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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "turbine blade manufacturer" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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1

Wooden wind turbine blade manufacturing process  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A wooden wind turbine blade is formed by laminating wood veneer in a compression mold having the exact curvature needed for one side of the blade, following which the other side of the blade is ground flat along its length but twisted with respect to the blade axis.

Coleman, Clint (Warren, VT)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

Wooden wind turbine blade manufacturing process  

SciTech Connect

A laminated wooden rotor blade is described having a flatbottomed air foil, comprising a two-sided tapered laminate composed of compression bonded parallel layers of wood having a convex side in a predetermined contour to which all of the layers of wood are approximately parallel over the entire length of the blade and a flat twisted side, the surface of which at any point along the length of the blade is rectilinear in cross section but of varying orientation along the length of the blade according to a predetermined twist schedule, the flat side cutting across the laminae of the blade to reveal the parallel edges thereof.

Coleman, C.

1986-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

Manufacturing Defects Common to Composite Wind Turbine Blades: Effects of Defects  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Manufacturing Defects Common to Composite Wind Turbine Blades: Effects of Defects Jared W. Nelson The Blade Reliability Collaborative has been formed to perform comprehensive studies to improve wind turbine uni-directional wind turbine fiber-reinforced composite material with an epoxy resin were utilized

4

Improving the manufacturing yield of investment cast turbine blades through robust design  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The manufacturing of turbine blades is often outsourced to investment casting foundries by aerospace companies that design and build jet engines. Aerospace companies have found that casting defects are an important cost ...

Margetts, David (David Lawrence)

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

Wind turbine composite blade manufacturing : the need for understanding defect origins, prevalence, implications and reliability.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Renewable energy is an important element in the US strategy for mitigating our dependence on non-domestic oil. Wind energy has emerged as a viable and commercially successful renewable energy source. This is the impetus for the 20% wind energy by 2030 initiative in the US. Furthermore, wind energy is important on to enable a global economy. This is the impetus for such rapid, recent growth. Wind turbine blades are a major structural element of a wind turbine blade. Wind turbine blades have near aerospace quality demands at commodity prices; often two orders of magnitude less cost than a comparable aerospace structure. Blade failures are currently as the second most critical concern for wind turbine reliability. Early blade failures typically occur at manufacturing defects. There is a need to understand how to quantify, disposition, and mitigate manufacturing defects to protect the current wind turbine fleet, and for the future. This report is an overview of the needs, approaches, and strategies for addressing the effect of defects in wind turbine blades. The overall goal is to provide the wind turbine industry with a hierarchical procedure for addressing blade manufacturing defects relative to wind turbine reliability.

Cairns, Douglas S. (Montana State University, Bozeman, MT); Riddle, Trey (Montana State University, Bozeman, MT); Nelson, Jared (Montana State University, Bozeman, MT)

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Blade Manufacturing Improvement: Remote Blade Manufacturing Demonstration  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of this program was to investigate manufacturing improvements for wind turbine blades. The program included a series of test activities to evaluate the strength, deflection, performance, and loading characteristics of the prototype blades. The original contract was extended in order to continue development of several key blade technologies identified in the project. The objective of the remote build task was to demonstrate the concept of manufacturing wind turbine blades at a temporary manufacturing facility in a rural environment. TPI Composites successfully completed a remote manufacturing demonstration in which four blades were fabricated. The remote demonstration used a manufacturing approach which relied upon material ''kits'' that were organized in the factory and shipped to the site. Manufacturing blades at the wind plant site presents serious logistics difficulties and does not appear to be the best approach. A better method appears to be regional manufacturing facilities, which will eliminate most of the transportation cost, without incurring the logistical problems associated with fabrication directly onsite. With this approach the remote facilities would use commonly available industrial infrastructure such as enclosed workbays, overhead cranes, and paved staging areas. Additional fatigue testing of the M20 root stud design was completed with good results. This design provides adhesive bond strength under fatigue loading that exceeds that of the fastener. A new thru-stud bonding concept was developed for the M30 stud design. This approach offers several manufacturing advantages; however, the test results were inconclusive.

ASHWILL, THOMAS D.

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Blade Manufacturing Improvement: Remote Blade Manufacturing Demonstration  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this program was to investigate manufacturing improvements for wind turbine blades. The program included a series of test activities to evaluate the strength, deflection, performance, and loading characteristics of the prototype blades. The original contract was extended in order to continue development of several key blade technologies identified in the project. The objective of the remote build task was to demonstrate the concept of manufacturing wind turbine blades at a temporary manufacturing facility in a rural environment. TPI Composites successfully completed a remote manufacturing demonstration in which four blades were fabricated. The remote demonstration used a manufacturing approach which relied upon material ''kits'' that were organized in the factory and shipped to the site. Manufacturing blades at the wind plant site presents serious logistics difficulties and does not appear to be the best approach. A better method appears to be regional manufacturing facilities, which will eliminate most of the transportation cost, without incurring the logistical problems associated with fabrication directly onsite. With this approach the remote facilities would use commonly available industrial infrastructure such as enclosed workbays, overhead cranes, and paved staging areas. Additional fatigue testing of the M20 root stud design was completed with good results. This design provides adhesive bond strength under fatigue loading that exceeds that of the fastener. A new thru-stud bonding concept was developed for the M30 stud design. This approach offers several manufacturing advantages; however, the test results were inconclusive.

ASHWILL, THOMAS D.

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

Evaluation of Hand Lay-Up and Resin Transfer Molding in Composite Wind Turbine Blade Manufacturing  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The majority of the wind turbine blade industry currently uses low cost hand lay-up manufacturing techniques to process composite blades. While there are benefits to the hand lay-up process, drawbacks inherent to this process along with advantages of other techniques suggest that better manufacturing alternatives may be available. Resin Transfer Molding (RTM) was identified as a processing alternative and shows promise in addressing the shortcomings of hand lay-up. This report details a comparison of the RTM process to hand lay-up of composite wind turbine blade structures. Several lay-up schedules and critical turbine blade structures were chosen for comparison of their properties resulting from RTM and hand lay-up processing. The geometries investigated were flat plate, thin and thick flanged T-stiffener, I-beam, and root connection joint. It was found that the manufacturing process played an important role in laminate thickness, fiber volume, and weight for the geometries investigated. RTM was found to reduce thickness and weight and increase fiber volumes for all substructures. RTM resulted in tighter material transition radii and eliminated the need for most secondary bonding operations. These results would significantly reduce the weight of wind turbine blades. Hand lay-up was consistently slower in fabrication times for the structures investigated. A comparison of mechanical properties showed no significant differences after employing fiber volume normalization techniques to account for geometry differences resulting from varying fiber volumes. The current root specimen design does not show significant mechanical property differences according to process and exceeds all static and fatigue requirements.

CAIRNS,DOUGLAS S.; SHRAMSTAD,JON D.

2000-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

Blade Manufacturing Improvement Project: Final Report  

SciTech Connect

The Blade Manufacturing Improvement Project explores new, unique and improved materials integrated with innovative manufacturing techniques that promise substantial economic enhancements for the fabrication of wind turbine blades. The primary objectives promote the development of advanced wind turbine blade manufacturing in ways that lower blade costs, cut rotor weight, reduce turbine maintenance costs, improve overall turbine quality and increase ongoing production reliability. Foam Matrix (FMI) has developed a wind turbine blade with an engineered foam core, incorporating advanced composite materials and using Resin Transfer Molding (RTM) processes to form a monolithic blade structure incorporating a single molding tool. Patented techniques are employed to increase blade load bearing capability and insure the uniform quality of the manufactured blade. In production quantities, FMI manufacturing innovations may return a sizable per blade cost reduction when compared to the cost of producing comparable blades with conventional methods.

