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1

Generating Resources Combined Cycle Combustion Turbine  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

turbine (s) Heat recovery steam generator (s) - HRSG with or without duct firing Natural gas supply11/17/2014 1 Generating Resources Combined Cycle Combustion Turbine Utility Scale Solar PV Steven doing recently around two key supply-side resource technologies 1. Combined Cycle Combustion Turbine

2

FUEL CELL/MICRO-TURBINE COMBINED CYCLE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A wide variety of conceptual design studies have been conducted that describe ultra-high efficiency fossil power plant cycles. The most promising of these ultra-high efficiency cycles incorporate high temperature fuel cells with a gas turbine. Combining fuel cells with a gas turbine increases overall cycle efficiency while reducing per kilowatt emissions. This study has demonstrated that the unique approach taken to combining a fuel cell and gas turbine has both technical and economic merit. The approach used in this study eliminates most of the gas turbine integration problems associated with hybrid fuel cell turbine systems. By using a micro-turbine, and a non-pressurized fuel cell the total system size (kW) and complexity has been reduced substantially from those presented in other studies, while maintaining over 70% efficiency. The reduced system size can be particularly attractive in the deregulated electrical generation/distribution environment where the market may not demand multi-megawatt central stations systems. The small size also opens up the niche markets to this high efficiency, low emission electrical generation option.

Larry J. Chaney; Mike R. Tharp; Tom W. Wolf; Tim A. Fuller; Joe J. Hartvigson

1999-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

Steam turbines of the Ural Turbine Works for advanced projects of combined-cycle plants  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We describe the design features, basic thermal circuits, and efficiency of steam turbines developed on the basis of serially produced steam turbines of Ural Turbine Works and used as part of combined-cycle plants...

G. D. Barinberg; A. E. Valamin; A. Yu. Kultyshev

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

Steam turbines produced by the Ural Turbine Works for combined-cycle plants  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The most interesting and innovative solutions adopted in the projects of steam turbines for combined-cycle plants with capacities from...

A. E. Valamin; A. Yu. Kultyshev; T. L. Shibaev; A. A. Gol’dberg…

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

Steam turbines of the Ural Turbine Works for combined-cycle plants  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Matters concerned with selecting the equipment for combined-cycle plants within the framework of work on ... Works regarding the supplies of steam turbines for combined-cycle plants used at retrofitted and newly ...

G. D. Barinberg; A. E. Valamin; A. Yu. Kultyshev; T. Yu. Linder

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Single pressure steam bottoming cycle for gas turbines combined cycle  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This patent describes a process for recapturing waste heat from the exhaust of a gas turbine to drive a high pressure-high temperature steam turbine and a low pressure steam turbine. It comprises: delivering the exhaust of the gas turbine to the hot side of an economizer-reheater apparatus; delivering a heated stream of feedwater and recycled condensate through the cold side of the economizer-reheater apparatus in an indirect heat exchange relationship with the gas turbine exhaust on the hot side of the economizer-reheater apparatus to elevate the temperature below the pinch point of the boiler; delivering the discharge from the high pressure-high temperature steam turbine through the economizer-reheater apparatus in an indirect heat exchange relationship with the gas turbine exhaust on the hot side of the economizer-reheater apparatus; driving the high pressure-high temperature steam turbine with the discharge stream of feedwater and recycled condensate which is heated to a temperature below the pinch point of the boiler by the economizer-reheater apparatus; and driving the low pressure steam turbine with the discharged stream of the high pressure-high temperature steam turbine reheated below the pinch point of the boiler by the economizer-reheater apparatus.

Zervos, N.

1990-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

7

Effect of Gas/Steam Turbine Inlet Temperatures on Combined Cycle Having Air Transpiration Cooled Gas Turbine  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Worldwide efforts are being made for further improving the gas/steam combined cycle performance by having better ... . The scope of improvement is possible through turbines having higher turbine inlet temperature...

S. Kumar; O. Singh

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

Potential solar thermal integration in Spanish combined cycle gas turbines  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Combined cycle gas turbines (CCGTs) are volumetric machines, which means that their net power output decreases at air temperatures above the design point. Such temperatures generally occur during periods of high solar irradiation. Many countries where these conditions occur, including Spain, have installed a significant number of \\{CCGTs\\} in recent years, with the subsequent yield losses in the summer. This implies enormous potential for solar hybridization, increasing production in peak hours and overall efficiency and reducing CO2 emissions. This paper analyzes the overall potential for solar thermal integration in 51 CCGTS (25,340 MW) in mainland Spain under different operating scenarios based on increasing yield, solar fraction and the hourly operational range adapted to the Spanish electricity market, considering actual meteorological conditions. A production model for integrating solar energy into combined cycles is proposed and described and the code in R is freely released so that the assessment can be replicated.

J. Antonanzas; E. Jimenez; J. Blanco; F. Antonanzas-Torres

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

Coordinated optimization of the parameters of the cooled gas-turbine flow path and the parameters of gas-turbine cycles and combined-cycle power plants  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In the present paper, we evaluate the effectiveness of the coordinated solution to the optimization problem for the parameters of cycles in gas turbine and combined cycle power plants and to the optimization prob...

A. M. Kler; Yu. B. Zakharov; Yu. M. Potanina

2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Chapter 4 - Natural Gas–fired Gas Turbines and Combined Cycle Power Plants  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Gas turbines can burn a range of liquid and gaseous fuels but most burn natural gas. Power plants based on gas turbines are one of the cheapest types of plant to build, but the cost of their electricity depends heavily on the cost of their fuel. Two types of gas turbine are used for power generation: aero-derivative gas turbines and heavy-duty gas turbines. The former are used to provide power to the grid at times of peak demand. The latter are most often found in combined cycle power stations. These are capable of more than 60% efficiency. There are a number of ways of modifying the gas turbine cycle to improve efficiency, including reheating and intercooling. Micro-turbines have been developed for very small-scale generation of both electricity and heat. The main atmospheric emissions from gas turbines are carbon dioxide and nitrogen oxide.

Paul Breeze

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Diagrams of regimes of cogeneration steam turbines for combined-cycle power plants  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

General considerations regarding the form of the steam-consumption diagram for a three-loop cogeneration-type combined-cycle plant are formulated on the basis of ... 12.4 steam turbine for the PGU-410 combined-cycle

A. Yu. Kultyshev; M. Yu. Stepanov; T. Yu. Linder

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Specific features of the schematic solutions adopted in the steam turbine units produced by the Ural Turbine Works and used as part of combined-cycle plants  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Specific features of the schematic solutions adopted in the steam turbine units designed and produced by the Ural Turbine Works for use as part of combined-cycle plants are considered.

A. A. Gol’dberg; T. L. Shibaev; H. C. Paneque Aguilera…

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Apparatus and methods of reheating gas turbine cooling steam and high pressure steam turbine exhaust in a combined cycle power generating system  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

In a combined cycle system having a multi-pressure heat recovery steam generator, a gas turbine and steam turbine, steam for cooling gas turbine components is supplied from the intermediate pressure section of the heat recovery steam generator supplemented by a portion of the steam exhausting from the HP section of the steam turbine, steam from the gas turbine cooling cycle and the exhaust from the HP section of the steam turbine are combined for flow through a reheat section of the HRSG. The reheated steam is supplied to the IP section inlet of the steam turbine. Thus, where gas turbine cooling steam temperature is lower than optimum, a net improvement in performance is achieved by flowing the cooling steam exhausting from the gas turbine and the exhaust steam from the high pressure section of the steam turbine in series through the reheater of the HRSG for applying steam at optimum temperature to the IP section of the steam turbine.

Tomlinson, Leroy Omar (Niskayuna, NY); Smith, Raub Warfield (Ballston Lake, NY)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Analysis of design and part load performance of micro gas turbine/organic Rankine cycle combined systems  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This study analyzes the design and part load performance of a power generation system combining a micro gas turbine (MGT) and an organic Rankine cycle (ORC). Design performances of cycles adopting several differe...

Joon Hee Lee; Tong Seop Kim

2006-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

New draft projects of steam turbines for combined-cycle plants  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We describe the design features, basic thermal circuits, and efficiency of steam turbines developed on the basis of serially produced steam turbines at the Ural Turbine Works and intended for use as part of combined

G. D. Barinberg; A. E. Valamin; A. Yu. Kultyshev; A. A. Ivanovskii…

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Operating experience of single cylinder steam turbine with 40 inch last blade applied for combined cycle plant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Inquiries and orders for combined cycle plant have increased recently because of the better efficiency of combined cycle plant in comparison with the usual fossil fuel power plant. The typical features of the steam turbine for combined cycle plant are the lower inlet steam conditions and the more driving steam flow quantity compared with the steam turbine for usual fossil fuel plants. This paper introduces the design and results of operation about 122 MW single cylinder steam turbine. Furthermore, the results of periodical overhaul inspection carried out after one year`s commercial operation is also presented.

Kishimoto, Masaru; Yamamoto, Tetsuya [Mitsubishi Heavy Industries, Ltd., Yokohama (Japan); Yokota, Hiroshi [Mitsubishi Heavy Industries, Ltd., Nagasaki (Northern Mariana Islands); Umaya, Masahide [Mitsubishi Heavy Industries, Ltd., Takasago (Japan)

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

17

Enhancement of combined cycle performance using transpiration cooling of gas turbine blades with steam  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Gas/steam combined cycle is synergetic combination of Brayton cycle based topping cycle and Rankine cycle based bottoming cycle, which have capability of operating independently too. Combined cycle performance de...

Sanjay Kumar; Onkar Singh

2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Thermodynamic and design considerations of organic Rankine cycles in combined application with a solar thermal gas turbine  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Concentrated Solar Power (CSP) technologies are considered to provide a significant contribution for the electric power production in the future. Different kinds of technologies are presently in operation or under development, e.g. parabolic troughs, central receivers, solar dish systems and Fresnel reflectors. This paper takes the focus on central receiver technologies, where the solar radiation is concentrated by a field of heliostats in a receiver on the top of a tall tower. To get this CSP technology ready for the future, the system costs have to reduce significantly. The main cost driver in such kind of CSP technologies are the huge amount of heliostats. To reduce the amount of heliostats, and so the investment costs, the efficiency of the energy conversion cycle becomes an important issue. An increase in the cycle efficiency results in a decrease of the solar heliostat field and thus, in a significant cost reduction. The paper presents the results of a thermodynamic model of an Organic Rankine Cycle (ORC) for combined cycle application together with a solar thermal gas turbine. The gas turbine cycle is modeled with an additional intercooler and recuperator and is based on a typical industrial gas turbine in the 2 MW class. The gas turbine has a two stage radial compressor and a three stage axial turbine. The compressed air is preheated within a solar receiver to 950°C before entering the combustor. A hybrid operation of the gas turbine is considered. In order to achieve a further increase of the overall efficiency, the combined operation of the gas turbine and an Organic Rankine Cycle is considered. Therefore an ORC has been set up, which is thermally connected to the gas turbine cycle at two positions. The ORC can be coupled to the solar-thermal gas turbine cycle at the intercooler and after the recuperator. Thus, waste heat from different cycle positions can be transferred to the ORC for additional production of electricity. Within this investigation different working fluids and ORC conditions have been analyzed in order to evaluate the best configuration. The investigations have been performed by application of improved thermodynamic and process analysis tools, which consider the real gas behavior of the analyzed fluids. The results show that by combined operation of the solar thermal gas turbine and the ORC, the combined cycle efficiency is approximately 4%-points higher than in the solar-thermal gas turbine cycle.

R Braun; K Kusterer; T Sugimoto; K Tanimura; D Bohn

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Improving a Pre-Combustion CCS Concept in Gas Turbine Combined Cycle for CHP Production  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This paper describes modifications to improve the feasibility of a pre-combustion CCS concept for a gas turbine combined cycle. A natural gas-fired greenfield combined heat and power (CHP) plant equipped with pre-combustion capture was used as a base case, for which various improvement options were identified, assessed and selected. The base case was modified using the selected improvement options, after which the investment costs were re-evaluated. The results showed that the investment cost can be reduced with 8% by excluding the pre-reformer and the low temperature water-gas-shift reactor from the reforming process. The exclusion of the pre-reformer did not affect the performance of the plant, but the exclusion of the low temperature water-gas-shift reactor led to higher CO2 emissions.

Marjut S. Suomalainen; Antti Arasto; Sebastian Teir; Sari Siitonen

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Thermionic-combustor combined-cycle system. Volume III. A thermionic converter design for gas-turbine combined-cycle systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Thermionic converter design is strongly influenced by the configuration of the heat source and heat sink. These two externally imposed conditions are of major importance in arriving at a viable converter design. In addition to these two factors, the economical and reliable transfer of energy internally within the converter is another major item in the design. The effects of the engineering trade-offs made in arriving at the design chosen for the Gas Turbine Combined Cycle combustor are reviewed.

Fitzpatrick, G.O.; Britt, E.J.; Dick, R.S. Jr.

1981-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "turbine combined cycle" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Combined gas turbine-Rankine turbine power plant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A combined gas turbine-Rankine cycle powerplant with improved part load efficiency is disclosed. The powerplant has a gas turbine with an organic fluid Rankine bottoming cycle which features an inter-cycle regenerator acting between the superheated vapor leaving the Rankine turbine and the compressor inlet air. The regenerator is used selectively as engine power level is reduced below maximum rated power.

Earnest, E.R.

1981-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

22

Coal-gasification/MHD/steam-turbine combined-cycle (GMS) power generation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The coal-gasification/MHD/steam-turbine combined cycle (GMS) refers to magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) systems in which coal gasification is used to supply a clean fuel (free of mineral matter and sulfur) for combustion in an MHD electrical power plant. Advantages of a clean-fuel system include the elimination of mineral matter or slag from all components other than the coal gasifier and gas cleanup system; reduced wear and corrosion on components; and increased seed recovery resulting from reduced exposure of seed to mineral matter or slag. Efficiencies in some specific GMS power plants are shown to be higher than for a comparably sized coal-burning MHD power plant. The use of energy from the MHD exhaust gas to gasify coal (rather than the typical approach of burning part of the coal) results in these higher efficiencies.

Lytle, J.M.; Marchant, D.D.

1980-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

9 - Hybrid fuel cell gas turbine (FC/GT) combined cycle systems  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract: Hybrid fuel cell gas turbine systems consisting of high-temperature fuel cells (HTFCs) integrated into cycles with gas turbines can significantly increase fuel-to-electricity conversion efficiency and lower emissions of greenhouse gases and criteria pollutants from the electric power sector. In addition, the separated anode and cathode compartments of the fuel cell can enable CO2 separation and sequestration for some cycle configurations. Hybrid fuel cell gas turbine technology has the potential to operate on natural gas, digester gas, landfill gas, and coal and biomass syngas. HTFC technologies are emerging with high reliability and durability, which should enable them to be integrated with gas turbine technology to produce modern hybrid power systems. Advanced thermodynamic and dynamic simulation capabilities have been developed and demonstrated to enable future system integration and control.

J. Brouwer

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

System study of an MHD/gas turbine combined-cycle baseload power plant. HTGL report No. 134  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The MHD/gas turbine combined-cycle system has been designed specifically for applications where the availability of cooling water is very limited. The base case systems which were studied consisted of an MHD plant with a gas turbine bottoming plant, and required no cooling water. The gas turbine plant uses only air as its working fluid and receives its energy input from the MHD exhaust gases by means of metal tube heat exchangers. In addition to the base case systems, vapor cycle variation systems were considered which included the addition of a vapor cycle bottoming plant to improve the thermal efficiency. These systems required a small amount of cooling water. The MHD/gas turbine systems were modeled with sufficient detail, using realistic component specifications and costs, so that the thermal and economic performance of the system could be accurately determined. Three cases of MHD/gas turbine systems were studied, with Case I being similar to an MHD/steam system so that a direct comparison of the performances could be made, with Case II being representative of a second generation MHD system, and with Case III considering oxygen enrichment for early commercial applications. The systems are nominally 800 MW/sub e/ to 1000 MW/sub e/ in size. The results show that the MHD/gas turbine system has very good thermal and economic performances while requiring either little or no cooling water. Compared to the MHD/steam system which has a cooling tower heat load of 720 MW, the Base Case I MHD/gas turbine system has a heat rate which is 13% higher and a cost of electricity which is only 7% higher while requiring no cooling water. Case II results show that an improved performance can be expected from second generation MHD/gas turbine systems. Case III results show that an oxygen enriched MHD/gas turbine system may be attractive for early commercial applications in dry regions of the country.

Annen, K.D.

1981-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Erosion-corrosion modelling of gas turbine materials for coal-fired combined cycle power generation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The development of coal-fired combined cycle power generation systems is receiving considerable worldwide interest. The successful development and commercialisation of these new systems require that all the component parts are manufactured from appropriate materials and that these materials give predictable in-service performance. Corrosion and erosion-corrosion, resulting from coal derived particulates, deposition and gaseous species, have been identified as potential life limiting factors for these systems. Models to predict these modes of materials degradation are under active development. This paper outlines the development and testing of models suitable for use in gas turbine environments. The complexity of the corrosion processes means that an empirical approach to model development is required whereas a more mechanistic approach can be applied to erosion processes. For hot corrosion conditions, statistically based corrosion models have been produced using laboratory tests for two coatings and a base alloy at typical type I and type II hot corrosion temperatures (900 and 700°C). These models use the parameters of alkali sulphate deposition flux and \\{SOx\\} partial pressure (at each temperature and for set \\{HCl\\} partial pressures), to predict the rate of the most likely localised damage associated with hot corrosion reactions. For erosion-corrosion modelling, a series of laboratory tests have been carried out to investigate erosion behaviour in corrosive conditions appropriate to coal-fired gas turbines. Materials performance data have been obtained from samples located in the hot gas path of the Grimethorpe PFBC pilot plant, under well characterised conditions, for testing the corrosion and erosion-corrosion models. The models successfully predict the materials damage observed in the pilot plant environments.

N.J. Simms; J.E. Oakey; D.J. Stephenson; P.J. Smith; J.R. Nicholls

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Combined-cycle gas and steam turbine power plants. 2. edition  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

First published in 1991, this book is the leading reference on technical and economic factors of combined-cycle applications now leading the trend toward merchant plants and the peaking power needed in newly deregulated markets around the world, this long-awaited second edition is more important than ever. In it, Kehlhofer -- an internationally recognized authority in the field of new combined-cycle power plants -- and his co-authors widen the scope and detail found in the first edition. Included are tips on system layout, details on controls and automation, and operating instructions. Loaded with case studies, reference tables, and more than 150 figures, this text offers solid advice on system layout, controls and automation, and operating and maintenance instructions. The author provides real-world examples to apply to one`s own applications. The contents include: Introduction; The electricity market; Thermodynamic principles of combined-cycle plants; Combined-cycle concepts; Applications of combined-cycle; Components; Control and automation; Operating and part load behavior; Environmental considerations; Developmental trends; Typical combined-cycle plants already built; Conclusion; Appendices; Conversions; Calculation of the operating performance of combined-cycle installations; Definitions of terms and symbols; Bibliography; and Index.

Kehlhofer, R.; Bachmann, R.; Nielson, H.; Warner, J.

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Combined Cycle (CC) and Combined Heat and Power (CHP) Systems: An Introduction  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Combined Cycle (CC)...is a power plant system in which two types of turbines, namely a gas turbine and a steam turbine, are used to generate electricity. Moreover the turbines are combined in one cycle

Andrzej W. Ordys MScEE; PhD; A. W. Pike…

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Optimization and the effect of steam turbine outlet quality on the output power of a combined cycle power plant  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract A narrow path exists to a sustainable solution which passes through careful steps of efficiency improvement (resource management) and provides environmental friendly energies. Thermal power plants are more common in many power production sites around the world. Therefore, in this current research study a comprehensive thermodynamic modeling of a combined cycle power plant with dual pressure heat recovery steam generator is presented. Since the steam turbine outlet quality is a restrictive parameter, optimization of three cases with different steam quality are conducted and discussed. In other hand, energy and exergy analysis of each components for these three different cases estimated and compared. Obtained results show that it is really important to keep the quality of the vapor at turbine outlet constant in 88% for the results to be more realistic and also optimization and data are more technically feasible and applicable.

A. Ganjehkaviri; M.N. Mohd Jaafar; S.E. Hosseini

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

ADVANCED MONITORING TO IMPROVE COMBUSTION TURBINE (CT)/COMBINED CYCLE (CC) RELIABILITY, AVAILABILITY AND MAINTAINABILITY (RAM)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Power generators are concerned with the maintenance costs associated with the advanced turbines that they are purchasing. Since these machines do not have fully established operation and maintenance (O&M) track records, power generators face financial risk due to uncertain future maintenance costs. This risk is of particular concern, as the electricity industry transitions to a competitive business environment in which unexpected O&M costs cannot be passed through to consumers. These concerns have accelerated the need for intelligent software-based diagnostic systems that can monitor the health of a combustion turbine in real time and provide valuable information on the machine's performance to its owner/operators. Such systems would interpret sensor and instrument outputs, correlate them to the machine's condition, provide interpretative analyses, forward projections of servicing intervals, estimate remaining component life, and identify faults. EPRI, Impact Technologies, Boyce Engineering, and Progress Energy have teamed to develop a suite of intelligent software tools integrated with a diagnostic monitoring platform that will, in real time, interpret data to assess the ''total health'' of combustion turbines. The Combustion Turbine Health Management System (CTHM) will consist of a series of dynamic link library (DLL) programs residing on a diagnostic monitoring platform that accepts turbine health data from existing monitoring instrumentation. The CTHM system will be a significant improvement over currently available techniques for turbine monitoring and diagnostics. CTHM will interpret sensor and instrument outputs, correlate them to a machine's condition, provide interpretative analyses, project servicing intervals, and estimate remaining component life. In addition, it will enable real-time anomaly detection and diagnostics of performance and mechanical faults, enabling power producers to more accurately predict critical component remaining useful life and turbine degradation.

Leonard Angello

2002-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Coal-Fuelled Combined Cycle Power Plants  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Combined cycle power plant, when used as a generic ... which converts heat into mechanical energy in a combined gas and steam turbine process. Combined cycle processes with coal gasification or coal combustion .....

Dr. Hartmut Spliethoff

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Gas-Turbine Cycles  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This book focuses on the design of regenerators for high-performance regenerative gas turbines. The ways in which gas-turbine regenerators can be designed for high system performance can be understood by studying...

Douglas Stephen Beck; David Gordon Wilson

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

La Spezia power plant: Conversion of units 1 and 2 to combined cycle with modification of steam turbines from cross compound to tandem compound  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Units 1 and 2 of ENEL's La Spezia power plant, rated 310 and 325 MW respectively, are going to be converted to combined cycle. This project will be accomplished by integrating components such as gas turbines and HRSGs with some of the existing components, particularly the steam turbines, which are of the cross compound type. Since the total power of each converted unit has to be kept at 335 MW because of permitting limitations, the power delivered by the steam turbine will be limited to about 115 MW. For this reason a study was carried out to verify the possibility of having only one shaft and modifying the turbine to tandem compound. As additional investments are required for this modification, a balance was performed that also took into account the incremental heat rate and, on the other hand, the benefits from decreased maintenance and increased availability and reliability calculated for the expected useful life. The result of this balance was in favor of the modification, and a decision was taken accordingly. The turbine modification will involve replacing the whole HP section with a new combined HP-IP section while retaining the corresponding LP rotor and cylinder and making the needed changes in the valve arrangements and piping. Work on the site began in the spring of 1997 by dismantling the existing boiler so as to have the space needed to install the GTs and HRSGs. The first synchronization of the converted unit 1 is scheduled for November 1999

Magneschi, P.; Gabiccini, S.; Bracaloni, N.; Fiaschi, C.

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Combined cycle power plant incorporating coal gasification  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A combined cycle power plant incorporating a coal gasifier as the energy source. The gases leaving the coal gasifier pass through a liquid couplant heat exchanger before being used to drive a gas turbine. The exhaust gases of the gas turbine are used to generate both high pressure and low pressure steam for driving a steam turbine, before being exhausted to the atmosphere.

Liljedahl, Gregory N. (Tariffville, CT); Moffat, Bruce K. (Simsbury, CT)

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

World experience with development of combined-cycle and gas turbine technologies and prospects for employing them in the thermal power engineering of Russia using the capacities of the country’s industry producing power machinery and equipment  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

World experience gained from using combined-cycle and gas-turbine technologies in power engineering is analyzed. The technical and production capacities of the Russian industry constructing power machinery and...

O. N. Favorskii; V. L. Polishchuk; I. M. Livshits…

2007-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

" "," ",,," Steam Turbines Supplied by Either Conventional or Fluidized Bed Boilers",,,"Conventional Combusion Turbines with Heat Recovery",,,"Combined-Cycle Combusion Turbines",,,"Internal Combusion Engines with Heat Recovery",,," Steam Turbines Supplied by Heat Recovered from High-Temperature Processes",,,," "  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 Relative Standard Errors for Table 8.3;" 3 Relative Standard Errors for Table 8.3;" " Unit: Percents." " "," ",,," Steam Turbines Supplied by Either Conventional or Fluidized Bed Boilers",,,"Conventional Combusion Turbines with Heat Recovery",,,"Combined-Cycle Combusion Turbines",,,"Internal Combusion Engines with Heat Recovery",,," Steam Turbines Supplied by Heat Recovered from High-Temperature Processes",,,," " " "," " ," " "NAICS Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Establishments(b)","Establishments with Any Cogeneration Technology in Use(c)","In Use(d)","Not in Use","Don't Know","In Use(d)","Not in Use","Don't Know","In Use(d)","Not in Use","Don't Know","In Use(d)","Not in Use","Don't Know","In Use(d)","Not in Use","Don't Know"

36

The combined cycle  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Any combination of at least two cyclic processes converting thermal energy (‘heat’) to work forms a combined cycle. In principle, the potential number of ... number of options reduces to a variety of cycles consi...

R. U. Pitt

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Influence of steam injection and hot gas bypass on the performance and operation of a combined heat and power system using a recuperative cycle gas turbine  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The influence of steam injection and hot gas bypass on the performance and operation of ... power (CHP) system using a recuperative cycle gas turbine was investigated. A full off-design analysis ... in steam gene...

Soo Young Kang; Jeong Ho Kim; Tong Seop Kim

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Indirect-fired gas turbine dual fuel cell power cycle  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A fuel cell and gas turbine combined cycle system which includes dual fuel cell cycles combined with a gas turbine cycle wherein a solid oxide fuel cell cycle operated at a pressure of between 6 to 15 atms tops the turbine cycle and is used to produce CO.sub.2 for a molten carbonate fuel cell cycle which bottoms the turbine and is operated at essentially atmospheric pressure. A high pressure combustor is used to combust the excess fuel from the topping fuel cell cycle to further heat the pressurized gas driving the turbine. A low pressure combustor is used to combust the excess fuel from the bottoming fuel cell to reheat the gas stream passing out of the turbine which is used to preheat the pressurized air stream entering the topping fuel cell before passing into the bottoming fuel cell cathode. The CO.sub.2 generated in the solid oxide fuel cell cycle cascades through the system to the molten carbonate fuel cell cycle cathode.

Micheli, Paul L. (Sacramento, CA); Williams, Mark C. (Morgantown, WV); Sudhoff, Frederick A. (Morgantown, WV)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Kalina combined cycle performance and operability  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Gas turbine combined cycles using Rankine bottoming cycles have gained broad market acceptance. The favorable plant economics derive from their high efficiency, short construction cycles and excellent environmental performance. The responsive operating characteristics of combined cycles is another key advantage for customers. Duty cycles cover the spectrum from daily start stop (DSS) to base load. Performance and economics of combined cycles have progressed with advances in gas turbine technology as well as the introduction of increasingly efficient multi-pressure Rankine bottoming cycles. Further advances in gas turbine technology and Rankine bottoming cycle performance are becoming incrementally more difficult and costly to achieve. The availability of the Kalina cycle presents a clear path toward improved combined-cycle system performance and reduced cost of electricity. This paper presents detailed performance and operating characteristics of a STAG 207FA combined cycle employing the Kalina bottoming cycle. These characteristics are compared to a conventional three-pressure reheat Rankine bottoming cycle. The Kalina cycle is shown to have performance and operability advantages throughout the range of site conditions and operating regimes, such as base load, load following, DSS duty, wet and dry cooling tower applications and unattended operation. These advantages derive from a single-pressure once-through heat recovery system, above atmospheric working fluid pressure throughout the system, above atmospheric working fluid pressure throughout the system, very high thermal efficiency ({approximately}2.0 to 2.5 percentage points better than the best Rankine), and compatibility with sub-freezing ambient conditions.

Smith, R.W.; Ranasinghe, J.; Stats, D.; Dykas, S.

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

40

ADVANCED MONITORING TO IMPROVE COMBUSTION TURBINE/COMBINED CYCLE CT/(CC) RELIABILITY, AVAILABILITY AND MAINTAINABILITY (RAM)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Power generators are concerned with the maintenance costs associated with the advanced turbines that they are purchasing. Since these machines do not have fully established operation and maintenance (O&M) track records, power generators face financial risk due to uncertain future maintenance costs. This risk is of particular concern, as the electricity industry transitions to a competitive business environment in which unexpected O&M costs cannot be passed through to consumers. These concerns have accelerated the need for intelligent software-based diagnostic systems that can monitor the health of a combustion turbine in real time and provide valuable information on the machine's performance to its owner/operators. EPRI, Impact Technologies, Boyce Engineering, and Progress Energy have teamed to develop a suite of intelligent software tools integrated with a diagnostic monitoring platform that will, in real time, interpret data to assess the ''total health'' of combustion turbines. The Combustion Turbine Health Management System (CTHM) will consist of a series of dynamic link library (DLL) programs residing on a diagnostic monitoring platform that accepts turbine health data from existing monitoring instrumentation. The CTHM system will be a significant improvement over currently available techniques for turbine monitoring and diagnostics. CTHM will interpret sensor and instrument outputs, correlate them to a machine's condition, provide interpretative analyses, project servicing intervals, and estimate remaining component life. In addition, it will enable real-time anomaly detection and diagnostics of performance and mechanical faults, enabling power producers to more accurately predict critical component remaining useful life and turbine degradation.

Leonard Angello

2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "turbine combined cycle" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

ADVANCED MONITORING TO IMPROVE COMBUSTION TURBINE/COMBINED CYCLE CT/(CC) RELIABILITY, AVAILABILITY AND MAINTAINABILITY (RAM)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Power generators are concerned with the maintenance costs associated with the advanced turbines that they are purchasing. Since these machines do not have fully established operation and maintenance (O&M) track records, power generators face financial risk due to uncertain future maintenance costs. This risk is of particular concern, as the electricity industry transitions to a competitive business environment in which unexpected O&M costs cannot be passed through to consumers. These concerns have accelerated the need for intelligent software-based diagnostic systems that can monitor the health of a combustion turbine in real time and provide valuable information on the machine's performance to its owner/operators. EPRI, Impact Technologies, Boyce Engineering, and Progress Energy have teamed to develop a suite of intelligent software tools integrated with a diagnostic monitoring platform that will, in real time, interpret data to assess the ''total health'' of combustion turbines. The Combustion Turbine Health Management System (CTHM) will consist of a series of dynamic link library (DLL) programs residing on a diagnostic monitoring platform that accepts turbine health data from existing monitoring instrumentation. The CTHM system will be a significant improvement over currently available techniques for turbine monitoring and diagnostics. CTHM will interpret sensor and instrument outputs, correlate them to a machine's condition, provide interpretative analyses, project servicing intervals, and estimate remaining component life. In addition, it will enable real-time anomaly detection and diagnostics of performance and mechanical faults, enabling power producers to more accurately predict critical component remaining useful life and turbine degradation.

Leonard Angello

2004-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

42

High efficiency carbonate fuel cell/turbine hybrid power cycle  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The hybrid power cycle studies were conducted to identify a high efficiency, economically competitive system. A hybrid power cycle which generates power at an LHV efficiency > 70% was identified that includes an atmospheric pressure direct carbonate fuel cell, a gas turbine, and a steam cycle. In this cycle, natural gas fuel is mixed with recycled fuel cell anode exhaust, providing water for reforming fuel. The mixed gas then flows to a direct carbonate fuel cell which generates about 70% of the power. The portion of the anode exhaust which is not recycled is burned and heat transferred through a heat exchanger (HX) to the compressed air from a gas turbine. The heated compressed air is then heated further in the gas turbine burner and expands through the turbine generating 15% of the power. Half the exhaust from the turbine provides air for the anode exhaust burner. All of the turbine exhaust eventually flows through the fuel cell cathodes providing the O2 and CO2 needed in the electrochemical reaction. Exhaust from the cathodes flows to a steam system (heat recovery steam generator, staged steam turbine generating 15% of the cycle power). Simulation of a 200 MW plant with a hybrid power cycle had an LHV efficiency of 72.6%. Power output and efficiency are insensitive to ambient temperature, compared to a gas turbine combined cycle; NOx emissions are 75% lower. Estimated cost of electricity for 200 MW is 46 mills/kWh, which is competitive with combined cycle where fuel cost is > $5.8/MMBTU. Key requirement is HX; in the 200 MW plant studies, a HX operating at 1094 C using high temperature HX technology currently under development by METC for coal gassifiers was assumed. A study of a near term (20 MW) high efficiency direct carbonate fuel cell/turbine hybrid power cycle has also been completed.

Steinfeld, G.; Maru, H.C. [Energy Research Corp., Danbury, CT (United States); Sanderson, R.A. [Sanderson (Robert) and Associates, Wethersfield, CT (United States)

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Combined Heat and Power Plant Steam Turbine  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Combined Heat and Power Plant Steam Turbine Steam Turbine Chiller Campus Heat Load Steam (recovered waste heat) Gas Turbine University Substation High Pressure Natural Gas Campus Electric Load Southern Generator Heat Recovery Alternative Uses: 1. Campus heating load 2. Steam turbine chiller to campus cooling

Rose, Michael R.

44

Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle Based on Pressurized Fluidized Bed Gasification  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Enviropower Inc. has developed a modern power plant concept based on an integrated pressurized fluidized bed gasification and gas turbine combined cycle (IGCC)....

Kari Salo; J. G. Patel

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

ADVANCED MONITORING TO IMPROVE COMBUSTION TURBINE/COMBINED CYCLE CT/(CC) RELIABILITY, AVAILABILITY AND MAINTAINABILITY (RAM)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Power generators are concerned with the maintenance costs associated with the advanced turbines that they are purchasing. Since these machines do not have fully established operation and maintenance (O&M) track records, power generators face financial risk due to uncertain future maintenance costs. This risk is of particular concern, as the electricity industry transitions to a competitive business environment in which unexpected O&M costs cannot be passed through to consumers. These concerns have accelerated the need for intelligent software-based diagnostic systems that can monitor the health of a combustion turbine in real time and provide valuable information on the machine's performance to its owner/operators. Such systems would interpret sensor and instrument outputs, correlate them to the machine's condition, provide interpretative analyses, forward projections of servicing intervals, estimate remaining component life, and identify faults. EPRI, Impact Technologies, Boyce Engineering, and Progress Energy have teamed to develop a suite of intelligent software tools integrated with a diagnostic monitoring platform that will, in real time, interpret data to assess the ''total health'' of combustion turbines. The Combustion Turbine Health Management System (CTHM) will consist of a series of dynamic link library (DLL) programs residing on a diagnostic monitoring platform that accepts turbine health data from existing monitoring instrumentation. The CTHM system will be a significant improvement over currently available techniques for turbine monitoring and diagnostics. CTHM will interpret sensor and instrument outputs, correlate them to a machine's condition, provide interpretative analyses, project servicing intervals, and estimate remaining component life. In addition, it will enable real-time anomaly detection and diagnostics of performance and mechanical faults, enabling power producers to more accurately predict critical component remaining useful life and turbine degradation.

Leonard Angello

2003-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

46

Modeling and Performance Prediction of a Solar Powered Rankin Cycle/Gas Turbine Cycle  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The present study is dealing with the development and implementation of an integrated solar combined cycle power plant in which heat ... its energy from the waste heat of a gas turbine unit in additional to solar

Mohammed A. Elhaj; Kassim K. Matrawy…

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Efficiency combined cycle power plant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This patent describes a method of operating a combined cycle power plant. It comprises: flowing exhaust gas from a combustion turbine through a heat recovery steam generator (HRSG); flowing feed water through an economizer section of the HRSG at a flow rate and providing heated feed water; flowing a first portion of the heated feed water through an evaporator section of the HRSG and producing saturated steam at a production rate, the flow rate of the feed water through the economizer section being greater than required to sustain the production rate of steam in the evaporator section; flowing fuel for the turbine through a heat exchanger; and, flowing a second portion of the heated feed water provided by the economizer section through the heat exchanger then to an inlet of the economizer section, thereby heating the fuel flowing through the heat exchanger.

Pavel, J.; Meyers, G.A.; Baldwin, T.S.

1990-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

48

Mathematical Modeling and Computer Simulation of a Combined Cycle Power Plant  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper presents the simulation procedure developed to predict the performance of a combined cycle power plant from given performance characteristics of ... . Effects of gas turbine and steam turbine cycle par...

Nikhil Dev; Samsher; S. S. Kachhwaha; Mohit

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Avestar® - Syngas-Fired Combined Cycle Dynamic Simulator  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Syngas-Fired Combined Cycle Dynamic Simulator Syngas-Fired Combined Cycle Dynamic Simulator The AVESTAR® center offers courses using the Combined Cycle Simulator, focusing on the power generation process after gasification. This simulator is well-suited for concentrated training on operation and control of the gas and steam turbines; condensate, feed water, and circulating water systems; heat recovery steam generator; and selective catalytic reduction (SCR) unit. Combined cycle simulator startup operations include bringing up the gas turbine to rated speed on natural gas and then switching over to the firing of synthesis gas. Key capabilities of the Combined Cycle Simulator include: Combined Cycle Simulator Operator training station HMI display for overview of Gas Turbine - Train A Normal base load operation

50

Performance improvement of combined cycle power plant based on the optimization of the bottom cycle and heat recuperation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Many F class gas turbine combined cycle (GTCC) power plants are built in ... the efficiency improvement of GTCC plant. A combined cycle with three-pressure reheat heat recovery steam ... HRSG inlet gas temperatur...

Wenguo Xiang; Yingying Chen

2007-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

SOFC combined cycle systems for distributed generation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The final phase of the tubular SOFC development program will focus on the development and demonstration of pressurized solid oxide fuel cell (PSOFC)/gas turbine (GT) combined cycle power systems for distributed power applications. The commercial PSOFC/GT product line will cover the power range 200 kWe to 50 MWe, and the electrical efficiency for these systems will range from 60 to 75% (net AC/LHV CH4), the highest of any known fossil fueled power generation technology. The first demonstration of a pressurized solid oxide fuel cell/gas turbine combined cycle will be a proof-of-concept 250 kWe PSOFC/MTG power system consisting of a single 200 kWe PSOFC module and a 50 kWe microturbine generator (MTG). The second demonstration of this combined cycle will be 1.3 MWe fully packaged, commercial prototype PSOFC/GT power system consisting of two 500 kWe PSOFC modules and a 300 kWe gas turbine.

Brown, R.A.

1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Connecting the second exhaust-heat boiler to the operating first one under the conditions of flow circuits of combined-cycle plants with two gas-turbine units and one steam turbine  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Problems arising with connecting the second exhaust-heat boiler to the first exhaust-heat boiler under load in the case of flow circuits of combined-cycle plants of type PGU-450 are considered. Similar problem...

Yu. A. Radin; I. A. Grishin; T. S. Kontorovich…

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

The cogeneration steam turbine of the T-63/76-8.8 type for a series of PGU-300 combined cycle power plants  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper describes in detail the design of the T-63/76–8.8 steam turbine manufactured by Ural Turbine Works (refurbished significantly), its electrohydraulic control and protection system made according to the ...

A. Ye. Valamin; A. Yu. Kultyshev; V. N. Bilan; A. A. Goldberg…

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Natural Gas Combined Cycle  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The “Coal Ash Corrosion Resistant Materials Testing Program ” is being conducted by B&W at Reliant Energy’s Niles plant in Niles, Ohio. The total estimated cost of $1,864,603 is co-funded by DOE contributing 37.5%, OCDO providing 33.3 % and B&W providing 17%. The remaining 12 % is in-kind contributions by Reliant Energy and tubing suppliers. Materials development is important to the power industry, and to the use of coal. Figure 1 compares the cost of electricity for subcritical and supercritical coal-fired plants with a natural gas combined cycle (NGCC) plant based on an 85 % capacity factor. This shows that at $1.20/MBtu for fuel, coal is competitive with NGCC when gas is at $3.40/MBtu or higher. An 85 % capacity factor is realistic for a coal-fired plant, but NGCC plants are currently only achieving about 60%. This gives coal an advantage if compared on the basis of cost per kW generated per year. When subcritical and supercritical plants are compared,

Dennis K. Mcdonald; Subcritical Coal Plant; Supercritical Coal Plant

55

Biomass Gasification Combined Cycle  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Gasification combined cycle continues to represent an important defining technology area for the forest products industry. The ''Forest Products Gasification Initiative'', organized under the Industry's Agenda 2020 technology vision and supported by the DOE ''Industries of the Future'' program, is well positioned to guide these technologies to commercial success within a five-to ten-year timeframe given supportive federal budgets and public policy. Commercial success will result in significant environmental and renewable energy goals that are shared by the Industry and the Nation. The Battelle/FERCO LIVG technology, which is the technology of choice for the application reported here, remains of high interest due to characteristics that make it well suited for integration with the infrastructure of a pulp production facility. The capital cost, operating economics and long-term demonstration of this technology area key input to future economically sustainable projects and must be verified by the 200 BDT/day demonstration facility currently operating in Burlington, Vermont. The New Bern application that was the initial objective of this project is not currently economically viable and will not be implemented at this time due to several changes at and around the mill which have occurred since the inception of the project in 1995. The analysis shows that for this technology, and likely other gasification technologies as well, the first few installations will require unique circumstances, or supportive public policies, or both to attract host sites and investors.

Judith A. Kieffer

2000-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

The efficiency of technical retrofitting of cogeneration stations using combined-cycle plants  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We consider the problem of technical retrofitting of gas-and-oil fired steam-turbine cogeneration stations by converting them into combined-cycle plants...

L. S. Popyrin; M. D. Dil’man; G. M. Belyaeva

2006-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Avestar® - Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) Dynamic Simulator  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) Dynamic Simulator Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) Dynamic Simulator The AVESTAR® center offers courses using the Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) Dynamic Simulator. The IGCC simulator builds on and reaches beyond existing combined-cycle and conventional-coal power plant simulators to combine--for the first time--a Gasification with CO2 Capture process simulator with a Combined-Cycle power simulator together in a single dynamic simulation framework. The AVESTAR® center IGCC courses provide unique, comprehensive training on all aspects of an IGCC plant, illustrating the high-efficiency aspects of the gasifier, gas turbine, and steam turbine integration. IGCC Operator training station HMI display for overview of IGCC Plant - Train A Reference:

58

Advanced Organic Vapor Cycles for Improving Thermal Conversion Efficiency in Renewable Energy Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to Gas Turbines & Applications (Solar Turbines)," in EPAOptimization of gas-turbine combined cycles for solar energythree typical gas turbines. Reprinted from Solar Turbines

Ho, Tony

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Working on new gas turbine cycle for heat pump drive  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Working on new gas turbine cycle for heat pump drive FILE COPY TAP By Irwin Stambler, Field Editor, is sized for a 10-ton heat pump system - will be scaled to power a commercial product line ranging from 7 of the cycle- as a heat pump drive for commercial installations. Company is testing prototype gas turbine

Oak Ridge National Laboratory

60

Solid-Fueled Pressurized Chemical Looping with Flue-Gas Turbine Combined Cycle for Improved Plant Efficiency and CO{sub 2} Capture  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this document is to report the final result of techno-economic analysis for the proposed 550MWe integrated pressurized chemical looping combustion combined cycle process. An Aspen Plus based model is delivered in this report along with the results from three sensitivity scenarios including the operating pressure, excess air ratio and oxygen carrier performance. A process flow diagram and detailed stream table for the base case are also provided with the overall plant energy balance, carbon balance, sulfur balance and water balance. The approach to the process and key component simulation are explained. The economic analysis (OPEX and CAPX) on four study cases via DOE NETL Reference Case 12 are presented and explained.

