY ON AERODYNAMIC PERFORMANCE OF SMALL VERTICAL-AXIS WIND TURBINES J. J. Miau*1

Leu, Tzong-Shyng "Jeremy"

70

Investigation of transient models and performances for a doubly fed wind turbine under a grid fault  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In order to investigate the impacts of the integration of wind farms into utilities network, it is necessary to analyze the transient performances of wind turbine generation systems (WTGS) with the appropriate transient models. According to the grid ... Keywords: crowbar, doubly fed induction generator, drive train, transient performance, wind power

Mingyu Wang; Bin Zhao; Hui Li; Chao Yang; Renjie Ye; Z. Chen

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Effect of thermal barrier coatings on the performance of steam- and water-cooled gas turbine: steam turbine combined cycle systems  

SciTech Connect

An analytical study was made of the performance of air-, steam-, and water-cooled gas-turbine/steam-turbine combined-cycle systems with and without thermal-barrier coatings. For steam cooling, thermal-barrier coatings permit an increase in the turbine inlet temperature from 1205/sup 0/C to 1370/sup 0/C, resulting in an efficiency improvement of 1.9 percentage points. The maximum specific power improvement with thermal barriers is 32.4% when the turbine inlet temperature is increased from 1425/sup 0/C to 1675/sup 0/C and the airfoil temperature is kept the same. For water cooling, the maximum efficiency improvement is 2.2 percentage points at a turbine inlet temperature of 1683/sup 0/C and the maximum specific power improvement is 36.6% by increasing the turbine inlet temperature from 1425/sup 0/C to 1730/sup 0/C and keeping the airfoil temperatures the same. These improvements are greater than that obtained with combined cycles using air-cooling at a turbine inlet temperature of 1205/sup 0/C. The large temperature differences across the thermal barriers at these high temperatures, however, indicate that thermal stresses may present obstacles to the use of coatings at high turbine inlet temperatures.

Nainiger, J.J.

1978-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Systems Study for Improving Gas Turbine Performance for Coal/IGCC Application  

SciTech Connect

This study identifies vital gas turbine (GT) parameters and quantifies their influence in meeting the DOE Turbine Program overall Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) plant goals of 50% net HHV efficiency, $1000/kW capital cost, and low emissions. The project analytically evaluates GE advanced F class air cooled technology level gas turbine conceptual cycle designs and determines their influence on IGCC plant level performance including impact of Carbon capture. This report summarizes the work accomplished in each of the following six Tasks. Task 1.0--Overall IGCC Plant Level Requirements Identification: Plant level requirements were identified, and compared with DOE's IGCC Goal of achieving 50% Net HHV Efficiency and $1000/KW by the Year 2008, through use of a Six Sigma Quality Functional Deployment (QFD) Tool. This analysis resulted in 7 GT System Level Parameters as the most significant. Task 2.0--Requirements Prioritization/Flow-Down to GT Subsystem Level: GT requirements were identified, analyzed and prioritized relative to achieving plant level goals, and compared with the flow down of power island goals through use of a Six Sigma QFD Tool. This analysis resulted in 11 GT Cycle Design Parameters being selected as the most significant. Task 3.0--IGCC Conceptual System Analysis: A Baseline IGCC Plant configuration was chosen, and an IGCC simulation analysis model was constructed, validated against published performance data and then optimized by including air extraction heat recovery and GE steam turbine model. Baseline IGCC based on GE 207FA+e gas turbine combined cycle has net HHV efficiency of 40.5% and net output nominally of 526 Megawatts at NOx emission level of 15 ppmvd{at}15% corrected O2. 18 advanced F technology GT cycle design options were developed to provide performance targets with increased output and/or efficiency with low NOx emissions. Task 4.0--Gas Turbine Cycle Options vs. Requirements Evaluation: Influence coefficients on 4 key IGCC plant level parameters (IGCC Net Efficiency, IGCC Net Output, GT Output, NOx Emissions) of 11 GT identified cycle parameters were determined. Results indicate that IGCC net efficiency HHV gains up to 2.8 pts (40.5% to 43.3%) and IGCC net output gains up to 35% are possible due to improvements in GT technology alone with single digit NOx emission levels. Task 5.0--Recommendations for GT Technical Improvements: A trade off analysis was conducted utilizing the performance results of 18 gas turbine (GT) conceptual designs, and three most promising GT candidates are recommended. A roadmap for turbine technology development is proposed for future coal based IGCC power plants. Task 6.0--Determine Carbon Capture Impact on IGCC Plant Level Performance: A gas turbine performance model for high Hydrogen fuel gas turbine was created and integrated to an IGCC system performance model, which also included newly created models for moisturized syngas, gas shift and CO2 removal subsystems. This performance model was analyzed for two gas turbine technology based subsystems each with two Carbon removal design options of 85% and 88% respectively. The results show larger IGCC performance penalty for gas turbine designs with higher firing temperature and higher Carbon removal.

Ashok K. Anand

2005-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

73

Systems Study for Improving Gas Turbine Performance for Coal/IGCC Application  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This study identifies vital gas turbine (GT) parameters and quantifies their influence in meeting the DOE Turbine Program overall Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) plant goals of 50% net HHV efficiency, $1000/kW capital cost, and low emissions. The project analytically evaluates GE advanced F class air cooled technology level gas turbine conceptual cycle designs and determines their influence on IGCC plant level performance including impact of Carbon capture. This report summarizes the work accomplished in each of the following six Tasks. Task 1.0--Overall IGCC Plant Level Requirements Identification: Plant level requirements were identified, and compared with DOE's IGCC Goal of achieving 50% Net HHV Efficiency and $1000/KW by the Year 2008, through use of a Six Sigma Quality Functional Deployment (QFD) Tool. This analysis resulted in 7 GT System Level Parameters as the most significant. Task 2.0--Requirements Prioritization/Flow-Down to GT Subsystem Level: GT requirements were identified, analyzed and prioritized relative to achieving plant level goals, and compared with the flow down of power island goals through use of a Six Sigma QFD Tool. This analysis resulted in 11 GT Cycle Design Parameters being selected as the most significant. Task 3.0--IGCC Conceptual System Analysis: A Baseline IGCC Plant configuration was chosen, and an IGCC simulation analysis model was constructed, validated against published performance data and then optimized by including air extraction heat recovery and GE steam turbine model. Baseline IGCC based on GE 207FA+e gas turbine combined cycle has net HHV efficiency of 40.5% and net output nominally of 526 Megawatts at NOx emission level of 15 ppmvd{at}15% corrected O2. 18 advanced F technology GT cycle design options were developed to provide performance targets with increased output and/or efficiency with low NOx emissions. Task 4.0--Gas Turbine Cycle Options vs. Requirements Evaluation: Influence coefficients on 4 key IGCC plant level parameters (IGCC Net Efficiency, IGCC Net Output, GT Output, NOx Emissions) of 11 GT identified cycle parameters were determined. Results indicate that IGCC net efficiency HHV gains up to 2.8 pts (40.5% to 43.3%) and IGCC net output gains up to 35% are possible due to improvements in GT technology alone with single digit NOx emission levels. Task 5.0--Recommendations for GT Technical Improvements: A trade off analysis was conducted utilizing the performance results of 18 gas turbine (GT) conceptual designs, and three most promising GT candidates are recommended. A roadmap for turbine technology development is proposed for future coal based IGCC power plants. Task 6.0--Determine Carbon Capture Impact on IGCC Plant Level Performance: A gas turbine performance model for high Hydrogen fuel gas turbine was created and integrated to an IGCC system performance model, which also included newly created models for moisturized syngas, gas shift and CO2 removal subsystems. This performance model was analyzed for two gas turbine technology based subsystems each with two Carbon removal design options of 85% and 88% respectively. The results show larger IGCC performance penalty for gas turbine designs with higher firing temperature and higher Carbon removal.

Ashok K. Anand

2005-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

74

A review of potential turbine technology options for improving the off-design performance of direct coal-fired gas turbines in base load service. Second topical report  

SciTech Connect

The January, 1988 draft topical report, entitled ``An Assessment of Off-Design Particle Control Performance on Direct Coal-Fired Gas Turbine Systems`` [Ref.1.1], identified the need to assess potential trade-offs in turbine aerodynamic and thermodynamic design which may offer improvements in the performance, operational and maintenance characteristics of open-cycle, direct coal-fired, combustion gas turbines. In this second of a series of three topical reports, an assessment of the technical options posed by the above trade-offs is presented. The assessment is based on the current status of gas turbine technology. Several industry and university experts were contacted to contribute to the study. Literature sources and theoretical considerations are used only to provide additional background and insight to the technology involved.

Thomas, R.L.

1988-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

A review of potential turbine technology options for improving the off-design performance of direct coal-fired gas turbines in base load service  

SciTech Connect

The January, 1988 draft topical report, entitled An Assessment of Off-Design Particle Control Performance on Direct Coal-Fired Gas Turbine Systems'' (Ref.1.1), identified the need to assess potential trade-offs in turbine aerodynamic and thermodynamic design which may offer improvements in the performance, operational and maintenance characteristics of open-cycle, direct coal-fired, combustion gas turbines. In this second of a series of three topical reports, an assessment of the technical options posed by the above trade-offs is presented. The assessment is based on the current status of gas turbine technology. Several industry and university experts were contacted to contribute to the study. Literature sources and theoretical considerations are used only to provide additional background and insight to the technology involved.

Thomas, R.L.

1988-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Effects of external boost compression on gas turbine performance in an advanced CPFBC application  

SciTech Connect

When a commercial gas turbine, designed and optimized for natural gas fuel, is used in an Advanced Circulating Pressurized Fluid Bed Combustor (CPFBC) application, changes occur that affect both the thermodynamic cycle and the performance of the individual components. These come principally from the increased pressure drop encountered between the compressor discharge and expander inlet, with changes in gas properties and flow rates for the hot combustion products having secondary effects. Net effect is that power output can be reduced and significant design and/or operational compromises may be required for the gas turbine. Application of an external boost compressor can mitigate these effects.

Freier, M.D. [USDOE Morgantown Energy Technology Center, WV (United States); Goldstein, H.N.; White, J.S. [Parsons Power Group, Inc., Reading, PA (United States)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

77

Configuration and performance of the indirect-fired fuel cell bottomed turbine cycle  

SciTech Connect

The natural gas, indirect-fired fuel cell bottomed turbine cycle (NG-IFFC) is introduced as a novel power plant system for the distributed power and on-site markets in the 20--200 megawatt (MW) size range. The novel indirect-fired carbonate fuel cell bottomed turbine cycle (NG-IFCFC) power plant system configures the ambient pressure carbonate fuel cell with a gas turbine, air compressor, combustor, and ceramic heat exchanger. Performance calculations from ASPEN simulations present material and energy balances with expected power output. The results indicate efficiencies and heat rates for the NG-IFCFC are comparable to conventionally bottomed carbonate fuel cell steam bottomed cycles, but with smaller and less expensive components.

Micheli, P.L.; Williams, M.C.; Parsons, E.L. Jr.

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

78

Enabling Technology for Monitoring & Predicting Gas Turbine Health & Performance in COAL IGCC Powerplants  

SciTech Connect

The ''Enabling & Information Technology To Increase RAM for Advanced Powerplants'' program, by DOE request, has been re-directed, de-scoped to two tasks, shortened to a 2-year period of performance, and refocused to develop, validate and accelerate the commercial use of enabling materials technologies and sensors for Coal IGCC powerplants. The new program has been re-titled as ''Enabling Technology for Monitoring & Predicting Gas Turbine Health & Performance in IGCC Powerplants'' to better match the new scope. This technical progress report summarizes the work accomplished in the reporting period April 1, 2004 to August 31, 2004 on the revised Re-Directed and De-Scoped program activity. The program Tasks are: Task 1--IGCC Environmental Impact on high Temperature Materials: This first materials task has been refocused to address Coal IGCC environmental impacts on high temperature materials use in gas turbines and remains in the program. This task will screen material performance and quantify the effects of high temperature erosion and corrosion of hot gas path materials in Coal IGCC applications. The materials of interest will include those in current service as well as advanced, high-performance alloys and coatings. Task 2--Material In-Service Health Monitoring: This second task develops and demonstrates new sensor technologies to determine the in-service health of advanced technology Coal IGCC powerplants, and remains in the program with a reduced scope. Its focus is now on only two critical sensor need areas for advanced Coal IGCC gas turbines: (1) Fuel Quality Sensor for detection of fuel impurities that could lead to rapid component degradation, and a Fuel Heating Value Sensor to rapidly determine the fuel heating value for more precise control of the gas turbine, and (2) Infra-Red Pyrometer to continuously measure the temperature of gas turbine buckets, nozzles, and combustor hardware.

Kenneth A. Yackly

2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

79

Thermal Performance of the ABB GT24 Combustion Turbine: Peaking Service Experience at GPU Gilbert Station  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

EPRI's Durability Surveillance (DS) program -- in place since 1991 -- is producing the first in-service performance and operating data on the newest high-efficiency gas turbines. This detailed investigation of the ABB GT24 installed at GPU Genco's Gilbert Station in Milford, New Jersey, is providing plant personnel and the manufacturer with valuable information for solving initial problems. Study results will help all power producers specify, operate, and maintain a new generation of high-performance gas...

1999-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

80

Cooperative field test program for wind energy systems: Effects of precipitation on wind turbine performance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this research is to examine the effect of precipitation on wind turbine performance. This study will be conducted at the Whisky Run windfarm on the southern Oregon coast. Precipitation has been shown to cause significant degradation in the performance of the MOD-O wind turbine by Corrigan and DeMiglio (1985), who found performance reductions of up to 20% for light rainfall, 30% for moderate rainfall and 36% for snow and drizzle. There are several penalties due to rainfall, but it appears that most of the performance degradation is due to rain induced roughness. The Whisky Run windfarm receives around 60 inches of rain per year most of which occurs from October through April. During the summer months drizzle is an occasional weather phenomena. Pacific Wind Energy (PWE) and Pacific Power and Light (PP L) propose to examine the effect of precipitation on wind turbine performance. The Whisky Run windfarm is unique among windfarms because the power sales contract is set up such that the wind farm is considered a research project and the participants have agreed to engage in research that will benefit the industry. PP L will be providing all of the instrumentation except for the recording rate of rain gage. PWE will be performing the analysis of the data and project management.

Not Available

1986-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "turbine performance ampere-hour-a" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

PERFORMANCE OF BLACK LIQUOR GASIFIER/GAS TURBINE COMBINED CYCLE COGENERATION IN mE KRAFT PULP  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PERFORMANCE OF BLACK LIQUOR GASIFIER/GAS TURBINE COMBINED CYCLE COGENERATION IN mE KRAFT PULP the next 5 to 20 years. As a replacement for Tomlinson-based cogeneration, black liquor- gasifier/gas turbine cogeneration promises higher elecuical efficiency, with prospective environmental, safety

82

Power Performance Testing Activities in the DOE-EPRI Turbine Verification Program  

SciTech Connect

As part of the US Department of Energy/Electric Power Research Institute (DOE-EPRI) Wind Turbine Verification Program, Global Energy Concepts (GEC) is engaged in planning and conducting power performance tests for wind turbines in Searsburg, Vermont; Glenmore, Wisconsin; Algona, Iowa; Springview, Nebraska; Kotzebue, Alaska; and Big Spring, Texas. The turbines under investigation include a 550-kW Zond Z-40 FS, a 600-kW Tacke 600e, two 750-kW Zond Z-50s, a 66-kW AOC 15/50, a 660-kW Vestas V-47, and a 1.65-MW Vestas V-66. The testing is performed in a variety of terrain types, including mountains, plains, deserts, and coastal tundra; and under a wide range of atmospheric conditions from arid to arctic. Because one goal of this testing program is to gain experience with the new International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC) 61400-12 standard, all of the measurements are being performed in accordance with this new standard. This paper presents the status of the power performance testing at each site, the methodologies employed, test results available, and lessons learned from the application of the IEC standard. Any sources of uncertainty are discussed, and attention is given to the relative importance of each aspect of the IEC standard in terms of its contribution to the overall measurement uncertainty.

VandenBosche, J.; McCoy, T.; Rhoads, H. (Global Energy Concepts, LLC); McNiff, B. (McNiff Light Industry); Smith, B. (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)

2000-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

83

Enabling Technology for Monitoring & Predicting Gas Turbine Health & Performance in IGCC Powerplants  

SciTech Connect

The ''Enabling & Information Technology To Increase RAM for Advanced Powerplants'' program, by DOE request, was re-directed, de-scoped to two tasks, shortened to a 2-year period of performance, and refocused to develop, validate and accelerate the commercial use of enabling materials technologies and sensors for coal/IGCC powerplants. The new program was re-titled ''Enabling Technology for Monitoring & Predicting Gas Turbine Health & Performance in IGCC Powerplants''. This final report summarizes the work accomplished from March 1, 2003 to March 31, 2004 on the four original tasks, and the work accomplished from April 1, 2004 to July 30, 2005 on the two re-directed tasks. The program Tasks are summarized below: Task 1--IGCC Environmental Impact on high Temperature Materials: The first task was refocused to address IGCC environmental impacts on high temperature materials used in gas turbines. This task screened material performance and quantified the effects of high temperature erosion and corrosion of hot gas path materials in coal/IGCC applications. The materials of interest included those in current service as well as advanced, high-performance alloys and coatings. Task 2--Material In-Service Health Monitoring: The second task was reduced in scope to demonstrate new technologies to determine the inservice health of advanced technology coal/IGCC powerplants. The task focused on two critical sensing needs for advanced coal/IGCC gas turbines: (1) Fuel Quality Sensor to rapidly determine the fuel heating value for more precise control of the gas turbine, and detection of fuel impurities that could lead to rapid component degradation. (2) Infra-Red Pyrometer to continuously measure the temperature of gas turbine buckets, nozzles, and combustor hardware. Task 3--Advanced Methods for Combustion Monitoring and Control: The third task was originally to develop and validate advanced monitoring and control methods for coal/IGCC gas turbine combustion systems. This task was refocused to address pre-mixed combustion phenomenon for IGCC applications. The work effort on this task was shifted to another joint GE Energy/DOE-NETL program investigation, High Hydrogen Pre-mixer Designs, as of April 1, 2004. Task 4--Information Technology (IT) Integration: The fourth task was originally to demonstrate Information Technology (IT) tools for advanced technology coal/IGCC powerplant condition assessment and condition based maintenance. The task focused on development of GateCycle. software to model complete-plant IGCC systems, and the Universal On-Site Monitor (UOSM) to collect and integrate data from multiple condition monitoring applications at a power plant. The work on this task was stopped as of April 1, 2004.

Kenneth A. Yackly

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Enabling Technology for Monitoring & Predicting Gas Turbine Health & Performance in IGCC Powerplants  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The ''Enabling & Information Technology To Increase RAM for Advanced Powerplants'' program, by DOE request, was re-directed, de-scoped to two tasks, shortened to a 2-year period of performance, and refocused to develop, validate and accelerate the commercial use of enabling materials technologies and sensors for coal/IGCC powerplants. The new program was re-titled ''Enabling Technology for Monitoring & Predicting Gas Turbine Health & Performance in IGCC Powerplants''. This final report summarizes the work accomplished from March 1, 2003 to March 31, 2004 on the four original tasks, and the work accomplished from April 1, 2004 to July 30, 2005 on the two re-directed tasks. The program Tasks are summarized below: Task 1--IGCC Environmental Impact on high Temperature Materials: The first task was refocused to address IGCC environmental impacts on high temperature materials used in gas turbines. This task screened material performance and quantified the effects of high temperature erosion and corrosion of hot gas path materials in coal/IGCC applications. The materials of interest included those in current service as well as advanced, high-performance alloys and coatings. Task 2--Material In-Service Health Monitoring: The second task was reduced in scope to demonstrate new technologies to determine the inservice health of advanced technology coal/IGCC powerplants. The task focused on two critical sensing needs for advanced coal/IGCC gas turbines: (1) Fuel Quality Sensor to rapidly determine the fuel heating value for more precise control of the gas turbine, and detection of fuel impurities that could lead to rapid component degradation. (2) Infra-Red Pyrometer to continuously measure the temperature of gas turbine buckets, nozzles, and combustor hardware. Task 3--Advanced Methods for Combustion Monitoring and Control: The third task was originally to develop and validate advanced monitoring and control methods for coal/IGCC gas turbine combustion systems. This task was refocused to address pre-mixed combustion phenomenon for IGCC applications. The work effort on this task was shifted to another joint GE Energy/DOE-NETL program investigation, High Hydrogen Pre-mixer Designs, as of April 1, 2004. Task 4--Information Technology (IT) Integration: The fourth task was originally to demonstrate Information Technology (IT) tools for advanced technology coal/IGCC powerplant condition assessment and condition based maintenance. The task focused on development of GateCycle. software to model complete-plant IGCC systems, and the Universal On-Site Monitor (UOSM) to collect and integrate data from multiple condition monitoring applications at a power plant. The work on this task was stopped as of April 1, 2004.

Kenneth A. Yackly

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Combustion Turbine Diagnostic Health Monitoring: Combined Cycle Performance and Fault Diagnostic Module (CCPFDM)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The industry-wide transition to condition-based maintenance strategies has prompted development of sophisticated, automated condition assessment tools. The Combined Cycle Performance and Fault Diagnostic Module (CCPFDM) presented in this report is the third of a suite of intelligent software tools being developed by EPRI and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory as part of the Combustion Turbine Health Management (CTHM) System. The CTHM System will offer a significant ...

2004-03-22T23:59:59.000Z

86

Reference wind speed distributions and height profiles for wind turbine design and performance evaluation applications. [USA  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The purpose of this report is to provide a set of reference or standard values of wind profiles, wind speed distributions and their effects on wind turbine performance for engineering design applications. Based on measured Weibull distribution parameters, representative average, low, and high variance data are given for height profiles of mean, 25 percentile, and 75 percentile wind speeds; and for wind speed probability density (velocity frequency) functions and cumulative probability (velocity duration) functions at selected heights. Results of a sensitivity analysis of the dependence of wind turbine performance parameters on cut-in speed, and rated speed for various mean wind and wind variance regimes are also presented. Wind turbine performance is expressed in terms of capacity factor (ratio of mean power output to rated power) and recovery factor (ratio of mean energy output to energy theoretically available in the wind). The representative high, mean, and low variance cases were determined from calculated Weibull distributions at 140 sites across the Continental U.S., and all of the representative functions are evaluated at mean wind speeds of 4, 5, 6, 7, and 8 m/s at standard 10 m level.

Justus, C.G.; Hargraves, W.R.; Mikhail, A.

1976-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Thermal Performance of the ABB GT24 Gas Turbine in Peaking Servicer at the Gilbert Station of GPU Energy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

EPRI's durability surveillance (DS) program, in place since 1991, is producing the first in-service performance and operating data on the newest high-efficiency gas turbines. This detailed investigation of the ABB GT24 installed at GPU Genco's Gilbert Station in Milford, New Jersey, is providing plant personnel and the manufacturer with valuable information for solving initial problems, and will help all power producers specify, operate, and maintain a new generation of high-performance gas turbines.

1998-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

88

Parametric performance analysis of steam-injected gas turbine with a thermionic-energy-converter-lined combustor  

SciTech Connect

The performance of steam-injected gas turbines having combustors lined with thermionic energy converters (STIG/TEC systems) was analyzed and compared with that of two baseline systems a steam-injected gas turbine (without a TEC-lined combustor) and a conventional combined gas turbine/steam turbine cycle. Common gas turbine parameters were assumed for all of the systems. Two configurations of the STIG/TEC system were investigated. In both cases, steam produced in an exhaust-heat-recovery boiler cools the TEC collectors. It is then injected into the gas combustion stream and expanded through the gas turbine. The STIG/TEC system combines the advantage of gas turbine steam injection with the conversion of high-temperature combustion heat by TEC's. The addition of TEC's to the baseline steam-injected gas turbine improves both its efficiency and specific power. Depending on system configuration and design parameters, the STIG/TEC system can also achieve higher efficiency and specific power than the baseline combined cycle.

Choo, Y.K.; Burns, R.K.

1982-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Influence of hole shape on the performance of a turbine vane endwall film-cooling scheme  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Rising combustor exit temperatures in gas turbine engines necessitate active cooling for the downstream industrial gas turbine engines. One means of achieving this goal is to increase the combustion temper- ature are so high in today's gas turbine engines that in the absence of complex cooling schemes the turbine

Thole, Karen A.

90

Advanced Gas Turbine Guidelines: Performance Retention for GE 7FA Unit in Baseload Operation: Durability Surveillance at Florida Pow er & Lights Company's Martin Station  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Worldwide pressures for reducing power generation costs have encouraged domestic and foreign manufacturers to build high-efficiency gas turbines implementing the latest technological advances. This report discusses performance monitoring and analysis in a multiyear project, launched in 1991, to assure the staying power of industrial gas turbines produced by major turbine manufacturers.

1999-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

91

NETL: Turbines  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Turbines Coal and Power Systems Turbines Turbine Animation Turbines have been the world's energy workhorses for generations... - Read More The NETL Turbine Program manages a...

92

Ten years with turbine metering  

SciTech Connect

The operation and performance experience in using 110 turbine meters to monitor the gas flow in turbines used on natural gas pipelines are discussed. Information is included on turbine meter selection, installation, calibration, performance testing, failures, and maintenance. (LCL)

Judd, H.C.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

DOE-Supported Technology Passes Scale-Up Test Converting CO DOE-Sponsored Research Improves Gas Turbine Performance  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

into Valuable Materials into Valuable Materials Publications News Release Release Date: June 17, 2013 DOE-Sponsored Research Improves Gas Turbine Performance DOE Lab Receives Award for Work on Drilling Technology An innovative airfoil manufacturing technology that promises to improve the performance of state-of-the-art gas turbines has been commercialized through research sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy. Photo courtesy of Mikro Systems, Inc. Washington, D.C. - An innovative airfoil manufacturing technology that promises to improve the performance of state-of-the-art gas turbines has been commercialized through research sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). The technology - which is expected to contribute to cleaner, more reliable and affordable domestic energy production as well as creating new

94

Use of an Autonomous Sensor to Evaluate the Biological Performance of the Advanced Turbine at Wanapum Dam  

SciTech Connect

Hydropower is the largest renewable energy resource in the world and the United States. However, Hydropower dams have adverse ecological impacts because migrating fish may be injured or killed when they pass through hydro turbines. In the Columbia and Snake River basins, dam operators and engineers are required to make these hydroelectric facilities more fish-friendly through changes in hydro-turbine design and operation after fish population declines and the subsequent listing of several species of Pacific salmon in the Endangered Species Act of 1973. Grant County Public Utility District (Grant PUD) requested authorization from the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission to replace the 10 turbines at Wanapum Dam with advanced hydropower turbines that are designed to improve survival for fish passing through the turbines while improving operation efficiency and increasing power generation. The U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy provided co-funding to Grant PUD for aspects of performance testing that supported the application. As an additional measure to the primary evaluation measure of direct injury and mortality rates of juvenile Chinook salmon using balloon tag-recapture methodology, this study used an autonomous sensor device to provide insight into the specific hydraulic conditions or physical stresses that the fish experienced or the specific causes of the biological response. We found that the new blade shape and the corresponding reduction of turbulence in the advanced hydropower turbine were effective. The frequency of severe events based on Sensor Fish pressure and acceleration measurements showed trends similar to those of fish survival determined by balloon tag-recapture tests. In addition, the new turbine provided a better pressure and rate of change environment for fish passage. Overall, the Sensor Fish data indicated that the advanced hydro turbine design met the desired fish passage goals for Wanapum Dam.

Deng, Zhiqun; Carlson, Thomas J.; Duncan, Joanne P.; Richmond, Marshall C.; Dauble, Dennis D.

2010-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

95

Applications: Operational wind turbines  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Capability Applications: Operational wind turbines Benefits: Optimize wind turbine performance Summary: Researchers at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) Intelligent Wind Turbine Program are developing a multi-physics modeling approach for the analysis of wind turbines in the presence of realistic

96

Operation and Performance of a Biphase Turbine Power Plant at the Cerro Prieto Geothermal Field (Final Report)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A full scale, wellhead Biphase turbine was manufactured and installed with the balance of plant at Well 103 of the Cerro Prieto geothermal resource in Baja, California. The Biphase turbine was first synchronized with the electrical grid of Comision Federal de Electricidad on August 20, 1997. The Biphase power plant was operated from that time until May 23, 2000, a period of 2 years and 9 months. A total of 77,549 kWh were delivered to the grid. The power plant was subsequently placed in a standby condition pending replacement of the rotor with a newly designed, higher power rotor and replacement of the bearings and seals. The maximum measured power output of the Biphase turbine, 808 kWe at 640 psig wellhead pressure, agreed closely with the predicted output, 840 kWe. When combined with the backpressure steam turbine the total output power from that flow would be increased by 40% above the power derived only from the flow by the present flash steam plant. The design relations used to predict performance and design the turbine were verified by these tests. The performance and durability of the Biphase turbine support the conclusion of the Economics and Application Report previously published, (Appendix A). The newly designed rotor (the Dual Pressure Rotor) was analyzed for the above power condition. The Dual Pressure Rotor would increase the power output to 2064 kWe by incorporating two pressure letdown stages in the Biphase rotor, eliminating the requirement for a backpressure steam turbine. The power plant availability was low due to deposition of solids from the well on the Biphase rotor and balance of plant problems. A great deal of plant down time resulted from the requirement to develop methods to handle the solids and from testing the apparatus in the Biphase turbine. Finally an online, washing method using the high pressure two-phase flow was developed which completely eliminated the solids problem. The availability of the Biphase turbine itself was 100% after implementations of this method in March 2000. However, failures of instrumentation and control system components led to additional plant down time and damage to the bearings and seals. The enthalpy and pressure of well 103 declined substantially from the inception of the project. When the project was started the wellhead pressure and enthalpy were 760 psig and 882 Btu/lb respectively. At the time the plant was placed in standby the corresponding values were only 525 psig and 658 Btu/lb. This reduced the available plant power to only 400 kWe making the project economically unfeasible. However, replacement of the existing rotor with the Dual Pressure Rotor and replacement of the bearings and seals will enable the existing Biphase turbine to produce 1190 kWe at the present well conditions without the backpressure steam turbine. Operation with the present staff can then be sustained by selling power under the existing Agreement with CFE. Implementation of this option is recommended with operation of the facility to continue as a demonstration plant. Biphase turbine theory, design and performance are reported herein. The construction of the Biphase turbine and power plant and operational experience are detailed. Improvements in the Biphase turbine are indicated and analyzed. The impact of Biphase techonology on geothermal power production is discussed and recommendations made.

Hays, Lance G. [Douglas Energy Company, Placentia, CA (United States)

2000-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Solid oxide fuel cell/gas turbine power plant cycles and performance estimates  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

SOFC pressurization enhances SOFC efficiency and power performance. It enables the direct integration of the SOFC and gas turbine technologies which can form the basis for very efficient combined- cycle power plants. PSOFC/GT cogeneration systems, producing steam and/or hot water in addition to electric power, can be designed to achieve high fuel effectiveness values. A wide range of steam pressures and temperatures are possible owing to system component arrangement flexibility. It is anticipated that Westinghouse will offer small PSOFC/GT power plants for sale early in the next decade. These plants will have capacities less than 10 MW net ac, and they will operate with efficiencies in the 60-65% (net ac/LHV) range.

Lundberg, W.L.

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

98

The Influence of Unsteady Wind on the Performance and Aerodynamics of Vertical Axis Wind Turbines.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Interest in small–scale wind turbines as energy sources in the built environment has increased due to the desire of consumers in urban areas to reduce… (more)

Danao, Louis Angelo

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Measured and predicted rotor performance for the SERI advanced wind turbine blades  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Measured and predicted rotor performance for the SERI advanced wind turbine blades were compared to assess the accuracy of predictions and to identify the sources of error affecting both predictions and measurements. An awareness of these sources of error contributes to improved prediction and measurement methods that will ultimately benefit future rotor design efforts. Propeller/vane anemometers were found to underestimate the wind speed in turbulent environments such as the San Gorgonio Pass wind farm area. Using sonic or cup anemometers, good agreement was achieved between predicted and measured power output for wind speeds up to 8 m/sec. At higher wind speeds an optimistic predicted power output and the occurrence of peak power at wind speeds lower than measurements resulted from the omission of turbulence and yaw error. In addition, accurate two-dimensional (2-D) airfoil data prior to stall and a post stall airfoil data synthesization method that reflects three-dimensional (3-D) effects were found to be essential for accurate performance prediction. 11 refs.

Tangler, J.; Smith, B.; Kelley, N.; Jager, D.

1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Exit blade geometry and part-load performance of small axial flow propeller turbines: An experimental investigation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A detailed experimental investigation of the effects of exit blade geometry on the part-load performance of low-head, axial flow propeller turbines is presented. Even as these turbines find important applications in small-scale energy generation using micro-hydro, the relationship between the layout of blade profile, geometry and turbine performance continues to be poorly characterized. The experimental results presented here help understand the relationship between exit tip angle, discharge through the turbine, shaft power, and efficiency. The modification was implemented on two different propeller runners and it was found that the power and efficiency gains from decreasing the exit tip angle could be explained by a theoretical model presented here based on classical theory of turbomachines. In particular, the focus is on the behaviour of internal parameters like the runner loss coefficient, relative flow angle at exit, mean axial flow velocity and net tangential flow velocity. The study concluded that the effects of exit tip modification were significant. The introspective discussion on the theoretical model's limitation and test facility suggests wider and continued experimentation pertaining to the internal parameters like inlet vortex profile and exit swirl profile. It also recommends thorough validation of the model and its improvement so that it can be made capable for accurate characterization of blade geometric effects. (author)

Singh, Punit; Nestmann, Franz [Institute for Water and River Basin Management (IWG), University of Karlsruhe, Kaiser Str. 12, D 76128 Karlsruhe (Germany)

2010-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "turbine performance ampere-hour-a" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Advanced Gas Turbine Guidelines: Performance Retention for GE 7F Unit in Peaking Operation: Durability Surveillance at Potomac Elect ric Power Company's Station H  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Worldwide pressures to reduce power generation costs have encouraged domestic and foreign manufacturers to build high-efficiency gas turbines implementing the latest technological advances. To assure the staying power of these turbines, EPRI launched a multi-year durability surveillance program. This report discusses performance monitoring and analysis of a General Electric 7F unit in peaking operation.

1999-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

102

Balancing Performance, Noise, Cost, and Aesthetics in the Southwest Windpower "Storm" Wind Turbine: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper describes the design, fabrication, and testing of an 1800-watt innovative small wind turbine and discusses the importance of idiosyncratic aerodynamic and aeroacoustic airfoil characteristics for clean airfoils at low Reynolds numbers.

Migliore, P.; Green, J.; Calley, D.; Lonjaret, J.

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Blade tip clearance effect on the performance and flow field of a three stage axial turbine  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The effect of a 1.5 % blade tip clearance on a rotating three stage turbine under different operating points was investigated using radially and circumferentially traversed five hole pressure probes. The probes were used to obtain flow field total and static pressures, absolute and relative velocities and angles, as well as calculate the blade span distribution of total pressure loss coefficient. Total temperature thermocouple probes were traversed radially and circumferentially to obtain temperature profiles under running conditions. Results showed high discrepancies especially in the blade tip region which is due to high circulation flows occurring at the tip that produce an out of probe calibration range type flow. Engine efficiency and massflow rate was also measured using a venturi flow meter in order to discern the effect the blade tip clearance has on the engine efficiency and performance. Results have shown that the blade tip clearance losses appear to play a smaller role when compared to other losses such as exit losses. This was because the engine efficiency was slightly affected when run using a blade tip clearance.