SHERWOOD, KENT

2002-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Task 4.1 Intelligent Manufacturing of Hybrid Carbon-Glass Fiber-Reinforced Composite Wind Turbine Blades  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

EXECUTIVE SUMARY In this subtask, the manufacturability of hybrid carbon-glass fiber-reinforced composite wind turbine blades using Vacuum-Assisted Resin Transfer Molding (VARTM) was investigated. The objective of this investigation was to study the VARTM process and its parameters to manufacture cost-effective wind turbine blades with no defects (mainly eliminate dry spots and reduce manufacturing time). A 2.5-dimensional model and a 3-dimensional model were developed to simulate mold filling and part curing under different conditions. These conditions included isothermal and non-isothermal filling, curing of the part during and after filling, and placement of injection gates at different locations. Results from this investigation reveal that the process can be simulated and also that manufacturing parameters can be optimized to eliminate dry spot formation and reduce the manufacturing time. Using computer-based models is a cost-effective way to simulate manufacturing of wind turbine blades. The approach taken herein allows the design of the wind blade manufacturing processes without physically running trial-and-error experiments that are expensive and time-consuming; especially for larger blades needed for more demanding environmental conditions. This will benefit the wind energy industry by reducing initial design and manufacturing costs which can later be passed down to consumers and consequently make the wind energy industry more competitive.

Janet M Twomey, PhD

2010-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

11

Application of Resin Transfer Molding to the Manufacture of Wind Turbine Blade Substructures. Final Report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The U.S. has generally lacked the capability for an iterative process of detailed structural design, manufacturing, and testing at the full blade level to achieve specific structural performance, cost, and weight targets. This project examined the effects that different composites processing methods had on the performance of representative blade substructures. In addition, the results of the testing of these substructures was used to validate NuMAD, the design tool developed at Sandia National Laboratories.

Hedley, C. W.; Ritter, W. J.; Ashwill, T.

2001-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

12

Sustainable Energy Solutions Task 4.1 Intelligent Manufacturing of Hybrid Carbon-Glass Fiber-Reinforced Composite Wind Turbine Blades  

SciTech Connect

EXECUTIVE SUMARY In this subtask, the manufacturability of hybrid carbon-glass fiber-reinforced composite wind turbine blades using Vacuum-Assisted Resin Transfer Molding (VARTM) was investigated. The objective of this investigation was to study the VARTM process and its parameters to manufacture cost-effective wind turbine blades with no defects (mainly eliminate dry spots and reduce manufacturing time). A 2.5-dimensional model and a 3-dimensional model were developed to simulate mold filling and part curing under different conditions. These conditions included isothermal and non-isothermal filling, curing of the part during and after filling, and placement of injection gates at different locations. Results from this investigation reveal that the process can be simulated and also that manufacturing parameters can be optimized to eliminate dry spot formation and reduce the manufacturing time. Using computer-based models is a cost-effective way to simulate manufacturing of wind turbine blades. The approach taken herein allows the design of the wind blade manufacturing processes without physically running trial-and-error experiments that are expensive and time-consuming; especially for larger blades needed for more demanding environmental conditions. This will benefit the wind energy industry by reducing initial design and manufacturing costs which can later be passed down to consumers and consequently make the wind energy industry more competitive.

Janet M Twomey, PhD

2010-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

13

Snubber assembly for turbine blades  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A snubber associated with a rotatable turbine blade in a turbine engine, the turbine blade including a pressure sidewall and a suction sidewall opposed from the pressure wall. The snubber assembly includes a first snubber structure associated with the pressure sidewall of the turbine blade, a second snubber structure associated with the suction sidewall of the turbine blade, and a support structure. The support structure extends through the blade and is rigidly coupled at a first end portion thereof to the first snubber structure and at a second end portion thereof to the second snubber structure. Centrifugal loads exerted by the first and second snubber structures caused by rotation thereof during operation of the engine are at least partially transferred to the support structure, such that centrifugal loads exerted on the pressure and suctions sidewalls of the turbine blade by the first and second snubber structures are reduced.

Marra, John J

2013-09-03T23:59:59.000Z

14

Cost Study for Large Wind Turbine Blades  

SciTech Connect

The cost study for large wind turbine blades reviewed three blades of 30 meters, 50 meters, and 70 meters in length. Blade extreme wind design loads were estimated in accordance with IEC Class I recommendations. Structural analyses of three blade sizes were performed at representative spanwise stations assuming a stressed shell design approach and E-glass/vinylester laminate. A bill of materials was prepared for each of the three blade sizes using the laminate requirements prepared during the structural analysis effort. The labor requirements were prepared for twelve major manufacturing tasks. TPI Composites developed a conceptual design of the manufacturing facility for each of the three blade sizes, which was used for determining the cost of labor and overhead (capital equipment and facilities). Each of the three potential manufacturing facilities was sized to provide a constant annual rated power production (MW per year) of the blades it produced. The cost of the production tooling and overland transportation was also estimated. The results indicate that as blades get larger, materials become a greater proportion of total cost, while the percentage of labor cost is decreased. Transportation costs decreased as a percentage of total cost. The study also suggests that blade cost reduction efforts should focus on reducing material cost and lowering manufacturing labor, because cost reductions in those areas will have the strongest impact on overall blade cost.

ASHWILL, THOMAS D.

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Simulation of the Manufacturing of Non-Crimp Fabric-Reinforced Composite Wind Turbine Blades to Predict the Formation of Wave Defects  

SciTech Connect

NCFs (Non-Crimp Fabrics) are commonly used in the design of wind turbine blades and other complex systems due to their ability to conform to complex shapes without the wrinkling that is typically experienced with woven fabrics or prepreg tapes. In the current research, a form of vacuum assisted resin transfer molding known as SCRIMP registered is used to manufacture wind turbine blades. Often, during the compacting of the fabric layers by the vacuum pressure, several plies may bunch together out-of-plane and form wave defects. When the resin is infused, the areas beneath the waves become resin rich and can compromise the structural integrity of the blade. A reliable simulation tool is valuable to help predict where waves and other defects may appear as a result of the manufacturing process. Forming simulations often focus on the in-plane shearing and tensile behavior of fabrics and do not necessarily consider the bending stiffness of the fabrics, which is important to predict the formation of wrinkles and/or waves. This study incorporates experimentally determined in-plane shearing, tensile, and bending stiffness information of NCFs into a finite element model (ABAQUS/Explicit) of a 9-meter wind turbine blade to investigate the mechanical behaviors that can lead to the formation of waves as a result of the manufacturing process.

Fetfatsidis, K. A.; Sherwood, J. A. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Massachusetts, Lowell One University Ave., Lowell, MA 01854 (United States)

2011-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

16

SERI advanced wind turbine blades  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The primary goal of the Solar Energy Research Institute`s (SERI) advanced wind turbine blades is to convert the kinetic energy in the wind into mechanical energy in an inexpensive and efficient manner. To accomplish this goal, advanced wind turbine blades have been developed by SERI that utilize unique airfoil technology. Performance characteristics of the advanced blades were verified through atmospheric testing on fixed-pitch, stall-regulated horizontal-axis wind turbines (HAWTs). Of the various wind turbine configurations, the stall-regulated HAWT dominates the market because of its simplicity and low cost. Results of the atmospheric tests show that the SERI advanced blades produce 10% to 30% more energy than conventional blades. 6 refs.

Tangler, J.; Smith, B.; Jager, D.

1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

SERI advanced wind turbine blades  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The primary goal of the Solar Energy Research Institute's (SERI) advanced wind turbine blades is to convert the kinetic energy in the wind into mechanical energy in an inexpensive and efficient manner. To accomplish this goal, advanced wind turbine blades have been developed by SERI that utilize unique airfoil technology. Performance characteristics of the advanced blades were verified through atmospheric testing on fixed-pitch, stall-regulated horizontal-axis wind turbines (HAWTs). Of the various wind turbine configurations, the stall-regulated HAWT dominates the market because of its simplicity and low cost. Results of the atmospheric tests show that the SERI advanced blades produce 10% to 30% more energy than conventional blades. 6 refs.