Liu, Kunlei; Chen, Liangyong; Zhang, Yi; Richburg, Lisa; Simpson, James; White, Jay; Rossi, Gianalfredo

2013-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "turbine combined cycle" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Selective Exhaust Gas Recycle with Membranes for CO2 Capture from Natural Gas Combined Cycle Power Plants  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The combination of the combustion turbine (Brayton cycle) and steam turbine (Rankine cycle) yields a combined cycle power plant with efficiencies as high as 50%–55% (compared to 35%–40% in a typical subcritical pulverized coal power plant). ... Of course, it is also possible to combine these designs so that both parallel and series membranes are used. ...

Timothy C. Merkel; Xiaotong Wei; Zhenjie He; Lloyd S. White; J. G. Wijmans; Richard W. Baker

2012-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

62

"Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Status of technologies and components modeled by EIA" Status of technologies and components modeled by EIA" ,"Revolutionary","Evolutionary","Mature" "Pulverized Coal",,,"X" "Pulverized Coal with CCS" " - Non-CCS portion of Pulverized Coal Plant",,,"X" " - CCS","X" "Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle" " - Advanced Combustion Turbine",,"X" " - Heat Recovery Steam Generator",,,"X" " - Gasifier",,"X" " - Balance of Plant",,,"X" "Conventional Natural Gas Combined Cycle" " - Conventional Combustion Turbine",,,"X" " - Heat Recovery Steam Generator",,,"X" " - Balance of Plant",,,"X"

63

Hybrid solar central receiver for combined cycle power plant  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A hybrid combined cycle power plant including a solar central receiver for receiving solar radiation and converting it to thermal energy. The power plant includes a molten salt heat transfer medium for transferring the thermal energy to an air heater. The air heater uses the thermal energy to preheat the air from the compressor of the gas cycle. The exhaust gases from the gas cycle are directed to a steam turbine for additional energy production.

Bharathan, Desikan (Lakewood, CO); Bohn, Mark S. (Golden, CO); Williams, Thomas A. (Arvada, CO)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Optimizing the start-up operations of combined cycle power plants using soft computing methods  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......megawatts. Industrial turbines produce high-quality...recovered to improve the efficiency of power generation...steam and drive a steam turbine in a combined-cycle...either gas or steam turbine alone because it performs...generation by their high efficiency and possibility to operate......

Ilaria Bertini; Matteo De Felice; Alessandro Pannicelli; Stefano Pizzuti

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Using energy balances for processing the results from tests of a single-shaft combined-cycle power plant  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Application of the balance method for dividing the overall power output produced by a single-shaft combined-cycle power plant between the steam turbine and...

G. G. Ol’khovskii

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Use of combined steam-water and organic rankine cycles for achieving better efficiency of gas turbine units and internal combustion engines  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Innovative concepts of recovering waste heat using low-boiling working fluids, due to which the the efficiency can be increased to 28–30%, are presented. If distributed generation of electricity or combined pr...

M. A. Gotovskiy; M. I. Grinman; V. I. Fomin; V. K. Aref’ev…

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Investigation of Gasification Chemical Looping Combustion Combined Cycle Performance  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Combining CLC with a gas turbine combined cycle offers a novel power generation technique with high efficiency and CO2 separation. ... Here, we have developed looping materials based on the integration of NiO, as solid reactants, with a composite metal oxide of NiAl2O4, as a binder, leading to a significant role in improving reaction rate, conversion, and regenerability in cyclic reaction in this combustor, compared with the other materials. ... Chemical looping combustion for combined cycles with CO2 capture. ...

Wenguo Xiang; Sha Wang; Tengteng Di

2008-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

68

Gas Foil Bearing Technology Advancements for Closed Brayton Cycle Turbines  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Closed Brayton Cycle (CBC) turbine systems are under consideration for future space electric power generation. CBC turbines convert thermal energy from a nuclear reactor or other heat source to electrical power using a closed?loop cycle. The operating fluid in the closed?loop is commonly a high pressure inert gas mixture that cannot tolerate contamination. One source of potential contamination in a system such as this is the lubricant used in the turbomachine bearings. Gas Foil Bearings (GFB) represent a bearing technology that eliminates the possibility of contamination by using the working fluid as the lubricant. Thus foil bearings are well suited to application in space power CBC turbine systems. NASA Glenn Research Center is actively researching GFB technology for use in these CBC power turbines. A power loss model has been developed and the effects of very high ambient pressure start?up torque and misalignment have been observed and are reported here.

Samuel A. Howard; Robert J. Bruckner; Christopher DellaCorte; Kevin C. Radil

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

The thermodynamic efficiency of the condensing process circuits of binary combined-cycle plants with gas-assisted heating of cycle air  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The thermal efficiencies of condensing-type circuits of binary combined-cycle plants containing one, two, and three ... gas turbine unit, and with preheating of cycle air are analyzed by way of comparison ... ini...

V. P. Kovalevskii

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Tsiklauri-Durst combined cycle (T-D Cycle{trademark}) application for nuclear and fossil-fueled power generating plants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Tsiklauri-Durst combined cycle is a combination of the best attributes of both nuclear power and combined cycle gas power plants. A technology patented in 1994 by Battelle Memorial Institute offers a synergistic approach to power generation. A typical combined cycle is defined as the combination of gas turbine Brayton Cycle, topping steam turbine Rankine Cycle. Exhaust from the gas turbine is used in heat recovery steam generators to produce steam for a steam turbine. In a standard combined cycle gas turbine-steam turbine application, the gas turbine generates about 65 to 70 percent of system power. The thermal efficiency for such an installation is typically about 45 to 50 percent. A T-D combined cycle takes a new, creative approach to combined cycle design by directly mixing high enthalpy steam from the heat recovery steam generator, involving the steam generator at more than one pressure. Direct mixing of superheated and saturated steam eliminates the requirement for a large heat exchanger, making plant modification simple and economical.

Tsiklauri, B.; Korolev, V.N.; Durst, B.M.; Shen, P.K.

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

A combined cycle designed to achieve greater than 60 percent efficiency  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In cooperation with the US Department of Energy`s Morgantown Energy Technology Center, Westinghouse is working on Phase 2 of an 8-year Advanced Turbine Systems Program to develop the technologies required to provide a significant increase in natural gas-fired combined cycle power generation plant efficiency. In this paper, the technologies required to yield an energy conversion efficiency greater than the Advanced Turbine Systems Program target value of 60 percent are discussed. The goal of 60 percent efficiency is achievable through an improvement in operating process parameters for both the combustion turbine and steam turbine, raising the rotor inlet temperature to 2,600 F (1,427 C), incorporation of advanced cooling techniques in the combustion turbine expander, and utilization of other cycle enhancements obtainable through greater integration between the combustion turbine and steam turbine.

Briesch, M.S.; Bannister, R.L.; Diakunchak, I.S.; Huber, D.J. [Westinghouse Electric Corp., Orlando, FL (United States)

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

72

A combined cycle designed to achieve greater than 60 percent efficiency  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In cooperation with the US Department of Energy`s Morgantown Energy Technology Center, Westinghouse is working on Phase 2 of an 8-year Advanced Turbine Systems Program to develop the technologies required to provide a significant increase in natural gas-fired combined cycle power generation plant efficiency. In this paper, the technologies required to yield an energy conversion efficiency greater than the Advanced Turbine Systems Program target value of 60% are discussed. The goal of 60% efficiency is achievable through an improvement in operating process parameters for both the combustion turbine and steam turbine, raising the rotor inlet temperature to 2,600 F (1,427 C), incorporation of advanced cooling techniques in the combustion turbine expander, and utilization of other cycle enhancements obtainable through greater integration between the combustion turbine and steam turbine.

Briesch, M.S.; Bannister, R.L.; Diakunchak, I.S.; Huber, D.J. [Westinghouse Electric Corp., Orlando, FL (United States)

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Viable combined cycle design for automotive applications  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A relatively new approach for improving fuel economy and automotive engine performance involves the use of automotive combined cycle generation technologies. The combined cycle generation, a process widely used i...

K. -B. Kim; K. -W. Choi; K. -H. Lee

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Gas Turbine Based Power Cycles - A State-of-the-Art Review  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Gas turbines have been used in wide ranging applications ... This paper provides the historical evolution of the gas turbine (GT) based power cycles. A detailed ... , modified Brayton cycles under development by ...

R. K. Bhargava; M. Bianchi; A. De Pascale…

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Thermodynamics of combined-cycle electric power plants  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Published data imply an average thermal efficiency of about 0.34 for U.S. electricity generating plants. With clever use of thermodynamics and technology modern gas and steam turbines can be coupled to effect dramatic efficiency increases. These combined-cycle power plants now reach thermal efficiencies in excess of 0.60. It is shown how the laws of thermodynamics make this possible.

Harvey S. Leff

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

A Computational Framework for Life-Cycle Management of Wind Turbines incorporating Structural Health Monitoring  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 A Computational Framework for Life-Cycle Management of Wind Turbines incorporating Structural of wind turbines and reducing the life-cycle costs significantly. This paper presents a life-cycle management (LCM) framework for online monitoring and performance assessment of wind turbines, enabling

Stanford University

77

Off-Design Performance of Power Plants: An Integrated Gasification Combined-Cycle Example  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...that of a normal natural gas-fired combined-cycle...for operation in the natural gas-fired combined-cycle...inlet flow around the high-pressure section of the turbine...when converting from natural gas firing to IGCC opera-tion...

M. R. ERBES; J. N. PHILLIPS; M. S. JOHNSON; J. PAFFENBARGER; M. GLUCKMAN; R. H. EUSTIS

1987-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

78

Air bottoming cycle: Use of gas turbine waste heat for power generation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper presents a thermodynamic analysis of the Air Bottoming Cycle (ABC) as well as the results of a feasibility study for using the Air Bottoming Cycle for gas turbine waste heat recovery/power generation on oil/gas platforms in the North Sea. The basis for the feasibility study was to utilize the exhaust gas heat from an LM2500PE gas turbine. Installation of the ABC on both a new and an existing platform have been considered. A design reference case is presented, and the recommended ABC is a two-shaft engine with two compressor intercoolers. The compression pressure ratio was found optimal at 8:1. The combined gas turbine and ABC shaft efficiency wa/s calculated to 46.6 percent. The LM2500PE gas turbine contributes with 36.1 percent while the ABC adds 10.5 percent points to the gas turbine efficiency. The ABC shaft power output is 6.6 MW when utilizing the waste heat of an LM2500PE gas turbine. A preliminary thermal and hydraulic design of the ABC main components (compressor, turbine, intercoolers, and recuperator) was carried out. The recuperator is the largest and heaviest component (45 tons). A weight and cost breakdown of the ABC is presented. The total weight of the ABC package was calculated to 154 metric tons, and the ABC package cost to 9.4 million US$. An economical examination for three different cases was carried out. The results show that the ABC alternative (LM2500PE + ABC) is economical, with a rather good margin, compared to the other alternatives. The conclusion is that the Air Bottoming Cycle is an economical alternative for power generation on both new platforms and on existing platforms with demand for more power.

Bolland, O.; Foerde, M. [Norwegian Univ. of Science and Technology, Trondheim (Norway). Div. of Thermal Energy and Hydropower; Haande, B. [Oil Engineering Consultants, Sandvika (Norway)

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

A Cyberinfrastructure for Integrated Monitoring and Life-Cycle Management of Wind Turbines  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A Cyberinfrastructure for Integrated Monitoring and Life-Cycle Management of Wind Turbines Kay Abstract. Integrating structural health monitoring into life-cycle management strategies for wind turbines data) can effectively be used to capture the operational and structural behavior of wind turbines

Stanford University

80

Technical and economic comparison of steam-injected versus combined- cycle retrofits on FT-4 engines  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The study discusses the findings of a conceptual site-specific investigation of the technical and economic aspects of converting the TPM FT4 simple cycle combustion turbines into either the steam injected gas turbine (SIGT) cycle or the combined cycle (CC). It describes the selection of the best retrofit alternatives through the evaluation and data analysis of a large number of sites and units at two utilities. Conceptual designs are performed on the best retrofit alternatives. Flow diagrams and general arrangement drawings are developed for various configurations utilizing drum type and once-through type multipressure heat recovery steam generators. Auxiliary power consumption and capital cost estimates are presented together with an economic evaluation and comparison of the retrofit alternatives. While the investigation is performed utilizing the FT4 combustion turbines, the steps presented in the report may be used as a guide for investigating the conversion of other gas turbines to either cycle at any utility site.

Silaghy, F.J. (Burns and Roe, Inc., Oradell, NJ (United States))

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "turbine combined cycle" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Impulse Turbine Efficiency Calculation Methods with Organic Rankine Cycle.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

?? A turbine was investigated by various methods of calculating its efficiency. The project was based on an existing impulse turbine, a one-stage turbine set… (more)

Dahlqvist, Johan

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Life cycle assessment: A case study of two wind turbines used in Mexico  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This paper presents the case study of two wind turbines installed in Mexico which are analyzed using the life cycle assessment (LCA) methodology. Environmental impacts of different fabrication materials and electricity consumption were studied for the main turbine components. The designs of both turbines were examined through the phases of manufacture, construction, and final disposal. Both turbines (turbine A and turbine B) were of 2.0 megawatts (MW). Results ascertain that the most intensive environmental impacts come from the nacelle and tower components of both turbines; and that within life cycle phases, turbine A influences the environment less than turbine B, specifically during manufacture and final disposal. This study is valuable for decision makers in the domain of technological product design and marketing; in order to determine which features of the wind turbines can be modified to mitigate environmental impacts, contributing to technological innovation in the domains of sustainability and renewable energies in Mexico.

A.V. Vargas; E. Zenón; U. Oswald; J.M. Islas; L.P. Güereca; F.L. Manzini

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Investigation of combined-cycle steam-plant problems. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The operation and maintenance of gas turbine combined-cycle steam generators is reviewed. Feedwater cycles and auxiliary equipment are also discussed, and the results of on-site discussions with operating and maintenance personnel are presented. Actual problems encountered are delineated, and recommendations are given for improving operation of existing plants, for design of new plants, and for future research and development.

Crutchfield, H.C.

1982-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Parametric study for the penetration of combined cycle technologies into Cyprus power system  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this work, a parametric study concerning the use of combined cycle technologies for power generation, by independent power producers in Cyprus, is carried out. The cost–benefit analysis is carried out using the Independent Power Producers optimization algorithm in which the electricity unit cost is calculated. Various conventional generation options are examined, such as, steam turbines and open cycle gas turbines, and compared with a parametric study (variations in fuel type, capital cost and efficiency) for combined cycle technologies. The results indicate that the future use of combined cycle technology with natural gas as fuel is recommended. Furthermore, it is estimated that by the use of natural gas combined cycle, the CO2 emissions environmental indicator of Cyprus power industry would be significantly reduced.

Andreas Poullikkas

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Topping of a combined gas- and steam-turbine powerplant using a TAM combustor  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this program is to evaluate the engineering and economic feasibility of a thermionic array module (TAM) topped combustor for a gas turbine. A combined gas- and steam-turbine system was chosen for this study. The nominal output of the gas and steam turbines were 70 MW and 30 MW, respectively. The gas-turbine fuel was a coal-derived medium-Btu gas assumed to be from an oxygen blown Texaco coal-gasification process which produces pressurized gas with an approximate composition of 52% CO and 36% H/sub 2/. Thermionic converters are assumed to line the walls of the gas-turbine combustor, so that the high-temperature gases heat the thermionic converter emitter. The thermionic converters produce electricity while the rejected heat is used to preheat the combustion air. To maximize the production of power from the thermionic converter, the highest practical flame temperature is obtained by preheating the combustor air with the thermionic collectors and rich combustion. A portion of the air, which bypassed the combustor, is reintroduced to complete the combustion at a lower temperature and the mixed gases flow to the turbine. The exhaust gases from the turbine flow to the heat recovery boilers to the bottoming steam cycle. The gas and steam turbine system performance calculation was based on data from Brown Boveri Turbomachinery, Inc. The performance of the thermionic converters (TAM) for the reference case was based on actual measurements of converters fired with a natural gas flame. These converters have been operated in a test furnace for approximately 15,000 device hours.

Miskolczy, G.; Wang, C.C.; Lovell, B.T.; McCrank, J.

1981-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Solar hybrid steam injection gas turbine (STIG) cycle  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Solar heat at moderate temperatures around 200 °C can be utilized for augmentation of conventional steam-injection gas turbine power plants. Solar concentrating collectors for such an application can be simpler and less expensive than collectors used for current solar power plants. We perform a thermodynamic analysis of this hybrid cycle. High levels of steam-to-air ratio are investigated, leading to high power augmentation compared to the simple cycle and to conventional STIG. The Solar Fraction can reach up to 50% at the highest augmentation levels. The overall conversion efficiency from heat to electricity (average over fuel and solar contributions) can be in the range of 40–55% for typical candidate turbines. The incremental efficiency (corresponding to the added steam beyond conventional STIG) is in the range of 22–37%, corresponding to solar-to-electricity efficiency of about 15–24%, similar to and even exceeding current solar power plants using higher temperature collectors. The injected water can be recovered and recycled leading to very low water consumption of the cycle, but a very low cost condenser is required to make water recovery feasible.

Maya Livshits; Abraham Kribus

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

TOWARDS LIFE-CYCLE MANAGEMENT OF WIND TURBINES BASED ON STRUCTURAL HEALTH MONITORING  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

TOWARDS LIFE-CYCLE MANAGEMENT OF WIND TURBINES BASED ON STRUCTURAL HEALTH MONITORING K. Smarsly1) strategies can enable wind turbine manufacturers, owners, and operators to precisely schedule maintenance behavior of wind turbines and to reduce (epistemic) uncertainty. Both the resistance parameters

Stanford University

88

,,,"with Any"," Steam Turbines Supplied by Either Conventional...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

or Fluidized Bed Boilers",,,"Conventional Combusion Turbines with Heat Recovery",,,"Combined-Cycle Combusion Turbines",,,"Internal Combusion Engines with Heat Recovery",,,"...

89

Investigation of gasification chemical looping combustion combined cycle performance  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A novel combined cycle based on coal gasification and chemical looping combustion (CLC) offers a possibility of both high net power efficiency and separation of the greenhouse gas CO{sub 2}. The technique involves the use of a metal oxide as an oxygen carrier, which transfers oxygen from the combustion air to the fuel, and the avoidance of direct contact between fuel and combustion air. The fuel gas is oxidized by an oxygen carrier, an oxygen-containing compound, in the fuel reactor. The oxygen carrier in this study is NiO. The reduced oxygen carrier, Ni, in the fuel reactor is regenerated by the air in the air reactor. In this way, fuel and air are never mixed, and the fuel oxidation products CO{sub 2} and water vapor leave the system undiluted by air. All that is needed to get an almost pure CO{sub 2} product is to condense the water vapor and to remove the liquid water. When the technique is combined with gas turbine and heat recovery steam generation technology, a new type of combined cycle is formed which gives a possibility of obtaining high net power efficiency and CO{sub 2} separation. The performance of the combined cycle is simulated using the ASPEN software tool in this paper. The influence of the water/coal ratio on the gasification and the influence of the CLC process parameters such as the air reactor temperature, the turbine inlet supplementary firing, and the pressure ratio of the compressor on the system performance are discussed. Results show that, assuming an air reactor temperature of 1200{sup o}C, a gasification temperature of 1100 {sup o}C, and a turbine inlet temperature after supplementary firing of 1350{sup o}C, the system has the potential to achieve a thermal efficiency of 44.4% (low heating value), and the CO{sub 2} emission is 70.1 g/(kW h), 90.1% of the CO{sub 2} captured. 22 refs., 7 figs., 6 tabs.

Wenguo Xiang; Sha Wang; Tengteng Di [Southeast University, Nanjing (China). Key Laboratory of Clean Coal Power Generation and Combustion Technology of the Ministry of Education

2008-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

90

Energy, emissions and environmental impact analysis of wind turbine using life cycle assessment technique  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Wind turbine used for electricity generation is known as clean and renewable energy technology. The worldwide increasing trend of wind turbine installation present and future projection addressing the issue of energy required for manufacture and environmental impact due to energy consumption. The life cycle energy and environmental impact of wind turbine has been studied in many literature, but some studies are based on average data, the life cycle stages are incomplete of some study, most of the literature are horizontal axis type and the literature for Asian developing countries are rare. In addition, the life cycle study of vertical axis wind turbine is unusual. Since, the life cycle assessment (LCA) study varied from location to location due to industrial performance, countries energy mix and related issues, a life cycle embodied energy, emissions and environmental impacts analysis were undertaken for two grid connected rooftop wind turbines (vertical axis and horizontal axis) considering the industrial performance, applications and related issues in Thailand. The life cycle assessment was done using SimaPro 7.3.3 software from cradle to grave for base case and for alternative cases. The result showed that, wind turbine installation in Thailand at Chiangmai is reliable to deliver wind energy over the year compared to Phuket and Surat Thani Island. The vertical axis wind turbine is energy and emission intensive per kWh/year energy delivered compared to horizontal axis wind turbine for base case system. The embodied energy and environmental impact could be possible to reduce by more than 60% and 50% respectively using reuse of materials strategy. The embodied energy of vertical axis wind turbine could be possible to reduce by 36% with thermoplastic and 40% with fiberglass plastic turbine instead of aluminum turbine, while the environmental impact reduction more than 15% has been observed. The energy intensity, CO2 emission intensity and energy payback time found to be lower when compared with literature.

Md. Shazib Uddin; S. Kumar

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Life Cycle Analysis: Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) Power Plant  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Life Cycle Analysis: Integrated Life Cycle Analysis: Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) Power Plant Revision 2, March 2012 DOE/NETL-2012/1551 Disclaimer This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference therein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise does not necessarily constitute or

92

Thermionic combustor application to combined gas and steam turbine power plants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The engineering and economic feasibility of a thermionic converter topped combustor for a gas turbine is evaluated in this paper. A combined gas and steam turbine system was chosen for this study with nominal outputs of the gas and steam turbines of 70 MW and 30 MW, respectively. 7 refs.

Miskolczy, G.; Wang, C.C.; Lieb, D.P.; Margulies, A.E.; Fusegni, L.J.; Lovell, B.J.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Solar's combined-cycle system utilizes novel steam-generator concept  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As escalating fuel costs force equipment users to seek more efficient prime movers, the combined-cycle system will become increasingly attractive because it retains the advantages of simple-cycle gas turbines - low installation costs, high availability, low maintenance, and low emission levels - while adding 40% power output from the steam-based system operated on the turbine exhaust. Solar Turbines International has sought to develop an automated, remote-control combined-cycle system that can be easily retrofitted to existing simple-cycle power stations. The key component giving the system its advantages over the hazardous, complex steam-drum-type boiler systems is a once-through dual-pressure steam-generator device that eliminates the need for drums and elaborate control mechanisms. Forty identical parallel tube circuits suspended from a single frame are connected to common inlet and discharge manifolds; the individual circuits are made of dual high- and low-pressure bundles, with each bundle having economizer, vaporizer, and superheating sections. The 40 circuits comprise one complete steam-generator module core matrix. By injecting the superheated low-pressure steam into the latter stages of the steam turbine, the dual-pressure feature improves the heat recovery by more than 12% over conventional devices. The only water treatment that the corrosion-resistant tube material requires is the removal of dissolved solids.

Not Available

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Low-grade geothermal energy conversion by organic Rankine cycle turbine generator  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper reports results of a demonstration project which helped determine the feasibility of converting low-grade thermal energy in 49/sup 0/C water into electrical energy via an organic Rankine cycle 2500 watt (electrical) turbine-generator. The geothermal source which supplied the water is located in a rural Alaskan village. The primary reasons an organic Rankine cycle turbine-generator was investigated as a possible source of electric power in rural Alaska are: high cost of operating diesel-electric units and their poor long-term reliability when high-quality maintenance is unavailable; and the extremely high level of long-term reliability reportedly attained by commercially available organic Rankine cycle turbines. The important contribution made by this project is data provided on the thermal and electrical operating characteristics of an experimental organic Rankine cycle turbine-generator operating at a uniquely low vaporizer temperature.

Zarling, J.P.; Aspnes, J.D.

1983-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Organic Rankine Cycle Turbine for Exhaust Energy Recovery in...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Increase Efficiency in Gasoline Powertrains Environmental Effects of Hydrokinetic Turbines on Fish: Desktop and Laboratory Flume Studies Achieving High Efficiency at 2010 Emissions...

96

Vibration Combined High Temperature Cycle Tests for Capacitive MEMS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Vibration Combined High Temperature Cycle Tests for Capacitive MEMS Accelerometers Z. Szcs, G. Nagy|nagyg|hodossy|rencz|poppe>@eet.bme.hu Abstract - In this paper vibration combined high temperature cycle tests for packaged capacitive SOI- MEMS designed and realized at BME ­ DED. Twenty thermal cycles of combined Temperature Cycle Test and Fatigue

Boyer, Edmond

97

A combined power and ejector refrigeration cycle for low temperature heat sources  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A combined power and ejector refrigeration cycle for low temperature heat sources is under investigation in this paper. The proposed cycle combines the organic Rankine cycle and the ejector refrigeration cycle. The ejector is driven by the exhausts from the turbine to produce power and refrigeration simultaneously. A simulation was carried out to analyze the cycle performance using R245fa as the working fluid. A thermal efficiency of 34.1%, an effective efficiency of 18.7% and an exergy efficiency of 56.8% can be obtained at a generating temperature of 395 K, a condensing temperature of 298 K and an evaporating temperature of 280 K. Simulation results show that the proposed cycle has a big potential to produce refrigeration and most exergy losses take place in the ejector. (author)

Zheng, B.; Weng, Y.W. [School of Mechanical Engineering, Shanghai Jiaotong University, Shanghai 200240 (China)

2010-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

98

Reinforced Wind Turbine Blades - An Environmental Life Cycle Evaluation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Methods for producing wind turbines and the foundations for offshore installation are not expected to change much before the year 2025. ... Benchmark LCA data from Ecoinvent for a 2 MW offshore horizontal axis wind turbine was selected with capacity factor of 30% and lifespan of 20 years. ...

Laura Merugula; Vikas Khanna; Bhavik R. Bakshi

2012-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

99

Comparison between two optimization strategies for solid oxide fuel cell–gas turbine hybrid cycles  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper compares the performance characteristics of a combined power system with solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) and gas turbine (GT) working under two thermodynamic optimization strategies. Expressions of the optimized power output and efficiency for both the subsystems and the SOFC-GT hybrid cycle are derived. Optimal performance characteristics are discussed and compared in detail through a parametric analysis to evaluate the impact of multi-irreversibilities that take into account on the system behaviour. It is found that there exist certain new optimum criteria for some important design and operating parameters. Engineers should find the methodologies developed in this paper useful in the optimal design and practical operation of complex hybrid fuel cell power plants.

Yingru Zhao; Nilay Shah; Nigel Brandon

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Off-design performance of integrated waste-to-energy, combined cycle plants  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper focuses on the off-design operation of plants where a waste-to-energy (WTE) system fed with municipal solid waste (MSW) is integrated with a natural gas-fired combined cycle (CC). Integration is accomplished by sharing the steam cycle: saturated steam generated in a MSW grate combustor is exported to the heat recovery steam generator (HRSG) of the combined cycle, where it is superheated and then fed to a steam turbine serving both the CC and the WTE plant. Most likely, the WTE section and the natural gas-fired CC section are subject to different operation and maintenance schedules, so that the integrated plant operates in conditions different from those giving full power output. In this paper we discuss and give performance estimates for the two situations that delimit the range of operating conditions: (a) WTE plant at full power and gas turbine down; (b) WTE plant down and gas turbine at full power. This is done for two integrated plants having the same WTE section, i.e. grate combustors with an overall MSW combustion power of 180 MWLHV, coupled with Combined Cycles based on two different heavy-duty gas turbines: a medium-size, 70 MW class turbine and a large-size, 250 MW class turbine. For each situation we discuss the control strategy and the actions that can help to achieve safe and reliable off-design operation. Heat and mass balances and performances at off-design conditions are estimated by accounting for the constraints imposed by the available heat transfer areas in boilers, heaters and condenser, as well as the characteristic curve of the steam turbine. When the gas turbine is down the net electric efficiency of the WTE section is very close to the one of the stand-alone WTE plant; instead, when the WTE section is down, the efficiency of the CC is much below the one of a stand alone CC. These performances appear most congenial to what is likely to be the operational strategy of these plants, i.e. paramount priority to waste treatment and CC dispatched according to the requirements of the national grid.

Stefano Consonni; Paolo Silva

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "turbine combined cycle" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Use of combined-cycle power units at cogeneration plants  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Indices of reconstructed and new cogeneration plants (CPs) using combined cycle units (CCPUs) are considered. The conclusions...

V. M. Batenin; Yu. A. Zeigarnik; V. M. Maslennikov; Yu. L. Shekhter…

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Mastering the pilot domestic binary combined-cycle plants  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Results are presented from mastering the pilot binary combined-cycle plants of Type PGU-450T (installed at...

Yu. A. Radin

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Natural Gas Combined Cycle Power Plant Integrated to Capture Plant  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Natural Gas Combined Cycle Power Plant Integrated to Capture Plant ... A natural gas combined cycle (NGCC) power plant with capacity of about 430 MW integrated to a chemical solvent absorber/stripping capture plant is investigated. ... The natural gas combined cycle (NGCC) is an advanced power generation technology that improves the fuel efficiency of natural gas. ...

Mehdi Karimi; Magne Hillestad; Hallvard F. Svendsen

2012-01-19T23:59:59.000Z

104

New efficiency charts for the optimum design of axial flow turbines for organic Rankine cycles  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Turbine efficiency plays a key role in the design optimization of \\{ORCs\\} (organic Rankine cycles) and should be properly evaluated for an accurate estimate of the real power production. Its value is in general assumed as given in the design optimization procedure, without a check that it can be really achieved in the resulting working conditions. The peculiar properties of high molecular weight fluids markedly influence turbine design and ask for turbine design criteria specifically tailored to ORCs. In this work a meanline design procedure for single stage axial flow turbines is developed to find optimum turbine geometry and efficiency in a wide range of operating conditions. Unlike previous literature, real fluid properties and very recent loss models are implemented. The variation of the predicted turbine efficiency with loading coefficient, flow coefficient, specific speed and specific diameter is shown through new general maps that explicitly take into account the strong influence of compressibility and turbine size through the volumetric expansion ratio and size parameter, respectively. All these maps can be included in a general design optimization procedure of the ORC system to help select the optimum design point, overcoming any arbitrary assumptions on turbine efficiency.

Luca Da Lio; Giovanni Manente; Andrea Lazzaretto

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Base-Load and Peak Electricity from a Combined Nuclear Heat and Fossil Combined-Cycle Plant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A combined-cycle power plant is proposed that uses heat from a high-temperature reactor and fossil fuel to meet base-load and peak electrical demands. The high-temperature gas turbine produces shaft power to turn an electric generator. The hot exhaust is then fed to a heat recovery steam generator (HRSG) that provides steam to a steam turbine for added electrical power production. A simplified computational model of the thermal power conversion system was developed in order to parametrically investigate two different steady-state operation conditions: base load nuclear heat only from an Advanced High Temperature Reactor (AHTR), and combined nuclear heat with fossil heat to increase the turbine inlet temperature. These two cases bracket the expected range of power levels, where any intermediate power level can result during electrical load following. The computed results indicate that combined nuclear-fossil systems have the potential to offer both low-cost base-load electricity and lower-cost peak power relative to the existing combination of base-load nuclear plants and separate fossil-fired peak-electricity production units. In addition, electric grid stability, reduced greenhouse gases, and operational flexibility can also result with using the conventional technology presented here for the thermal power conversion system coupled with the AHTR.

Conklin, Jim [ORNL; Forsberg, Charles W [ORNL

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Base-Load and Peak Electricity from a Combined Nuclear Heat and Fossil Combined-Cycle Plant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A combined-cycle power plant is proposed that uses heat from a high-temperature reactor and fossil fuel to meet base-load and peak electrical demands. The high temperature gas turbine produces shaft power to turn an electric generator. The hot exhaust is then fed to a heat recovery steam generator (HRSG) that provides steam to a steam turbine for added electrical power production. A simplified computational model of the thermal power conversion system was developed in order to parametrically investigate two different steady-state operation conditions: base load nuclear heat only from an Advanced High Temperature Reactor (AHTR), and combined nuclear heat with fossil heat to increase the turbine inlet temperature. These two cases bracket the expected range of power levels, where any intermediate power level can result during electrical load following. The computed results indicate that combined nuclear-fossil systems have the potential to offer both low-cost base-load electricity and lower-cost peak power relative to the existing combination of base-load nuclear plants and separate fossil-fired peak-electricity production units. In addition, electric grid stability, reduced greenhouse gases, and operational flexibility can also result with using the conventional technology presented here for the thermal power conversion system coupled with the AHTR. (authors)

Conklin, James C.; Forsberg, Charles W. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, P.O. Box 2008, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

A hydrogen and oxygen combined cycle with chemical-looping combustion  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract In the current paper, new systems integrating chemical-looping hydrogen (CLH) generation and the hydrogen (H2) and oxygen (O2) combined cycle have been proposed. The new methane-fueled cycle using CLH has been investigated with the aid of the exergy principle (energy utilization diagram methodology). First, H2 is produced in the CLH, in which FeO and Fe3O4 are used as the looping material. The H2 and O2 combined cycle then uses H2 as fuel. Two types of these combined cycles have been analyzed. Waste heat from the H2–O2 combined cycle is utilized in the CLH to produce H2. The advantages of CLH and the H2 and O2 combined cycle have resulted in a breakthrough in performance. The new system can achieve 59.8% net efficiency with CO2 separation when the turbine inlet temperature is 1300 °C. Meanwhile, the cycle is environmentally superior because of the recovery of CO2 without an energy penalty.

Xiaosong Zhang; Sheng Li; Hui Hong; Hongguang Jin

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Thermodynamic analysis of a closed-cycle, solar gas-turbine plant  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Thermodynamic analysis of a closed-cycle, Brayton gas-turbine plant with a heat exchanger powered by the sun has been studied. A Brayton cycle is simpler than a Rankine cycle and has an advantage in places where water is scarce and expensive. A simple expression is derived for calculating the efficiency of the cycle in terms of the compression pressure ratio, the pressure loss coefficient and the ratio of the lower to higher temperature in the cycle with the efficiency of various components. The maximum permissible pressure loss coefficient has also been calculated.

P. Gandhidasan

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

A Flashing Binary Combined Cycle For Geothermal Power Generation | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Flashing Binary Combined Cycle For Geothermal Power Generation Flashing Binary Combined Cycle For Geothermal Power Generation Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: A Flashing Binary Combined Cycle For Geothermal Power Generation Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) Abstract: The performance of a flashing binary combined cycle for geothermal power generation is analysed. It is proposed to utilize hot residual brine from the separator in flashing-type plants to run a binary cycle, thereby producing incremental power. Parametric variations were carried out to determine the optimum performance of the combined cycle. Comparative evaluation with the simple flashing plant was made to assess its thermodynamic potential and economic viability. Results of the analyses indicate that the combined cycle can generate 13-28% more power than the

110

A Carbon Dioxide Gas Turbine Direct Cycle with Partial Condensation for Nuclear Reactors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A carbon dioxide gas turbine power generation system with a partial condensation cycle has been proposed for thermal and fast nuclear reactors, in which compression is done partly in the liquid phase and partly in the gas phase. This cycle achieves higher cycle efficiency than a He direct cycle mainly due to reduced compressor work of the liquid phase and of the carbon dioxide real gas effect, especially in the vicinity of the critical point. If this cycle is applied to a thermal reactor, efficiency of this cycle is about 55% at a reactor outlet temperature of 900 deg. C and pressure of 12.5 MPa, which is higher by about 10% than a typical helium direct gas turbine cycle plant (PBMR) at 900 deg. C and 8.4 MPa; this cycle also provides comparable cycle efficiency at the moderate core outlet temperature of 600 deg. C with that of the helium cycle at 900 deg. C. If this cycle is applied to a fast reactor, it is anticipated to be an alternative to liquid metal cooled fast reactors that can provide slightly higher cycle efficiency at the same core outlet temperature; it would eliminate safety problems, simplify the heat transport system and simplify plant maintenance. A passive decay heat removal system is realized by connecting a liquid carbon dioxide storage tank with the reactor vessel and by supplying carbon dioxide gasified from the tank to the core in case of depressurization event. (authors)

Yasuyoshi Kato; Takeshi Nitawaki; Yoshio Yoshizawa [Research Laboratory for Nuclear Reactors, Tokyo Institute of Technology, O-okayama, Meguro-ku, Tokyo, 152-8550 (Japan)

2002-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Exergoeconomic analysis of a biomass post-firing combined-cycle power plant  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Biomass can be converted thermo- and bio-chemically to solid, liquid and gaseous biofuels. In this paper, energy, exergy and exergoeconomic analyses are applied to a biomass integrated post-firing combined-cycle power plant. The energy and exergy efficiencies of the cycle are found to be maximized at specific compressor pressure ratio values, and that higher pressure ratios reduce the total unit product cost. Increasing the gas turbine inlet temperature and decreasing the compressor pressure ratio decreases the CO2 mole fraction exiting the power plant. The exergoeconomic factor for the biomass integrated post-firing combined-cycle power plant at the optimum energy/exergy efficiency is 0.39. This implies that the major cost rate of this power plant configuration is attributable to the exergy destruction cost rate. Increasing the compressor pressure ratio decreases the mass of air per mass of steam in the power plant, implying a reduction in the gas turbine plant size. Increasing both the compressor pressure ratio and the heat recovery steam generator inlet gas temperature increases the capital investment cost compared with the exergy destruction cost. However, increasing the gas turbine inlet temperature decreases this ratio.

Hassan Athari; Saeed Soltani; Seyed Mohammad Seyed Mahmoudi; Marc A. Rosen; Tatiana Morosuk

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Fossil fuel combined cycle power generation method  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for converting fuel energy to electricity includes the steps of converting a higher molecular weight gas into at least one mixed gas stream of lower average molecular weight including at least a first lower molecular weight gas and a second gas, the first and second gases being different gases, wherein the first lower molecular weight gas comprises H.sub.2 and the second gas comprises CO. The mixed gas is supplied to at least one turbine to produce electricity. The mixed gas stream is divided after the turbine into a first gas stream mainly comprising H.sub.2 and a second gas stream mainly comprising CO. The first and second gas streams are then electrochemically oxidized in separate fuel cells to produce electricity. A nuclear reactor can be used to supply at least a portion of the heat the required for the chemical conversion process.

Labinov, Solomon D [Knoxville, TN; Armstrong, Timothy R [Clinton, TN; Judkins, Roddie R [Knoxville, TN

2008-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

113

Optimization of Fog Inlet Air Cooling System for Combined Cycle Power Plants using Genetic Algorithm  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract In this research paper, a comprehensive thermodynamic modeling of a combined cycle power plant is first conducted and the effects of gas turbine inlet fogging system on the first and second law efficiencies and net power outputs of combined cycle power plants are investigated. The combined cycle power plant (CCPP) considered for this study consist of a double pressure heat recovery steam generator (HRSG) to utilize the energy of exhaust leaving the gas turbine and produce superheated steam to generate electricity in the Rankine cycle. In order to enhance understanding of this research and come up with optimum performance assessment of the plant, a complete optimization is using a genetic algorithm conducted. In order to achieve this goal, a new objective function is defined for the system optimization including social cost of air pollution for the power generation systems. The objective function is based on the first law efficiency, energy cost and the external social cost of air pollution for an operational system. It is concluded that using inlet air cooling system for the CCPP system and its optimization results in an increase in the average output power, first and second law efficiencies by 17.24%, 3.6% and 3.5%, respectively, for three warm months of year.

Mehdi A. Ehyaei; Mojtaba Tahani; Pouria Ahmadi; M. Esfandiari

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Life cycle assessment of a biomass gasification combined-cycle power system  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The potential environmental benefits from biomass power are numerous. However, biomass power may also have some negative effects on the environment. Although the environmental benefits and drawbacks of biomass power have been debated for some time, the total significance has not been assessed. This study serves to answer some of the questions most often raised in regard to biomass power: What are the net CO{sub 2} emissions? What is the energy balance of the integrated system? Which substances are emitted at the highest rates? What parts of the system are responsible for these emissions? To provide answers to these questions, a life cycle assessment (LCA) of a hypothetical biomass power plant located in the Midwest United States was performed. LCA is an analytical tool for quantifying the emissions, resource consumption, and energy use, collectively known as environmental stressors, that are associated with converting a raw material to a final product. Performed in conjunction with a technoeconomic feasibility study, the total economic and environmental benefits and drawbacks of a process can be quantified. This study complements a technoeconomic analysis of the same process, reported in Craig and Mann (1996) and updated here. The process studied is based on the concept of power Generation in a biomass integrated gasification combined cycle (BIGCC) plant. Broadly speaking, the overall system consists of biomass production, its transportation to the power plant, electricity generation, and any upstream processes required for system operation. The biomass is assumed to be supplied to the plant as wood chips from a biomass plantation, which would produce energy crops in a manner similar to the way food and fiber crops are produced today. Transportation of the biomass and other materials is by both rail and truck. The IGCC plant is sized at 113 MW, and integrates an indirectly-heated gasifier with an industrial gas turbine and steam cycle. 63 refs., 34 figs., 32 tabs.

Mann, M.K.; Spath, P.L.

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Thermal Cycling Combined with Dynamic Mechanical Load: Preliminary...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Load: Preliminary Report This PowerPoint presentation summarizes the efforts of the team led by ESPEC Corp. to investigate thermal cycling combined with dynamic mechanical load, a...

116

Off-design Simulations of Offshore Combined Cycles.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

?? This thesis presents an off-design simulation of offshore combined cycles. Offshore installations have a substantial power demand to facilitate the oil and gas production.… (more)

Flatebř, Řystein

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Insights for Quantitative Risk Assessment of Combined Cycle Power Plants  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Traditional techniques of risk analysis have been fitted for the application to combined cycle power plants and the results of several...

Gabriele Ballocco; Andrea Carpignano…

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

An integrated solar thermal power system using intercooled gas turbine and Kalina cycle  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A new solar tower thermal power system integrating the intercooled gas turbine top cycle and the Kalina bottoming cycle is proposed in the present paper. The thermodynamic performance of the proposed system is investigated, and the irreversibility of energy conversion is disclosed using the energy–utilization diagram method. On the top cycle of the proposed system, the compressed air after being intercooled is heated at 1000 °C or higher at the solar tower receiver and is used to drive the gas turbine to generate power. The ammonia–water mixture as the working substance of the bottom cycle recovers the waste heat from the gas turbine to generate power. A concise analytical formula of solar-to-electric efficiency of the proposed system is developed. As a result, the peak solar-to-electric efficiency of the proposed system is 27.5% at a gas turbine inlet temperature of 1000 °C under the designed solar direct normal irradiance of 800 W/m2. Compared with a conventional solar power tower plant, the proposed integrated system conserves approximately 69% of consumed water. The results obtained in the current study provide an approach to improve solar-to-electric efficiency and offer a potential to conserve water for solar thermal power plants in arid area.