Abdel-Fattah, Sharef Aly

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Gas Turbine Optimum Operation.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Many offshore installations are dependent on power generated by gas turbines and a critical issue is that these experience performance deterioration over time. Performance deterioration… (more)

Flesland, Synnøve Mangerud

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Modeling the performance of a two-phase turbine using numerical methods and the results of nozzle, static cascade, and windage experiments  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Performance models for a two-phase turbine were developed to verify the understanding of the loss mechanisms and to extrapolate from the single-nozzle test condition to a full-admission turbine. The numerical models for predicting the performance of the nozzle and the combined nozzle and rotor are described. Results from two-phase, static cascade tests and disk-friction and windage experiments are used to calibrate the performance model(s). Model predictions are compared with single-nozzle prototype-turbine test results, and extrapolations are made to a full-admission design. The modeling also provides predictions of performance for turbines with various blade geometries, inlet conditions, and droplet sizes. Thus the modeling provides insight into design improvements.

Comfort, W.J. III

1978-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

106

Incorporating supercritical steam turbines into molten-salt power tower plants : feasibility and performance.  

SciTech Connect

Sandia National Laboratories and Siemens Energy, Inc., examined 14 different subcritical and supercritical steam cycles to determine if it is feasible to configure a molten-salt supercritical steam plant that has a capacity in the range of 150 to 200 MWe. The effects of main steam pressure and temperature, final feedwater temperature, and hot salt and cold salt return temperatures were determined on gross and half-net efficiencies. The main steam pressures ranged from 120 bar-a (subcritical) to 260 bar-a (supercritical). Hot salt temperatures of 566 and 600%C2%B0C were evaluated, which resulted in main steam temperatures of 553 and 580%C2%B0C, respectively. Also, the effects of final feedwater temperature (between 260 and 320%C2%B0C) were evaluated, which impacted the cold salt return temperature. The annual energy production and levelized cost of energy (LCOE) were calculated using the System Advisory Model on 165 MWe subcritical plants (baseline and advanced) and the most promising supercritical plants. It was concluded that the supercritical steam plants produced more annual energy than the baseline subcritical steam plant for the same-size heliostat field, receiver, and thermal storage system. Two supercritical steam plants had the highest annual performance and had nearly the same LCOE. Both operated at 230 bar-a main steam pressure. One was designed for a hot salt temperature of 600%C2%B0C and the other 565%C2%B0C. The LCOEs for these plants were about 10% lower than the baseline subcritical plant operating at 120 bar-a main steam pressure and a hot salt temperature of 565%C2%B0C. Based on the results of this study, it appears economically and technically feasible to incorporate supercritical steam turbines in molten-salt power tower plants.

Pacheco, James Edward; Wolf, Thorsten [Siemens Energy, Inc., Orlando, FL; Muley, Nishant [Siemens Energy, Inc., Orlando, FL

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Wind Turbines  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Although all wind turbines operate on similar principles, several varieties are in use today. These include horizontal axis turbines and vertical axis turbines.

108

Performance Characteristics of an Electrochemically Powered Turboprop: A Comparison with State of the Art Gas Turbines  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

As we search for alternative fuels and energy efficient vehicles it is important to consider the role of electrochemical fuel cells in aircraft propulsion systems. This paper focuses on this issue with regards to small turboprop aircraft. An electrochemical propulsion system would employ liquid hydrogen in an air breathing fuel cell that would generate electricity to run electric motors which in tum power the props. The major question this paper addresses is: under what conditions will a hydrogen/fuel cell power system be superior to a state of the art hydrogen/gas turbine power system? The systems are compared on a fuel consumption basis, a cost basis, and a reliability/ maintainability basis. The analysis show that both specific power and efficiency play an important role in determining which configuration uses less fuel. In general, the fuel cell system is heavier but more efficient than the gas turbine. It appears that the fuel cell system will begin to compete with the gas turbine as the power densities surpass 1 kw/kg and the efficiencies approaches .45. From a cost perspective gas turbines presently cost $500/ Kw and fuel cells are far more expensive. However, the raw materials in a fuel cell are inexpensive and could conceivably be cheaper, thus making the fuel cells increasingly attractive. From a reliability perspective, the fuel cell system appears to have a significant advantage due to the lack of moving parts and the high reliability of electric motors.

Johnson, M. C.; Swan, D. H.

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Steam generators, turbines, and condensers. Volume six  

SciTech Connect

Volume six covers steam generators (How steam is generated, steam generation in a PWR, vertical U-tube steam generators, once-through steam generators, how much steam do steam generators make.), turbines (basic turbine principles, impulse turbines, reaction turbines, turbine stages, turbine arrangements, turbine steam flow, steam admission to turbines, turbine seals and supports, turbine oil system, generators), and condensers (need for condensers, basic condenser principles, condenser arrangements, heat transfer in condensers, air removal from condensers, circulating water system, heat loss to the circulating water system, factors affecting condenser performance, condenser auxiliaries).

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Design and Performance of a Low Btu Fuel Rich-Quench-Lean Gas Turbine Combustor  

SciTech Connect

General Electric Company is developing gas turbines and a high temperature desulfurization system for use in integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power plants. High temperature desulfurization, or hot gas cleanup (HGCU), offers many advantages over conventional low temperature desulfurization processes, but does not reduce the relatively high concentrations of fuel bound nitrogen (FBN) that are typically found in low Btu fuel. When fuels containing bound nitrogen are burned in conventional gas turbine combustors, a significant portion of the FBN is converted to NO{sub x}. Methods of reducing the NO{sub x} emissions from IGCC power plants equipped with HGCU are needed. Rich-quench-lean (RQL) combustion can decrease the conversion of FBN to NO{sub x} because a large fraction of the FBN is converted into non-reactive N{sub 2} in a fuel rich stage. Additional air, required for complete combustion, is added in a quench stage. A lean stage provides sufficient residence time for complete combustion. Objectives General Electric has developed and tested a rich-quench-lean gas turbine combustor for use with low Btu fuels containing FBN. The objective of this work has been to design an RQL combustor that has a lower conversion of FBN to N{sub x} than a conventional low Btu combustor and is suitable for use in a GE heavy duty gas turbine. Such a combustor must be of appropriate size and scale, configuration (can-annular), and capable of reaching ``F`` class firing conditions (combustor exit temperature = 2550{degrees}F).

Feitelberg, A.S.; Jackson, M.R.; Lacey, M.A.; Manning, K.S.; Ritter, A.M.

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

111

Numerical and Experimental Analysis of Multi-Stage Axial Turbine Performance at Design and Off-Design Conditions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Computational fluid dynamics or CFD isan importanttool thatis used at various stages in the design of highly complex turbomachinery such as compressorand turbine stages that are used in land and air based power generation units. The ability of CFD to predict the performance characteristics of a specific blade design is challenged by the need to use various turbulence models to simulate turbulent flows as well as transition models to simulate laminar to turbulent transition that can be observed in various turbomachinery designs. Moreover, CFD is based on numerically solving highly complex differential equations, which through the use of a grid to discretize the geometry introduces numerical errors. Allthese factors combine to challenge CFD’s role as a predictor of blade performance. It has been generallyfound that CFD in its current state of the art is best used to compare between various design points and not as a pure predictor of performances. In this study the capability of CFD, and turbulence modeling, in turbomachinery based geometry is assessed.Three different blade designs are tested, that include an advanced two-stage turbine blade design, a three stage 2D or cylindrical design and finally a three stage bowed stator and rotor design. Allcases were experimentally tested at the Texas A&Muniversity Turbomachinery Performance and Flow Research Laboratory (TPFL).In all cases CFD provided good insights into fundamental turbomachinery flow physics, showing the expected improvement from using 2D cylindrical blades to 3D bowed blade designs in abating the secondary flow effects which are dominant loss generators.However, comparing experimentally measured performance results to numerically predicted shows a clear deficiency, where the CFD overpredicts performance when compared to experimentallyobtained data, largely underestimating the various loss mechanisms. In a relative sense, CFD as a tool allows the user to calculate the impact a new feature or change can have on a baseline design. CFD will also provide insight into what are the dominant physics that explain why a change can provide an increase or decrease in performance. Additionally,as part of this study, one of the main factors that affect the performance of modern turbomachinery is transition from laminar to turbulent flow.Transition is an influential phenomena especially in high pressure turbines, and is sensitive to factors such asupstream incidentwake frequency and turbulence intensity.A model experimentally developed, is implemented into a CFD solver and compared to various test results showing greater capability in modeling the effects of reduced frequency on the transition point and transitional flow physics. This model is compared to industry standard models showing favorable prediction performance due to its abilityto account for upstream wake effects which most current model are unable to account for.

Abdelfattah, Sherif Alykadry

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

GAS TURBINES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In the age of volatile and ever increasing natural gas fuel prices, strict new emission regulations and technological advancements, modern IGCC plants are the answer to growing market demands for efficient and environmentally friendly power generation. IGCC technology allows the use of low cost opportunity fuels, such as coal, of which there is a more than a 200-year supply in the U.S., and refinery residues, such as petroleum coke and residual oil. Future IGCC plants are expected to be more efficient and have a potential to be a lower cost solution to future CO2 and mercury regulations compared to the direct coal fired steam plants. Siemens has more than 300,000 hours of successful IGCC plant operational experience on a variety of heavy duty gas turbine models in Europe and the U.S. The gas turbines involved range from SGT5-2000E to SGT6-3000E (former designations are shown on Table 1). Future IGCC applications will extend this experience to the SGT5-4000F and SGT6-4000F/5000F/6000G gas turbines. In the currently operating Siemens ’ 60 Hz fleet, the SGT6-5000F gas turbine has the most operating engines and the most cumulative operating hours. Over the years, advancements have increased its performance and decreased its emissions and life cycle costs without impacting reliability. Development has been initiated to verify its readiness for future IGCC application including syngas combustion system testing. Similar efforts are planned for the SGT6-6000G and SGT5-4000F/SGT6-4000F models. This paper discusses the extensive development programs that have been carried out to demonstrate that target emissions and engine operability can be achieved on syngas operation in advanced F-class 50 Hz and 60 Hz gas turbine based IGCC applications.

Power For L; Satish Gadde; Jianfan Wu; Anil Gulati; Gerry Mcquiggan; Berthold Koestlin; Bernd Prade

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Aerothermodynamics of low pressure steam turbines and condensers  

SciTech Connect

This book presents papers on steam turbines and steam condensers. Topics considered include the design of modern low pressure steam turbines, throughflow design methods, three-dimensional flow calculations, the calculation of wet steam stages, aerodynamic development of turbine blades, turbine performance measurement, turbine exhaust system design, and condensers for large turbines.

Moore, M.J.; Sieverding, C.H.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Computational Predictions and Experimental Measurements of the Performance of a Louver Particle Separator for Use in Gas Turbine Engines.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Gas turbine engines that power aircraft operate in harsh environments where solid particles, such as sand, are ingested into the engine. Solid particles damage aircraft… (more)

Musgrove, Grant

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Early Identification of Steam Turbine Performance Issues via Real-Time Diagnostics:Concepts to Advance the State-of-the-Art  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes initial work performed to demonstrate how advanced analytics, coupled with existing monitoring tools, could be used to better identify the cause and location of steam turbine performance problems. Developing a full-fledged diagnostic system that incorporates this approach is potentially a multi-year project, but the payoff could be significant.BackgroundThe importance of power plant performance is well recognized since improving ...

2013-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

116

NETL: Turbines - About the Turbine Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Turbines About the Turbine Program Siemens Turbine Turbines have been the world's energy workhorses for generations, harkening back to primitive devices such as waterwheels (2,000...

117

Geothermal turbine  

SciTech Connect

A turbine for the generation of energy from geothermal sources including a reaction water turbine of the radial outflow type and a similar turbine for supersonic expansion of steam or gases. The rotor structure may incorporate an integral separator for removing the liquid and/or solids from the steam and gas before the mixture reaches the turbines.

Sohre, J.S.

1982-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

118

66 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON SUSTAINABLE ENERGY, VOL. 1, NO. 2, JULY 2010 Optimization of Wind Turbine Performance With  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

66 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON SUSTAINABLE ENERGY, VOL. 1, NO. 2, JULY 2010 Optimization of Wind Turbine, torque, tower acceleration, wind turbine vibrations. I. INTRODUCTION I NTEREST in renewable energy has to carbon taxation has become a catalyst in the quest for clean energy. Wind energy has been most

Kusiak, Andrew

119

Cooperative field test program for wind energy systems: Effects of precipitation on wind turbine performance. Detailed test plan and quality assurance plan  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this research is to examine the effect of precipitation on wind turbine performance. This study will be conducted at the Whisky Run windfarm on the southern Oregon coast. Precipitation has been shown to cause significant degradation in the performance of the MOD-O wind turbine by Corrigan and DeMiglio (1985), who found performance reductions of up to 20% for light rainfall, 30% for moderate rainfall and 36% for snow and drizzle. There are several penalties due to rainfall, but it appears that most of the performance degradation is due to rain induced roughness. The Whisky Run windfarm receives around 60 inches of rain per year most of which occurs from October through April. During the summer months drizzle is an occasional weather phenomena. Pacific Wind Energy (PWE) and Pacific Power and Light (PP&L) propose to examine the effect of precipitation on wind turbine performance. The Whisky Run windfarm is unique among windfarms because the power sales contract is set up such that the wind farm is considered a research project and the participants have agreed to engage in research that will benefit the industry. PP&L will be providing all of the instrumentation except for the recording rate of rain gage. PWE will be performing the analysis of the data and project management.

Not Available

1986-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

120

Micro Turbine Generator Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A number of micro turbines generators have recently been announced as currently commercially available for sale to customers, such as end users, utilities, and energy service providers. Manufacturers and others are reporting certain performance capabilities ...

Stephanie L. Hamilton

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "turbine performance ampere-hour-a" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

SPACE HANDBOOK TURBINES  

SciTech Connect

Turbine specific weight vs. power plant output was investigated for rubidium, potassium, and sodium at several inlet temperatures to obtain order of magnitude performance and weight of possible nuclear power plant systems. (W.L.H.)

Grimaldi, J.

1960-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

122

Turbine arrangement  

SciTech Connect

A turbine arrangement is disclosed for a gas turbine engine having a sloped gas flowpath through the turbine. The radial axes of the rotor blades and stator vanes in the sloped flowpath are tilted such that the axes are substantially normal to the mean flow streamline of the gases. This arrangement reduces tip losses and thereby increases engine efficiency.

Johnston, R.P.

1984-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

123

A low order model for vertical axis wind turbines  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A new computational model for initial sizing and performance prediction of vertical axis wind turbines

Drela, Mark

124

A Dynamic Wind Turbine Simulator of the Wind Turbine Generator System  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To study dynamic performances of wind turbine generator system (WTGS), and to determine the control structures in laboratory. The dynamic torque generated by wind turbine (WT) must be simulated. In there paper, a dynamic wind turbine emulator (WTE) is ... Keywords: dynamic wind turbine emulation, wind shear, tower shadow, torque compensation

Lei Lu; Zhen Xie; Xing Zhang; Shuying Yang; Renxian Cao

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Testing and Performance of the Siemens V84.3A Gas Turbine in Peaking Service at Hawthorn Station of Kansas City Power & Light Compan y  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

EPRI's durability surveillance (DS) program, in place since 1991, is producing the first in-service performance and operating data on the newest high-efficiency gas turbines. This detailed investigation of the Siemens V84.3A installed at the Kansas City Power & Light (KCP&L) Hawthorn Station is providing plant personnel and the manufacturer with valuable information for solving initial problems, and will help all power producers specify, operate, and maintain a new generation of high-performance gas turb...

1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

126

Performance comparison between transpiration air cooled turbine 3000/sup 0/F (1649/sup 0/C) stator vanes and solid uncooled vanes  

SciTech Connect

Testing was conducted to compare the aerodynamic performance of a turbine vane using transpiration air-cooling capable of operation at 3000/sup 0/F (1649/sup 0/C) gas temperature with a vane of identical profile with no cooling provisions to determine the effect of cooling on vane kinetic energy efficiency and loss coefficient. The test configuration was a 10-vane section of full scale first stage turbine stator annulus designed for 1.6 pressure ratio, cooling air flow equal to 6.1 percent of primary flow, 3000/sup 0/F (1649/sup 0/C) turbine inlet temperature and primary-to-coolant temperature ratio of 2.7. To enable comparison with other investigations, tests were conducted at three pressure ratios from 1.4 to 1.6, three coolant flows from 75 to 120 percent of design, and three primary-tocoolant temperature ratios from 2.70 to 1.15. Efficiency, loss coefficient and flow capacity test results were in good agreement with predicted values for both the transpiration air cooled and uncooled vanes. The testing demonstrated that it is necessary to conduct test evaluations of transpiration air-cooled components at or near design coolant-to-gas stream temperature ratio in order to achieve correct results.

Manning, G.B.; Moskowitz, S.

1984-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

NETL: Turbines - UTSR Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

7 Simulating Particle Deposition and Mitigating Deposition Degradation Effects in Film Cooled Turbine Sections University of Texas 7 Simulating Particle Deposition and Mitigating Deposition Degradation Effects in Film Cooled Turbine Sections University of Texas David Bogard Project Dates: 8/1/2007 - 9/30/2010 Area of Research: Aero/Heat Transfer Federal Project Manager: Mark Freeman Project Objective: A major goal of this project is to determine a reliable methodology for simulating contaminant deposition in a low-speed wind tunnel facility where testing is considerably less costly. The project is aimed at developing new cooling designs for turbine components that will minimize the effect of the depositions of contaminant particles on turbine components and maintain good film cooling performance even when surface conditions deteriorate. Moreover, a methodology will be established that

128

NETL: Turbines - UTSR Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3 Aerodynamics and Heat Transfer Studies of Parameters Specific to the IGCC Requirements: High Mass Flow Endwall Contouring, Leading Edge Filleting and Blade Tip Ejection under Roating Turbine Condition Texas A&M University Meinhard Schobeiri 3 Aerodynamics and Heat Transfer Studies of Parameters Specific to the IGCC Requirements: High Mass Flow Endwall Contouring, Leading Edge Filleting and Blade Tip Ejection under Roating Turbine Condition Texas A&M University Meinhard Schobeiri Project Dates: 10/1/2009 - 9/30/2012 Area of Research: Aero/Heat Transfer Federal Project Manager: Robin Ames Project Objective: This project is advanced research designed to provide the gas turbine industry with a set of quantitative aerodynamic and film cooling effectiveness data essential to understanding the basic physics of complex secondary flows. This includes their influence on the efficiency and performance of gas turbines, and the impact that differing film cooling ejection arrangements have on suppressing the detrimental effect of these

129

Turbine Option  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

study was sponsored by the Turbine Survival Program in cooperation with the Department of Energy (DOE), Hydro Optimization Team (HOT), and the Federal Columbia River Power System...

130

A next-generation modeling capability assesses wind turbine array fluid dynamics and aeroelastic simulations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A next-generation modeling capability assesses wind turbine array fluid dynamics and aeroelastic of multi-megawatt turbines requires a new generation of modeling capability to assess individual turbine performance as well as detailed turbine- turbine and turbine-atmosphere interactions. Scientists

131

Design of a Transonic Research Turbine Facility Ruolong Ma*  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and performance of modern gas-turbine engines. A detailed address of the various opportunities for flow control throughout the gas-turbine engine in terms of their impact on each engine component was given by Lord et al.1 in the new Advanced Performance Gas Turbine Laboratory at the University of Notre Dame. II. Turbine Rig

Morris, Scott C.

132

Minimization of Motion Smear: Reducing Avian Collision with Wind Turbines; Period of Performance: July 12, 1999 -- August 31, 2002  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Collisions with wind turbines can be a problem for many species of birds. Of particular concern are collisions by eagles and other protected species. This research study used the laboratory methods of physiological optics, animal psychophysics, and retinal electrophysiology to analyze the causes of collisions and to evaluate visual deterrents based on the results of this analysis. Bird collisions with the seemingly slow-moving turbines seem paradoxical given the superb vision that most birds, especially raptors, possess. However, our optical analysis indicated that as the eye approaches the rotating blades, the retinal image of the blade (which is the information that is transmitted to the animal's brain) increases in velocity until it is moving so fast that the retina cannot keep up with it. At this point, the retinal image becomes a transparent blur that the bird probably interprets as a safe area to fly through, with disastrous consequences. This phenomenon is called"motion smear" or"motion blur."

Hodos, W.

2003-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Gas turbines for the future  

SciTech Connect

Utility gas turbine technology has been advancing fairly rapidly, one reason being that it shares in the benefits of the research and development for aviation gas turbines. In general, turbine progress is characterized by large, incremental advances in performance. At intervals of approx. 15 yr, new-generation turbines are introduced, refined, and eventually installed in relatively large numbers. A new generation of turbines is being readied for the market that will have power ratings into the 130- to 150-MW range (simple cycle), significantly higher than the 70 to 100 MW now in service. When the new turbines are installed in combined-cycle plants, the efficiency levels are expected to rise from the present value of approx. 42% higher heating value to approx. 46%.

Cohn, A.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Assessment of Supervisory Control and Data Acquisition Data Mining for Wind Turbine Condition Monitoring and Performance Improvement  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As the wind industry grows and matures, many of the larger wind turbines (2 MW and above) are being outfitted with sophisticated condition-monitoring systems (CMSs), supplied either by the original equipment manufacturer or through a third party to reduce failures, decrease maintenance downtime, and improve reliability. Such systems use vibration sensors in key positions and lubrication oil analysis, with costs of the hardware relatively high, and suffer from spurious alarms. The lifetime cost-benefit ra...

2011-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

135

Scale Model Turbine Missile Casing Impact Tests  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes three 1/5-scale-model turbine missile impact experiments performed to provide benchmark data for assessing turbine missiles effects in nuclear plant design. The development of an explosive launcher to accelerate the turbine missile models to the desired impact velocities is described. A comparison of the test results with those from full-scale experiments demonstrates scalability.

1982-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Chemically recuperated gas turbine  

SciTech Connect

This patent describes a powerplant. It comprises: a gas turbine engine having a compressor, a combustor downstream of the compressor, a turbine, and a power turbine downstream and adjacent the turbine there being no reheating means between the turbine and power turbine; a reformer positioned downstream of the power turbine such that the output of the power turbine provides a first means for heating the reformer; a second means for heating the reformer, the second means positioned downstream of the power turbine.

Horner, M.W.; Hines, W.R.

1992-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

137

Steam Generating Units (duct burners) 40 CFR Part 60 Subpart GG- Standards of Performance for Stationary Gas Turbines  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

For nitrogen oxides has been determined to be selective catalytic reduction. l As authorized by the Northwest Clean Air Agency Regulation Section 300, this order is issued subject to the following restrictions and conditions: 1) The gas turbines shall burn either pipeline natural gas, or number 2 distillate oil with a sulfur content not to exceed 0.05 weight percent. The HRSG duct burners shall burn only pipeline natural gas. 2) Pollutant concentrations for each gas turbinelheat recovery steam generator stack shall not exceed the following:

unknown authors

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Ceramic stationary gas turbine  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The performance of current industrial gas turbines is limited by the temperature and strength capabilities of the metallic structural materials in the engine hot section. Because of their superior high-temperature strength and durability, ceramics can be used as structural materials for hot section components (blades, nozzles, combustor liners) in innovative designs at increased turbine firing temperatures. The benefits include the ability to increase the turbine inlet temperature (TIT) to about 1200{degrees}C ({approx}2200{degrees}F) or more with uncooled ceramics. It has been projected that fully optimized stationary gas turbines would have a {approx}20 percent gain in thermal efficiency and {approx}40 percent gain in output power in simple cycle compared to all metal-engines with air-cooled components. Annual fuel savings in cogeneration in the U.S. would be on the order of 0.2 Quad by 2010. Emissions reductions to under 10 ppmv NO{sub x} are also forecast. This paper describes the progress on a three-phase, 6-year program sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Industrial Technologies, to achieve significant performance improvements and emissions reductions in stationary gas turbines by replacing metallic hot section components with ceramic parts. Progress is being reported for the period September 1, 1994, through September 30, 1995.

Roode, M. van

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

139

ORCENT2. Nuclear Steam Turbine Cycle Analysis  

SciTech Connect

ORCENT2 performs heat and mass balance calculations at valves-wide-open design conditions, maximum guaranteed rating conditions, and an approximation of part-load conditions for steam turbine cycles supplied with throttle steam, characteristic of contemporary light-water reactors. The program handles both condensing and back-pressure turbine exhaust arrangements. Turbine performance calculations are based on the General Electric Company method for 1800-rpm large steam turbine-generators operating with light-water-cooled nuclear reactors. Output includes all information normally shown on a turbine-cycle heat balance diagram.

Fuller, L.C. [Oak Ridge National Lab, TN (United States)

1979-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

WindPACT Turbine Rotor Design, Specific Rating Study; Period of Performance: June 29, 2000--March 1, 2003  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In 2000, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) launched the Wind Partnerships for Advanced Component Technologies (WindPACT) program to examine ways in which the cost of wind energy could be reduced a further 30%. One element of the WindPACT program has been a series of design studies aimed at each of the major subsystems of the wind turbine to study the effect of scale and of alternative design approaches. The WindPACT Turbine Rotor Design Study was carried out by Global Energy Concepts, LLC, (GEC) on behalf of NREL, and the final report was delivered in June 2002. The study examined what configuration and design changes in the rotor would reduce the overall cost of energy. The objectives of this report are to use the 1.5-MW baseline configuration from the earlier WindPACT Rotor Design Study to examine the effect of different power ratings and to identify an optimum specific rating; to examine the effect of different maximum tip speeds on overall cost of energy (COE); to examine the role of different wind regimes on the optimum specific rating; and to examine how the optimum specific rating may be affected by introducing more advanced blade designs.

Malcolm, D. J.; Hansen, A. C.

2003-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "turbine performance ampere-hour-a" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Rugged ATS turbines for alternate fuels  

SciTech Connect

A major national effort is directed to developing advanced turbine systems designed for major improvements in efficiency and emissions performance using natural gas fuels. These turbine designs are also to be adaptable for future operation with alternate coal and biomass derived fuels. For several potential alternate fuel applications, available hot gas cleanup technologies will not likely be adequate to protect the turbine flowpath from deposition and corrosion. Past tests have indicated that cooling turbine airfoil surfaces could ruggedized a high temperature turbine flowpath to alleviate deposition and corrosion. Using this specification. ATS turbine that was evaluated. The initial analyses also showed that two-phase cooling offers the most attractive method of those explored to protect a coal-fueled ATS turbine from deposition and corrosion. This paper describes ruggedization approaches, particularly to counter the extreme deposition and corrosion effects of the high inlet temperatures of ATS turbines using alternate fuels.

Wenglarz, R.A.; Nirmalan, N.V.; Daehler, T.G.

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Gas Turbine Engine Collaborative Research - NASA Glenn Research Center  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Gas Turbine Engine Collaborative Gas Turbine Engine Collaborative Research-NASA Glenn Research Center Background Advancing the efficiency and performance levels of gas turbine technology requires high levels of fundamental understanding of the actual turbine component level technology systems. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration Glenn Research Center (NASA Glenn), with support from the Ohio State University, is planning research to compile

143

Investigation of materials performances in high moisture environments including corrosive contaminants typical of those arising by using alternative fuels in gas turbines  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

materials performances in high moisture materials performances in high moisture environments including corrosive contaminants typical of those arising by using alternative fuels in gas turbines Gerald Meier, Frederick Pettit and Keeyoung Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Jung University of Pittsburgh Pittsburgh, PA 15260 Peer review Workshop III UTSR Project 04 01 SR116 October 18-20, 2005 Project Approach Task I Selection and Preparation of Specimens Task II Selection of Test Conditions Specimens : GTD111+CoNiCrAlY and Pt Aluminides, N5+Pt Aluminides Deposit : No Deposit, CaO, CaSO 4 , Na 2 SO 4 1150℃ Dry 1150℃ Wet 950℃ Wet 750℃ SO 3 950℃ Dry Selection of Test Temperature, T 1 , Gas Environment and Deposit Composition, D

144

Marine Hydrokinetic Turbine Power-Take-Off Design for Optimal Performance and Low Impact on Cost-of-Energy: Preprint  

SciTech Connect

Marine hydrokinetic devices are becoming a popular method for generating marine renewable energy worldwide. These devices generate electricity by converting the kinetic energy of moving water, wave motion or currents, into electrical energy through the use of a power-take-off (PTO) system. Most PTO systems incorporate a mechanical or hydraulic drivetrain, power generator, and electric control/conditioning system to deliver the generated electric power to the grid at the required state. Like wind turbine applications, the PTO system must be designed for high reliability, good efficiency, and long service life with reasonable maintenance requirements, low cost, and an appropriate mechanical design for anticipated applied steady and unsteady loads. The ultimate goal of a PTO design is high efficiency and low maintenance and cost, with a low impact on the device cost-of-energy (CoE).

Beam, M.; Kline, B.; Elbing, B.; Straka, W.; Fontaine, A.; Lawson, M.; Li, Y.; Thresher, R.; Previsic, M.

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Marine Hydrokinetic Turbine Power-Take-Off Design for Optimal Performance and Low Impact on Cost-of-Energy: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Marine hydrokinetic devices are becoming a popular method for generating marine renewable energy worldwide. These devices generate electricity by converting the kinetic energy of moving water, wave motion or currents, into electrical energy through the use of a Power-Take-Off (PTO) system. Most PTO systems incorporate a mechanical or hydraulic drive train, power generator and electric control/conditioning system to deliver the generated electric power to the grid at the required state. Like wind turbine applications, the PTO system must be designed for high reliability, good efficiency, and long service life with reasonable maintenance requirements, low cost and an appropriate mechanical design for anticipated applied steady and unsteady loads. The ultimate goal of a PTO design is high efficiency, low maintenance and cost with a low impact on the device Cost-of-Energy (CoE).

Beam, M.; Kline, B.; Elbing, B.; Straka, W.; Fontaine, A.; Lawson, M.; Li, Y.; Thresher, R.; Previsic, M.

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

NREL: Wind Research - Large Wind Turbine Research  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Wind Research Search More Search Options Site Map Printable Version Large Wind Turbine Research NREL's utility scale wind system research addresses performance and...

147

Combustion turbine operation and optimization model.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Combustion turbine performance deterioration, quantified by loss of system power, is an artifact of increased inlet air temperature and continuous degradation of the machine. Furthermore,… (more)

Sengupta, Jeet

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Steam turbines for cogeneration power plants  

SciTech Connect

Steam turbines for cogeneration plants may carry a combination of industrial, space heating, cooling and domestic hot water loads. These loads are hourly, weekly, and seasonally irregular and require turbines of special design to meet the load duration curve, while generating electric power. Design features and performance characteristics of one of the largest cogeneration turbine units for combined electric generation and district heat supply are presented. Different modes of operation of the cogeneration turbine under variable load conditions are discussed in conjunction with a heat load duration curve for urban heat supply. Problems associated with the retrofitting of existing condensing type turbines for cogeneration applications are identified. 4 refs.

Oliker, I.

1980-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Chapter 14: Wind Turbine Control Systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Wind turbines are complex, nonlinear, dynamic systems forced by gravity, stochastic wind disturbances, and gravitational, centrifugal, and gyroscopic loads. The aerodynamic behavior of wind turbines is nonlinear, unsteady, and complex. Turbine rotors are subjected to a complicated three-dimensional turbulent wind inflow field that drives fatigue loading. Wind turbine modeling is also complex and challenging. Accurate models must contain many degrees of freedom (DOF) to capture the most important dynamic effects. The rotation of the rotor adds complexity to the dynamics modeling. Designs of control algorithms for wind turbines must account for these complexities. Algorithms must capture the most important turbine dynamics without being too complex and unwieldy. Off-the-shelf commercial soft ware is seldom adequate for wind turbine dynamics modeling. Instead, specialized dynamic simulation codes are usually required to model all the important nonlinear effects. As illustrated in Figure 14-1, a wind turbine control system consists of sensors, actuators and a system that ties these elements together. A hardware or software system processes input signals from the sensors and generates output signals for actuators. The main goal of the controller is to modify the operating states of the turbine to maintain safe turbine operation, maximize power, mitigate damaging fatigue loads, and detect fault conditions. A supervisory control system starts and stops the machine, yaws the turbine when there is a significant yaw misalignment, detects fault conditions, and performs emergency shut-downs. Other parts of the controller are intended to maximize power and reduce loads during normal turbine operation.

Wright, A. D.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Tempe Transportation Division: LNG Turbine Hybrid Electric Buses  

SciTech Connect

Fact sheet describes the performance of liquefied natural gas (LNG) turbine hybrid electric buses used in Tempe's Transportation Division.

Not Available

2002-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Wind turbine  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A wind turbine of the type having an airfoil blade (15) mounted on a flexible beam (20) and a pitch governor (55) which selectively, torsionally twists the flexible beam in response to wind turbine speed thereby setting blade pitch, is provided with a limiter (85) which restricts unwanted pitch change at operating speeds due to torsional creep of the flexible beam. The limiter allows twisting of the beam by the governor under excessive wind velocity conditions to orient the blades in stall pitch positions, thereby preventing overspeed operation of the turbine. In the preferred embodiment, the pitch governor comprises a pendulum (65,70) which responds to changing rotor speed by pivotal movement, the limiter comprising a resilient member (90) which engages an end of the pendulum to restrict further movement thereof, and in turn restrict beam creep and unwanted blade pitch misadjustment.

Cheney, Jr., Marvin C. (Glastonbury, CT)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

H gas turbine combined cycle  

SciTech Connect

A major step has been taken in the development of the Next Power Generation System--``H`` Technology Combined Cycle. This new gas turbine combined-cycle system increases thermal performance to the 60% level by increasing gas turbine operating temperature to 1,430 C (2,600 F) at a pressure ratio of 23 to 1. Although this represents a significant increase in operating temperature for the gas turbine, the potential for single digit NOx levels (based upon 15% O{sub 2}, in the exhaust) has been retained. The combined effect of performance increase and environmental control is achieved by an innovative closed loop steam cooling system which tightly integrates the gas turbine and steam turbine cycles. The ``H`` Gas Turbine Combined Cycle System meets the goals and objectives of the DOE Advanced Turbine System Program. The development and demonstration of this new system is being carried out as part of the Industrial/Government cooperative agreement under the ATS Program. This program will achieve first commercial operation of this new system before the end of the century.

Corman, J.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

153

Aerodynamic interference between two Darrieus wind turbines  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The effect of aerodynamic interference on the performance of two curved bladed Darrieus-type vertical axis wind turbines has been calculated using a vortex/lifting line aerodynamic model. The turbines have a tower-to-tower separation distance of 1.5 turbine diameters, with the line of turbine centers varying with respect to the ambient wind direction. The effects of freestream turbulence were neglected. For the cases examined, the calculations showed that the downwind turbine power decrement (1) was significant only when the line of turbine centers was coincident with the ambient wind direction, (2) increased with increasing tipspeed ratio, and (3) is due more to induced flow angularities downstream than to speed deficits near the downstream turbine.

Schatzle, P.R.; Klimas, P.C.; Spahr, H.R.