Tangler, J.; Smith, B.; Jager, D.

1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Multiple piece turbine blade  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A turbine rotor blade with a spar and shell construction, the spar including an internal cooling supply channel extending from an inlet end on a root section and ending near the tip end, and a plurality of external cooling channels formed on both side of the spar, where a middle external cooling channel is connected to the internal cooling supply channels through a row of holes located at a middle section of the channels. The spar and the shell are held together by hooks that define serpentine flow passages for the cooling air and include an upper serpentine flow circuit and a lower serpentine flow circuit. the serpentine flow circuits all discharge into a leading edge passage or a trailing edge passage.

Kimmel, Keith D (Jupiter, FL)

2012-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

19

Turbine blade cooling  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A turbine rotor blade comprises a shank portion, a tip portion and an airfoil. The airfoil has a pressure side wall and a suction side wall that are interconnected by a plurality of partition sidewalls, defining an internal cooling passageway within the airfoil. The internal cooling passageway includes at least one radial outflow passageway to direct a cooling medium flow from the shank portion towards the tip portion and at least one radial inflow passageway to direct a cooling medium flow from the tip portion towards the shank portion. A number of mixing ribs are disposed on the partition sidewalls within the radial outflow passageways so as to enhance the thermal mixing of the cooling medium flow, thereby producing improved heat transfer over a broad range of the Buoyancy number.

Staub, Fred Wolf (Schenectady, NY); Willett, Fred Thomas (Niskayuna, NY)

1999-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

20

Turbine blade cooling  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A turbine rotor blade comprises a shank portion, a tip portion and an airfoil. The airfoil has a pressure side wall and a suction side wall that are interconnected by a plurality of partition sidewalls, defining an internal cooling passageway within the airfoil. The internal cooling passageway includes at least one radial outflow passageway to direct a cooling medium flow from the shank portion towards the tip portion and at least one radial inflow passageway to direct a cooling medium flow from the tip portion towards the shank portion. A number of mixing ribs are disposed on the partition sidewalls within the radial outflow passageways so as to enhance the thermal mixing of the cooling medium flow, thereby producing improved heat transfer over a broad range of the Buoyancy number.

Staub, Fred Wolf (Schenectady, NY); Willett, Fred Thomas (Niskayuna, NY)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "turbine blade manufacturer" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Turbine blade cooling  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A turbine rotor blade comprises a shank portion, a tip portion and an airfoil. The airfoil has a pressure side wall and a suction side wall that are interconnected by a plurality of partition sidewalls, defining an internal cooling passageway within the airfoil. The internal cooling passageway includes at least one radial outflow passageway to direct a cooling medium flow from the shank portion towards the tip portion and at least one radial inflow passageway to direct a cooling medium flow from the tip portion towards the shank portion. A number of mixing ribs are disposed on the partition sidewalls within the radial outflow passageways so as to enhance the thermal mixing of the cooling medium flow, thereby producing improved heat transfer over a broad range of the Buoyancy number. 13 figs.

Staub, F.W.; Willett, F.T.

1999-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

22

Turbine Blade Shape Favorable for Fish Survival  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Various mechanisms associated with turbine design and operation injure fish passing through hydro turbines. Pilot-scale tests with various fish species and sizes showed that most turbine passage injury and mortality are caused by blade strike. Leading edge blade strike is particularly important for turbines with numerous blades. Very little information and data are available on the mechanics of fish struck by turbine blades and the resulting injury and mortality rates. Determining what leading edge blade...

2008-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

23

Turbine blade tip gap reduction system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A turbine blade sealing system for reducing a gap between a tip of a turbine blade and a stationary shroud of a turbine engine. The sealing system includes a plurality of flexible seal strips extending from a pressure side of a turbine blade generally orthogonal to the turbine blade. During operation of the turbine engine, the flexible seal strips flex radially outward extending towards the stationary shroud of the turbine engine, thereby reducing the leakage of air past the turbine blades and increasing the efficiency of the turbine engine.

Diakunchak, Ihor S.

2012-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

24

Methods of making wind turbine rotor blades  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of manufacturing a root portion of a wind turbine blade includes, in an exemplary embodiment, providing an outer layer of reinforcing fibers including at least two woven mats of reinforcing fibers, providing an inner layer of reinforcing fibers including at least two woven mats of reinforcing fibers, and positioning at least two bands of reinforcing fibers between the inner and outer layers, with each band of reinforcing fibers including at least two woven mats of reinforcing fibers. The method further includes positioning a mat of randomly arranged reinforcing fibers between each pair of adjacent bands of reinforcing fibers, introducing a polymeric resin into the root potion of the wind turbine blade, infusing the resin through the outer layer, the inner layer, each band of reinforcing fibers, and each mat of random reinforcing fibers, and curing the resin to form the root portion of the wind turbine blade.

Livingston, Jamie T. (Pensacola, FL); Burke, Arthur H. E. (Gulf Breeze, FL); Bakhuis, Jan Willem (Nijverdal, NL); Van Breugel, Sjef (Enschede, NL); Billen, Andrew (Daarlerveen, NL)

2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

UMass Lowell Smoothing Out Wrinkles in Blade Manufacturing Process |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

UMass Lowell Smoothing Out Wrinkles in Blade Manufacturing Process UMass Lowell Smoothing Out Wrinkles in Blade Manufacturing Process UMass Lowell Smoothing Out Wrinkles in Blade Manufacturing Process August 4, 2010 - 2:04pm Addthis Researchers at the University of Massachusetts Lowell work on a wind blade project. | Photo courtesy of University of Massachusetts Lowell Researchers at the University of Massachusetts Lowell work on a wind blade project. | Photo courtesy of University of Massachusetts Lowell Stephen Graff Former Writer & editor for Energy Empowers, EERE A research team at the University of Massachusetts Lowell is ironing out the kinks in blade manufacturing to make way for safer, lighter and cheaper blades. The Wind Turbine Research Group (WTRG) at UMass Lowell has received $401,885 in American Recovery and Reinvestment Act funds to figure out

26

Aircraft Gas Turbine Blade and Vane Repair  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Gas turbine blades experience dimensional .... platinum applied in separate gas phase or electroplating ..... surfaces are natural consequences of fluoride.

27

Turbine blade vibration dampening  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present turbine wheel assembly increases component life and turbine engine longevity. The combination of the strap and the opening combined with the preestablished area of the outer surface of the opening and the preestablished area of the outer circumferential surface of the strap and the friction between the strap and the opening increases the life and longevity of the turbine wheel assembly. Furthermore, the mass ``M`` or combined mass ``CM`` of the strap or straps and the centrifugal force assist in controlling vibrations and damping characteristics. 5 figs.

Cornelius, C.C.; Pytanowski, G.P.; Vendituoli, J.S.

1997-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

28

Turbine blade vibration dampening  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present turbine wheel assembly increases component life and turbine engine longevity. The combination of the strap and the opening combined with the preestablished area of the outer surface of the opening and the preestablished area of the outer circumferential surface of the strap and the friction between the strap and the opening increases the life and longevity of the turbine wheel assembly. Furthermore, the mass "M" or combined mass "CM" of the strap or straps and the centrifugal force assist in controlling vibrations and damping characteristics.

Cornelius, Charles C. (San Diego, CA); Pytanowski, Gregory P. (San Diego, CA); Vendituoli, Jonathan S. (San Diego, CA)

1997-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

29

Blade for a gas turbine  

SciTech Connect

A blade is provided for a gas turbine. The blade comprises a main body comprising a cooling fluid entrance channel; a cooling fluid collector in communication with the cooling fluid entrance channel; a plurality of side channels extending through an outer wall of the main body and communicating with the cooling fluid collector and a cooling fluid cavity; a cooling fluid exit channel communicating with the cooling fluid cavity; and a plurality of exit bores extending from the cooling fluid exit channel through the main body outer wall.