Shuo Peng; Hui Hong; Hongguang Jin; Zhifeng Wang

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Electric power generation from a geothermal source utilizing a low-temperature organic Rankine cycle turbine  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A demonstration project to generate electricity with a geothermal source and low-temperature organic Rankine cycle turbine in a rural Alaskan location is described. Operating data and a set of conclusions are presented detailing problems and recommendations for others contemplating this approach to electric power generation.

Aspnes, J.D.; Zarling, J.P.

1982-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Encouraging Combined Heat and Power in California Buildings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

incentive ($/W) wind turbine waste heat to power pressurewind turbines, fuel cells, organic rankine cycle/waste heat capture, pressure reduction turbines, advanced energy storage, and combined heat and power

Stadler, Michael

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "turbine combined cycle" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

System study on partial gasification combined cycle with CO{sub 2} recovery - article no. 051801  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

S partial gasification combined cycle with CO{sub 2} recovery is proposed in this paper. Partial gasification adopts cascade conversion of the composition of coal. Active composition of coal is simply gasified, while inactive composition, that is char, is burnt in a boiler. Oxy-fuel combustion of syngas produces only CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}O, so the CO{sub 2} can be separated through cooling the working fluid. This decreases the amount of energy consumption to separate CO{sub 2} compared with conventional methods. The novel system integrates the above two key technologies by injecting steam from a steam turbine into the combustion chamber of a gas turbine to combine the Rankine cycle with the Brayton cycle. The thermal efficiency of this system will be higher based on the cascade utilization of energy level. Compared with the conventional integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC), the compressor of the gas turbine, heat recovery steam generator (HRSG) and gasifier are substituted for a pump, reheater, and partial gasifier, so the system is simplified. Furthermore, the novel system is investigated by means of energy-utilization diagram methodology and provides a simple analysis of their economic and environmental performance. As a result, the thermal efficiency of this system may be expected to be 45%, with CO{sub 2} recovery of 41.2%, which is 1.5-3.5% higher than that of an IGCC system. At the same time, the total investment cost of the new system is about 16% lower than that of an IGCC. The comparison between the partial gasification technology and the IGCC technology is based on the two representative cases to identify the specific feature of the proposed system.

Xu, Y.J.; Jin, H.G.; Lin, R.M.; Han, W. [Chinese Academy of Science, Beijing (China)

2008-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

122

Determination of cycle configuration of gas turbines and aircraft engines by an optimization procedure  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper is devoted to the analyses and optimization of simple and sophisticated cycles, particularly for various gas turbine engines and aero-engines (including the scramjet engine) to achieve maximum performance. The optimization of such criteria as thermal efficiency, specific output, and total performance for gas turbine engines, and overall efficiency, nondimensional thrust, and specific impulse for aero-engines has been performed by the optimization procedure with the multiplier method. Comparison of results with analytical solutions establishes the validity of the optimization procedure.

Tsuijikawa, Y.; Nagaoka, M. (Dept. of Aeronautical Engineering, Univ. of Osaka Prefecture, Mozu-umemachi, Sakai 591 (JP))

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Three-dimensional off-design numerical analysis of an organic Rankine cycle radial-inflow turbine  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Optimisation of organic Rankine cycles (ORCs) for binary cycle applications could play a major role in determining the competitiveness of low to moderate renewable sources. An important aspect of the optimisation is to maximise the turbine output power for a given resource. This requires careful attention to the turbine design notably through numerical simulations. Challenges in the numerical modelling of radial-inflow turbines using high-density working fluids still need to be addressed in order to improve the turbine design and better optimise ORCs. This paper presents preliminary 3D numerical simulations of a high-density radial-inflow ORC turbine in sensible geothermal conditions. Following extensive investigation of the operating conditions and thermodynamic cycle analysis, the refrigerant \\{R143a\\} is chosen as the high-density working fluid. The 1D design of the candidate radial-inflow turbine is presented in details. Furthermore, commercially-available software Ansys-CFX is used to perform preliminary steady-state 3D CFD simulations of the candidate \\{R143a\\} radial-inflow turbine for a number of operating conditions including off-design conditions. The real-gas properties are obtained using the Peng–Robinson equations of state. The thermodynamic ORC cycle is presented. The preliminary design created using dedicated radial-inflow turbine software Concepts-Rital is discussed and the 3D CFD results are presented and compared against the meanline analysis.

Emilie Sauret; Yuantong Gu

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Turbines  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... with his torical notes and some explanations of the principles involved in the working of turbines. This is fol lowed by three chapters on water-wheels, ... . This is fol lowed by three chapters on water-wheels, turbine pumps, and water ...

1922-02-09T23:59:59.000Z

125

A concept of power generator using wind turbine, hydrodynamic retarder, and organic Rankine cycle drive  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper describes a concept of electric power generating system that uses a wind turbine to generate kinetic energy which converts heat through a hydrodynamic retarder. The heat so generated is utilized to drive an organic Rankine cycle that converts thermal energy into electricity power for continuous and undisrupted supply during the year. A hydrodynamic retarder converts kinetic energy into heat through hot fluid by directing the flow of the fluid into the hydrodynamic retarder in a manner that resists rotation of blades of the wind turbine. The hot fluid circulating in the hydrodynamic retarder is a thermal heat source for vapor regeneration of organic heat exchange fluid mixture(s) used in the Rankine cycle. The expansion of the organic heat exchange fluid gets converted into rotation of the generator rotor.

Samuel Sami

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Thermodynamic performance analysis of a combined power cycle using low grade heat source and LNG cold energy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Thermodynamic analysis of a combined cycle using a low grade heat source and LNG cold energy was carried out. The combined cycle consisted of an ammonia–water Rankine cycle with and without regeneration and a LNG Rankine cycle. A parametric study was conducted to examine the effects of the key parameters, such as ammonia mass fraction, turbine inlet pressure, condensation temperature. The effects of the ammonia mass fraction on the temperature distributions of the hot and cold streams in heat exchangers were also investigated. The characteristic diagram of the exergy efficiency and heat transfer capability was proposed to consider the system performance and expenditure of the heat exchangers simultaneously. The simulation showed that the system performance is influenced significantly by the parameters with the ammonia mass fraction having largest effect. The net work output of the ammonia–water cycle may have a peak value or increase monotonically with increasing ammonia mass fraction, which depends on turbine inlet pressure or condensation temperature. The exergy efficiency may decrease or increase or have a peak value with turbine inlet pressure depending on the ammonia mass fraction.

Kyoung Hoon Kim; Kyung Chun Kim

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Optimizing the start-up operations of combined cycle power plants using soft computing methods  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......Energy, New technologies and sustainable Economic development Agency...Detection in Gas Turbines using Fuzzy...fusion for gas turbine power plants...Research Development Center Technical...Energy, New technologies and sustainable Economic development Agency...combination of a gas turbine and a steam......

Ilaria Bertini; Matteo De Felice; Alessandro Pannicelli; Stefano Pizzuti

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Thermal Cycling Combined with Dynamic Mechanical Load: Preliminary Report  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This PowerPoint presentation summarizes the efforts of the team led by ESPEC Corp. to investigate thermal cycling combined with dynamic mechanical load, a solar project funded by the SunShot Initiative.

129

Evaluation of Indirect Combined Cycle in Very High Temperature Gas--Cooled Reactor  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy and Idaho National Laboratory are developing a very high temperature reactor to serve as a demonstration of state-of-the-art nuclear technology. The purpose of the demonstration is twofold: (a) efficient, low-cost energy generation and (b) hydrogen production. Although a next-generation plant could be developed as a single-purpose facility, early designs are expected to be dual purpose, as assumed here. A dual-purpose design with a combined cycle of a Brayton top cycle and a bottom Rankine cycle was investigated. An intermediate heat transport loop for transporting heat to a hydrogen production plant was used. Helium, CO2, and a helium-nitrogen mixture were studied to determine the best working fluid in terms of the cycle efficiency. The relative component sizes were estimated for the different working fluids to provide an indication of the relative capital costs. The relative size of the turbomachinery was measured by comparing the power input/output of the component. For heat exchangers the volume was computed and compared. Parametric studies away from the baseline values of the cycle were performed to determine the effects of varying conditions in the cycle. This gives some insight into the sensitivity of the cycle to various operating conditions as well as trade-offs between efficiency and component size. Parametric studies were carried out on reactor outlet temperature, mass flow, pressure, and turbine cooling.

Chang Oh; Robert Barner; Cliff Davis; Steven Sherman; Paul Pickard

2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Combining Droop Curve Concepts with Control Systems for Wind Turbine Active Power Control: Preprint  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Wind energy is becoming a larger portion of the global energy portfolio and wind penetration has increased dramatically in certain regions of the world. This increasing wind penetration has driven the need for wind turbines to provide active power control (APC) services to the local utility grid, as wind turbines do not intrinsically provide frequency regulation services that are common with traditional generators. It is common for large scale wind turbines to be decoupled from the utility grid via power electronics, which allows the turbine to synthesize APC commands via control of the generator torque and blade pitch commands. Consequently, the APC services provided by a wind turbine can be more flexible than those provided by conventional generators. This paper focuses on the development and implementation of both static and dynamic droop curves to measure grid frequency and output delta power reference signals to a novel power set point tracking control system. The combined droop curve and power tracking controller is simulated and comparisons are made between simulations using various droop curve parameters and stochastic wind conditions. The tradeoffs involved with aggressive response to frequency events are analyzed. At the turbine level, simulations are performed to analyze induced structural loads. At the grid level, simulations test a wind plant's response to a dip in grid frequency.

Buckspan, A.; Aho, J.; Pao, L.; Fleming, P.; Jeong, Y.

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Vibration Combined High Temperature Cycle Tests for Capacitive MEMS Accelerometers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this paper vibration combined high temperature cycle tests for packaged capacitive SOI-MEMS accelerometers are presented. The aim of these tests is to provide useful Design for Reliability information for MEMS designers. A high temperature test chamber and a chopper-stabilized read-out circuitry were designed and realized at BME - DED. Twenty thermal cycles of combined Temperature Cycle Test and Fatigue Vibration Test has been carried out on 5 samples. Statistical evaluation of the test results showed that degradation has started in 3 out of the 5 samples.

Z. Szucs; G. Nagy; S. Hodossy; M. Rencz; A. Poppe

2008-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

132

Influence of Turbine Inlet Temperature on the Efficiency of Externally Fired Gas Turbines  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Many researchers have considered externally fired gas turbines (EFGT) as an option for the ... . The EFGT cycle with regeneration or the gas-vapor combined cycle using one EFGT, also ... is used to investigate th...

Paulo Eduardo Batista de Mello…

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Development of a dynamic simulator for a natural gas combined cycle (NGCC) power plant with post-combustion carbon capture  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The AVESTAR Center located at the U.S. Department of Energy’s National Energy Technology Laboratory and West Virginia University is a world-class research and training environment dedicated to using dynamic process simulation as a tool for advancing the safe, efficient and reliable operation of clean energy plants with CO{sub 2} capture. The AVESTAR Center was launched with a high-fidelity dynamic simulator for an Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) power plant with pre-combustion carbon capture. The IGCC dynamic simulator offers full-scope Operator Training Simulator (OTS) Human Machine Interface (HMI) graphics for realistic, real-time control room operation and is integrated with a 3D virtual Immersive Training Simulator (ITS), thus allowing joint control room and field operator training. The IGCC OTS/ITS solution combines a “gasification with CO{sub 2} capture” process simulator with a “combined cycle” power simulator into a single high-performance dynamic simulation framework. This presentation will describe progress on the development of a natural gas combined cycle (NGCC) dynamic simulator based on the syngas-fired combined cycle portion of AVESTAR’s IGCC dynamic simulator. The 574 MW gross NGCC power plant design consisting of two advanced F-class gas turbines, two heat recovery steam generators (HRSGs), and a steam turbine in a multi-shaft 2x2x1 configuration will be reviewed. Plans for integrating a post-combustion carbon capture system will also be discussed.

Liese, E.; Zitney, S.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Joining semi-closed gas turbine cycle and tri-reforming: SCGT-TRIREF as a proposal for low CO2 emissions powerplants  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Methane conversion to a rich H2 fuel by reforming reactions is a largely applied industrial process. Recently, it has been considered for applications combined to gas turbine powerplants, as a mean for (I) chemical recuperation (i.e. chemical looping CRGT) and (II) decarbonising the primary fuel and make the related power cycle a low CO2 releaser. The possibility of enhancing methane conversion by the addition of CO2 to the steam reactant flow (i.e. tri-reforming) has been assessed and showed interesting results. When dealing with gas turbines, the possibility of applying tri-reforming is related to the availability of some CO2 into the fluegas going to the reformer. This happens in semi-closed gas turbine cycles (SCGT), where the fluegas has a typical 14–15% CO2 mass content. The possibility of joining CRGT and SCGT technologies to improve methane reforming and propose an innovative, low CO2 emissions gas turbine cycle was assessed here. One of the key issues of this joining is also the possibility of greatly reduce the external water consumption due to the reforming, as the SCGT is a water producer cycle. The SCGT-TRIREF cycle is an SCGT cycle where fuel tri-reforming is applied. The steam due to the reformer is generated by the vaporization of the condensed water coming out from the fluegas condensing heat exchanger, upstream the main compressor, where the exhausts are cooled down and partially recirculated. The heat due to the steam generation is recuperated from the turbine exhausts cooling. The reforming process is partially sustained by the heat recovered from the turbine exhausts (which generates superheated steam) and partially by the auto thermal reactions of methane with fresh air, coming from the compressor (i.e. partial combustion). The effect of CO2 on methane reforming (tri-reforming effect) increases with decreasing steam/methane ratio: at very low values, around 30% of methane is converted by reactions with CO2. At high values of steam/methane ratio, the steam reforming reactions are dominant and only a marginal fraction of methane is interested to tri-reforming. Under optimised conditions, which can be reached at relatively high pressure ratios (25–30), the power cycle showed a potential efficiency around 46% and specific work at 550 kJ/kg level. When the amine CO2 capture is applied, the specific CO2 emissions range between 45 and 55 g CO 2 / kW h .

Daniele Fiaschi; Andrea Baldini

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Black liquor gasification combined cycle with Co2 capture – Technical and economic analysis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The pulp and paper sector is intensive in the use of energy, and presents a high participation in the industrial context, specially based in the black liquor, a renewable source generated in the pulp process. Black liquor gasification is not still completely dominated; however, it has the potential of becoming an important alternative for the pulp and paper sector. In this article, the traditional steam cycle based on chemical recovery and biomass boilers associated to backpressure/extraction turbine is compared to black liquor gasification combined cycle schemes, associated to biomass boiler, considering the technical and economic attractiveness of capturing and sequestering CO2. Results show that despite its interesting exergetic efficiency, the adoption CO2 capture system for BLGCC did not prove to be attractive under the prescribed conditions without major incentive.

Elzimar Tadeu de Freitas Ferreira; José Antonio Perrella Balestieri

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Improved System Integration for Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) Systems  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Improved System Integration for Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) Systems ... The model is applied to evaluate integration schemes involving nitrogen injection, air extraction, and combinations of both, as well as different ASU pressure levels. ... The optimal nitrogen injection only case in combination with an elevated pressure ASU had the highest efficiency and power output and approximately the lowest emissions per unit output of all cases considered, and thus is a recommended design option. ...

H. Christopher Frey; Yunhua Zhu

2006-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

137

The development of Coke Carried-Heat Gasification Coal-Fired Combined Cycle  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Carried-Heat Partial Gasification Combined cycle is a novel combined cycle which was proposed by Thermal Engineering Department ... technology, Coke Carried-Heat Gasification Coal-Fired Combined Cycle, as the imp...

Li Zhao; Xiangdong Xu

1999-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Technoeconomic Analysis and Life Cycle Assessment of an Integrated Biomass Gasification Combined Cycle System  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A biomass gasification combined-cycle power plant, consisting of a low pressure...®...Economic analyses were then performed to determine the levelized cost of electricity. The economic viability and efficiency of...

M. K. Mann; P. L. Spath

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

The Combined Otto and Stirling Cycle Prime-Mover-Based Power Plant.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

?? An exploratory study of the combined Otto and Stirling cycle prime mover is presented. The Stirling cycle acts as the bottoming cycle on the… (more)

Cullen, Barry, (Thesis)

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Combined Cycles and Cogeneration - An Alternative for the Process Industries  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SYSTEM Gasification Numerous programs are underway for gasification of solid fuels and heavy oils and it is among these systems that many feel medium Btu gas will be pro duced for use in combined cycle systems. Many of the problems now facing... the gasification approach are economic in nature caused by the compe titive costs of gas and oil. In addition, in areas lacking a coal infrastructure, extraordinary costs still exist in the early years. FIG. 13 INTEGRATED INTERMEDIATE Btu GASIFICATION CYCLE...

Harkins, H. L.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "turbine combined cycle" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

AVESTAR® - Natural Gas Combined Cycle (NGCC) Dynamic Simulator  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Natural Gas Combined Cycle (NGCC) Dynamic Simulator Natural Gas Combined Cycle (NGCC) Dynamic Simulator A simulator that can provide future engineers with realistic, hands-on experience for operating advanced natural gas combined cycle (NGCC) power plants will soon be available at an innovative U.S. Department of Energy training center. Under a new cooperative research and development agreement signed by the Office of Fossil Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) and Invensys Operations Management, the partners will develop, test, and deploy a dynamic simulator and operator training system (OTS) for a generic NGCC power plant equipped for use with post-combustion carbon capture. NETL will operate the new dynamic simulator/OTS at the AVESTAR (Advanced Virtual Energy Simulation Training and Research) Center in Morgantown, W.Va.

142

Rotor Support Technology Developments for Long Life Closed Brayton Cycle Turbines  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Power conversion systems based upon the Closed Brayton Cycle (CBC) turbine are under consideration for space power generation applications. Using this approach inert gas heated with a nuclear reactor or other means is used to drive a turbine?generator in a recirculating flow path. As a closed system contamination of the working fluid for instance with bearing lubricating oil cannot be tolerated. To prevent this possibility compliant surface gas film bearings are employed that use the working fluid as their lubricant. Foil gas bearings are in widespread use in turbocompressors and microturbines in aeronatuics and terrestrial applications. To successfully implement them for space power CBC systems research is underway at NASA’s Glenn Research Center to assess foil bearing start?up torque requirements bearing thermal management and the effects of high ambient pressures in inert gases on performance. This paper introduces foil gas bearing rotor support technologies and provides an update on bearing performance testing and evaluations being conducted to integrate foil bearings in future CBC turbine systems.

Christopher DellaCorte; Kevin C. Radil; Robert J. Bruckner; Steven W. Bauman; Bernadette J. Puleo; Samuel A. Howard

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Technical and Economic Analysis of Chemical Looping Combustion with Humid Air Turbine Power Cycle  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Chemical looping combustion (CLC) is an innovative concept that offers potentially attractive option to capture CO2 with appreciably lower thermal efficiency penalties when compared to the tradition approaches. This paper presents process simulation, technical and economic analysis of the CLC integrated with humid air turbine (HAT) cycle for natural gas-fired power plant with CO2 capture. Aspen Plus® process simulator and Aspen Process Economic Analyzer® were employed for technical and economic analysis of the CLC-HAT and conventional HAT cycle.The analysis shows the CLC- HAT cycle has a thermal efficiency of 57 % at oxidizing temperature of 1,200 oC and reducer inlet temperature of 530 oC. The economic evaluation performed shows that a 50 MWth CLC-HAT plant with a projected lifetime of 30 y has a payback period of 6 y compared to 7 y for conventional HAT cycle. This indicates that CLC-HAT cycle is commercially viable with respect to CO2 capture cost.

Akeem Olaleye; Meihong Wang

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

EIS-0409: Kemper County Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle Project, Mississippi  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This EIS analyzes DOE's decision to provide funding for the Kemper County Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle Project in Kemper County, Mississippi to assess the potential environmental impacts associated with the construction and operation of a project proposed by Southern Power Company, through its affiliate Mississippi Power Company, which has been selected by DOE for consideration under the Clean Coal Power Initiative (CCPI) program.

145

Combined cycle and run performance is maximised when the cycle is completed at the highest sustainable intensity  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The aim of this study was to determine the effect of cycle intensity on subsequent running performance and combined cycle–run (CR) performance. Seven triathletes undertook a cycling graded exercise test to exhaus...

Robert Suriano; David Bishop

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Analysis of the fuel efficiency of gas-turbine cogeneration stations  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A technique for evaluating the fuel efficiency of the combined generation of electricity and heat at a gas-turbine cogeneration station is presented. The effects the regeneration degree of the gas-turbine cycle a...

V. I. Evenko; A. S. Strebkov

2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Domestic equipment for the development of gas-turbine based power engineering  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A brief analysis of characteristics and specific features of foreign gas-turbine installations is presented. Prospects of introduction of combined-cycle and gas-turbine technologies in power engineering of Rus...

G. G. Ol’khovskii

2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

NETL: Turbine Projects - Cost Reduction  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Cost Reduction Cost Reduction Turbine Projects Cost Reduction Single Crystal Turbine Blades Enhancing Gas Turbine Efficiency Data/Fact Sheets Enabling and Information Technologies to Increase RAM of Advanced Powerplants Data/Fact Sheets Development of NDE Technology for Environmental Barrier Coating and Residual Life Estimation Data/Fact Sheets Welding and Weld Repair of Single Crystal Gas Turbine Alloy Data/Fact Sheets Combustion Turbine Hot Section Coating Life Management Data/Fact Sheets On-Line Thermal Barrier Coating Monitor for Real-Time Failure Protection and Life Maximization Data/Fact Sheets On-Line Thermal Barrier Coating [PDF] Advanced Monitoring to Improve Combustion Turbine/Combined Cycle RAM Data/Fact Sheets Advanced Monitoring to Improve Combustion Turbine [PDF]

149

Performance analysis of combined humidified gas turbine power generation and multi-effect thermal vapor compression desalination systems: Part 2: The evaporative gas turbine based system and some discussions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This is Part 2 of the paper “Performance analysis of combined humidified gas turbine power generation and multi-effect thermal vapor compression desalination systems — Part 1: The desalination unit and its combination with a steam-injected gas turbine power system”. A combined power and water system based on the evaporative gas turbine (EvGT) is studied, and major features such as the fuel saving, power-to-water ratio, energy and exergy utilization, and approaches to performance improvement, are presented and discussed in comparison with STIG- and EvGT- based systems, to further reveal the characteristics of these two types of combined systems. Some of the main results of the paper are: the fuel consumption of water production in STIG-based combined system is, based on reference-cycle method, about 45% of a water-only unit, and that in an EvGT-based system, it is 31–54%; compared with the individual power-only and water-only units, the fuel savings of the two combined systems are 12%–28% and 10%–21%, respectively; a water production gain of more than 15% can be obtained by using a direct-contact gas-saline water heat exchanger to recover the stack heat; and the combined system are more flexible in its power-to-water ratio than currently used dual-purpose systems. Further studies on aspects such as operation, hardware cost, control complexity, and environmental impact, are needed to determine which configuration is more favorable in practice.

Yongqing Wang; Noam Lior

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Catalytic combustor for integrated gasification combined cycle power plant  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A gasification power plant 10 includes a compressor 32 producing a compressed air flow 36, an air separation unit 22 producing a nitrogen flow 44, a gasifier 14 producing a primary fuel flow 28 and a secondary fuel source 60 providing a secondary fuel flow 62 The plant also includes a catalytic combustor 12 combining the nitrogen flow and a combustor portion 38 of the compressed air flow to form a diluted air flow 39 and combining at least one of the primary fuel flow and secondary fuel flow and a mixer portion 78 of the diluted air flow to produce a combustible mixture 80. A catalytic element 64 of the combustor 12 separately receives the combustible mixture and a backside cooling portion 84 of the diluted air flow and allows the mixture and the heated flow to produce a hot combustion gas 46 provided to a turbine 48. When fueled with the secondary fuel flow, nitrogen is not combined with the combustor portion.

Bachovchin, Dennis M. (Mauldin, SC); Lippert, Thomas E. (Murrysville, PA)

2008-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

151

Hydrogen-or-Fossil-Combustion Nuclear Combined-Cycle Systems for Base- and Peak-Load Electricity Production  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A combined-cycle power plant is described that uses (1) heat from a high-temperature nuclear reactor to meet base-load electrical demands and (2) heat from the same high-temperature reactor and burning natural gas, jet fuel, or hydrogen to meet peak-load electrical demands. For base-load electricity production, fresh air is compressed; then flows through a heat exchanger, where it is heated to between 700 and 900 C by heat provided by a high-temperature nuclear reactor via an intermediate heat-transport loop; and finally exits through a high-temperature gas turbine to produce electricity. The hot exhaust from the Brayton-cycle gas turbine is then fed to a heat recovery steam generator that provides steam to a steam turbine for added electrical power production. To meet peak electricity demand, the air is first compressed and then heated with the heat from a high-temperature reactor. Natural gas, jet fuel, or hydrogen is then injected into the hot air in a combustion chamber, combusts, and heats the air to 1300 C-the operating conditions for a standard natural-gas-fired combined-cycle plant. The hot gas then flows through a gas turbine and a heat recovery steam generator before being sent to the exhaust stack. The higher temperatures increase the plant efficiency and power output. If hydrogen is used, it can be produced at night using energy from the nuclear reactor and stored until needed. With hydrogen serving as the auxiliary fuel for peak power production, the electricity output to the electric grid can vary from zero (i.e., when hydrogen is being produced) to the maximum peak power while the nuclear reactor operates at constant load. Because nuclear heat raises air temperatures above the auto-ignition temperatures of the various fuels and powers the air compressor, the power output can be varied rapidly (compared with the capabilities of fossil-fired turbines) to meet spinning reserve requirements and stabilize the electric grid. This combined cycle uses the unique characteristics of high-temperature reactors (T>700 C) to produce electricity for premium electric markets whose demands can not be met by other types of nuclear reactors. It may also make the use of nuclear reactors economically feasible in smaller electrical grids, such as those found in many developing countries. The ability to rapidly vary power output can be used to stabilize electric grid performance-a particularly important need in small electrical grids.

Forsberg, Charles W [ORNL; Conklin, Jim [ORNL

2007-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Analysis of Membrane and Adsorbent Processes for Warm Syngas Cleanup in Integrated Gasification Combined-Cycle Power with CO2 Capture and Sequestration  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Analysis of Membrane and Adsorbent Processes for Warm Syngas Cleanup in Integrated Gasification Combined-Cycle Power with CO2 Capture and Sequestration ... The clean syngas is diluted with N2 from the ASU and enters the gas turbine burner. ... The amount of N2 diluent to be added is determined by the requirement of maintaining the appropriate lower heating value of the syngas feeding into the gas turbine burner to achieve sufficiently low NOx emissions (15–35 ppmv at 15% O2)(36) and to keep the temperature of the gas low enough to avoid blade failure. ...

David J. Couling; Kshitij Prakash; William H. Green

2011-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

153

Gas Turbine Manufacturers Perspective  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Viability and Experience of IGCC From a Viability and Experience of IGCC From a Gas Turbine Manufacturers Perspective ASME - IGCC ASME - IGCC Turbo Turbo Expo Expo June 2001 June 2001 GE Power Systems g Klaus Brun, Ph.D. - Manager Process Power Plant Product & Market Development Robert M. Jones - Project Development Manager Process Power Plants Power Systems Power Systems General Electric Company General Electric Company ABSTRACT GE Power Systems g Economic Viability and Experience of IGCC From a Gas Turbine Manufacturers Perspective High natural gas fuel gas prices combined with new technology developments have made IGCC a competitive option when compared to conventional combined cycle or coal steam turbine cycles. Although the initial investment costs for an IGCC plant are still comparatively high, the low

154

An overview of current and future sustainable gas turbine technologies  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this work an overview of current and future sustainable gas turbine technologies is presented. In particular, the various gas turbine technologies are described and compared. Emphasis has been given to the various advance cycles involving heat recovery from the gas turbine exhaust, such as, the gas to gas recuperation cycle, the combined cycle, the chemical recuperation cycle, the Cheng cycle, the humid air turbine cycle, etc. The thermodynamic characteristics of the various cycles are considered in order to establish their relative importance to future power generation markets. The combined cycle technology is now well established and offers superior to any of the competing gas turbine based systems, which are likely to be available in the medium term for large-scale power generation applications. In small-scale generation, less than 50 MWe, it is more cost effective to install a less complex power plant, due to the adverse effect of the economics of scale. Combined cycle plants in this power output range normally have higher specific investment costs and lower electrical efficiencies but also offer robust and reliable performance. Mixed air steam turbines (MAST) technologies are among the possible ways to improve the performance of gas turbine based power plants at feasible costs (e.g. peak load gas turbine plants).

Andreas Poullikkas

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Studies of the thermal circuit of an advanced integrated gasification combined-cycle power plant  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The results obtained from a study of the thermal circuit of a combined-cycle plant with coal gasification are presented, and ... of producer gas and calculated values of the combined-cycle power plant efficiency ...

D. G. Grigoruk; A. V. Turkin

2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Gasification combined cycle: Carbon dioxide recovery, transport, and disposal  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of the project is to develop engineering evaluations of technologies for the capture, use, and disposal of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}). This project emphasizes CO{sub 2}-capture technologies combined with integrated gasification combined-cycle (IGCC) power systems. Complementary evaluations address CO{sub 2} transportation, CO{sub 2} use, and options for the long-term sequestering of unused CO{sub 2}. Commercially available CO{sub 2}-capture technology is providing a performance and economic baseline against which to compare innovative technologies. The intent is to provide the CO{sub 2} budget, or an {open_quotes}equivalent CO{sub 2}{close_quotes} budget, associated with each of the individual energy-cycle steps, in addition to process design capital and operating costs. The value used for the {open_quotes}equivalent CO{sub 2}{close_quotes} budget is 1 kg of CO{sub 2} per kilowatt-hour (electric). The base case is a 458-MW IGCC system that uses an air-blown Kellogg-Rust-Westinghouse agglomerating fluidized-bed gasifier, Illinois No. 6 bituminous coal feed, and in-bed sulfur removal. Mining, feed preparation, and conversion result in a net electric power production of 454 MW, with a CO{sub 2} release rate of 0.835 kg/kWhe. Two additional life-cycle energy balances for emerging technologies were considered: (1) high-temperature CO{sub 2} separation with calcium- or magnesium-based sorbents, and (2) ambient-temperature facilitated-transport polymer membranes for acid-gas removal.

Doctor, R.D.; Molburg, J.C.; Thimmapuram, P.R.; Berry, G.F.; Livengood, C.D.

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Advanced Feed Water and Cooling Water Treatment at Combined Cycle Power Plant  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Tokyo Gas Yokosuka Power Station is an IPP combined cycle power plant supplied by Fuji Electric Systems...

Ryo Takeishi; Kunihiko Hamada; Ichiro Myogan…

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Integration of coal utilization and environmental control in integrated gasification combined cycle systems  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Integration of coal utilization and environmental control in integrated gasification combined cycle systems ... The Cost of Carbon Capture and Storage for Natural Gas Combined Cycle Power Plants ... The Cost of Carbon Capture and Storage for Natural Gas Combined Cycle Power Plants ...

H. Christopher Frey; Edward S. Rubin

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Modeling the Performance, Emissions, and Cost of an Entrained-Flow Gasification Combined Cycle System Using  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Modeling the Performance, Emissions, and Cost of an Entrained-Flow Gasification Combined Cycle-based Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) system using ASPEN. ASPEN is a steady-state chemical process-flow Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) system. This study aims at developing a base case analysis

Frey, H. Christopher

160

NOVEL GAS CLEANING/ CONDITIONING FOR INTEGRATED GASIFICATION COMBINED CYCLE  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

INTEGRATED GASIFICATION COMBINED CYCLE VOLUME I - CONCEPTUAL COMMERCIAL EVALUATION OPTIONAL PROGRAM FINAL REPORT September 1, 2001 - December 31, 2005 By Dennis A. Horazak (Siemens), Program Manager Richard A. Newby (Siemens) Eugene E. Smeltzer (Siemens) Rachid B. Slimane (GTI) P. Vann Bush (GTI) James L. Aderhold, Jr. (GTI) Bruce G. Bryan (GTI) December 2005 DOE Award Number: DE-AC26-99FT40674 Prepared for U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Prepared by Siemens Power Generation, Inc. 4400 Alafaya Trail Orlando, FL 32826 & Gas Technology Institute 1700 S. Mt. Prospect Rd. Des Plaines, Illinois 60018 DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "turbine combined cycle" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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161

E-Print Network 3.0 - air turbine cycle Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Engineering 48 Reproducedwith pennissionfrom ElsevierPergamon Biomass and Bioenerg..' Vol: 10, :os 2-3, pp..149-l66, 1996 Summary: option is the humid air turbine...

162

Combined Experiment Phase 1. [Horizontal axis wind turbines: wind tunnel testing versus field testing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

How does wind tunnel airfoil data differ from the airfoil performance on an operating horizontal axis wind turbine (HAWT) The National Renewable Energy laboratory has been conducting a comprehensive test program focused on answering this question and understanding the basic fluid mechanics of rotating HAWT stall aerodynamics. The basic approach was to instrument a wind rotor, using an airfoil that was well documented by wind tunnel tests, and measure operating pressure distributions on the rotating blade. Based an the integrated values of the pressure data, airfoil performance coefficients were obtained, and comparisons were made between the rotating data and the wind tunnel data. Care was taken to the aerodynamic and geometric differences between the rotating and the wind tunnel models. This is the first of two reports describing the Combined Experiment Program and its results. This Phase I report covers background information such as test setup and instrumentation. It also includes wind tunnel test results and roughness testing.

Butterfield, C.P.; Musial, W.P.; Simms, D.A.

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Application of the integrated gasification combined cycle technology and BGL gasification design for power generation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) technology promises to be the power generation technology of choice in the late 1990s and beyond. Based on the principle that almost any fuel can be burned more cleanly and efficiently if first turned into a gas, an IGCC plant extracts more electricity from a ton of coal by burning it as a gas in a turbine rather than as a solid in a boiler. Accordingly, coal gasification is the process of converting coal to a clean-burning synthetic gas. IGCC technology is the integration of the coal-gasification plant with a conventional combined-cycle plant to produce electricity. The benefits of this technology merger are many and result in a highly efficient and environmentally superior energy production facility. The lGCC technology holds significant implications for Asia-Pacific countries and for other parts of the world. High-growth regions require additional baseload capacity. Current low prices for natural gas and minimal emissions that result from its use for power generation favor its selection as the fuel source for new power generation capacity. However, fluctuations in fuel price and fuel availability are undermining the industry`s confidence in planning future capacity based upon gas-fueled generation. With the world`s vast coal reserves, there is a continuing effort to provide coal-fueled power generation technologies that use coal cleanly and efficiently. The lGCC technology accomplishes this objective. This chapter provides a summary of the status of lGCC technology and lGCC projects known to date. It also will present a technical overview of the British Gas/Lurgi (BGL) technology, one of the leading and most promising coal gasifier designs.

Edmonds, R.F. Jr.; Hulkowich, G.J.

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

164

ADVANCED TURBINE SYSTEMS PROGRAM  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Natural gas combustion turbines are rapidly becoming the primary technology of choice for generating electricity. At least half of the new generating capacity added in the US over the next twenty years will be combustion turbine systems. The Department of Energy has cosponsored with Siemens Westinghouse, a program to maintain the technology lead in gas turbine systems. The very ambitious eight year program was designed to demonstrate a highly efficient and commercially acceptable power plant, with the ability to fire a wide range of fuels. The main goal of the Advanced Turbine Systems (ATS) Program was to develop ultra-high efficiency, environmentally superior and cost effective competitive gas turbine systems for base load application in utility, independent power producer and industrial markets. Performance targets were focused on natural gas as a fuel and included: System efficiency that exceeds 60% (lower heating value basis); Less than 10 ppmv NO{sub x} emissions without the use of post combustion controls; Busbar electricity that are less than 10% of state of the art systems; Reliability-Availability-Maintainability (RAM) equivalent to current systems; Water consumption minimized to levels consistent with cost and efficiency goals; and Commercial systems by the year 2000. In a parallel effort, the program was to focus on adapting the ATS engine to coal-derived or biomass fuels. In Phase 1 of the ATS Program, preliminary investigators on different gas turbine cycles demonstrated that net plant LHV based efficiency greater than 60% was achievable. In Phase 2 the more promising cycles were evaluated in greater detail and the closed-loop steam-cooled combined cycle was selected for development because it offered the best solution with least risk for achieving the ATS Program goals for plant efficiency, emissions, cost of electricity and RAM. Phase 2 also involved conceptual ATS engine and plant design and technology developments in aerodynamics, sealing, combustion, cooling, materials, coatings and casting development. The market potential for the ATS gas turbine in the 2000-2014 timeframe was assessed for combined cycle, simple cycle and integrated gasification combined cycle, for three engine sizes. The total ATS market potential was forecasted to exceed 93 GW. Phase 3 and Phase 3 Extension involved further technology development, component testing and W501ATS engine detail design. The technology development efforts consisted of ultra low NO{sub x} combustion, catalytic combustion, sealing, heat transfer, advanced coating systems, advanced alloys, single crystal casting development and determining the effect of steam on turbine alloys. Included in this phase was full-load testing of the W501G engine at the McIntosh No. 5 site in Lakeland, Florida.

Gregory Gaul

2004-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

165

A demonstrator for the SSTO launcher with combined cycle propulsion  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...airflow almost to saturation. An expander turbo-compressor compresses cold gas before it is piped to an expander rocket. LACE = liquid air cycle...air. In the latter case, an expander cycle turbo- compressor compresses the cold...

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Energetic analysis of a syngas-fueled chemical-looping combustion combined cycle with integration of carbon dioxide sequestration  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Chemical-looping combustion for power generation has significant advantages over conventional combustion. Mainly, it allows an integration of CO2 capture in the power plant without energy penalty; secondly, a less exergy destruction in the combustion chemical transformation is achieved, leading to a greater overall thermal efficiency. Most efforts have been devoted to systems based on methane as a fuel, although other systems for alternative fuels have can be proposed. This paper focus on the study of the energetic performance of this concept of combustion in a gas turbine combined cycle when synthesis gas is used as fuel. After optimization of some thermodynamic parameters of the cycle, the power plant performance is evaluated under diverse working conditions and compared to a conventional gas turbine system. Energy savings related with CO2 capture and storage have been quantified. The overall efficiency increase is found to be significant, reaching values of around 5% (even more in some cases). In order to analyze the influence of syngas composition on the results, different H2-content fuels are considered. In a context of real urgency to reduce green house gas emissions, this work is intended to contribute to the conceptual development of highly efficient alternative power generation systems.

Ángel Jiménez Álvaro; Ignacio López Paniagua; Celina González Fernández; Rafael Nieto Carlier; Javier Rodríguez Martín

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

Model Predictive Control of Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle Power Plants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The primary project objectives were to understand how the process design of an integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power plant affects the dynamic operability and controllability of the process. Steady-state and dynamic simulation models were developed to predict the process behavior during typical transients that occur in plant operation. Advanced control strategies were developed to improve the ability of the process to follow changes in the power load demand, and to improve performance during transitions between power levels. Another objective of the proposed work was to educate graduate and undergraduate students in the application of process systems and control to coal technology. Educational materials were developed for use in engineering courses to further broaden this exposure to many students. ASPENTECH software was used to perform steady-state and dynamic simulations of an IGCC power plant. Linear systems analysis techniques were used to assess the steady-state and dynamic operability of the power plant under various plant operating conditions. Model predictive control (MPC) strategies were developed to improve the dynamic operation of the power plants. MATLAB and SIMULINK software were used for systems analysis and control system design, and the SIMULINK functionality in ASPEN DYNAMICS was used to test the control strategies on the simulated process. Project funds were used to support a Ph.D. student to receive education and training in coal technology and the application of modeling and simulation techniques.

B. Wayne Bequette; Priyadarshi Mahapatra

2010-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

168

BYPASS FLOW PATTERN CHANGES AT TURBO-RAM TRANSIENT OPERATION OF A COMBINED CYCLE ENGINE  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Turbo-Ramjet Combined Cycle Engine is composed of a turbofan engine ... are not available from the transient engine thermo-cycle simulation. CFD calculation showed that such flow ... , yielding rather good agreem...

Shinichi Takata Researcher…

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

An update technology for integrated biomass gasification combined cycle power plant  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A discussion is presented on the technical analysis of a 6.4 MWe integrated biomass gasification combined cycle (IBGCC) plant. It features three numbers ... producing 5.85 MW electrical power in open cycle and 55...

Paritosh Bhattacharya; Suman Dey

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

The Cascaded Humidified Advanced Turbine (CHAT)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper introduces the Cascaded Humidified Advanced Turbine (CHAT) plant, a gas turbine based power generation plant utilizing intercooling, reheat, and humidification. It is based upon the integration of an existing heavy duty gas turbine with an additional shaft comprising industrial compressors and high pressure expander. CHAT capitalizes on the latest proven gas turbine technology, which, combined with a sophisticated thermal cycle configuration, results in substantial improvement in gas turbine efficiency, compared to a simple cycle, while still maintaining typical advantages and merits of a combustion turbine plant. Built with a commercial combustion turbine and available industrial compressors and expanders, the CHAT plant does not require extensive product development and testing. As a result, the CHAT power plant can be offered with specific capital costs up to 20 percent lower than the combined cycle plant, and with competing efficiency. Compared to a combined cycle plant, the CHAT plant offers lower emissions (due to air humidification) and other significant operating advantages with regard to start-up time and costs, better efficiency at part load, lower power degradation at higher ambient temperatures, and simpler operations and maintenance due to elimination of the complexities and costs associated with steam production. The CHAT plant also integrates very effectively with coal gasification and particularly well with the water quench design. This feature has been discussed in previous publications.

Nakhamkin, M.; Swensen, E.C. [Energy Storage and Power Consultants, Inc., Mountainside, NJ (United States); Wilson, J.M.; Gaul, G. [Westinghouse Electric Corp., Orlando, FL (United States); Polsky, M. [Polsky Energy Corp., Northbrook, IL (United States)

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Combined obliquity and precession pacing of the late Pleistocene glacial cycles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Combined obliquity and precession pacing of the late Pleistocene glacial cycles Peter Huybers in Earth's obliquity4,5 , or some combination of both6­11 to control the glacial cycles, though mechanisms, and this general concept has been elaborated to show how precession, obliquity, or combinations of both could

Huybers, Peter

172

THE DISTRIBUTION OF THE COMBINED LENGTH OF SPANNED CYCLES IN A  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

THE DISTRIBUTION OF THE COMBINED LENGTH OF SPANNED CYCLES IN A RANDOM PERMUTATION By YANNAI A of the combined length L = L(, M) of all cycles of that contain at least one element of M. We give a simple-MAIL: ratio@math.huji.ac.il URL: http://www.ratio.huji.ac.il/ #12;The Distribution of the Combined Length

Hart, Sergiu

173

Field Test of Combined Desiccant-Evaporator Cycle Providing Lower Dew Points and Enhanced Dehumidification  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Field Test of Combined Desiccant-Evaporator Cycle Providing Lower Dew Points and Enhanced Dehumidification Charles J. Cromer, PhD, P.E.; Florida Solar Energy Center, 1679 Clearlake Road, Cocoa, FL, 321-638-1445, charlie... of difficult criteria, some with more success than others. Combined Cycle with Desiccant and AC Coil This paper describes the field testing of a novel air conditioning desiccant cycle. This cycle uses a desiccant to move moisture within the air...

Cromer, C. J.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Development of Gas Turbine Combustors for Low BTU Gas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Large-capacity combined cycles with high-temperature gas turbines burning petroleum fuel or LNG have already ... the other hand, as the power generation technology utilizing coal burning the coal gasification com...