1981-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

ADVANCED TURBINE SYSTEMS PROGRAM  

SciTech Connect

Natural gas combustion turbines are rapidly becoming the primary technology of choice for generating electricity. At least half of the new generating capacity added in the US over the next twenty years will be combustion turbine systems. The Department of Energy has cosponsored with Siemens Westinghouse, a program to maintain the technology lead in gas turbine systems. The very ambitious eight year program was designed to demonstrate a highly efficient and commercially acceptable power plant, with the ability to fire a wide range of fuels. The main goal of the Advanced Turbine Systems (ATS) Program was to develop ultra-high efficiency, environmentally superior and cost effective competitive gas turbine systems for base load application in utility, independent power producer and industrial markets. Performance targets were focused on natural gas as a fuel and included: System efficiency that exceeds 60% (lower heating value basis); Less than 10 ppmv NO{sub x} emissions without the use of post combustion controls; Busbar electricity that are less than 10% of state of the art systems; Reliability-Availability-Maintainability (RAM) equivalent to current systems; Water consumption minimized to levels consistent with cost and efficiency goals; and Commercial systems by the year 2000. In a parallel effort, the program was to focus on adapting the ATS engine to coal-derived or biomass fuels. In Phase 1 of the ATS Program, preliminary investigators on different gas turbine cycles demonstrated that net plant LHV based efficiency greater than 60% was achievable. In Phase 2 the more promising cycles were evaluated in greater detail and the closed-loop steam-cooled combined cycle was selected for development because it offered the best solution with least risk for achieving the ATS Program goals for plant efficiency, emissions, cost of electricity and RAM. Phase 2 also involved conceptual ATS engine and plant design and technology developments in aerodynamics, sealing, combustion, cooling, materials, coatings and casting development. The market potential for the ATS gas turbine in the 2000-2014 timeframe was assessed for combined cycle, simple cycle and integrated gasification combined cycle, for three engine sizes. The total ATS market potential was forecasted to exceed 93 GW. Phase 3 and Phase 3 Extension involved further technology development, component testing and W501ATS engine detail design. The technology development efforts consisted of ultra low NO{sub x} combustion, catalytic combustion, sealing, heat transfer, advanced coating systems, advanced alloys, single crystal casting development and determining the effect of steam on turbine alloys. Included in this phase was full-load testing of the W501G engine at the McIntosh No. 5 site in Lakeland, Florida.

Gregory Gaul

2004-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

155

Electronic fuel control system for gas turbine  

SciTech Connect

A method is described for monitoring gas turbine operating temperatures and rotational velocity for producing one of a group of fuel control signals for controlling the fuel input rate to the gas turbine. The method consists of: monitoring turbine inlet temperatures through respective sensors for the gas turbine, averaging the turbine inlet temperatures to produce an average turbine inlet temperature signal, monitoring a gas generator inlet temperature sensor of the gas turbine for producing a gas generator inlet temperature signal, generating a speed signal proportional to the rotational velocity of the gas turbine, combining the gas generator inlet temperature signal with the speed signal to produce a first function signal, applying the first function signal to a stored data set to produce a second function signal, the stored data set related to performance characteristics of the gas turbine, and comparing the turbine inlet temperature signal to the second function signal to produce a difference signal therefrom, the difference signal serving as a fuel control signal for the gas turbine.

Nick, C.F.

1986-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

156

Advanced turbine systems program  

SciTech Connect

In accordance with the goals of the DOE program, improvements in the gas turbine are the primary focus of Allison activity during Phase I. To this end Allison conducted a survey of potentially applicable gas turbine cycles and selected the advanced combined cycle as reference system. Extensive analysis of two versions of the advanced combined cycle was performed against the requirement for a 60% thermal efficiency (LHV) utility-sized, natural gas fired system. This analysis resulted in technology requirements for this system. Additional analysis determined emissions potential for the system, established a coal-fueled derivative system and a commercialization plan. This report deals with the technical requirements for a system that meets the thermal efficiency goal. Allison initially investigated four basic thermodynamic cycles: Humid air turbine, intercalate-recuperated systems, advanced combined cycle, chemically recuperated cycle. Our survey and cycle analysis indicated that au had the potential of reaching 60% thermal efficiency. We also concluded that engine hot section technology would be a critical technology regardless of which cycle was chosen. Based on this result Allison chose to concentrate on the advanced combined cycle. This cycle is well known and understood by the utility turbine user community and is therefore likely to be acceptable to users.

Wilkes, C.; Mukavetz, D.W.; Knickerbocker, T.K.; Ali, S.A.

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

157

Advanced turbine systems program  

SciTech Connect

In accordance with the goals of the DOE program, improvements in the gas turbine are the primary focus of Allison activity during Phase I. To this end Allison conducted a survey of potentially applicable gas turbine cycles and selected the advanced combined cycle as reference system. Extensive analysis of two versions of the advanced combined cycle was performed against the requirement for a 60% thermal efficiency (LHV) utility-sized, natural gas fired system. This analysis resulted in technology requirements for this system. Additional analysis determined emissions potential for the system, established a coal-fueled derivative system and a commercialization plan. This report deals with the technical requirements for a system that meets the thermal efficiency goal. Allison initially investigated four basic thermodynamic cycles: Humid air turbine, intercalate-recuperated systems, advanced combined cycle, chemically recuperated cycle. Our survey and cycle analysis indicated that au had the potential of reaching 60% thermal efficiency. We also concluded that engine hot section technology would be a critical technology regardless of which cycle was chosen. Based on this result Allison chose to concentrate on the advanced combined cycle. This cycle is well known and understood by the utility turbine user community and is therefore likely to be acceptable to users.

Wilkes, C.; Mukavetz, D.W.; Knickerbocker, T.K.; Ali, S.A.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Forecasting and strategic inventory placement for gas turbine aftermarket spares  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis addresses the problem of forecasting demand for Life Limited Parts (LLPs) in the gas turbine engine aftermarket industry. It is based on work performed at Pratt & Whitney, a major producer of turbine engines. ...

Simmons, Joshua T. (Joshua Thomas)

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Tracking Laser Coordinate Measurement System Application for Turbine Outage Activities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Tracking Laser Coordinate Measurement System Application for Turbine Outage Activities provides nuclear and fossil personnel with a faster and more accurate method for performing turbine measurement activities during an outage.

2007-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

160

SMART POWER TURBINE  

SciTech Connect

Gas turbines are the choice technology for high-performance power generation and are employed in both simple and combined cycle configurations around the world. The Smart Power Turbine (SPT) program has developed new technologies that are needed to further extend the performance and economic attractiveness of gas turbines for power generation. Today's power generation gas turbines control firing temperatures indirectly, by measuring the exhaust gas temperature and then mathematically calculating the peak combustor temperatures. But temperatures in the turbine hot gas path vary a great deal, making it difficult to control firing temperatures precisely enough to achieve optimal performance. Similarly, there is no current way to assess deterioration of turbine hot-gas-path components without shutting down the turbine. Consequently, maintenance and component replacements are often scheduled according to conservative design practices based on historical fleet-averaged data. Since fuel heating values vary with the prevalent natural gas fuel, the inability to measure heating value directly, with sufficient accuracy and timeliness, can lead to maintenance and operational decisions that are less than optimal. GE Global Research Center, under this Smart Power Turbine program, has developed a suite of novel sensors that would measure combustor flame temperature, online fuel lower heating value (LHV), and hot-gas-path component life directly. The feasibility of using the ratio of the integrated intensities of portions of the OH emission band to determine the specific average temperature of a premixed methane or natural-gas-fueled combustion flame was demonstrated. The temperature determined is the temperature of the plasma included in the field of view of the sensor. Two sensor types were investigated: the first used a low-resolution fiber optic spectrometer; the second was a SiC dual photodiode chip. Both methods worked. Sensitivity to flame temperature changes was remarkably high, that is a 1-2.5% change in ratio for an 11.1 C (20 F) change in temperature at flame temperatures between 1482.2 C (2700 F) and 1760 C (3200 F). Sensor ratio calibration was performed using flame temperatures determined by calculations using the amount of unburned oxygen in the exhaust and by the fuel/air ratio of the combustible gas mixture. The agreement between the results of these two methods was excellent. The sensor methods characterized are simple and viable. Experiments are underway to validate the GE Flame Temperature Sensor as a practical tool for use with multiburner gas turbine combustors. The lower heating value (LHV) Fuel Quality Sensor consists of a catalytic film deposited on the surface of a microhotplate. This micromachined design has low heat capacity and thermal conductivity, making it ideal for heating catalysts placed on its surface. Several methods of catalyst deposition were investigated, including micropen deposition and other proprietary methods, which permit precise and repeatable placement of the materials. The use of catalysts on the LHV sensor expands the limits of flammability (LoF) of combustion fuels as compared with conventional flames; an unoptimized LoF of 1-32% for natural gas (NG) in air was demonstrated with the microcombustor, whereas conventionally 4 to 16% is observed. The primary goal of this work was to measure the LHV of NG fuels. The secondary goal was to determine the relative quantities of the various components of NG mixes. This determination was made successfully by using an array of different catalysts operating at different temperatures. The combustion parameters for methane were shown to be dependent on whether Pt or Pd catalysts were used. In this project, significant effort was expended on making the LHV platform more robust by the addition of high-temperature stable materials, such as tantalum, and the use of passivation overcoats to protect the resistive heater/sensor materials from degradation in the combustion environment. Modeling and simulation were used to predict improved sensor designs.

Nirm V. Nirmalan

2003-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "turbine performance ampere-hour-a" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Single Rotor Turbine  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A rotor for use in turbine applications has a centrifugal compressor having axially disposed spaced apart fins forming passages and an axial turbine having hollow turbine blades interleaved with the fins and through which fluid from the centrifugal compressor flows.

Platts, David A. (Los Alamos, NM)

2004-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

162

Gas Turbine Repair Guidelines: Alstom GT26  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

For more than a decade, the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) has been developing gas turbine hot section component repair and coating guidelines to assist utilities and power generators in the refurbishment of these critical and expensive parts. Utilities, generators, and repair vendors have used these guidelines to perform repairs on turbine blades, vanes, and combustion hardware. The guidelines in this volume address the specific features of the Alstom GT26 gas turbine.

2011-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

163

Turbine power plant with back pressure turbine  

SciTech Connect

A combined gas/steam turbine power plant is disclosed including a gas turbine having a combustion chamber and a steam turbine driven by steam generated with heat from the combustion gases of the gas turbine. The steam is utilized in a technological process downstream of the steam turbine. Relatively small fluctuations in back pressure are compensated by varying a delivery of fuel to the combustion chamber. Relatively large fluctuations in back pressure are compensated by supplying live steam directly to the technological process downstream of the steam turbine. Various devices are provided for conditioning the steam prior to being supplied to the technological process.

Kalt, J.; Kehlhofer, R.

1981-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

164

SERI advanced wind turbine blades  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The primary goal of the Solar Energy Research Institute`s (SERI) advanced wind turbine blades is to convert the kinetic energy in the wind into mechanical energy in an inexpensive and efficient manner. To accomplish this goal, advanced wind turbine blades have been developed by SERI that utilize unique airfoil technology. Performance characteristics of the advanced blades were verified through atmospheric testing on fixed-pitch, stall-regulated horizontal-axis wind turbines (HAWTs). Of the various wind turbine configurations, the stall-regulated HAWT dominates the market because of its simplicity and low cost. Results of the atmospheric tests show that the SERI advanced blades produce 10% to 30% more energy than conventional blades. 6 refs.

Tangler, J.; Smith, B.; Jager, D.

1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

SERI advanced wind turbine blades  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The primary goal of the Solar Energy Research Institute's (SERI) advanced wind turbine blades is to convert the kinetic energy in the wind into mechanical energy in an inexpensive and efficient manner. To accomplish this goal, advanced wind turbine blades have been developed by SERI that utilize unique airfoil technology. Performance characteristics of the advanced blades were verified through atmospheric testing on fixed-pitch, stall-regulated horizontal-axis wind turbines (HAWTs). Of the various wind turbine configurations, the stall-regulated HAWT dominates the market because of its simplicity and low cost. Results of the atmospheric tests show that the SERI advanced blades produce 10% to 30% more energy than conventional blades. 6 refs.

Tangler, J.; Smith, B.; Jager, D.

1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Plant Engineering: Performance Diagnostic Test Program for the Nuclear Turbine Cycle at Korea Hydro & Nuclear Power Company  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Currently, many power generating companies are challenged to reduce operating costs, and at the same time, the cost of unit unavailability can be significant in today's power markets. In the past decade, management of nuclear power plants, including Korea Hydro & Nuclear Power (KHNP), has been focused on reducing forced outage rates and nuclear-safety-related issues, with less attention paid to thermal performance. But recently, KHNP has been strongly challenged to increase unit thermal performance, as f...

2012-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

167

Energy Basics: Wind Turbines  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Energy Basics Renewable Energy Printable Version Share this resource Biomass Geothermal Hydrogen Hydropower Ocean Solar Wind Wind Turbines Wind Resources Wind Turbines...

168

Advanced Hydrogen Turbine Development  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Siemens has developed a roadmap to achieve the DOE goals for efficiency, cost reduction, and emissions through innovative approaches and novel technologies which build upon worldwide IGCC operational experience, platform technology, and extensive experience in G-class operating conditions. In Phase 1, the technologies and concepts necessary to achieve the program goals were identified for the gas turbine components and supporting technology areas and testing plans were developed to mitigate identified risks. Multiple studies were conducted to evaluate the impact in plant performance of different gas turbine and plant technologies. 2015 gas turbine technologies showed a significant improvement in IGCC plant efficiency, however, a severe performance penalty was calculated for high carbon capture cases. Thermodynamic calculations showed that the DOE 2010 and 2015 efficiency targets can be met with a two step approach. A risk management process was instituted in Phase 1 to identify risk and develop mitigation plans. For the risks identified, testing and development programs are in place and the risks will be revisited periodically to determine if changes to the plan are necessary. A compressor performance prediction has shown that the design of the compressor for the engine can be achieved with additional stages added to the rear of the compressor. Tip clearance effects were studied as well as a range of flow and pressure ratios to evaluate the impacts to both performance and stability. Considerable data was obtained on the four candidate combustion systems: diffusion, catalytic, premix, and distributed combustion. Based on the results of Phase 1, the premixed combustion system and the distributed combustion system were chosen as having the most potential and will be the focus of Phase 2 of the program. Significant progress was also made in obtaining combustion kinetics data for high hydrogen fuels. The Phase 1 turbine studies indicate initial feasibility of the advanced hydrogen turbine that meets the aggressive targets set forth for the advanced hydrogen turbine, including increased rotor inlet temperature (RIT), lower total cooling and leakage air (TCLA) flow, higher pressure ratio, and higher mass flow through the turbine compared to the baseline. Maintaining efficiency with high mass flow Syngas combustion is achieved using a large high AN2 blade 4, which has been identified as a significant advancement beyond the current state-of-the-art. Preliminary results showed feasibility of a rotor system capable of increased power output and operating conditions above the baseline. In addition, several concepts were developed for casing components to address higher operating conditions. Rare earth modified bond coat for the purpose of reducing oxidation and TBC spallation demonstrated an increase in TBC spallation life of almost 40%. The results from Phase 1 identified two TBC compositions which satisfy the thermal conductivity requirements and have demonstrated phase stability up to temperatures of 1850 C. The potential to join alloys using a bonding process has been demonstrated and initial HVOF spray deposition trials were promising. The qualitative ranking of alloys and coatings in environmental conditions was also performed using isothermal tests where significant variations in alloy degradation were observed as a function of gas composition. Initial basic system configuration schematics and working system descriptions have been produced to define key boundary data and support estimation of costs. Review of existing materials in use for hydrogen transportation show benefits or tradeoffs for materials that could be used in this type of applications. Hydrogen safety will become a larger risk than when using natural gas fuel as the work done to date in other areas has shown direct implications for this type of use. Studies were conducted which showed reduced CO{sub 2} and NOx emissions with increased plant efficiency. An approach to maximize plant output is needed in order to address the DOE turbine goal for 20-30% reduction o

Joesph Fadok

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Impingement starting and power boosting of small gas turbines  

SciTech Connect

The technology of high-pressure air or hot-gas impingement from stationary shroud supplementary nozzles onto radial outflow compressors and radial inflow turbines to permit rapid gas turbine starting or power boosting is discussed. Data are presented on the equivalent turbine component performance for convergent/divergent shroud impingement nozzles, which reveal the sensitivity of nozzle velocity coefficient with Mach number and turbine efficiency with impingement nozzle admission arc. Compressor and turbine matching is addressed in the transient turbine start mode with the possibility of operating these components in braking or reverse flow regimes when impingement flow rates exceed design.

Rodgers, C.

1985-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Fluid turbine  

SciTech Connect

A fluid turbine designed for increased power output includes an annular housing provided with a semi-spherical dome for directing incoming fluid flow to impinge on a plurality of rotor blades within the housing fixed to a vertical output shaft. An angle on the order of between 5 to 85/sup 0/, in the direction of rotation of the shaft, exists between the upper (Leading) and lower (Trailing) edges of each blade. The blades are manufactured from a plurality of aerodynamically-shaped, radially spaced ribs covered with a skin. The leading edge of each rib is curved, while the trailing edge is straight. The straight edge of the ribs in each blade approach a vertical plane through the vertical axis of the housing output shaft as the ribs progress radially inwardly towards the output shaft. The housing has fluid exit passages in its base so that deenergized fluid can be quickly flushed from the housing by the downwardly directed flow in combination with the novel blade configuration, which acts as a screw or force multiplier, to expel deenergized fluid. The airfoil shaped ribs also provide the blades with a contour for increasing the fluid velocity on the underside of the blades adjacent the fluid exit passage to aid in expelling the deenergized air while providing the turbine with both impulse and axial-flow, fluid impingement on the blades, resulting in a force vector of increased magnitude. A downwardly directed, substantially semi-cylindrical deflector frame connected to the housing blocks the path of flow of ambient fluid to create a low pressure area beneath the base to aid in continuously drawing fluid into the housing at high velocity to impinge on the rotor blades. The increased flow velocity and force on the blades along with the enhanced removal of deenergized fluid results in increased power output of the turbine.

Lebost, B.A.

1980-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

171

Turbine bucket natural frequency tuning rib  

SciTech Connect

A tuning rib is added preferably in the aft cavity of a cored turbine bucket to alter the bucket's natural frequencies. The tuning rib may be a solid rib or a segmented rib and is particularly suited for altering high order frequency modes such as 2T, 4F and 1-3S. As such, detrimental crossings of natural bucket frequencies and gas turbine stimuli can be avoided to thereby improve the reliability of a gas turbine without impacting other features of the bucket that are important to the performance of the gas turbine.

Wang, John Zhiqiang (Greenville, SC); Norton, Paul Francis (Greenville, SC); Barb, Kevin Joseph (Halfmoon, NY); Jacala, Ariel Caesar-Prepena (Simpsonville, SC)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Apparatus and methods of reheating gas turbine cooling steam and high pressure steam turbine exhaust in a combined cycle power generating system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

In a combined cycle system having a multi-pressure heat recovery steam generator, a gas turbine and steam turbine, steam for cooling gas turbine components is supplied from the intermediate pressure section of the heat recovery steam generator supplemented by a portion of the steam exhausting from the HP section of the steam turbine, steam from the gas turbine cooling cycle and the exhaust from the HP section of the steam turbine are combined for flow through a reheat section of the HRSG. The reheated steam is supplied to the IP section inlet of the steam turbine. Thus, where gas turbine cooling steam temperature is lower than optimum, a net improvement in performance is achieved by flowing the cooling steam exhausting from the gas turbine and the exhaust steam from the high pressure section of the steam turbine in series through the reheater of the HRSG for applying steam at optimum temperature to the IP section of the steam turbine.

Tomlinson, Leroy Omar (Niskayuna, NY); Smith, Raub Warfield (Ballston Lake, NY)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Stochastic Analysis of Wind Turbine Power Curves Edgar Anahua  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

procedure (IEC 61400-12) for power performance charac- terization of a single wind turbines is shown by the standard IEC 61400-12 3 [12]. In this standard procedure the power curve of a single wind turbine of the blade pitch angle system of a wind turbine [9]. The phase averaged P(t,t ) function depends on the time

Peinke, Joachim

174

Dynamic Simulation of DFIG Wind Turbines on FPGA Boards  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Dynamic Simulation of DFIG Wind Turbines on FPGA Boards Hao Chen, Student Member, IEEE, Song Sun is a friction coefficient. The wind turbine model is based on the relation between the upstream wind speed V w + 1 where p is the air density; Rw is the wind turbine radius; cp (A, (3) is the performance

Zambreno, Joseph A.

175

Sliding mode control law for a variable speed wind turbine  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Modern wind turbines are designed in order to work in variable speed operations. To perform this task, wind turbines are provided with adjustable speed generators, like the double feed induction generator. One of the main advantage of adjustable speed ... Keywords: modeling and simulation, variable structure control, wind turbine control

Oscar Barambones; Jose Maria Gonzalez De Durana; Patxi Alkorta; Jose Antonio Ramos; Manuel De La Sen

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Cost Benefit Evaluation of HP Turbine Admission Schemes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The scheme used to position the control valves that admit steam to high-pressure turbines has a direct effect on the turbine’s performance. This report describes the two most common admission schemes, partial and full arc, and discusses their effects on heat rate, reliability, and cost versus benefit under different loading conditions and modes of operation.BackgroundHistorically, most steam turbines in coal-fired power plants operated in a ...

2012-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

177

Wind Turbine Safety and Function Test Report for the Mariah Windspire Wind Turbine  

SciTech Connect

This test was conducted as part of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Independent Testing project. This project was established to help reduce the barriers to wind energy expansion by providing independent testing results for small wind turbines (SWT). In total, five turbines were tested at the National Wind Technology Center (NWTC) as a part of this project. Safety and function testing is one of up to five tests performed on the turbines, including power performance, duration, noise, and power-quality tests. NWTC testing results provide manufacturers with reports that may be used to meet part of small wind turbine certification requirements. The test equipment includes a Mariah Windspire wind turbine mounted on a monopole tower. L&E Machine manufactured the turbine in the United States. The inverter was manufactured separately by Technology Driven Products in the United States. The system was installed by the NWTC site operations group with guidance and assistance from Mariah Power.

Huskey, A.; Bowen, A.; Jager, D.

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

turbine | OpenEI Community  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

turbine Home Future of Condition Monitoring for Wind Turbines Description: Research into third party software to aid in the development of better CMS in order to raise turbine...

179

Steam Path Audits on Industrial Steam Turbines  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The electric utility industry has benefitted from steam path audits on steam turbines for several years. Benefits include the ability to identify areas of performance degradation during a turbine outage. Repair priorities can then be set in accordance with quantitative results from the steam path audit. As a result of optimized repair decisions, turbine efficiency increases, emissions decrease, and maintenance expenses decrease. These benefits can be achieved by using a computer program Encotech, Inc. developed for the utility industry to perform steam path audits. With the increased emphasis on industrial turbine efficiency, and as a result of the experience with the Destec Operating Company, Encotech is adapting the computer program to respond to the needs of the industrial steam turbine community. This paper describes the results of using the STPE computer program to conduct a steam path audit at Destec Energy's Lyondell Cogeneration power plant.

Mitchell, D. R.

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Creep performance of candidate SiC and Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} materials for land-based, gas turbine engine components  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Tensile creep-rupture of a commercial gas pressure sintered Si3N4 and a sintered SiC is examined at 1038, 1150, and 1350 C. These 2 ceramics are candidates for nozzles and combustor tiles that are to be retrofitted in land-based gas turbine engines, and there is interest in their high temperature performance over service times {ge} 10,000 h (14 months). For this long lifetime, a static tensile stress of 300 MPa at 1038/1150 C and 125 Mpa at 1350 C cannot be exceeded for Si3N4; for SiC, the corresponding numbers are 300 Mpa at 1038 C, 250 MPa at 1150 C, and 180 MPa at 1350 C. Creep-stress exponents for Si3N4 are 33, 17, and 8 for 1038, 1150, 1350 C; fatigue- stress exponents are equivalent to creep exponents, suggesting that the fatigue mechanism causing fracture is related to the creep mechanism. Little success was obtained in producing failure in SiC after several decades of time through exposure to appropriate tensile stress; if failure did not occur on loading, then the SiC specimens most often did not creep-rupture. Creep-stress exponents for the SiC were determined to be 57, 27, and 11 for 1038, 1150, and 1350 C. For SiC, the fatigue-stress exponents did not correlate as well with creep-stress exponents. Failures that occurred in the SiC were a result of slow crack growth that initiated from the surface.

Wereszczak, A.A.; Kirkland, T.P.

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "turbine performance ampere-hour-a" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Turbine power plant system  

SciTech Connect

A turbine power plant system consisting of three sub-systems; a gas turbine sub-system, an exhaust turbine sub-system, and a steam turbine sub-system. The three turbine sub-systems use one external fuel source which is used to drive the turbine of the gas turbine sub-system. Hot exhaust fluid from the gas turbine sub-system is used to drive the turbines of the exhaust turbine sub-system and heat energy from the combustion chamber of the gas turbine sub-system is used to drive the turbine of the steam turbine sub-system. Each sub-system has a generator. In the gas turbine sub-system, air flows through several compressors and a combustion chamber and drives the gas turbine. In the exhaust turbine sub-system, hot exhaust fluid from the gas turbine sub-system flows into the second passageway arrangement of first and fourth heat exchangers and thus transfering the heat energy to the first passageway arrangement of the first and fourth heat exchangers which are connected to the inlets of first and second turbines, thus driving them. Each turbine has its own closed loop fluid cycle which consists of the turbine and three heat exchangers and which uses a fluid which boils at low temperatures. A cooler is connected to a corresponding compressor which forms another closed loop system and is used to cool the exhaust fluid from each of the two above mentioned turbines. In the steam turbine sub-system, hot fluid is used to drive the steam turbine and then it flows through a fluid duct, to a first compressor, the first fluid passageway arrangement of first and second heat exchangers, the second passageway of the first heat exchanger, the combustion chamber of the gas turbine where it receives heat energy, and then finally to the inlet of the steam turbine, all in one closed loop fluid cycle. A cooler is connected to the second passageway of the second heat exchanger in a closed loop fluid cycle, which is used to cool the turbine exhaust.

Papastavros, D.

1985-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

182

Blade Offset and Pitch Effects on a High Solidity Vertical Axis Wind Turbine  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ABSTRACT A high solidity, small scale, 2.5m diameter by 3m high Vertical Axis Wind Turbine (VAWT, performance 1. INTRODUCTION Small scale vertical axis wind turbines (VAWTs) show potential for urban rooftop turbines. Keywords: Vertical Axis Wind Turbine, VAWT, airfoil, pitch, blade, mount, offset, high solidity

Tullis, Stephen

183

On optimization of sensor selection for aircraft gas turbine engines Ramgopal Mushini  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

On optimization of sensor selection for aircraft gas turbine engines Ramgopal Mushini Cleveland sets for the problem of aircraft gas turbine engine health parameter estimation. The performance metric for generating an optimal sensor set [3]. 3. Aircraft gas turbine engines An aircraft gas turbine engine

Simon, Dan

184

Automotive turbine engine  

SciTech Connect

Gas flow through a turbine is divided, with part of the flow directed to the compressor for the combusion chamber and part directed to the primary power turbine. Division of the gas flow is accomplished by a mixing wheel of novel design. Before passing to the primary power turbine the gas flow passes through a secondary power turbine that drives the compressor for the combustion chamber. Both the secondary power turbine and the compressor rotate independently of the main turbine rotor shaft. The power input to the secondary power turbine is varied in accordance with the pressure differential between the gas pressure at the outlet of the compressor for the combustion chamber and the outlet from the mixing wheel. If the speed of the main turbine shaft slows down more power is put into the secondary power turbine and the combustion chamber compressor is speeded up so as to produce a higher gas pressure than would otherwise be the case.

Wirth, R.E.; Wirth, M.N.

1978-12-26T23:59:59.000Z

185

Wind Turbines | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Turbines Wind Turbines July 30, 2013 - 2:58pm Addthis Energy 101: Wind Turbines Basics This video explains the basics of how wind turbines operate to produce clean power from an...

186

Creep performance of candidate SiC and Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} materials for land-based, gas turbine engine components  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The tensile creep-rupture performance of a commercially available gas pressure sintered silicon nitride (Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}) and a sintered silicon carbide (SiC) is examined at 1038, 1150, and 1350 C. These two ceramic materials are candidates for nozzles and combustor tiles that are to be retrofitted in land-based gas turbine engines, and interest exists to investigate their high-temperature mechanical performance over service times up to, and in excess of, 10,000 hours ({approx}14 months). To achieve lifetimes approaching 10,000 hours for the candidate Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} ceramic, it was found (or it was estimated based on ongoing test data) that a static tensile stress of 300 MPa at 1038 and 1150 C, and a stress of 125 MPa at 1350 C cannot be exceeded. For the SiC ceramic, it was estimated from ongoing test data that a static tensile stress of 300 MPa at 1038 C, 250 MPa at 1150 C, and 180 MPa at 1350 C cannot be exceeded. The creep-stress exponents for this Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} were determined to be 33, 17, and 8 for 1038, 1150, and 1350 C, respectively. The fatigue-stress exponents for the Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} were found to be equivalent to the creep exponents, suggesting that the fatigue mechanism that ultimately causes fracture is controlled and related to the creep mechanisms. Little success was experienced at generating failures in the SiC after several decades of time through exposure to appropriate tensile stress; it was typically observed that if failure did not occur on loading, then the SiC specimens most often did not creep-rupture. However, creep-stress exponents for the SiC were determined to be 57, 27, and 11 for 1038, 1150, and 1350 C, respectively. For SiC, the fatigue-stress exponents did not correlate as well with creep-stress exponents. Failures that occurred in the SiC were a result of slow crack growth that was initiated from the specimen`s surface.

Wereszczak, A.A.; Kirkland, T.P. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). High Temperature Materials Lab.

1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Low pressure turbine installation  

SciTech Connect

Low-pressure turbine installation is described comprising a casing, at least two groups of turbine stages mounted in said casing, each turbine stage having blades so arranged that a flow of steam passes through the respective turbine stages in contraflow manner, partition means in said casing for separating the opposed final stages of said turbine stages from each other, and steam exhausting means opened in the side walls of said casing in a direction substantially perpendicular to the axis of said turbine, said steam exhausting means being connected to condensers.

Iizuka, N.; Hisano, K.; Ninomiya, S.; Otawara, Y.

1976-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

188

Wind Tunnel Aerodynamic Tests of Six Airfoils for Use on Small Wind Turbines; Period of Performance: October 31, 2002--January 31, 2003  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Wind Tunnel Aerodynamic Tests of Six Airfoils for Use on Small Wind Turbinesrepresents the fourth installment in a series of volumes documenting the ongoing work of th University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Low-Speed Airfoil Tests Program. This particular volume deals with airfoils that are candidates for use on small wind turbines, which operate at low Reynolds numbers.

Selig, M. S.; McGranahan, B. D.

2004-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Generic turbine design study. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of Task 12, Generic Turbine Design Study was to develop a conceptual design of a combustion turbine system that would perform in a pressurized fluidized bed combustor (PFBC) application. A single inlet/outlet casing design that modifies the W251B12 combustion turbine to provide compressed air to the PFBC and accept clean hot air from the PFBC was developed. Performance calculations show that the net power output expected, at an inlet temperature of 59{degrees}F, is 20,250 kW.

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

NREL: Wind Research - Small Wind Turbine Tests and Testing Approach  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Association of Laboratory Accreditation (A2LA). The suite of tests conducted on small wind turbines includes acoustic noise emissions, duration, power performance, power...

191

Turbine Component Rapid Manufacturing Via Electron Beam Melting...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Electrochemical Machining- Barber-Nichols Background Development of new, more efficient gas turbine engines is achieved by a lengthy process of maximizing performance through...

192

STATEMENT OF CONSIDERATIONS REQUEST BY SOLAR TURBINES INCORPORATED...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

under this contract is to improve the performance of stationary gas turbines in cogeneration applications and to lessen environmental emissions through the replacement of...

193

State of the Art in Floating Wind Turbine Design Tools  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents an overview of the simulation codes available to the offshore wind industry that are capable of performing integrated dynamic calculations for floating offshore wind turbines.

Cordle, A.; Jonkman, J.

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Energy Basics: Wind Turbines  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Photo of a crane lifting the blades onto a wind turbine that reads 'U.S. Department of Energy, NREL.' You can learn more about horizontal axis turbines from the EERE Wind Program's...

195

Wind Turbine Maintenance Guide  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This guideline provides component-level information regarding the maintenance of major components associated with a wind turbine. It combines recommendations offered by major equipment manufacturers with lessons learned from owner/operators of wind turbine facilities.

2012-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

196

Turbine Overspeed Trip Modernization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides guidance for power plant engineers contemplating modernization of their main turbine overspeed trip systems. When a large power plant turbine suddenly loses its output shaft loading due to a generator or power grid problem, the steam flow driving the turbine must be cut off very quickly to prevent an overspeed event. The overspeed trip system protects personnel and plant systems by preventing missiles that can result when turbines disintegrate at higher than normal rotational speeds....

2006-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

197

Gas Turbine Engines  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

...times higher than atmospheric pressure.Ref 25The gas turbine was developed generally for main propulsion and power

198

NEXT GENERATION TURBINE PROGRAM  

SciTech Connect

The Next Generation Turbine (NGT) Program's technological development focused on a study of the feasibility of turbine systems greater than 30 MW that offer improvement over the 1999 state-of-the-art systems. This program targeted goals of 50 percent turndown ratios, 15 percent reduction in generation cost/kW hour, improved service life, reduced emissions, 400 starts/year with 10 minutes to full load, and multiple fuel usage. Improvement in reliability, availability, and maintainability (RAM), while reducing operations, maintenance, and capital costs by 15 percent, was pursued. This program builds on the extensive low emissions stationary gas turbine work being carried out by Pratt & Whitney (P&W) for P&W Power Systems (PWPS), which is a company under the auspices of the United Technologies Corporation (UTC). This study was part of the overall Department of Energy (DOE) NGT Program that extends out to the year 2008. A follow-on plan for further full-scale component hardware testing is conceptualized for years 2002 through 2008 to insure a smooth and efficient transition to the marketplace for advanced turbine design and cycle technology. This program teamed the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), P&W, United Technologies Research Center (UTRC), kraftWork Systems Inc., a subcontractor on-site at UTRC, and Multiphase Power and Processing Technologies (MPPT), an off-site subcontractor. Under the auspices of the NGT Program, a series of analyses were performed to identify the NGT engine system's ability to serve multiple uses. The majority were in conjunction with a coal-fired plant, or used coal as the system fuel. Identified also was the ability of the NGT system to serve as the basis of an advanced performance cycle: the humid air turbine (HAT) cycle. The HAT cycle is also used with coal gasification in an integrated cycle HAT (IGHAT). The NGT systems identified were: (1) Feedwater heating retrofit to an existing coal-fired steam plant, which could supply both heat and peaking power (Block 2 engine); (2) Repowering of an older coal-fired plant (Block 2 engine); (3) Gas-fired HAT cycle (Block 1 and 2 engines); (4) Integrated gasification HAT (Block 1 and 2 engines). Also under Phase I of the NGT Program, a conceptual design of the combustion system has been completed. An integrated approach to cycle optimization for improved combustor turndown capability has been employed. The configuration selected has the potential for achieving single digit NO{sub x}/CO emissions between 40 percent and 100 percent load conditions. A technology maturation plan for the combustion system has been proposed. Also, as a result of Phase I, ceramic vane technology will be incorporated into NGT designs and will require less cooling flow than conventional metallic vanes, thereby improving engine efficiency. A common 50 Hz and 60 Hz power turbine was selected due to the cost savings from eliminating a gearbox. A list of ceramic vane technologies has been identified for which the funding comes from DOE, NASA, the U.S. Air Force, and P&W.