Liang, George (Palm City, FL)

2010-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

30

Wind Turbine Blade Structural Health Monitoring  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Structural health monitoring (SHM) is the automated inspection and evaluation of structures such as wind turbine blades. This report examines the current state-of-the-art blade SHM systems, identifies future trends, and outlines a methodology for probabilistic cost-benefit analysis of the application of SHM systems to wind turbine blades. The reliability of wind turbine blades is an ongoing concern for the wind industry. Applying SHM to blades may be one way to reduce blade failure rates and reduce the d...

2010-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

31

Innovative Design Approaches for Large Wind Turbine Blades  

SciTech Connect

The primary goal of the WindPACT Blade System Design Study (BSDS) was investigation and evaluation of design and manufacturing issues for wind turbine blades in the one to ten megawatt size range. The initial project task was to assess the fundamental physical and manufacturing issues that govern and constrain large blades and entails three basic elements: (1) a parametric scaling study to assess blade structure using current technology, (2) an economic study of the cost to manufacture, transport, and install large blades, and (3) identification of promising innovative design approaches that show potential for overcoming fundamental physical and manufacturing constraints. This report discusses several innovative design approaches and their potential for blade cost reduction. During this effort we reviewed methods for optimizing the blade cross-section to improve structural and manufacturing characteristics. We also analyzed and compared a number of composite materials and evaluated their relative merits for use in large wind turbine blades in the range from 30 meters to 70 meters. The results have been summarized in dimensional and non-dimensional format to aid in interpretation. These results build upon earlier parametric and blade cost studies, which were used as a guide for the innovative design approaches explored here.

ASHWILL, THOMAS D.

2003-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Turbine blade tip flow discouragers  

SciTech Connect

A turbine assembly comprises a plurality of rotating blade portions in a spaced relation with a stationery shroud. The rotating blade portions comprise a root section, a tip portion and an airfoil. The tip portion has a pressure side wall and a suction side wall. A number of flow discouragers are disposed on the blade tip portion. In one embodiment, the flow discouragers extend circumferentially from the pressure side wall to the suction side wall so as to be aligned generally parallel to the direction of rotation. In an alternative embodiment, the flow discouragers extend circumferentially from the pressure side wall to the suction side wall so as to be aligned at an angle in the range between about 0.degree. to about 60.degree. with respect to a reference axis aligned generally parallel to the direction of rotation. The flow discouragers increase the flow resistance and thus reduce the flow of hot gas flow leakage for a given pressure differential across the blade tip portion so as to improve overall turbine efficiency.

Bunker, Ronald Scott (Niskayuna, NY)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Probabilistic analysis of turbine blade durability  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The effect of variability on turbine blade durability was assessed for seven design/operating parameters in three blade designs. The parameters included gas path and cooling convective parameters, metal and coating thermal ...

Kountras, Apostolos, 1970-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Structural Health Monitoring of Wind Turbine Blades  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Structural Health Monitoring of Wind Turbine Blades. Author(s) ... is mandatory for the cost-effective operation of an offshore wind power plant.

35

Evaluation of Turbine Blades Using Computed Tomography  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Turbine blades are high value castings having complex internal geometry. Computed Tomography has been employed on Turbine blades for finding out defects and internal details. The wall thickness, rib thickness and radius of curvature are measured from the CT slices. The discontinuities including blockages of cooling passages in the cast material can be detected. 3D visualization of the turbine blade provides in extracting its internal features including inaccessible areas nondestructively, which is not possible through conventional NDE methods. The salient features for evaluation of turbine blades using Tomography are brought out.

C. Muralidhar; S. N. Lukose; M. P. Subramanian

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Streamlining blade production would reduce turbine costs  

SciTech Connect

Gas turbine technology's overall future will see continuing increases in both size and higher operating temperatures, each contributing to improved energy conversion efficiency and reduced comparative capital outlay. Manufacturing technology will become even more relevant as blades acquire more sophisticated cooling or adopt the use of exotic refractory material such as crystal fibers and ceramics or both. The trend towards rising temperatures will continue. The incentives are high when it is realized that for every 100/sup 0/C increase in firing temperature there is a gain of approximately 18 percent in machine output and 2.7 percent increase in thermal efficiency.

Graham-Bryce, A.

1976-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Reaction Injection Molded 7.5 Meter Wind Turbine Blade  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

An optimized small turbine blade (7.5m radius) was designed and a partial section molded with the RIM (reaction-injection molded polymer) process for mass production. The intended market is for generic three-bladed wind turbines, 100 kilowatts or less, for grid-assist end users with rural and semi-rural sites, such as the farm/ranch market, having low to moderate IEC Class 3-4 wind regimes. This blade will have substantial performance improvements over, and be cheaper than, present-day 7.5m blades. This is made possible by the injection-molding process, which yields high repeatability, accurate geometry and weights, and low cost in production quantities. No wind turbine blade in the 7.5m or greater size has used this process. The blade design chosen uses a RIM skin bonded to a braided infused carbon fiber/epoxy spar. This approach is attractive to present users of wind turbine blades in the 5-10m sizes. These include rebladeing California wind farms, refurbishing used turbines for the Midwest farm market, and other manufacturers introducing new turbines in this size range.

David M. Wright; DOE Project Officer - Keith Bennett

2007-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

38

Innovative design approaches for large wind turbine blades : final report.  

SciTech Connect

The goal of the Blade System Design Study (BSDS) was investigation and evaluation of design and manufacturing issues for wind turbine blades in the one to ten megawatt size range. A series of analysis tasks were completed in support of the design effort. We began with a parametric scaling study to assess blade structure using current technology. This was followed by an economic study of the cost to manufacture, transport and install large blades. Subsequently we identified several innovative design approaches that showed potential for overcoming fundamental physical and manufacturing constraints. The final stage of the project was used to develop several preliminary 50m blade designs. The key design impacts identified in this study are: (1) blade cross-sections, (2) alternative materials, (3) IEC design class, and (4) root attachment. The results show that thick blade cross-sections can provide a large reduction in blade weight, while maintaining high aerodynamic performance. Increasing blade thickness for inboard sections is a key method for improving structural efficiency and reducing blade weight. Carbon/glass hybrid blades were found to provide good improvements in blade weight, stiffness, and deflection when used in the main structural elements of the blade. The addition of carbon resulted in modest cost increases and provided significant benefits, particularly with respect to deflection. The change in design loads between IEC classes is quite significant. Optimized blades should be designed for each IEC design class. A significant portion of blade weight is related to the root buildup and metal hardware for typical root attachment designs. The results show that increasing the number of blade fasteners has a positive effect on total weight, because it reduces the required root laminate thickness.

2004-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Isogeometric Simulation of Turbine Blades for Aircraft Engines David Gromann1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Isogeometric Simulation of Turbine Blades for Aircraft Engines David Gro�mann1 , Bert Jüttler2, in the challenging field of aircraft engines. We study the deformation of turbine blades under the assumption, manufacturing and repairing turbine engines for aircrafts. A challenging task in this field is the efficient

Jüttler, Bert

40

The new Wind Technology Test Center is the only facility in the nation capable of testing wind turbine blades up to  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

turbine blades up to 90 meters in length. A critical factor to wind turbine design and development is the ability to test new designs, components, and materials. In addition, wind turbine blade manufacturers the blades millions of times to simulate what a blade goes through in its lifetime on a wind turbine

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "turbine blade manufacturer" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Multiple piece turbine rotor blade  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A multiple piece turbine rotor blade with a shell having an airfoil shape and secured between a spar and a platform with the spar including a tip end piece. a snap ring fits around the spar and abuts against the spar tip end piece on a top side and abuts against a shell on the bottom side so that the centrifugal loads from the shell is passed through the snap ring and into the spar and not through a tip cap dovetail slot and projection structure.