I. Fukue; S. Mandai; M. Inada

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Design and Exergy Analysis of Combined Rankine Cycle Using LNG Cold Energy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract In this study, a 90 MWe combined Rankine cycle utilizing LNG cold exergy was proposed. Utilizing LNG cold exergy and waste heat from the conventional steam cycle, this process was able to generate additional power in the CO2 organic Rankine cycle (ORC). A conventional steam cycle generates only 42 MW electric power; this combined Rankine cycle produced more than twice as much power as the conventional steam cycle while consuming the same amount of fossil fuel. Through parameter sensitivity analysis and exergy analysis, the optimum design and operating conditions were also determined. Finally, reduction of the power plant de-rate by introducing a CO2 capture process was also analyzed.

Ung Lee; Chonghun Han

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Analysis and optimization of a solid oxide fuel cell and intercooled gas turbine (SOFC–ICGT) hybrid cycle  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The power generation community faces a major challenge: to protect the environment while producing a plentiful supply of clean low-cost energy. “21st Century Energy Plants” (Vision 21 Plants) have been proposed and conceptualized to meet the energy and environmental challenges. The solid oxide fuel cell and intercooled gas turbine (SOFC–ICGT) hybrid cycle introduced in this work is one example of a Vision 21 Plant. The system includes an internal-reforming tubular-SOFC, an intercooled gas turbine, a humidifier, and other auxiliary components. A recently developed thermodynamic analysis computer code entitled advanced power systems analyses tools (APSAT) was applied to analyze the system performance of the SOFC–ICGT cycle. Sensitivity analyses of several major system parameters were studied to identify the key development needs and design and operating improvements for this hybrid cycle. A novel optimization strategy including a design of experiments (DOEx) approach is proposed and applied to the hybrid system. Using this optimization strategy, a system electrical efficiency higher than 75% (net ac/lower heating value (LHV)) could be achieved when the system was designed to operate under a high operating pressure (50 bara) and with a low percent excess air (EA) (55%) in the SOFC.

Yaofan Yi; Ashok D. Rao; Jacob Brouwer; G.Scott Samuelsen

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Retrofitting the Strogino district heat supply station with construction of a 260-MW combined-cycle power plant (Consisting of two PGU-130 combined-cycle power units)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The retrofitting carried out at the Strogino district heat supply station and the specific features of works accomplished in the course of constructing the thermal power station based on a combined-cycle power pl...

V. F. Aleksandrov

2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Constructing the Russian combined-cycle cogeneration plant and mastering its operation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The main results obtained from the development, construction, mastering, and operation of the PGU-450T combined-cycle power plant are described.

P. A. Berezinets; V. M. Grinenko; I. V. Dolinin; V. N. Kondrat’ev…

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Adaptive hybrid predictive control for a combined cycle power plant optimization .  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??The design and development of an adaptive hybrid predictive controller for the optimization of a real combined cycle power plant (CCPP) are presented. The real… (more)

Sáez, D.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

An Edge-based Formulation for the Combined-Cycle Units  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Oct 1, 2014 ... Abstract: As the number of combined-cycle units increases, efficient modeling approaches for these units play important roles for Independent ...

Lei Fan

2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "turbine combined cycle" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

THERMODYNAMIC MODELLING OF BIOMASS INTEGRATED GASIFICATION COMBINED CYCLE (BIGCC) POWER GENERATION SYSTEM.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??An attractive and practicable possibility of biomass utilization for energy production is gasification integrated with a combined cycle. This technology seems to have the possibility… (more)

Desta, Melaku

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Recovery Act: Brea California Combined Cycle Electric Generating Plant Fueled by Waste Landfill Gas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The primary objective of the Project was to maximize the productive use of the substantial quantities of waste landfill gas generated and collected at the Olinda Landfill near Brea, California. An extensive analysis was conducted and it was determined that utilization of the waste gas for power generation in a combustion turbine combined cycle facility was the highest and best use. The resulting Project reflected a cost effective balance of the following specific sub-objectives: • Meeting the environmental and regulatory requirements, particularly the compliance obligations imposed on the landfill to collect, process and destroy landfill gas • Utilizing proven and reliable technology and equipment • Maximizing electrical efficiency • Maximizing electric generating capacity, consistent with the anticipated quantities of landfill gas generated and collected at the Olinda Landfill • Maximizing equipment uptime • Minimizing water consumption • Minimizing post-combustion emissions • The Project produced and will produce a myriad of beneficial impacts. o The Project created 360 FTE construction and manufacturing jobs and 15 FTE permanent jobs associated with the operation and maintenance of the plant and equipment. o By combining state-of-the-art gas clean up systems with post combustion emissions control systems, the Project established new national standards for best available control technology (BACT). o The Project will annually produce 280,320 MWh’s of clean energy o By destroying the methane in the landfill gas, the Project will generate CO2 equivalent reductions of 164,938 tons annually. The completed facility produces 27.4 MWnet and operates 24 hours a day, seven days a week.

Galowitz, Stephen

2012-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

183

Investigation of the effect of organic working fluids on thermodynamic performance of combined cycle Stirling-ORC  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper presents thermodynamic investigation and environmental consideration of combined Stirling-organic Rankine cycle (ORC) power cycle. Combined cycle can be assisted by solar energy and ... side heat rejec...

Mohammad Bahrami; Ali A Hamidi…

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Investigation of coal fired combined-cycle cogeneration plants for power, heat, syngas, and hydrogen  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The methodology for determination of technical and economic efficiency of coal fired combined-cycle cogeneration plant (CCCP) with low-pressure ... steam-gas generator and continuous flow gasifier at combined pro...

V. E. Nakoryakov; G. V. Nozdrenko; A. G. Kuzmin

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Fuzzy Optimization of Start-Up Operations for Combined Cycle Power Plants  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this paper we present a study on the application of fuzzy sets for the start-up optimisation of a combined cycle power plant. We fuzzyfy the output process variables and then we properly combine the resulting ...

Ilaria Bertini; Alessandro Pannicelli…

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Optimization of a Combined-Cycle Plant with Thermodynamic, Economic and Environmental Considerations  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Environmental considerations are combined with thermodynamics and economics for the design optimization of a double-pressure combined-cycle plant, which produces electricity. Two pollutants...2 and NOX, and a pen...

Christos A. Frangopoulos; Vasilios A. Bulmetis

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Combined Cold Compressor/Ejector Helium Refrigerator Cycle  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In recent years there has been increasing interest in raising refrigeration efficiency and capacity in cycles which produce cooling below 4.2 K. It is, of course, desirable to be able to produce the required s...

A. P. Schlafke; D. P. Brown; K. C. Wu

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Preliminary Design of a Pulsed Detonation Based Combined Cycle Engine Ramakanth Munipalli*  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Preliminary Design of a Pulsed Detonation Based Combined Cycle Engine Ramakanth Munipalli combined cycle engine using periodic detonation waves are presented here. Four modes of operation are used detonation rocket for take off to moderate supersonic Mach numbers (2) A pulsed normal detonation wave mode

Texas at Arlington, University of

189

Modeling and Optimization of Membrane Reactors for Carbon Capture in Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle Units  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Modeling and Optimization of Membrane Reactors for Carbon Capture in Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle Units ... This paper investigates the alternative of precombustion capture of carbon dioxide from integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) plants using membrane reactors equipped with H2-selective zeolite membranes for the water gas shift reaction. ...

Fernando V. Lima; Prodromos Daoutidis; Michael Tsapatsis; John J. Marano

2012-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

190

Combined Simple Biosphere/Carnegie-Ames-Stanford Approach terrestrial carbon cycle model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Combined Simple Biosphere/Carnegie-Ames-Stanford Approach terrestrial carbon cycle model Kevin and physical processes to test our understanding of the terrestrial carbon cycle and to predict ecosystem biomass and carbon fluxes. We combine the photosynthesis and biophysical calculations in the Simple

Collett Jr., Jeffrey L.

191

1 - Introduction to gas turbines  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract: This chapter provides an overview of the importance of gas turbines for the power generation and oil and gas sector and – in less detail – the aviation sector. Worldwide trends in power generation and electricity conversion processes and the role of gas turbines to minimise CO2 emissions are addressed. Gas turbines are essential and crucial to reduce emissions both in aviation and in power production. Technologies for improving gas turbine and system efficiency, through higher turbine inlet temperatures, improved materials, cooling methods and thermal barrier coatings are described. New thermodynamic approaches, including intercooling, water and steam injection and hybrid cycles are addressed. Major issues are also fuel and operational flexibility, reliability and availability, cost reduction and power density, especially for the offshore sector. Market trends have been sketched. In the coming decades, gas turbines will be one of the major technologies for CO2 emission reductions in the power generation, aviation, oil and gas exploration and transport sectors. This prognosis is based on their high current efficiency and further efficiency improvement potential, both for simple cycle as for combined-cycle applications.

A.J.A. Mom

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

NETL: Turbines - UTSR Projects  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

65 Hafnia-based Nanostructured Thermal Barrier Coatings for Advanced Hydrogen Turbine Technology University of Texas -- El Paso 65 Hafnia-based Nanostructured Thermal Barrier Coatings for Advanced Hydrogen Turbine Technology University of Texas -- El Paso Chintalapalle Ramana Project Dates: 9/30/2009 - 9/30/2011 Area of Research: Materials Federal Project Manager: Briggs White Project Objective: This project is focused on developing novel coatings for high-H2 fired gas turbine components such that high efficiencies and long lifetimes may be acheived in Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) powerplants. Nanostructured Hafnia-based coatings will be develped for thermal barrier coatings (TBCs). A fundamental understanding of TBCs will be aquired and a knowledge database of next generation TBC materials with high-temperature tolerance, durability, and reliability will be generated.

193

The use of sustainable combined cycle technologies in Cyprus: a case study for the use of LOTHECO cycle  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this work, a cost–benefit analysis concerning the use of the low temperature heat combined cycle (LOTHECO cycle) in Cyprus is carried out. Also, the expected main emissions from the LOTHECO cycle are compared with existing commercial technologies. In particular, the future generation system of Cyprus power industry is simulated by the independent power producers optimization algorithm and by the long-term expansion software Wien Automatic System Planning. Various conventional generation options are examined and compared with LOTHECO cycle parametric studies. The economic analysis, based on the assumptions used and the candidate technologies examined, indicated that in the case of conventional technologies the least cost solution is the natural gas combined cycle. Additional computer runs with the various LOTHECO cycle parametric studies indicated that for efficiencies greater than 60% and capital cost between 700 and 900 €/kW, LOTHECO cycle is the least cost generation technology. Furthermore, the current state and future improvements of the environmental indicators of the power industry in Cyprus are presented. It is estimated that by the use of LOTHECO cycle instead of the business as usual scenario, the principal environmental indicators would be reduced by the year 2010 by approximately ?23% instead of ?8%. Further, the carbon dioxide environmental indicator will be reduced by +24% instead of +68%.

Andreas Poullikkas; Adonis Kellas

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Gas Turbine Plants  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In a cycle process of a gas turbine, the compressor load, as well as ... from the expansion of the hot pressurized flue gas. Either turbine, compressor and driven assembly are joined by ... shaft is thus divided,...

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Thermodynamic evaluation of solar integration into a natural gas combined cycle power plant  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The term integrated solar combined-cycle (ISCC) has been used to define the combination of solar thermal energy into a natural gas combined-cycle (NGCC) power plant. Based on a detailed thermodynamic cycle model for a reference ISCC plant, the impact of solar addition is thoroughly evaluated for a wide range of input parameters such as solar thermal input and ambient temperature. It is shown that solar hybridization into an NGCC plant may give rise to a substantial benefit from a thermodynamic point of view. The work here also indicates that a significant solar contribution may be achieved in an ISCC plant, thus implying substantial fuel savings and environmental benefits.

Guangdong Zhu; Ty Neises; Craig Turchi; Robin Bedilion

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Discovering functional transcription-factor combinations in the human cell cycle  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Discovering functional transcription-factor combinations in the human cell cycle Zhou Zhu,1 Jay-factor (TF) combinations using phylogenetically conserved sequences and microarray-based expression data of binding sites in the vicinity of one another and whether these combinations result in more coherent

Church, George M.

197

Energy and exergy analyses of an externally fired gas turbine (EFGT) cycle integrated with biomass gasifier for distributed power generation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Biomass based decentralized power generation using externally fired gas turbine (EFGT) can be a technically feasible option. In this work, thermal performance and sizing of such plants have been analyzed at different cycle pressure ratio (rp = 2?8), turbine inlet temperature (TIT = 1050–1350 K) and the heat exchanger cold end temperature difference (CETD = 200–300 K). It is found that the thermal efficiency of the EFGT plant reaches a maximum at an optimum pressure ratio depending upon the TIT and heat exchanger CETD. For a particular pressure ratio, thermal efficiency increases either with the increase in TIT or with the decrease in heat exchanger CETD. The specific air flow, associated with the size of the plant equipment, decreases with the increase in pressure ratio. This decrease is rapid at the lower end of the pressure ratio (rp < 4) but levels-off at higher rp values. An increase in the TIT reduces the specific air flow, while a change in the heat exchanger CETD has no influence on it. Based on this comparison, the performance of a 100 kW EFGT plant has been analyzed for three sets of operating parameters and a trade-off in the operating condition is reached.

Amitava Datta; Ranjan Ganguly; Luna Sarkar

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

1 - An Overview of Gas Turbines  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Publisher Summary The gas turbine is a power plant that produces a great amount of energy depending on its size and weight. The gas turbine has found increasing service in the past 60 years in the power industry among both utilities and merchant plants as well as the petrochemical industry throughout the world. The utilization of gas turbine exhaust gases, for steam generation or the heating of other heat transfer mediums, or the use of cooling or heating buildings or parts of cities is not a new concept and is currently being exploited to its full potential. The aerospace engines have been leaders in most of the technology in the gas turbine. The design criteria for these engines were high reliability, high performance, with many starts and flexible operation throughout the flight envelope. The industrial gas turbine has always emphasized long life and this conservative approach has resulted in the industrial gas turbine in many aspects giving up high performance for rugged operation. The gas turbine produces various pollutants in the combustion of the gases in the combustor. These include smoke, unburnt hydrocarbons, carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, and oxides of nitrogen. The gas turbine is a power plant that produces a great amount of energy depending on its size and weight. It has found increasing service in the past 60 years in the power industry among both utilities and merchant plants, as well as in the petrochemical industry. Its compactness, low weight and multiple fuel application make it a natural power plant for offshore platforms. Today there are gas turbines that run on natural gas, diesel fuel, naphtha, methane, crude, low-BTU gases, vaporized fuel oils and biomass gases. The last 20 years have seen a large growth in gas turbine technology, spearheaded by the growth in materials technology, new coatings, new cooling schemes and combined cycle power plants. This chapter presents an overview of the development of modern gas turbines and gas turbine design considerations. The six categories of simple-cycle gas turbines (frame type heavy-duty; aircraft-derivative; industrial-type; small; vehicular; and micro) are described. The major gas turbine components (compressors; regenerators/recuperators; fuel type; and combustors) are outlined. A gas turbine produces various pollutants in the combustion of the gases in the combustor and the potential environmental impact of gas turbines is considered. The two different types of combustor (diffusion; dry low NOx, (DLN) or dry low emission (DLE)), the different methods to arrange combustors on a gas turbine, and axial-flow and radial-inflow turbines are described. Developments in materials and coatings are outlined.

Meherwan P. Boyce

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Advanced coal-fueled gas turbine systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Several technology advances since the early coal-fueled turbine programs that address technical issues of coal as a turbine fuel have been developed in the early 1980s: Coal-water suspensions as fuel form, improved methods for removing ash and contaminants from coal, staged combustion for reducing NO{sub x} emissions from fuel-bound nitrogen, and greater understanding of deposition/erosion/corrosion and their control. Several Advanced Coal-Fueled Gas Turbine Systems programs were awarded to gas turbine manufacturers for for components development and proof of concept tests; one of these was Allison. Tests were conducted in a subscale coal combustion facility and a full-scale facility operating a coal combustor sized to the Allison Model 501-K industrial turbine. A rich-quench-lean (RQL), low nitrogen oxide combustor design incorporating hot gas cleanup was developed for coal fuels; this should also be applicable to biomass, etc. The combustor tests showed NO{sub x} and CO emissions {le} levels for turbines operating with natural gas. Water washing of vanes from the turbine removed the deposits. Systems and economic evaluations identified two possible applications for RQL turbines: Cogeneration plants based on Allison 501-K turbine (output 3.7 MW(e), 23,000 lbs/hr steam) and combined cycle power plants based on 50 MW or larger gas turbines. Coal-fueled cogeneration plant configurations were defined and evaluated for site specific factors. A coal-fueled turbine combined cycle plant design was identified which is simple, compact, and results in lower capital cost, with comparable efficiency and low emissions relative to other coal technologies (gasification, advanced PFBC).

Wenglarz, R.A.

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Assessment of off-design performance of a small-scale combined cooling and power system using an alternative operating strategy for gas turbine  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract A small-scale combined cooling and power (CCP) system usually serves district air conditioning apart from power generation purposes. The typical system consists of a gas turbine and an exhaust gas-fired absorption refrigerator. The surplus heat of the gas turbine is recovered to generate cooling energy. In this way, the CCP system has a high overall efficiency at the design point. However, the CCP system usually runs under off-design conditions because the users’ demand varies frequently. The operating strategy of the gas turbine will affect the thermodynamic performance of itself and the entire CCP system. The operating strategies for gas turbines include the reducing turbine inlet temperature (TIT) and the compressor inlet air throttling (IAT). A CCP system, consisting of an OPRA gas turbine and a double effects absorption refrigerator, is investigated to identify the effects of different operating strategies. The CCP system is simulated based on the partial-load model of gas turbine and absorption refrigerator. The off-design performance of the CCP system is compared under different operating strategies. The results show that the IAT strategy is the better one. At 50% rated power output of the gas turbine, the IAT operating strategy can increase overall system efficiency by 10% compared with the TIT strategy. In general, the IAT operating strategy is suited for other gas turbines. However, the benefits of IAT should be investigated in the future, when different gas turbine is adopted. This study may provide a new operating strategy of small scale gas turbine to improve the off-design performance of CCP system.

Wei Han; Qiang Chen; Ru-mou Lin; Hong-guang Jin

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "turbine combined cycle" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

NETL: News Release - Enabling Turbine Technologies for Hydrogen Fuels  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

September 8, 2005 September 8, 2005 Enabling Turbine Technologies for Hydrogen Fuels Turbine Program Advances Ultra-Clean, Coal-Based Systems WASHINGTON, DC - The Department of Energy's Office of Fossil Energy Turbine Technology R&D Program was recently expanded with the selection of 10 new projects valued at $130 million. The new program will advance turbines and turbine subsystems for integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power plants, and address the use of hydrogen in small-scale turbines for industrial applications. Resulting technologies will operate cleanly and efficiently when fueled with coal-derived hydrogen or synthesis gas. Turbines can generate electrical power on a large scale-in central power stations sized 250 megawatts and larger-or on a small scale-in local, industrial power systems sized 1-100 megawatts. Small-scale systems also produce mechanical power for jet engines, compressors, heating systems, and other applications.

202

Analysis of a coal fired combined cycle with carried-heat gasification  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In the research of a more efficient, less costly, more environmentally responsible and less technically difficult method for generating electrical power from coal, the Carried-heat Gasification Combined Cycle (CG...

Xiangdong Xu; Weimin Zhu; Li Zhao; F. N. Fett

203

Optimizing the start-up operations of combined cycle power plants using soft computing methods  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......Fast Start-up of a Combined-Cycle Power Plant: a Simulation Study with Modelica. In: Proceedings 5th International Modelica Conference (2006) 3-10. Modelica Association eds. [4] Zimmerman HJ . Fuzzy set theory (1991) Kluwer Academic......

Ilaria Bertini; Matteo De Felice; Alessandro Pannicelli; Stefano Pizzuti

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Off-design performance of a chemical looping combustion (CLC) combined cycle: effects of ambient temperature  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The present work investigates the influence of ambient temperature on the steady-state off-design thermodynamic performance of a chemical looping combustion (CLC) combined cycle. A sensitivity analysis...

Jinling Chi; Bo Wang; Shijie Zhang; Yunhan Xiao

2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Proposing a novel combined cycle for optimal exergy recovery of liquefied natural gas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The effective utilization of the cryogenic exergy associated with liquefied natural gas (LNG) vaporization is important. In this paper, a novel combined power cycle is proposed which utilizes LNG in different ......

M. R. Salimpour; M. A. Zahedi

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Discussion of the Key Problems on Designing 350 MW-Class Combined Cycle Power Plant  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

With adjustment of energy structure and enhancement of environmental protection standard, gas-steam combined cycle power plants will be erupt gradually, especially...gas being moved from WEST to EAST and liquefie...

Tai Lu; Sike Hu; Wenrui Wu

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

The importance of combined cycle generating plants in integrating large levels of wind power generation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Integration of high wind penetration levels will require fast-ramping combined cycle and steam cycles that, due to higher operating costs, will require proper pricing of ancillary services or other forms of compensation to remain viable. Several technical and policy recommendations are presented to help realign the generation mix to properly integrate the wind. (author)

Puga, J. Nicolas

2010-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

208

Advanced CO2 Capture Technology for Low Rank Coal Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) Systems  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

CO CO 2 Capture Technology for Low Rank Coal Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) Systems Background Gasification of coal or other solid feedstocks (wood waste, petroleum coke, etc.) is a clean way to produce electricity and produce or co-produce a variety of commercial products. The major challenge is cost reduction; current integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) technology is estimated to produce power at a cost higher than that of pulverized coal combustion. However, the Gasification

209

Performance and emission characteristics of natural gas combined cycle power generation system with steam injection and oxyfuel combustion.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Natural gas combined cycle power generation systems are gaining popularity due to their high power generation efficiency and reduced emission. In the present work, combined… (more)

Varia, Nitin

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Creation of equipment for combined-cycle installations—One of the priority problems facing power-machinery builders  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Offers of OAO Silovye Mashiny for delivery of equipment for combined-cycle installations (CCIs) of reconstructed and newly...

A. S. Lebedev; G. L. Butalov

2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Combined Brayton-JT cycles with refrigerants for natural gas liquefaction  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Thermodynamic cycles for natural gas liquefaction with single-component refrigerants are investigated under a governmental project in Korea aiming at new processes to meet the requirements on high efficiency large capacity and simple equipment. Based upon the optimization theory recently published by the present authors it is proposed to replace the methane-JT cycle in conventional cascade process with a nitrogen-Brayton cycle. A variety of systems to combine nitrogen-Brayton ethane-JT and propane-JT cycles are simulated with Aspen HYSYS and quantitatively compared in terms of thermodynamic efficiency flow rate of refrigerants and estimated size of heat exchangers. A specific Brayton-JT cycle is suggested with detailed thermodynamic data for further process development. The suggested cycle is expected to be more efficient and simpler than the existing cascade process while still taking advantage of easy and robust operation with single-component refrigerants.

Ho-Myung Chang; Jae Hoon Park; Sanggyu Lee; Kun Hyung Choe

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Thermochemical Gasification of Biomass: Fuel Conversion, Hot Gas Cleanup and Gas Turbine Combustion  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Air-blown fluidized bed biomass gasification integrated with a gas- and steam turbine combined cycle (BIGCC) is a potentially attractive way to convert biomass into electricity and heat with a high efficiency.

J. Andries; W. de Jong; P. D. J. Hoppesteyn…

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Thermodynamic modelling of three-stage combined cycle power systems utilising ammonia-water mixture as a working fluid in bottoming cycle  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this study, two three-stage combined power cycles with ammonia-water mixture in bottoming cycle are introduced; one with variable ammonia fraction and the other with constant ammonia fraction. Energy and exergy analyses are carried out and optimal parameters of the proposed cycles are compared with the conventional power cycles. The second law efficiency of three-stage cycles with variable and constant ammonia fraction are 4.71% and 5.15% higher than steam-gas combined power cycle, respectively. Exergy flow diagram for each cycle is presented and exergy destruction of all components is investigated. Results quantitatively highlight the thermodynamic advantages of the proposed cycles in comparison with the conventional cycles. Three-stage cycle with constant ammonia fraction has the best performance in comparison with the others.

Amin Momeni; Hossein Shokouhmand

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Burning Droplets Composed of Light Cycle Oil and Diesel Light Oil  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Burning Droplets Composed of Light Cycle Oil and Diesel Light Oil ... 3. General Characteristics ... Now we are considering using LCO as well as its blend with LO in gas turbine (GT) or partially in the combined cycling gas turbine (CCGT),10 as to avoid the tight standards on oil compositions. ...

Guangwen Xu; Masiki Ikegami; Senji Honma; Khoji Ikeda; Hiroshi Nagaishi; Daniel L. Dietrich; Yasuhiro Takeshita

2002-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

215

Kentucky Pioneer Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle Demonstration Project, Final Environmental Impact Statement  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

8 8 U.S. Department of Energy Kentucky Pioneer Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle Demonstration Project Final Environmental Impact Statement November 2002 U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory COVER SHEET Responsible Agency: U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Title: Kentucky Pioneer Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) Demonstration Project Final Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) (DOE/EIS-0318) Location: Clark County, Kentucky Contacts: For further information on this environmental For further information on the DOE National impact statement (EIS), call: Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) process, call: 1-800-432-8330 ext. 5460 1-800-472-2756 or contact: or contact: Mr. Roy Spears Ms. Carol Borgstrom

216

NETL Publications: 2011 University Turbine Systems Research Workshop  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

2011 University Turbine Systems Research Workshop 2011 University Turbine Systems Research Workshop October 25-27, 2011 PRESENTATIONS Tuesday, October 25, 2011 H2 Turbine Development for IGCC with CCS: Project Overviews and Technical Issues [PDF-1.12MB] Susan Scofield, Siemens Energy, Inc. GE Energy's DOE Advanced IGCC/Hydrogen Gas Turbine Program [PDF-1.16MB] Roger Schonewald, GE Energy DOE FE Hydrogen Turbine Program Overview [PDF-1.66MB] Richard Dennis, U.S. Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory Natural Gas Combined Cycle Power Generation [PDF-1.56MB] Robert Steele, Electric Power Research Institute Overview of Gas Turbine R&D at The Ohio State University [PDF-6.02MB] Meyer (Mike) Benzakein, Director of The Ohio State University's Center for Propulsion and Power An Experimental and Chemical Kinetics Study of the Combustion of Syngas and High Hydrogen Content Fuels [PDF-1.61MB]

217

NETL: News Release - Universities Begin Critical Turbine Systems Research  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

30, 2008 30, 2008 Universities Begin Critical Turbine Systems Research WASHINGTON, D.C. - The U.S. Department of Energy announced the selection of four projects under the Office of Fossil Energy's University Turbine Systems Research (UTSR) Program. The projects will develop technologies for use in the new generation of advanced turbines that operate cleanly and efficiently when fueled with coal-derived synthesis gas and hydrogen fuels. The overall goal of the Department of Energy's (DOE) Turbine Program is to provide high-efficiency, near-zero emissions and lower-cost turbines for coal-based stationary power systems. Developing turbine technology to operate on high hydrogen content (HHC) fuels derived from coal synthesis gas is critical to the development of advanced, near-zero-emission integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power generation plants that separate and capture carbon dioxide (CO2).

218

An Evaluation of Gas Turbines for APFBC Power Plants  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

EVALUATION OF GAS TURBINES FOR APFBC POWER PLANTS EVALUATION OF GAS TURBINES FOR APFBC POWER PLANTS Donald L. Bonk U.S. DOE National Energy Technology Laboratory Morgantown, West Virginia eMail: dbonk@netl.doe.gov phone: (304) 285-4889 Richard E. Weinstein, P.E. Parsons Infrastructure & Technology Group Inc. Reading, Pennsylvania eMail: richard.e.weinstein@parsons.com phone: (610) 855-2699 Abstract This paper describes a concept screening evaluation of gas turbines from several manufacturers that assessed the merits of their respective gas turbines for advanced circulating pressurized fluidized bed combustion combined cycle (APFBC) applications. The following gas turbines were evaluated for the modifications expected for APFBC service: 2 x Rolls-Royce Industrial Trent aeroderivative gas turbine configurations; a 3 x Pratt & Whitney Turbo Power FT8 Twin-

219

Modeling of the rock bed thermal energy storage system of a combined cycle solar thermal power plant in South Africa  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract A thermocline-based rock bed thermal energy storage system potentially offers a cheap and simple way of achieving dispatchability in an air-cooled central receiver CSP plant. In order to efficiently match heliostat field size, storage dimensions, back-up fuel consumption and turbine sizes for non-stop power generation and economic feasibility, year-long power plant simulations have to be run. This paper focuses on the storage as the center of in- and outgoing thermal energy. The derived storage model has one spatial dimension which is justified by the high tube-to-particle diameter ratio and because yearly aggregated – and not momentary – values are of interest. A validation of the correlations with data from the literature shows acceptable agreement. Sensitivity analyses indicate that, due to low costs of the storage system, above certain minimum storage dimensions, the influence on energetic and monetary performance indicators is marginal. The calculated LCOE is in the range of 0.11–0.18 EUR/kW h and in agreement with other studies on combined cycle CSP plants.

Lukas Heller; Paul Gauché

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

CO2 Offset Options: Comparative Assessment of Terrestial Sinks vs. Natural Gas Combined Cycle  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

W. South (south@energyresources.com; 202-785-8833) W. South (south@energyresources.com; 202-785-8833) Energy Resources International, Inc. 1015 18 th Street, N.W., Suite 650 Washington, DC 20036 CO 2 Offset Options: Comparative Assessment of Terrestial Sinks vs. Natural Gas Combined Cycle 1 Abstract This study compares the economic value of two CO 2 mitigation actions: terrestrial reforestation to sequester CO 2 emitted from coal-fired power generation versus natural gas combined cycle (NGCC) power generation to avoid (minimize) CO 2 release. The same quantity of carbon offset was assumed for both actions. Tree stock growth, carbon absorption/release cycles, and replanting were considered to maintain the quantity of carbon offset via reforestation. The study identified important parameters with both CO 2 mitigation options that should be considered when examining alternative strategies.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "turbine combined cycle" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Analysis of Biomass/Coal Co-Gasification for Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) Systems with Carbon Capture.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

?? In recent years, Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle Technology (IGCC) has become more common in clean coal power operations with carbon capture and sequestration (CCS).… (more)

Long, Henry A, III

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Performance Diagnosis using Optical Torque Sensor for Selection of a Steam Supply Plant among Advanced Combined Cycle Power Plants  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A newly developed optical torque sensor was applied to select a steam supply plant among advanced combined cycle, i.e. ACC, power plants of...

Shuichi Umezawa

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Hermetic turbine generator  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A Rankine cycle turbine drives an electric generator and a feed pump, all on a single shaft, and all enclosed within a hermetically sealed case. The shaft is vertically oriented with the turbine exhaust directed downward and the shaft is supported on hydrodynamic fluid film bearings using the process fluid as lubricant and coolant. The selection of process fluid, type of turbine, operating speed, system power rating, and cycle state points are uniquely coordinated to achieve high turbine efficiency at the temperature levels imposed by the recovery of waste heat from the more prevalent industrial processes.

Meacher, John S. (Ballston Lake, NY); Ruscitto, David E. (Ballston Spa, NY)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Carbon capture with low energy penalty: Supplementary fired natural gas combined cycles  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Enhancing CO2 concentration in exhaust gas has been considered as a potentially effective method to reduce the penalty of electrical efficiency caused by CO2 chemical absorption in post-combustion carbon capture systems. Supplementary firing is an option that inherently has an increased CO2 concentration in the exhaust gas, albeit a relatively low electrical efficiency due to its increased mass flow of exhaust gas to treat and large temperature difference in heat recovery steam generator. This paper focuses on the methods that can improve the electrical efficiency of the supplementary fired combined cycles (SFCs) integrated with MEA-based CO2 capture. Three modifications have been evaluated: (I) integration of exhaust gas reheating, (II) integration of exhaust gas recirculation, and (III) integration of supercritical bottoming cycle. It is further showed that combining all three modifications results in a significant increase in electrical efficiency which is raised from 43.3% to 54.1% based on Lower Heating Value (LHV) of natural gas when compared to the original SFC. Compared with a conventional combined cycle with a subcritical bottoming cycle and without CO2 capture (56.7% of LHV), the efficiency penalty caused by CO2 capture is only 2.6% of LHV.

Hailong Li; Mario Ditaranto; Jinyue Yan

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Optimization of waste heat recovery boiler of a combined cycle power plant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper describes the details of a procedure developed for optimization of a waste heat recovery boiler (WHRB) of a combined cycle power plant (CCPP) using the program for performance prediction of a typical CCPP, details of which have been presented elsewhere (Seyedan et al., 1994). In order to illustrate the procedure, the optimum design of a WHRB for a typical CCPP (employing dual-pressure bottoming cycle) built by a prominent Indian company, has been carried out. The present design of a WHRB is taken as the base design and the newer designs generated by this procedure are compared with it to assess the extent of cost reduction possible.

Seyedan, B.; Dhar, P.L.; Gaur, R.R. [Indian Inst. of Tech., New Delhi (India). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering; Bindra, G.S. [Bharat Heavy Electrical Ltd., New Delhi (India)

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Restoration islands supplied by gas turbines  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The paper describes how gas turbine based plants (open cycle and combined cycle) can be profitably used in power system restoration for supplying restoration areas. In recent times, in fact, several gas turbine sections entered the power system due to the improved efficiency of gas turbines and to the development of high efficiency combined-cycle plants. These units can be easily improved to provide black-start capability and can therefore largely increase the black-start capacity of the entire system. Restoration islands to be used for minimizing the time to supply critical areas, such as urban and industrial zones, can support the usual restoration paths designed to provide cranking power to large steam units. The paper presents the defining criteria for the procedures to be followed during restoration. An example referred to as an urban area is reported with simulation results. The Italian System Operator recently carried out some tests on an open cycle gas turbine aimed at checking the island operation of the unit. Some results are described.

S. Barsali; D. Poli; A. Praticň; R. Salvati; M. Sforna; R. Zaottini

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

NETL: News Release - Advanced Natural Gas Turbine Hailed as Top Power  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

December 30, 2003 December 30, 2003 Advanced Natural Gas Turbine Hailed as Top Power Project of 2003 Power Engineering Cites Product of Energy Department's Advanced Turbine Systems Program WASHINGTON, DC - A power plant featuring a next-generation gas turbine developed as part of the U.S. Department of Energy's advanced turbine systems program has been selected by Power Engineering magazine as one of three "2003 Projects of the Year." Baglan Bay Power Station Baglan Bay Power Station, South Wales, U.K. Photo courtesy of GE Power Systems The Baglan Bay Power Station near Cardiff, Wales, UK reached a major milestone for the global power industry when GE Power System's H System gas turbine debuted there earlier this year. The most advanced combustion turbine in the world, the H System is the first gas turbine combined-cycle

228

Design and experimental studies of low-cycle fatigue defects in turbine disks of aircraft long-life gas turbine engines  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Some data obtained in the course of numerous studies that include the calculated evaluation of the stressed state and cyclic life of disks up to low-cycle fatigue crack nucleation are presented. Also included ...

N. P. Velikanova; L. R. Botvina; G. P. Okatova

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Chapter 7 - Gas Turbine Fuel Systems and Fuels  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The basics of a gas turbine fuel system are similar for all turbines. The most common fuels are natural gas, LNG (liquid natural gas), and light diesel. With appropriate design changes, the gas turbine has proved to be capable of handling residual oil, pulverized coal, syngas from coal and various low BTU fluids, both liquid and gas, that may be waste streams of petrochemical processes or, for instance, gas from a steel (or other industry) blast furnace. Handling low BTU fuel can be a tricky operation, requiring long test periods and a willingness to trade the savings in fuel costs with the loss of turbine availability during initial prototype full load tests. This chapter covers gas turbine fuel systems and includes a case study (Case 5) on blast furnace gas in a combined cycle power plant (CCPP). “All truths are easy to understand once they are discovered, the point is to discover them.” —Plato

Claire Soares

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Managing long-term environmental aspects of wind turbines: a prospective case study  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper describes a method for mapping and mitigating the negative environmental impacts of wind turbines and provides an analysis of future removal and recycling processes of offshore wind turbines. The time horizon is up to 2050. The method is process-oriented and interactive with respect to the participation of the actors involved in this area. It recognises the dynamic, uncertain and rapidly changing character of wind energy and deals systematically with the future removal and recycling of wind turbines and future wind turbine technologies. The method combines life cycle assessment and technology foresight methods and integrates the perspectives of the present and the future.

Per Dannemand Andersen; Mads Borup; Thomas Krogh

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Turbine-generator replacement study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper describes an engineering study for the replacement of a nominal 70 Mw turbine-generator in a multi-unit utility cogeneration station. The existing plant is briefly described, alternatives considered are discussed, and the conclusions reached are presented. Key topics are the turbine steam cycle evaluation and the turbine pedestal analysis.

Miller, E.F.; Stuhrke, S.P., Shah, A.A. (Burns and Roe Enterprises, Inc., Oradell, NJ (USA))

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Combining biogas LCA reviews with stakeholder interviews to analyse life cycle impacts at a practical level  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Biogas presents an increasing energy production form in municipalities and rural locations, and it is also a feasible waste management option. In terms of environmental life cycle assessments (LCA), biogas production seems to offer a unique opportunity to combine nutrient recycling with energy production using various underutilised resources such as municipal biowastes or manure. \\{LCAs\\} of biogas production suggest benefits related to CO2 emission savings and the replacement of chemical fertilisers, for example. Existing biogas plants have varying practices related to biogas production and actualisation of the life cycle benefits is influenced by policies, local contexts, and the purposes of the biogas production activity. This paper identifies and explores critical points related to biogas production by reviewing LCA studies and comparing them to actual choices made at Finnish biogas plants based on stakeholder interviews. The most critical points related to biogas production involve the end use of the biogas and the end use of the digestate. The practical implementation and site-specific conditions of biogas plants can lead to significant differences between life cycle impacts. Therefore, we emphasise the importance of site-specific LCA studies for reliable impact assessments. In addition, we suggest the incorporation of stakeholder interviews to support LCA at different phases and better implementation of life cycle thinking in policy design.

Suvi Huttunen; Kaisa Manninen; Pekka Leskinen

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Theory and Performance of Tesla Turbines  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

gas turbines for combined heat and power”. In: Ap- plied10.1115/1.4001356. [3] Combined Heat and Power. Tech. rep.of Tesla Turbines for Combined Heat and Power Applications”.

Romanin, Vincent D.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

A dynamic process model of a natural gas combined cycle -- Model development with startup and shutdown simulations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Research in dynamic process simulation for integrated gasification combined cycles (IGCC) with carbon capture has been ongoing at the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), culminating in a full operator training simulator (OTS) and immersive training simulator (ITS) for use in both operator training and research. A derivative work of the IGCC dynamic simulator has been a modification of the combined cycle section to more closely represent a typical natural gas fired combined cycle (NGCC). This paper describes the NGCC dynamic process model and highlights some of the simulator’s current capabilities through a particular startup and shutdown scenario.

Liese, Eric [U.S. DOE; Zitney, Stephen E. [U.S. DOE

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Proposal for the Award of a Contract for the Supply and Installation of a gas Turbine for Combined Generation of Electricity and Heat in the Heating Plant on the Meyrin Site  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Proposal for the Award of a Contract for the Supply and Installation of a gas Turbine for Combined Generation of Electricity and Heat in the Heating Plant on the Meyrin Site

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Improvement of combustion efficiency and emission characteristics of IC diesel engine operating on ESC cycle applying Variable Geometry Turbocharger (VGT) with vaneless turbine volute  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Based on experimental data, the present study investigates the influence of turbine adjustment in a turbocharger with vaneless turbine volute on diesel combustion efficiency indices and emission characteristics. ...

D. Samoilenko; H. M. Cho

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Hydrogen Turbines | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Hydrogen Turbines Hydrogen Turbines Hydrogen Turbines Hydrogen Turbines The Turbines of Tomorrow Combustion (gas) turbines are key components of advanced systems designed for new electric power plants in the United States. With gas turbines, power plants will supply clean, increasingly fuel-efficient, and relatively low-cost energy. Typically, a natural gas-fired combustion turbine-generator operating in a "simple cycle" converts between 25 and 35 percent of the natural gas heating value to useable electricity. Today, most new smaller power plants also install a recuperator to capture waste heat from the turbine's exhaust to preheat combustion air and boost efficiencies. In most of the new larger plants, a "heat recovery steam generator" is installed to recover waste

238

Results of heat tests of the TGE-435 main boiler in the PGU-190/220 combined-cycle plant of the Tyumen' TETs-2 cogeneration plant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Special features of operation of a boiler operating as a combined-cycle plant and having its own furnace and burner unit are descried. The flow of flue gases on the boiler is increased due to feeding of exhaust gases of the GTU into the furnace, which intensifies the convective heat exchange. In addition, it is not necessary to preheat air in the convective heating surfaces (the boiler has no air preheater). The convective heating surfaces of the boiler are used for heating the feed water, thus replacing the regeneration extractions of the steam turbine (HPP are absent in the circuit) and partially replacing the preheating of condensate (the LPP in the circuit of the unit are combined with preheaters of delivery water). Regeneration of the steam turbine is primarily used for the district cogeneration heating purposes. The furnace and burner unit of the exhaust-heat boiler (which is a new engineering solution for the given project) ensures utilization of not only the heat of the exhaust gases of the GTU but also of their excess volume, because the latter contains up to 15% oxygen that oxidizes the combustion process in the boiler. Thus, the gas temperature at the inlet to the boiler amounts to 580{sup o}C at an excess air factor a = 3.50; at the outlet these parameters are utilized to T{sub out} = 139{sup o}C and a{sub out} = 1.17. The proportions of the GTU/boiler loads that can actually be organized at the generating unit (and have been checked by testing) are presented and the proportions of loads recommended for the most efficient operation of the boiler are determined. The performance characteristics of the boiler are presented for various proportions of GTU/boiler loads. The operating conditions of the superheater and of the convective trailing heating surfaces are presented as well as the ecological parameters of the generating unit.

A.V. Kurochkin; A.L. Kovalenko; V.G. Kozlov; A.I. Krivobok [Engineering Center of the Ural Power Industry (Russian Federation)

2007-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

239

Improving steam turbine efficiency  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper describes the condition of a significant number of fossil steam turbines operating in the United States and the maintenance practices used to improve their performance. Through the use of steam path audits conducted by the authors` company and by several utilities, a large data base of information on turbine heat rate, casing efficiency, and maintenance practices is available to help the power generation industry understand how different maintenance practices and steam path damage impact turbine performance. The data base reveals that turbine cycle heat rate is typically 5.23% poorer than design just prior to major outages. The degraded condition of steam turbines presents an opportunity for utilities to improve heat rate and reduce emissions without increasing fuel costs. The paper describes what losses typically contribute to the 5.23% heat rate degradation and how utilities can recover steam turbine performance through maintenance actions aimed at improving steam path efficiency.

Cioffi, D.H.; Mitchell, D.R.; Whitecar, S.C. [Encotech, Inc., Schenectady, NY (United States)

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Offshore Floating Wind Turbine-driven Deep Sea Water Pumping for Combined Electrical Power and District Cooling  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A new concept utilising floating wind turbines to exploit the low temperatures of deep sea water for space cooling in buildings is presented. The approach is based on offshore hydraulic wind turbines pumping pressurised deep sea water to a centralised plant consisting of a hydro-electric power system coupled to a large-scale sea water-cooled air conditioning (AC) unit of an urban district cooling network. In order to investigate the potential advantages of this new concept over conventional technologies, a simplified model for performance simulation of a vapour compression AC unit was applied independently to three different systems, with the AC unit operating with (1) a constant flow of sea surface water, (2) a constant flow of sea water consisting of a mixture of surface sea water and deep sea water delivered by a single offshore hydraulic wind turbine and (3) an intermittent flow of deep sea water pumped by a single offshore hydraulic wind turbine. The analysis was based on one year of wind and ambient temperature data for the Central Mediterranean that is known for its deep waters, warm climate and relatively low wind speeds. The study confirmed that while the present concept is less efficient than conventional turbines utilising grid-connected electrical generators, a significant portion of the losses associated with the hydraulic transmission through the pipeline are offset by the extraction of cool deep sea water which reduces the electricity consumption of urban air-conditioning units.