William H. Day

2002-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

199

NEXT GENERATION TURBINE PROGRAM  

SciTech Connect

The Next Generation Turbine (NGT) Program's technological development focused on a study of the feasibility of turbine systems greater than 30 MW that offer improvement over the 1999 state-of-the-art systems. This program targeted goals of 50 percent turndown ratios, 15 percent reduction in generation cost/kW hour, improved service life, reduced emissions, 400 starts/year with 10 minutes to full load, and multiple fuel usage. Improvement in reliability, availability, and maintainability (RAM), while reducing operations, maintenance, and capital costs by 15 percent, was pursued. This program builds on the extensive low emissions stationary gas turbine work being carried out by Pratt & Whitney (P&W) for P&W Power Systems (PWPS), which is a company under the auspices of the United Technologies Corporation (UTC). This study was part of the overall Department of Energy (DOE) NGT Program that extends out to the year 2008. A follow-on plan for further full-scale component hardware testing is conceptualized for years 2002 through 2008 to insure a smooth and efficient transition to the marketplace for advanced turbine design and cycle technology. This program teamed the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), P&W, United Technologies Research Center (UTRC), kraftWork Systems Inc., a subcontractor on-site at UTRC, and Multiphase Power and Processing Technologies (MPPT), an off-site subcontractor. Under the auspices of the NGT Program, a series of analyses were performed to identify the NGT engine system's ability to serve multiple uses. The majority were in conjunction with a coal-fired plant, or used coal as the system fuel. Identified also was the ability of the NGT system to serve as the basis of an advanced performance cycle: the humid air turbine (HAT) cycle. The HAT cycle is also used with coal gasification in an integrated cycle HAT (IGHAT). The NGT systems identified were: (1) Feedwater heating retrofit to an existing coal-fired steam plant, which could supply both heat and peaking power (Block 2 engine); (2) Repowering of an older coal-fired plant (Block 2 engine); (3) Gas-fired HAT cycle (Block 1 and 2 engines); (4) Integrated gasification HAT (Block 1 and 2 engines). Also under Phase I of the NGT Program, a conceptual design of the combustion system has been completed. An integrated approach to cycle optimization for improved combustor turndown capability has been employed. The configuration selected has the potential for achieving single digit NO{sub x}/CO emissions between 40 percent and 100 percent load conditions. A technology maturation plan for the combustion system has been proposed. Also, as a result of Phase I, ceramic vane technology will be incorporated into NGT designs and will require less cooling flow than conventional metallic vanes, thereby improving engine efficiency. A common 50 Hz and 60 Hz power turbine was selected due to the cost savings from eliminating a gearbox. A list of ceramic vane technologies has been identified for which the funding comes from DOE, NASA, the U.S. Air Force, and P&W.

William H. Day

2002-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

200

Cooperative Research and Development for Advanced Materials in Advanced Industrial Gas Turbines Final Technical Report  

SciTech Connect

Evaluation of the performance of innovative thermal barrier coating systems for applications at high temperatures in advanced industrical gas turbines.

Ramesh Subramanian

2006-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "turbine performance ampere-hour-a" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

The wind turbine  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper we present the modeling of a wing turbine, using the Euler Lagrange method and circuits theory. We get the mathematical equation (modeling) that describes the wind turbine and we simulate it using the mathlab program. Keywords: modeling, simulation, wind turbine

José De Jesús Rubio Avila; Andrés Ferreira Ramírez; Genaro Deloera Flores; Martín Salazar Pereyra; Fernando Baruch Santillanes Posada

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Improving steam turbine-gas turbine plants  

SciTech Connect

Leningrad Polytechnic Institute investigated the main characteristics of combined plants according to their structure, determined by very important parameters. The following parameters were selected: utilization factor (ratio of heat added to the steam-water working medium from the heat of the exhaust gases to the entire amount of heat added to the steam-water working medium) and fuel consumption factor (ratio of heat from fuel added to the steam-water working medium to the entire consumption of heat in the combined plant). It is concluded that steam turbine-gas turbine plants working at comparatively low gas temperatures (about 800/sup 0/C) must be constructed as plants of maximum capacity, i.e., with large steam flows. Gas turbine-steam turbine plants with high-temperature gas turbines operating at a high utilization factor (approaching binary plants) ensure a qualitative rise in efficiency and have high flexibility characteristics. They are the most promising power plants. A long-term plan for development of combined plants on the basis of standard steam turbine and gas turbine equipment, the production of which is planned in the USSR and in Comecon countries, is required. This plan must be closely connected with solution of the problem of using coals for gas turbine plants.

Kirillov, I.I.; Arsen' ev, L.V.; Khodak, E.A.; Romakhova, G.A.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Turbine adapted maps for turbocharger engine matching  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents a new representation of the turbine performance maps oriented for turbocharger characterization. The aim of this plot is to provide a more compact and suited form to implement in engine simulation models and to interpolate data from turbocharger test bench. The new map is based on the use of conservative parameters as turbocharger power and turbine mass flow to describe the turbine performance in all VGT positions. The curves obtained are accurately fitted with quadratic polynomials and simple interpolation techniques give reliable results. Two turbochargers characterized in an steady flow rig were used for illustrating the representation. After being implemented in a turbocharger submodel, the results obtained with the model have been compared with success against turbine performance evaluated in engine tests cells. A practical application in turbocharger matching is also provided to show how this new map can be directly employed in engine design. (author)

Tancrez, M. [PSA - Peugeot Citroen, 18 rue des fauvelles, La Garenne-Colombes (France); Galindo, J.; Guardiola, C.; Fajardo, P.; Varnier, O. [CMT - Motores Termicos, Universidad Politecnica de Valencia (Spain)

2011-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

204

NETL: Turbines - Oxy-Fuel Turbines  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Oxy-Fuel Turbines Oxy-Fuel Turbines Oxy-fuel combustion potentially can be used in plants based on both conventional and advanced technology. Studies have shown that plants equipped with oxy-fuel systems could reach nominal efficiencies in the 30 percent range with today's steam turbines when fueled with natural gas and when capturing the CO2. With anticipated advances in gasification, oxygen separation, and steam turbine technology, plants using oxy-fuel systems are expected to achieve efficiencies in the mid-40 percent range, with near-100 percent CO2 capture and near-zero NOx emissions. By 2012: In the near-term, efforts are focused on the development of oxy- fuel turbine and combustor technologies for highly efficient (50-60 percent), near-zero emissions, coal-based power systems

205

Wind Turbine Generator System Duration Test Report for the ARE 442 Wind Turbine  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This test is being conducted as part of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Independent Testing project. This project was established to help reduce the barriers of wind energy expansion by providing independent testing results for small turbines. In total, four turbines are being tested at the NWTC as a part of this project. Duration testing is one of up to 5 tests that may be performed on the turbines, including power performance, safety and function, noise, and power quality tests. The results of the testing provide manufacturers with reports that may be used for small wind turbine certification. The test equipment includes a grid connected ARE 442 wind turbine mounted on a 30.5 meter (100 ft) lattice tower manufactured by Abundant Renewable Energy. The system was installed by the NWTC Site Operations group with guidance and assistance from Abundant Renewable Energy.

van Dam, J.; Baker, D.; Jager, D.

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Wind Turbine Generator System Duration Test Report for the Mariah Power Windspire Wind Turbine  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This test was conducted as part of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Independent Testing project to help reduce the barriers of wind energy expansion by providing independent testing results for small turbines. In total, five turbines are being tested at the National Wind Technology Center (NWTC) as a part of the first round of this project. Duration testing is one of up to five tests that may be performed on the turbines. Other tests include power performance, safety and function, noise, and power quality tests. NWTC testing results provide manufacturers with reports that may be used to meet part of small wind turbine certification requirements. This duration test report focuses on the Mariah Power Windspire wind turbine.

Huskey, A.; Bowen, A.; Jager, D.

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Wind Turbine Safety and Function Test Report for the ARE 442 Wind Turbine  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This test was conducted as part of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Independent Testing project. This project was established to help reduce the barriers of wind energy expansion by providing independent testing results for small turbines. In total, four turbines were tested at the National Wind Technology Center (NWTC) as a part of this project. Safety and function testing is one of up to five tests that were performed on the turbines, including power performance, duration, noise, and power quality tests. Test results provide manufacturers with reports that can be used for small wind turbine certification. The test equipment includes an ARE 442 wind turbine mounted on a 100-ft free-standing lattice tower. The system was installed by the NWTC Site Operations group with guidance and assistance from Abundant Renewable Energy.

van Dam, J.; Baker, D.; Jager, D.

2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Turbine Imaging Technology Assessment  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The goal of this project was to identify and evaluate imaging alternatives for observing the behavior of juvenile fish within an operating Kaplan turbine unit with a focus on methods to quantify fish injury mechanisms inside an operating turbine unit. Imaging methods are particularly needed to observe the approach and interaction of fish with turbine structural elements. This evaluation documents both the opportunities and constraints for observing juvenile fish at specific locations during turbine passage. The information may be used to acquire the scientific knowledge to make structural improvements and create opportunities for industry to modify turbines and improve fish passage conditions.

Moursund, Russell A.; Carlson, Thomas J.

2004-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

209

Interface between a gas turbine and PFBC  

SciTech Connect

First-generation pressurized fluidized bed combustion (PFBC) technology has potential advantages that include lower capital cost, improved environmental performance, shorter lead times, higher efficiency, and enhanced fuel flexibility. The objective of this program is to ensure that combustion turbine designs stay current with PFBC technology, specifically to ensure that the Westinghouse 251B12 combustion turbine is suitable for demonstration phases of this technology as it progresses toward commercial deployment. This paper presents the preliminary design of system interfaces that permit combining a PFBC and a Westinghouse 251B12 combustion turbine.

Bannister, R.L.; McGuigan, A.W.; Christenson, J.A.; Howell, I.L.; Marson, E.; Post, M.V.; Risley, R.P.; Vota, T.L.

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Advanced Turbine Technology Applications Project (ATTAP). 1944 Annual report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report summarizes work performed in development and demonstration of structural ceramics technology for automotive gas turbine engines. At the end of this period, the project name was changed to ``Ceramic Turbine Engine Demonstration Project``, effective Jan. 1995. Objectives are to provide early field experience demonstrating the reliability and durability of ceramic components in a modified, available gas turbine engine application, and to scale up and improve the manufacturing processes for ceramic turbine engine components and demonstrate the application of these processes in the production environment. The 1994 ATTAP activities emphasized demonstration and refinement of the ceramic turbine nozzles in the AlliedSignal/Garrett Model 331-200[CT] engine test bed in preparation for field testing; improvements in understanding the vibration characteristics of the ceramic turbine blades; improvements in critical ceramics technologies; and scaleup of the process used to manufacture ceramic turbine components.

NONE

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Geothermal turbine installation  

SciTech Connect

A geothermal turbine intallation in which high-pressure steam is separated from geothermal steam, which is a mixture of steam and water, with the high pressure steam connected to a high pressure turbine. Low pressure steam produced by flashing the hot water component of the geothermal steam is introduced to a low pressure turbine which is constructed and operates independently of the high pressure turbine. The discharge steam from the high pressure turbine is introduced to a steam condenser operating at a low vacuum while discharge steam from the low pressure turbine is introduced into a steam condenser operating at a high vacuum. The cooling water system of the high and low pressure condensers are connected in series with one another. A maximum power increase is obtained if the flow rates of the high and low pressure steams at the extraction ports of the high and low pressure turbines are made substantially equal to one another.

Nishioka, R.

1983-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

212

Steam turbine plant  

SciTech Connect

A system for regulating the rate of closing of the turbine intake valve of a steam turbine plant is disclosed. A steam turbine is supplied from a steam generator through a turbine intake valve. A branch line conducts the steam to a bypass valve which is normally closed. In the event of conditions making it necessary to close the turbine intake valve rapidly, a regulator is provided to control the rate of closing of the turbine intake valve and the opening of the bypass valve so that the pressure conditions in the steam generator do not exceed the limits established by the manufacturer. Pressure measuring instruments are placed in the system to sense the pressure immediately upstream from the turbine intake valve and the bypass valve as well as the initial steam supply pressure. These pressure signals are transmitted to a computer which produces a control signal in accordance with predetermined conditions.

Skala, K.

1981-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

213

Wind Turbine Manufacturing Process Monitoring  

SciTech Connect

To develop a practical inline inspection that could be used in combination with automated composite material placement equipment to economically manufacture high performance and reliable carbon composite wind turbine blade spar caps. The approach technical feasibility and cost benefit will be assessed to provide a solid basis for further development and implementation in the wind turbine industry. The program is focused on the following technology development: (1) Develop in-line monitoring methods, using optical metrology and ultrasound inspection, and perform a demonstration in the lab. This includes development of the approach and performing appropriate demonstration in the lab; (2) Develop methods to predict composite strength reduction due to defects; and (3) Develop process models to predict defects from leading indicators found in the uncured composites.

Waseem Faidi; Chris Nafis; Shatil Sinha; Chandra Yerramalli; Anthony Waas; Suresh Advani; John Gangloff; Pavel Simacek

2012-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

214

Stream-injected free-turbine-type gas turbine  

SciTech Connect

This patent describes an improvement in a free turbine type gas turbine. The turbine comprises: compressor means; a core turbine mechanically coupled with the compressor means to power it; a power turbine which is independent from the core turbine; and a combustion chamber for providing a heated working fluid; means for adding steam to the working fluid; means for providing a single flow path for the working fluid, first through the core turbine and then through the power turbine. The improvement comprises: means for preventing mismatch between the core turbine and the compressor due to the addition of steam comprising coupling a variable output load to the compressor.

Cheng, D.Y.

1990-02-13T23:59:59.000Z

215

Understanding Trends in Wind Turbine Prices Over the Past Decade  

SciTech Connect

Taking a bottom-up approach, this report examines seven primary drivers of wind turbine prices in the United States, with the goal of estimating the degree to which each contributed to the doubling in turbine prices from 2002 through 2008, as well as the subsequent decline in prices through 2010 (our analysis does not extend into 2011 because several of these drivers are best gauged on a full-year basis due to seasonality issues). The first four of these drivers can be considered, at least to some degree, endogenous influences – i.e., those that are largely within the control of the wind industry – and include changes in: 1) Labor costs, which have historically risen during times of tight turbine supply; 2) Warranty provisions, which reflect technology performance and reliability, and are most often capitalized in turbine prices; 3) Turbine manufacturer profitability, which can impact turbine prices independently of costs; and 4) Turbine design, which for the purpose of this analysis is principally manifested through increased turbine size. The other three drivers analyzed in this study can be considered exogenous influences, in that they can impact wind turbine costs but fall mostly outside of the direct control of the wind industry. These exogenous drivers include changes in: 5) Raw materials prices, which affect the cost of inputs to the manufacturing process; 6) Energy prices, which impact the cost of manufacturing and transporting turbines; and 7) Foreign exchange rates, which can impact the dollar amount paid for turbines and components imported into the United States.

Bolinger, Mark; Wiser, Ryan

2011-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

216

Gas Turbine Rotor Life: Material Testing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Gas turbine rotor materials are subject to degradation from prolonged hours and multiple start/stop cycles of operation. Periodically, plant operators disassemble the compressor and turbine sections of the rotor system and inspect the components for signs of creep, embrittlement, corrosion, thermal fatigue, and high- and low-cycle fatigue. Beyond limited rotor inspections performed during hot gas path inspections and major overhauls, a more thorough inspection is often required by the equipment ...

2012-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

217

Gas Turbine Repair Guidelines: GE 9FA  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

For more than a decade, the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) has been developing gas turbine hot section component repair and coating guidelines to assist utilities in the refurbishment of these critical and expensive parts. Utilities, generators, and repair vendors have used these guidelines to perform repairs on blades, turbine vanes, and combustion hardware. Guidelines now exist for a variety of conventional and advanced General Electric, Siemens/Westinghouse, Alstom, and Mitsubishi heavy ...

2012-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

218

Gas Turbine Rotor Life Assessment Guideline  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Gas turbine rotor materials are subject to degradation from prolonged hours and multiple start/stop cycles of operation. Periodically, plant operators disassemble the compressor and turbine sections of the rotor system and inspect the components for signs of creep, embrittlement, corrosion, thermal fatigue, and high- and low-cycle fatigue. Beyond limited rotor inspections performed during hot gas path inspections and major overhauls, a more thorough inspection is often required by the equipment manufactu...

2011-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

219

Gas Turbine Repair Guidelines: GE 7FA  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

For more than a decade, the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) has been developing gas turbine hot section component repair and coating guidelines to assist utilities in the refurbishment of these critical and expensive parts. Utilities, generators, and repair vendors have used these guidelines to perform repairs on blades, turbine vanes, and combustion hardware. Guidelines now exist for a variety of conventional and advanced General Electric, Siemens/Westinghouse, Alstom, and Mitsubishi heavy fram...

2011-12-27T23:59:59.000Z

220

Wind Turbine Generator System Acoustic Noise Test Report for the ARE 442 Wind Turbine  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This test was conducted on the ARE 442 as part of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Independent Testing project. This project was established to help reduce the barriers of wind energy expansion by providing independent testing results for small turbines. In total, five turbines are being tested at the National Wind Technology Center (NWTC) as a part of this project. Acoustic noise testing is one of up to five tests that may be performed on the turbines, including duration, safety and function, power performance, and power quality tests. The acoustic noise test was conducted to the IEC 61400-11 Edition 2.1.

Huskey, A.; van Dam, J.

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "turbine performance ampere-hour-a" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Ceramic stationary gas turbine development. Final report, Phase 1  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report summarizes work performed by Solar Turbines Inc. and its subcontractors during the period September 25, 1992 through April 30, 1993. The objective of the work is to improve the performance of stationary gas turbines in cogeneration through implementation of selected ceramic components.

NONE

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Design and evaluation of small water turbines. Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An evaluation was made of the design and hydromechanical performance characteristics for three basic turbine types: axial flow (Jonval), inward radial flow (Francis) and crossflow (Banki). A single commercially available turbine representative of each type and within the appropriate power range (microhydro designs to their full performance potential.

Marquis, J.A.

1983-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

223

Research turbine supports sustained technology development. For more than three decades, engineers at the National Renewable Energy Labora-  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Research turbine supports sustained technology development. For more than three decades, engineers, improve wind turbine performance, and reduce the cost of energy. Although there have been dramatic turbine test platform. Working with DOE, NREL purchased and installed a GE 1.5-MW wind turbine at the NWTC

224

The evaporative gas turbine (EGT) cycle  

SciTech Connect

Humidification of the flow through a gas turbine has been proposed in a variety of forms. The STIG plant involves the generation of steam by the gas turbine exhaust in a heat recovery steam generator (HRSG), and its injection into or downstream of the combustion chamber. This increases the mass flow through the turbine and the power output from the plant, with a small increase in efficiency. In the evaporative gas turbine (or EGT) cycle, water is injected in the compressor discharge in a regenerative gas turbine cycle (a so-called CBTX plant--compressor [C], burner [B], turbine [T], heat exchanger [X]); the air is evaporatively cooled before it enters the heat exchanger. While the addition of water increases the turbine mass flow and power output, there is also apparent benefit in reducing the temperature drop in the exhaust stack. In one variation of the basic EGT cycle, water is also added downstream of the evaporative aftercooler, even continuously in the heat exchanger. There are several other variations on the basic cycle (e.g., the cascaded humidified advanced turbine [CHAT]). The present paper analyzes the performance of the EGT cycle. The basic thermodynamics are first discussed, and related to the cycle analysis of a dry regenerative gas turbine plant. Subsequently some detailed calculations of EGT cycles are presented. The main purpose of the work is to seek the optimum pressure ratio in the EGT cycle for given constraints (e.g., fixed maximum to minimum temperature). It is argued that this optimum has a relatively low value.

Horlock, J.H. [Whittle Lab., Cambridge (United Kingdom)

1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Plan for an Advanced Turbine Systems Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A draft version of this paper was presented at the Clemson Clean, affordable, and reliable natural gas utilization technologies will play a growing role in meeting future power generation needs in the United States. The US Department of Energy's (DOE) National Energy Strategy projected that total demand for natural gas will rise from 18.5 trillion cubic feet (tcf) in 1990 to 24.2 tcf by the year 2000. Much of this increase is attributed to the increased use of natural gas as a fuel for electric power generation. Candidate technologies for gas fired power generation include gas turbine and fuel cell systems. The first workshop on research needs for advanced gas turbine systems for power generation was held on April 8-10, 1991 in Greenville, South Carolina. The goals of the Clemson-I Workshop were to identify research needs which would accelerate the development of advanced gas turbines and to consider new approaches to implement this research. The Clemson-I Workshop focused on advanced gas turbine systems which would have a lower cost of electricity or better environmental performance than systems currently under development. The workshop was cosponsored by the DOE's Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC), Clemson University, and the South Carolina Energy Research and Development Center. The proceedings from the workshop have been published. The 75 participants in the Clemson-I Workshop represented a broad spectrum of the gas turbine Research Development (R D) community as well as potential users of advanced gas turbines. Gas turbine manufacturers, the electric utility industry, the university community, as well as government and private sector R D sponsors were represented. Participants in the Clemson-I Workshop concluded that it is technically feasible to develop advanced turbine systems and that Government participation would accelerate the developmental effort. Advanced turbine systems could be operated on natural gas or adapted to coal or biomass firing.

Bajura, R.A.; Webb, H.A. (USDOE Morgantown Energy Technology Center, WV (United States)); Parks, W.P. (USDOE Assistant Secretary for Conservation and Renewable Energy, Washington, DC (United States))

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Plan for an Advanced Turbine Systems Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A draft version of this paper was presented at the Clemson Clean, affordable, and reliable natural gas utilization technologies will play a growing role in meeting future power generation needs in the United States. The US Department of Energy`s (DOE) National Energy Strategy projected that total demand for natural gas will rise from 18.5 trillion cubic feet (tcf) in 1990 to 24.2 tcf by the year 2000. Much of this increase is attributed to the increased use of natural gas as a fuel for electric power generation. Candidate technologies for gas fired power generation include gas turbine and fuel cell systems. The first workshop on research needs for advanced gas turbine systems for power generation was held on April 8-10, 1991 in Greenville, South Carolina. The goals of the Clemson-I Workshop were to identify research needs which would accelerate the development of advanced gas turbines and to consider new approaches to implement this research. The Clemson-I Workshop focused on advanced gas turbine systems which would have a lower cost of electricity or better environmental performance than systems currently under development. The workshop was cosponsored by the DOE`s Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC), Clemson University, and the South Carolina Energy Research and Development Center. The proceedings from the workshop have been published. The 75 participants in the Clemson-I Workshop represented a broad spectrum of the gas turbine Research & Development (R&D) community as well as potential users of advanced gas turbines. Gas turbine manufacturers, the electric utility industry, the university community, as well as government and private sector R&D sponsors were represented. Participants in the Clemson-I Workshop concluded that it is technically feasible to develop advanced turbine systems and that Government participation would accelerate the developmental effort. Advanced turbine systems could be operated on natural gas or adapted to coal or biomass firing.

Bajura, R.A.; Webb, H.A. [USDOE Morgantown Energy Technology Center, WV (United States); Parks, W.P. [USDOE Assistant Secretary for Conservation and Renewable Energy, Washington, DC (United States)

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Steam Turbine Cogeneration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Steam turbines are widely used in most industrial facilities because steam is readily available and steam turbine is easy to operate and maintain. If designed properly, a steam turbine co-generation (producing heat and power simultaneously) system can increase energy efficiency, reduce air emissions and qualify the equipment for a Capital Cost tax Allowance. As a result, such a system benefits the stakeholders, the society and the environment. This paper describes briefly the types of steam turbine classified by their conditions of exhaust and review quickly the fundamentals related to steam and steam turbine. Then the authors will analyze a typical steam turbine co-generation system and give examples to illustrate the benefits of the System.

Quach, K.; Robb, A. G.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Wind Turbine Generator System Power Quality Test Report for the Gaia Wind 11-kW Wind Turbine  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report details the power quality test on the Gaia Wind 11-kW Wind Turbine as part of the U.S. Department of Energy's Independent Testing Project. In total five turbines are being tested as part of the project. Power quality testing is one of up to five test that may be performed on the turbines including power performance, safety and function, noise, and duration tests. The results of the testing provide manufacturers with reports that may be used for small wind turbine certification.

Curtis, A.; Gevorgian, V.

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Wind turbine | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

turbine turbine Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Wind turbine: A machine that converts wind energy to mechanical energy; typically connected to a generator to produce electricity. Other definitions:Wikipedia Reegle Contents 1 Types of Wind Turbines 1.1 Vertical Axis Wind Turbines 1.2 Horizontal Axis Wind Turbines 2 Wind Turbine Sizes 3 Components of a Wind Turbine 4 References Types of Wind Turbines There are two basic wind turbine designs: those with a vertical axis (sometimes referred to as VAWTs) and those with a horizontal axis (sometimes referred to as HAWTs). There are several manufacturers of vertical axis turbines, but they have not penetrated the "utility scale" (100 kW capacity and larger) market to the same degree as horizontal axis turbines.[1]

230

Wind Turbine Safety and Function Test Report for the Gaia-Wind 11-kW Wind Turbine  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This test was conducted as part of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Independent Testing project. This project was established to help reduce the barriers to wind energy expansion by providing independent testing results for small wind turbines (SWT). In total, four turbines were tested at the National Wind Technology Center (NWTC) as a part of this project. Safety and function testing is one of up to five tests performed on the turbines, including power performance, duration, noise, and power-quality tests. The results of the testing provide the manufacturers with reports that can be used for small wind turbine certification. The test equipment includes a Gaia-Wind 11-kW wind turbine mounted on an 18-m monopole tower. Gaia-Wind Ltd. manufactured the turbine in Denmark. The system was installed by the NWTC site operations group with guidance and assistance from Gaia-Wind.

Huskey, A.; Bowen, A.; Jager, D.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Combustion Turbine Repair Guidelines: General Electric MS6001 Model B  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

For more than a decade, EPRI has been developing gas turbine hot section component repair and coating guidelines to assist utilities in the refurbishment of these critical and expensive parts. Utilities, generators, and repair vendors have used these guidelines to perform repairs on blades, turbine vanes, and combustion hardware. Guidelines now exist for a variety of conventional and advanced General Electric, Siemens/Westinghouse, Alstom, and Mitsubishi heavy frame gas turbines. The guidelines in this v...

2009-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

232

Combustion Turbine Repair Guidelines: Siemens V94.3A  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

For more than a decade, EPRI has been developing gas turbine hot section component repair and coating guidelines to assist utilities in the refurbishment of these critical and expensive parts. Utilities and repair vendors have used these guidelines to perform repairs on blades, turbine vanes, and combustion hardware. Guidelines now exist for a variety of conventional and advanced General Electric, Siemens/Westinghouse, Alstom, and Mitsubishi heavy frame gas turbines. The guidelines in this volume address...

2009-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

233

Vertical axis wind turbine control strategy  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Early expensive in automatic operation of the Sandia 17-m vertical axis research wind turbine (VAWT) has demonstrated the need for a systematic study of control algorithms. To this end, a computer model has been developed that uses actual wind time series and turbine performance data to calculate the power produced by the Sandia 17-m VAWT operating in automatic control. The model has been used to investigate the influence of starting algorithms on annual energy production. The results indicate that, depending on turbine and local wind characteristics, a bad choice of a control algorithm can significantly reduce overall energy production. The model can be used to select control algorithms and threshold parameters that maximize long-term energy production. An attempt has been made to generalize these results from local site and turbine characteristics to obtain general guidelines for control algorithm design.

McNerney, G.M.

1981-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Active load control techniques for wind turbines.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report provides an overview on the current state of wind turbine control and introduces a number of active techniques that could be potentially used for control of wind turbine blades. The focus is on research regarding active flow control (AFC) as it applies to wind turbine performance and loads. The techniques and concepts described here are often described as 'smart structures' or 'smart rotor control'. This field is rapidly growing and there are numerous concepts currently being investigated around the world; some concepts already are focused on the wind energy industry and others are intended for use in other fields, but have the potential for wind turbine control. An AFC system can be broken into three categories: controls and sensors, actuators and devices, and the flow phenomena. This report focuses on the research involved with the actuators and devices and the generated flow phenomena caused by each device.

van Dam, C.P. (University of California, Davis, CA); Berg, Dale E.; Johnson, Scott J. (University of California, Davis, CA)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Steam Turbine Developments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

...O. Jonas, Corrosion of Steam Turbines, Corrosion: Environments and Industries, Vol 13C, ASM Handbook, ASM International, 2006, p 469â??476...

236

Economical Condensing Turbines?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Steam turbines have long been used at utilities and in industry to generate power. There are three basic types of steam turbines: condensing, letdown and extraction/condensing. • Letdown turbines reduce the pressure of the incoming steam to one or more pressures and generate power very efficiently, assuming that all the letdown steam has a use. Two caveats: Letdown turbines produce power based upon steam requirements and not based upon power requirements, and if all the steam letdown does not have a use, letdown turbines can become a very expensive way of producing electric power. • Condensing turbines have the ability to handle rapid swings in electrical load. Unfortunately, they can only condense a small percentage of the steam, usually less than 14%. Therefore only a small percent of the heat of condensation is available for their use. Also equipment must be used to condense the remaining steam below atmospheric pressure. • Extraction/condensing turbines both extract steam at a useful temperature and pressure and then condense the remainder of the steam. These units have the ability to load follow also. They are often used in concert with gas turbines to produce the balance of electrical power and to keep a electric self generator from drawing electrical power from the grid. The method for analyzing the cost of the condensing steam produced power is exactly the same in all cases. This paper will attempt to provide a frame work for preliminary economic analysis on electric power generation for condensing steam turbines.

Dean, J. E.

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Rampressor Turbine Design  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The design of a unique gas turbine engine is presented. The first Rampressor Turbine engine rig will be a configuration where the Rampressor rotor is integrated into an existing industrial gas turbine engine. The Rampressor rotor compresses air which is burned in a traditional stationary combustion system in order to increase the enthalpy of the compressed air. The combustion products are then expanded through a conventional gas turbine which provides both compressor and electrical power. This in turn produces shaft torque, which drives a generator to provide electricity. The design and the associated design process of such an engine are discussed in this report.

Ramgen Power Systems

2003-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

238

NETL: Turbines - UTSR Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3 Syngas Particulate Deposition and Erosion at the Leading Edge of a Turbine Blade with Film Cooling Virginia Tech Danesh Tafti Project Dates: 812007 - 9302010 Area of...

239

Hermetic turbine generator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A Rankine cycle turbine drives an electric generator and a feed pump, all on a single shaft, and all enclosed within a hermetically sealed case. The shaft is vertically oriented with the turbine exhaust directed downward and the shaft is supported on hydrodynamic fluid film bearings using the process fluid as lubricant and coolant. The selection of process fluid, type of turbine, operating speed, system power rating, and cycle state points are uniquely coordinated to achieve high turbine efficiency at the temperature levels imposed by the recovery of waste heat from the more prevalent industrial processes.

Meacher, John S. (Ballston Lake, NY); Ruscitto, David E. (Ballston Spa, NY)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Real time wind turbine simulator.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??A novel dynamic real-time wind turbine simulator (WTS) is developed in this thesis, which is capable of reproducing dynamic behavior of real wind turbine. The… (more)

Gong, Bing

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "turbine performance ampere-hour-a" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

NETL: Turbine Projects - Efficiency Improvement  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Efficiency Improvemenet Turbine Projects Efficiency Improvemenet Advanced Hot Section Materials and Coatings Test Rig DataFact Sheets System Study for Improved Gas Turbine...

242

Single rotor turbine engine  

SciTech Connect

There has been invented a turbine engine with a single rotor which cools the engine, functions as a radial compressor, pushes air through the engine to the ignition point, and acts as an axial turbine for powering the compressor. The invention engine is designed to use a simple scheme of conventional passage shapes to provide both a radial and axial flow pattern through the single rotor, thereby allowing the radial intake air flow to cool the turbine blades and turbine exhaust gases in an axial flow to be used for energy transfer. In an alternative embodiment, an electric generator is incorporated in the engine to specifically adapt the invention for power generation. Magnets are embedded in the exhaust face of the single rotor proximate to a ring of stationary magnetic cores with windings to provide for the generation of electricity. In this alternative embodiment, the turbine is a radial inflow turbine rather than an axial turbine as used in the first embodiment. Radial inflow passages of conventional design are interleaved with radial compressor passages to allow the intake air to cool the turbine blades.

Platts, David A. (Los Alamos, NM)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Gas turbine diagnostic system  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In the given article the methods of parametric diagnostics of gas turbine based on fuzzy logic is proposed. The diagnostic map of interconnection between some parts of turbine and changes of corresponding parameters has been developed. Also we have created model to define the efficiency of the compressor using fuzzy logic algorithms.

Talgat, Shuvatov

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Turbine disc sealing assembly  

SciTech Connect

A disc seal assembly for use in a turbine engine. The disc seal assembly includes a plurality of outwardly extending sealing flange members that define a plurality of fluid pockets. The sealing flange members define a labyrinth flow path therebetween to limit leakage between a hot gas path and a disc cavity in the turbine engine.

Diakunchak, Ihor S.

2013-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

245

Gas turbine engines  

SciTech Connect

A core engine or gas generator is described for use in a range of gas turbine engines. A multi-stage compressor and a single stage supersonic turbine are mounted on a single shaft. The compressor includes a number of stages of variable angle and the gas generator has an annular combustion chamber.

MacDonald, A.G.

1976-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

246

Steam turbine control  

SciTech Connect

In a power plant which includes a steam turbine with main control valves for admitting steam into the steam turbine and a steam bypass with bypass control valves for diverting steam around the steam turbine directly into a condenser, it is necessary to coordinate the operation of the respective valves so that the steam turbine can be started, brought up to speed, synchronized with a generator and then loaded as smoothly and efficiently as possible. The present invention provides for such operation and, in addition, allows for the transfer of power plant operation from the so-called turbine following mode to the boiler following mode through the use of the sliding pressure concept. The invention described is particularly applicable to combined cycle power plants.

Priluck, D.M.; Wagner, J.B.

1982-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

247

Ceramic turbine nozzle  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A turbine nozzle and shroud assembly having a preestablished rate of thermal expansion is positioned in a gas turbine engine and being attached to conventional metallic components. The metallic components having a preestablished rate of thermal expansion being greater than the preestablished rate of thermal expansion of the turbine nozzle vane assembly. The turbine nozzle vane assembly includes a plurality of segmented vane defining a first vane segment and a second vane segment. Each of the first and second vane segments having a vertical portion. Each of the first vane segments and the second vane segments being positioned in functional relationship one to another within a recess formed within an outer shroud and an inner shroud. The turbine nozzle and shroud assembly provides an economical, reliable and effective ceramic component having a preestablished rate of thermal expansion being less than the preestablished rate of thermal expansion of the other component.

Shaffer, James E. (Maitland, FL); Norton, Paul F. (San Diego, CA)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Ceramic Cerami Turbine Nozzle  

SciTech Connect

A turbine nozzle vane assembly having a preestablished rate of thermal expansion is positioned in a gas turbine engine and being attached to conventional metallic components. The metallic components having a preestablished rate of thermal expansion being greater than the preestablished rate of thermal expansion of the turbine nozzle vane assembly. The turbine nozzle vane assembly includes an outer shroud and an inner shroud having a plurality of horizontally segmented vanes therebetween being positioned by a connecting member positioning segmented vanes in functional relationship one to another. The turbine nozzle vane assembly provides an economical, reliable and effective ceramic component having a preestablished rate of thermal expansion being greater than the preestablished rate of thermal expansion of the other component.

Boyd, Gary L. (Alpine, CA)

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Ceramic turbine nozzle  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A turbine nozzle and shroud assembly having a preestablished rate of thermal expansion is positioned in a gas turbine engine and being attached to conventional metallic components. The metallic components have a preestablished rate of thermal expansion greater than the preestablished rate of thermal expansion of the turbine nozzle vane assembly. The turbine nozzle vane assembly includes a plurality of segmented vane defining a first vane segment and a second vane segment, each of the first and second vane segments having a vertical portion, and each of the first vane segments and the second vane segments being positioned in functional relationship one to another within a recess formed within an outer shroud and an inner shroud. The turbine nozzle and shroud assembly provides an economical, reliable and effective ceramic component having a preestablished rate of thermal expansion being less than the preestablished rate of thermal expansion of the other component. 4 figs.

Shaffer, J.E.; Norton, P.F.