Jones, Russell B; Fedock, John A

2013-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

42

Load attenuating passively adaptive wind turbine blade  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and apparatus for improving wind turbine performance by alleviating loads and controlling the rotor. The invention employs the use of a passively adaptive blade that senses the wind velocity or rotational speed, and accordingly modifies its aerodynamic configuration. The invention exploits the load mitigation prospects of a blade that twists toward feather as it bends. The invention includes passively adaptive wind turbine rotors or blades with currently preferred power control features. The apparatus is a composite fiber horizontal axis wind-turbine blade, in which a substantial majority of fibers in the blade skin are inclined at angles of between 15 and 30 degrees to the axis of the blade, to produces passive adaptive aeroelastic tailoring (bend-twist coupling) to alleviate loading without unduly jeopardizing performance.

Veers, Paul S. (Albuquerque, NM); Lobitz, Donald W. (Albuquerque, NM)

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Applications: Wind turbine and blade design  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Capability Applications: Wind turbine and blade design optimization Energy production enhancement Summary: As the wind energy industry works to provide the infra- structure necessary for wind turbine develops a means to aug- ment power production with wind-derived energy. Turbines have become massive

44

Wind Turbine Manufacturing Process Monitoring  

SciTech Connect

To develop a practical inline inspection that could be used in combination with automated composite material placement equipment to economically manufacture high performance and reliable carbon composite wind turbine blade spar caps. The approach technical feasibility and cost benefit will be assessed to provide a solid basis for further development and implementation in the wind turbine industry. The program is focused on the following technology development: (1) Develop in-line monitoring methods, using optical metrology and ultrasound inspection, and perform a demonstration in the lab. This includes development of the approach and performing appropriate demonstration in the lab; (2) Develop methods to predict composite strength reduction due to defects; and (3) Develop process models to predict defects from leading indicators found in the uncured composites.

Waseem Faidi; Chris Nafis; Shatil Sinha; Chandra Yerramalli; Anthony Waas; Suresh Advani; John Gangloff; Pavel Simacek

2012-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

45

Turbine blade tip with offset squealer  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An industrial turbine assembly comprises a plurality of rotating blade portions in a spaced relation with a stationary shroud. The rotating blade includes a root section, an airfoil having a pressure sidewall and a suction sidewall defining an outer periphery and a tip portion having a tip cap. An offset squealer is disposed on the tip cap. The offset squealer is positioned inward from the outer periphery of the rotating blade. The offset squealer increases the flow resistance and reduces the flow of hot gas flow leakage for a given pressure differential across the blade tip portion so as to improve overall turbine efficiency.

Bunker, Ronald Scott (Niskayuna, NY)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

Cooling arrangement for a tapered turbine blade  

SciTech Connect

A cooling arrangement (11) for a highly tapered gas turbine blade (10). The cooling arrangement (11) includes a pair of parallel triple-pass serpentine cooling circuits (80,82) formed in an inner radial portion (50) of the blade, and a respective pair of single radial channel cooling circuits (84,86) formed in an outer radial portion (52) of the blade (10), with each single radial channel receiving the cooling fluid discharged from a respective one of the triple-pass serpentine cooling circuit. The cooling arrangement advantageously provides a higher degree of cooling to the most highly stressed radially inner portion of the blade, while providing a lower degree of cooling to the less highly stressed radially outer portion of the blade. The cooling arrangement can be implemented with known casting techniques, thereby facilitating its use on highly tapered, highly twisted Row 4 industrial gas turbine blades that could not be cooled with prior art cooling arrangements.

Liang, George (Palm City, FL)

2010-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

47

Gas Turbine Manufacturers Perspective  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Viability and Experience of IGCC From a Viability and Experience of IGCC From a Gas Turbine Manufacturers Perspective ASME - IGCC ASME - IGCC Turbo Turbo Expo Expo June 2001 June 2001 GE Power Systems g Klaus Brun, Ph.D. - Manager Process Power Plant Product & Market Development Robert M. Jones - Project Development Manager Process Power Plants Power Systems Power Systems General Electric Company General Electric Company ABSTRACT GE Power Systems g Economic Viability and Experience of IGCC From a Gas Turbine Manufacturers Perspective High natural gas fuel gas prices combined with new technology developments have made IGCC a competitive option when compared to conventional combined cycle or coal steam turbine cycles. Although the initial investment costs for an IGCC plant are still comparatively high, the low

48

Advanced Blade Manufacturing Project - Final Report  

SciTech Connect

The original scope of the project was to research improvements to the processes and materials used in the manufacture of wood-epoxy blades, conduct tests to qualify any new material or processes for use in blade design and subsequently build and test six blades using the improved processes and materials. In particular, ABM was interested in reducing blade cost and improving quality. In addition, ABM needed to find a replacement material for the mature Douglas fir used in the manufacturing process. The use of mature Douglas fir is commercially unacceptable because of its limited supply and environmental concerns associated with the use of mature timber. Unfortunately, the bankruptcy of FloWind in June 1997 and a dramatic reduction in AWT sales made it impossible for ABM to complete the full scope of work. However, sufficient research and testing were completed to identify several promising changes in the blade manufacturing process and develop a preliminary design incorporating these changes.

POORE, ROBERT Z.

1999-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Blade System Design Studies Volume I: Composite Technologies for Large Wind Turbine Blades  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

As part of the U.S. Department of Energy's Wind Partnerships for Advanced Component Technologies (WindPACT) program, Global Energy Concepts LLC (GEC) is performing a study concerning innovations in materials, processes and structural configurations for application to wind turbine blades in the multi-megawatt range. The project team for this work includes experts in all areas of wind turbine blade design, analysis, manufacture, and testing. Constraints to cost-effective scaling-up of the current commercial blade designs and manufacturing methods are identified, including self-gravity loads, transportation, and environmental considerations. A trade-off study is performed to evaluate the incremental changes in blade cost, weight, and stiffness for a wide range of composite materials, fabric types, and manufacturing processes. Fiberglass/carbon fiber hybrid blades are identified as having a promising combination of cost, weight, stiffness and fatigue resistance. Vacuum-assisted resin transfer molding, resin film infision, and pre-impregnated materials are identified as having benefits in reduced volatile emissions, higher fiber content, and improved laminate quality relative to the baseline wet lay-up process. Alternative structural designs are identified, including jointed configurations to facilitate transportation. Based on the results to date, recommendations are made for further evaluation and testing under this study to verify the predicted material and structural performance.

GRIFFIN, DAYTON A.; ASHWILL, THOMAS D.

2002-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Blade System Design Studies Volume I: Composite Technologies for Large Wind Turbine Blades  

SciTech Connect

As part of the U.S. Department of Energy's Wind Partnerships for Advanced Component Technologies (WindPACT) program, Global Energy Concepts LLC (GEC) is performing a study concerning innovations in materials, processes and structural configurations for application to wind turbine blades in the multi-megawatt range. The project team for this work includes experts in all areas of wind turbine blade design, analysis, manufacture, and testing. Constraints to cost-effective scaling-up of the current commercial blade designs and manufacturing methods are identified, including self-gravity loads, transportation, and environmental considerations. A trade-off study is performed to evaluate the incremental changes in blade cost, weight, and stiffness for a wide range of composite materials, fabric types, and manufacturing processes. Fiberglass/carbon fiber hybrid blades are identified as having a promising combination of cost, weight, stiffness and fatigue resistance. Vacuum-assisted resin transfer molding, resin film infision, and pre-impregnated materials are identified as having benefits in reduced volatile emissions, higher fiber content, and improved laminate quality relative to the baseline wet lay-up process. Alternative structural designs are identified, including jointed configurations to facilitate transportation. Based on the results to date, recommendations are made for further evaluation and testing under this study to verify the predicted material and structural performance.