T Sant; D Buhagiar; R N Farrugia

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "turbine combined cycle" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Modeling and optimization of a combined cycle Stirling-ORC system and design of an integrated microchannel Stirling heat rejector.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??The performance of a combined Stirling-ORC power cycle is evaluated, and an integrated microchannel heat exchanger is designed as an annular cold-side heat rejector for… (more)

Ingram-Goble, Robbie

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Combined surface solar brightening and increasing greenhouse effect support recent intensification of the global land-based hydrological cycle  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Combined surface solar brightening and increasing greenhouse effect support recent intensification of the global land-based hydrological cycle Martin Wild,1 Ju¨rgen Grieser,2 and Christoph Scha¨r1 Received 30 radiation (surface radiation balance) is the key driver behind the global hydrological cycle. Here we

Fischlin, Andreas

243

Fuel option for gas turbine  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Growth in electricity demand is an average of 10% per year. Energy, emission, and economy are importance of critical concerns for generating systems. Therefore, combined cycle power plant is preferred to Electricity Generating Authority of Thailand (EGAT) new power generating capacity. The various option of available fuel for gas turbine are natural gas, liquid fuel and coal fuel. Particularly with the tremendous price increases in imported and domestic fuel supplies, natural gas is an attractive low cost alternative for power generation. EGAT has researched using heavy fuel instead of natural gas since the year 1991. The problems of various corrosion characteristics have been found. In addition, fuel treatment for gas turbine are needed, and along with it, the environmental consideration are options that provide the limitation of environmental regulation.

Tantayakom, S. [Electricity Generating Authority of Thailand, Nonthaburi (Thailand). Chemical and Analysis Dept.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

244

Exergetic analysis of solar concentrator aided natural gas fired combined cycle power plant  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This article deals with comparative energy and exergetic analysis for evaluation of natural gas fired combined cycle power plant and solar concentrator aided (feed water heating and low pressure steam generation options) natural gas fired combined cycle power plant. Heat Transfer analysis of Linear Fresnel reflecting solar concentrator (LFRSC) is used to predict the effect of focal distance and width of reflector upon the reflecting surface area. Performance analysis of LFRSC with energetic and exergetic methods and the effect, of concentration ratio and inlet temperature of the fluid is carried out to determine, overall heat loss coefficient of the circular evacuated tube absorber at different receiver temperatures. An instantaneous increase in power generation capacity of about 10% is observed by substituting solar thermal energy for feed water heater and low pressure steam generation. It is observed that the utilization of solar energy for feed water heating and low pressure steam generation is more effective based on exergetic analysis rather than energetic analysis. Furthermore, for a solar aided feed water heating and low pressure steam generation, it is found that the land area requirement is 7 ha/MW for large scale solar thermal storage system to run the plant for 24 h.

V. Siva Reddy; S.C. Kaushik; S.K. Tyagi

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Study of Gas-steam Combined Cycle Power Plants Integrated with MCFC for Carbon Dioxide Capture  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract In the field of fossil-fuel based technologies, natural gas combined cycle (NGCC) power plants are currently the best option for electricity generation, having an efficiency close to 60%. However, they produce significant CO2 emissions, amounting to around 0.4 tonne/MWh for new installations. Among the carbon capture and sequestration (CCS) technologies, the process based on chemical absorption is a well-established technology, but markedly reduces the NGCC performances. On the other side, the integration of molten carbonate fuel cells (MCFCs) is recognized as an attractive option to overcome the main drawbacks of traditional CCS technologies. If the cathode side is fed by NGCC exhaust gases, the MCFC operates as a CO2 concentrator, beside providing an additional generating capacity. In this paper the integration of MCFC into a two pressure levels combined cycle is investigated through an energy analysis. To improve the efficiency of MCFC and its integration within the NGCC, plant configurations based on two different gas recirculation options are analyzed. The first is a traditional recirculation of exhaust gases at the compressor inlet; the second, mainly involving the MCFC stack, is based on recirculating a fraction of anode exhaust gases at the cathode inlet. Effects of MCFC operating conditions on energy and environmental performances of the integrated system are evaluated.

Roberto Carapellucci; Roberto Saia; Lorena Giordano

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Dynamic simulation of an oxygen mixed conducting membrane-based gas turbine power cycle for CO2 capture  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper investigates the transient behaviour of an oxygen mixed conducting membrane (OMCM)-based gas turbine (GT) power plant. Several operation and material constraints limit the operability of the power plant. For part-load operation two strategies are analysed: (i) reduction in mass flow of air to the GT in conjunction with reduced fuel supply to the afterburner while keeping the turbine exit temperature (TET) constant (TET control strategy), and (ii) reduction of fuel supply to the afterburner at constant air supply to the GT while the TET is allowed to vary (turbine inlet temperature (TIT) control strategy). Simulation reveals that this GT power plant shows rather slow dynamics because of the recirculation of large amount of gas. The OMCM-based GT power plant is compared to a simple GT power plant with respect to design, off-design as well as transient behaviour during load reduction. Information about controlled and manipulated variables in the GT power plant is given for the development of control strategy.

Konrad Eichhorn Colombo; Olav Bolland

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

SMART POWER TURBINE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Gas turbines are the choice technology for high-performance power generation and are employed in both simple and combined cycle configurations around the world. The Smart Power Turbine (SPT) program has developed new technologies that are needed to further extend the performance and economic attractiveness of gas turbines for power generation. Today's power generation gas turbines control firing temperatures indirectly, by measuring the exhaust gas temperature and then mathematically calculating the peak combustor temperatures. But temperatures in the turbine hot gas path vary a great deal, making it difficult to control firing temperatures precisely enough to achieve optimal performance. Similarly, there is no current way to assess deterioration of turbine hot-gas-path components without shutting down the turbine. Consequently, maintenance and component replacements are often scheduled according to conservative design practices based on historical fleet-averaged data. Since fuel heating values vary with the prevalent natural gas fuel, the inability to measure heating value directly, with sufficient accuracy and timeliness, can lead to maintenance and operational decisions that are less than optimal. GE Global Research Center, under this Smart Power Turbine program, has developed a suite of novel sensors that would measure combustor flame temperature, online fuel lower heating value (LHV), and hot-gas-path component life directly. The feasibility of using the ratio of the integrated intensities of portions of the OH emission band to determine the specific average temperature of a premixed methane or natural-gas-fueled combustion flame was demonstrated. The temperature determined is the temperature of the plasma included in the field of view of the sensor. Two sensor types were investigated: the first used a low-resolution fiber optic spectrometer; the second was a SiC dual photodiode chip. Both methods worked. Sensitivity to flame temperature changes was remarkably high, that is a 1-2.5% change in ratio for an 11.1 C (20 F) change in temperature at flame temperatures between 1482.2 C (2700 F) and 1760 C (3200 F). Sensor ratio calibration was performed using flame temperatures determined by calculations using the amount of unburned oxygen in the exhaust and by the fuel/air ratio of the combustible gas mixture. The agreement between the results of these two methods was excellent. The sensor methods characterized are simple and viable. Experiments are underway to validate the GE Flame Temperature Sensor as a practical tool for use with multiburner gas turbine combustors. The lower heating value (LHV) Fuel Quality Sensor consists of a catalytic film deposited on the surface of a microhotplate. This micromachined design has low heat capacity and thermal conductivity, making it ideal for heating catalysts placed on its surface. Several methods of catalyst deposition were investigated, including micropen deposition and other proprietary methods, which permit precise and repeatable placement of the materials. The use of catalysts on the LHV sensor expands the limits of flammability (LoF) of combustion fuels as compared with conventional flames; an unoptimized LoF of 1-32% for natural gas (NG) in air was demonstrated with the microcombustor, whereas conventionally 4 to 16% is observed. The primary goal of this work was to measure the LHV of NG fuels. The secondary goal was to determine the relative quantities of the various components of NG mixes. This determination was made successfully by using an array of different catalysts operating at different temperatures. The combustion parameters for methane were shown to be dependent on whether Pt or Pd catalysts were used. In this project, significant effort was expended on making the LHV platform more robust by the addition of high-temperature stable materials, such as tantalum, and the use of passivation overcoats to protect the resistive heater/sensor materials from degradation in the combustion environment. Modeling and simulation were used to predict improved sensor designs.

Nirm V. Nirmalan

2003-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Thermodynamics of combined-cycle electric power plants Harvey S. Leffa)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of thermodynamics and technology, modern gas and steam turbines can be coupled, to effect dramatic efficiency to examine reversible heat engine models. One learns that the maximum efficiency of a heat engine operating gcarnot engineering

249

Gas turbine performance prognostic for condition-based maintenance  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Gas turbine engines experience degradations over time that cause great concern to gas turbine users on engine reliability, availability and operating costs. Gas turbine diagnostics and prognostics is one of the key technologies to enable the move from time-scheduled maintenance to condition-based maintenance in order to improve engine reliability and availability and reduce life cycle costs. This paper describes a prognostic approach to estimate the remaining useful life of gas turbine engines before their next major overhaul based on historical health information. A combined regression techniques, including both linear and quadratic models, is proposed to predict the remaining useful life of gas turbine engines. A statistic “compatibility check” is used to determine the transition point from a linear regression to a quadratic regression. The developed prognostic approach has been applied to a model gas turbine engine similar to Rolls-Royce industrial gas turbine AVON 1535 implemented with compressor degradation over time. The analysis shows that the developed prognostic approach has a great potential to provide an estimation of engine remaining useful life before next major overhaul for gas turbine engines experiencing a typical soft degradation.

Y.G. Li; P. Nilkitsaranont

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Harmonization of initial estimates of shale gas life cycle greenhouse gas emissions for electric power generation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...and conventional gas are not significantly...harmonized estimates of life cycle GHG emissions...unconventional gas used for electricity...combined cycle turbine (NGCC) compared...explanation of the remaining harmonization...evaluated shale gas LCAs: inclusion of missing life cycle stages...

Garvin A. Heath; Patrick O’Donoughue; Douglas J. Arent; Morgan Bazilian

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

A hypothetical profile of ordinary steam turbines with reduced cost and enhanced reliability for contemporary conditions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Power steam turbines should be characterized with the reduced cost and enhanced reliability and designed on the basis of experience in steam turbine design and operation accumulated in the world`s practice for the latest years. Currently, such turbines have to be particularly matched with requirements of operation for deregulated power systems; so they should be capable of operating in both base-load and cycling modes. It seems reasonable to have such turbines with the single capacity about 250--400 MW, supercritical main steam pressure, and single steam reheat. This makes it possible to design such turbines with the minimum specific metal amount and length, with the integrated HP-IP and one two-flow LP cylinders. With existing ferritic and martensitic-class steels, the main and reheat steam temperatures can be chosen at the level of 565--580 C (1050--1075 F) without remarkable supplemental expenditures and a sacrifice of reliability. To reduce the capital cost and simplify operation and maintenance, the turbine`s regenerative system can be designed deaeratorless with motor-driven boiler-feed pumps. Such turbines could be used to replace existing old turbines with minimum expenditures. They can also be combined with large high-temperature gas-turbine sets to shape highly efficient combined-cycle units. There exist various design and technological decisions to enhance the turbine reliability and efficiency; they are well worked up and verified in long-term operation practice of different countries. For reliable and efficient operation, the turbine should be furnished with advanced automatic and automated control, diagnostic monitoring, and informative support for the operational personnel.

Leyzerovich, A.S. [Actinium Corp., St. Louis, MO (United States)

1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

252

Ceramics for ATS industrial turbines  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

US DOE and most US manufacturers of stationary gas turbines are participating in a major national effort to develop advanced turbine systems (ATS). The ATS program will achieve ultrahigh efficiencies, environmental superiority, and cost competitiveness compared with current combustion turbine systems. A major factor in the improved efficiencies of simple cycle ATS gas turbines will be higher operating efficiencies than curren engines. These temperatures strain the limits of metallic alloy and flow-path cooling technologies. Ceramics materials offer a potential alterative to cooled turbine alloys for ATS turbines due to higher melting points than metallics. This paper evaluates ceramics technology and plant economic issues for ATS industrial turbine systems. A program with the objective of demonstrating first-stage ceramic vanes in a commerical industrial turbine is also described.

Wenglarz, R.; Ali, S. [Allison Engine Co., Indianapolis, IN (United States); Layne, A. [USDOE Morgantown Energy Technology Center, WV (United States)

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Kentucky Pioneer Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle Demonstration Project, Final Environmental Impact Statement  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

S-1 S-1 SUMMARY The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) prepared this environmental impact statement (EIS) on the proposed Kentucky Pioneer Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) Demonstration Project in compliance with the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA). The National Environmental Policy Act Process NEPA is a federal law that serves as the basic national charter for protection of the environment. For major federal actions that may significantly affect the quality of the environment, NEPA requires federal agencies to prepare a detailed statement that includes the potential environmental impacts of the Proposed Action and reasonable alternatives. A fundamental objective of NEPA is to foster better decisionmaking by ensuring that high quality environmental information is available to public officials and members of the

254

A review of integrated solar combined cycle system (ISCCS) with a parabolic trough technology  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The huge amount of solar energy available on Earth?s surface has heightened awareness in Concentrating Solar Power, and more particularly in hybrid concepts. The integrated solar combined cycle system (ISCCS) is one of the more promising hybrid configurations for converting solar energy into electricity and it might become the technology of choice in the near future. This article reviews the R&D activities and published studies since the introduction of such a concept in the 1990s. The review includes the current status and describes different hybridizations of solar energy with natural gas, coal and other renewable energy sources. Furthermore, it provides in-depth analysis of real and expected R&D finding.

Omar Behar; Abdallah Khellaf; Kamal Mohammedi; Sabrina Ait-Kaci

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

Method and system to estimate variables in an integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) plant  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

System and method to estimate variables in an integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) plant are provided. The system includes a sensor suite to measure respective plant input and output variables. An extended Kalman filter (EKF) receives sensed plant input variables and includes a dynamic model to generate a plurality of plant state estimates and a covariance matrix for the state estimates. A preemptive-constraining processor is configured to preemptively constrain the state estimates and covariance matrix to be free of constraint violations. A measurement-correction processor may be configured to correct constrained state estimates and a constrained covariance matrix based on processing of sensed plant output variables. The measurement-correction processor is coupled to update the dynamic model with corrected state estimates and a corrected covariance matrix. The updated dynamic model may be configured to estimate values for at least one plant variable not originally sensed by the sensor suite.

Kumar, Aditya; Shi, Ruijie; Dokucu, Mustafa

2013-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

256

Model predictive control system and method for integrated gasification combined cycle power generation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Control system and method for controlling an integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) plant are provided. The system may include a controller coupled to a dynamic model of the plant to process a prediction of plant performance and determine a control strategy for the IGCC plant over a time horizon subject to plant constraints. The control strategy may include control functionality to meet a tracking objective and control functionality to meet an optimization objective. The control strategy may be configured to prioritize the tracking objective over the optimization objective based on a coordinate transformation, such as an orthogonal or quasi-orthogonal projection. A plurality of plant control knobs may be set in accordance with the control strategy to generate a sequence of coordinated multivariable control inputs to meet the tracking objective and the optimization objective subject to the prioritization resulting from the coordinate transformation.

Kumar, Aditya; Shi, Ruijie; Kumar, Rajeeva; Dokucu, Mustafa

2013-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

257

Temporary CO2 Capture Shut Down: Implications on Low Pressure Steam Turbine Design and Efficiency  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The Natural gas Combined Cycle (NGCC) with post combustion capture using liquid solvents may in some cases be of interest to design with a flexible steam bottoming cycle, so that it can operate both with and without CO2 capture. It is then important that the choice of the low pressure (LP) steam turbine exhaust size is made accordingly. The paper describes why a flexible NGCC requires a LP steam turbine with smaller exhaust than the corresponding NGCC without CO2 capture, and how this will affect the LP turbine exhaust loss and NGCC process efficiency. Handling large variations in LP steam flow is in fact well- known technology in combined heat and power (CHP) plants, and the use of 3D simulation tools can further help making the best LP steam turbine design choice.

Marcus Thern; Kristin Jordal; Magnus Genrup

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Table 3-2. Activity and idea summary for unit 2, cycle 3: Combining Pushes and Pulls. Activity Activity Summary Benchmark Ideas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

54 Table 3-2. Activity and idea summary for unit 2, cycle 3: Combining Pushes and Pulls. Activity individual objects and predict the combined weight of groups of objects. The teacher then leads a class, and then the teacher leads a class discussion as to which ideas best explain the cycle phenomena. All cycle ideas. A5

Sandifer, Cody

259

Analysis of a new thermodynamic cycle for combined power and cooling using low and mid temperature solar collectors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A combined thermal power and cooling cycle is proposed which combines the Rankine and absorption refrigeration cycles. It can provide power output as well as refrigeration with power generation as a primary goal. Ammonia-water mixture is used as a working fluid. The boiling temperature of the ammonia-water mixture increases as the boiling process proceeds until all liquid is vaporized, so that a better thermal match is obtained in the boiler. The proposed cycle takes advantage of the low boiling temperature of ammonia vapor so that it can be expanded to a low temperature while it is still in a vapor state or a high quality two phase state. This cycle is ideally suited for solar thermal power using low cost concentrating collectors, with the potential to reduce the capital cost of a solar thermal power plant. The cycle can also be used as a bottoming cycle for any thermal power plant. This paper presents a parametric analysis of the proposed cycle.

Goswami, D.Y.; Xu, F. [Univ. of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States). Solar Energy and Energy Conversion Lab.

1999-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Life-Cycle Implications of Using Crop Residues for Various Energy Demands in China  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The remaining 34.5% was accounted for by field burning and by a collection-loss component. ... P&Hdigestion represents a biogas power plant with gas turbines >1 MWelectr and with a conversion efficiency of 0.85 divided between electricity (0.40) and heat (0.45). ... Jia Youjian, Y. Z.; Chuangzhi, Wu. Life cycle assessment of a 4MWe biomass integrated gasification gas engines-steam turbine combined cycles power plant Acta Energiae Solaris Sin. ...

Wei Lu; Tianzhu Zhang

2010-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "turbine combined cycle" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

An experimental and numerical study of wind turbine seismic behavior  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Seismic and Wind Load Combinations 8.5.2 Extremeextrapolation for wind turbine extreme loads. ” Wind Energy,extrapolation for wind turbine extreme loads. ” 46th AIAA

Prowell, I.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Small gas turbine technology  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Small Gas Turbine Technology: Small gas turbine, in the power range up to 500 kW, requires a recuperated thermodynamic cycle to achieve an electrical efficiency of about 30%. This efficiency is the optimum, which is possible for a cycle pressure ratio of about 4–1. The cycle airflow is function of the power requirement. To increase the efficiency, in view to reduce the CO2 emission, it is mandatory to develop a more efficient thermodynamic cycle. Different thermodynamic cycles were examined and the final choice was made for an Intercooled, Recuperated cycle. The advantage of this cycle, for the same final electrical efficiency of about 35%, is the smaller cycle airflow, which is the most dimensional parameter for the important components as the heat exchanger recuperator and the combustion chamber. In parallel with the thermodynamic cycle it is necessary to develop the High Speed Alternator technology, integrated on the same shaft that the gas turbine rotating components, to achieve the constant efficiency at part loads, from 50% up to 100%, by the capacity to adjust the engine speed at the required load. To satisfy the stringent requirement in pollutant emissions of \\{NOx\\} and CO, the catalytic combustion system is the most efficient and this advance technology has to be proven. The major constraints for the small gas turbine technology development are the production cost and the maintenance cost of the unit. In the power range of 0–500 kW the gas turbine technology is in competition with small reciprocating engines, which are produced in large quantity for automotive industry, at a very low production cost.

Andre Romier

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

An evaluation of integrated-gasification-combined-cycle and pulverized-coal-fired steam plants: Volume 1, Base case studies: Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An evaluation of the performance and costs for a Texaco-based integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power plant as compared to a conventional pulverized coal-fired steam (PCFS) power plant with flue gas desulfurization (FGD) is provided. A general set of groundrules was used within which each plant design was optimized. The study incorporated numerous sensitivity cases along with up-to-date operating and cost data obtained through participation of equipment vendors and process developers. Consequently, the IGCC designs presented in this study use the most recent data available from Texaco's ongoing international coal gasification development program and General Electric's continuing gas turbine development efforts. The Texaco-based IGCC has advantages over the conventional PCFS technology with regard to environmental emissions and natural resource requirements. SO/sub 2/, NOx, and particulate emissions are lower. Land area and water requirements are less for IGCC concepts. Coal consumption is less due to the higher plant thermal efficiency attainable in the IGCC plant. The IGCC plant also has the capability to be designed in several different configurations, with and without the use of natural gas or oil as a backup fuel. This capability may prove to be particularly advantageous in certain utility planning and operation scenarios. 107 figs., 114 tabs.

Pietruszkiewicz, J.; Milkavich, R.J.; Booras, G.S.; Thomas, G.O.; Doss, H.

1988-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Anticipatory control of turbine generators  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Turbine Generators. (Nay 1971) Freddie Laurel Nessec, B. S. E. E, , Texas Tech University; Directed by: Professor J. S . Denison An investigation is made of the use of predicted loads in controlling turbine generators. A perturbation model of a turbine... generator is presented along with typical parameter values. A study is made of the effects of applying control action before a load change occurs. Two predictive control schemes are investi- gated using a load cycle which incorporates both ramp and step...

Messec, Freddie Laurel

1971-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Study on a gas-steam combined cycle system with CO2 capture by integrating molten carbonate fuel cell  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This paper studies a gas-steam combined cycle system with CO2 capture by integrating the MCFC (molten carbonate fuel cell). With the Aspen plus software, this paper builds the model of the overall MCFC-GT hybrid system with CO2 capture and analyzes the effects of the key parameters on the performances of the overall system. The result shows that compared with the gas-steam combined cycle system without CO2 capture, the efficiency of the new system with CO2 capture does not decrease obviously and keeps the same efficiency with the original gas steam combined cycle system when the carbon capture percentage is 45%. When the carbon capture percentage reaches up to 85%, the efficiency of the new system is about 54.96%, only 0.67 percent points lower than that of the original gas-steam combined cycle system. The results show that the new system has an obvious superiority of thermal performance. However, its technical economic performance needs be improved with the technical development of MCFC and ITM (oxygen ion transfer membrane). Achievements from this paper will provide the useful reference for CO2 capture with lower energy consumption from the traditional power generation system.

Liqiang Duan; Jingnan Zhu; Long Yue; Yongping Yang

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Technical review of Westinghouse`s Advanced Turbine Systems Program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

US DOE`s ATS program has the goals of increased efficiency of natural gas-fired power generation plants, decreased cost of electricity, and a decrease in harmful emissions. The Westinghouse ATS plant is based on an advanced gas turbine design combined with an advanced steam turbine and a high efficiency generator. Objectives of the ATS Program Phase 2 are to select the ATS cycle and to develop technologies required to achieve ATS Program goals: combustion, cooling, aerodynamics, leakage control, coatings, materials. This paper describes progress on each.

Diakunchak, I.S.; Bannister, R.L.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

267

Externally fired gas turbine technology: A review  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Externally fired heat engines were used widely since helium the industrial revolution using dirty solid fuels for example coal, due to the lack of refined fuels. However, with the availability of clean fuels, external firing mode was abandoned, except for steam power plants. Lately, with the global trend moving towards green power production, the idea of the external fired system has captured the attention again especially externally fired gas turbine (EFGT) due to its wider range of power generation and the potential of using environment friendly renewable energy sources like biomass. In this paper, a wide range of thermal power sources utilizing EFGT such as concentrated solar power (CSP), fossil, nuclear and biomass fuels are reviewed. Gas turbine as the main component of EFGT is investigated from micro scale below 1 MWe to the large scale central power generation. Moreover, the different high temperature heat exchanger (HTHE) materials and designs are reviewed. Finally, the methods of improving cycle efficiency such as the externally fired combined cycle (EFCC), humidified air turbine (HAT), EFGT with fuel cells and other cycles are reviewed thoroughly.

K.A. Al-attab; Z.A. Zainal

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Carbon dioxide recovery from an integrated coal gasifier, combined cycle plant using membrane separation and a CO2 gas turbine  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A scheme is described for electricity production based on coal gasification with recovery of carbon dioxide. In this scheme, coal is gasified into a coal gas, consisting mainly of hydrogen and carbon monoxide. A ...

Chris Hendriks

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

CoalFleet RD&D augmentation plan for integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power plants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To help accelerate the development, demonstration, and market introduction of integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) and other clean coal technologies, EPRI formed the CoalFleet for Tomorrow initiative, which facilitates collaborative research by more than 50 organizations from around the world representing power generators, equipment suppliers and engineering design and construction firms, the U.S. Department of Energy, and others. This group advised EPRI as it evaluated more than 120 coal-gasification-related research projects worldwide to identify gaps or critical-path activities where additional resources and expertise could hasten the market introduction of IGCC advances. The resulting 'IGCC RD&D Augmentation Plan' describes such opportunities and how they could be addressed, for both IGCC plants to be built in the near term (by 2012-15) and over the longer term (2015-25), when demand for new electric generating capacity is expected to soar. For the near term, EPRI recommends 19 projects that could reduce the levelized cost-of-electricity for IGCC to the level of today's conventional pulverized-coal power plants with supercritical steam conditions and state-of-the-art environmental controls. For the long term, EPRI's recommended projects could reduce the levelized cost of an IGCC plant capturing 90% of the CO{sub 2} produced from the carbon in coal (for safe storage away from the atmosphere) to the level of today's IGCC plants without CO{sub 2} capture. EPRI's CoalFleet for Tomorrow program is also preparing a companion RD&D augmentation plan for advanced-combustion-based (i.e., non-gasification) clean coal technologies (Report 1013221). 7 refs., 30 figs., 29 tabs., 4 apps.

NONE

2007-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

270

Advanced industrial gas turbine technology readiness demonstration. Quarterly technical progress report No. 12, 1 December 1979-29 February 1980  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The component technology base required for improved industrial gas turbine conversion efficiency is discussed. Specific goals are to demonstrate the high-pressure compressor and turbine cooling technologies required to achieve industrial gas turbine efficiencies of 34 to 36% simple cycle and 45 to 48% in combined cycle operation while reducing the number of compressor and turbine parts 80% over state-of-the-art units. The approach involves combining some of the most advanced aircraft turbine cooling and high-pressure compressor technology with the simplicity and ruggedness required of industrial engines to achieve not only improved performance, but also increased durability and low initial cost. The program currently consists of two phases. Phase I, which has been completed, included the conceptual definition of an industrial gas turbine capable of meeting the above goals and the aerothermodynamic designs of compressor and turbine component test rigs. Phase II, which is in progress, consists of component validation testing of the high-pressure compressor and turbine cooling designs which evolved in Phase I. During this quarter, work continued on Phase II, Task III - Compressor Rig Assembly and Test. Assembly of the compressor rig has been completed and final preparation of the rig for transporting to the test facility is in progress.

none,

1980-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

271

Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) demonstration project, Polk Power Station -- Unit No. 1. Annual report, October 1993--September 1994  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This describes the Tampa Electric Company`s Polk Power Station Unit 1 (PPS-1) Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) demonstration project which will use a Texaco pressurized, oxygen-blown, entrained-flow coal gasifier to convert approximately 2,300 tons per day of coal (dry basis) coupled with a combined cycle power block to produce a net 250 MW electrical power output. Coal is slurried in water, combined with 95% pure oxygen from an air separation unit, and sent to the gasifier to produce a high temperature, high pressure, medium-Btu syngas with a heat content of about 250 Btu/scf (LHV). The syngas then flows through a high temperature heat recovery unit which cools the syngas prior to its entering the cleanup systems. Molten coal ash flows from the bottom of the high temperature heat recovery unit into a water-filled quench chamber where it solidifies into a marketable slag by-product.

NONE

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Industrial Gas Turbines | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Industrial Gas Turbines Industrial Gas Turbines Industrial Gas Turbines November 1, 2013 - 11:40am Addthis A gas turbine is a heat engine that uses high-temperature, high-pressure gas as the working fluid. Part of the heat supplied by the gas is converted directly into mechanical work. High-temperature, high-pressure gas rushes out of the combustor and pushes against the turbine blades, causing them to rotate. In most cases, hot gas is produced by burning a fuel in air. This is why gas turbines are often referred to as "combustion" turbines. Because gas turbines are compact, lightweight, quick-starting, and simple to operate, they are used widely in industry, universities and colleges, hospitals, and commercial buildings. Simple-cycle gas turbines convert a portion of input energy from the fuel

273

Industrial Gas Turbines | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Industrial Gas Turbines Industrial Gas Turbines Industrial Gas Turbines November 1, 2013 - 11:40am Addthis A gas turbine is a heat engine that uses high-temperature, high-pressure gas as the working fluid. Part of the heat supplied by the gas is converted directly into mechanical work. High-temperature, high-pressure gas rushes out of the combustor and pushes against the turbine blades, causing them to rotate. In most cases, hot gas is produced by burning a fuel in air. This is why gas turbines are often referred to as "combustion" turbines. Because gas turbines are compact, lightweight, quick-starting, and simple to operate, they are used widely in industry, universities and colleges, hospitals, and commercial buildings. Simple-cycle gas turbines convert a portion of input energy from the fuel

274

10 MW Supercritical CO2 Turbine Test  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Supercritical CO2 Turbine Test project was to demonstrate the inherent efficiencies of a supercritical carbon dioxide (s-CO2) power turbine and associated turbomachinery under conditions and at a scale relevant to commercial concentrating solar power (CSP) projects, thereby accelerating the commercial deployment of this new power generation technology. The project involved eight partnering organizations: NREL, Sandia National Laboratories, Echogen Power Systems, Abengoa Solar, University of Wisconsin at Madison, Electric Power Research Institute, Barber-Nichols, and the CSP Program of the U.S. Department of Energy. The multi-year project planned to design, fabricate, and validate an s-CO2 power turbine of nominally 10 MWe that is capable of operation at up to 700°C and operates in a dry-cooled test loop. The project plan consisted of three phases: (1) system design and modeling, (2) fabrication, and (3) testing. The major accomplishments of Phase 1 included: Design of a multistage, axial-flow, s-CO2 power turbine; Design modifications to an existing turbocompressor to provide s-CO2 flow for the test system; Updated equipment and installation costs for the turbomachinery and associated support infrastructure; Development of simulation tools for the test loop itself and for more efficient cycle designs that are of greater commercial interest; Simulation of s-CO2 power cycle integration into molten-nitrate-salt CSP systems indicating a cost benefit of up to 8% in levelized cost of energy; Identification of recuperator cost as a key economic parameter; Corrosion data for multiple alloys at temperatures up to 650şC in high-pressure CO2 and recommendations for materials-of-construction; and Revised test plan and preliminary operating conditions based on the ongoing tests of related equipment. Phase 1 established that the cost of the facility needed to test the power turbine at its full power and temperature would exceed the planned funding for Phases 2 and 3. Late in Phase 1 an opportunity arose to collaborate with another turbine-development team to construct a shared s-CO2 test facility. The synergy of the combined effort would result in greater facility capabilities than either separate project could produce and would allow for testing of both turbine designs within the combined budgets of the two projects. The project team requested a no-cost extension to Phase 1 to modify the subsequent work based on this collaborative approach. DOE authorized a brief extension, but ultimately opted not to pursue the collaborative facility and terminated the project.

Turchi, Craig

2014-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

275

Gas Turbines  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

When the gas turbine generator was introduced to the power generation ... fossil-fueled power plant. Twenty years later, gas turbines were established as an important means of ... on utility systems. By the early...

Jeffrey M. Smith

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Annual Report: Turbine Thermal Management (30 September 2013)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The FY13 NETL-RUA Turbine Thermal Management effort supported the Department of Energy’s (DOE) Hydrogen Turbine Program through conduct of novel, fundamental, basic, and applied research in the areas of aerothermal heat transfer, coatings development, and secondary flow control. This research project utilized the extensive expertise and facilities readily available at NETL and the participating universities. The research approach included explorative studies based on scaled models and prototype coupon tests conducted under realistic high-temperature, pressurized, turbine operating conditions. This research is expected to render measurable outcomes that will meet DOE’s advanced turbine development goals of a 3- to 5-point increase in power island efficiency and a 30 percent power increase above the hydrogen-fired combined cycle baseline. In addition, knowledge gained from this project will further advance the aerothermal cooling and TBC technologies in the general turbine community. This project has been structured to address: • Development and design of aerothermal and materials concepts in FY12-13. • Design and manufacturing of these advanced concepts in FY13. • Bench-scale/proof-of-concept testing of these concepts in FY13-14 and beyond. In addition to a Project Management task, the Turbine Thermal Management project consists of four tasks that focus on a critical technology development in the areas of heat transfer, materials development, and secondary flow control. These include: • Aerothermal and Heat Transfer • Coatings and Materials Development • Design Integration and Testing • Secondary Flow Rotating Rig.

Alvin, Mary Anne; Richards, George

2014-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

277

Dynamic simulation and load-following control of an integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power plant with CO{sub 2} capture  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Load-following control of future integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) plants with pre-combustion CO{sub 2} capture is expected to be far more challenging as electricity produced by renewable energy is connected to the grid and strict environmental limits become mandatory requirements. To study control performance during load following, a plant-wide dynamic simulation of a coal-fed IGCC plant with CO{sub 2} capture has been developed. The slurry-fed gasifier is a single-stage, downward-fired, oxygen-blown, entrained-flow type with a radiant syngas cooler (RSC). The syngas from the outlet of the RSC goes to a scrubber followed by a two-stage sour shift process with inter-stage cooling. The acid gas removal (AGR) process is a dual-stage physical solvent-based process for selective removal of H{sub 2}S in the first stage and CO{sub 2} in the second stage. Sulfur is recovered using a Claus unit with tail gas recycle to the AGR. The recovered CO{sub 2} is compressed by a split-shaft multistage compressor and sent for sequestration after being treated in an absorber with triethylene glycol for dehydration. The clean syngas is sent to two advanced “F”-class gas turbines (GTs) partially integrated with an elevated-pressure air separation unit. A subcritical steam cycle is used for heat recovery steam generation. A treatment unit for the sour water strips off the acid gases for utilization in the Claus unit. The steady-state model developed in Aspen Plus® is converted to an Aspen Plus Dynamics® simulation and integrated with MATLAB® for control studies. The results from the plant-wide dynamic model are compared qualitatively with the data from a commercial plant having different configuration, operating condition, and feed quality than what has been considered in this work. For load-following control, the GT-lead with gasifier-follow control strategy is considered. A modified proportional–integral–derivative (PID) control is considered for the syngas pressure control. For maintaining the desired CO{sub 2} capture rate while load-following, a linear model predictive controller (LMPC) is implemented in MATLAB®. A combined process and disturbance model is identified by considering a number of model forms and choosing the final model based on an information-theoretic criterion. The performance of the LMPC is found to be superior to the conventional PID control for maintaining CO{sub 2} capture rates in an IGCC power plant while load following.

Bhattacharyya, D,; Turton, R.; Zitney, S.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

UTILITY ADVANCED TURBINE SYSTEMS(ATS) TECHNOLOGY READINESS TESTING  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The following paper provides an overview of GE's H System{trademark} technology, and specifically, the design, development, and test activities associated with the DOE Advanced Turbine Systems (ATS) program. There was intensive effort expended in bringing this revolutionary advanced technology program to commercial reality. In addition to describing the magnitude of performance improvement possible through use of H System{trademark} technology, this paper discusses the technological milestones during the development of the first 9H (50Hz) and 7H (60 Hz) gas turbines. To illustrate the methodical product development strategy used by GE, this paper discusses several technologies that were essential to the introduction of the H System{trademark}. Also included are analyses of the series of comprehensive tests of materials, components and subsystems that necessarily preceded full scale field testing of the H System{trademark}. This paper validates one of the basic premises with which GE started the H System{trademark} development program: exhaustive and elaborate testing programs minimized risk at every step of this process, and increase the probability of success when the H System{trademark} is introduced into commercial service. In 1995, GE, the world leader in gas turbine technology for over half a century, in conjunction with the DOE National Energy Technology Laboratory's ATS program, introduced its new generation of gas turbines. This H System{trademark} technology is the first gas turbine ever to achieve the milestone of 60% fuel efficiency. Because fuel represents the largest individual expense of running a power plant, an efficiency increase of even a single percentage point can substantially reduce operating costs over the life of a typical gas-fired, combined-cycle plant in the 400 to 500 megawatt range. The H System{trademark} is not simply a state-of-the-art gas turbine. It is an advanced, integrated, combined-cycle system in which every component is optimized for the highest level of performance. The unique feature of an H-technology combined-cycle system is the integrated heat transfer system, which combines both the steam plant reheat process and gas turbine bucket and nozzle cooling. This feature allows the power generator to operate at a higher firing temperature than current technology units, thereby resulting in dramatic improvements in fuel-efficiency. The end result is the generation of electricity at the lowest, most competitive price possible. Also, despite the higher firing temperature of the H System{trademark}, the combustion temperature is kept at levels that minimize emission production. GE has more than 3.6 million fired hours of experience in operating advanced technology gas turbines, more than three times the fired hours of competitors' units combined. The H System{trademark} design incorporates lessons learned from this experience with knowledge gleaned from operating GE aircraft engines. In addition, the 9H gas turbine is the first ever designed using ''Design for Six Sigma'' methodology, which maximizes reliability and availability throughout the entire design process. Both the 7H and 9H gas turbines will achieve the reliability levels of our F-class technology machines. GE has tested its H System{trademark} gas turbine more thoroughly than any previously introduced into commercial service. The H System{trademark} gas turbine has undergone extensive design validation and component testing. Full-speed, no-load testing of the 9H was achieved in May 1998 and pre-shipment testing was completed in November 1999. The 9H will also undergo approximately a half-year of extensive demonstration and characterization testing at the launch site. Testing of the 7H began in December 1999, and full speed, no-load testing was completed in February 2000. The 7H gas turbine will also be subjected to extensive demonstration and characterization testing at the launch site.

Kenneth A. Yackly

2001-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Carbon Dioxide Capture from Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle Gas Streams Using the Ammonium Carbonate-Ammonium Bicarbonate Process  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Integrated Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle Gas Streams Using the Ammonium Carbonate- Ammonium Bicarbonate Process Description Current commercial processes to remove carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) from conventional power plants are expensive and energy intensive. The objective of this project is to reduce the cost associated with the capture of CO 2 from coal based gasification processes, which convert coal and other carbon based feedstocks to synthesis gas.

280

Feasibility Studies to Improve Plant Availability and Reduce Total Installed Cost in Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle Plants  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Feasibility Studies to Improve Plant Feasibility Studies to Improve Plant Availability and Reduce Total Installed Cost in Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle Plants Background Gasification provides the means to turn coal and other carbonaceous solid, liquid and gaseous feedstocks as diverse as refinery residues, biomass, and black liquor into synthesis gas and valuable byproducts that can be used to produce low-emissions power, clean-burning fuels and a wide range of commercial products to support

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "turbine combined cycle" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Is Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle with Carbon Capture-Storage the Solution for Conventional Coal Power Plants  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Engineering Management Field Project Is Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle with Carbon Capture-Storage the Solution for Conventional Coal Power Plants By Manish Kundi Fall Semester, 2011 An EMGT Field Project report... 2.4 Environmental Aspects-Emissions 23 3.0 Procedure & Methodology 3.1 Working technology – Conventional Coal Plants 30 3.2 Working technology – IGCC Power Plants 32 3.3 Carbon Capture and Storage 35 3...

Kundi, Manish

2011-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

282

Advanced Turbine Technology Applications Project (ATTAP) and Hybrid Vehicle Turbine Engine Technology Support project (HVTE-TS): Final summary report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This final technical report was prepared by Rolls-Royce Allison summarizing the multiyear activities of the Advanced Turbine Technology Applications Project (ATTAP) and the Hybrid Vehicle Turbine Engine Technology Support (HVTE-TS) project. The ATTAP program was initiated in October 1987 and continued through 1993 under sponsorship of the US Department of Energy (DOE), Energy Conservation and Renewable Energy, Office of Transportation Technologies, Propulsion Systems, Advanced Propulsion Division. ATTAP was intended to advance the technological readiness of the automotive ceramic gas turbine engine. The target application was the prime power unit coupled to conventional transmissions and powertrains. During the early 1990s, hybrid electric powered automotive propulsion systems became the focus of development and demonstration efforts by the US auto industry and the Department of energy. Thus in 1994, the original ATTAP technology focus was redirected to meet the needs of advanced gas turbine electric generator sets. As a result, the program was restructured to provide the required hybrid vehicle turbine engine technology support and the project renamed HVTE-TS. The overall objective of the combined ATTAP and HVTE-TS projects was to develop and demonstrate structural ceramic components that have the potential for competitive automotive engine life cycle cost and for operating 3,500 hr in an advanced high temperature turbine engine environment. This report describes materials characterization and ceramic component development, ceramic components, hot gasifier rig testing, test-bed engine testing, combustion development, insulation development, and regenerator system development. 130 figs., 12 tabs.

NONE

1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

8 - Radial-Inflow Turbines  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Publisher Summary The inward-flow radial turbine covers tremendous ranges of power, rates of mass flow, and rotational speeds from very large Francis turbines used in hydroelectric power generation and developing hundreds of megawatts down to tiny closed cycle gas turbines for space power generation of a few kilowatts. The widespread adoption of variable geometry turbines for diesel engine turbochargers has been the major factor in increasing the commercial use of this technology. Variable area is commonly, but not exclusively, achieved by pivoting the nozzle vanes about an axis disposed in the span-wise direction. The most common radial-inflow turbine applications are turbochargers for internal combustion engines, natural gas, diesel, and gasoline powered units. The advantage of a turbocharger is that it compresses the air, thus letting the engine squeeze more air into a cylinder, and more air means that more fuel can be added. Applications of turbo expanders in the chemical industry abound in the petrochemical and chemical industries. Turbo expanders using radial-inflow turbines have a much higher ruggedness than turbo expanders using axial-flow turbines. The radial-inflow turbine for gas turbine application is basically a centrifugal compressor with reversed flow and opposite rotation. The performance of the radial-inflow turbine is being investigated with increased interest by the transportation and chemical industries. In the petrochemical industry, it is used in expander designs, gas liquefaction expanders and other cryogenic systems. The radial-inflow turbine’s greatest advantage is that the work produced by a single stage is equivalent to that of two or more stages in an axial turbine. Its cost is also much lower than that of a single- or multi-stage axial-flow turbine. The configurations and designs of the two types of radial-inflow turbine (cantilever and mixed-flow) are described. The thermodynamic and aerodynamic principles governing a radial-inflow turbine are summarized. The design and performance of a radial-inflow turbine are discussed. The potential problems (erosion; exducer blade vibration; noise) and types of losses in a radial-inflow turbine are described. Applications of radial-inflow turbines (e.g. turbochargers) are discussed.

Meherwan P. Boyce

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Comparative Analysis of Alternative Configurations of the Mercury 50 Recuperated Gas-Turbine-Based Biomass Integrated Gasification Combined Heat and Power (BIGCHP) Plant  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this paper, several original configurations of the cogeneration system based on different gasification technologies and Mercury 50 recuperated gas turbine are proposed and examined theoretically. ... (14) Another key problem of the successful commercialization of the technology is the commercial availability of reliable and efficient gas turbines (GTs) modified for syngas operation. ... In particular, the paper presents current development status and design challenges being addressed by Siemens Westinghouse Power Corp. for large industrial engines (>200 MW) and by Solar Turbines for smaller engines (Turbine Systems (ATS) program. ...