1996-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

250

Field Measurements of Wind Turbine Wakes with Lidars  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Field measurements of the wake flow produced from a 2-MW Enercon E-70 wind turbine were performed using three scanning Doppler wind lidars. A GPS-based technique was used to determine the position of the wind turbine and the wind lidar locations, ...

Giacomo Valerio Iungo; Yu-Ting Wu; Fernando Porté-Agel

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Nuclear Maintenance Applications Center: Feed Pump Turbine Maintenance Guide  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) Steam Turbines and Auxiliaries Program 65 and the Nuclear Maintenance Application Center have developed a series of maintenance guides to assist plant personnel with the performance of various maintenance tasks associated with a wide variety of plant components. The objective of this project was to publish a maintenance guide for the feed pump turbines that included an ...

2012-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

252

The Estimation of Wind Turbine Pitch Angle Based on ANN  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Variable-speed and constant-frequency (VSCF) pitch-controlled wind turbine is believed to be superior to other types of wind turbine due to its features such as high efficiency and ideal starting and braking performance, Artificial Neural Networks (ANN) ... Keywords: VSCF, ANN, pitch angle, Pitch-controlled system

Yanping Liu; Shuhong Liu; Hongmei Guo; Huajun Wang

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Combined gas turbine and steam turbine power plant  

SciTech Connect

A description is given of a power plant arrangement having a gas turbine, a heat recovery steam generator, a steam turbine and means for controlling steam flow from the heat recovery steam generator to the steam turbine. Steam conditions are maintained generally constant and variations in power plant loading are carried by the steam turbine while operating the gas turbine at a generally constant fuel flow.

Baker, J.M.; Clark, G.W.; Harper, D.M.; Tomlinson, L.O.

1978-04-04T23:59:59.000Z

254

On H8Robust Control for Hydraulic Servo System of Steam Turbine  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Digital Electrical Hydraulic Servo System (DEH )of steam turbine has perfect performance, but it is difficult to format mathematical model accurately. Due to complexity of steam turbine and hydraulic servo system and the complex factors of applying field, ... Keywords: component, Steam turbine, hydraulic Servo System, H8 Robust control, hybrid Sensitiveness, disturbance

Lian-yu Chen

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

Int. Symp. on Heat Transfer in Gas Turbine Systems 9 14 August, 2009, Antalya, Turkey  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

procedure (IEC 61400-12) for power performance charac- terization of a single wind turbines is shown by the standard IEC 61400-12 3 [12]. In this standard procedure the power curve of a single wind turbine of the blade pitch angle system of a wind turbine [9]. The phase averaged P(t,t ) function depends on the time

Camci, Cengiz

256

Fault detection and isolation in aircraft gas turbine engines. Part 1: underlying concept  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

307 Fault detection and isolation in aircraft gas turbine engines. Part 1: underlying concept: aircraft propulsion, gas turbine engines, fault detection and isolation, statistical pattern recognition 1 INTRODUCTION Performance and reliability of aircraft gas turbine engines gradually deteriorate over the service

Ray, Asok

257

Investigating the efficiency of gas turbines in off-design operation  

SciTech Connect

Experimental data on the performance of gas turbines for eight gas turbine power plants are presented and compared for the purpose of determining the efficiency of gas turbines in off-design operation such as during start-up or at less than rated speeds. (LCL)

Ol' Khovskii, G.G.; Ol' Khovskaya, N.I.

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Manufacturing Defects Common to Composite Wind Turbine Blades: Effects of Defects  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Manufacturing Defects Common to Composite Wind Turbine Blades: Effects of Defects Jared W. Nelson The Blade Reliability Collaborative has been formed to perform comprehensive studies to improve wind turbine uni-directional wind turbine fiber-reinforced composite material with an epoxy resin were utilized

259

Foam Cleaning of Steam Turbines  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The efficiency and power output of a steam turbine can be dramatically reduced when deposits form on the turbine blades. Disassembly and mechanical cleaning of the turbine is very time consuming and costly. Deposits can be removed from the turbine internals in situ by foaming an appropriate cleaning solution and injecting it through the turbine, dissolving the deposits and removing them from the system. Because disassembly of the turbine is not required, foam cleaning is a much faster and more cost-effective method of removing deposits. In recent years, HydroChem has removed copper deposits from over 130 Westinghouse and General Electric turbines nationwide using patented equipment.

Foster, C.; Curtis, G.; Horvath, J. W.

2000-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Coupled Dynamic Analysis of Multiple Unit Floating Offshore Wind Turbine  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In the present study, a numerical simulation tool has been developed for the rotor-floater-tether coupled dynamic analysis of Multiple Unit Floating Offshore Wind Turbine (MUFOWT) in the time domain including aero-blade-tower dynamics and control, mooring dynamics and platform motion. In particular, the numerical tool developed in this study is based on the single turbine analysis tool FAST, which was developed by National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL). For linear or nonlinear hydrodynamics of floating platform and generalized-coordinate-based FEM mooring line dynamics, CHARM3D program, hull-riser-mooring coupled dynamics program developed by Prof. M.H. Kim’s research group during the past two decades, is incorporated. So, the entire dynamic behavior of floating offshore wind turbine can be obtained by coupled FAST-CHARM3D in the time domain. During the coupling procedure, FAST calculates all the dynamics and control of tower and wind turbine including the platform itself, and CHARM3D feeds all the relevant forces on the platform into FAST. Then FAST computes the whole dynamics of wind turbine using the forces from CHARM3D and return the updated displacements and velocities of the platform to CHARM3D. To analyze the dynamics of MUFOWT, the coupled FAST-CHARM3D is expanded more and re-designed. The global matrix that includes one floating platform and a number of turbines is built at each time step of the simulation, and solved to obtain the entire degrees of freedom of the system. The developed MUFOWT analysis tool is able to compute any type of floating platform with various kinds of horizontal axis wind turbines (HAWT). Individual control of each turbine is also available and the different structural properties of tower and blades can be applied. The coupled dynamic analysis for the three-turbine MUFOWT and five-turbine MUFOWT are carried out and the performances of each turbine and floating platform in normal operational condition are assessed. To investigate the coupling effect between platform and each turbine, one turbine failure event is simulated and checked. The analysis shows that some of the mal-function of one turbine in MUFOWT may induce significant changes in the performance of other turbines or floating platform. The present approach can directly be applied to the development of the remote structural health monitoring system of MUFOWT in detecting partial turbine failure by measuring tower or platform responses in the future.

Bae, Yoon Hyeok

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "turbine performance ampere-hour-a" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Gas turbine combustor transition  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is described for converting a steam cooled transition to an air cooled transition in a gas turbine having a compressor in fluid communication with a combustor, a turbine section in fluid communication with the combustor, the transition disposed in a combustor shell and having a cooling circuit connecting a steam outlet and a steam inlet and wherein hot gas flows from the combustor through the transition and to the turbine section, includes forming an air outlet in the transition in fluid communication with the cooling circuit and providing for an air inlet in the transition in fluid communication with the cooling circuit. 7 figs.

Coslow, B.J.; Whidden, G.L.

1999-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

262

Gas turbine combustor transition  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of converting a steam cooled transition to an air cooled transition in a gas turbine having a compressor in fluid communication with a combustor, a turbine section in fluid communication with the combustor, the transition disposed in a combustor shell and having a cooling circuit connecting a steam outlet and a steam inlet and wherein hot gas flows from the combustor through the transition and to the turbine section, includes forming an air outlet in the transition in fluid communication with the cooling circuit and providing for an air inlet in the transition in fluid communication with the cooling circuit.

Coslow, Billy Joe (Winter Park, FL); Whidden, Graydon Lane (Great Blue, CT)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Turbine blade vibration dampening  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present turbine wheel assembly increases component life and turbine engine longevity. The combination of the strap and the opening combined with the preestablished area of the outer surface of the opening and the preestablished area of the outer circumferential surface of the strap and the friction between the strap and the opening increases the life and longevity of the turbine wheel assembly. Furthermore, the mass ``M`` or combined mass ``CM`` of the strap or straps and the centrifugal force assist in controlling vibrations and damping characteristics. 5 figs.

Cornelius, C.C.; Pytanowski, G.P.; Vendituoli, J.S.

1997-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

264

Gas turbine plant emissions  

SciTech Connect

Many cogeneration facilities use gas turbines combined with heat recovery boilers, and the number is increasing. At the start of 1986, over 75% of filings for new cogeneration plants included plans to burn natural gas. Depending on the geographic region, gas turbines are still one of the most popular prime movers. Emissions of pollutants from these turbines pose potential risks to the environment, particularly in geographical areas that already have high concentrations of cogeneration facilities. Although environmental regulations have concentrated on nitrogen oxides (NO/sub x/) in the past, it is now necessary to evaluate emission controls for other pollutants as well.

Davidson, L.N.; Gullett, D.E.

1987-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Turbine blade vibration dampening  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present turbine wheel assembly increases component life and turbine engine longevity. The combination of the strap and the opening combined with the preestablished area of the outer surface of the opening and the preestablished area of the outer circumferential surface of the strap and the friction between the strap and the opening increases the life and longevity of the turbine wheel assembly. Furthermore, the mass "M" or combined mass "CM" of the strap or straps and the centrifugal force assist in controlling vibrations and damping characteristics.

Cornelius, Charles C. (San Diego, CA); Pytanowski, Gregory P. (San Diego, CA); Vendituoli, Jonathan S. (San Diego, CA)

1997-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

266

Aviation turbine fuels, 1982  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Properties of some aviation turbine fuels marketed in the United States during 1982 are presented in this report. The samples represented are typical 1982 production and were analyzed in the laboratories of 14 manufacturers of aviation turbine (jet) fuels. The data were submitted for study, calculation, and compilation under a cooperative agreement between the Department of Energy (DOE), Bartlesville Energy Technology Center (BETC), Bartlesville, Oklahoma, and the American Petroleum Institute (API). Results for the properties of 90 samples of aviation turbine fuels are included in the report for military grades JP-4 and HP-5, and commercial type Jet A.

Shelton, E.M.; Dickson, C.L.

1983-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Load attenuating passively adaptive wind turbine blade  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and apparatus for improving wind turbine performance by alleviating loads and controlling the rotor. The invention employs the use of a passively adaptive blade that senses the wind velocity or rotational speed, and accordingly modifies its aerodynamic configuration. The invention exploits the load mitigation prospects of a blade that twists toward feather as it bends. The invention includes passively adaptive wind turbine rotors or blades with currently preferred power control features. The apparatus is a composite fiber horizontal axis wind-turbine blade, in which a substantial majority of fibers in the blade skin are inclined at angles of between 15 and 30 degrees to the axis of the blade, to produces passive adaptive aeroelastic tailoring (bend-twist coupling) to alleviate loading without unduly jeopardizing performance.

Veers, Paul S. (Albuquerque, NM); Lobitz, Donald W. (Albuquerque, NM)

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

NETL: Turbines - Research&Development  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

R & D R & D Turbines Research and Development NETL In-house R&D for Turbines The Combustion and Engine Dynamics Division within NETL's Office of Science and Technology provides skills, expertise, equipment, and facilities to conduct research and provides technical support for NETL product lines and programs in combustion science and technology and in the dynamics of prime movers or engines, such as gas turbines; fuel cells; internal combustion engines; or hybrid cycles that utilize fossil fuels, biomass, wastes, or other related fuel sources. Research is conducted with the primary goals of improving cycle efficiency, reducing capital cost, and improving environmental performance. Studies on supporting technologies, such as combustion instability, fuels versatility, and fluid and particle dynamics, are performed as well.

269

Wind Turbine Acoustic Noise A white paper  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Wind Turbine Acoustic Noise A white paper Prepared by the Renewable Energy Research Laboratory...................................................................... 8 Sound from Wind Turbines .............................................................................................. 10 Sources of Wind Turbine Sound

Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

270

Assessment of turbine generator technology for district heating applications  

SciTech Connect

Steam turbines for cogeneration plants may carry a combination of industrial, space heating, cooling and domestic hot water loads. These loads are hourly, weekly, and seasonally irregular and require turbines of special design to meet the load duration curve, while generating electric power. Design features and performance characteristics of large cogeneration turbine units for combined electric generation and district heat supply are presented. Different modes of operation of the cogeneration turbine under variable load conditions are discussed in conjunction with a heat load duration curve for urban heat supply. The performance of the 250 MW district heating turbine as applied to meet the heat load duration curve for Minneapolis--St. Paul area is analyzed, and associated fuel savings are estimated.

Oliker, I.

1978-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Duration Test Report for the Ventera VT10 Wind Turbine  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This project was established to help reduce the barriers of wind energy expansion by providing independent testing results for small wind turbines. Five turbines were tested at the National Wind Technology Center (NWTC) at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) as a part of round one of this project. Duration testing is one of up to five tests that may be performed on the turbines, including power performance, safety and function, noise, and power quality. Test results will provide manufacturers with reports that can be used to fulfill part of the requirements for small wind turbine certification. The test equipment included a grid-connected Ventera Energy Corporation VT10 wind turbine mounted on an 18.3-m (60-ft) self-supporting lattice tower manufactured by Rohn.

Smith, J.; Huskey, A.; Jager, D.; Hur, J.

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Duration Test Report for the SWIFT Wind Turbine  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This test was conducted as part of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Independent Testing project. This project was established to help reduce the barriers of wind energy expansion by providing independent testing results for small turbines. Three turbines where selected for testing at the National Wind Technology Center (NWTC) as a part of round two of the Small Wind Turbine Independent Testing project. Duration testing is one of up to 5 tests that may be performed on the turbines. Other tests include power performance, safety and function, noise, and power quality. The results of the testing will provide the manufacturers with reports that may be used for small wind turbine certification.

Mendoza, I.; Hur, J.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Safety and Function Test Report for the SWIFT Wind Turbine  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This test was conducted as part of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Independent Testing project. This project was established to help reduce the barriers of wind energy expansion by providing independent testing results for small turbines. Three turbines where selected for testing at the National Wind Technology Center (NWTC) as a part of round two of the Small Wind Turbine Independent Testing project. Safety and Function testing is one of up to 5 tests that may be performed on the turbines. Other tests include power performance, duration, noise, and power quality. The results of the testing will provide the manufacturers with reports that may be used for small wind turbine certification.

Mendoza, I.; Hur, J.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Analysis of the effects of integrating wind turbines into a conventional utility: a case study. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The impact on a utility incorporating wind turbine generation due to wind speed sampling frequency, wind turbine performance model, and wind speed forecasting accuracy is examined. The utility analyzed in the study was the Los Angeles Department of Water and Power and the wind turbine assumed was the MOD-2. The sensitivity of the economic value of wind turbine generation to wind speed sampling frequency and wind turbine modeling technique is examined as well as the impact of wind forecasting accuracy on utility operation and production costs. Wind speed data from San Gorgonio Pass, California during 1979 are used to estimate wind turbine performance using four different simulation methods. (LEW)

Goldenblatt, M.K.; Wegley, H.L.; Miller, A.H.

1982-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Analysis of the effects of integrating wind turbines into a conventional utility: a case study. Revised final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The impact on a utility incorporating wind turbine generation due to wind speed sampling frequency, wind turbine performance model, and wind speed forecasting accuracy is examined. The utility analyzed in this study was the Los Angeles Department of Water and Power, and the wind turbine assumed was the MOD-2. The sensitivity of the economic value of wind turbine generation to wind speed sampling frequency and wind turbine modeling technique is examined as well as the impact of wind forecasting accuracy on utility operation and production costs. Wind speed data from San Gorgonio Pass, California during 1979 are used to estimate wind turbine performance using four different simulation methods. (LEW)

Goldenblatt, M.K.; Wegley, H.L.; Miller, A.H.

1983-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

NETL: Turbines Archive  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Archive Archive KEY: News News & Features Events Events Publications Publications Archive 09.26.2013 Publications The 2013 Hydrogen Turbine Program Portfolio has been posted to the Reference Shelf. 08.15.2013 News DOE Selects Ten Projects to Conduct Advanced Turbine Technology Research Ten university projects to conduct advanced turbine technology research under the Office of Fossil Energy's University Turbine Systems Research (UTSR) Program have been selected by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) for additional development. 07.15.2013 News NETL Innovations Recognized with R&D 100 Awards Two technologies advanced by the Office of Fossil Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) in collaboration with strategic partners have been recognized by R&D Magazine as among the 100 most technologically significant products introduced into the commercial marketplace within the past year.

277

NETL: Turbines - Reference Shelf  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

- Catalytic Combustion PDF-855KB 41892 - Praxair Final Report - Low NOx Fuel Flexible Gas Turbine PDF-214KB 42176 - GT 2006 Annual Report PDF-504KB 42495 - UTEP H2 Kinetics...

278

Turbines in the sky  

SciTech Connect

Gas turbines are being investigated as power sources for the proposed Star Wars weapons flatforms. The gas turbine engine offers the best opportunity for exploiting the high-temperature potential of both nuclear and chemical combustion. The use of mature gas turbine technology and existing materials would result in highly reliable PCUs capable of meeting SDI's requirements. However, operation under the temperature limits imposed by existing materials would result in a prohibitively heavy system. Cooled blades would somewhat increase temperature capability; however the turbine's mass, though reduced, would still be unacceptably large. The greatest improvements would result from the ability to operate at temperatures of up to 2000 K, pressures up to 14 MPa, and stress up to 690 MPa.

Boyle, R.V.; Riple, J.C.

1987-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Wind Turbines and Health  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Wind power has been gaining prominence as a viable sustainable alternative to other forms of energy production. Studies have found that there is increasing population demand for ‘green’ energy 1,2. In Australia, this has been encouraged by the introduction of the Renewable Energy (Electricity) Act in 2000 and the Renewable Energy Target Scheme in 2009. As with any new technology, wind turbines are not without controversy. Those who oppose the development of wind farms contend that wind turbines can adversely impact the health of individuals living in close proximity. Do wind turbines impact on health? Concerns regarding the adverse health impacts of wind turbines focus on infrasound noise, electromagnetic interference, shadow flicker and blade glint produced

unknown authors

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Wind Turbines and Health  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Wind power has been gaining prominence as a viable sustainable alternative to other forms of energy production. Studies have found that there is increasing population demand for ‘green’ energy1,2. In Australia, this has been encouraged by the introduction of the Renewable Energy (Electricity) Act in 2000 and the Renewable Energy Target Scheme in 2009. As with any new technology, wind turbines are not without controversy. Those who oppose the development of wind farms contend that wind turbines can adversely impact the health of individuals living in close proximity. Do wind turbines impact on health? Concerns regarding the adverse health impacts of wind turbines focus on infrasound noise, electromagnetic interference, shadow flicker and blade glint produced

unknown authors

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "turbine performance ampere-hour-a" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Turbine nozzle positioning system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A nozzle guide vane assembly having a preestablished rate of thermal expansion is positioned in a gas turbine engine and being attached to conventional metallic components. The nozzle guide vane assembly includes an outer shroud having a mounting leg with an opening defined therein, a tip shoe ring having a mounting member with an opening defined therein, a nozzle support ring having a plurality of holes therein and a pin positioned in the corresponding opening in the outer shroud, opening in the tip shoe ring and the hole in the nozzle support ring. A rolling joint is provided between metallic components of the gas turbine engine and the nozzle guide vane assembly. The nozzle guide vane assembly is positioned radially about a central axis of the gas turbine engine and axially aligned with a combustor of the gas turbine engine.

Norton, Paul F. (San Diego, CA); Shaffer, James E. (Maitland, FL)

1996-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

282

Turbine nozzle positioning system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A nozzle guide vane assembly having a preestablished rate of thermal expansion is positioned in a gas turbine engine and being attached to conventional metallic components. The nozzle guide vane assembly includes an outer shroud having a mounting leg with an opening defined therein, a tip shoe ring having a mounting member with an opening defined therein, a nozzle support ring having a plurality of holes therein and a pin positioned in the corresponding opening in the outer shroud, opening in the tip shoe ring and the hole in the nozzle support ring. A rolling joint is provided between metallic components of the gas turbine engine and the nozzle guide vane assembly. The nozzle guide vane assembly is positioned radially about a central axis of the gas turbine engine and axially aligned with a combustor of the gas turbine engine. 9 figs.

Norton, P.F.; Shaffer, J.E.

1996-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

283

Gas turbine noise control  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The use of gas turbine powered generators and pumping stations are likely to increase over the next two decades. Alternative fuel systems utilizing fluidized coal beds are likely in the near future

Louis A. Challis and Associates Pty. Ltd.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Advanced Turbine Systems program  

SciTech Connect

Allison draws the following preliminary conclusions from this preliminary design effort: (1) All cycles investigated require a high temperature turbine capability to be developed under ATS. (2) The HAT and intercooled chemical recuperation cycles compete in only a narrow sector of the industrial engine market. This is the result of the complexity and water usage of the HAT cycle and the limitation of the chemical recuperation cycle to applications where natural gas is readily available. (3) From a cycle point of view, the ICR and chemical recuperation cycles are similar. Both optimize at fairly low compressor pressure ratios ({approximately}15) because both want high temperature in the exhaust to optimize the recuperation process. Excess steam production with the chemical recuperation process makes it somewhat doubtful that the two recuperation processes are interchangeable from a hardware point of view. Allison intends to perform a global optimization on this cycle during Phase 2 of ATS. (4). There appears to be no substitute for the simple cycle with steam generation in the cogen-steam market since steam is, by definition, a valuable product of the cycle.

Wilkes, C.; Mukavetz, D.W.; Knickerbocker, T.K.; Ali, S.A.

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Fish schooling as a basis for vertical axis wind turbine farm design  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Most wind farms consist of horizontal axis wind turbines (HAWTs) due to the high power coefficient (mechanical power output divided by the power of the free-stream air through the turbine cross-sectional area) of an isolated turbine. However when in close proximity to neighbouring turbines, HAWTs suffer from a reduced power coefficient. In contrast, previous research on vertical axis wind turbines (VAWTs) suggests that closely-spaced VAWTs may experience only small decreases (or even increases) in an individual turbine's power coefficient when placed in close proximity to neighbours, thus yielding much higher power outputs for a given area of land. A potential flow model of inter-VAWT interactions is developed to investigate the effect of changes in VAWT spatial arrangement on the array performance coefficient, which compares the expected average power coefficient of turbines in an array to a spatially-isolated turbine. A geometric arrangement based on the configuration of shed vortices in the wake of schooli...

Whittlesey, Robert W; Dabiri, John O

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

Real-time wind turbine emulator suitable for power quality and dynamic control studies, MASc Thesis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract — Wind turbines are increasingly becoming significant components of power systems. To evaluate competing wind energy conversion technologies, a real-time Wind Turbine Emulator, which emulates the dynamic torque produced by an actual turbine has been developed. This is necessary since the real world performance of a wind turbine, subjected to variable wind conditions is more difficult to evaluate than a standard turbine generator system operating in near steady state. This emulator is capable of reproducing both the static and dynamic torque of an actual wind turbine. It models the torque oscillations caused by wind shear, tower shadow, and the obvious pulsations caused by variable wind speed. Also included are the dynamic effects of a large turbine inertia. This emulator will allow testing without the costly construction of the actual turbine blades and tower to determine the strengths and weaknesses of competing energy conversion and control technologies.

Dale S. L. Dolan; Student Member; P. W. Lehn; Member Ieee

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

ADVANCED TURBINE SYSTEM FEDERAL ASSISTANCE PROGRAM  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Rolls-Royce Corporation has completed a cooperative agreement under Department of Energy (DOE) contract DE-FC21-96MC33066 in support of the Advanced Turbine Systems (ATS) program to stimulate industrial power generation markets. This DOE contract was performed during the period of October 1995 to December 2002. This final technical report, which is a program deliverable, describes all associated results obtained during Phases 3A and 3B of the contract. Rolls-Royce Corporation (formerly Allison Engine Company) initially focused on the design and development of a 10-megawatt (MW) high-efficiency industrial gas turbine engine/package concept (termed the 701-K) to meet the specific goals of the ATS program, which included single digit NOx emissions, increased plant efficiency, fuel flexibility, and reduced cost of power (i.e., $/kW). While a detailed design effort and associated component development were successfully accomplished for the 701-K engine, capable of achieving the stated ATS program goals, in 1999 Rolls-Royce changed its focus to developing advanced component technologies for product insertion that would modernize the current fleet of 501-K and 601-K industrial gas turbines. This effort would also help to establish commercial venues for suppliers and designers and assist in involving future advanced technologies in the field of gas turbine engine development. This strategy change was partly driven by the market requirements that suggested a low demand for a 10-MW aeroderivative industrial gas turbine, a change in corporate strategy for aeroderivative gas turbine engine development initiatives, and a consensus that a better return on investment (ROI) could be achieved under the ATS contract by focusing on product improvements and technology insertion for the existing Rolls-Royce small engine industrial gas turbine fleet.

Frank Macri

2003-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Hydrogen Turbines | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Hydrogen Turbines Hydrogen Turbines Hydrogen Turbines Hydrogen Turbines The Turbines of Tomorrow Combustion (gas) turbines are key components of advanced systems designed for new electric power plants in the United States. With gas turbines, power plants will supply clean, increasingly fuel-efficient, and relatively low-cost energy. Typically, a natural gas-fired combustion turbine-generator operating in a "simple cycle" converts between 25 and 35 percent of the natural gas heating value to useable electricity. Today, most new smaller power plants also install a recuperator to capture waste heat from the turbine's exhaust to preheat combustion air and boost efficiencies. In most of the new larger plants, a "heat recovery steam generator" is installed to recover waste

289

Effects of blade configurations on flow distribution and power output of a Zephyr vertical axis wind turbine  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Numerical simulations with FLUENT software were conducted to investigate the fluid flow through a novel vertical axis wind turbine (VAWT). Simulation of flow through the turbine rotor was performed with the aim of predicting the performance characteristics ... Keywords: blade configuration, power output, rotor, simulation, vertical axis wind turbine

J. O. Ajedegba; G. F. Naterer; M. A. Rosen; E. Tsang

2008-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

High temperature nuclear gas turbine  

SciTech Connect

Significance of gas turbine cycle, process of the development of gas turbines, cycle and efficiency of high-temperature gas turbines, history of gas turbine plants and application of nuclear gas turbines are described. The gas turbines are directly operated by the heat from nuclear plants. The gas turbines are classified into two types, namely open cycle and closed cycle types from the point of thermal cycle, and into two types of internal combustion and external combustion from the point of heating method. The hightemperature gas turbines are tbe type of internal combustion closed cycle. Principle of the gas turbines of closed cycle and open cycle types is based on Brayton, Sirling, and Ericsson cycles. Etficiency of the turbines is decided only by pressure ratio, and is independent of gas temperature. An example of the turbine cycle for the nuclear plant Gestacht II is explained. The thermal efficiency of that plant attains 37%. Over the gas temperature of about 750 deg C, the thermal efficiency of the gas turbine cycle is better than that of steam turbine cycle. As the nuclear fuel, coated particle fuel is used, and this can attain higher temperature of core outlet gas. Direct coupling of the nuclear power plants and the high temperature gas turbines has possibility of the higher thermal efficiency. (JA)

Kurosawa, A.

1973-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Radial-Radial Single Rotor Turbine  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Radial-Radial Single Rotor Turbine Radial-Radial Single Rotor Turbine A rotor for use in turbine applications. June 26, 2013 Radial-Radial Single Rotor Turbine A rotor for use in...

292

Advanced turbine systems: Studies and conceptual design  

SciTech Connect

The ABB selection for the Advanced Turbine System (ATS) includes advanced developments especially in the hot gas path of the combustion turbine and new state-of-the-art units such as the steam turbine and the HRSG. The increase in efficiency by more than 10% multiplicative compared to current designs will be based on: (1) Turbine Inlet Temperature Increase; (2) New Cooling Techniques for Stationary and Rotating Parts; and New Materials. Present, projected component improvements that will be introduced with the above mentioned issues will yield improved CCSC turbine performance, which will drive the ATS selected gas-fired reference CC power plant to 6 % LHV or better. The decrease in emission levels requires a careful optimization of the cycle design, where cooling air consumption has to be minimized. All interfaces of the individual systems in the complete CC Plant need careful checks, especially to avoid unnecessary margins in the individual designs. This study is an important step pointing out the feasibility of the ATS program with realistic goals set by DOE, which, however, will present challenges for Phase II time schedule of 18 months. With the approach outlined in this study and close cooperation with DOE, ATS program success can be achieved to deliver low emissions and low cost of electricity by the year 2002. The ABB conceptual design and step approach will lead to early component demonstration which will help accelerate the overall program objectives.

van der Linden, S.; Gnaedig, G.; Kreitmeier, F.

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Industrial Advanced Turbine Systems Program overview  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

DOE`s ATS Program will lead to the development of an optimized, energy efficient, and environmentally friendly gas turbine power systems in the 3 to 20 MW class. Market studies were conducted for application of ATS to the dispersed/distributed electric power generation market. The technology studies have led to the design of a gas-fired, recuperated, industrial size gas turbine. The Ceramic Stationary Gas Turbine program continues. In the High Performance Steam Systems program, a 100 hour development test to prove the advanced 1500 F, 1500 psig system has been successfully completed. A market transformation will take place: the customer will be offered a choice of energy conversion technologies to meet heat and power generation needs into the next century.

Esbeck, D.W.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

294

Improved Gas Turbines for LBTU Syngas Fuel Operation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Gas turbine engines running on syngas can take advantage of that fuel's high mass flow per BTU. Optimizing performance while keeping all operating parameters within acceptable limits was the result of a G.E. project.

1997-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

295

Turbine Surface Degradation with Service and Its Effects on Performanc...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

(3-D) Tom Shih (2-D) Iowa State University IOWA STATE UNIVERSITY Aerospace Engineering Turbine Surface Degradation with Service and Its Effects on Performance - 2-D3-D CFD...

296

Turbine inner shroud and turbine assembly containing such inner shroud  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A turbine inner shroud and a turbine assembly. The turbine assembly includes a turbine stator having a longitudinal axis and having an outer shroud block with opposing and longitudinally outward facing first and second sides having open slots. A ceramic inner shroud has longitudinally inward facing hook portions which can longitudinally and radially surround a portion of the sides of the outer shroud block. In one attachment, the hook portions are engageable with, and are positioned within, the open slots.

Bagepalli, Bharat Sampathkumaran (Niskayuna, NY); Corman, Gregory Scot (Ballston Lake, NY); Dean, Anthony John (Scotia, NY); DiMascio, Paul Stephen (Clifton Park, NY); Mirdamadi, Massoud (Niskayuna, NY)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

DOE Research Grant Leads to Gas Turbine Manufacturing Improvements |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Research Grant Leads to Gas Turbine Manufacturing Improvements Research Grant Leads to Gas Turbine Manufacturing Improvements DOE Research Grant Leads to Gas Turbine Manufacturing Improvements August 16, 2011 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - Research sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Fossil Energy (FE) has led to a new licensing agreement that will improve the performance of state-of-the-art gas turbines, resulting in cleaner, more reliable and affordable energy. The collaborative technology license agreement, penned by Mikro Systems Inc. and Siemens Energy Inc., reflects growth in U.S.-based manufacturing know-how and leadership in cutting-edge technology development and rapid implementation. Gas turbines, which are used to produce electricity for industrial or central power generation applications, consist sequentially of compressor,

298

A Portable Expert System for Gas Turbine Maintenance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Combustion turbines for electric power generation and industrial applications have steadily increased in size, efficiency and prominence. The newest class of gas turbine-generators coming into service will deliver 150 megawatts, with turbine inlet temperatures of 2300° F. To sustain high levels of performance and reliability of this equipment, diagnostics and maintenance planning have also become increasingly important. Within the electric power industry, for example, as the overall fleet of gas turbines has aged, their annual service factor has increased to carry more of the peak load burden as reserve margins shrink. However, peaking duty requires frequent cycling with large thermal stresses that tend to shorten the life of hot section components. To assist the industry in meeting these needs, EPRI has developed The SA?VANT™ System. This unique multi-faceted portable unit will apply a broad range of expert systems in the workplace for power plant maintenance, including turbomachinery of all types, but especially for gas turbines.

Quentin, G. H.

1989-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Siting guidelines for utility application of wind turbines. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Utility-oriented guidelines are described for identifying viable sites for wind turbines. Topics and procedures are also discussed that are important in carrying out a wind turbine siting program. These topics include: a description of the Department of Energy wind resource atlases; procedures for predicting wind turbine performance at potential sites; methods for analyzing wind turbine economics; procedures for estimating installation and maintenance costs; methods for anlayzing the distribution of wind resources over an area; and instrumentation for documenting wind behavior at potential sites. The procedure described is applicable to small and large utilities. Although the procedure was developed as a site-selection tool, it can also be used by a utility who wishes to estimate the potential for wind turbine penetration into its future generation mix.

Pennell, W.T.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Experimental Study of Main Gas Ingestion and Purge Gas Egress Flow in Model Gas Turbine Stages.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Efficient performance of gas turbines depends, among several parameters, on the mainstream gas entry temperature. At the same time, transport of this high temperature gas… (more)

Balasubramanian, Jagdish Harihara

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "turbine performance ampere-hour-a" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Simulations of Multi-Phase Particle Deposition on Film-Cooled Turbine Sections.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The demand for clean, efficient energy has driven the motivation for improving the performance standards for gas turbines. Increasing the combustion temperature is one way… (more)

Lawson, Seth

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Guide to Optimized Nuclear Low-Pressure Turbine Rotor Inspection  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the past few years, the nuclear utility industry has reduced down-time for refueling outages to trim costs and improve overall unit performance. Consequently, this has also reduced the time available for other routine outage work and has often placed turbine maintenance and inspection tasks on the critical path. This report provides a review of the strategies several nuclear utilities have employed at their plants to reduce the time required to perform low-pressure turbine inspections. Included is a r...

1997-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

303

Advanced Turbine Technology (ATTAP) Applications Project. 1992 Annual report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

ATTAP activities during the past year included reference powertrain design (RPD) updates, test-bed engine design and development, ceramic component design, materials and component characterization, ceramic component development and fabrication, ceramic component rig testing, and test-bed engine fabrication and testing. RPD revisions included updating the baseline vehicle as well as the turbine RPD. Comparison of major performance parameters shows that the turbine engine installation exceeds critical fuel economy, emissions, and performance goals, and meets overall ATTAP objectives.

NONE

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Biphase Turbine Tests on Process Fluids  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Biphase turbine is a device for effectively producing shaft power from two-phase (liquid and gas) pressure let-downs and for separating the resulting phases. No other device is currently available for simultaneously performing these tasks. The performance of the Biphase turbine and its advantages over single-phase, energy-conversion devices has been demonstrated with subscale and commercial scale steam/water (geothermal wellhead) operations. Its development and application to two-phase process streams is now being pursued and is the subject of this paper. The two-phase working fluid may be a single component, two-phase stream, as in a steam/ water combination, or it may be a multicomponent, two-phase process stream which may also include foam and/or entrained solids. Performance data from initial tests using a subscale Biphase turbine on a two-phase, expanding, gas-cleaning application (Selexol/C02 mixture) are presented. Turbine designs for tests scheduled for gas/oil wellhead applications are described.

Helgeson, N. L.; Maddox, J. P.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Gas Turbine Emissions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Historically, preliminary design information regarding gas turbine emissions has been unreliable, particularly for facilities using steam injection and other forms of Best Available Control Technology (BACT). This was probably attributed to the lack of regulatory interest in the 'real world' test results coupled with the difficulties of gathering analogous bench test data for systems employing gas turbines with Heat Recovery Steam Generators (HRSG) and steam injection. It appears that the agencies are getting a better grasp of emissions, but there are still problem areas, particularly CO and unburned hydrocarbon emissions. The lag in data has resulted in the imposition of a CO reactor as BACT for the gas turbine. With the renewed concern about the environment, air permits will have a high profile with offsets being the next fix beyond BACT. 'The manner in which technology developers and electric utilities will share emissions reductions in the coming era of pollution allowance trading is becoming prominent on the agendas of strategic planners at technology vendors and the electric power industry....' (1) Therefore, it becomes increasingly important that the proponents of gas turbine-based facilities establish more reliable data on their proposed emissions. This paper addresses the gas turbine emissions experiences of eight cogeneration plants utilizing: 1) steam injection for both NOx control and power augmentation, 2) CO reactors, 3) selective catalytic reduction units. It also looks at possible regulatory actions.