GRIFFIN, DAYTON A.; ASHWILL, THOMAS D.

2002-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

WIND TURBINE BLADE DESIGN BASED ON DURABILITY AND DAMAGE TOLERANCE  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of the program was to demonstrate and verify Certification-by-Analysis (CBA) capability for wind turbine blades made from advanced lightweight composite materials. The approach integrated durability and damage tolerance analysis with robust design and virtual testing capabilities to deliver superior, durable, low weight, low cost, long life, and reliable wind blade design. The GENOA durability and life prediction software suite was be used as the primary simulation tool. First, a micromechanics-based computational approach was used to assess the durability of composite laminates with ply drop features commonly used in wind turbine applications. Ply drops occur in composite joints and closures of wind turbine blades to reduce skin thicknesses along the blade span. They increase localized stress concentration, which may cause premature delamination failure in composite and reduced fatigue service life. Durability and damage tolerance (D&DT) were evaluated utilizing a multi-scale micro-macro progressive failure analysis (PFA) technique. PFA is finite element based and is capable of detecting all stages of material damage including initiation and propagation of delamination. It assesses multiple failure criteria and includes the effects of manufacturing anomalies (i.e., void, fiber waviness). Two different approaches have been used within PFA. The first approach is Virtual Crack Closure Technique (VCCT) PFA while the second one is strength-based. Constituent stiffness and strength properties for glass and carbon based material systems were reverse engineered for use in D&DT evaluation of coupons with ply drops under static loading. Lamina and laminate properties calculated using manufacturing and composite architecture details matched closely published test data. Similarly, resin properties were determined for fatigue life calculation. The simulation not only reproduced static strength and fatigue life as observed in the test, it also showed composite damage and fracture modes that resemble those reported in the tests. The results show that computational simulation can be relied on to enhance the design of tapered composite structures such as the ones used in turbine wind blades. A computational simulation for durability, damage tolerance (D&DT) and reliability of composite wind turbine blade structures in presence of uncertainties in material properties was performed. A composite turbine blade was first assessed with finite element based multi-scale progressive failure analysis to determine failure modes and locations as well as the fracture load. D&DT analyses were then validated with static test performed at Sandia National Laboratories. The work was followed by detailed weight analysis to identify contribution of various materials to the overall weight of the blade. The methodology ensured that certain types of failure modes, such as delamination progression, are contained to reduce risk to the structure. Probabilistic analysis indicated that composite shear strength has a great influence on the blade ultimate load under static loading. Weight was reduced by 12% with robust design without loss in reliability or D&DT. Structural benefits obtained with the use of enhanced matrix properties through nanoparticles infusion were also assessed. Thin unidirectional fiberglass layers enriched with silica nanoparticles were applied to the outer surfaces of a wind blade to improve its overall structural performance and durability. The wind blade was a 9-meter prototype structure manufactured and tested subject to three saddle static loading at Sandia National Laboratory (SNL). The blade manufacturing did not include the use of any nano-material. With silica nanoparticles in glass composite applied to the exterior surfaces of the blade, the durability and damage tolerance (D&DT) results from multi-scale PFA showed an increase in ultimate load of the blade by 9.2% as compared to baseline structural performance (without nano). The use of nanoparticles lead to a delay in the onset of delamination. Load-displacement relati

Galib Abumeri; Frank Abdi (PhD)

2012-02-16T23:59:59.000Z

52

Rejuvenation of Service-Exposed in 738 Turbine Blades  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

are used as investment cast turbine blades in many aircraft gas turbine engines. In their conventionally cast polycrystalline equiaxed forms, these alloys derive ...

53

Deformation Prediction of a Heavy Hydro Turbine Blade During ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Deformation Prediction of a Heavy Hydro Turbine Blade During ... Abstract Scope, Heavy hydro turbine castings are made of martensitic ...

54

2010 Tests Examining Survival of Fish Struck By Turbine Blades  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As part of ongoing efforts to develop environmentally enhanced hydro turbines, EPRI has been conducting studies to assess turbine blade design parameters that affect fish mortality. This report describes the third year of EPRI-funded hydro turbine blade strike testing. The goal of these studies has been to improve industry understanding of blade strike injury and mortality, primarily with respect to fish length, leading edge blade thickness, and strike velocity (relative speed of fish to blade).

2011-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

55

EFFECTS OF FIBER WAVINESS ON COMPOSITES FOR WIND TURBINE BLADES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

EFFECTS OF FIBER WAVINESS ON COMPOSITES FOR WIND TURBINE BLADES J.F. Mandell D.D. Samborsky and L Composite materials of interest for wind turbine blades use relatively low cost fibers, resins and processes WORDS: Composite Materials, Fiber Waviness, Compressive Strength #12;1. INTRODUCTION Wind turbine blades

56

TECHNICALADVANCES IN EPOXY TECHNOLOGY FOR WIND TURBINE BLADE COMPOSITE FABRICATION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

TECHNICALADVANCES IN EPOXY TECHNOLOGY FOR WIND TURBINE BLADE COMPOSITE FABRICATION George C. Jacob reliability in many demanding applications including components for aerospace and wind turbine blades. While in operation, wind turbine blades are subjected to significant stresses from their movement, wind and other

57

Volumetric Geometry Reconstruction of Turbine Blades for Aircraft Engines  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Volumetric Geometry Reconstruction of Turbine Blades for Aircraft Engines David GroÃ?mann1 and Bert-spline parametrization of turbine blades from measurement data generated by optical scanners. This new representation elements. We focus on the industrial applicability of the framework, by using standard turbine blade

Jüttler, Bert

58

Energy harvesting to power sensing hardware onboard wind turbine blade  

SciTech Connect

Wind turbines are becoming a larger source of renewable energy in the United States. However, most of the designs are geared toward the weather conditions seen in Europe. Also, in the United States, manufacturers have been increasing the length of the turbine blades, often made of composite materials, to maximize power output. As a result of the more severe loading conditions in the United States and the material level flaws in composite structures, blade failure has been a more common occurrence in the U.S. than in Europe. Therefore, it is imperative that a structural health monitoring system be incorporated into the design of the wind turbines in order to monitor flaws before they lead to a catastrophic failure. Due to the rotation of the turbine and issues related to lightning strikes, the best way to implement a structural health monitoring system would be to use a network of wireless sensor nodes. In order to provide power to these sensor nodes, piezoelectric, thermoelectric and photovoltaic energy harvesting techniques are examined on a cross section of a CX-100 wind turbine blade in order to determine the feasibility of powering individual nodes that would compose the sensor network.

Carlson, Clinton P [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Schichting, Alexander D [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Quellette, Scott [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Faringolt, Kevin M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Park, Gyuhae [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Experiences with titanium next-to-last LP blades in a 1300 MW turbine  

SciTech Connect

The use of titanium as a material for the end blades of LP turbines has already been investigated twenty years ago by Brown Boveri. Next-to-last LP blades in the past have several times been the cause of turbine damage, because these blades work in the zone of the first condensation and thus are subjected to mechanical stress in corrosive environment. Favorable corrosion properties of titanium provided a reason for developing and manufacturing two next-to-last titanium low pressure blade rows in 1980 and to use them in a 1300 MW plant. On the occasion of an overhaul, a visual check was carried out of the titanium blades and chemical analysis of the blade surface deposits were made. From the distribution of the deposits conclusions can be drawn, retroactively, as to why steel blades might have failed. The titanium blades are undergoing a further operation period.

Meyer, H.W.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Test evaluation of a laminated wood wind turbine blade concept  

SciTech Connect

Because of the high stiffness and fatigue strength of wood (as compared to density) along with the low cost manufacturing techniques available, a laminated wood wind turbine blade application has been studied. This report presents the results of the testing performed on elements of the wood blade-to-hub transition section which uses steel studs cast into a laminated wood spar with a filled epoxy. Individual stud samples were tested for both ultimate load carrying capability and fatigue strength. A one-time pull-out load of 78,000 lb was achieved for a 15 in. long stud with a diameter of 1 in. Tension-tension fatigue indicated that peak loads on the order of 40% of ultimate could be maintained as an endurance limit (mean load = 20,000 lb, cyclic load = +-15,000 lb). Following the individual stud testing, a full-scale inboard blade section (20 ft in length) was tested.