Jacek Kalina

2011-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

285

Refurbishing steam turbines  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Power-plant operators are reducing maintenance costs of their aging steam turbines by using wire-arc spray coating and shot peening to prolong the service life of components, and by replacing outmoded bearings and seals with newer designs. Steam-turbine operators are pressed with the challenge of keeping their aging machines functioning in the face of wear problems that are exacerbated by the demand for higher efficiencies. These problems include intense thermal cycling during both start-up and shutdown, water particles in steam and solid particles in the air that pit smooth surfaces, and load changes that cause metal fatigue.

Valenti, M.

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

Thermal Barrier Coatings for Gas-Turbine Engine Applications  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...but in some industrial gas-turbine engines applications it can reach...shorter thermal-cycling lives than EB-PVD TBCs...extremely well in industrial gas-turbine engines, including “bucket...thermal” compressive residual stresses in...

Nitin P. Padture; Maurice Gell; Eric H. Jordan

2002-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

287

Transition length in turbine/compressor blade flows  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...with compressor/turbine blades. The computation...governs the spike development in central cycles...characteristic of gas turbine blades in the course...preliminary design strategy. The theoretical...pursue the nonlinear development of the emitted...

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Cascade utilization of chemical energy of natural gas in an improved CRGT cycle  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this paper three advanced power systems: the chemically recuperated gas turbine (CRGT) cycle, the steam injected gas turbine (STIG) cycle and the combined cycle (CC), are investigated and compared by means of exergy analysis. Making use of the energy level concept, cascaded use of the chemical exergy of natural gas in a CRGT cycle is clarified, and its performance of the utilization of chemical energy is evaluated. Based on this evaluation, a new CRGT cycle is designed to convert the exergy of natural gas more efficiently into electrical power. As a result, the exergy efficiency of the new CRGT cycle is about 55%, which is 8 percentage points higher than that of the reference CRGT cycle. The analysis gave a better interpretation of the inefficiencies of the CRGT cycle and suggested improvement options. This new approach can be used to design innovative energy systems.

Wei Han; Hongguang Jin; Na Zhang; Xiaosong Zhang

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Extreme responses of a combined spar-type floating wind turbine and floating wave energy converter (STC) system with survival modes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Offshore wind is an important source of renewable energy and is steadier and stronger than onshore wind. Offshore areas not only have strong winds but also contain other potential renewable energy sources, such as ocean waves and tidal currents. Therefore, it is interesting to investigate the possibility to utilise these energy potentials simultaneously, particularly the combination of wind and ocean wave energy due to their natural correlation. For this reason, previous researchers have examined the use of a floating wind turbine (FWT) and a wave energy converter (WEC) on a single platform (Aubault et al., 2011; Peiffer et al., 2011; Soulard and Babarit, 2012). In this paper, a combined concept involving a spar-type FWT and an axi-symmetric two-body WEC is considered and denoted as STC. With respect to operational conditions, a previous study (Muliawan et al., 2013) indicates that the STC not only reduces the total capital cost but also increases the total power production compared to the use of segregated FWT and WEC concepts. As with other floating systems, the STC must be designed to ensure serviceability and survivability during its entire service life. One of the design criteria is the ultimate limit state (ULS), which ensures that the entire STC system will have adequate strength to withstand the load effects imposed by extreme environmental actions. Therefore, in the present study, coupled (wave- and wind-induced response mooring) analysis is performed using SIMO/TDHMILL in the time domain to investigate such responses of the STC system as mooring tension, spar-tower interface bending moment, end stop force, and contact force at the Spar-Torus interface under extreme conditions. Environmental conditions that pertain to the northern North Sea metocean data are selected and include operational, survival and 50-year conditions. Finally, the ULS level responses that are capital cost indicators for both FWT alone and for the STC system are estimated and compared.

Made Jaya Muliawan; Madjid Karimirad; Zhen Gao; Torgeir Moan

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

On Combining Duty-cycling with Network Coding in Flood-based Sensor Networks  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of coding, there are periods of time when a node does not benefit from overhearing coded packets being transmitted. We seek to precisely determine these periods of time, and let nodes that do not benefit from these ?useless? packets to sleep. Our solution...] is an instance of NetCode. We describe its operation in detail because we aim to analytically demonstrate, in the sections that follow, that the introduction of our smart duty-cycle does not come with any major overhead. The operation of NetCode is depicted...

Chandanala, Roja Ramani

2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

291

System Study of Rich Catalytic/Lean burn (RCL) Catalytic Combustion for Natural Gas and Coal-Derived Syngas Combustion Turbines  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Rich Catalytic/Lean burn (RCL{reg_sign}) technology has been successfully developed to provide improvement in Dry Low Emission gas turbine technology for coal derived syngas and natural gas delivering near zero NOx emissions, improved efficiency, extending component lifetime and the ability to have fuel flexibility. The present report shows substantial net cost saving using RCL{reg_sign} technology as compared to other technologies both for new and retrofit applications, thus eliminating the need for Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) in combined or simple cycle for Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) and natural gas fired combustion turbines.

Shahrokh Etemad; Lance Smith; Kevin Burns

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Life cycle analysis of distributed concentrating solar combined heat and power: economics, global warming potential and water  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We report on life cycle assessment (LCA) of the economics, global warming potential and water (both for desalination and water use in operation) for a distributed concentrating solar combined heat and power (DCS-CHP) system. Detailed simulation of system performance across 1020 sites in the US combined with a sensible cost allocation scheme informs this LCA. We forecast a levelized cost of $0.25 kWh?1 electricity and $0.03 kWh?1 thermal, for a system with a life cycle global warming potential of ~80 gCO2eq kWh?1 of electricity and ~10 gCO2eq kWh?1 thermal, sited in Oakland, California. On the basis of the economics shown for air cooling, and the fact that any combined heat and power system reduces the need for cooling while at the same time boosting the overall solar efficiency of the system, DCS-CHP compares favorably to other electric power generation systems in terms of minimization of water use in the maintenance and operation of the plant. The outlook for water desalination coupled with distributed concentrating solar combined heat and power is less favorable. At a projected cost of $1.40 m?3, water desalination with DCS-CHP would be economical and practical only in areas where water is very scarce or moderately expensive, primarily available through the informal sector, and where contaminated or salt water is easily available as feed-water. It is also interesting to note that $0.40–$1.90 m?3 is the range of water prices in the developed world, so DCS-CHP desalination systems could also be an economical solution there under some conditions.

Zack Norwood; Daniel Kammen

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Determining the maximal capacity of a combined-cycle plant operating with afterburning of fuel in the gas conduit upstream of the heat-recovery boiler  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The effect gained from afterburning of fuel in the gas conduit upstream of the heat-recovery boiler used as part of a PGU-450T combined-cycle plant is considered. The results obtained from ... electric and therma...

V. M. Borovkov; N. M. Osmanova

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

Exergetic analysis and evaluation of coal-fired supercritical thermal power plant and natural gas-fired combined cycle power plant  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The present work has been undertaken for energetic and exergetic analysis of coal-fired supercritical thermal power plant and natural gas-fired combined cycle power plant. Comparative analysis has been conducted ...

V. Siva Reddy; S. C. Kaushik; S. K. Tyagi

2014-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Demonstration of a Variable Phase Turbine Power System for Low Temperature Geothermal Resources  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Project objectives: Demonstrate a 1 megawatt Variable Phase Turbine and Variable Phase Cycle with low temperature brine.

296

Steam Turbines  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... chapters take up the design of nozzles and blades, and descriptions of commercial types of turbines. The treatment of low-pressure, mixed pressure, bleeder, and marine ... . The treatment of low-pressure, mixed pressure, bleeder, and marine turbines occupies separate chapters. Of these, the section dealing with the marine ...

1917-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

297

Economic comparison between coal-fired and liquefied natural gas combined cycle power plants considering carbon tax: Korean case  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Economic growth is main cause of environmental pollution and has been identified as a big threat to sustainable development. Considering the enormous role of electricity in the national economy, it is essential to study the effect of environmental regulations on the electricity sector. This paper aims at making an economic analysis of Korea's power plant utilities by comparing electricity generation costs from coal-fired power plants and liquefied natural gas (LNG) combined cycle power plants with environmental consideration. In this study, the levelized generation cost method (LGCM) is used for comparing economic analysis of power plant utilities. Among the many pollutants discharged during electricity generation, this study principally deals with control costs related only to CO2 and NO2, since the control costs of SO2 and total suspended particulates (TSP) are already included in the construction cost of utilities. The cost of generating electricity in a coal-fired power plant is compared with such cost in a LNG combined cycle power plant. Moreover, a sensitivity analysis with computer simulation is performed according to fuel price, interest rates and carbon tax. In each case, these results can help in deciding which utility is economically justified in the circumstances of environmental regulations.

Suk-Jae Jeong; Kyung-Sup Kim; Jin-Won Park; Dong-soon Lim; Seung-moon Lee

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

The Gas Turbine and Its Significance as a Prime Mover  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...1885; the Diesel engine, 1895...relating to heat cycles, such as regeneration...reheating came into general application...an ideal power cycle first found an...gas turbines for general prime mover purposes...type of power cycle which followed...turbine, the Diesel engine and the...

C. Richard Soderberg

1948-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Development of high-temperature turbine subsystem technology to a technology readiness status, Phase II. Quarterly report, January-March 1981  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

progress in developing a technical readiness vehicle (TRV) for demonstrating the performance of a combined-cycle power plant with high-temperature, 2600 to 3000/sup 0/F firing temperature, gas turbines using coal-derived gas fuel is reported. Work on the combined-cycle power plant and TRV design, component development, aerodynamics studies, simulation, and fuel gas cleanup systems is described. (LCL)

Horner, M.W.

1981-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

THE EFFECTS OF CHANGING FUELS ON HOT GAS PATH CONDITIONS IN SYNGAS TURBINES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Gas turbines in integrated gasification combined cycle power plants burn a fuel gas (syngas) in which the proportions of hydrocarbons, H2, CO, water vapor, and minor impurity levels may differ significantly from those in natural gas. Such differences can yield changes in the temperature, pressure, and corrosive species that are experienced by critical components in the hot gas path, with important implications in the design, operation, and reliability of the turbine. A new data structure and computational methodology is presented for the numerical simulation of a turbine thermodynamic cycle for various fuel types. The approach used allows efficient handling of turbine components and different variable constraints due to fuel changes. Examples are presented for a turbine with four stages. The vanes and blades were considered to be cooled in an open circuit, with air provided from the appropriate compressor stages. A constraint was placed on the maximum metal temperature and values were calculated for the fuel flow rates, airflow ratios, and coolant flow rates for cases where the turbine was fired with natural gas, NG, or syngas, SG. One NG case was conducted to assess the effect of coolant pressure matching between the compressor extraction points and corresponding turbine injection points. It was found that pressure matching is a feature that must be considered for high combustion temperatures. The first series of SG simulations was conducted using the same inlet mass flow and pressure ratios as those for the NG case. The results showed that higher coolant flow rates and a larger number of cooled turbine rows were needed for the SG case to comply with imposed temperature constraint. Thus, for this first case, the turbine size would be different for SG than for NG. In order to maintain the original turbine configuration (i.e., geometry, diameters, blade heights, angles, and cooling circuit characteristics) for the SG simulations, a second series of simulations was carried out in which the inlet mass flow was varied while keeping constant the pressure ratios and the amount of hot gas passing the first vane of the turbine. The effects of turbine matching between the NG and SG cases were increases for the SG case of approximately 7 and 13 % for total cooling flows and cooling flows for the first vane, respectively. In particular, for the SG case, the vane in the last stage of the turbine experienced inner wall temperatures that approached the maximum allowable limit.

Sabau, Adrian S [ORNL; Wright, Ian G [ORNL

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

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to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Demonstration of a Variable Phase Turbine Power System for Low...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

turbine geothermal ORC system A Revolutionary Hybrid Thermodynamic Cycle for Bianary Geothermal Power Free Flow Energy (TRL 1 2 3 Component) - Design and Development of a...

302

Solar gas turbine systems: Design, cost and perspectives  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The combination of high solar shares with high conversion efficiencies is one of the major advantages of solar gas turbine systems compared to other solar-fossil hybrid power plants. Pressurized air receivers are used in solar tower plants to heat the compressed air in the gas turbine to temperatures up to 1000 °C. Therefore solar shares in the design case of 40% up to 90% can be realized and annual solar shares up to 30% can be achieved in base load. Using modern gas turbine systems in recuperation or combined cycle mode leads to conversion efficiencies of the solar heat from around 40% up to more than 50%. This is an important step towards cost reduction of solar thermal power. Together with the advantages of hybrid power plants—variable solar share, fully dispatchable power, 24 h operation without storage—solar gas turbine systems are expected to have a high potential for market introduction in the mid term view. In this paper the design and performance assessment of several prototype plants in the power levels of 1 MW, 5 MW and 15 MW are presented. Advanced software tools are used for design optimization and performance prediction of the solar tower gas turbine power plants. Detailed cost assumptions for the solarized gas turbine, the solar tower plant and further equipment as well as for operation and maintenance are presented. Intensive performance and economic analysis of the prototype plants for different locations and capacity factors are shown. The cost reduction potential through automation and remote operation is revealed.

Peter Schwarzbözl; Reiner Buck; Chemi Sugarmen; Arik Ring; Ma Jesús Marcos Crespo; Peter Altwegg; Juan Enrile

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle Dynamic Model: H2S Absorption/Stripping, Water?Gas Shift Reactors, and CO2 Absorption/Stripping  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle Dynamic Model: H2S Absorption/Stripping, Water?Gas Shift Reactors, and CO2 Absorption/Stripping ... Future chemical plants may be required to have much higher flexibility and agility than existing process facilities in order to be able to handle new hybrid combinations of power and chemical units. ...

Patrick J. Robinson; William L. Luyben

2010-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

304

Principles of Jet Propulsion and Gas Turbines  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... the presentation of the basic theory of jet propulsion and the thermodynamics of the gas-turbine and rocket types of engine. The layout follows a logical sequence, on the whole ... reader is treated to the now well-known thermodynamic analysis of the power-producing gas turbine cycle, which seems rather misplaced in a book dealing with jet propulsion. In his ...

S. J. MOYES

1949-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

305

Energy and Economic Analysis of the CO2 Capture from Flue Gas of Combined Cycle Power Plants  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Carbon capture and storage is considered as one of the key strategies for reducing the emissions of carbon dioxide from power generation facilities. Although post-combustion capture via chemical absorption is now a mature technology, the separation of CO2 from flue gases shows many issues, including the solvent degradation and the high regeneration energy requirement, that in turn reduces the power plant performances. Focusing on a triple pressure and reheat combined cycle with exhaust gas recirculation, this paper aims to evaluate the potential impacts of integrating a post-combustion capture system, based on an absorption process with monoethanolamine solvent. Energy and economic performances of the integrated system are evaluated varying the exhaust gas recirculation fraction and the CO2 capture ratio. The different configurations examined are then compared in terms of efficiency and rated capacity of the integrated system, as well as considering the cost of electricity generated and the cost of CO2 avoided.

Maura Vaccarelli; Roberto Carapellucci; Lorena Giordano

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Cost and Performance Baseline for Fossil Energy Plants; Volume 3c: Natural Gas Combined Cycle at Elevation  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Baseline for Fossil Energy Plants Volume 3c: Natural Gas Combined Cycle at Elevation March 2011 DOE/NETL-2010/1396 Disclaimer This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference therein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise does not necessarily constitute or imply its endorsement, recommendation, or favoring by the United States

307

DOE`s high performance power systems program: Development of advanced coal-fired combined-cycle systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Coal currently provides more than one third of the world`s electricity and more than one half of the US`s electricity. However, for coal to be the fuel of choice in the future, highly efficient, environmentally acceptable, and economically competitive, coal-fired power plants are needed. The US Department of Energy, Federal Energy Technology Center, under its High Performance Power Systems (HIPPS) Program, has two contracts in place, one with Foster Wheeler Development Corporation and one with United Technologies Research Center, to develop advanced power generation systems. Based on an indirectly fired cycle, HIPPS uses a combined cycle for power generation at efficiencies of 47--50% (HHV) with superior environmental performance (1/10 of New Source Performance Standards) and a lower cost-of-electricity (10% reduction relative to current coal-fired plants). HIPPS, scheduled to be ready for commercialization by the year 2005, could provide a solution to the anticipated worldwide demand for clean, efficient electricity generation. In this paper, the two HIPPS designs are reviewed and on-going research is discussed.

Ruth, L.; Plasynski, S.; Shaffer, F. [Dept. of Energy, Pittsburgh, PA (United States). Federal Energy Technology Center; Ramezan, M. [Burns and Roe Services Corp., Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

An assessment of solar-powered organic Rankine cycle systems for combined heating and power in UK domestic applications  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Performance calculations are presented for a small-scale combined solar heat and power (CSHP) system based on an Organic Rankine Cycle (ORC), in order to investigate the potential of this technology for the combined provision of heating and power for domestic use in the UK. The system consists of a solar collector array of total area equivalent to that available on the roof of a typical UK home, an ORC engine featuring a generalised positive-displacement expander and a water-cooled condenser, and a hot water storage cylinder. Preheated water from the condenser is sent to the domestic hot water cylinder, which can also receive an indirect heating contribution from the solar collector. Annual simulations of the system are performed. The electrical power output from concentrating parabolic-trough (PTC) and non-concentrating evacuated-tube (ETC) collectors of the same total array area are compared. A parametric analysis and a life-cycle cost analysis are also performed, and the annual performance of the system is evaluated according to the total electrical power output and cost per unit generating capacity. A best-case average electrical power output of 89 W (total of 776 kW h/year) plus a hot water provision capacity equivalent to ?80% of the total demand are demonstrated, for a whole system capital cost of Ł2700–Ł3900. Tracking \\{PTCs\\} are found to be very similar in performance to non-tracking \\{ETCs\\} with an average power output of 89 W (776 kW h/year) vs. 80 W (701 kW h/year).

James Freeman; Klaus Hellgardt; Christos N. Markides

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Turbine Burners: Flameholding in Accelerating Flow W. A. Sirignano1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Turbine Burners: Flameholding in Accelerating Flow W. A. Sirignano1 , D. Dunn-Rankin2 , F. Liu3 B, Irvine Abstract A review of turbine-burner research and some relevant background issues is presented. Previous work on thermal cycle analysis for augmentative combustion in the passages of the turbine

Liu, Feng

310

Chapter 9 - Hydraulic Turbines  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This chapter covers the following topics: Features of hydraulic turbines; Early history and development; Efficiency of various types of turbine; Size of the various turbine types; The Pelton wheel turbine and controlling its speed; Energy losses; Reaction turbines; The Francis and the Kaplan turbines; Calculation of performance; Effect of size on the performance of hydraulic turbines; Cavitation and its avoidance; Calculation of the various specific speeds of turbines; The Wells turbine- Design and performance variables; Tidal power turbines- The SeaGen tidal turbine and its operational principles.

S.L. Dixon; C.A. Hall

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Modelling and simulation of CO2 (carbon dioxide) bottoming cycles for offshore oil and gas installations at design and off-design conditions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Improved energy efficiency is an issue of increasing importance in offshore oil and gas installations. The power on offshore installations is generated by gas turbines operating in a simple cycle. There is an obvious possibility for heat recovery for further power generation from the exhaust heat. However, the limited space and weight available makes the inclusion of bottoming cycles challenging. Due to its high working pressure and thereby compact components CO2 (carbon dioxide) could be a viable solution, combining compactness and efficiency. An in-house simulation tool is used to evaluate the performance of CO2 bottoming cycles at design and off-design conditions. Both a simple recuperated single stage cycle and a more advanced dual stage system are modelled. Results from simulations show a potential for 10–11%-points increase in net plant efficiency at 100% gas turbine load. Also off-design simulations taking the variation in heat exchanger performance into account are performed showing that the bottoming cycle improves the off-design performance compared to the standard gas turbine solution. Even at 60% GT (gas turbine) load, the combined cycle with CO2 bottoming cycle can achieve up to 45% net plant efficiency, compared to 31% for only the gas turbine.

Harald Taxt Walnum; Petter Neksĺ; Lars O. Nord; Trond Andresen

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Systems Study for Improving Gas Turbine Performance for Coal/IGCC Application  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study identifies vital gas turbine (GT) parameters and quantifies their influence in meeting the DOE Turbine Program overall Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) plant goals of 50% net HHV efficiency, $1000/kW capital cost, and low emissions. The project analytically evaluates GE advanced F class air cooled technology level gas turbine conceptual cycle designs and determines their influence on IGCC plant level performance including impact of Carbon capture. This report summarizes the work accomplished in each of the following six Tasks. Task 1.0--Overall IGCC Plant Level Requirements Identification: Plant level requirements were identified, and compared with DOE's IGCC Goal of achieving 50% Net HHV Efficiency and $1000/KW by the Year 2008, through use of a Six Sigma Quality Functional Deployment (QFD) Tool. This analysis resulted in 7 GT System Level Parameters as the most significant. Task 2.0--Requirements Prioritization/Flow-Down to GT Subsystem Level: GT requirements were identified, analyzed and prioritized relative to achieving plant level goals, and compared with the flow down of power island goals through use of a Six Sigma QFD Tool. This analysis resulted in 11 GT Cycle Design Parameters being selected as the most significant. Task 3.0--IGCC Conceptual System Analysis: A Baseline IGCC Plant configuration was chosen, and an IGCC simulation analysis model was constructed, validated against published performance data and then optimized by including air extraction heat recovery and GE steam turbine model. Baseline IGCC based on GE 207FA+e gas turbine combined cycle has net HHV efficiency of 40.5% and net output nominally of 526 Megawatts at NOx emission level of 15 ppmvd{at}15% corrected O2. 18 advanced F technology GT cycle design options were developed to provide performance targets with increased output and/or efficiency with low NOx emissions. Task 4.0--Gas Turbine Cycle Options vs. Requirements Evaluation: Influence coefficients on 4 key IGCC plant level parameters (IGCC Net Efficiency, IGCC Net Output, GT Output, NOx Emissions) of 11 GT identified cycle parameters were determined. Results indicate that IGCC net efficiency HHV gains up to 2.8 pts (40.5% to 43.3%) and IGCC net output gains up to 35% are possible due to improvements in GT technology alone with single digit NOx emission levels. Task 5.0--Recommendations for GT Technical Improvements: A trade off analysis was conducted utilizing the performance results of 18 gas turbine (GT) conceptual designs, and three most promising GT candidates are recommended. A roadmap for turbine technology development is proposed for future coal based IGCC power plants. Task 6.0--Determine Carbon Capture Impact on IGCC Plant Level Performance: A gas turbine performance model for high Hydrogen fuel gas turbine was created and integrated to an IGCC system performance model, which also included newly created models for moisturized syngas, gas shift and CO2 removal subsystems. This performance model was analyzed for two gas turbine technology based subsystems each with two Carbon removal design options of 85% and 88% respectively. The results show larger IGCC performance penalty for gas turbine designs with higher firing temperature and higher Carbon removal.

Ashok K. Anand

2005-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

313

High temperature turbine engine structure  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A high temperature turbine engine includes a rotor portion having axially stacked adjacent ceramic rotor parts. A ceramic/ceramic joint structure transmits torque between the rotor parts while maintaining coaxial alignment and axially spaced mutually parallel relation thereof despite thermal and centrifugal cycling.

Boyd, Gary L. (Tempe, AZ)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Advanced Turbine Systems Program conceptual design and product development. Task 3.0, Selection of natural gas-fired Advanced Turbine System  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents results of Task 3 of the Westinghouse ATS Phase II program. Objective of Task 3 was to analyze and evaluate different cycles for the natural gas-fired Advanced Turbine Systems in order to select one that would achieve all ATS program goals. About 50 cycles (5 main types) were evaluated on basis of plant efficiency, emissions, cost of electricity, reliability-availability-maintainability (RAM), and program schedule requirements. The advanced combined cycle was selected for the ATS plant; it will incorporate an advanced gas turbine engine as well as improvements in the bottoming cycle and generator. Cost and RAM analyses were carried out on 6 selected cycle configurations and compared to the baseline plant. Issues critical to the Advanced Combined Cycle are discussed; achievement of plant efficiency and cost of electricity goals will require higher firing temperatures and minimized cooling of hot end components, necessitating new aloys/materials/coatings. Studies will be required in combustion, aerodynamic design, cooling design, leakage control, etc.

NONE

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

The gas turbine-modular helium reactor (GT-MHR), high efficiency, cost competitive, nuclear energy for the next century  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Gas Turbine-Modular Helium Reactor (GT-MHR) is the result of coupling the evolution of a small passively safe reactor with key technology developments in the US during the last decade: large industrial gas turbines, large active magnetic bearings, and compact, highly effective plate-fin heat exchangers. The GT-MHR is the only reactor concept which provides a step increase in economic performance combined with increased safety. This is accomplished through its unique utilization of the Brayton cycle to produce electricity directly with the high temperature helium primary coolant from the reactor directly driving the gas turbine electrical generator. This cannot be accomplished with another reactor concept. It retains the high levels of passive safety and the standardized modular design of the steam cycle MHTGR, while showing promise for a significant reduction in power generating costs by increasing plant net efficiency to a remarkable 47%.

Zgliczynski, J.B.; Silady, F.A.; Neylan, A.J.

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Siemens introduces 50 Hz 190 MW gas turbine  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

According to market data for high power gas turbines compiled by Erlangen, Germany-based Siemens KWU, referring to machines above 50 MW, market demand will average approximately 22 GW per year from now to 2005, of which roughly 15 GW will be for combined-cycle plants and nearly half (11 GW) will be placed in the intermediate capacity class (M Class). Looking at the Siemens line of advanced machines for 50 Hz grids; from the V64.3A rated 70 MW one jumps to the V94.3A rated 240 MW leaving a gap of 170 MW uncovered aside from the existing model V94.2 at 159 MW. This article describes the design and specifications of Siemens new 50 Hz 190 MW gas turbines that hope to cater to this gap. 2 refs.

Chellini, R.

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Dynamic stall occurrence on a horizontal axis wind turbine blade  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Surface pressure data from the National Renewable Energy Laboratory`s ``Combined Experiment`` were analyzed to provide a statistical representation of dynamic stall occurrence on a downwind horizontal axis wind turbine (HAWT). Over twenty thousand blade rotational cycles were each characterized at four span locations by the maximum leading edge suction pressure and by the azimuth, velocity, and yaw at which it occurred. Peak suction values at least twice that seen in static wind tunnel tests were taken to be indicative of dynamic stall. The occurrence of dynamic stall at all but the inboard station (30% span) shows good quantitative agreement with the theoretical limits on inflow velocity and yaw that should yield dynamic stall. Two hypotheses were developed to explain the discrepancy at 30% span. Estimates are also given for the frequency of dynamic stall occurrence on upwind turbines. Operational regimes were identified which minimize the occurrence of dynamic stall events.

Shipley, D.E.; Miller, M.S.; Robinson, M.C. [Colorado Univ., Boulder, CO (United States). Dept. of Aerospace Engineering Sciences

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Weight and power optimization of steam bottoming cycle for offshore oil and gas installations  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Offshore oil and gas installations are mostly powered by simple cycle gas turbines. To increase the efficiency, a steam bottoming cycle could be added to the gas turbine. One of the keys to the implementation of combined cycles on offshore oil and gas installations is for the steam cycle to have a low weight-to-power ratio. In this work, a detailed combined cycle model and numerical optimization tools were used to develop designs with minimum weight-to-power ratio. Within the work, single-objective optimization was first used to determine the solution with minimum weight-to-power ratio, then multi-objective optimization was applied to identify the Pareto frontier of solutions with maximum power and minimum weight. The optimized solution had process variables leading to a lower weight of the heat recovery steam generator while allowing for a larger steam turbine and condenser to achieve a higher steam cycle power output than the reference cycle. For the multi-objective optimization, the designs on the Pareto front with a weight-to-power ratio lower than in the reference cycle showed a high heat recovery steam generator gas-side pressure drop and a low condenser pressure.

Lars O. Nord; Emanuele Martelli; Olav Bolland

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

Filter system cost comparison for integrated gasification combined cycle and pressurized fluidized-bed combustion power systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To assess the relative cost of components and sub-systems for a hot gas particulate cleanup system a cost comparison between the filter systems for two advanced coal-based power plants was conducted. Assessing component and sub-system costs permits the most beneficial areas for product improvement to be identified. The results from this study are presented. The filter system is based on a Westinghouse Advanced Particulate Filter Concept which is designed to operate with ceramic candle filters. The Foster Wheeler second Generation 453 MWe (net) Pressurized Fluidized-Bed Combustor (PFBC) and the KRW 458 MWe (net) Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) power plants are used for the comparison. The comparison presents the general differences of the two power plants and the process related filtration conditions for PFBC and IGCC systems. The results present the conceptual designs for the PFBC and IGCC filter systems as well as a cost summary comparison. The cost summary comparison includes the total plant cost, the fixed operating and maintenance cost, the variable operating and maintenance cost and the effect on the cost of electricity for the two filter systems. The most beneficial areas for product improvement are identified.

Dennis, R.A.; McDaniel, H.M. [Dept. of Energy, Morgantown, WV (United States). Morgantown Energy Technology Center; Buchanan, T.; Chen, H.; Harbaugh, L.B.; Klett, M.; Zaharchuk, R. [Gilbert/Commonwealth, Reading, PA (United States)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

320

Investigation of the part-load performance of two 1. 12 MW regenerative marine gas turbines  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Regenerative and intercooled-regenerative gas turbine engines with low pressure ratio have significant efficiency advantages over traditional aero-derivative engines of higher pressure ratios, and can compete with modern diesel engines for marine propulsion. Their performance is extremely sensitive to thermodynamic-cycle parameter choices and the type of components. The performance of two 1.12 MW (1,500 hp) regenerative gas turbines are predicted with computer simulations. One engine has a single-shaft configuration, and the other has a gas-generator/power-turbine combination. The latter arrangement is essential for wide off-design operating regime. The performance of each engine driving fixed-pitch and controllable-pitch propellers, or an AC electric bus (for electric-motor-driven propellers) is investigated. For commercial applications the controllable-pitch propeller may have efficiency advantages (depending on engine type and shaft arrangements). For military applications the electric drive provides better operational flexibility.

Korakianitis, T.; Beier, K.J. (Washington Univ., St. Louis, MO (United States). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering)

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "turbine combined cycle" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Combined effects of short-term rainfall patterns and soil texture on nitrogen cycling -- A Modeling Analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Precipitation variability and magnitude are expected to change in many parts of the world over the 21st century. We examined the potential effects of intra-annual rainfall patterns on soil nitrogen (N) transport and transformation in the unsaturated soil zone using a deterministic dynamic modeling approach. The model (TOUGHREACT-N), which has been tested and applied in several experimental and observational systems, mechanistically accounts for microbial activity, soil-moisture dynamics that respond to precipitation variability, and gaseous and aqueous tracer transport in the soil. Here, we further tested and calibrated the model against data from a precipitation variability experiment in a tropical system in Costa Rica. The model was then used to simulate responses of soil moisture, microbial dynamics, nitrogen (N) aqueous and gaseous species, N leaching, and N trace-gas emissions to changes in rainfall patterns; the effect of soil texture was also examined. The temporal variability of nitrate leaching and NO, N{sub 2}, and N{sub 2}O effluxes were significantly influenced by rainfall dynamics. Soil texture combined with rainfall dynamics altered soil moisture dynamics, and consequently regulated soil N responses to precipitation changes. The clay loam soil more effectively buffered water stress during relatively long intervals between precipitation events, particularly after a large rainfall event. Subsequent soil N aqueous and gaseous losses showed either increases or decreases in response to increasing precipitation variability due to complex soil moisture dynamics. For a high rainfall scenario, high precipitation variability resulted in as high as 2.4-, 2.4-, 1.2-, and 13-fold increases in NH{sub 3}, NO, N{sub 2}O and NO{sub 3}{sup -} fluxes, respectively, in clay loam soil. In sandy loam soil, however, NO and N{sub 2}O fluxes decreased by 15% and 28%, respectively, in response to high precipitation variability. Our results demonstrate that soil N cycling responses to increasing precipitation variability depends on precipitation amount and soil texture, and that accurate prediction of future N cycling and gas effluxes requires models with relatively sophisticated representation of the relevant processes.

Gu, C.; Riley, W.J.

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

Cycle cover with short cycles Nicole Immorlica  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Introduction Given a graph and a subset of marked elements (nodes, edges, or some combination thereof), a cycleCycle cover with short cycles Nicole ImmorlicaÂŁ Mohammad MahdianÂŁ Vahab S. MirrokniÂŁ Abstract Cycle for variants of cycle covering problems which bound the size and/or length of the covering cycles

Immorlica, Nicole

323

Optimization of hybrid-water/air-cooled condenser in an enhanced turbine  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Optimization of hybrid-water/air-cooled condenser in an enhanced turbine Optimization of hybrid-water/air-cooled condenser in an enhanced turbine geothermal ORC system Geothermal Project Jump to: navigation, search Last modified on July 22, 2011. Project Title Optimization of hybrid-water/air-cooled condenser in an enhanced turbine geothermal ORC system Project Type / Topic 1 Recovery Act: Enhanced Geothermal Systems Component Research and Development/Analysis Project Type / Topic 2 Air-Cooling Project Description The technical approaches are: -UTRC shall develop a lab-based analysis of hybrid-water/air-cooled condensers with minimal water consumption, focusing on combined mist evaporative pre-cooling and mist deluge evaporative cooling technology applied to microchannel heat exchangers. Models to predict evaporative cooling performance will be validated by sub-scale testing. The predicted performance will be compared to that of state-of-the-art commercial evaporative coolers. -UTRC shall analyze the interaction of turbine design and cooling needs and specifically address how an enhanced turbine, which features variable nozzles and diffuser boundary layer suction, would further improve the ORC system performance and enable full utilization of the hybrid-cooled system. UTRC shall design, procure and test the enhanced turbine in an existing 200 kW geothermal ORC system for a technology demonstration. -UTRC shall complete a detailed design of the hybrid-cooled geothermal ORC system with an enhanced turbine that complies with its performance, cost, and quality requirements, and use this system design to prescribe subsystem/component technology requirements and interfaces. UTRC shall optimize UTC's PureCycle® geothermal ORC system integrated with a hybrid-water/air-cooled condenser and an enhanced turbine for net power output, efficiency and water consumption. -UTRC shall analyze the feasibility of addressing pure water supply for hybrid-water/aircooled condenser by using geothermal-driven Liquid-Gap-Membrane-Distillation (LGMD) technology, as an alternative to conventional Reverse Osmosis/De-Ionized treatment.

324

Parametric Optimization of Vapor Power and Cooling Cycle  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The proposed solar thermal based combined power and cooling cycle can be operated from low grade energy such as heat and well suited for domestic and industrial needs. The hybridization of vapour absorption refrigeration (VAR) and Kalina cycle system (KCS) results power in addition to cooling. The proposed plant has two turbines with super heater and reheater to recover more heat from the solar thermal collectors. The refrigerant vapour from the high pressure turbine is reheated for low pressure turbine which gives 9.3 kW of extra power. The total power and cooling are 14.05 kW and 73.58 kW respectively at 0.42 absorber concentration and 99% of turbine concentration and 150 °C of solar collector temperature. The invention also highlights the flexibility in the operation of system on only power mode or on only cooling mode. Thermodynamic analysis has been carried out with a focus on separator temperature and turbine concentration.

R. Shankar; T. Srinivas

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Advanced Turbine System (ATS): Task 1, System scoping and feasibility study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Present GT(Gas Turbine) Systems are available to achieve 52% (LHV) thermal efficiencies, plants in construction will be capable of 54%, and the goal of this study is to identify incentives, technical issues, and resource requirements to develop natural gas-and coal-compatible ATS which would have a goal of 60% or greater based on LHV. The prime objective of this project task is to select a natural gas-fired ATS (Advanced Turbine System) that could be manufactured and marketed should development costs not be at issue with the goals of: (1) Coal of electricity 10% below 1991 vintage power plants in same market class and size. (2) Expected performance 60% efficiency and higher, (3) Emission levels, NO[sub x] < 10 ppM (0.15 lb/MW-h), CO < 20 ppM (0.30 lb/MW-h), and UHC < 20 ppM (0.30 lb/MW-h). ABB screening studies have identified the gas-fueled combined cycle as the most promising full scale solution to achieve the set goals for 1988--2002. This conclusion is based on ABB's experience level, as well as the multi-step potential of the combined cycle process to improve in many component without introducing radical changes that might increase costs and lower RAM. The technical approach to achieve 60% or better thermal efficiency will include increased turbine inlet temperatures, compressor intercooling, as well a improvements in material, turbine cooling technology and the steam turbine. Use of improved component efficiencies will achieve gas-fired cycle performance of 61.78%. Conversion to coal-firing will result in system performance of 52.17%.

van der Linden, S.

1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Advanced Turbine System (ATS): Task 1, System scoping and feasibility study. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Present GT(Gas Turbine) Systems are available to achieve 52% (LHV) thermal efficiencies, plants in construction will be capable of 54%, and the goal of this study is to identify incentives, technical issues, and resource requirements to develop natural gas-and coal-compatible ATS which would have a goal of 60% or greater based on LHV. The prime objective of this project task is to select a natural gas-fired ATS (Advanced Turbine System) that could be manufactured and marketed should development costs not be at issue with the goals of: (1) Coal of electricity 10% below 1991 vintage power plants in same market class and size. (2) Expected performance 60% efficiency and higher, (3) Emission levels, NO{sub x} < 10 ppM (0.15 lb/MW-h), CO < 20 ppM (0.30 lb/MW-h), and UHC < 20 ppM (0.30 lb/MW-h). ABB screening studies have identified the gas-fueled combined cycle as the most promising full scale solution to achieve the set goals for 1988--2002. This conclusion is based on ABB`s experience level, as well as the multi-step potential of the combined cycle process to improve in many component without introducing radical changes that might increase costs and lower RAM. The technical approach to achieve 60% or better thermal efficiency will include increased turbine inlet temperatures, compressor intercooling, as well a improvements in material, turbine cooling technology and the steam turbine. Use of improved component efficiencies will achieve gas-fired cycle performance of 61.78%. Conversion to coal-firing will result in system performance of 52.17%.

van der Linden, S.

1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Life Cycle GHG Emissions from Conventional Natural Gas Power Generation: Systematic Review and Harmonization (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This research provides a systematic review and harmonization of the life cycle assessment (LCA) literature of electricity generated from conventionally produced natural gas. We focus on estimates of greenhouse gases (GHGs) emitted in the life cycle of electricity generation from conventionally produced natural gas in combustion turbines (NGCT) and combined-cycle (NGCC) systems. A process we term "harmonization" was employed to align several common system performance parameters and assumptions to better allow for cross-study comparisons, with the goal of clarifying central tendency and reducing variability in estimates of life cycle GHG emissions. This presentation summarizes preliminary results.

Heath, G.; O'Donoughue, P.; Whitaker, M.

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

Identification of airfoil characteristics for optimum wind turbine performance / b  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

combine to determine how much power output is obtained. Oi' specific interest in this study is the influence of airi'oil section characteristics on horizontal axis wind turbine (HAWT) performance. By identifying these characteristics, better selection... characteristics f' or HAWT airfoil design or selection. EFFECT OF AIRFOIL CHARACTERISTICS ON INTEGRATED TURBINE PERFORMANCE Wind Turbine Performance Com uter Pro ram An existing horizontal axis wind turbine (HAWT) performance computer program" was modified f...

Miller, Leonard Scott

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Steam Turbine Cogeneration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Steam turbines are widely used in most industrial facilities because steam is readily available and steam turbine is easy to operate and maintain. If designed properly, a steam turbine co-generation (producing heat and power simultaneously) system...

Quach, K.; Robb, A. G.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Energy 101: Wind Turbines  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

See how wind turbines generate clean electricity from the power of the wind. Highlighted are the various parts and mechanisms of a modern wind turbine.

None

2013-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

331

Energy 101: Wind Turbines  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

See how wind turbines generate clean electricity from the power of the wind. Highlighted are the various parts and mechanisms of a modern wind turbine.

None

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

Defining a Standard Metric for Electricity Savings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Existing coal = 1.0 Gas turbine Distillateoil Gas turbine Natural gas Combined cycle Distillate oilTable 1. (3) Steam turbine, gas turbine, and combined cycle

Koomey, Jonathan

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Wind turbine  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The improvement in a wind turbine comprises providing a tower with a freely liftable mount and adapting a nacelle which is fitted with a propeller windwheel consisting of a plurality of rotor blades and provided therein with means for conversion of wind energy to be shifted onto said mount attached to the tower. In case of a violent wind storm, the nacelle can be lowered down to the ground to protect the rotor blades from breakage due to the force of the wind. Required maintenance and inspection of the nacelle and replacement of rotor blades can be safely carried out on the ground.

Abe, M.

1982-01-19T23:59:59.000Z

334

Techno-economic modelling of integrated advanced power cycles  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Concerns regarding the environmental impacts of power generation have stimulated interest in energy efficient cycles such as the integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) and the integrated gasification humid air turbine (IGHAT) cycle. These advanced power cycles are complex owing to the large number of units involved, interactions among the units, and the presence of streams of diverse compositions and properties. In this paper, techno-economic computer models of IGCC and IGHAT cycles are presented along with some sample results that illustrate the models' capabilities. The models, which were validated using actual data, provide performance predictions, inventories of capital and operating costs, as well as levels of gaseous emissions and solid wastes. While the models are simple enough for use in parametric, sensitivity and optimisation studies, they are responsive to variations in coal characteristics, design and operating conditions, part load operations and financial parameters.

A.O. Ong'iro; V.I. Ugursal; A.M. Al Taweel

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

High pressure test results of a catalytic combustor for gas turbine  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Recently, the use of gas turbine systems, such as combined cycle and cogeneration systems, has gradually increased in the world. But even when a clean fuel such as LNG (liquefied natural gas) is used, thermal NO{sub x} is generated in the high temperature gas turbine combustion process. The NO{sub x} emission from gas turbines is controlled through selective catalytic reduction processes (SCR) in the Japanese electric industry. If catalytic combustion could be applied to the combustor of the gas turbine, it is expected to lower NO{sub x} emission more economically. Under such high temperature and high pressure conditions, as in the gas turbine, however, the durability of the catalyst is still insufficient. So it prevents the realization of a high temperature catalytic combustor. To overcome this difficulty, a catalytic combustor combined with premixed combustion for a 1,300 C class gas turbine was developed. In this method, catalyst temperature is kept below 1,000 C, and a lean premixed gas is injected into the catalytic combustion gas. As a result, the load on the catalyst is reduced and it is possible to prevent the catalyst deactivation. After a preliminary atmospheric test, the design of the combustion was modified and a high pressure combustion test was conducted. As a result, it was confirmed that NO{sub x} emission was below 10 ppm (at 16 percent O{sub 2}) at a combustor outlet gas temperature of 1,300 C and that the combustion efficiency was almost 100%. This paper presents the design features and test results of the combustor.

Fujii, T.; Ozawa, Y.; Kikumoto, S.; Sato, M. [Central Research Inst. of Electric Power Industry, Yokosuka, Kanagawa (Japan); Yuasa, Y.; Inoue, H. [Kansai Electric Power Co., Inc., Amagasaki, Hyogo (Japan)

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

turbine | OpenEI Community  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

turbine Home Future of Condition Monitoring for Wind Turbines Description: Research into third party software to aid in the development of better CMS in order to raise turbine...