Frederick, J. D.

1990-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Gas generator and turbine unit  

SciTech Connect

A gas turbine power unit is disclosed in which the arrangement and configuration of parts is such as to save space and weight in order to provide a compact and self-contained assembly. An air-intake casing supports the upstream end of a gas generator, the down-stream end of which is integral with a power turbine. The stator casing of the turbine is connected to a cone thermally insulated and completely inserted into any exhaust casing having a vertical outlet, wherein the turbine exhaust is conveyed into the exhaust casing by an annular diffusing cone. The turbine casing is supported on four legs. In addition, the turbine rotor and thus the turbine shaft are overhangingly supported by an independent structure, the weight of which bears on the machine base outside the exhaust casing and away of the power turbine space.

Vinciguerra, C.

1984-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

307

Ceramics for ATS industrial turbines  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

US DOE and most US manufacturers of stationary gas turbines are participating in a major national effort to develop advanced turbine systems (ATS). The ATS program will achieve ultrahigh efficiencies, environmental superiority, and cost competitiveness compared with current combustion turbine systems. A major factor in the improved efficiencies of simple cycle ATS gas turbines will be higher operating efficiencies than curren engines. These temperatures strain the limits of metallic alloy and flow-path cooling technologies. Ceramics materials offer a potential alterative to cooled turbine alloys for ATS turbines due to higher melting points than metallics. This paper evaluates ceramics technology and plant economic issues for ATS industrial turbine systems. A program with the objective of demonstrating first-stage ceramic vanes in a commerical industrial turbine is also described.

Wenglarz, R.; Ali, S. [Allison Engine Co., Indianapolis, IN (United States); Layne, A. [USDOE Morgantown Energy Technology Center, WV (United States)

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

NETL: Turbine Projects - Emissions Reduction  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Emissions Reduction Turbine Projects Emissions Reduction Pre-Mixer Design for High Hydrogen Fuels DataFact Sheets Low-NOX Emissions in a Fuel Flexible Gas Turbine Combustor Design...

309

Heat pipe turbine vane cooling  

SciTech Connect

The applicability of using heat pipe principles to cool gas turbine vanes is addressed in this beginning program. This innovative concept involves fitting out the vane interior as a heat pipe and extending the vane into an adjacent heat sink, thus transferring the vane incident heat transfer through the heat pipe to heat sink. This design provides an extremely high heat transfer rate and a uniform temperature along the vane due to the internal change of phase of the heat pipe working fluid. Furthermore, this technology can also eliminate hot spots at the vane leading and trailing edges and increase the vane life by preventing thermal fatigue cracking. There is also the possibility of requiring no bleed air from the compressor, and therefore eliminating engine performance losses resulting from the diversion of compressor discharge air. Significant improvement in gas turbine performance can be achieved by using heat pipe technology in place of conventional air cooled vanes. A detailed numerical analysis of a heat pipe vane will be made and an experimental model will be designed in the first year of this new program.

Langston, L.; Faghri, A. [Connecticut Univ., Storrs, CT (United States). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

310

Fish-Friendly Hydropower Turbine Development & Deployment: Alden Turbine Preliminary Engineering and Model Testing  

SciTech Connect

The Alden turbine was developed through the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) former Advanced Hydro Turbine Systems Program (1994-2006) and, more recently, through the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) and the DOE's Wind & Water Power Program. The primary goal of the engineering study described here was to provide a commercially competitive turbine design that would yield fish passage survival rates comparable to or better than the survival rates of bypassing or spilling flow. Although the turbine design was performed for site conditions corresponding to 92 ft (28 m) net head and a discharge of 1500 cfs (42.5 cms), the design can be modified for additional sites with differing operating conditions. During the turbine development, design modifications were identified for the spiral case, distributor (stay vanes and wicket gates), runner, and draft tube to improve turbine performance while maintaining features for high fish passage survival. Computational results for pressure change rates and shear within the runner passage were similar in the original and final turbine geometries, while predicted minimum pressures were higher for the final turbine. The final turbine geometry and resulting flow environments are expected to further enhance the fish passage characteristics of the turbine. Computational results for the final design were shown to improve turbine efficiencies by over 6% at the selected operating condition when compared to the original concept. Prior to the release of the hydraulic components for model fabrication, finite element analysis calculations were conducted for the stay vanes, wicket gates, and runner to verify that structural design criteria for stress and deflections were met. A physical model of the turbine was manufactured and tested with data collected for power and efficiency, cavitation limits, runaway speed, axial and radial thrust, pressure pulsations, and wicket gate torque. All parameters were observed to fall within ranges expected for conventional radial flow machines. Based on these measurements, the expected efficiency peak for prototype application is 93.64%. These data were used in the final sizing of the supporting mechanical and balance of plant equipment. The preliminary equipment cost for the design specification is $1450/kW with a total supply schedule of 28 months. This equipment supply includes turbine, generator, unit controls, limited balance of plant equipment, field installation, and commissioning. Based on the selected head and flow design conditions, fish passage survival through the final turbine is estimated to be approximately 98% for 7.9-inch (200-mm) fish, and the predicted survival reaches 100% for fish 3.9 inches (100 mm) and less in length. Note that fish up to 7.9- inches (200 mm) in length make up more than 90% of fish entrained at hydro projects in the United States. Completion of these efforts provides a mechanical and electrical design that can be readily adapted to site-specific conditions with additional engineering development comparable to costs associated with conventional turbine designs.

None

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Fuzzy control of steam turbines  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Keywords: PID control, comparison of PID and fuzzy control, fuzzy logic control, robustness, speed control, steam turbine control

N. Kiupel; P. M. Frank; O. Bux

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Cavitation Erosion of Francis Turbines  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

About this Abstract. Meeting, Materials Science & Technology 2013. Symposium, Advances in Hydroelectric Turbine Manufacturing and Repair. Presentation ...

313

ADVANCED TURBINE SYSTEMS PROGRAM  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The market for power generation equipment is undergoing a tremendous transformation. The traditional electric utility industry is restructuring, promising new opportunities and challenges for all facilities to meet their demands for electric and thermal energy. Now more than ever, facilities have a host of options to choose from, including new distributed generation (DG) technologies that are entering the market as well as existing DG options that are improving in cost and performance. The market is beginning to recognize that some of these users have needs beyond traditional grid-based power. Together, these changes are motivating commercial and industrial facilities to re-evaluate their current mix of energy services. One of the emerging generating options is a new breed of advanced fuel cells. While there are a variety of fuel cell technologies being developed, the solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC) and molten carbonate fuel cells (MCFC) are especially promising, with their electric efficiency expected around 50-60 percent and their ability to generate either hot water or high quality steam. In addition, they both have the attractive characteristics of all fuel cells--relatively small siting footprint, rapid response to changing loads, very low emissions, quiet operation, and an inherently modular design lending itself to capacity expansion at predictable unit cost with reasonably short lead times. The objectives of this project are to:(1) Estimate the market potential for high efficiency fuel cell hybrids in the U.S.;(2) Segment market size by commercial, industrial, and other key markets;(3) Identify and evaluate potential early adopters; and(4) Develop results that will help prioritize and target future R&D investments. The study focuses on high efficiency MCFC- and SOFC-based hybrids and competing systems such as gas turbines, reciprocating engines, fuel cells and traditional grid service. Specific regions in the country have been identified where these technologies and the corresponding early adopters are likely to be located.

Sy Ali

2002-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Gas Turbine Manufacturers Perspective  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Viability and Experience of IGCC From a Viability and Experience of IGCC From a Gas Turbine Manufacturers Perspective ASME - IGCC ASME - IGCC Turbo Turbo Expo Expo June 2001 June 2001 GE Power Systems g Klaus Brun, Ph.D. - Manager Process Power Plant Product & Market Development Robert M. Jones - Project Development Manager Process Power Plants Power Systems Power Systems General Electric Company General Electric Company ABSTRACT GE Power Systems g Economic Viability and Experience of IGCC From a Gas Turbine Manufacturers Perspective High natural gas fuel gas prices combined with new technology developments have made IGCC a competitive option when compared to conventional combined cycle or coal steam turbine cycles. Although the initial investment costs for an IGCC plant are still comparatively high, the low

315

NETL: Turbines - UTSR Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

65 Hafnia-based Nanostructured Thermal Barrier Coatings for Advanced Hydrogen Turbine Technology University of Texas -- El Paso 65 Hafnia-based Nanostructured Thermal Barrier Coatings for Advanced Hydrogen Turbine Technology University of Texas -- El Paso Chintalapalle Ramana Project Dates: 9/30/2009 - 9/30/2011 Area of Research: Materials Federal Project Manager: Briggs White Project Objective: This project is focused on developing novel coatings for high-H2 fired gas turbine components such that high efficiencies and long lifetimes may be acheived in Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) powerplants. Nanostructured Hafnia-based coatings will be develped for thermal barrier coatings (TBCs). A fundamental understanding of TBCs will be aquired and a knowledge database of next generation TBC materials with high-temperature tolerance, durability, and reliability will be generated.

316

Wind turbine spoiler  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An aerodynamic spoiler system for a vertical axis wind turbine includes spoilers on the blades initially stored near the rotor axis to minimize drag. A solenoid latch adjacent the central support tower releases the spoilers and centrifugal force causes the spoilers to move up the turbine blades away from the rotor axis, thereby producing a braking effect and actual slowing of the associated wind turbine, if desired. The spoiler system can also be used as an infinitely variable power control by regulated movement of the spoilers on the blades over the range between the undeployed and fully deployed positions. This is done by the use of a suitable powered reel and cable located at the rotor tower to move the spoilers.

Sullivan, William N. (Albuquerque, NM)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Turbine nozzle attachment system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A nozzle guide vane assembly having a preestablished rate of thermal expansion is positioned in a gas turbine engine and being attached to conventional metallic components. The nozzle guide vane assembly includes a pair of legs extending radially outwardly from an outer shroud and a pair of mounting legs extending radially inwardly from an inner shroud. Each of the pair of legs and mounting legs have a pair of holes therein. A plurality of members attached to the gas turbine engine have a plurality of bores therein which axially align with corresponding ones of the pair of holes in the legs. A plurality of pins are positioned within the corresponding holes and bores radially positioning the nozzle guide vane assembly about a central axis of the gas turbine engine.

Norton, Paul F. (San Diego, CA); Shaffer, James E. (Maitland, FL)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Gas turbine sealing apparatus  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A gas turbine includes forward and aft rows of rotatable blades, a row of stationary vanes between the forward and aft rows of rotatable blades, an annular intermediate disc, and a seal housing apparatus. The forward and aft rows of rotatable blades are coupled to respective first and second portions of a disc/rotor assembly. The annular intermediate disc is coupled to the disc/rotor assembly so as to be rotatable with the disc/rotor assembly during operation of the gas turbine. The annular intermediate disc includes a forward side coupled to the first portion of the disc/rotor assembly and an aft side coupled to the second portion of the disc/rotor assembly. The seal housing apparatus is coupled to the annular intermediate disc so as to be rotatable with the annular intermediate disc and the disc/rotor assembly during operation of the gas turbine.

Wiebe, David J; Wessell, Brian J; Ebert, Todd; Beeck, Alexander; Liang, George; Marussich, Walter H

2013-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

319

Turbine nozzle attachment system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A nozzle guide vane assembly having a preestablished rate of thermal expansion is positioned in a gas turbine engine and is attached to conventional metallic components. The nozzle guide vane assembly includes a pair of legs extending radially outwardly from an outer shroud and a pair of mounting legs extending radially inwardly from an inner shroud. Each of the pair of legs and mounting legs have a pair of holes therein. A plurality of members attached to the gas turbine engine have a plurality of bores therein which axially align with corresponding ones of the pair of holes in the legs. A plurality of pins are positioned within the corresponding holes and bores radially positioning the nozzle guide vane assembly about a central axis of the gas turbine engine. 3 figs.

Norton, P.F.; Shaffer, J.E.

1995-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

320

Applications: Wind turbine structural health  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of turbine system management. The data obtained from this multi-scale sensing capability will be fullyCapability Applications: Wind turbine structural health monitoring Individual turbine maintenance for active control in the field Limit damage propagation and maintenance costs Maximize return

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "turbine performance ampere-hour-a" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Guidelines for Reducing the Time and Cost of Turbine-Generator Maintenance Overhauls and Inspections 2010--Volume 4: Turbine Generat or Component Procurement Specifications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Up to 70% of the outages planned for conventional steam power plants involve work on the turbine. The challenge for the engineer is to improve performance and extend reliability, while eliminating unproductive activities from the maintenance outage schedule. This report provides general guidelines for planning and performing maintenance on steam turbines during outages.

2010-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

322

Guidelines for Reducing the Time and Cost of Turbine-Generator Maintenance Overhauls and Inspections-2006; Volume 4: Turbine-Generat or Component Procurement Specifications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Up to 70% of the outages planned for conventional steam power plants involve work on the turbine. The challenge for the engineer is to improve performance and extend reliability, while eliminating unproductive activities from the maintenance outage schedule. This report provides general guidelines for planning and performing maintenance on steam turbines during outages.

2007-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

323

ANN Models for Steam Turbine Power Output Toward Condenser Circulating Water Flux  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Aimed the costliness and the complex process of performance test for steam turbine power output toward circulating water flux and in view of the non—linear advantage about neural network, it brings forward predicting the performance using artificial ... Keywords: Artificial neural network, steam turbine power output, performance prediction

Jia Ruixuan; Xu Hong

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

Velocity pump reaction turbine  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An expanding hydraulic/two-phase velocity pump reaction turbine including a dual concentric rotor configuration with an inter-rotor annular flow channel in which the inner rotor is mechanically driven by the outer rotor. In another embodiment, the inner rotor is immobilized and provided with gas recovery ports on its outer surface by means of which gas in solution may be recovered. This velocity pump reaction turbine configuration is capable of potential energy conversion efficiencies of up to 70%, and is particularly suited for geothermal applications.

House, Palmer A. (Walnut Creek, CA)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Velocity pump reaction turbine  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An expanding hydraulic/two-phase velocity pump reaction turbine including a dual concentric rotor configuration with an inter-rotor annular flow channel in which the inner rotor is mechanically driven by the outer rotor. In another embodiment, the inner rotor is immobilized and provided with gas recovery ports on its outer surface by means of which gas in solution may be recovered. This velocity pump reaction turbine configuration is capable of potential energy conversion efficiencies of up to 70%, and is particularly suited for geothermal applications.

House, Palmer A. (Walnut Creek, CA)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Vertical axis wind turbines  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A vertical axis wind turbine is described. The wind turbine can include a top ring, a middle ring and a lower ring, wherein a plurality of vertical airfoils are disposed between the rings. For example, three vertical airfoils can be attached between the upper ring and the middle ring. In addition, three more vertical airfoils can be attached between the lower ring and the middle ring. When wind contacts the vertically arranged airfoils the rings begin to spin. By connecting the rings to a center pole which spins an alternator, electricity can be generated from wind.

Krivcov, Vladimir (Miass, RU); Krivospitski, Vladimir (Miass, RU); Maksimov, Vasili (Miass, RU); Halstead, Richard (Rohnert Park, CA); Grahov, Jurij (Miass, RU)

2011-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

327

Multiple piece turbine airfoil  

SciTech Connect

A turbine airfoil, such as a rotor blade or a stator vane, for a gas turbine engine, the airfoil formed as a shell and spar construction with a plurality of dog bone struts each mounted within openings formed within the shell and spar to allow for relative motion between the spar and shell in the airfoil chordwise direction while also forming a seal between adjacent cooling channels. The struts provide the seal as well as prevent bulging of the shell from the spar due to the cooling air pressure.

Kimmel, Keith D (Jupiter, FL); Wilson, Jr., Jack W. (Palm Beach Gardens, FL)

2010-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

328

Aviation turbine fuels, 1985  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Samples of this report are typical 1985 production and were analyzed in the laboratories of 17 manufactures of aviation turbine (jet) fuels. The data were submitted for study, calculation, and compilation under a cooperative agreement between the National Institute for Petroleum and Energy Research (NIPER), Bartlesville, Oklahoma, the American Petroleum Institute (API), and the United States Department of Energy (DOE), Bartlesville Project Office. results for certain properties of 88 samples of aviation turbine fuels are included in the report for military grades JP-4 and JP-5, and commercial type Jet A. Previous aviation fuel survey reports are listed.

Dickson, C.L.; Woodward, P.W.

1986-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Experimental and analytical research on the aerodynamics of wind turbines. Mid-term technical report, June 1--December 31, 1975  

SciTech Connect

The successful development of reliable, cost competitive horizontal axis, propeller-type wind energy conversion systems (WECS) is strongly dependent on the availability of advanced technology for each of the system components. Past experience and current studies of this type of wind energy conversion systems have shown that the wind turbine subsystem most significantly effects the system's cost effectiveness and performance capability. Thus adequate technology bases are essential for all elements of the wind turbine design. Information is presented concerning aerodynamic design and performance technology, wind turbine parametric performance study, selection of model wind turbine configurations, and structural design of wind turbine models.

Rohrbach, C.

1976-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Experimental and analytical research on the aerodynamics of wind turbines. Mid-term technical report, June 1--December 31, 1975  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The successful development of reliable, cost competitive horizontal axis, propeller-type wind energy conversion systems (WECS) is strongly dependent on the availability of advanced technology for each of the system components. Past experience and current studies of this type of wind energy conversion systems have shown that the wind turbine subsystem most significantly effects the system's cost effectiveness and performance capability. Thus adequate technology bases are essential for all elements of the wind turbine design. Information is presented concerning aerodynamic design and performance technology, wind turbine parametric performance study, selection of model wind turbine configurations, and structural design of wind turbine models.

Rohrbach, C.

1976-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

Combined gas turbine and steam turbine power station  

SciTech Connect

In order to operate a gas turbine and steam turbine plant with a high temperature at the inlet to the gas turbine plant, the parts located in the hot-gas stream of the gas turbine being steam-cooled, and the cooling steam, thereby raised to a higher temperature, being fed to the steam turbine for further expansion, it is proposed that the waste heat from the gas turbine be led through a two-pressure waste heat boiler, and that the steam, generated in this boiler, be slightly superheated in a cooling-steam superheater, and fed to the hollow inlet vanes and to the rotor blades, which are likewise hollow, the steam, strongly superheated during this cooling process, then being admixed to the steam coming from the intermediate superheater, and being fed to the low-pressure section of the steam turbine.

Mukherjee, D.

1984-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

332

Understanding Trends in Wind Turbine Prices Over the Past Decade  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

that the average turbine’s rotor swept area has increasedthe average turbine hub height and rotor diameter also6. Average Turbine Capacity, Hub Height, and Rotor Diameter

Bolinger, Mark

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Turbine Inflow Characterization at the National Wind Technology Center  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Utility-scale wind turbines operate in dynamic flows that can vary significantly over timescales from less than a second to several years. To better understand the inflow to utility-scale turbines, two inflow towers were installed and commissioned at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's (NREL) National Wind Technology Center near Boulder, Colorado, in 2011. These towers are 135 m tall and instrumented with a combination of sonic anemometers, cup anemometers, wind vanes, and temperature measurements to characterize the inflow wind speed and direction, turbulence, stability and thermal stratification to two utility-scale turbines. Herein, we present variations in mean and turbulent wind parameters with height, atmospheric stability, and as a function of wind direction that could be important for turbine operation as well as persistence of turbine wakes. Wind speed, turbulence intensity, and dissipation are all factors that affect turbine performance. Our results show that these all vary with height across the rotor disk, demonstrating the importance of measuring atmospheric conditions that influence wind turbine performance at multiple heights in the rotor disk, rather than relying on extrapolation from lower levels.

Clifton, A.; Schreck, S.; Scott, G.; Kelley, N.; Lundquist, J. K.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Turbine Inflow Characterization at the National Wind Technology Center: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Utility-scale wind turbines operate in dynamic flows that can vary significantly over timescales from less than a second to several years. To better understand the inflow to utility-scale turbines, two inflow towers were installed and commissioned at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's (NREL) National Wind Technology Center near Boulder, Colorado, in 2011. These towers are 135 m tall and instrumented with a combination of sonic anemometers, cup anemometers, wind vanes, and temperature measurements to characterize the inflow wind speed and direction, turbulence, stability and thermal stratification to two utility-scale turbines. Herein, we present variations in mean and turbulent wind parameters with height, atmospheric stability, and as a function of wind direction that could be important for turbine operation as well as persistence of turbine wakes. Wind speed, turbulence intensity, and dissipation are all factors that affect turbine performance. Our results shown that these all vary with height across the rotor disk, demonstrating the importance of measuring atmospheric conditions that influence wind turbine performance at multiple heights in the rotor disk, rather than relying on extrapolation from lower levels.

Clifton, A.; Schreck, S.; Scott, G.; Kelley, N.; Lundquist, J.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Wind Turbine Basics | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Wind Turbine Basics Wind Turbine Basics Wind Turbine Basics July 30, 2013 - 2:58pm Addthis Energy 101: Wind Turbines Basics This video explains the basics of how wind turbines operate to produce clean power from an abundant, renewable resource-the wind. Text Version Wind turbine assembly Although all wind turbines operate on similar principles, several varieties are in use today. These include horizontal axis turbines and vertical axis turbines. Horizontal Axis Turbines Horizontal axis turbines are the most common turbine configuration used today. They consist of a tall tower, atop which sits a fan-like rotor that faces into or away from the wind, a generator, a controller, and other components. Most horizontal axis turbines built today are two- or three-bladed. Horizontal axis turbines sit high atop towers to take advantage of the

336

Wind Turbine Basics | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Turbine Basics Turbine Basics Wind Turbine Basics July 30, 2013 - 2:58pm Addthis Energy 101: Wind Turbines Basics This video explains the basics of how wind turbines operate to produce clean power from an abundant, renewable resource-the wind. Text Version Wind turbine assembly Although all wind turbines operate on similar principles, several varieties are in use today. These include horizontal axis turbines and vertical axis turbines. Horizontal Axis Turbines Horizontal axis turbines are the most common turbine configuration used today. They consist of a tall tower, atop which sits a fan-like rotor that faces into or away from the wind, a generator, a controller, and other components. Most horizontal axis turbines built today are two- or three-bladed. Horizontal axis turbines sit high atop towers to take advantage of the

337

Addendum to a proposal to NSF to sponsor a vertical-axis wind turbine research program  

SciTech Connect

Information is presented concerning the performance evaluation of a 15 foot-diameter test bed Darrieus rotor, Darrieus rotor wind tunnel tests, Savonius rotor wind tunnel tests, blade manufacturing techniques for 15 foot-diameter and 35 foot-diameter wind turbines, static and dynamic structural analysis, production prototype design of a 15 foot-diameter turbine, production prototype design of 35 foot-diameter turbine, and aerodynamic performance studies.

Blackwell, B.F.; Feltz, L.V.; Rightley, E.C.

1974-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Robust and fault-tolerant linear parameter-varying control of wind turbines Christoffer Sloth a,,1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Robust and fault-tolerant linear parameter-varying control of wind turbines Christoffer Sloth a,,1 Keywords: Wind turbine control Linear parameter-varying (LPV) control Fault-tolerant control Robust control a b s t r a c t High performance and reliability are required for wind turbines to be competitive

Hansen, René Rydhof

339

Abstract--Modelling and control of gas turbines (GTs) have always been a controversial issue because of the complex  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract--Modelling and control of gas turbines (GTs) have always been a controversial issue that there is no end to the efforts for performance optimization of gas turbines. A variety of analytical and experimental models as well as control systems has been built so far for gas turbines. However, the need

Sainudiin, Raazesh

340

Fatigue case study and reliability analyses for wind turbines  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Modern wind turbines are fatigue critical machines used to produce electrical power. To insure long term, reliable operation, their structure must be optimized if they are to be economically viable. The fatigue and reliability projects in Sandia`s Wind Energy Program are developing the analysis tools required to accomplish these design requirements. The first section of the paper formulates the fatigue analysis of a wind turbine using a cumulative damage technique. The second section uses reliability analysis for quantifying the uncertainties and the inherent randomness associated with turbine performance and the prediction of service lifetimes. Both research areas are highlighted with typical results.

Sutherland, H.J.; Veers, P.S.

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "turbine performance ampere-hour-a" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Examination of cracked turbine discs from nuclear power plants  

SciTech Connect

Investigations were performed on a cracked turbine disc from the Cooper Nuclear Power Station (BWR), and on two failed turbine discs from the Yankee-Rowe Nuclear Power Station (PWR). The Yankee-Rowe discs were subjected to SEM/EDAX, uniaxial tension tests, hardness testing, notch sensitivity tests, and environmental notched tensile tests. The results of this investigation support the model whereby the cracks initiated at startup of the turbine, probably from H/sub 2/S produced by hydrolysis of MoS/sub 2/, and grew at a rate consistent with published data for propagation of cracks in pure steam.

Czajkowski, C.J.; Weeks, J.R.

1983-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Materials/manufacturing element of the Advanced Turbine Systems Program  

SciTech Connect

The technology based portion of the Advanced Turbine Systems Program (ATS) contains several subelements which address generic technology issues for land-based gas-turbine systems. One subelement is the Materials/ Manufacturing Technology Program which is coordinated by DOE Oak Ridge Operations and Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The work in this subelement is being performed predominantly by industry with assistance from universities and the national laboratories. Projects in this sub-element are aimed toward hastening the incorporation of new materials and components in gas turbines.

Karnitz, M.A.; Holcomb, R.S.; Wright, I.G.; Ferber, M.K. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Hoffman, E.E. [USDOE Oak Ridge Operations Office, TN (United States)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

343

Atmospheric and Wake Turbulence Impacts on Wind Turbine Fatigue Loading: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Large-eddy simulations of atmospheric boundary layers under various stability and surface roughness conditions are performed to investigate the turbulence impact on wind turbines. In particular, the aeroelastic responses of the turbines are studied to characterize the fatigue loading of the turbulence present in the boundary layer and in the wake of the turbines. Two utility-scale 5 MW turbines that are separated by seven rotor diameters are placed in a 3 km by 3 km by 1 km domain. They are subjected to atmospheric turbulent boundary layer flow and data is collected on the structural response of the turbine components. The surface roughness was found to increase the fatigue loads while the atmospheric instability had a small influence. Furthermore, the downstream turbines yielded higher fatigue loads indicating that the turbulent wakes generated from the upstream turbines have significant impact.

Lee, S.; Churchfield, M.; Moriarty, P.; Jonkman, J.; Michalakes, J.

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

NETL: Turbine Projects - Cost Reduction  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cost Reduction Cost Reduction Turbine Projects Cost Reduction Single Crystal Turbine Blades Enhancing Gas Turbine Efficiency Data/Fact Sheets Enabling and Information Technologies to Increase RAM of Advanced Powerplants Data/Fact Sheets Development of NDE Technology for Environmental Barrier Coating and Residual Life Estimation Data/Fact Sheets Welding and Weld Repair of Single Crystal Gas Turbine Alloy Data/Fact Sheets Combustion Turbine Hot Section Coating Life Management Data/Fact Sheets On-Line Thermal Barrier Coating Monitor for Real-Time Failure Protection and Life Maximization Data/Fact Sheets On-Line Thermal Barrier Coating [PDF] Advanced Monitoring to Improve Combustion Turbine/Combined Cycle RAM Data/Fact Sheets Advanced Monitoring to Improve Combustion Turbine [PDF]

345

Turbine vane structure  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A liquid cooled stator blade assembly for a gas turbine engine includes an outer shroud having a pair of liquid inlets and a pair of liquid outlets supplied through a header and wherein means including tubes support the header radially outwardly of the shroud and also couple the header with the pair of liquid inlets and outlets. A pair of turbine vanes extend radially between the shroud and a vane platform to define a gas turbine motive fluid passage therebetween; and each of the vanes is cooled by an internal body casting of super alloy material with a grooved layer of highly heat conductive material that includes spaced apart flat surface trailing edges in alignment with a flat trailing edge of the casting joined to wall segments of the liner which are juxtaposed with respect to the internal casting to form an array of parallel liquid inlet passages on one side of the vane and a second plurality of parallel liquid return passages on the opposite side of the vane; and a superalloy heat and wear resistant imperforate skin covers the outer surface of the composite blade including the internal casting and the heat conductive layer; a separate trailing edge section includes an internal casting and an outer skin butt connected to the end surfaces of the internal casting and the heat conductive layer to form an easily assembled liquid cooled trailing edge section in the turbine vane.

Irwin, John A. (Greenwood, IN)

1980-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

346

Temperature stratified turbine compressors  

SciTech Connect

A method and apparatus for improving the efficiency of a compressor of a gas turbine engine is disclosed. The inlet gas entering the compressor is stratified into two portions of different temperatures. The higher temperature gas is introduced adjacent the outer tipe of the compressor blades to reduce the relative Mach number of the flow at the area.

Earnest, E.R.; Passinos, B.

1979-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

347

An overview of DOE`s wind turbine development programs  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The development of technologically advanced, higher efficiency wind turbines continues to be a high priority activity of the US wind industry. The United States Department of Energy (DOE) is conducting and sponsoring a range of programs aimed at assisting the wind industry with system design, development, and testing. The overall goal is to develop systems that can compete with conventional electric generation for $.05/kWh at 5.8 m/s (13 mph sites) by the mid-1990s and with fossil-fuel-based generators for $.04/kWh at 5.8 m/s sites by the year 2000. These goals will be achieved through several programs. The Value Engineered Turbine Program will promote the rapid development of US capability to manufacture wind turbines with known and well documented records of performance, cost, and reliability, to take advantage of near-term market opportunities. The Advanced Wind Turbine Program will assist US industry to develop and integrate innovative technologies into utility-grade wind turbines for the near-term (mid 1990s) and to develop a new generation of turbines for the year 2000. The collaborative Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI)/DOE Utility Wind Turbine Performance Verification Program will deploy and evaluate commercial-prototype wind turbines in typical utility operating environments, to provide a bridge between development programs currently underway and commercial purchases of utility-grade wind turbines. A number of collaborative efforts also will help develop a range of small systems optimized to work in a diesel hybrid environment to provide electricity for smaller non-grid-connected applications.

Laxson, A; Dodge, D; Flowers, L [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States); Loose, R; Goldman, P [Dept. of Energy, Washington, DC (United States)

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Advanced Micro Turbine System (AMTS) -C200 Micro Turbine -Ultra-Low Emissions Micro Turbine  

SciTech Connect

In September 2000 Capstone Turbine Corporation commenced work on a US Department of Energy contract to develop and improve advanced microturbines for power generation with high electrical efficiency and reduced pollutants. The Advanced MicroTurbine System (AMTS) program focused on: (1) The development and implementation of technology for a 200 kWe scale high efficiency microturbine system (2) The development and implementation of a 65 kWe microturbine which meets California Air Resources Board (CARB) emissions standards effective in 2007. Both of these objectives were achieved in the course of the AMTS program. At its conclusion prototype C200 Microturbines had been designed, assembled and successfully completed field demonstration. C65 Microturbines operating on natural, digester and landfill gas were also developed and successfully tested to demonstrate compliance with CARB 2007 Fossil Fuel Emissions Standards for NOx, CO and VOC emissions. The C65 Microturbine subsequently received approval from CARB under Executive Order DG-018 and was approved for sale in California. The United Technologies Research Center worked in parallel to successfully execute a RD&D program to demonstrate the viability of a low emissions AMS which integrated a high-performing microturbine with Organic Rankine Cycle systems. These results are documented in AMS Final Report DOE/CH/11060-1 dated March 26, 2007.

Capstone Turbine Corporation

2007-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

349

Solar turbines perspective on advanced fuel cell/gas turbine systems  

SciTech Connect

Solar Turbines Inc. has a vested interest in integrating gas turbines and high-temperature fuel cells(eg, solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs)). Approach is to develop more efficient recuperated engines, which would be followed by more efficient intercooled and recuperated engines and finally by a humid air turbine cycle system. This engine system would be capable of providing efficiencies on the order of 60% with potentially low exhaust emissions. Because of possible fossil fuel shortages and severe CO{sub 2} emissions regulations, Solar adopted an alternative approach in the development of high efficiency machines; it involves combining SOFCs with recuperated gas turbines. Preliminary results show that the performance of TCPS (Tandem Cycle Unified Power System) is much better than expected, especially the efficiency. Costs are acceptable for the introductory models, and with full production, cost reductions will make the system competitive with all future energy conversion systems of the same power output. Despite the problems that must be overcome in creating a viable control system, it is believed that they are solvable. The efficiency of TCPS would be synergetic, ie, higher than either fuel cell or gas turbine alone.

White, D.J.

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

350

9-19-05_turbine_brochure.indd  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Te Te c h n o l o g y L a b o r a t o r y In the 1990s, U.S. Department of Energy partnerships with industry and academia through the Advanced Turbine System (ATS) Program spurred advances in utility-scale, natural gas-fueled turbines to levels of performance seemingly unachievable at the time. Today, the Department is embarking on a mission to leverage the knowledge base gained in the ATS Program to develop

351

Summary of Gas Turbine Operation on Liquid Biofuels  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Biodiesel, an alternative liquid biofuel option for stationary gas turbines, has gained much interest in the past decade. This report documents recent biodiesel field tests on aeroderivative and frame class gas turbines. Pollutant emissions and engine performance for these gas turbineswhich include models from General Electric, Siemens, Pratt Whitney, and Alstomwere plotted, compared, and analyzed to determine trends, similarities, and noticeable differences. In addition, the report documents engine oper...

2011-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

352

Turbine blade tip gap reduction system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A turbine blade sealing system for reducing a gap between a tip of a turbine blade and a stationary shroud of a turbine engine. The sealing system includes a plurality of flexible seal strips extending from a pressure side of a turbine blade generally orthogonal to the turbine blade. During operation of the turbine engine, the flexible seal strips flex radially outward extending towards the stationary shroud of the turbine engine, thereby reducing the leakage of air past the turbine blades and increasing the efficiency of the turbine engine.

Diakunchak, Ihor S.

2012-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

353

Compressor & Steam Turbine Efficiency Improvements & Revamping Opportunities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fossil fuels remain the dominant source for primary energy production worldwide. In relation to this trend, energy consumption in turbomachinery has been increasing due to the scale up of both the machinery itself as well as the processing plants in which they operate. This energy growth requires high efficiency improvements for machine design and operation to minimize life cycle cost. This paper will focus on the mechanical drive steam turbines which power the main process equipment in the heart of the plant and introduce the history of efficiency improvements for compressors and steam turbines in the Petrochemical Industry. Since heat balance configurations affect the plant's steam consumption, the authors will explain several cases of heat balance configurations and applications / selections of steam turbines. According to the change in output demand, in some cases the original plants are modified by increasing capacity and consequently the turbines and compressors are revamped internally or replaced totally. The authors will introduce several case studies on revamping to increase efficiency and reliability as per the following cases: a) Replacement of High Pressure Section Internals b) Replacement of Low Pressure Section Internals c) Replacement of All Internals d) Internals and Casing Replacement e) Efficiency Recovery Technique Modification Finally, life cycle cost (LCC) evaluation and sensitivity due to turbomachinery performance are explained as a case study of a mega ethylene plant.