Faddoul, J.R.

1981-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "turbine blade manufacturer" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Rotor blades for turbine engines  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A tip shroud that includes a plurality of damping fins, each damping fin including a substantially non-radially-aligned surface that is configured to make contact with a tip shroud of a neighboring rotor blade. At least one damping fin may include a leading edge damping fin and at least one damping fin may include a trailing edge damping fin. The leading edge damping fin may be configured to correspond to the trailing edge damping fin.

Piersall, Matthew R; Potter, Brian D

2013-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

62

Reconstruction of steam turbine blade twisted based on NURBS surface  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

NURBS (Non-Uniform Rational B-Spline) is the most popular mathematical descriptor for surface modeling. To construct steam turbine blade efficiently and accurately, 2´3 NURBS was obtained to fitted blade surface as its cross-section is different tangent ... Keywords: steam turbine blade, surface modeling, NURBS surfac, reconstruction

Yue Ying; Wang Zhangqi; Han Qingyao

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Method of making a wooden wind turbine blade  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A wooden wind turbine blade is formed by laminating wood veneer in a compression mold having the exact curvature needed for one side of the blade, following which the other side of the blade is ground flat along its length but twisted with respect to the blade axis.

Coleman, Clint (Warren, VT)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Method of making a wooden wind turbine blade  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A wooden wind turbine blade is formed by laminating wood veneer in a compression mold having the exact curvature needed for one side of the blade, following which the other side of the blade is ground flat along its length but twisted with respect to the blade axis. 8 figs.

Coleman, C.

1984-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

65

Dynamic stall on wind turbine blades  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Dynamic loads must be predicted accurately in order to estimate the fatigue life of wind turbines operating in turbulent environments. Dynamic stall contributes to increased dynamic loads during normal operation of all types of horizontal-axis wind turbine (HAWTs). This report illustrates how dynamic stall varies throughout the blade span of a 10 m HAWT during yawed and unyawed operating conditions. Lift, drag, and pitching moment coefficients during dynamics stall are discussed. Resulting dynamic loads are presented, and the effects of dynamic stall on yaw loads are demonstrated using a yaw loads dynamic analysis (YAWDYN). 12 refs., 22 figs., 1 tab.

Butterfield, C.P.; Simms, D.; Scott, G. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States)] [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States); Hansen, A.C. [Utah Univ., Salt Lake City, UT (United States)] [Utah Univ., Salt Lake City, UT (United States)

1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Multiscale Modelling of Single Crystal Superalloys for Gas Turbine Blades  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Multiscale Modelling of Single Crystal Superalloys for Gas Turbine Blades PROEFSCHRIFT ter Multiscale Modelling of Single Crystal Superalloys for Gas Turbine Blades / by Tiedo Tinga. ­ Eindhoven accumulation 120 5.5 Application 121 5.6 Summary and conclusions 128 6. Application to gas turbine parts 131 6

67

Low Speed Technology for Small Turbine Development Reaction Injection Molded 7.5 Meter Wind Turbine Blade  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An optimized small turbine blade (7.5m radius) was designed and a partial section molded with the RIM (reaction-injection molded polymer) process for mass production. The intended market is for generic three-bladed wind turbines, 100 kilowatts or less, for grid-assist end users with rural and semi-rural sites, such as the farm/ranch market, having low to moderate IEC Class 3-4 wind regimes. This blade will have substantial performance improvements over, and be cheaper than, present-day 7.5m blades. This is made possible by the injection-molding process, which yields high repeatability, accurate geometry and weights, and low cost in production quantities. No wind turbine blade in the 7.5m or greater size has used this process. The blade design chosen uses a RIM skin bonded to a braided infused carbon fiber/epoxy spar. This approach is attractive to present users of wind turbine blades in the 5-10m sizes. These include rebladeing California wind farms, refurbishing used turbines for the Midwest farm market, and other manufacturers introducing new turbines in this size range.

David M. Wright; DOE Project Officer - Keith Bennett

2007-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

68

Vertical axis wind turbine with continuous blade angle adjustment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The author presents a concept for a vertical axis wind turbine that utilizes each blade's entire rotational cycle for power generation. Each blade has its own vertical axis of rotation and is constrained to rotate at the ...

Weiss, Samuel Bruce

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Infrared Probe for Application to Steam Turbine Blade Vibration Detection  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Technology for non-contacting steam turbine blade tip vibration measurement has advanced to the point of being a viable tool for risk management in situations where turbine blade high-cycle vibration occurs as a result of operating parameters or blade condition. This report describes the development and prototype testing of a new type of blade tip time-of-arrival sensing system for use with commercial signal processing systems.

2004-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

70

Incipient Crack Detection in Composite Wind Turbine Blades  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper presents some analysis results for incipient crack detection in a 9-meter CX-100 wind turbine blade that underwent fatigue loading to failure. The blade was manufactured to standard specifications, and it underwent harmonic excitation at its first resonance using a hydraulically-actuated excitation system until reaching catastrophic failure. This work investigates the ability of an ultrasonic guided wave approach to detect incipient damage prior to the surfacing of a visible, catastrophic crack. The blade was instrumented with piezoelectric transducers, which were used in an active, pitchcatch mode with guided waves over a range of excitation frequencies. The performance results in detecting incipient crack formation in the fiberglass skin of the blade is assessed over the range of frequencies in order to determine the point at which the incipient crack became detectable. Higher excitation frequencies provide consistent results for paths along the rotor blade's carbon fiber spar cap, but performance falls off with increasing excitation frequencies for paths off of the spar cap. Lower excitation frequencies provide more consistent performance across all sensor paths.

Taylor, Stuart G. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Choi, Mijin [Chonbuk National University, Korea; Jeong, Hyomi [Chonbuk National University, Korea; Jang, Jae Kyeong [Chonbuk National University, Korea; Park, Gyuhae [Chonnam National University, Korea; Farinholt, Kevin [Commonwealth Center for Advanced Manufacturing, VA; Farrar, Charles R. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Ammerman, Curtt N. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Todd, Michael D. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Lee, Jung-Ryul [Chonbuk National University, Korea

2012-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

71

Snubber Assembly for Turbine Blades - Energy Innovation Portal  

Wind Energy; Partners (27) Visual Patent Search; Success Stories; News; Events; Snubber Assembly for Turbine Blades United States Patent Application *** PATENT ...

72

COOLED SNUBBER STRUCTURE FOR TURBINE BLADES - Energy Innovation Portal  

Wind Energy; Partners (27) Visual Patent Search; Success Stories; News; Events; COOLED SNUBBER STRUCTURE FOR TURBINE BLADES United States Patent Application ...

73

The Development of Single Crystal Superalloy Turbine Blades  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Airbus Industries A310 aircraft. Engine certification and initial production shipments are planned for July of 1980. Alloy 454 turbine blades have also been  ...

74

3D Modeling of Dendritic Grain Structures in Turbine Blade ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

modern aircraft engines and land-based power-plants. .... Figure 2 illustrates the grid generation for a close-up detail of a turbine blade geometry. (junction ...

75

Wuxi Bamboo Wind Turbine Blade Technology Co Ltd | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Wuxi Bamboo Wind Turbine Blade Technology Co Ltd Wuxi Bamboo Wind Turbine Blade Technology Co Ltd Jump to: navigation, search Name Wuxi Bamboo Wind Turbine Blade Technology Co Ltd Place Wuxi, Jiangsu Province, China Sector Wind energy Product Chinese wind turbine blade manufacturer. Coordinates 31.574011°, 120.288223° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":31.574011,"lon":120.288223,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

76

First wind turbine blade delivered to Pantex | National Nuclear...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Work crews began to erect the first of five wind turbines that will make up the Pantex Renewable Energy Project (PREP). The first wind turbine blade was delivered to the site...