337

Definition: Rankine cycle | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Rankine cycle Rankine cycle Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Rankine cycle Sometimes referred to as the steam cycle. Fuel is used to heat a liquid to produce a high pressure gas that expands and produces work, such as turning a turbine; when the turbine is connected to a generator, it produces electricity. Usually water is the liquid used in the Rankine cycle (to produce steam), but other liquids can also be used. The exhaust vapor expelled from the turbine condenses and the liquid is pumped back to the boiler to repeat the cycle.[1][2] View on Wikipedia Wikipedia Definition The Rankine cycle is a mathematical model that is used to predict the performance of steam engines. The Rankine cycle is an idealised thermodynamic cycle of a heat engine that converts heat into mechanical

338

Performance Assessment of a Recuperative Helium Gas Turbine System  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Helium is considered an ideal working fluid for closed cycle gas turbines powered by the heat of nuclear reactors or solar concentrators. Energetic and exergetic based thermodynamic analyses ... applied to an act...

Rami Salah El-Emam; Ibrahim Dincer

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Vertical axis wind turbine with continuous blade angle adjustment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The author presents a concept for a vertical axis wind turbine that utilizes each blade's entire rotational cycle for power generation. Each blade has its own vertical axis of rotation and is constrained to rotate at the ...

Weiss, Samuel Bruce

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

NEXT GENERATION GAS TURBINE SYSTEMS STUDY  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Under sponsorship of the U.S. Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory, Siemens Westinghouse Power Corporation has conducted a study of Next Generation Gas Turbine Systems that embraces the goals of the DOE's High Efficiency Engines and Turbines and Vision 21 programs. The Siemens Westinghouse Next Generation Gas Turbine (NGGT) Systems program was a 24-month study looking at the feasibility of a NGGT for the emerging deregulated distributed generation market. Initial efforts focused on a modular gas turbine using an innovative blend of proven technologies from the Siemens Westinghouse W501 series of gas turbines and new enabling technologies to serve a wide variety of applications. The flexibility to serve both 50-Hz and 60-Hz applications, use a wide range of fuels and be configured for peaking, intermediate and base load duty cycles was the ultimate goal. As the study progressed the emphasis shifted from a flexible gas turbine system of a specific size to a broader gas turbine technology focus. This shift in direction allowed for greater placement of technology among both the existing fleet and new engine designs, regardless of size, and will ultimately provide for greater public benefit. This report describes the study efforts and provides the resultant conclusions and recommendations for future technology development in collaboration with the DOE.

Benjamin C. Wiant; Ihor S. Diakunchak; Dennis A. Horazak; Harry T. Morehead

2003-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "turbine combined cycle" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Advanced Organic Vapor Cycles for Improving Thermal Conversion Efficiency in Renewable Energy Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

DL Chase and PT Kehoe, "GE Combined-Cycle Product Line andand W Stenze, "Combined Cycle Heat Recovery Optimization,"bottoming cycle FOR combined cycle power plants," Applied

Ho, Tony

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Foam Cleaning of Steam Turbines  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The efficiency and power output of a steam turbine can be dramatically reduced when deposits form on the turbine blades. Disassembly and mechanical cleaning of the turbine is very time consuming and costly. Deposits can be removed from the turbine...

Foster, C.; Curtis, G.; Horvath, J. W.

343

Vertical axis wind turbine  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Wind turbines are largely divided into vertical axis wind turbines and propeller (Horizontal axis) wind turbines. The present invention discloses a vertical axis high speed wind turbine provided with rotational speed control systems. This vertical axis wind turbine is formed by having blades of a proper airfoil fitted to respective supporting arms provided radially from a vertical rotating shaft by keeping the blade span-wise direction in parallel with the shaft and being provided with aerodynamic control elements operating manually or automatically to control the rotational speed of the turbine.

Kato, Y.; Seki, K.; Shimizu, Y.

1981-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

344

Hybrid Offshore Wind and Tidal Turbine Power System to Compensate for Fluctuation (HOTCF)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The hybrid system proposed in this study involves an offshore-wind turbine and a complementary tidal turbine that supplies grid power. The hybrid wind–tidal system consistently combines wind power and tidal power...

Mohammad Lutfur Rahman; Shunsuke Oka; Yasuyuki Shirai

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Comparison of AEO 2008 Natural Gas Price Forecast to NYMEX Futures Prices  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

typical of an advanced combined cycle gas turbine), the $comparison between a combined cycle gas turbine and a fixed-

Bolinger, Mark

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

Comparison of AEO 2007 Natural Gas Price Forecast to NYMEX Futures Prices  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

typical of an advanced combined cycle gas turbine), the $comparison between a combined cycle gas turbine and a fixed-

Bolinger, Mark; Wiser, Ryan

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

Comparison of AEO 2006 Natural Gas Price Forecast to NYMEX Futures Prices  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

comparison between a combined cycle gas turbine and a fixed-typical of an advanced combined cycle gas turbine), the $

Bolinger, Mark; Wiser, Ryan

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Study of Lean Premixed Methane Combustion with CO2 Dilution under Gas Turbine Conditions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In gas turbines, high air dilution is used in order to keep the turbine inlet temperature (TIT)(7) below the metallurgical temperature limit of the first turbine stages. ... It was shown that CO2 dilution could be an efficient method for increasing CO2 concentration in exhaust gas, thus making its capture easier. ... Efforts were focused on the impacts on cycle efficiency, combustion, gas turbine components, and cost. ...

Stéphanie de Persis; Gilles Cabot; Laure Pillier; Iskender Gökalp; Abdelakrim Mourad Boukhalfa

2012-12-29T23:59:59.000Z

349

NETL: Turbines - Research&Development  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

R & D R & D Turbines Research and Development NETL In-house R&D for Turbines The Combustion and Engine Dynamics Division within NETL's Office of Science and Technology provides skills, expertise, equipment, and facilities to conduct research and provides technical support for NETL product lines and programs in combustion science and technology and in the dynamics of prime movers or engines, such as gas turbines; fuel cells; internal combustion engines; or hybrid cycles that utilize fossil fuels, biomass, wastes, or other related fuel sources. Research is conducted with the primary goals of improving cycle efficiency, reducing capital cost, and improving environmental performance. Studies on supporting technologies, such as combustion instability, fuels versatility, and fluid and particle dynamics, are performed as well.

350

Novel Cell Design for Combined In Situ Acoustic Emission and X-ray Diffraction of Cycling Lithium Ion Batteries  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An in situ acoustic emission (AE) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) cell for use in the study of battery electrode materials has been devised and tested. This cell uses commercially available coin cell hardware retrofitted with a metalized polyethylene terephthalate (PET) disk which acts as both an X-ray window and a current collector. In this manner the use of beryllium and its associated cost and hazard is avoided. An AE sensor may be affixed to the cell face opposite the PET window in order to monitor degradation effects, such as particle fracture, during cell cycling. Silicon particles which were previously studied by the AE technique were tested in this cell as a model material. The performance of these cells compared well with unmodified coin cells while providing information about structural changes in the active material as the cell is repeatedly charged and discharged.

Rhodes, Kevin J [ORNL; Kirkham, Melanie J [ORNL; Meisner, Roberta Ann [ORNL; Parish, Chad M [ORNL; Dudney, Nancy J [ORNL; Daniel, Claus [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Novel cell design for combined in situ acoustic emission and x-ray diffraction study during electrochemical cycling of batteries  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An in situ acoustic emission (AE) and x-ray diffraction cell for use in the study of battery electrode materials has been designed and tested. This cell uses commercially available coin cell hardware retrofitted with a metalized polyethylene terephthalate (PET) disk, which acts as both an x-ray window and a current collector. In this manner, the use of beryllium and its associated cost and hazards is avoided. An AE sensor may be affixed to the cell face opposite the PET window in order to monitor degradation effects, such as particle fracture, during cell cycling. Silicon particles, which were previously studied by the AE technique, were tested in this cell as a model material. The performance of these cells compared well with unmodified coin cells, while providing information about structural changes in the active material as the cell is repeatedly charged and discharged.

Rhodes, Kevin; Meisner, Roberta; Daniel, Claus [Materials Science and Technology Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, 1 Bethel Valley Rd., MS 6083, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37931-6083 (United States); Materials Science and Engineering Department, University of Tennessee, 434 Dougherty Hall, Knoxville, Tennessee 37996-2200 (United States); Kirkham, Melanie; Parish, Chad M.; Dudney, Nancy [Materials Science and Technology Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, 1 Bethel Valley Rd., MS 6083, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37931-6083 (United States)

2011-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

352

Indirect-fired gas turbine bottomed with fuel cell  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An indirect-heated gas turbine cycle is bottomed with a fuel cell cycle with the heated air discharged from the gas turbine being directly utilized at the cathode of the fuel cell for the electricity-producing electrochemical reaction occurring within the fuel cell. The hot cathode recycle gases provide a substantial portion of the heat required for the indirect heating of the compressed air used in the gas turbine cycle. A separate combustor provides the balance of the heat needed for the indirect heating of the compressed air used in the gas turbine cycle. Hot gases from the fuel cell are used in the combustor to reduce both the fuel requirements of the combustor and the NOx emissions therefrom. Residual heat remaining in the air-heating gases after completing the heating thereof is used in a steam turbine cycle or in an absorption refrigeration cycle. Some of the hot gases from the cathode can be diverted from the air-heating function and used in the absorption refrigeration cycle or in the steam cycle for steam generating purposes.

Micheli, Paul L. (Morgantown, WV); Williams, Mark C. (Morgantown, WV); Parsons, Edward L. (Morgantown, WV)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Wind Turbines Benefit Crops  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Ames Laboratory associate scientist Gene Takle talks about research into the effect of wind turbines on nearby crops. Preliminary results show the turbines may have a positive effect by cooling and drying the crops and assisting with carbon dioxide uptake.

Takle, Gene

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Sliding vane geometry turbines  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Various systems and methods are described for a variable geometry turbine. In one example, a turbine nozzle comprises a central axis and a nozzle vane. The nozzle vane includes a stationary vane and a sliding vane. The sliding vane is positioned to slide in a direction substantially tangent to an inner circumference of the turbine nozzle and in contact with the stationary vane.

Sun, Harold Huimin; Zhang, Jizhong; Hu, Liangjun; Hanna, Dave R

2014-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

355

Wind Turbine Competition Introduction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Wind Turbine Competition Introduction: The Society of Hispanic Professional Engineers, SHPE at UTK, wishes to invite you to participate in our first `Wind Turbine' competition as part of Engineer's Week). You will be evaluated by how much power your wind turbine generates at the medium setting of our fan

Wang, Xiaorui "Ray"

356

Recent developments in gas turbine materials and technology and their implications for syngas firing  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Gas turbine combined-cycle systems burning natural gas represent a reliable and efficient power generation technology that is widely used. A critical factor in their development was the rapid adaptation of aero-engine technology (single crystal airfoils, sophisticated cooling techniques, and thermal barrier coatings) in order to operate at the high rotor-inlet temperatures required for high efficiency generation. Early reliability problems have been largely overcome, so that this type of power generation system is now considered to be a mature technology capable of achieving high levels of availability. Current interest in replacing natural gas with gas derived from coal (syngas or hydrogen) in these gas turbine systems focuses attention on implications for the critical turbine components. In this paper, the development requirements for materials for critical hot gas-path parts in large gas turbines burning coal-derived syngas fuels are briefly considered in the context of the state-of-the-art in materials for engines burning natural gas. It is shown that, despite some difficult design issues, many of the materials used in current engines will be applicable to units burning syngas. However, there is the potential that the durability of some components may be prejudiced because of differences in the combustion environment (especially in terms of water vapor content, and possibly sulfur compounds and particulates). Consequently, effort to develop improved coatings to resist erosion and also attack by S-containing compounds may be necessary.

I.G. Wright; T.B. Gibbons

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

NETL: Turbines - Oxy-Fuel Turbines  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Oxy-Fuel Turbines Oxy-Fuel Turbines Oxy-fuel combustion potentially can be used in plants based on both conventional and advanced technology. Studies have shown that plants equipped with oxy-fuel systems could reach nominal efficiencies in the 30 percent range with today's steam turbines when fueled with natural gas and when capturing the CO2. With anticipated advances in gasification, oxygen separation, and steam turbine technology, plants using oxy-fuel systems are expected to achieve efficiencies in the mid-40 percent range, with near-100 percent CO2 capture and near-zero NOx emissions. By 2012: In the near-term, efforts are focused on the development of oxy- fuel turbine and combustor technologies for highly efficient (50-60 percent), near-zero emissions, coal-based power systems

358

Theory and Performance of Tesla Turbines  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

can significantly increase turbine efficiency. Exploratorymodel indicate that turbine efficiencies exceeding 75% canand experimental turbine efficiencies. The CFD solutions of

Romanin, Vincent D.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

M. Bahrami ENSC 461 (S 11) Tutorial Rankine Cycle 1 ENSC 461 Tutorial, Week#10 -Rankine Cycle  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

on a simple ideal Rankine cycle with turbine inlet conditions of 5 MPa and 450C and a condenser pressure of 25, it is common to assume that the liquid at location 1 is saturated. Turbine inW 1 Pump 2 Qout Q Condenser Boiler the rate of work output (turbine 3 4), a control volume is constructed that encloses the steam

Bahrami, Majid

360

Vertical axis wind turbine  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Wind turbines are largely divided into vertical axis wind turbines and propeller (Horizontal axis) wind turbines. The present invention discloses a vertical axis high speed wind turbine provided with a starting and braking control system. This vertical axis wind turbine is formed by having blades of a proper airfoil fitted to respective supporting arms provided radially from a vertical rotary axis by keeping the blade span-wise direction in parallel with the axis and being provided with a low speed control windmill in which the radial position of each operating piece varies with a centrifugal force produced by the rotation of the vertical rotary axis.

Kato, Y.; Seki, K.; Shimizu, Y.

1981-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "turbine combined cycle" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Fuel cell–gas turbine hybrid system design part II: Dynamics and control  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Fuel cell gas turbine hybrid systems have achieved ultra-high efficiency and ultra-low emissions at small scales, but have yet to demonstrate effective dynamic responsiveness or base-load cost savings. Fuel cell systems and hybrid prototypes have not utilized controls to address thermal cycling during load following operation, and have thus been relegated to the less valuable base-load and peak shaving power market. Additionally, pressurized hybrid topping cycles have exhibited increased stall/surge characteristics particularly during off-design operation. This paper evaluates additional control actuators with simple control methods capable of mitigating spatial temperature variation and stall/surge risk during load following operation of hybrid fuel cell systems. The novel use of detailed, spatially resolved, physical fuel cell and turbine models in an integrated system simulation enables the development and evaluation of these additional control methods. It is shown that the hybrid system can achieve greater dynamic response over a larger operating envelope than either individual sub-system; the fuel cell or gas turbine. Results indicate that a combined feed-forward, P–I and cascade control strategy is capable of handling moderate perturbations and achieving a 2:1 (MCFC) or 4:1 (SOFC) turndown ratio while retaining >65% fuel-to-electricity efficiency, while maintaining an acceptable stack temperature profile and stall/surge margin.

Dustin McLarty; Jack Brouwer; Scott Samuelsen

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

ENERGY ANALYSIS PROGRAM FY-1979.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for Combus- tion Turbine-Steam Turbine Combined Cycle Powercycle system and a steam turbine design, respectively. The

Authors, Various

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

Humidification Processes in Gas Turbine Cycles.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??The global climate change caused by emissions of greenhouse gases from combustion processes has been recognized as a continuously growing problem and much research focuses… (more)

Thern, Marcus

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Fuel-Flexible Microturbine and Gasifier System for Combined Heat...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Flexible Microturbine and Gasifier System for Combined Heat and Power Fuel-Flexible Microturbine and Gasifier System for Combined Heat and Power Capstone Turbine Corporation, in...

365

Design of the ORC (organic Rankine cycle) condensation temperature with respect to the expander characteristics for domestic CHP (combined heat and power) applications  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Domestic CHP (combined heat and power) generation is one new application of the ORC (organic Rankine cycle). An environment temperature fluctuation of 40 °C through the year is common in many areas, where the consumer's demand on heat follows a seasonal cycle. In no demand periods the ORC shall work under lower condensation temperature for more efficient power generation. Off-design operation will be executed, accompanied with a degraded performance of the ORC components especially the expander. The design of the condensation temperature herein becomes crucial. It influences the ORC efficiency in both the CHP and SPG (solo power generation) modes. If the condensation temperature is designed simply based on the CHP mode, the power conversion in the SPG mode will suffer from low expander efficiency. An optimum design of the condensation temperature involves a compromise between the power outputs in the two modes. This paper aims to determine the optimum design condensation temperature for the ORC-CHP system. A new concept, namely the threshold condensation temperature, is introduced and found to be important to the design and operation strategies of the system. The results indicate that via a careful design of the condensation temperature, the annual power output can be increased by 50%.

Jing Li; Gang Pei; Jie Ji; Xiaoman Bai; Pengcheng Li; Lijun Xia

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

n-step cycle inequalities - Optimization Online  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

also introduced the so-called cycle inequalities (called 1-step cycle inequalities in this ...... combination of the cycle detection strategy of Tarjan [16] and the ...

2014-07-02T23:59:59.000Z

367

Wind Turbine Manufacturing Process Monitoring  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To develop a practical inline inspection that could be used in combination with automated composite material placement equipment to economically manufacture high performance and reliable carbon composite wind turbine blade spar caps. The approach technical feasibility and cost benefit will be assessed to provide a solid basis for further development and implementation in the wind turbine industry. The program is focused on the following technology development: (1) Develop in-line monitoring methods, using optical metrology and ultrasound inspection, and perform a demonstration in the lab. This includes development of the approach and performing appropriate demonstration in the lab; (2) Develop methods to predict composite strength reduction due to defects; and (3) Develop process models to predict defects from leading indicators found in the uncured composites.

Waseem Faidi; Chris Nafis; Shatil Sinha; Chandra Yerramalli; Anthony Waas; Suresh Advani; John Gangloff; Pavel Simacek

2012-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

368

Performance and market evaluation of the bladeless turbine  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The three-inch diameter prototype bladeless turbine was tested with air over a range of inlet pressures from 20 to 100 psia and speeds of 10, 20, 30 and 40 thousand rpm. The peak efficiency of 22.5 percent was recorded at a pressure of 98 psia and a speed of 40,000 rpm. Efficiency increased slightly with speed and inlet pressure over the range of test conditions. The test program was somewhat hindered by mechanical failures. The turbine bearings in particular were unreliable, with two instances of outright failure and numerous cases of erratic performance. A model of the bladeless turbine was developed to aid in interpreting the experimental results. A macroscopic approach, incorporating several favorable assumptions, was taken to place a reasonable upper bound on turbine efficiency. The model analytically examines the flow through the air inlet nozzles and the interaction between the fluid jet and the turbine blades. The analysis indicates that the maximum possible efficiency of a tangential flow turbine with straight axial blades is 50 percent. This is a direct consequence of turning the fluid only 90 degrees relative to the turbine blade. The adoption of the bladeless turbine as the expander in an Organic Rankine Cycle (ORC) will depend to a great extent on the efficiency of the turbine. The market potential for ORC technology will also impact the adoption of the bladeless turbine. Other expanders have demonstrated efficiencies of 60 to 80% in ORC systems. The Gamell turbine had a peak test efficiency of 22.5% and a maximum theoretical efficiency of 50%. Costs of the turbine are highly uncertain, relying to a great extent on cost reductions achieved through quantity production and through learning.

Garrett-Price, B.A.; Barnhart, J.S.; Eschbach, E.J.

1982-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

Wind turbine | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

turbine turbine Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Wind turbine: A machine that converts wind energy to mechanical energy; typically connected to a generator to produce electricity. Other definitions:Wikipedia Reegle Contents 1 Types of Wind Turbines 1.1 Vertical Axis Wind Turbines 1.2 Horizontal Axis Wind Turbines 2 Wind Turbine Sizes 3 Components of a Wind Turbine 4 References Types of Wind Turbines There are two basic wind turbine designs: those with a vertical axis (sometimes referred to as VAWTs) and those with a horizontal axis (sometimes referred to as HAWTs). There are several manufacturers of vertical axis turbines, but they have not penetrated the "utility scale" (100 kW capacity and larger) market to the same degree as horizontal axis turbines.[1]

370

Foundations for offshore wind turbines  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...T. Thompson Foundations for offshore wind turbines B. W. Byrne G. T...civil-engineering problems encountered for offshore wind turbines. A critical component...energy suppliers. Foundations|Offshore Wind Turbines|Renewable Energy...

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Utility advanced turbine systems (ATS) technology readiness testing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The overall objective of the Advanced Turbine System (ATS) Phase 3 Cooperative Agreement between GE and the US Department of Energy (DOE) is the development of a highly efficient, environmentally superior, and cost-competitive utility ATS for base-load utility-scale power generation, the GE 7H (60 Hz) combined cycle power system, and related 9H (50 Hz) common technology. The major effort will be expended on detail design. Validation of critical components and technologies will be performed, including: hot gas path component testing, sub-scale compressor testing, steam purity test trials, and rotational heat transfer confirmation testing. Processes will be developed to support the manufacture of the first system, which was to have been sited and operated in Phase 4 but will now be sited and operated commercially by GE. This change has resulted from DOE's request to GE for deletion of Phase 4 in favor of a restructured Phase 3 (as Phase 3R) to include full speed, no load (FSNL) testing of the 7H gas turbine. Technology enhancements that are not required for the first machine design but will be critical for future ATS advances in performance, reliability, and costs will be initiated. Long-term tests of materials to confirm design life predictions will continue. A schematic of the GE H machine is shown.

NONE

2000-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

372

Utility Advanced Turbine Systems (ATS) technology readiness testing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The overall objective of the Advanced Turbine System (ATS) Phase 3 Cooperative Agreement between GE and the US Department of Energy (DOE) is the development of the GE 7H and 9H combined cycle power systems. The major effort will be expended on detail design. Validation of critical components and technologies will be performed, including: hot gas path component testing, sub-scale compressor testing, steam purity test trials, and rotational heat transfer confirmation testing. Processes will be developed to support the manufacture of the first system, which was to have been sited and operated in Phase 4 but will now be sited and operated commercially by GE. This change has resulted horn DOE's request to GE for deletion of Phase 4 in favor of a restructured Phase 3 (as Phase 3R) to include fill speed, no load (FSNL) testing of the 7H gas turbine. Technology enhancements that are not required for the first machine design but will be critical for future ATS advances in performance, reliability, and costs will be initiated. Long-term tests of materials to confirm design life predictions will continue. A schematic of the GE H machine is shown.

NONE

1999-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

UTILITY ADVANCED TURBINE SYSTEMS (ATS) TECHNOLOGY READINESS TESTING  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The overall objective of the Advanced Turbine System (ATS) Phase 3 Cooperative Agreement between Ge and the US Department of Energy (DOE) is the development of the GE 7H and 9H combined cycle power systems. The major effort will be expended on detail design. Validation of critical components and technologies will be performed, including: hot gas path component testing, sub-scale compressor testing, steam purity test trials, and rotational heat transfer confirmation testing. Processes will be developed to support the manufacture of the first system, which was to have been sited and operated in Phase 4 but will now be sited and operated commercially be GE. This change has resulted from DOE's request to GE for deletion of Phase 4 in favor of a restructured Phase 3 (as Phase 3R) to include full speed, no load (FSNL) testing of the 7H gas turbine. Technology enhancements that are not required for the first machine design but will be critical for future ATS advances in performance, reliability, and costs will be initiated. Long-term tests of materials to confirm design life predictions will continue. A schematic of the GE H machine is shown. This report summarizes work accomplished from 4Q97 through 3Q98.

Unknown

1998-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Utility Advanced Turbine Systems (ATS) Technology Readiness Testing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The overall objective of the Advanced Turbine System (ATS) Phase 3 Cooperative Agreement between GE and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is the development of the GE 7H and 9H combined cycle power systems. The major effort will be expended on detail design. Validation of critical components and technologies will be performed, including: hot gas path component testing, sub-scale compressor testing, steam purity test trials, and rotational heat transfer confirmation testing. Processes will be developed to support the manufacture of the first system, which was to have been sited and operated in Phase 4 but will now be sited and operated commercially by GE. This change has resulted from DOE's request to GE for deletion of Phase 4 in favor of a restructured Phase 3 (as Phase 3R) to include full speed, no load (FSNL) testing of the 7H gas turbine. Technology enhancements that are not required for the first machine design but will be critical for future ATS advances in performance, reliability, and costs will be initiated. Long-term tests of materials to confirm design life predictions will continue. A schematic of the GE H machine is shown in Figure 1-1. This report summarizes work accomplished in 2Q98. The most significant accomplishments are listed in the report.

NONE

1998-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

375

Barstow Wind Turbine Project  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Presentation covers the Barstow Wind Turbine project for the Federal Utility Partnership Working Group (FUPWG) meeting, held on November 18-19, 2009.

376

Wind Turbine Tribology Seminar  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Wind turbine reliability issues are often linked to failures of contacting components, such as bearings, gears, and actuators. Therefore, special consideration to tribological design in wind...

377

Economical Condensing Turbines?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

an engineer decide when to conduct an in depth study of the economics either in the company or outside utilizing professional engineers who are experts in this type of project. Condensing steam turbines may not be economical when the fuel is purchased...Economical Condensing Turbines? by J.E.Dean, P.E. Steam turbines have long been used at utilities and in industry to generate power. There are three basic types of steam turbines: condensing, letdown 1 and extraction/condensing. ? Letdown...

Dean, J. E.

378

The Inside of a Wind Turbine | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

The Inside of a Wind Turbine The Inside of a Wind Turbine The Inside of a Wind Turbine 1 of 17 Tower: 2 of 17 Tower: Made from tubular steel (shown here), concrete, or steel lattice. Supports the structure of the turbine. Because wind speed increases with height, taller towers enable turbines to capture more energy and generate more electricity. Generator: 3 of 17 Generator: Produces 60-cycle AC electricity; it is usually an off-the-shelf induction generator. High-speed shaft: 4 of 17 High-speed shaft: Drives the generator. Nacelle: 5 of 17 Nacelle: Sits atop the tower and contains the gear box, low- and high-speed shafts, generator, controller, and brake. Some nacelles are large enough for a helicopter to land on. Wind vane: 6 of 17 Wind vane: Measures wind direction and communicates with the yaw drive to orient the

379

E-Print Network 3.0 - aero gas turbine Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

and analysis tool capable of analyzing floating platform concepts for offshore wind turbines. The new modeling... tool combines the computational methodologies used to analyze...

380

A Methodology for Estimating the Parameters of Steam Turbine Generator Shaft Systems for Subsynchronous Resonance Studies .  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??The increase of coal and nuclear power steam turbines over the past few decades combined with transmission line series capacitors creates a potential drawback known… (more)

Sambarapu, Krishna

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "turbine combined cycle" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Advanced turbine systems: Studies and conceptual design  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The ABB selection for the Advanced Turbine System (ATS) includes advanced developments especially in the hot gas path of the combustion turbine and new state-of-the-art units such as the steam turbine and the HRSG. The increase in efficiency by more than 10% multiplicative compared to current designs will be based on: (1) Turbine Inlet Temperature Increase; (2) New Cooling Techniques for Stationary and Rotating Parts; and New Materials. Present, projected component improvements that will be introduced with the above mentioned issues will yield improved CCSC turbine performance, which will drive the ATS selected gas-fired reference CC power plant to 6 % LHV or better. The decrease in emission levels requires a careful optimization of the cycle design, where cooling air consumption has to be minimized. All interfaces of the individual systems in the complete CC Plant need careful checks, especially to avoid unnecessary margins in the individual designs. This study is an important step pointing out the feasibility of the ATS program with realistic goals set by DOE, which, however, will present challenges for Phase II time schedule of 18 months. With the approach outlined in this study and close cooperation with DOE, ATS program success can be achieved to deliver low emissions and low cost of electricity by the year 2002. The ABB conceptual design and step approach will lead to early component demonstration which will help accelerate the overall program objectives.

van der Linden, S.; Gnaedig, G.; Kreitmeier, F.

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Clean Energy Technologies: A Preliminary Inventory of the Potential for Electricity Generation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Outline of 145 MW Combined Cycle Power Plant for KawasakiGas Firing Gas Turbine Combined Cycle Plant,” Journal ofgasifier/gas turbine combined cycle technology and its

Bailey, Owen; Worrell, Ernst

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

Diagnosing Unilateral Market Power in Electricity Reserves Market  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

15 combustion (CTNG), combined cycle (CCNG) and steam (STNG)interruptible load and combined cycle turbines scheduled byEPMI) combustion turbines combined cycle and Reliant (NES1)

Knittel, Christopher R; Metaxoglou, Konstantinos

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Strategies for Mitigating the Reduction in Economic Value of Variable Generation with Increasing Penetration Levels  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Puga. The importance of combined cycle generating plants inthe assumption that new combined cycle gas turbines (CCGTs)Ancillary services Combined cycle gas turbine Concentrating

Mills, Andrew

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Defining a Standard Metric for Electricity Savings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

an advanced natural gas combined cycle (typical for recentlyoil Gas turbine Natural gas Combined cycle Distillateoil Combined cycle Natural gas New plants Steam turbine,

Koomey, Jonathan

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

Steam Turbine Control Valve Noise  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Although noise problems with steam turbine control valves have existed before they have become more prominent with nuclear turbines whose valves range to 20 in. in diameter. Our first?generation nuclear control valves were unacceptably noisy when operating under chocked conditions. These noise levels have been ameliorated by incorporation of a valve cage with numerous small holes. Rational design rules for this “dispersive muffler” have been developed from published multiple?jet noise data and improved through our own tests. However we are also evaluating other low?noise valve configurations which are consistent with turbine requirements. The approach we are developing is to investigate the internal aerodynamic noisegeneration in small air model tests and to combine this with measurements of pipe?wall transmission characteristics (being reported separately) to predict externally radiated noise. These predictions will be checked in a new steam test facility for complete scale?model valves. The small air tests show that acoustic efficiencies of throttling valve flows tend to vary with third power of Mach number when exhausting into space and with a lesser power when enclosed in a downstream pipe. At some pressure ratios narrow?band spikes appear in the spectrum and for some configurations step changes in sound power are associated with transitions in flow regimes.

Frank J. Heymann; Michael A. Staiano

1973-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Low-pressure-ratio regenerative exhaust-heated gas turbine  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A design study of coal-burning gas-turbine engines using the exhaust-heated cycle and state-of-the-art components has been completed. In addition, some initial experiments on a type of rotary ceramic-matrix regenerator that would be used to transfer heat from the products of coal combustion in the hot turbine exhaust to the cool compressed air have been conducted. Highly favorable results have been obtained on all aspects on which definite conclusions could be drawn.

Tampe, L.A.; Frenkel, R.G.; Kowalick, D.J.; Nahatis, H.M.; Silverstein, S.M.; Wilson, D.G.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Dual-Axis Resonance Testing of Wind Turbine Blades  

Energy Innovation Portal (Marketing Summaries) [EERE]

Wind turbine blades must undergo strength and fatigue testing in order to be rated and marketed appropriately. Presently, wind turbine blades are fatigue-tested in the flapwise direction and in the edgewise direction independently. This testing involves placing the blades through 1 to 10 million or more load or fatigue cycles, which may take 3 to 12 months or more to complete for each tested direction. There is a need for blade testing techniques that are less expensive to use and require...

2014-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

389

Theory and tests of two-phase turbines  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Two-phase turbines open the possibility of new types of power cycles operating with extremely wet mixtures of steam and water, organic fluids, or immiscible liquids and gases. Possible applications are geothermal power, waste-heat recovery, refrigerant expansion, solar conversion, transportation turbine engines, and engine bottoming cycles. A theoretical model for two-phase impulse turbines was developed. Apparatus was constructed for testing one- and two-stage turbines (using speed decrease from stage to stage). Turbines were tested with water-and-nitrogen mixtures and Refrigerant 22. Nozzle efficiencies were 0.78 (measured) and 0.72 (theoretical) for water-and-nitrogen mixtures at a water/nitrogen mixture ratio of 68, by mass; and 0.89 (measured) and 0.84 (theoretical) for Refrigerant 22 expanding from 0.02 quality to 0.28 quality. Blade efficiencies (shaft power before windage and bearing loss divided by nozzle jet power) were 0.63 (measured) and 0.71 (theoretical) for water-and-nitrogen mixtures and 0.62 (measured) and 0.63 (theoretical) for Refrigerant 22 with a single-stage turbine, and 0.70 (measured) and 0.85 (theoretical) for water-and-nitrogen mixtures with a two-stage turbine.

Elliot, D.G.

1982-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

390

Life Cycle Regulation of Transportation Fuels: Uncertainty and its Policy Implications  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ethanol; NGCC = natural gas combined-cycle; BIGCC =gasification combined-cycle. P ART III U NCERTAINTY Aaverage, (ii) natural gas combined-cycle (NGCC), (iii) coal

Plevin, Richard Jay

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

The role of Life Cycle Assessment in identifying and reducing environmental impacts of CCS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) Power Plant.Analysis: Natural Gas Combined Cycle (NGCC) Power Plant.assessment of natural gas combined cycle power plant with

Sathre, Roger

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

Turbines and turbulence  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... Will wind turbines wreck the environment? Last month, the South China Morning Post published a news story ... dismissive official quoted probably has a point. There is no solid scientific evidence that wind turbines can trigger major changes in rainfall. And given Nature's conversations with atmospheric modellers ...

2010-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

393

Modern Gas Turbines  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... THE published information on gas turbines is both voluminous and widely dispersed, a considerable part of the technical literature of ... hands of students whose imagination has been fired by the rapid development of the gas turbine, and whose knowledge of thermodynamics may not be sufficient to detect such errors. There ...

E. G. STERLAND

1948-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

394

Shipbuilding: Cunard Turbines Examined  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... judge. It will be a great achievement if he can devise an assessment of the turbine troubles to satisfy all three parties. The Minister of Technology, Mr Anthony Wedgwood Benn ... Arnold to examine reports from all three companies on the faults which arose in the turbines during the recent trials of the QE2, and to assess the remedial measures that ...

1969-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

395

Single rotor turbine engine  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

There has been invented a turbine engine with a single rotor which cools the engine, functions as a radial compressor, pushes air through the engine to the ignition point, and acts as an axial turbine for powering the compressor. The invention engine is designed to use a simple scheme of conventional passage shapes to provide both a radial and axial flow pattern through the single rotor, thereby allowing the radial intake air flow to cool the turbine blades and turbine exhaust gases in an axial flow to be used for energy transfer. In an alternative embodiment, an electric generator is incorporated in the engine to specifically adapt the invention for power generation. Magnets are embedded in the exhaust face of the single rotor proximate to a ring of stationary magnetic cores with windings to provide for the generation of electricity. In this alternative embodiment, the turbine is a radial inflow turbine rather than an axial turbine as used in the first embodiment. Radial inflow passages of conventional design are interleaved with radial compressor passages to allow the intake air to cool the turbine blades.

Platts, David A. (Los Alamos, NM)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

turbine thermal index | netl.doe.gov  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

island efficiency and a 30 percent power increase above the hydrogen-fueled combined cycle baseline. Research projects utilize the extensive expertise and facilities readily...

397

Ceramic Cerami Turbine Nozzle  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A turbine nozzle vane assembly having a preestablished rate of thermal expansion is positioned in a gas turbine engine and being attached to conventional metallic components. The metallic components having a preestablished rate of thermal expansion being greater than the preestablished rate of thermal expansion of the turbine nozzle vane assembly. The turbine nozzle vane assembly includes an outer shroud and an inner shroud having a plurality of horizontally segmented vanes therebetween being positioned by a connecting member positioning segmented vanes in functional relationship one to another. The turbine nozzle vane assembly provides an economical, reliable and effective ceramic component having a preestablished rate of thermal expansion being greater than the preestablished rate of thermal expansion of the other component.

Boyd, Gary L. (Alpine, CA)

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

Ceramic turbine nozzle  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A turbine nozzle and shroud assembly having a preestablished rate of thermal expansion is positioned in a gas turbine engine and being attached to conventional metallic components. The metallic components have a preestablished rate of thermal expansion greater than the preestablished rate of thermal expansion of the turbine nozzle vane assembly. The turbine nozzle vane assembly includes a plurality of segmented vane defining a first vane segment and a second vane segment, each of the first and second vane segments having a vertical portion, and each of the first vane segments and the second vane segments being positioned in functional relationship one to another within a recess formed within an outer shroud and an inner shroud. The turbine nozzle and shroud assembly provides an economical, reliable and effective ceramic component having a preestablished rate of thermal expansion being less than the preestablished rate of thermal expansion of the other component. 4 figs.

Shaffer, J.E.; Norton, P.F.

1996-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

399

Ceramic turbine nozzle  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A turbine nozzle and shroud assembly having a preestablished rate of thermal expansion is positioned in a gas turbine engine and being attached to conventional metallic components. The metallic components having a preestablished rate of thermal expansion being greater than the preestablished rate of thermal expansion of the turbine nozzle vane assembly. The turbine nozzle vane assembly includes a plurality of segmented vane defining a first vane segment and a second vane segment. Each of the first and second vane segments having a vertical portion. Each of the first vane segments and the second vane segments being positioned in functional relationship one to another within a recess formed within an outer shroud and an inner shroud. The turbine nozzle and shroud assembly provides an economical, reliable and effective ceramic component having a preestablished rate of thermal expansion being less than the preestablished rate of thermal expansion of the other component.

Shaffer, James E. (Maitland, FL); Norton, Paul F. (San Diego, CA)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

The United States of America and the People`s Republic of China experts report on integrated gasification combined-cycle technology (IGCC)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A report written by the leading US and Chinese experts in Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) power plants, intended for high level decision makers, may greatly accelerate the development of an IGCC demonstration project in the People`s Republic of China (PRC). The potential market for IGCC systems in China and the competitiveness of IGCC technology with other clean coal options for China have been analyzed in the report. Such information will be useful not only to the Chinese government but also to US vendors and companies. The goal of this report is to analyze the energy supply structure of China, China`s energy and environmental protection demand, and the potential market in China in order to make a justified and reasonable assessment on feasibility of the transfer of US Clean Coal Technologies to China. The Expert Report was developed and written by the joint US/PRC IGCC experts and will be presented to the State Planning Commission (SPC) by the President of the CAS to ensure consideration of the importance of IGCC for future PRC power production.

NONE

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "turbine combined cycle" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Integrated low emissions cleanup system for coal fueled turbines Phase III bench-scale testing and evaluation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The United States Department of Energy, Morgantown Energy Research Center (DOE/METC), is sponsoring the development of coal-fired turbine technologies such as Pressurized Fluidized Bed Combustion (PFBC), coal Gasification Combined Cycles (GCC), and Direct Coal-Fired Turbines (DCFT). A major technical development challenge remaining for coal-fired turbine systems is high-temperature gas cleaning to meet environmental emissions standards, as well as to ensure acceptable turbine life. The Westinghouse Electric Corporation, Science & Technology Center, has evaluated an Integrated Low Emissions Cleanup (ILEC) concept that has been configured to meet this technical challenge. This ceramic hot gas filter (HGF), ILEC concept controls particulate emissions, while simultaneously contributing to the control of sulfur and alkali vapor contaminants in high-temperature, high-pressure, fuel gases or combustion gases. This document reports on the results of Phase III of the ILEC evaluation program, the final phase of the program. In Phase III, a bench-scale ILEC facility has been tested to (1) confirm the feasibility of the ILEC concept, and (2) to resolve some major filter cake behavior issues identified in PFBC, HGF applications.

Newby, R.A.; Alvin, M.A.; Bachovchin, D.M. [and others

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Marine gas turbine programs at AlliedSignal  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Work has been continuing at AlliedSignal Turbines, located in Phoenix, Arizona, U.S.A., on the integration of their gas turbine programs with those of Textron Lycoming since the merger of the Lycoming gas turbine operations into the AlliedSignal Turbines Group about a year and a half ago. Although much of the gas turbine business and development programs are aimed at the aircraft markets, the industrial and marine gas turbine product area is also receiving significant attention in this combined organization. Of particular importance is the marine market, where the TF40 marine gas turbine is a key element. The TF40 is based on a tested turbine core engine with over ten million hours of operating experience. The compact TF40 gas turbine offers one of the highest power-to-weight ratios in its class. With a length of 1422 mm and a weight of 600 kg without a gearbox, the TF40 can produce 3432 kW boost rating for yachts and military craft and 2984 kW at maximum continuous rating for fast ferries. This paper describes the specifications and variations of the different versions being offered by the company.

NONE

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Wind Turbine Blockset General Overview  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Wind Turbine Blockset in Saber General Overview and Description of the Models Florin Iov, Adrian Turbine Blockset in Saber Abstract. This report presents a new developed Saber Toolbox for wind turbine, optimize and design wind turbines". The report provides a quick overview of the Saber and then explains

404

Cooled snubber structure for turbine blades  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A turbine blade assembly in a turbine engine. The turbine blade assembly includes a turbine blade and a first snubber structure. The turbine blade includes an internal cooling passage containing cooling air. The first snubber structure extends outwardly from a sidewall of the turbine blade and includes a hollow interior portion that receives cooling air from the internal cooling passage of the turbine blade.

Mayer, Clinton A; Campbell, Christian X; Whalley, Andrew; Marra, John J

2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Preliminary Estimates of Combined Heat and Power Greenhouse Gas Abatement Potential for California in 2020  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

natural-gas- fired combined cycle generation, and the othernatural-gas-fired combined cycle plants. This assumptionplants were efficient combined cycle plants. The four

Firestone, Ryan; Ling, Frank; Marnay, Chris; Hamachi LaCommare, Kristina

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Composite turbine bucket assembly  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A composite turbine blade assembly includes a ceramic blade including an airfoil portion, a shank portion and an attachment portion; and a transition assembly adapted to attach the ceramic blade to a turbine disk or rotor, the transition assembly including first and second transition components clamped together, trapping said ceramic airfoil therebetween. Interior surfaces of the first and second transition portions are formed to mate with the shank portion and the attachment portion of the ceramic blade, and exterior surfaces of said first and second transition components are formed to include an attachment feature enabling the transition assembly to be attached to the turbine rotor or disk.

Liotta, Gary Charles; Garcia-Crespo, Andres

2014-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

407

Aviation turbine fuels, 1980  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Properties of some aviation turbine fuels marketed in the United States during 1980 are presented in this report. The samples represented are typical 1980 production and were analyzed in the laboratories of 17 manufacturers of aviation turbine (jet) fuels. The data were submitted for study, calculation, and compilation under a cooperative agreement between the Department of Energy (DOE), Bartlesville Energy Technology Center (BETC), Bartlesville, Oklahoma, and the American Petroleum Institute (API). Results for the properties of 98 samples of aviation turbine fuels are included in the report for military grades JP-4 and JP-5 and commercial type Jet A.

Shelton, E.M.

1981-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Aviation turbine fuels, 1982  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Properties of some aviation turbine fuels marketed in the United States during 1982 are presented in this report. The samples represented are typical 1982 production and were analyzed in the laboratories of 14 manufacturers of aviation turbine (jet) fuels. The data were submitted for study, calculation, and compilation under a cooperative agreement between the Department of Energy (DOE), Bartlesville Energy Technology Center (BETC), Bartlesville, Oklahoma, and the American Petroleum Institute (API). Results for the properties of 90 samples of aviation turbine fuels are included in the report for military grades JP-4 and HP-5, and commercial type Jet A.

Shelton, E.M.; Dickson, C.L.

1983-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Aviation turbine fuels, 1979  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Properties of some aviation turbine fuels marketed in the United States during 1979 are presented in this report. The samples represented are typical 1979 production and were analyzed in the laboratories of 17 manufacturers of aviation turbine (jet) fuels. The data were submitted for study, calculation, and compilation under a cooperative agreement between the Department of Energy (DOE), Bartlesville Energy Technology Center (BETC), Bartlesville, Oklahoma, and the American Petroleum Institute (API). Results for the properties of 93 samples of aviation turbine fuels are included in the report for military grades JP-4 and JP-5, and commercial type Jet A.

Shelton, E.M.