Hata, S.; Horiba, J.; Sicker, M.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Advanced Coal-Fueled Gas Turbine Program  

SciTech Connect

The objective of the original Request for Proposal was to establish the technological bases necessary for the subsequent commercial development and deployment of advanced coal-fueled gas turbine power systems by the private sector. The offeror was to identify the specific application or applications, toward which his development efforts would be directed; define and substantiate the technical, economic, and environmental criteria for the selected application; and conduct such component design, development, integration, and tests as deemed necessary to fulfill this objective. Specifically, the offeror was to choose a system through which ingenious methods of grouping subcomponents into integrated systems accomplishes the following: (1) Preserve the inherent power density and performance advantages of gas turbine systems. (2) System must be capable of meeting or exceeding existing and expected environmental regulations for the proposed application. (3) System must offer a considerable improvement over coal-fueled systems which are commercial, have been demonstrated, or are being demonstrated. (4) System proposed must be an integrated gas turbine concept, i.e., all fuel conditioning, all expansion gas conditioning, or post-expansion gas cleaning, must be integrated into the gas turbine system.

Horner, M.W.; Ekstedt, E.E.; Gal, E.; Jackson, M.R.; Kimura, S.G.; Lavigne, R.G.; Lucas, C.; Rairden, J.R.; Sabla, P.E.; Savelli, J.F.; Slaughter, D.M.; Spiro, C.L.; Staub, F.W.

1989-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

UNSTEADY SIMULATION OF FLOW IN MICRO VERTICAL AXIS WIND TURBINE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Though wind turbines and windmills have been used for centuries, the application of aerodynamics technology to improve reliability and reduce costs of wind-generated energy has only been pursued in earnest for the past 40 years. Today, wind energy is mainly used to generate electricity. Wind is a renewable energy source. Power production from wind turbines is affected by certain conditions: wind speed, turbine speed, turbulence and the changes of wind direction. These conditions are not always optimal and have negative effects on most turbines. The present turbine is supposed to be less affected by these conditions because the blades combine a rotating movement around each own axis and around the nacelle’s one. Due to this combination of movements, flow around this turbine can be more highly unsteady, because of great blade stagger angles. The turbine has a rotor with three straight blades of symmetrical airfoil. Paper presents unsteady simulations that have been performed for one wind velocity, and different initial blades stagger angles. The influence of interaction of blades is studied for one specific constant rotational speed among the four rotational speeds that have been studied.

A. C. Bayeul-lainé; G. Bois

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

Ceramic Stationary Gas Turbine Development. Technical progress report, April 1, 1993--October 31, 1994  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report summarizes work performed by Solar Technologies Inc. and its subcontractors, during the period April 1, 1993 through October 31, 1994 under Phase II of the DOE Ceramic Stationary Gas Turbine Development program. The objective of the program is to improve the performance of stationary gas turbines in cogeneration through the implementation of selected ceramic components.

NONE

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Operation of Mammoth Pacific`s MP1-100 turbine with metastable, supersaturated expansions  

SciTech Connect

INEL`s Heat Cycle Research project continues to develop a technology base for increasing use of moderate-temperature hydrothermal resources to generate electrical power. One concept is the use of metastable, supersaturated turbine expansions. These expansions support a supersaturated working fluid vapor; at equilibrium conditions, liquid condensate would be present during the turbine expansion process. Studies suggest that if these expansions do not adversely affect the turbine performance, up to 8-10% more power could be produced from a given geothermal fluid. Determining the impact of these expansions on turbine performance is the focus of the project investigations being reported.

Mines, G.L.

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

EVALUATION OF SINGLE AND DUAL TURBINE-GENERATOR UNITS FOR PL-3  

SciTech Connect

The investigation performed relative to the selection of a turbine- generator unit for the PL-3 portable nuclear power plant, Byrd Station, Antarctica, is described. Available conventional equipment was surveyed to minimize air shipment, installation, and cost requirements. Pertinent details of functional performance were considered. A comparison was drawn between the alternatives of utilizing either a single turbine generator unit shipped partially disassembled or twin, half-capacity units shipped assembled. The conclusion reached was that a single turbine-generator unit should be used with the turbine and generator shipped separately. (auth)

Prall, T.F.

1962-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Assessment of a water-cooled gas-turbine concept. Final report  

SciTech Connect

A program for development of Ultra-High Temperature (UHT) 2800/sup 0/F firing temperature, water-cooled turbine technology began in 1967. In 1973 it was decided to design and build a full-scale gas turbine to demonstrate the feasibility and evaluate the performance and economics of a complete utility-size machine. The preliminary design phase, performed from June 1974 to March 1975 is reported here with information on the definition of the baseline cycle for the UHT machine in a combined cycle power plant; turbine aerodynamics; design of turbine, its cooling system, and the combustor; materials selection; controls; cost estimates; heat flux experiments, and program planning. (LCL)

1975-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Combustion turbine repowering: Final report  

SciTech Connect

The study discusses the findings of a conceptual site-specific investigation into the feasibility of repowering an existing reheat fossil unit utilizing combustion turbines. It identifies a potentially attractive repowering project, through the evaluation and selective elimination of a large number of alternatives. A conceptual design is performed on the selected alternative. Capital costs are developed for this alternative including new equipment and modifications to existing equipment. The results of an economic evaluation and sensitivity analysis are presented, to serve as a basis for a decision on whether or not to proceed with final design, procurement, and construction of the system. The steps presented in the report are intended to provide for the utility industry a detailed methodology for investigating repowering at a specific utility site. 4 refs., 21 figs., 15 tabs.

Oliker, I.; Silaghy, F.J.

1987-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "turbine performance ampere-hour-a" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Using Neural Networks to Estimate Wind Turbine  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper uses data collected at Central and South West Services Fort Davis wind farm to develop a neural network based prediction of power produced by each turbine. The power generated by electric wind turbines changes rapidly because of the continuous fluctuation of wind speed and direction. It is important for the power industry to have the capability to perform this prediction for diagnostic purposes---lower-than-expected wind power may be an early indicator of a need for maintenance. In this paper, characteristics of wind power generation are first evaluated in order to establish the relative importance for the neural network. A four input neural network is developed and its performance is shown to be superior to the single parameter traditional model approach.

Power Generation Shuhui; Shuhui Li; Donald C. Wunsch; Edgar A. O’hair; Michael G. Giesselmann; Senior Member; Senior Member

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

Airborne Wind Turbine  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Broad Funding Opportunity Announcement Project: Makani Power is developing an Airborne Wind Turbine (AWT) that eliminates 90% of the mass of a conventional wind turbine and accesses a stronger, more consistent wind at altitudes of near 1,000 feet. At these altitudes, 85% of the country can offer viable wind resources compared to only 15% accessible with current technology. Additionally, the Makani Power wing can be economically deployed in deep offshore waters, opening up a resource which is 4 times greater than the entire U.S. electrical generation capacity. Makani Power has demonstrated the core technology, including autonomous launch, land, and power generation with an 8 meter wingspan, 20 kW prototype. At commercial scale, Makani Power aims to develop a 600 kW, 28 meter wingspan product capable of delivering energy at an unsubsidized cost competitive with coal, the current benchmark for low-cost power.

None

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

Gas turbine cooling system  

SciTech Connect

A gas turbine engine (10) having a closed-loop cooling circuit (39) for transferring heat from the hot turbine section (16) to the compressed air (24) produced by the compressor section (12). The closed-loop cooling system (39) includes a heat exchanger (40) disposed in the flow path of the compressed air (24) between the outlet of the compressor section (12) and the inlet of the combustor (14). A cooling fluid (50) may be driven by a pump (52) located outside of the engine casing (53) or a pump (54) mounted on the rotor shaft (17). The cooling circuit (39) may include an orifice (60) for causing the cooling fluid (50) to change from a liquid state to a gaseous state, thereby increasing the heat transfer capacity of the cooling circuit (39).

Bancalari, Eduardo E. (Orlando, FL)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Turbine seal assembly  

SciTech Connect

A seal assembly that limits gas leakage from a hot gas path to one or more disc cavities in a turbine engine. The seal assembly includes a seal apparatus that limits gas leakage from the hot gas path to a respective one of the disc cavities. The seal apparatus comprises a plurality of blade members rotatable with a blade structure. The blade members are associated with the blade structure and extend toward adjacent stationary components. Each blade member includes a leading edge and a trailing edge, the leading edge of each blade member being located circumferentially in front of the blade member's corresponding trailing edge in a direction of rotation of the turbine rotor. The blade members are arranged such that a space having a component in a circumferential direction is defined between adjacent circumferentially spaced blade members.

Little, David A.

2013-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

365

Gas turbine sealing apparatus  

SciTech Connect

A sealing apparatus in a gas turbine. The sealing apparatus includes a seal housing apparatus coupled to a disc/rotor assembly so as to be rotatable therewith during operation of the gas turbine. The seal housing apparatus comprises a base member, a first leg portion, a second leg portion, and spanning structure. The base member extends generally axially between forward and aft rows of rotatable blades and is positioned adjacent to a row of stationary vanes. The first leg portion extends radially inwardly from the base member and is coupled to the disc/rotor assembly. The second leg portion is axially spaced from the first leg portion, extends radially inwardly from the base member, and is coupled to the disc/rotor assembly. The spanning structure extends between and is rigidly coupled to each of the base member, the first leg portion, and the second leg portion.

Marra, John Joseph; Wessell, Brian J.; Liang, George

2013-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

366

Multiple piece turbine airfoil  

SciTech Connect

A turbine airfoil, such as a rotor blade or a stator vane, for a gas turbine engine, the airfoil formed as a shell and spar construction with a plurality of hook shaped struts each mounted within channels extending in a spanwise direction of the spar and the shell to allow for relative motion between the spar and shell in the airfoil chordwise direction while also fanning a seal between adjacent cooling channels. The struts provide the seal as well as prevent bulging of the shell from the spar due to the cooling air pressure. The hook struts have a hooked shaped end and a rounded shaped end in order to insert the struts into the spar.

Kimmel, Keith D (Jupiter, FL)

2010-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

367

Snubber assembly for turbine blades  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A snubber associated with a rotatable turbine blade in a turbine engine, the turbine blade including a pressure sidewall and a suction sidewall opposed from the pressure wall. The snubber assembly includes a first snubber structure associated with the pressure sidewall of the turbine blade, a second snubber structure associated with the suction sidewall of the turbine blade, and a support structure. The support structure extends through the blade and is rigidly coupled at a first end portion thereof to the first snubber structure and at a second end portion thereof to the second snubber structure. Centrifugal loads exerted by the first and second snubber structures caused by rotation thereof during operation of the engine are at least partially transferred to the support structure, such that centrifugal loads exerted on the pressure and suctions sidewalls of the turbine blade by the first and second snubber structures are reduced.

Marra, John J

2013-09-03T23:59:59.000Z

368

Gas turbine premixing systems  

SciTech Connect

Methods and systems are provided for premixing combustion fuel and air within gas turbines. In one embodiment, a combustor includes an upstream mixing panel configured to direct compressed air and combustion fuel through premixing zone to form a fuel-air mixture. The combustor includes a downstream mixing panel configured to mix additional combustion fuel with the fule-air mixture to form a combustion mixture.

Kraemer, Gilbert Otto; Varatharajan, Balachandar; Evulet, Andrei Tristan; Yilmaz, Ertan; Lacy, Benjamin Paul

2013-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

369

Airfoils for wind turbine  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Airfoils for the blade of a wind turbine wherein each airfoil is characterized by a thickness in a range from 16%-24% and a maximum lift coefficient designed to be largely insensitive to roughness effects. The airfoils include a family of airfoils for a blade 15 to 25 meters in length, a family of airfoils for a blade 1 to 5 meters in length, and a family of airfoils for a blade 5 to 10 meters in length.

Tangler, James L. (Boulder, CO); Somers, Dan M. (State College, PA)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Airfoils for wind turbine  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Airfoils are disclosed for the blade of a wind turbine wherein each airfoil is characterized by a thickness in a range from 16%-24% and a maximum lift coefficient designed to be largely insensitive to roughness effects. The airfoils include a family of airfoils for a blade 15 to 25 meters in length, a family of airfoils for a blade 1 to 5 meters in length, and a family of airfoils for a blade 5 to 10 meters in length. 10 figs.

Tangler, J.L.; Somers, D.M.

1996-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

371

Advanced Turbine Design Program  

SciTech Connect

The prime objective of this project task is to select a natural gas fired as Advanced Turbine Systems (ATS) capable of reaching 60% cycle efficiency. Several cycles were compared and evaluated under all different kind of aspects, to determine the one with the highest potential and, at the same time, the best overall fit within and experience base to guarantee project goals. The combined cycle with multistep development potential was identified as the system to reach the 60% or greater thermal efficiency.

van der Linden, S.; Gnaedig, G.; Kreitmeier, F.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

Advanced Turbine Design Program  

SciTech Connect

The prime objective of this project task is to select a natural gas fired as Advanced Turbine Systems (ATS) capable of reaching 60% cycle efficiency. Several cycles were compared and evaluated under all different kind of aspects, to determine the one with the highest potential and, at the same time, the best overall fit within and experience base to guarantee project goals. The combined cycle with multistep development potential was identified as the system to reach the 60% or greater thermal efficiency.

van der Linden, S.; Gnaedig, G.; Kreitmeier, F.

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

373

Guidelines for Turbine Deposit Collection and Analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Steam impurities can deposit throughout the steam path, causing a variety of performance issues. Deposits can result in efficiency losses and component failures through stress corrosion cracking (SCC) or corrosion fatigue (CF) initiated by corrosive deposits. The potential for each of these mechanisms can be exacerbated by the reduced frequency of turbine overhauls or opportunities to conduct an inspection. Sampling and deposit analysis is an integral part of a steam path audit, as well as a reflection o...

2011-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

374

Tornado type wind turbines  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A tornado type wind turbine has a vertically disposed wind collecting tower with spaced apart inner and outer walls and a central bore. The upper end of the tower is open while the lower end of the structure is in communication with a wind intake chamber. An opening in the wind chamber is positioned over a turbine which is in driving communication with an electrical generator. An opening between the inner and outer walls at the lower end of the tower permits radially flowing air to enter the space between the inner and outer walls while a vertically disposed opening in the wind collecting tower permits tangentially flowing air to enter the central bore. A porous portion of the inner wall permits the radially flowing air to interact with the tangentially flowing air so as to create an intensified vortex flow which exits out of the top opening of the tower so as to create a low pressure core and thus draw air through the opening of the wind intake chamber so as to drive the turbine.

Hsu, Cheng-Ting (Ames, IA)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

OVERLAY COATINGS FOR GAS TURBINE AIRFOILS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Supperalloys for Gas Turbine Engines, 11 J. Metals, Q,OVERLAY COATINGS FOR GAS TURBINE AIRFOILS Donald H. Boone1970, p. 545. R. Krutenat, Gas Turbine Materials Conference

Boone, Donald H.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

Howden Wind Turbines Ltd | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Howden Wind Turbines Ltd Jump to: navigation, search Name Howden Wind Turbines Ltd Place United Kingdom Sector Wind energy Product Howden was a manufacturer of wind turbines in the...

377

NREL: Wind Research - Advanced Research Turbines  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Research Turbines Two 440 foot meteorological towers are upwind of two research wind turbines. Two 600-kW Westinghouse turbines at the NWTC are used to test new control...

378

Combustion Turbine Guidelines: Conventional and Advanced Machines: Volume 5: Westinghouse Models W501A-D  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

For more than a decade, EPRI has been developing gas turbine hot section component repair and coating guidelines to assist utilities in the refurbishment of these critical and expensive parts. Utilities and repair vendors have used these guidelines to perform repairs on buckets (blades), turbine nozzles (vanes), combustion liners, and combustor transitions. Guidelines now exist for a variety of conventional and advanced General Electric and Westinghouse heavy frame gas turbines.

2001-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

379

An artificial neural network system for diagnosing gas turbine engine fuel faults  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The US Army Ordnance Center & School and Pacific Northwest Laboratories are developing a turbine engine diagnostic system for the M1A1 Abrams tank. This system employs Artificial Neural Network (AN) technology to perform diagnosis and prognosis of the tank`s AGT-1500 gas turbine engine. This paper describes the design and prototype development of the ANN component of the diagnostic system, which we refer to as ``TEDANN`` for Turbine Engine Diagnostic Artificial Neural Networks.

Illi, O.J. Jr. [Army Ordnance Center and School, Aberdeen Proving Ground, MD (United States). Knowledge Engineering Group (KEG); Greitzer, F.L.; Kangas, L.J. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Reeve, T. [Expert Solutions, Stratford, CT (United States)

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Microhydropower Turbines, Pumps, and Waterwheels  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

A microhydropower system needs a turbine, pump, or waterwheel to transform the energy of flowing water into rotational energy, which is then converted into electricity.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "turbine performance ampere-hour-a" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

NETL Publications: 2012 University Turbine  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

National Energy Technology Laboratory Presentation PDF-7.41MB South Coast AQMD's Gas Turbine Experience-Regulations and Operations Mohsen Nazemi, Deputy Executive Officer,...

382

Engines, turbines and compressors directory  

SciTech Connect

This book is a directory of engines, turbines and compressors. It adds and deletes compressor engines in use by the gas industry.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

Design and evaluation of small water turbines. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

An evaluation was made of the design and hydromechanical performance characteristics for three basic turbine types: axial flow (Jonval), inward radial flow (Francis) and crossflow (Banki). A single commercially available turbine representative of each type and within the appropriate power range (<5hp) was obtained for evaluation. Specific turbine selections were based on price, availability and suitability for operation at heads of 50 feet or less and flows under 2 cubic feet per second. In general, the peak operating efficiencies of each unit tended to be lower than anticipated, falling in the range of 40 to 50%. With sufficient flow, however, significant useful power outputs up to 3 hp were obtained. While the radial flow turbine (a centrifugal pump operated as a turbine) had the lowest initial unit cost, the axial and cross flow designs exhibited more stable operation, particularly under transient loadings. The crossflow turbine had the added advantage that it was essentially self-cleaning. With further developmental effort and appropriate design modifications it should be possible to bring each of these microhydro designs to their full performance potential.

Marquis, J.A.

1983-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

384

Advanced turbine design for coal-fueled engines  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of this task is to perform a technical assessment of turbine blading for advanced second generation PFBC conditions, identify specific problems/issues, and recommend an approach for solving any problems identified. A literature search was conducted, problems associated with hot corrosion defined and limited experiments performed. Sulfidation corrosion occurs in industrial, marine and aircraft gas turbine engines and is due to the presence of condensed alkali (sodium) sulfates. The principle source of the alkali in industrial, marine and aircraft gas turbine engines is sea salt crystals. The principle source of the sulfur is not the liquid fuels, but the same ocean born crystals. Moreover deposition of the corrosive salt occurs primarily by a non-equilibrium process. Sodium will be present in the cleaned combusted gases that enter the PFBC turbine. Although equilibrium condensation is not favored, deposition via impaction is probable. Marine gas turbines operate in sodium chloride rich environments without experiencing the accelerated attack noted in coal fired boilers where condensed chlorides contact metallic surfaces. The sulfates of calcium and magnesium are the products of the reactions used to control sulfur. Based upon industrial gas turbine experience and laboratory tests, calcium and magnesium sulfates are, at temperatures up to 1500[degrees]F (815[degrees]C), relatively innocuous salts. In this study it is found that at 1650[degrees]F (900[degrees]C) and above, calcium sulfate becomes an aggressive corrodent.

Bornstein, N.S.

1992-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

385

GE Upgrades Top Selling Advanced Gas Turbine  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Oct 30, 2009 ... According to GE, a typical power plant operating two new 7FA gas turbines with a single steam turbine in combined cycle configuration would ...

386

Westwind Wind Turbines | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Westwind Wind Turbines Jump to: navigation, search Name Westwind Wind Turbines Place Northern Ireland, United Kingdom Zip BT29 4TF Sector Wind energy Product Northern Ireland based...

387

Baldrige Award Recipients--Solar Turbines (1998)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Incorporated With customers in 86 countries, Solar Turbines Incorporated is the world's largest supplier of mid-range industrial gas turbine systems. ...

2012-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

388

Strategies for Refining IEC 61400-2: Wind Turbine Generator Systems - Part 2: Safety of Small Wind Turbines: Preprint  

SciTech Connect

This paper provides a status of the changes currently being made by IEC Maintenance Team 02 (MT02) to the existing IEC 61400-2 ''Safety of small wind turbines.'' In relation to the work done by IEC MT02, work has been done by NREL and Windward Engineering under the DOE/NREL Small Wind Turbine (SWT) Project. Aeroelastic models were built and measurements taken on a Whisper H40 turbine and an AOC 15/50. Results from this study were used to verify the simple design equations. This verification will be used to evaluate how changes made in the design load estimation section of the standard work out for a broad range of turbine configurations. The work presented here builds on work performed by Van Hulle (1996).

van Dam, J. J. D. (Energy Research Centre of the Netherlands); Forsyth, T. L. (National Renewable Energy Laboratory); Hansen, A. C. (Windward Engineering LLC)

2001-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

389

Wind Turbine Modeling for Computational Fluid Dynamics: December 2010 - December 2012  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

With the shortage of fossil fuel and the increasing environmental awareness, wind energy is becoming more and more important. As the market for wind energy grows, wind turbines and wind farms are becoming larger. Current utility-scale turbines extend a significant distance into the atmospheric boundary layer. Therefore, the interaction between the atmospheric boundary layer and the turbines and their wakes needs to be better understood. The turbulent wakes of upstream turbines affect the flow field of the turbines behind them, decreasing power production and increasing mechanical loading. With a better understanding of this type of flow, wind farm developers could plan better-performing, less maintenance-intensive wind farms. Simulating this flow using computational fluid dynamics is one important way to gain a better understanding of wind farm flows. In this study, we compare the performance of actuator disc and actuator line models in producing wind turbine wakes and the wake-turbine interaction between multiple turbines. We also examine parameters that affect the performance of these models, such as grid resolution, the use of a tip-loss correction, and the way in which the turbine force is projected onto the flow field.

Tossas, L. A. M.; Leonardi, S.

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Wind Turbine Generator System Duration Test Report for the Gaia-Wind 11 kW Wind Turbine  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This test was conducted as part of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Independent Testing project. This project was established to help reduce the barriers of wind energy expansion by providing independent testing results for small turbines. In total, five turbines are being tested at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's (NRELs) National Wind Technology Center (NWTC) as a part of this project. Duration testing is one of up to five tests that may be performed on the turbines, including power performance, safety and function, noise, and power quality tests. The results of the testing will provide the manufacturers with reports that may be used for small wind turbine certification. The test equipment includes a Gaia-Wind 11 kW wind turbine mounted on an 18 m monopole tower. Gaia-Wind Ltd. manufactured the turbine in Denmark, although the company is based in Scotland. The system was installed by the NWTC Site Operations group with guidance and assistance from Gaia-Wind.

Huskey, A.; Bowen, A.; Jager, D.

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

NEXT GENERATION TURBINE SYSTEM STUDY  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Rolls-Royce has completed a preliminary design and marketing study under a Department of Energy (DOE) cost shared contract (DE-AC26-00NT40852) to analyze the feasibility of developing a clean, high efficiency, and flexible Next Generation Turbine (NGT) system to meet the power generation market needs of the year 2007 and beyond. Rolls-Royce evaluated the full range of its most advanced commercial aerospace and aeroderivative engines alongside the special technologies necessary to achieve the aggressive efficiency, performance, emissions, economic, and flexibility targets desired by the DOE. Heavy emphasis was placed on evaluating the technical risks and the economic viability of various concept and technology options available. This was necessary to ensure the resulting advanced NGT system would provide extensive public benefits and significant customer benefits without introducing unacceptable levels of technical and operational risk that would impair the market acceptance of the resulting product. Two advanced cycle configurations were identified as offering significant advantages over current combined cycle products available in the market. In addition, balance of plant (BOP) technologies, as well as capabilities to improve the reliability, availability, and maintainability (RAM) of industrial gas turbine engines, have been identified. A customer focused survey and economic analysis of a proposed Rolls-Royce NGT product configuration was also accomplished as a part of this research study. The proposed Rolls-Royce NGT solution could offer customers clean, flexible power generation systems with very high efficiencies, similar to combined cycle plants, but at a much lower specific cost, similar to those of simple cycle plants.

Frank Macri

2002-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

392

Steam turbine upgrading: low-hanging fruit  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The thermodynamic performance of the steam turbine, more than any other plant component, determines overall plant efficiency. Upgrading steam path components and using computerized design tools and manufacturing techniques to minimise internal leaks are two ways to give tired steam turbines a new lease on life. The article presents three case studies that illustrate how to do that. These are at Unit 1 of Dairyland's J.P. Madgett Station in Alma, WI, a coal-fired subcritical steam plant; the four units at AmerenUE's 600 MW coal-fired Labadie plant west of St. Louis; and Unit 3 of KeyPlan Corp's Northport Power Station on Long Island. 8 figs.

Peltier, R.

2006-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

393

NREL: Wind Research - Small Wind Turbine Development  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Small Wind Turbine Development Small Wind Turbine Development A photo of Southwest Windpower's Skystream wind turbine in front of a home. PIX14936 Southwest Windpower's Skystream wind turbine. A photo of the Endurance wind turbine. PIX15006 The Endurance wind turbine. A photo of the Atlantic Orient Corporation 15/50 wind turbine at the National Wind Technology Center. PIX07301 The Atlantic Orient Corporation 15/50 wind turbine at the National Wind Technology Center. NREL supports continued market expansion of small wind turbines by funding manufacturers through competitive solicitations (i.e., subcontracts and/or grants) to refine prototype systems leading to commercialization. Learn more about the turbine development projects below. Skystream NREL installed and tested an early prototype of this turbine at the

394

Gas Turbine Procurement: 1988 Workshop  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Specifying the levels of reliability and availability needed for new gas turbines or combined-cycle plants can help utilities meet plant operating requirements. Equipment specifiers can use information presented in this workshop to help them formulate more effective specifications for new gas turbine generating equipment.

1989-04-06T23:59:59.000Z

395

Aero Turbine | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Aero Turbine Aero Turbine Jump to: navigation, search Name Aero Turbine Facility Aero Turbine Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner AeroTurbine Energy Company Location Riverside County CA Coordinates 33.7437°, -115.9925° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":33.7437,"lon":-115.9925,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

396

Gas turbines face new challenges  

SciTech Connect

Gas turbines continue to increase the electric power generation market in both the peaking and the intermediate load categories. With the increase in unit size and operating efficiencies. capital costs per kilowatt are reduced. Clean fuels---gas, light oil, or alcohol-type fuel--are needed for the gas turbines. The most efficient method of power generation is now attained from gas turbines, but the shortage of clean fuels looms. Manufacturers are anticipating the availability of clean fuels and continue working on the development of high- pressure, high-temperature turbines. In the near-term, increased efficiency is sought by making use of the turbine exhaust heat. involving combined or regenerative cycles. (MCW)

Papamarcos, J.

1973-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Reaction Injection Molded 7.5 Meter Wind Turbine Blade  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

An optimized small turbine blade (7.5m radius) was designed and a partial section molded with the RIM (reaction-injection molded polymer) process for mass production. The intended market is for generic three-bladed wind turbines, 100 kilowatts or less, for grid-assist end users with rural and semi-rural sites, such as the farm/ranch market, having low to moderate IEC Class 3-4 wind regimes. This blade will have substantial performance improvements over, and be cheaper than, present-day 7.5m blades. This is made possible by the injection-molding process, which yields high repeatability, accurate geometry and weights, and low cost in production quantities. No wind turbine blade in the 7.5m or greater size has used this process. The blade design chosen uses a RIM skin bonded to a braided infused carbon fiber/epoxy spar. This approach is attractive to present users of wind turbine blades in the 5-10m sizes. These include rebladeing California wind farms, refurbishing used turbines for the Midwest farm market, and other manufacturers introducing new turbines in this size range.

David M. Wright; DOE Project Officer - Keith Bennett

2007-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

398

UNIVERSITY TURBINE SYSTEMS RESEARCH PROGRAM SUMMARY AND DIRECTORY  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The South Carolina Institute for Energy Studies (SCIES), administratively housed at Clemson University, has participated in the advancement of combustion turbine technology for over a decade. The University Turbine Systems Research Program, previously referred to as the Advanced Gas Turbine Systems Research (AGTSR) program, has been administered by SCIES for the U.S. DOE during the 1992-2003 timeframe. The structure of the program is based on a concept presented to the DOE by Clemson University. Under the supervision of the DOE National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), the UTSR consortium brings together the engineering departments at leading U.S. universities and U.S. combustion turbine developers to provide a solid base of knowledge for the future generations of land-based gas turbines. In the UTSR program, an Industrial Review Board (IRB) (Appendix C) of gas turbine companies and related organizations defines needed gas turbine research. SCIES prepares yearly requests for university proposals to address the research needs identified by the IRB organizations. IRB technical representatives evaluate the university proposals and review progress reports from the awarded university projects. To accelerate technology transfer technical workshops are held to provide opportunities for university, industry and government officials to share comments and improve quality and relevancy of the research. To provide educational growth at the Universities, in addition to sponsored research, the UTSR provides faculty and student fellowships. The basis for all activities--research, technology transfer, and education--is the DOE Turbine Program Plan and identification, through UTSR consortium group processes, technology needed to meet Program Goals that can be appropriately researched at Performing Member Universities.

Lawrence P. Golan; Richard A. Wenglarz

2004-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Environmental Effects of Hydrokinetic Turbines on Fish: Desktop and Laboratory Flume Studies  

SciTech Connect

This collection of three reports describes desktop and laboratory flume studies that provide information to support assessment of the potential for injury and mortality of fish that encounter hydrokinetic turbines of various designs installed in tidal and river environments. Behavioral responses to turbine exposure also are investigated to support assessment of the potential for disruptions to upstream and downstream movements of fish. The studies: (1) conducted an assessment of potential injury mechanisms using available data from studies with conventional hydro turbines; (2) developed theoretical models for predicting blade strike probabilities and mortality rates; and (3) performed flume testing with three turbine designs and several fish species and size groups in two laboratory flumes to estimate survival rates and document fish behavior. The project yielded three reports which this document comprises. The three constituent documents are addressed individually below Fish Passage Through Turbines: Application of Conventional Hydropower Data to Hydrokinetic Technologies Fish passing through the blade sweep of a hydrokinetic turbine experience a much less harsh physical environment than do fish entrained through conventional hydro turbines. The design and operation of conventional turbines results in high flow velocities, abrupt changes in flow direction, relatively high runner rotational and blade speeds, rapid and significant changes in pressure, and the need for various structures throughout the turbine passageway that can be impacted by fish. These conditions generally do not occur or are not significant factors for hydrokinetic turbines. Furthermore, compared to conventional hydro turbines, hydrokinetic turbines typically produce relatively minor changes in shear, turbulence, and pressure levels from ambient conditions in the surrounding environment. Injuries and mortality from mechanical injuries will be less as well, mainly due to low rotational speeds and strike velocities, and an absence of structures that can lead to grinding or abrasion injuries. Additional information is needed to rigorously assess the nature and magnitude of effects on individuals and populations, and to refine criteria for design of more fish-friendly hydrokinetic turbines. Evaluation of Fish Injury and Mortality Associated with Hydrokinetic Turbines Flume studies exposed fish to two hydrokinetic turbine designs to determine injury and survival rates and to assess behavioral responses. Also, a theoretical model developed for predicting strike probability and mortality of fish passing through conventional hydro turbines was adapted for use with hydrokinetic turbines and applied to the two designs evaluated during flume studies. The flume tests were conducted with the Lucid spherical turbine (LST), a Darrieus-type (cross flow) turbine, and the Welka UPG, an axial flow propeller turbine. Survival rates for rainbow trout tested with the LST were greater than 98% for both size groups and approach velocities evaluated. Turbine passage survival rates for rainbow trout and largemouth bass tested with the Welka UPG were greater than 99% for both size groups and velocities evaluated. Injury rates of turbine-exposed fish were low with both turbines and generally comparable to control fish. Video observations of the LST demonstrated active avoidance of turbine passage by a large proportion fish despite being released about 25 cm upstream of the turbine blade sweep. Video observations from behavior trials indicated few if any fish pass through the turbines when released farther upstream. The theoretical predictions for the LST indicated that strike mortality would begin to occur at an ambient current velocity of about 1.7 m/s for fish with lengths greater than the thickness of the leading edge of the blades. As current velocities increase above 1.7 m/s, survival was predicted to decrease for fish passing through the LST, but generally remained high (greater than 90%) for fish less than 200 mm in length. Strike mortality was not predicted to occur duri

Jacobson, Paul T. [Electric Power Research Institute; Amaral, Stephen V. [Alden Research Laboratory; Castro-Santos, Theodore [U.S. Geological Survey; Giza, Dan [Alden Research Laboratory; Haro, Alexander J. [U.S. Geological Survey; Hecker, George [Alden Research Laboratory; McMahon, Brian [Alden Research Laboratory; Perkins, Norman [Alden Research Laboratory; Pioppi, Nick [Alden Research Laboratory

2012-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

400

FAST 1.0 - Flow Path Analysis for Steam Turbines, Version 1.0  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

FAST Software Flow Analysis of Steam Turbines is a tool for performance engineers, designers and financial analysts. This tool is for industry use by utilities and manufacturers to evaluate thermal performance characteristics of existing and proposed turbine steam-path modifications/upgrades. Description The FAST software diagnoses performance problems and facilitates the economic evaluation of steam-path upgrade options. FAST software is used primarily by the thermal performance engineer in both fossil ...

2007-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "turbine performance ampere-hour-a" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Demonstration of EPRI STEEM Optical Probe for LP Turbine Steam Quality Measurement  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

EPRI has developed the STEEM system, which contains an optical probe for measurement of saturated steam quality that is deployed at the exhaust of low-pressure (LP) turbines. As part of EPRI's development effort, tests of the probe's performance have been conducted in operating turbines, and the results compared with standard measurements of the steam cycle.

2001-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

402

Aeroengine turbine exhaust gas temperature prediction using process support vector machines  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The turbine exhaust gas temperature (EGT) is an important parameter of the aeroengine and it represents the thermal health condition of the aeroengine. By predicting the EGT, the performance deterioration of the aeroengine can be deduced in advance and ... Keywords: aeroengine, condition monitoring, process support vector machines, time series prediction, turbine exhaust gas temperature

Xu-yun Fu, Shi-sheng Zhong

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

SNAP I POWER CONVERSION SYSTEM TURBINE DEVELOPMENT. Period covered: February 1, 1957 to June 30, 1959  

SciTech Connect

Turbine development for the SNAP I power conversion system is described. A three-stage axial flow turbine with the first two impulse stages partial admission and the last stage full admission with a slight amount of reaction was selected. Other design and performance data are included. (J.R.D.)

Reemsnyder, D.C.; Szanca, E.M.

1960-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

404

Self-tuning PID control of hydro-turbine governor based on genetic neural networks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A genetic neural networks (GNN) control strategy for hydroturbine governor is proposed in this paper. Considering the complex dynamic characteristic and uncertainty of the hydro-turbine governor model and taking the static and dynamic performance of ... Keywords: PID control, genetic algorithm, hydro-turbine governor, neural network

Aiwen Guo; Jiandong Yang

2007-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

EFFECT OF PITCH CONTROL AND POWER CONDITIONING ON POWER QUALITY OF VARIABLE SPEED WIND TURBINE GENERATORS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Wind energy is considered as the most viable renewable energy options. In a renewable energy system more energy from the wind. One of the options is to use the variable speed wind turbine-speed wind turbine system for transient studies are discussed in this paper. The performance of wind energy

406

Original article: Comparison of maximum peak power tracking algorithms for a small wind turbine  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper reviews maximum power point tracking (MPPT) algorithms dedicated for small wind turbines (SWTs). Many control strategies with different features are available and it is very important to select proper one in order to achieve best performance ... Keywords: Maximum power point tracking (MPPT), PMSG, Small wind turbine (SWT)

R. Kot, M. Rolak, M. Malinowski

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

Low Speed Technology for Small Turbine Development Reaction Injection Molded 7.5 Meter Wind Turbine Blade  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An optimized small turbine blade (7.5m radius) was designed and a partial section molded with the RIM (reaction-injection molded polymer) process for mass production. The intended market is for generic three-bladed wind turbines, 100 kilowatts or less, for grid-assist end users with rural and semi-rural sites, such as the farm/ranch market, having low to moderate IEC Class 3-4 wind regimes. This blade will have substantial performance improvements over, and be cheaper than, present-day 7.5m blades. This is made possible by the injection-molding process, which yields high repeatability, accurate geometry and weights, and low cost in production quantities. No wind turbine blade in the 7.5m or greater size has used this process. The blade design chosen uses a RIM skin bonded to a braided infused carbon fiber/epoxy spar. This approach is attractive to present users of wind turbine blades in the 5-10m sizes. These include rebladeing California wind farms, refurbishing used turbines for the Midwest farm market, and other manufacturers introducing new turbines in this size range.