1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

Aviation turbine fuels, 1981  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Properties of some aviation turbine fuels marketed in the United States during 1981 are presented in this report. The samples represented are typical 1981 production and were analyzed in the laboratories of 15 manufacturers of aviation turbine (jet) fuels. The data were submitted for study, calculation, and compilation under a cooperative agreement between the Department of Energy (DOE), Bartlesville Energy Technology Center (BETC), Bartlesville, Oklahoma, and the American Petroleum Institute (API). Results for the properties of 95 samples of aviation turbine fuels are included in the report for military grades JP-4 and JP-5, and commercial type Jet A.

Shelton, E.M.

1982-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Gas turbine combustor transition  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method is described for converting a steam cooled transition to an air cooled transition in a gas turbine having a compressor in fluid communication with a combustor, a turbine section in fluid communication with the combustor, the transition disposed in a combustor shell and having a cooling circuit connecting a steam outlet and a steam inlet and wherein hot gas flows from the combustor through the transition and to the turbine section, includes forming an air outlet in the transition in fluid communication with the cooling circuit and providing for an air inlet in the transition in fluid communication with the cooling circuit. 7 figs.

Coslow, B.J.; Whidden, G.L.

1999-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

412

Performance prediction of micro-CHP systems using simple virtual operating cycles  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This paper presents a general methodology to roughly estimate in advance the actual performance of ?-CHP (micro Combined Heat and Power) systems in one year of operation, by means of limited information on the CHP prime mover efficiency and emission factors in selected set points and by means of a simplified prediction model of the operating cycle. The carried out analysis has been applied to several market-available and under development ?-CHP units of different technologies (Internal Combustion Engines, Micro Gas Turbines, Organic Rankine Cycles, Stirling, Thermo Photo Voltaic, Fuel Cell), operated under a hypothetical virtual operating cycle. The virtual cycle is obtained in this paper on the basis of the year thermal demand of a domestic user, assuming thermal load following of the CHP system. The methodology can be generalized to different applications and different management logics of the CHP system.

M. Bianchi; A. De Pascale; F. Melino; A. Peretto

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Howden Wind Turbines Ltd | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Howden Wind Turbines Ltd Jump to: navigation, search Name: Howden Wind Turbines Ltd Place: United Kingdom Sector: Wind energy Product: Howden was a manufacturer of wind turbines in...

414

Category:Wind turbine | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

turbine Jump to: navigation, search Pages in category "Wind turbine" This category contains only the following page. W Wind turbine Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgw...

415

GER 4194 - The 7FB: The Next Evolution of the F Gas Turbine  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

The 7FB: The 7FB: The Next Evolution of the F Gas Turbine Roberta Eldrid Lynda Kaufman Paul Marks GE Power Systems Schenectady, NY GER-4194 g Contents Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 Critical Issues in the F Evolution . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 Life-Cycle Economics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 The F Series Gas Turbine Experience . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Reliability and Availability . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4

416

NETL: Turbines - UTSR Projects  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

3 Aerodynamics and Heat Transfer Studies of Parameters Specific to the IGCC Requirements: High Mass Flow Endwall Contouring, Leading Edge Filleting and Blade Tip Ejection under Roating Turbine Condition Texas A&M University Meinhard Schobeiri 3 Aerodynamics and Heat Transfer Studies of Parameters Specific to the IGCC Requirements: High Mass Flow Endwall Contouring, Leading Edge Filleting and Blade Tip Ejection under Roating Turbine Condition Texas A&M University Meinhard Schobeiri Project Dates: 10/1/2009 - 9/30/2012 Area of Research: Aero/Heat Transfer Federal Project Manager: Robin Ames Project Objective: This project is advanced research designed to provide the gas turbine industry with a set of quantitative aerodynamic and film cooling effectiveness data essential to understanding the basic physics of complex secondary flows. This includes their influence on the efficiency and performance of gas turbines, and the impact that differing film cooling ejection arrangements have on suppressing the detrimental effect of these

417

NETL: Turbines Archive  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Archive Archive KEY: News News & Features Events Events Publications Publications Archive 09.26.2013 Publications The 2013 Hydrogen Turbine Program Portfolio has been posted to the Reference Shelf. 08.15.2013 News DOE Selects Ten Projects to Conduct Advanced Turbine Technology Research Ten university projects to conduct advanced turbine technology research under the Office of Fossil Energy's University Turbine Systems Research (UTSR) Program have been selected by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) for additional development. 07.15.2013 News NETL Innovations Recognized with R&D 100 Awards Two technologies advanced by the Office of Fossil Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) in collaboration with strategic partners have been recognized by R&D Magazine as among the 100 most technologically significant products introduced into the commercial marketplace within the past year.

418

NETL: Turbines - UTSR Projects  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

7 Simulating Particle Deposition and Mitigating Deposition Degradation Effects in Film Cooled Turbine Sections University of Texas 7 Simulating Particle Deposition and Mitigating Deposition Degradation Effects in Film Cooled Turbine Sections University of Texas David Bogard Project Dates: 8/1/2007 - 9/30/2010 Area of Research: Aero/Heat Transfer Federal Project Manager: Mark Freeman Project Objective: A major goal of this project is to determine a reliable methodology for simulating contaminant deposition in a low-speed wind tunnel facility where testing is considerably less costly. The project is aimed at developing new cooling designs for turbine components that will minimize the effect of the depositions of contaminant particles on turbine components and maintain good film cooling performance even when surface conditions deteriorate. Moreover, a methodology will be established that

419

Gas Turbine Emissions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Historically, preliminary design information regarding gas turbine emissions has been unreliable, particularly for facilities using steam injection and other forms of Best Available Control Technology (BACT). This was probably attributed to the lack...

Frederick, J. D.

420

Scale Models & Wind Turbines  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Scale Models and Wind Turbines Grades: 5-8, 9-12 Topics: Wind Energy Owner: Kidwind Project This educational material is brought to you by the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "turbine combined cycle" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Fixed Offshore Wind Turbines  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this chapter, a perspective of offshore wind farms, applied concepts for fixed offshore wind turbines, and related statistics are given. One example of a large wind farm, which is successfully operating, is st...

Madjid Karimirad

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

Wind Turbine Blade Design  

K-12 Energy Lesson Plans and Activities Web site (EERE)

Blade engineering and design is one of the most complicated and important aspects of modern wind turbine technology. Engineers strive to design blades that extract as much energy from the wind as possible throughout a range of wind speeds and gusts, yet are still durable, quiet and cheap. A variety of ideas for building turbines and teacher handouts are included in this document and at the Web site.

423

Definition: Brayton cycle | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

form form View source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Definition Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Definition: Brayton cycle Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Brayton cycle A thermodynamic cycle using constant pressure, heat addition and rejection. Fuel and a compressor are used to heat and increase the pressure of a gas; the gas expands and spins the blades of a turbine, which, when connected to a generator, generates electricity.[1][2] View on Wikipedia Wikipedia Definition The Brayton cycle is a thermodynamic cycle that describes the workings of a constant pressure heat engine. Gas turbine engines and airbreathing jet engines use the Brayton Cycle. Although the Brayton cycle

424

DOE/NREL Advanced Wind Turbine Development Program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The development of technologically advanced, high-efficiency wind turbines continues to be a high-priority activity of the US wind industry. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (formerly the Solar Energy Research Institute), sponsored by the US Department of Energy (DOE), has initiated the Advanced Wind Turbine Program to assist the wind industry in the development of a new class of advanced wind turbines. The initial phase of the program focused on developing conceptual designs for near-term and advanced turbines. The goal of the second phase of this program is to use the experience gained over the last decade of turbine design and operation combined with the latest existing design tools to develop a turbine that will produce energy at $0.05 per kilowatt-hour (kWh) in a 5.8-m/s (13-mph) wind site. Three contracts have been awarded, and two more are under negotiation in the second phase. The third phase of the program will use new innovations and state-of-the-art wind turbine design technology to produce a turbine that will generate energy at $0.04/kWh in a 5.8-m/s wind site. Details of the third phase will be announced in early 1993.

Butterfield, C.P.; Smith, B.; Laxson, A.; Thresher, B. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States)] [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States); Goldman, P. [USDOE Assistant Secretary for Conservation and Renewable Energy, Washington, DC (United States). Wind/Hydro/Ocean Technologies Div.] [USDOE Assistant Secretary for Conservation and Renewable Energy, Washington, DC (United States). Wind/Hydro/Ocean Technologies Div.

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

Reducing emissions by addressing steam turbine inefficiencies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper reports that inefficient steam turbines increase fossil plant emissions because additional fuel must be burned to meet the power output requirements. During a turbine outage, plant performance and maintenance staff make and prioritize repair decisions within tight time and budget constraints. This paper describes how Georgia Power identifies performance losses of degraded components in the steam path and determines their impact on heat rate. Turbine performance is assessed by a steam path audit program that Encotech has developed and make available to utilities. Georgia Power has conducted several operating tests that give good correlation with audit results. Georgia Power uses the audit information to make the most cost-effective repairs to maintain a low heat rate and to reduce emissions. The Clean Air Act presents electric utilities with the challenge of reducing emissions from fossil plants in the most cost-effective way possible. Meeting the stack emissions limitations often translates to large capital expenditures and increased cycle heat rate. One resource the electric utilities have to reduce the costly impact of compliance with the Clean Air Act is control over the efficiency of their steam turbines.

Harris, J.C. (Georgia Power Co., Atlanta, GA (United States)); Cioffi, D.H. (Encotech, Inc., Schenectady, NY (United States))

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

Techno-environmental assessment of marine gas turbines for the propulsion of merchant ships.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??This research study seeks to evaluate the techno-economic and environmental implications of a variety of aero-derivative marine gas turbine cycles that have been modelled for… (more)

Bonet, Mathias Usman

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

Combined experiment Phase 2 data characterization  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The National Renewable Energy Laboratory`s ``Combined Experiment`` has yielded a large quantity of experimental data on the operation of a downwind horizontal axis wind turbine under field conditions. To fully utilize this valuable resource and identify particular episodes of interest, a number of databases were created that characterize individual data events and rotational cycles over a wide range of parameters. Each of the 59 five-minute data episodes collected during Phase 11 of the Combined Experiment have been characterized by the mean, minimum, maximum, and standard deviation of all data channels, except the blade surface pressures. Inflow condition, aerodynamic force coefficient, and minimum leading edge pressure coefficient databases have also been established, characterizing each of nearly 21,000 blade rotational cycles. In addition, a number of tools have been developed for searching these databases for particular episodes of interest. Due to their extensive size, only a portion of the episode characterization databases are included in an appendix, and examples of the cycle characterization databases are given. The search tools are discussed and the FORTRAN or C code for each is included in appendices.

Miller, M.S.; Shipley, D.E.; Young, T.S.; Robinson, M.C.; Luttges, M.W. [Colorado Univ., Boulder, CO (United States); Simms, D.A. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States)

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

Distributed Wind Turbines | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Distributed Wind Turbines Distributed Wind Turbines Addthis 1 of 11 Three 100 kilowatt (kW) wind turbines in Bisaccia, Italy. Last year, U.S. small wind turbines were exported to...

429

Heavy duty gas turbines in LCV applications: 25 years of experience and R and D  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

For a number of reasons, Low Calorific Value (LCV) gases are expected to play an increasing part on the future power generation scene, especially within large gas turbine combined cycle (CCGT) schemes. The group of LCV gases is largely represented worldwide as it includes products as diverse as: Weak Natural Gases (WNG) containing inert (N2, CO{sub 2}) fraction as high as 70%; coal/steel industry by-products: coke oven gas (COG) and blast furnace gas (BFG); biogases obtained by controlled, anaerobic fermentation of organic wastes (household, farm) or biomass; gasification products of solid fuels (gas deriving from coal, lignite or residual oil); substitute natural gas (SNG) obtained by treatment/reforming of primary gasification products. Historically, process by-products (COG, BFG) were the first fuels to be successfully burnt in turbines and were used by the main gas turbine manufacturers to devise their LCV combustion technology. Therefore, such fuels are worthy of interest from both a technical and economic standpoint. However, for reasons tied to energy strategy considerations, gasification products nowadays represent the most promising members of the LCV gas family, likely to give rise to large, efficient and low-emission power plants. This paper offers a comprehensive review of the company R and D and experience relating to the combustion of LCV gas fuels in heavy duty gas turbines, starting from the first COG-combustion installation (HBL, France, 1972) to the latest R and D program results, devoted to the heavy duty machine segment and including the successful, coal-gasification plant at Vresova (SUV, Czech Republic, 1996) based on two Frame 9E machines which have accumulated over 25,000 operation hours. As for the current R and D programs, which demonstrate the active involvement of the company in the LCV activity, the paper places particular emphasis on the development of the Frame 6B combustor for the ABGC program.

Pourchot, T.; Moliere, M.

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

Sensor placement algorithm development to maximize the efficiency of acid gas removal unit for integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power plant with CO{sub 2} capture  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Future integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power plants with CO{sub 2} capture will face stricter operational and environmental constraints. Accurate values of relevant states/outputs/disturbances are needed to satisfy these constraints and to maximize the operational efficiency. Unfortunately, a number of these process variables cannot be measured while a number of them can be measured, but have low precision, reliability, or signal-to-noise ratio. In this work, a sensor placement (SP) algorithm is developed for optimal selection of sensor location, number, and type that can maximize the plant efficiency and result in a desired precision of the relevant measured/unmeasured states. In this work, an SP algorithm is developed for an selective, dual-stage Selexol-based acid gas removal (AGR) unit for an IGCC plant with pre-combustion CO{sub 2} capture. A comprehensive nonlinear dynamic model of the AGR unit is developed in Aspen Plus Dynamics® (APD) and used to generate a linear state-space model that is used in the SP algorithm. The SP algorithm is developed with the assumption that an optimal Kalman filter will be implemented in the plant for state and disturbance estimation. The algorithm is developed assuming steady-state Kalman filtering and steady-state operation of the plant. The control system is considered to operate based on the estimated states and thereby, captures the effects of the SP algorithm on the overall plant efficiency. The optimization problem is solved by Genetic Algorithm (GA) considering both linear and nonlinear equality and inequality constraints. Due to the very large number of candidate sets available for sensor placement and because of the long time that it takes to solve the constrained optimization problem that includes more than 1000 states, solution of this problem is computationally expensive. For reducing the computation time, parallel computing is performed using the Distributed Computing Server (DCS®) and the Parallel Computing® toolbox from Mathworks®. In this presentation, we will share our experience in setting up parallel computing using GA in the MATLAB® environment and present the overall approach for achieving higher computational efficiency in this framework.

Paul, P.; Bhattacharyya, D.; Turton, R.; Zitney, S.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

Hydraulic Turbines: Types and Operational Aspects  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The turbine is considered to be the heart of ... , the proper selection and operation of the turbine is very important.

Prof. Dr.-Ing Hermann-Josef Wagner…

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

Efficient steam turbines produced by the “Ural Turbine Plant” company  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Design features and efficiency of some steam turbines produced at present by a plant formed as a result of division of the “Turbine Motor Plant” Company into several enterprises are...

G. D. Barinberg; A. E. Valamin

433

Bottom steam turbines of the Ural Turbine Works  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Basic design features, thermal schemes, and economic indicators of some bottom turbines that have been developed, as well as ... that have partially been manufactured at the Ural Turbine Works, are presented.

G. D. Barinberg; A. E. Valamin; Yu. A. Sakhnin

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

Trigeneration scheme for energy efficiency enhancement in a natural gas processing plant through turbine exhaust gas waste heat utilization  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The performance of Natural Gas Processing Plants (NGPPs) can be enhanced with the integration of Combined Cooling, Heating and Power (CCHP) generation schemes. This paper analyzes the integration of a trigeneration scheme within a NGPP, that utilizes waste heat from gas turbine exhaust gases to generate process steam in a Waste Heat Recovery Steam Generator (WHRSG). Part of the steam generated is used to power double-effect water–lithium bromide (H2O–LiBr) absorption chillers that provide gas turbine compressor inlet air-cooling. Another portion of the steam is utilized to meet part furnace heating load, and supplement plant electrical power in a combined regenerative Rankine cycle. A detailed techno-economic analysis of scheme performance is presented based on thermodynamic predictions obtained using Engineering Equation Solver (EES). The results indicate that the trigeneration system could recover 79.7 MW of gas turbine waste heat, 37.1 MW of which could be utilized by three steam-fired H2O–LiBr absorption chillers to provide 45 MW of cooling at 5 °C. This could save approximately 9 MW of electric energy required by a typical compression chiller, while providing the same amount of cooling. In addition, the combined cycle generates 22.6 MW of additional electrical energy for the plant, while process heating reduces furnace oil consumption by 0.23 MSCM per annum. Overall, the trigeneration scheme would result in annual natural gas fuel savings of approximately 1879 MSCM, and annual operating cost savings of approximately US$ 20.9 million, with a payback period of 1 year. This study highlights the significant economical and environmental benefits that could be achieved through implementation of the proposed integrated cogeneration scheme in NGPPs, particularly in elevated ambient temperature and humidity conditions such as encountered in Middle East facilities.

Sahil Popli; Peter Rodgers; Valerie Eveloy

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

Utility Advanced Turbine Systems Program (ATS) Technical Readiness Testing and Pre-Commercial Demonstration  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of the ATS program is to develop ultra-high efficiency, environmentally superior and cost competitive gas turbine systems for base load application in utility, independent power producer and industrial markets. Specific performance targets have been set using natural gas as the primary fuel: {lg_bullet} System efficiency that will exceed 60%(lower heating value basis) on natural gas for large scale utility turbine systems; for industrial applications, systems that will result in a 15% improvement in heat rate compared to currently available gas turbine systems. {lg_bullet} An environmentally superior system that will not require the use of post combustion emissions controls under full load operating conditions. {lg_bullet} Busbar energy costs that are 10% less than current state-of-the-art turbine systems, while meeting the same environmental requirements. {lg_bullet} Fuel-flexible designs that will operate on natural gas but are capable of being adapted to operate on coal-derived or biomass fuels. {lg_bullet} Reliability-Availability-Maintainability (RAM) that is equivalent to the current turbine systems. {lg_bullet} Water consumption minimized to levels consistent with cost and efficiency goals. {lg_bullet} Commercial systems that will enter the market in the year 2000. In Phase I of the ATS program, Siemens Westinghouse found that efficiency significantly increases when the traditional combined-cycle power plant is reconfigured with closed-loop steam cooling of the hot gas path. Phase II activities involved the development of a 318MW natural gas fired turbine conceptual design with the flexibility to burn coal-derived and biomass fuels. Phases I and II of the ATS program have been completed. Phase III, the current phase, completes the research and development activities and develops hardware specifications from the Phase II conceptual design. This report summarizes Phase III Extension activities for a three-month period. Additional details may be found in monthly technical progress reports covering the period stated on the cover of this report. Background information regarding the work to be completed in Phase III may be found in the revised proposal submitted in response to A Request for Extension of DE-FC21-95MC32267, dated May 29, 1998 and the Continuing Applications of DE-FC21-95MC32267, dated March 31, 1999 and November 19, 1999.

Siemens Westinghouse

2001-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

436

Experience with organic Rankine cycles in heat recovery power plants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Over the last 30 years, organic Rankine cycles (ORC) have been increasingly employed to produce power from various heat sources when other alternatives were either technically not feasible or economical. These power plants have logged a total of over 100 million turbine hours of experience demonstrating the maturity and field proven technology of the ORC cycle. The cycle is well adapted to low to moderate temperature heat sources such as waste heat from industrial plants and is widely used to recover energy from geothermal resources. The above cycle technology is well established and applicable to heat recovery of medium size gas turbines and offers significant advantages over conventional steam bottoming cycles.

Bronicki, L.Y.; Elovic, A.; Rettger, P.

1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

Turbine tip clearance loss mechanisms  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Three-dimensional numerical simulations (RANS and URANS) were used to assess the impact of two specific design features, and of aspects of the actual turbine environment, on turbine blade tip loss. The calculations were ...

Mazur, Steven (Steven Andrew)

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

Turbine nozzle attachment system  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A nozzle guide vane assembly having a preestablished rate of thermal expansion is positioned in a gas turbine engine and is attached to conventional metallic components. The nozzle guide vane assembly includes a pair of legs extending radially outwardly from an outer shroud and a pair of mounting legs extending radially inwardly from an inner shroud. Each of the pair of legs and mounting legs have a pair of holes therein. A plurality of members attached to the gas turbine engine have a plurality of bores therein which axially align with corresponding ones of the pair of holes in the legs. A plurality of pins are positioned within the corresponding holes and bores radially positioning the nozzle guide vane assembly about a central axis of the gas turbine engine. 3 figs.

Norton, P.F.; Shaffer, J.E.

1995-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

439

Gas turbine noise control  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The use of gas turbine powered generators and pumping stations are likely to increase over the next two decades. Alternative fuel systems utilizing fluidized coal beds are likely in the near future and direct combustion of pulverized coal is also a possibility. The primary problem of generally unacceptable noise levels from gas turbine powered equipment affects both community noise and hearing conservation alike. The noise criteria of such plant remain a significant design factor. The paper looks at the technical and historical aspects associated with the noise generation process and examines past present and possible future approaches to the problem of silencing gas turbine units; adequately specifying the acoustical criteria and ratings; evaluates the techniques by which these criteria should be measured; and correlates these with the typical results achieved in the field.

Louis A. Challis and Associates Pty. Ltd.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

Model Predictive Control Wind Turbines  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Model Predictive Control of Wind Turbines Martin Klauco Kongens Lyngby 2012 IMM-MSc-2012-65 #12;Summary Wind turbines are the biggest part of the green energy industry. Increasing interest control strategies. Control strategy has a significant impact on the wind turbine operation on many levels

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "turbine combined cycle" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

UTILITY ADVANCED TURBINE SYSTEMS (ATS) TECHNOLOGY READINESS TESTING  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The overall objective of the Advanced Turbine System (ATS) Phase 3 Cooperative Agreement between GE and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is the development of a highly efficient, environmentally superior, and cost-competitive utility ATS for base-load utility-scale power generation, the GE 7H (60 Hz) combined cycle power system, and related 9H (50 Hz) common technology. The major effort will be expended on detail design. Validation of critical components and technologies will be performed, including: hot gas path component testing, sub-scale compressor testing, steam purity test trials, and rotational heat transfer confirmation testing. Processes will be developed to support the manufacture of the first system, which was to have been sited and operated in Phase 4 but will now be sited and operated commercially by GE. This change has resulted from DOE's request to GE for deletion of Phase 4 in favor of a restructured Phase 3 (as Phase 3R) to include full speed, no load (FSNL) testing of the 7H gas turbine. Technology enhancements that are not required for the first machine design but will be critical for future ATS advances in performance, reliability, and costs will be initiated. Long-term tests of materials to confirm design life predictions will continue. A schematic of the GE H machine is shown in Figure 1-1. Information specifically related to 9H production is presented for continuity in H program reporting, but lies outside the ATS program. This report summarizes work accomplished from 4Q98 through 3Q99. The most significant accomplishments are listed.

Unknown

1999-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

UTILITY ADVANCED TURBINE SYSTEMS (ATS) TECHNOLOGY READINESS TESTING  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The overall objective of the Advanced Turbine System (ATS) Phase 3 Cooperative Agreement between GE and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is the development of the GE 7H and 9H combined cycle power systems. The major effort will be expended on detail design. Validation of critical components and technologies will be performed, including: hot gas path component testing, sub-scale compressor testing, steam purity test trials, and rotational heat transfer conflation testing. Processes will be developed to support the manufacture of the first system, which was to have been sited and operated in Phase 4 but will now be sited and operated commercially by GE. This change has resulted from DOE's request to GE for deletion of Phase 4 in favor of a restructured Phase 3 (as Phase 3R) to include full speed, no load (FSNL) testing of the 7H gas turbine. Technology enhancements that are not required for the first machine design but will be critical for future ATS advances in performance, reliability, and costs will be initiated. Long-term tests of materials to confirm design life predictions will continue. The objective of this task is to design 7H and 9H compressor rotor and stator structures with the goal of achieving high efficiency at lower cost and greater durability by applying proven GE Power Systems (GEPS) heavy-duty use design practices. The designs will be based on the GE Aircraft Engines (GEAE) CF6-80C2 compressor. Transient and steady-state thermo-mechanical stress analyses will be run to ensure compliance with GEPS life standards. Drawings will be prepared for forgings, castings, machining, and instrumentation for full speed, no load (FSNL) tests of the first unit on both 9H and 7H applications.

Unknown

1999-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

Ceramic gas turbine shroud  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An example gas turbine engine shroud includes a first annular ceramic wall having an inner side for resisting high temperature turbine engine gasses and an outer side with a plurality of radial slots. A second annular metallic wall is positioned radially outwardly of and enclosing the first annular ceramic wall and has a plurality of tabs in communication with the slot of the first annular ceramic wall. The tabs of the second annular metallic wall and slots of the first annular ceramic wall are in communication such that the first annular ceramic wall and second annular metallic wall are affixed.

Shi, Jun; Green, Kevin E.

2014-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

444

Vertical axis wind turbines  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A vertical axis wind turbine is described. The wind turbine can include a top ring, a middle ring and a lower ring, wherein a plurality of vertical airfoils are disposed between the rings. For example, three vertical airfoils can be attached between the upper ring and the middle ring. In addition, three more vertical airfoils can be attached between the lower ring and the middle ring. When wind contacts the vertically arranged airfoils the rings begin to spin. By connecting the rings to a center pole which spins an alternator, electricity can be generated from wind.

Krivcov, Vladimir (Miass, RU); Krivospitski, Vladimir (Miass, RU); Maksimov, Vasili (Miass, RU); Halstead, Richard (Rohnert Park, CA); Grahov, Jurij (Miass, RU)

2011-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

445

Multiple piece turbine airfoil  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A turbine airfoil, such as a rotor blade or a stator vane, for a gas turbine engine, the airfoil formed as a shell and spar construction with a plurality of dog bone struts each mounted within openings formed within the shell and spar to allow for relative motion between the spar and shell in the airfoil chordwise direction while also forming a seal between adjacent cooling channels. The struts provide the seal as well as prevent bulging of the shell from the spar due to the cooling air pressure.

Kimmel, Keith D (Jupiter, FL); Wilson, Jr., Jack W. (Palm Beach Gardens, FL)

2010-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

446

Velocity pump reaction turbine  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An expanding hydraulic/two-phase velocity pump reaction turbine including a dual concentric rotor configuration with an inter-rotor annular flow channel in which the inner rotor is mechanically driven by the outer rotor. In another embodiment, the inner rotor is immobilized and provided with gas recovery ports on its outer surface by means of which gas in solution may be recovered. This velocity pump reaction turbine configuration is capable of potential energy conversion efficiencies of up to 70%, and is particularly suited for geothermal applications.

House, Palmer A. (Walnut Creek, CA)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

Velocity pump reaction turbine  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An expanding hydraulic/two-phase velocity pump reaction turbine including a dual concentric rotor configuration with an inter-rotor annular flow channel in which the inner rotor is mechanically driven by the outer rotor. In another embodiment, the inner rotor is immobilized and provided with gas recovery ports on its outer surface by means of which gas in solution may be recovered. This velocity pump reaction turbine configuration is capable of potential energy conversion efficiencies of up to 70%, and is particularly suited for geothermal applications.

House, Palmer A. (Walnut Creek, CA)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

Turbine airfoil to shround attachment  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A turbine airfoil (31) with an end portion (42) that tapers (44) toward the end (43) of the airfoil. A ridge (46) extends around the end portion. It has proximal (66) and distal (67) sides. A shroud platform (50) is bi-cast onto the end portion around the ridge without bonding. Cooling shrinks the platform into compression (62) on the end portion (42) of the airfoil. Gaps between the airfoil and platform are formed using a fugitive material (56) in the bi-casting stage. These gaps are designed in combination with the taper angle (44) to accommodate differential thermal expansion while maintaining a gas seal along the contact surfaces. The taper angle (44) may vary from lesser on the pressure side (36) to greater on the suction side (38) of the airfoil. A collar portion (52) of the platform provides sufficient contact area for connection stability.

Campbell, Christian X; Morrison, Jay A; James, Allister W; Snider, Raymond G; Eshak, Daniel M; Marra, John J; Wessell, Brian J

2014-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

449

Partial Oxidation Gas Turbine for Power and Hydrogen Co-Production from Coal-Derived Fuel in Industrial Applications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The report presents a feasibility study of a new type of gas turbine. A partial oxidation gas turbine (POGT) shows potential for really high efficiency power generation and ultra low emissions. There are two main features that distinguish a POGT from a conventional gas turbine. These are associated with the design arrangement and the thermodynamic processes used in operation. A primary design difference of the POGT is utilization of a non?catalytic partial oxidation reactor (POR) in place of a conventional combustor. Another important distinction is that a much smaller compressor is required, one that typically supplies less than half of the air flow required in a conventional gas turbine. From an operational and thermodynamic point of view a key distinguishing feature is that the working fluid, fuel gas provided by the OR, has a much higher specific heat than lean combustion products and more energy per unit mass of fluid can be extracted by the POGT expander than in the conventional systems. The POGT exhaust stream contains unreacted fuel that can be combusted in different bottoming ycle or used as syngas for hydrogen or other chemicals production. POGT studies include feasibility design for conversion a conventional turbine to POGT duty, and system analyses of POGT based units for production of power solely, and combined production of power and yngas/hydrogen for different applications. Retrofit design study was completed for three engines, SGT 800, SGT 400, and SGT 100, and includes: replacing the combustor with the POR, compressor downsizing for about 50% design flow rate, generator replacement with 60 90% ower output increase, and overall unit integration, and extensive testing. POGT performances for four turbines with power output up to 350 MW in POGT mode were calculated. With a POGT as the topping cycle for power generation systems, the power output from the POGT ould be increased up to 90% compared to conventional engine keeping hot section temperatures, pressures, and volumetric flows practically identical. In POGT mode, the turbine specific power (turbine net power per lb mass flow from expander exhaust) is twice the value of the onventional turbine. POGT based IGCC plant conceptual design was developed and major components have been identified. Fuel flexible fluid bed gasifier, and novel POGT unit are the key components of the 100 MW IGCC plant for co producing electricity, hydrogen and/or yngas. Plant performances were calculated for bituminous coal and oxygen blown versions. Various POGT based, natural gas fueled systems for production of electricity only, coproduction of electricity and hydrogen, and co production of electricity and syngas for gas to liquid and hemical processes were developed and evaluated. Performance calculations for several versions of these systems were conducted. 64.6 % LHV efficiency for fuel to electricity in combined cycle was achieved. Such a high efficiency arise from using of syngas from POGT exhaust s a fuel that can provide required temperature level for superheated steam generation in HRSG, as well as combustion air preheating. Studies of POGT materials and combustion instabilities in POR were conducted and results reported. Preliminary market assessment was performed, and recommendations for POGT systems applications in oil industry were defined. POGT technology is ready to proceed to the engineering prototype stage, which is recommended.

Joseph Rabovitser

2009-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

450

Simulation of an Industrial Rankine Cycle Cogeneration Plant  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and transient loads and the resulting interactions between system components may be assessed. A thermal energy system simulation code is utilized and expanded to predict the performance of an industrial Rankine cycle (steam turbine) cogeneration plant having...

Carattie, G.; Wepfer, W. J.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

Turbine Inflow Characterization at the National Wind Technology Center  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Utility-scale wind turbines operate in dynamic flows that can vary significantly over timescales from less than a second to several years. To better understand the inflow to utility-scale turbines, two inflow towers were installed and commissioned at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's (NREL) National Wind Technology Center near Boulder, Colorado, in 2011. These towers are 135 m tall and instrumented with a combination of sonic anemometers, cup anemometers, wind vanes, and temperature measurements to characterize the inflow wind speed and direction, turbulence, stability and thermal stratification to two utility-scale turbines. Herein, we present variations in mean and turbulent wind parameters with height, atmospheric stability, and as a function of wind direction that could be important for turbine operation as well as persistence of turbine wakes. Wind speed, turbulence intensity, and dissipation are all factors that affect turbine performance. Our results show that these all vary with height across the rotor disk, demonstrating the importance of measuring atmospheric conditions that influence wind turbine performance at multiple heights in the rotor disk, rather than relying on extrapolation from lower levels.

Clifton, A.; Schreck, S.; Scott, G.; Kelley, N.; Lundquist, J. K.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

452

Modeling and control of an open accumulator Compressed Air Energy Storage (CAES) system for wind turbines  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This paper presents the modeling and control for a novel Compressed Air Energy Storage (CAES) system for wind turbines. The system captures excess power prior to electricity generation so that electrical components can be downsized for demand instead of supply. Energy is stored in a high pressure dual chamber liquid-compressed air storage vessel. It takes advantage of the power density of hydraulics and the energy density of pneumatics in the “open accumulator” architecture. A liquid piston air compressor/expander is utilized to achieve near-isothermal compression/expansion for efficient operation. A cycle-average approach is used to model the dynamics of each component in the combined wind turbine and storage system. Standard torque control is used to capture the maximum power from wind through a hydraulic pump attached to the turbine rotor in the nacelle. To achieve both accumulator pressure regulation and generator power tracking, a nonlinear controller is designed based on an energy based Lyapunov function. The nonlinear controller is then modified to distribute the control effort between the hydraulic and pneumatic elements based on their bandwidth capabilities. As a result, liquid piston air compressor/expander will loosely maintain the accumulator pressure ratio, while the down-tower hydraulic pump/motor precisely tracks the desired generator power. This control scheme also allows the accumulator to function as a damper for the storage system by absorbing power disturbances from the hydraulic path generated by the wind gusts. A set of simulation case studies demonstrate the operation of the combined system when the nonlinear controller is utilized and illustrates how this system can be used for load leveling, downsizing electrical system and maximizing revenues.

Mohsen Saadat; Farzad A. Shirazi; Perry Y. Li

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

453

Wind Turbine Basics | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Turbine Basics Turbine Basics Wind Turbine Basics July 30, 2013 - 2:58pm Addthis Energy 101: Wind Turbines Basics This video explains the basics of how wind turbines operate to produce clean power from an abundant, renewable resource-the wind. Text Version Wind turbine assembly Although all wind turbines operate on similar principles, several varieties are in use today. These include horizontal axis turbines and vertical axis turbines. Horizontal Axis Turbines Horizontal axis turbines are the most common turbine configuration used today. They consist of a tall tower, atop which sits a fan-like rotor that faces into or away from the wind, a generator, a controller, and other components. Most horizontal axis turbines built today are two- or three-bladed. Horizontal axis turbines sit high atop towers to take advantage of the

454

Wind Turbine Basics | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Wind Turbine Basics Wind Turbine Basics Wind Turbine Basics July 30, 2013 - 2:58pm Addthis Energy 101: Wind Turbines Basics This video explains the basics of how wind turbines operate to produce clean power from an abundant, renewable resource-the wind. Text Version Wind turbine assembly Although all wind turbines operate on similar principles, several varieties are in use today. These include horizontal axis turbines and vertical axis turbines. Horizontal Axis Turbines Horizontal axis turbines are the most common turbine configuration used today. They consist of a tall tower, atop which sits a fan-like rotor that faces into or away from the wind, a generator, a controller, and other components. Most horizontal axis turbines built today are two- or three-bladed. Horizontal axis turbines sit high atop towers to take advantage of the

455

Some problems of steam turbine lifetime assessment and extension  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The problems of lifetime assessment and extension in reference to power equipment (including high-temperature rotors and casings of power steam turbines) and theoretical and normative grounds for these procedures, as well as some specific measures to prolong the turbine service time and diagnose the turbine components` conditions in the operation process, were covered in many published works, including the authors` ones. The present paper is to consider in more details some aspects of these problems that have not been sufficiently considered in known publications. In particular, it seems important to dwell on experimental verification of some mathematical models for calculating temperatures, stresses, and strains in the turbine casings on the basis of direct measurements at turbines in service. Another item to be discussed ia an approach to choosing the system of interrelated criteria and safety factors referring to the upper admissible values of stresses, strains, cycles, and accumulated damage, as well as crack resistance, as applied to an adopted conception of the limiting states for the rotors and casings with taking into consideration their loads and resulted stress-strain states. In this connection, it is important to arrange and use properly the continuous monitoring of temperatures, stresses, and accumulated metal damage to assess the residual lifetime of the rotors and casings more accurately. Certain design, technology, and repair measures are briefly described. They have successfully been employed at fossil power plants of the former Soviet Union to raise the steam turbine reliability and durability.

Berlyand, V.; Pozhidaev, A.; Glyadya, A. [Kharkov Central Designers Bureau (Ukraine); Plotkin, E.; Avrutsky, G. [All-Russia Thermal Engineering Research Inst., Moscow (Russian Federation); Leyzerovich, A. [Actinium Corp., Mountain View, CA (United States)

1999-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

High-pressure turbine deposition in land-based gas turbines from various synfuels  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Ash deposits from four candidate power turbine synfuels were studied in an accelerated deposition test facility. The facility matches the gas temperature and velocity of modern first-stage high-pressure turbine vanes. A natural gas combustor was seeded with finely ground fuel ash particulate from four different fuels: straw, sawdust, coal, and petroleum coke. The entrained ash particles were accelerated to a combustor exit flow Mach number of 0.31 before impinging on a thermal barrier coating (TBC) target coupon at 1150{sup o}C. Postexposure analyses included surface topography, scanning electron microscopy and x-ray spectroscopy. Due to significant differences in the chemical composition of the various fuel ash samples, deposit thickness and structure vary considerably for fuel. Biomass products (e.g., sawdust and straw) are significantly less prone to deposition than coal and petcoke for the same particle loading conditions. In a test simulating one turbine operating year at a moderate particulate loading of 0.02 parts per million by weight, deposit thickness from coal and petcoke ash exceeded 1 and 2 mm, respectively. These large deposits from coal and petcoke were found to detach readily from the turbine material with thermal cycling and handling. The smaller biomass deposit samples showed greater tenacity, in adhering to the TBC surface. In all cases, corrosive elements (e.g., Na, K, V, Cl, S) were found to penetrate the TBC layer during the accelerated deposition test. Implications for the power generation goal of fuel flexibility are discussed.

Bons, J.P.; Crosby, J.; Wammack, J.E.; Bentley, B.I.; Fletcher, T.H. [Brigham Young University, Provo, UT (United States). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering

2007-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

457

Energy Conversion Advanced Heat Transport Loop and Power Cycle  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Department of Energy and the Idaho National Laboratory are developing a Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) to serve as a demonstration of state-of-the-art nuclear technology. The purpose of the demonstration is two fold 1) efficient low cost energy generation and 2) hydrogen production. Although a next generation plant could be developed as a single-purpose facility, early designs are expected to be dual-purpose. While hydrogen production and advanced energy cycles are still in its early stages of development, research towards coupling a high temperature reactor, electrical generation and hydrogen production is under way. Many aspects of the NGNP must be researched and developed in order to make recommendations on the final design of the plant. Parameters such as working conditions, cycle components, working fluids, and power conversion unit configurations must be understood. Three configurations of the power conversion unit were demonstrated in this study. A three-shaft design with 3 turbines and 4 compressors, a combined cycle with a Brayton top cycle and a Rankine bottoming cycle, and a reheated cycle with 3 stages of reheat were investigated. An intermediate heat transport loop for transporting process heat to a High Temperature Steam Electrolysis (HTSE) hydrogen production plant was used. Helium, CO2, and an 80% nitrogen, 20% helium mixture (by weight) were studied to determine the best working fluid in terms cycle efficiency and development cost. In each of these configurations the relative component size were estimated for the different working fluids. The relative size of the turbomachinery was measured by comparing the power input/output of the component. For heat exchangers the volume was computed and compared. Parametric studies away from the baseline values of the three-shaft and combined cycles were performed to determine the effect of varying conditions in the cycle. This gives some insight into the sensitivity of these cycles to various operating conditions as well as trade offs between efficiency and capital cost. Prametric studies were carried out on reactor outlet temperature, mass flow, pressure, and turbine cooling. Recommendations on the optimal working fluid for each configuration were made. A steady state model comparison was made with a Closed Brayton Cycle (CBC) power conversion system developed at Sandia National Laboratory (SNL). A preliminary model of the CBC was developed in HYSYS for comparison. Temperature and pressure ratio curves for the Capstone turbine and compressor developed at SNL were implemented into the HYSYS model. A comparison between the HYSYS model and SNL loop demonstrated power output predicted by HYSYS was much larger than that in the experiment. This was due to a lack of a model for the electrical alternator which was used to measure the power from the SNL loop. Further comparisons of the HYSYS model and the CBC data are recommended. Engineering analyses were performed for several configurations of the intermediate heat transport loop that transfers heat from the nuclear reactor to the hydrogen production plant. The analyses evaluated parallel and concentric piping arrangements and two different working fluids, including helium and a liquid salt. The thermal-hydraulic analyses determined the size and insulation requirements for the hot and cold leg pipes in the different configurations. Economic analyses were performed to estimate the cost of the va

Oh, C. H.

2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

458

Wind turbine reliability : understanding and minimizing wind turbine operation and maintenance costs.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Wind turbine system reliability is a critical factor in the success of a wind energy project. Poor reliability directly affects both the project's revenue stream through increased operation and maintenance (O&M) costs and reduced availability to generate power due to turbine downtime. Indirectly, the acceptance of wind-generated power by the financial and developer communities as a viable enterprise is influenced by the risk associated with the capital equipment reliability; increased risk, or at least the perception of increased risk, is generally accompanied by increased financing fees or interest rates. Cost of energy (COE) is a key project evaluation metric, both in commercial applications and in the U.S. federal wind energy program. To reflect this commercial reality, the wind energy research community has adopted COE as a decision-making and technology evaluation metric. The COE metric accounts for the effects of reliability through levelized replacement cost and unscheduled maintenance cost parameters. However, unlike the other cost contributors, such as initial capital investment and scheduled maintenance and operating expenses, costs associated with component failures are necessarily speculative. They are based on assumptions about the reliability of components that in many cases have not been operated for a complete life cycle. Due to the logistical and practical difficulty of replacing major components in a wind turbine, unanticipated failures (especially serial failures) can have a large impact on the economics of a project. The uncertainty associated with long-term component reliability has direct bearing on the confidence level associated with COE projections. In addition, wind turbine technology is evolving. New materials and designs are being incorporated in contemporary wind turbines with the ultimate goal of reducing weight, controlling loads, and improving energy capture. While the goal of these innovations is reduction in the COE, there is a potential impact on reliability whenever new technologies are introduced. While some of these innovations may ultimately improve reliability, in the short term, the technology risks and the perception of risk will increase. The COE metric used by researchers to evaluate technologies does not address this issue. This paper outlines the issues relevant to wind turbine reliability for wind turbine power generation projects. The first sections describe the current state of the industry, identify the cost elements associated with wind farm O&M and availability and discuss the causes of uncertainty in estimating wind turbine component reliability. The latter sections discuss the means for reducing O&M costs and propose O&M related research and development efforts that could be pursued by the wind energy research community to reduce COE.

Not Available

2004-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

459

Three-dimensional Numerical Analysis on Blade Response of Vertical Axis Tidal Current Turbine Under Operational Condition  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Tidal power as a large-scale renewable source of energy has been receiving significant attention recently because of its advantages over the wind and other renewal energy sources. The technology used to harvest energy from tidal current is called a tidal current turbine. Though some of the principles of wind turbine design are applicable to tidal current turbines, the design of latter ones need additional considerations like cavitation damage, corrosion etc. for the long-term reliability of such turbines. Depending up on the orientation of axis, tidal current turbines can be classified as vertical axis turbines or horizontal axis turbines. Existing studies on the vertical axis tidal current turbine focus more on the hydrodynamic aspects of the turbine rather than the structural aspects. This paper summarizes our recent efforts to study the integrated hydrodynamic and structural aspects of the vertical axis tidal current turbines. After reviewing existing methods in modeling tidal current turbines, we developed a hybrid approach that combines discrete vortex method -finite element method that can simulate the integrated hydrodynamic and structural response of a vertical axis turbine. This hybrid method was initially employed to analyze a typical