David M. Wright; DOE Project Officer - Keith Bennett

2007-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

408

Repowering reheat units with gas turbines: Final report. [Adding gas turbines and heat recovery to present units  

SciTech Connect

Although conventional repowering on nonreheat units replaces existing boilers with gas turbines and heat recovery steam generators, options investigated by Virginia Power use gas turbine waste heat to supplement, rather than replace, the output of existing steam generators. Virginia Power's experience in considering feedwater heater repowering (FHR) and hot windbox repowering (HWR) as repowering options is described here. Studying five plants identified as potential repowering candidates, investigators first evaluated FHR, which uses a gas turbine generator set equipped with an economizer to heat boiler feedwater. This reduces the steam turbine extraction flow and increases the steam turbine capacity. HWR, the second method investigated, routes the hot, relatively oxygen-rich exhaust flow from a gas turbine into the boiler windbox, eliminating the need for an air preheater. A boiler stack gas cooler then heats feedwater, again increasing turbine capacity by reducing extraction steam flow requirements for feedwater heating. FHR provided the lowest installed cost, especially at Mount Storm unit 3, a coal-fired minemouth plant. Use of a gas turbine to heat feedwater at this plant resulted in a $523/kW (1985) installed cost and 124-MWe unit capacity increase at a design incremental heat rate of 8600 Btu/kWh. FHR at Mount Storm units 1, 2, and 3 cost less overall than installation and operation of a new combined cycle. Although the findings and conclusions in this series of repowering reports are largely unique to the individual plants, units, and applications studied, other utilities performing repowering studies can draw on the types of consideration entertained, alternatives examined, and factors and rationale leading to rejection or acceptance of a given repowering approach. 12 figs., 12 tabs.

Rives, J.D.; Catina, J.

1987-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Yale ME Turbine Test cell instructions Background  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Yale ME Turbine Test cell instructions Background: The Turbine Technologies Turbojet engine combustion gas backflow into the lab space. Test Cell preparation: 1. Turn on Circuit breakers # 16 of the turbine and check a few items: o Open keyed access door on rear of Turbine enclosure o Check Jet A fuel

Haller, Gary L.

410

AIAA 20033698 Aircraft Gas Turbine Engine  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

AIAA 2003­3698 Aircraft Gas Turbine Engine Simulations W. C. Reynolds , J. J. Alonso, and M. Fatica, Reston, VA 20191­4344 #12;AIAA 2003­3698 Aircraft Gas Turbine Engine Simulations W. C. Reynolds , J. J of the flowpath through complete aircraft gas turbines including the compressor, combustor, turbine, and secondary

Stanford University

411

Combined Heat and Power Plant Steam Turbine  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

waste heat) Gas Turbine University Substation High Pressure Natural Gas Campus Electric Load SouthernCombined Heat and Power Plant Steam Turbine Steam Turbine Chiller Campus Heat Load Steam (recovered Generator Heat Recovery Alternative Uses: 1. Campus heating load 2. Steam turbine chiller to campus cooling

Rose, Michael R.

412

Advanced Coating Development for Gas Turbine Components  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Sacrificial, oxidation-resistant coatings on turbine blades in high-firing temperature gas turbines are wearing out at an unacceptably rapid rate, resulting in excessive downtime and repair costs for turbine operators. This report summarizes the results of an exploratory development project that assessed the feasibility of decelerating the degradation rate of an MCrAlY coating on several turbine blade alloys.

2000-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Coatings for gas turbines; Specialized coatings boost, maintain turbine efficiency  

SciTech Connect

Airlines have been coating their jet engines for the past 30 years, thereby avoiding corrosion, erosion and wear. More recently, operators of mechanical-drive gas turbines have come to realize the value of coatings as a way to keep down costs. This paper describes specialized coatings technology which has evolved for gas turbines. Coatings have been designed for specific areas and even specific components within the turbine. Because operators must often request these coatings when buying new equipment or at overhaul, a basic understanding of the technology is presented.

1988-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

High freestream turbulence levels have been shown to greatly augment the heat transfer along a gas turbine airfoil, particularly for the first stage  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

along a gas turbine airfoil, particularly for the first stage nozzle guide vane. For this study of the variables affecting boundary layer development on gas turbine airfoils, studies need to be performed of a variety of gas turbine combustors have shown that the levels can range between 8% and 40% (Kuotmos and Mc

Thole, Karen A.

415

Commercialization of coal-fueled gas turbine systems  

SciTech Connect

The overall goal of this program is to develop and demonstrate the technological bases for economically attractive, commercial, coal- fired gas turbine systems. Objectives to accomplish this goal include these: identify candidate technical approaches to meet the challenges of using coal as a turbine fuel, screen the candidate technical approaches by testing their relative performance and evaluating their effects on the economic attractiveness of commercial coal-fueled systems, demonstrate the most promising technologies and associated components in proof-of-concept system tests leading up to commercialization. This paper presents background information on the project, and results on cogeneration systems, combined cycle power plants to include performance and cost.

Wilkes, C.; Wenglarz, R.A.

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Commercialization of coal-fueled gas turbine systems  

SciTech Connect

The overall goal of this program is to develop and demonstrate the technological bases for economically attractive, commercial, coal- fired gas turbine systems. Objectives to accomplish this goal include these: identify candidate technical approaches to meet the challenges of using coal as a turbine fuel, screen the candidate technical approaches by testing their relative performance and evaluating their effects on the economic attractiveness of commercial coal-fueled systems, demonstrate the most promising technologies and associated components in proof-of-concept system tests leading up to commercialization. This paper presents background information on the project, and results on cogeneration systems, combined cycle power plants to include performance and cost.

Wilkes, C.; Wenglarz, R.A.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

NREL: Wind Research - Small Wind Turbine Research  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Small Wind Turbine Research Small Wind Turbine Research The National Renewable Energy Laboratory and U.S. Department of Energy (NREL/DOE) Small Wind Project's objectives are to reduce barriers to wind energy expansion, stabilize the market, and expand the number of small wind turbine systems installed in the United States. "Small wind turbine" refers to a turbine smaller than or equal to 100 kilowatts (kW). "Distributed wind" includes small and midsize turbines (100 kW through 1 megawatt [MW]). Since 1996, NREL's small wind turbine research has provided turbine testing, turbine development, and prototype refinement leading to more commercially available small wind turbines. Work is conducted under the following areas. You can also learn more about state and federal policies

418

NREL: Wind Research - Midsize Wind Turbine Research  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Midsize Wind Turbine Research Midsize Wind Turbine Research To facilitate the development and commercialization of midsize wind turbines (turbines with a capacity rating of more than 100 kW up to 1 MW), the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and NREL launched the Midsize Wind Turbine Development Project. In its latest study, NREL determined that there is a substantial market for midsize wind turbines. One of the most significant barriers to the midsize turbine market is the lack of turbines available for deployment; there are few midsize turbines on the market today. The objectives of the Midsize Wind Turbine Development Project are to reduce the barriers to wind energy expansion by filling an existing domestic technology gap; facilitate partnerships; accelerate maturation of existing U.S. wind energy businesses; and incorporate process improvement

419

Coupled Dynamic Modeling of Floating Wind Turbine Systems: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This article presents a collaborative research program that the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) have undertaken to develop innovative and cost-effective floating and mooring systems for offshore wind turbines in water depths of 10-200 m. Methods for the coupled structural, hydrodynamic, and aerodynamic analysis of floating wind turbine systems are presented in the frequency domain. This analysis was conducted by coupling the aerodynamics and structural dynamics code FAST [4] developed at NREL with the wave load and response simulation code WAMIT (Wave Analysis at MIT) [15] developed at MIT. Analysis tools were developed to consider coupled interactions between the wind turbine and the floating system. These include the gyroscopic loads of the wind turbine rotor on the tower and floater, the aerodynamic damping introduced by the wind turbine rotor, the hydrodynamic damping introduced by wave-body interactions, and the hydrodynamic forces caused by wave excitation. Analyses were conducted for two floater concepts coupled with the NREL 5-MW Offshore Baseline wind turbine in water depths of 10-200 m: the MIT/NREL Shallow Drafted Barge (SDB) and the MIT/NREL Tension Leg Platform (TLP). These concepts were chosen to represent two different methods of achieving stability to identify differences in performance and cost of the different stability methods. The static and dynamic analyses of these structures evaluate the systems' responses to wave excitation at a range of frequencies, the systems' natural frequencies, and the standard deviations of the systems' motions in each degree of freedom in various wind and wave environments. This article in various wind and wave environments. This article explores the effects of coupling the wind turbine with the floating platform, the effects of water depth, and the effects of wind speed on the systems' performance. An economic feasibility analysis of the two concepts was also performed. Key cost components included the material and construction costs of the buoy; material and installation costs of the tethers, mooring lines, and anchor technologies; costs of transporting and installing the system at the chosen site; and the cost of mounting the wind turbine to the platform. The two systems were evaluated based on their static and dynamic performance and the total system installed cost. Both systems demonstrated acceptable motions, and have estimated costs of $1.4-$1.8 million, not including the cost of the wind turbine, the power electronics, or the electrical transmission.

Wayman, E. N.; Sclavounos, P. D.; Butterfield, S.; Jonkman, J.; Musial, W.

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

Coupled Dynamic Modeling of Floating Wind Turbine Systems: Preprint  

SciTech Connect

This article presents a collaborative research program that the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) have undertaken to develop innovative and cost-effective floating and mooring systems for offshore wind turbines in water depths of 10-200 m. Methods for the coupled structural, hydrodynamic, and aerodynamic analysis of floating wind turbine systems are presented in the frequency domain. This analysis was conducted by coupling the aerodynamics and structural dynamics code FAST [4] developed at NREL with the wave load and response simulation code WAMIT (Wave Analysis at MIT) [15] developed at MIT. Analysis tools were developed to consider coupled interactions between the wind turbine and the floating system. These include the gyroscopic loads of the wind turbine rotor on the tower and floater, the aerodynamic damping introduced by the wind turbine rotor, the hydrodynamic damping introduced by wave-body interactions, and the hydrodynamic forces caused by wave excitation. Analyses were conducted for two floater concepts coupled with the NREL 5-MW Offshore Baseline wind turbine in water depths of 10-200 m: the MIT/NREL Shallow Drafted Barge (SDB) and the MIT/NREL Tension Leg Platform (TLP). These concepts were chosen to represent two different methods of achieving stability to identify differences in performance and cost of the different stability methods. The static and dynamic analyses of these structures evaluate the systems' responses to wave excitation at a range of frequencies, the systems' natural frequencies, and the standard deviations of the systems' motions in each degree of freedom in various wind and wave environments. This article in various wind and wave environments. This article explores the effects of coupling the wind turbine with the floating platform, the effects of water depth, and the effects of wind speed on the systems' performance. An economic feasibility analysis of the two concepts was also performed. Key cost components included the material and construction costs of the buoy; material and installation costs of the tethers, mooring lines, and anchor technologies; costs of transporting and installing the system at the chosen site; and the cost of mounting the wind turbine to the platform. The two systems were evaluated based on their static and dynamic performance and the total system installed cost. Both systems demonstrated acceptable motions, and have estimated costs of $1.4-$1.8 million, not including the cost of the wind turbine, the power electronics, or the electrical transmission.

Wayman, E. N.; Sclavounos, P. D.; Butterfield, S.; Jonkman, J.; Musial, W.

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "turbine performance ampere-hour-a" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Steam turbine gland seal control system  

SciTech Connect

A high pressure steam turbine having a sealing gland where the turbine rotor penetrates the casing of the turbine. Under certain conditions the gland is sealed by an auxiliary steam supply, and under other conditions the gland is self sealed by turbine inlet steam. A control system is provided to modify the temperature of the auxiliary steam to be more compatible with the self sealing steam, so as to eliminate thermal shock to the turbine rotor.

Martin, H. F.

1985-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

422

Turbine Blade Shape Favorable for Fish Survival  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Various mechanisms associated with turbine design and operation injure fish passing through hydro turbines. Pilot-scale tests with various fish species and sizes showed that most turbine passage injury and mortality are caused by blade strike. Leading edge blade strike is particularly important for turbines with numerous blades. Very little information and data are available on the mechanics of fish struck by turbine blades and the resulting injury and mortality rates. Determining what leading edge blade...

2008-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

423

Steam assisted gas turbine engine  

SciTech Connect

A gas turbine engine is disclosed which has an integral steam power system consisting of heat absorbing boilers which convert an unpressurized liquid into an expanded and heated steam by utilizing heat normally lost through component cooling systems and the exhaust system. Upon completion of the steam power cycle, the steam is condensed back to a liquid state through a condensing system located within the compressor and other functional components of the gas turbine engine. A system of high pressure air and friction seals restrict steam or liquid condensate within designed flow bounds. The gas turbine engine disclosed is designed to give improved fuel efficiency and economy for aircraft and land use applications.

Coronel, P.D.

1982-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

424

Gas turbine effects on integrated-gasification-combined-cycle power plant operations  

SciTech Connect

This study used detailed thermodynamic modeling procedures to assess the influence of different gas turbine characteristics and steam cycle conditions on the design and off-design performance of integrated gasification-combined-cycle (IGCC) power plants. IGCC plant simulation models for a base case plant with Texaco gasifiers and both radiant and convective syngas coolers were developed, and three different types of gas turbines were evaluated as well as non-reheat and reheat steam systems. Results indicated that improving the gas turbine heat rate significantly improves the heat rate of the IGCC power plant. In addition results indicated that using a reheat steam system with current gas turbines improves IGCC performance, though as gas turbine efficiency increases, the impact of using a reheat steam system decreases. Increasing gas turbine temperatures from 1985{degree}F to 2500{degree}F was also found to have the potential to reduce overall IGCC system heat rates by approximately 700 BTU/kWh. The methodologies and models developed for this work are extremely useful tools for investigating the impact of specific gas turbine and steam cycle conditions on the overall performance of IGCC power plants. Moreover, they can assist utilities during the preliminary engineering phase of an IGCC project in evaluating the cost effectiveness of using specific gas turbines and steam cycles in the overall plant design. 45 refs., 20 figs., 10 tabs.

Eustis, F.H. (Stanford Univ., CA (USA). High Temperature Gasdynamics Lab.)

1990-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

Retooling Michigan: Tanks to Turbines | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Tanks to Turbines Tanks to Turbines Retooling Michigan: Tanks to Turbines June 8, 2010 - 6:13pm Addthis Joshua DeLung Editor's Note: This story was updated Oct. 13, 2010, to reflect the additional equipment purchases, manufacturing goals and customer additions for Loc Performance Products. Tanks strike fear in enemies during battle, and for good reason - the 120-mm main gun of an M1 Abrams tank is both deafening and destructive. Now a company that has manufactured geared systems for those mobile weapons for more than 20 years is part of the forces working toward energy security and independence. Weapons of mass production In southern Michigan, Loc Performance Products is retooling space in its existing factory in Plymouth, where it builds gears and gearboxes -which provide rotating force from gears to move vehicles - for the U.S.

426

Development of a low swirl injector concept for gas turbines  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Injector Concept for Gas Turbines Robert K. Cheng * , Scottconcept for ultra- low NO x gas turbines. Low-swirl flamevirtually every industrial gas turbine manufacturer to meet

Cheng, R.K.; Fable, S.A.; Schmidt, D.; Arellano, L.; Smith, K.O.

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

An experimental and numerical study of wind turbine seismic behavior  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

3.2.1 Description of Test Wind Turbine . . . . . .Figure 1.2: Components of a modern wind turbine . . . . . .Wind Turbine . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Prowell, I.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

Gamesa Wind Turbines Pvt Ltd | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Turbines Pvt Ltd Jump to: navigation, search Name Gamesa Wind Turbines Pvt. Ltd. Place Chennai, Tamil Nadu, India Sector Wind energy Product Chennai-based wind turbine...

429

Experimental Study of Stability Limits for Slender Wind Turbine Blades.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??There is a growing interest in extracting more power per turbine by increasing the rotor size in offshore wind turbines. As a result, the turbine… (more)

Ladge, Shruti

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

The Virtual Gas Turbine System for Alloy Assesment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Key words: Virtual turbine, Alloy design program, Gas turbine design program, Nickel-base ... developed a virtual gas turbine (VT) system as a combination of.

431

An experimental and numerical study of wind turbine seismic behavior  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2.2.1 Turbine Description . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .112 4.2 Description of Turbine . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3.2.1 Description of Test Wind Turbine . . . . . .

Prowell, I.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

Turbine-Generator Auxiliary Systems, Volume 2: Turbine Steam Seal System Maintenance Guide  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Turbine-Generator Auxiliary Systems, Volume 2: Turbine Steam Seal System Maintenance Guide provides nuclear and fossil plant personnel with operation and maintenance guidance on the turbine steam seal system components.

2006-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

433

NETL: Turbines - UTSR Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

6 High Pressure Kinetics of Syngas and Nearly Pure Hydrogen Fuels Univ of Colorado 6 High Pressure Kinetics of Syngas and Nearly Pure Hydrogen Fuels Univ of Colorado John Daily Project Dates: 8/1/2007 - 9/30/2010 Area of Research: Combusion Federal Project Manager: Mark Freeman Project Objective: The goal of this project is to develop the necessary chemical kinetics information to understand the combustion of syngas and nearly pure hydrogen fuels at conditions of interest in gas turbine combustion. Objectves are to explore high-pressure kinetics by making detailed composition measurements of combustion intermediates and products in a flow reactor using molecular beam/mass spectrometry (MB/MS) and matrix isolation spectroscopy (MIS), to compare experimental data with calculations using existing mechanisms, and to use theoretical methods to

434

NETL: Turbines - UTSR Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2 An Experimental and Chemical Kinetics Study of the Combustion of Synga and High Hydrogen Content Fuels Penn State University & Princeton University 2 An Experimental and Chemical Kinetics Study of the Combustion of Synga and High Hydrogen Content Fuels Penn State University & Princeton University Robert Santoro (PSU), Fred Dryer (Princeton), & Yiguang Ju (Princeton) Project Dates: 10/1/2009 - 9/30/2012 Area of Research: Combusion Federal Project Manager: Mark Freeman Project Objective: To resolve the recently noted difficulties observed in the ability of existing elementary kinetic models to predict experimental ignition delay, burning rate, and homogenous chemical kinetic oxidation characteristics of hydrogen and hydrogen/carbon monoxide fuels with air and with air diluted with nitrogen and/or carbon dioxide at pressures and dilutions in the range of those contemplated for gas turbine applicaitons

435

NETL: Turbines - UTSR Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1 Numerical and Experimental Study of Mixing Processes Associated with Hydrogen and High Hydrogen Content Fuels University of California -- Irvine 1 Numerical and Experimental Study of Mixing Processes Associated with Hydrogen and High Hydrogen Content Fuels University of California -- Irvine Vincent McDonell Project Dates: 10/1/2008 - 9/30/2010 Area of Research: Combusion Federal Project Manager: Mark Freeman Project Objective: The goal of this comprehensive research is to evaluate methods for characterizing fuel profiles of coal syngas and high hydrogen content (HHC) fuels and the level of mixing, and apply these methods to provide detailed fuel concentration profile data for various premixer system configurations relevant for turbine applications. The specific project objectives include: (1) Establish and apply reliable, accurate measurement methods to establish instantaneous and time averaged fuel

436

Multiple piece turbine blade  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A turbine rotor blade with a spar and shell construction, the spar including an internal cooling supply channel extending from an inlet end on a root section and ending near the tip end, and a plurality of external cooling channels formed on both side of the spar, where a middle external cooling channel is connected to the internal cooling supply channels through a row of holes located at a middle section of the channels. The spar and the shell are held together by hooks that define serpentine flow passages for the cooling air and include an upper serpentine flow circuit and a lower serpentine flow circuit. the serpentine flow circuits all discharge into a leading edge passage or a trailing edge passage.

Kimmel, Keith D (Jupiter, FL)

2012-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

437

Wind turbine rotor aileron  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A wind turbine has a rotor with at least one blade which has an aileron which is adjusted by an actuator. A hinge has two portions, one for mounting a stationary hinge arm to the blade, the other for coupling to the aileron actuator. Several types of hinges can be used, along with different actuators. The aileron is designed so that it has a constant chord with a number of identical sub-assemblies. The leading edge of the aileron has at least one curved portion so that the aileron does not vent over a certain range of angles, but vents if the position is outside the range. A cyclic actuator can be mounted to the aileron to adjust the position periodically. Generally, the aileron will be adjusted over a range related to the rotational position of the blade. A method for operating the cyclic assembly is also described.

Coleman, Clint (Warren, VT); Kurth, William T. (Warren, VT)

1994-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

438

Turbine blade cooling  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A turbine rotor blade comprises a shank portion, a tip portion and an airfoil. The airfoil has a pressure side wall and a suction side wall that are interconnected by a plurality of partition sidewalls, defining an internal cooling passageway within the airfoil. The internal cooling passageway includes at least one radial outflow passageway to direct a cooling medium flow from the shank portion towards the tip portion and at least one radial inflow passageway to direct a cooling medium flow from the tip portion towards the shank portion. A number of mixing ribs are disposed on the partition sidewalls within the radial outflow passageways so as to enhance the thermal mixing of the cooling medium flow, thereby producing improved heat transfer over a broad range of the Buoyancy number.

Staub, Fred Wolf (Schenectady, NY); Willett, Fred Thomas (Niskayuna, NY)

1999-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

439

Turbine blade cooling  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A turbine rotor blade comprises a shank portion, a tip portion and an airfoil. The airfoil has a pressure side wall and a suction side wall that are interconnected by a plurality of partition sidewalls, defining an internal cooling passageway within the airfoil. The internal cooling passageway includes at least one radial outflow passageway to direct a cooling medium flow from the shank portion towards the tip portion and at least one radial inflow passageway to direct a cooling medium flow from the tip portion towards the shank portion. A number of mixing ribs are disposed on the partition sidewalls within the radial outflow passageways so as to enhance the thermal mixing of the cooling medium flow, thereby producing improved heat transfer over a broad range of the Buoyancy number.

Staub, Fred Wolf (Schenectady, NY); Willett, Fred Thomas (Niskayuna, NY)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

Turbine blade cooling  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A turbine rotor blade comprises a shank portion, a tip portion and an airfoil. The airfoil has a pressure side wall and a suction side wall that are interconnected by a plurality of partition sidewalls, defining an internal cooling passageway within the airfoil. The internal cooling passageway includes at least one radial outflow passageway to direct a cooling medium flow from the shank portion towards the tip portion and at least one radial inflow passageway to direct a cooling medium flow from the tip portion towards the shank portion. A number of mixing ribs are disposed on the partition sidewalls within the radial outflow passageways so as to enhance the thermal mixing of the cooling medium flow, thereby producing improved heat transfer over a broad range of the Buoyancy number. 13 figs.

Staub, F.W.; Willett, F.T.

1999-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "turbine performance ampere-hour-a" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

NETL: News Release - NETL Opens Fuel Cell/Turbine Hybrid Research Facility  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

May 20, 2004 May 20, 2004 NETL Opens Fuel Cell/Turbine Hybrid Research Facility MORGANTOWN, WV - The Hybrid Performance Facility - called the Hyper facility - is now fully operational at the Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL). This one-of-a-kind facility, developed by NETL's Office of Science and Technology, will be used to develop control strategies for the reliable operation of fuel cell/turbine hybrids. - NETL's Fuel Cell/Turbine Hybrid Facility - The Hyper facility allows assessment of dynamic control and performance issues in fuel cell/turbine hybrid systems. Combined systems of turbines and fuel cells are expected to meet power efficiency targets that will help eliminate, at competitive costs, environmental concerns associated with the use of fossil fuels for

442

Testing State-Space Controls for the Controls Advanced Research Turbine: Preprint  

SciTech Connect

Control can improve wind turbine performance by enhancing energy capture and reducing dynamic loads. At the National Renewable Energy Laboratory, we are implementing and testing state-space controls on the Controls Advanced Research Turbine (CART), a turbine specifically configured to test advanced controls. We show the design of control systems to regulate turbine speed in Region 3 using rotor collective pitch and reduce dynamic loads in Regions 2 and 3 using generator torque. These controls enhance damping in the first drive train torsion mode. We base these designs on sensors typically used in commercial turbines. We evaluate the performance of these controls by showing field test results. We also compare results from these modern controllers to results from a baseline proportional integral controller for the CART. Finally, we report conclusions to this work and outline future studies.

Wright, A. D.; Fingersh, L. J.; Balas, M. J.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

Safety and Function Test Report for the Viryd CS8 Wind Turbine  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This test was conducted as part of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Independent Testing project. This project was established to help reduce the barriers of wind energy expansion by providing independent testing results for small turbines. Several turbines were selected for testing at the National Wind Technology Center (NWTC) at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) as a part of the Small Wind Turbine Independent Testing project. Safety and function testing is one of up to five tests that may be performed on the turbines. Other tests include duration, power performance, acoustic noise, and power quality. Viryd Technologies, Inc. of Austin, Texas, was the recipient of the DOE grant and provided the turbine for testing.

Roadman, J.; Murphy, M.; van Dam, J.

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

SUSTAINABLE CONCRETE FOR WIND TURBINE FOUNDATIONS.  

SciTech Connect

The use of wind power to generate electricity continues to grow, especially given commitments by various countries throughout the world to ensure that a significant percentage of energy comes from renewable sources. In order to meet such objectives, increasingly larger turbines with higher capacity are being developed. The engineering aspects of larger turbine development tend to focus on design and materials for blades and towers. However, foundations are also a critical component of large wind turbines and represent a significant cost of wind energy projects. Ongoing wind research at BNL is examining two areas: (a) structural response analysis of wind turbine-tower-foundation systems and (b) materials engineering of foundations. This work is investigating the dynamic interactions in wind turbine systems, which in turn assists the wind industry in achieving improved reliability and more cost efficient foundation designs. The results reported herein cover initial studies of concrete mix designs for large wind turbine foundations and how these may be tailored to reduce cost and incorporate sustainability and life cycle concepts. The approach taken was to investigate material substitutions so that the environmental, energy and CO{sub 2}-impact of concrete could be reduced. The use of high volumes of ''waste'' materials in concrete was examined. These materials included fly ash, blast furnace slag and recycled concrete aggregate. In addition, the use of steel fiber reinforcement as a means to improve mechanical properties and potentially reduce the amount of bar reinforcement in concrete foundations was studied. Four basic mixes were considered. These were: (1) conventional mix with no material substitutions, (2) 50% replacement of cement with fly ash, (3) 50% replacement of cement with blast furnace slag and (4) 25% replacement of cement with fly ash and 25% replacement with blast furnace slag. Variations on these mixes included the addition of 1% by volume steel fibers. The use of recycled concrete aggregate in the conventional and 50% slag mixes was also studied. Properties investigated included compressive and tensile strengths, elastic modulus, coefficient of permeability, thermal conductivity and durability in seawater and sulfate solutions. It was determined that the mixes containing 50% slag gave the best overall performance. Slag was particularly beneficial for concrete that used recycled aggregate and could reduce strength losses. Initial durability results indicated that corrosion of fibers in the different concrete mixes when exposed to seawater was minimal. Future research needs to include more detailed studies of mix design and properties of concrete for wind turbine foundations. Emphasis on slag-modified mixes with natural and recycled concrete aggregate is recommended. The proportion of slag that can be incorporated in the concrete needs to be optimized, as does the grading of recycled aggregate. The potential for using silica fume in conjunction with slag is worth exploring as this may further enhance strength and durability. Longer-term durability studies are necessary and other pertinent properties of concrete that require investigation include damping characteristics, pullout strength, fatigue strength and risk of thermal cracking. The properties of sustainable concrete mixes need to be integrated with studies on the structural behavior of wind turbine foundations in order to determine the optimal mix design and to examine means of reducing conservatism and cost of foundations.

BERNDT,M.L.

2004-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

Developing an acoustic discharge measurement technique for hydroelectric performance testing.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The efficient operation of hydroelectric generating plants requires an accurate definition of the performance relationships of each turbine/generator unit. Of the information obtained by performance… (more)

Gawne, Kevin D.

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

Western Turbine | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Turbine Turbine Jump to: navigation, search Name Western Turbine Place Aurora, Colorado Zip 80011 Sector Wind energy Product Wind Turbine Installation and Maintainance. Coordinates 39.325162°, -79.54975° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":39.325162,"lon":-79.54975,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

447

Turbine Oil Lube Notes Compilation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report is a special compilation of the EPRI Nuclear Maintenance Applications Center's (NMAC's) "Lube Notes" articles (extracted from "Lube Notes Compilation, 1989-2001 (Report Number 1006848)) that relate specifically to the topic of turbine oils.

2002-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

448

Rim seal for turbine wheel  

SciTech Connect

A turbine wheel assembly includes a disk having a plurality of blades therearound. A ceramic ring is mounted to the housing of the turbine wheel assembly. A labyrinth rim seal mounted on the disk cooperates with the ceramic ring to seal the hot gases acting on the blades from the disk. The ceramic ring permits a tighter clearance between the labyrinth rim seal and the ceramic ring.

Glezer, Boris (Del Mar, CA); Boyd, Gary L. (Alpine, CA); Norton, Paul F. (San Diego, CA)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

Onshore Wind Turbines Life Extension  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Wind turbines are currently type-certified for nominal 20-year design lives, but many wind industry stakeholders are considering the possibility of extending the operating lives of their projects by 5, 10, or 15 years. Life extension—the operation of an asset beyond the nominal design life—is just one option to maximize the financial return of these expensive assets. Other options include repowering, upgrading, or uprating a turbine.In order to make informed decisions ...

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

High temperature turbine engine structure  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A high temperature ceramic/metallic turbine engine includes a metallic housing which journals a rotor member of the turbine engine. A ceramic disk-like shroud portion of the engine is supported on the metallic housing portion and maintains a close running clearance with the rotor member. A ceramic spacer assembly maintains the close running clearance of the shroud portion and rotor member despite differential thermal movements between the shroud portion and metallic housing portion.

Carruthers, William D. (Mesa, AZ); Boyd, Gary L. (Tempe, AZ)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

High temperature turbine engine structure  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A high temperature ceramic/metallic turbine engine includes a metallic housing which journals a rotor member of the turbine engine. A ceramic disk-like shroud portion of the engine is supported on the metallic housing portion and maintains a close running clearance with the rotor member. A ceramic spacer assembly maintains the close running clearance of the shroud portion and rotor member despite differential thermal movements between the shroud portion and metallic housing portion.

Carruthers, William D. (Mesa, AZ); Boyd, Gary L. (Tempe, AZ)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

452

High temperature turbine engine structure  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A high temperature ceramic/metallic turbine engine includes a metallic housing which journals a rotor member of the turbine engine. A ceramic disk-like shroud portion of the engine is supported on the metallic housing portion and maintains a close running clearance with the rotor member. A ceramic spacer assembly maintains the close running clearance of the shroud portion and rotor member despite differential thermal movements between the shroud portion and metallic housing portion.

Carruthers, William D. (Mesa, AZ); Boyd, Gary L. (Tempe, AZ)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

453

DOE's Advanced Turbine Systems Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper discusses the Advanced Turbine Systems (ATS) Program, which is necessary to achieve METC's vision for future IGCC systems. This major new program is a cooperative effort in which DOE's Office of Fossil Energy (FE) and Office of Conservation and Renewable Energy (CE) are joining forces with the private sector to develop ultra-high efficiency gas turbine systems. A goal of this Program is to have a utility-size gas turbine with a 60 percent efficiency (lower heating value basis (LHV)) ready for commercialization by the year 2002. (While this paper focuses on utility-size turbines which are the primary interest of this audience, an ultra-high efficiency, industrial-size gas turbine will also be developed in the ATS Program with a comparable improvement in efficiency.) Natural gas is the target fuel of the Program, a recognition by DOE that natural gas will play a significant role in supplying future power generation needs in the US. However, to insure that the US has fuel supply options, ATS designs will be adaptable to coal and biomass fuels. Therefore, the ATS Program will directly benefit IGCC and other advanced coal based power generation systems. Cost and efficiency improvements in the turbine system as well as in the gasification and gas stream cleanup plant sections will enable IGCC to reach a cost target of $1,000--$1,280/kW and an efficiency goal of 52 percent (higher heating value basis (HHV)) in the post-2000 market.

Bechtel, T.F.; Bajura, R.A.; Salvador, L.A.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

Biphase turbine bottoming cycle for a diesel engine  

SciTech Connect

Application of a two-phase turbine system to waste heat recovery was examined. Bottoming cycle efficiencies ranging from 15 to 30% were calculated for a 720/sup 0/F diesel exhaust temperature. A single stage demonstration unit, designed for non-toxic fluids (water and DowTherm A) and for atmospheric seals and bearings, had a cycle efficiency of 23%. The net output power was 276 hp at 8,100 rpm, increasing the total shaft power from 1,800 hp for the diesel alone, to 2,076 hp for the combined system. A four stage organic turbine, for the same application, had a rotational speed of 14,700 rpm while a four stage steam turbine had 26,000 rpm. Fabrication drawings were prepared for the turbine and nozzle. The major improvement leading to higher cycle efficiency and lower turbine rpm was found to be the use of a liquid component with lower sensible heat. A reduction in capital cost was found to result from the use of a contact heat exchanger instead of tube-fin construction. The cost for a contact heat exchanger was only $35-52/kWe compared to $98/kWe for a tube-fin heat exchanger. Design drawings and materials list were prepared. A program resulting in the demonstration of a two-phase bottoming system was planned and the required cost estimated. The program would result in a feasibility test of the nozzle and turbine at the end of the first year, a laboratory performance test of the bottoming system by the end of the second year and a field demonstration test and laboratory endurance test of the bottoming system during the third year. The blowdown test rig for the first year's program and test turbine were designed.

Ahmad, S.; Hays, L.

1977-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

455

Industrial Gas Turbines | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Industrial Gas Turbines Industrial Gas Turbines Industrial Gas Turbines November 1, 2013 - 11:40am Addthis A gas turbine is a heat engine that uses high-temperature, high-pressure gas as the working fluid. Part of the heat supplied by the gas is converted directly into mechanical work. High-temperature, high-pressure gas rushes out of the combustor and pushes against the turbine blades, causing them to rotate. In most cases, hot gas is produced by burning a fuel in air. This is why gas turbines are often referred to as "combustion" turbines. Because gas turbines are compact, lightweight, quick-starting, and simple to operate, they are used widely in industry, universities and colleges, hospitals, and commercial buildings. Simple-cycle gas turbines convert a portion of input energy from the fuel

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Industrial Gas Turbines | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Industrial Gas Turbines Industrial Gas Turbines Industrial Gas Turbines November 1, 2013 - 11:40am Addthis A gas turbine is a heat engine that uses high-temperature, high-pressure gas as the working fluid. Part of the heat supplied by the gas is converted directly into mechanical work. High-temperature, high-pressure gas rushes out of the combustor and pushes against the turbine blades, causing them to rotate. In most cases, hot gas is produced by burning a fuel in air. This is why gas turbines are often referred to