77

Steam Turbine Blade Failure Root Cause Analysis Guide  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Steam Turbine Blade Failure Root Cause Analysis Guide is a concise reference written for operators to plan and conduct an investigation into the most probable causes of a steam turbine blade (bucket) failure. The report provides both an overview and step-by-step approach to identifying the damage mechanisms most common to turbine blade failures. It proceeds to show how damage mechanisms are related to the operating history prior to the blades failure and how they are evaluated to establish their role as ...

2008-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

78

Turbine blade having a constant thickness airfoil skin  

SciTech Connect

A turbine blade is provided for a gas turbine comprising: a support structure comprising a base defining a root of the blade and a framework extending radially outwardly from the base, and an outer skin coupled to the support structure framework. The skin has a generally constant thickness along substantially the entire radial extent thereof. The framework and the skin define an airfoil of the blade.

Marra, John J; McNamee, Sara

2012-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

79

Effects of Manufacturing Deviations on Core Compressor Blade Performance.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??There has been recent incentive for understanding the possible deleterious effects that manufacturing deviations can have on compressor blade performance. This is of particular importance… (more)

De Losier, Clayton Ray

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Advances in Hydroelectric Turbine Manufacturing and Repair  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

About this Symposium. Meeting, Materials Science & Technology 2013. Symposium, Advances in Hydroelectric Turbine Manufacturing and Repair. Sponsorship ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "turbine blade manufacturer" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Turbine airfoil manufacturing technology  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The specific goal of this program is to define manufacturing methods that will allow single crystal technology to be applied to complex-cored airfoils components for power generation applications. Tasks addressed include: alloy melt practice to reduce the sulfur content; improvement of casting process; core materials design; and grain orientation control.

Kortovich, C. [PCC Airfoils, Inc., Beachwood, OH (United States)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

82

First Hybrid Turbulence Modeling for Turbine Blade Cooling Sagar Kapadia*  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

First Hybrid Turbulence Modeling for Turbine Blade Cooling Sagar Kapadia* and Subrata Roy turbines require proper cooling mechanism to protect the airfoils from thermal stresses generated by exposure to hot combustion gases. The problem becomes aggravated by the growing trend to use higher turbine

Roy, Subrata

83

Determining effects of turbine blades on fluid motion  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Disclosed is a technique for simulating wind interaction with wind turbines. A turbine blade is divided into radial sections. The effect that each of these radial sections has on the velocities in Eulerian computational cells they overlap is determined. The effect is determined using Lagrangian techniques such that the calculations need not include wind components in the radial direction. A force on each radial section of turbine blade is determined. This force depends on the axial and azimuthal components of the fluid flow in the computational cell and the geometric properties of the turbine blade. The force on the turbine blade is fed back to effect the fluid flow in the computational cell for the next time step.

Linn, Rodman Ray (Los Alamos, NM); Koo, Eunmo (Los Alamos, NM)

2011-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

84

Determining effects of turbine blades on fluid motion  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Disclosed is a technique for simulating wind interaction with wind turbines. A turbine blade is divided into radial sections. The effect that each of these radial sections has on the velocities in Eulerian computational cells they overlap is determined. The effect is determined using Lagrangian techniques such that the calculations need not include wind components in the radial direction. A force on each radial section of turbine blade is determined. This force depends on the axial and azimuthal components of the fluid flow in the computational cell and the geometric properties of the turbine blade. The force on the turbine blade is fed back to effect the fluid flow in the computational cell for the next time step.

Linn, Rodman Ray (Los Alamos, NM); Koo, Eunmo (Los Alamos, NM)

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Analyses of Pressing Process for Francis Turbines Blades of ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

About this Abstract. Meeting, Materials Science & Technology 2013. Symposium, Advances in Hydroelectric Turbine Manufacturing and Repair. Presentation ...

86

The use of carbon fibers in wind turbine blade design: A SERI-8 blade example  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The benefit of introducing carbon fibers in a wind turbine blade was evaluated. The SERI-8 wind turbine blade was used as a baseline for study. A model of the blade strength and stiffness properties was created using the 3D-Beam code; the predicted geometry and structural properties were validated against available data and static test results. Different enhanced models, which represent different volumes of carbon fibers in the blade, were also studied for two design options: with and without bend-twist coupling. Studies indicate that hybrid blades have excellent structural properties compared to the all-glass SERI-8 blade. Recurring fabrication costs were also included in the study. The cost study highlights the importance of the labor-cost to material-cost ratio in the cost benefits and penalties of fabrication of a hybrid glass and carbon blade.

ONG,CHENG-HUAT; TSAI,STEPHEN W.

2000-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

The application of non-destructive techniques to the testing of a wind turbine blade  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

NonDestructive Testing (NDT), also called NonDestructive Evaluation (NDE), is commonly used to monitor structures before, during, and after testing. This paper reports on the use of two NDT techniques to monitor the behavior of a typical wind turbine blade during a quasi-static test-to-failure. The two NDT techniques used were acoustic emission and coherent optical. The former monitors the acoustic energy produced by the blade as it is loaded. The latter uses electron shearography to measure the differences in surface displacements between two load states. Typical results are presented to demonstrate the ability of these two techniques to locate and monitor both high damage regions and flaws in the blade structure. Furthermore, this experiment highlights the limitations in the techniques that must be addressed before one or both can be transferred, with a high probability of success, to the inspection and monitoring of turbine blades during the manufacturing process and under normal operating conditions.

Sutherland, H.; Beattie, A.; Hansche, B. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Musial, W.; Allread, J.; Johnson, J. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States); Summers, M. [United Technologies, West Palm Beach, FL (United States)

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

An evolutionary environment for wind turbine blade design  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The aerodynamic design of wind turbine blades is carried out by means of evolutionary techniques within an automatic design environment based on evolution. A simple, fast, and robust aerodynamic simulator is embedded in the design environment to predict ...

V. Díaz Casás; F. Lopez Peña; A. Lamas; R. J. Duro

2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Evaluation of Aeroelastically Tailored Small Wind Turbine Blades Final Project Report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Evaluation of Aeroelastically Tailored Small Wind Turbine Blades Final Report Global Energy Concepts, LLC (GEC) has performed a conceptual design study concerning aeroelastic tailoring of small wind turbine blades. The primary objectives were to evaluate ways that blade/rotor geometry could be used to enable cost-of-energy reductions by enhancing energy capture while constraining or mitigating blade costs, system loads, and related component costs. This work builds on insights developed in ongoing adaptive-blade programs but with a focus on application to small turbine systems with isotropic blade material properties and with combined blade sweep and pre-bending/pre-curving to achieve the desired twist coupling. Specific goals of this project are to: (A) Evaluate and quantify the extent to which rotor geometry can be used to realize load-mitigating small wind turbine rotors. Primary aspects of the load mitigation are: (1) Improved overspeed safety affected by blades twisting toward stall in response to speed increases. (2) Reduced fatigue loading affected by blade twisting toward feather in response to turbulent gusts. (B) Illustrate trade-offs and design sensitivities for this concept. (C) Provide the technical basis for small wind turbine manufacturers to evaluate this concept and commercialize if the technology appears favorable. The SolidWorks code was used to rapidly develop solid models of blade with varying shapes and material properties. Finite element analyses (FEA) were performed using the COSMOS code modeling with tip-loads and centripetal accelerations. This tool set was used to investigate the potential for aeroelastic tailoring with combined planform sweep and pre-curve. An extensive matrix of design variables was investigated, including aerodynamic design, magnitude and shape of planform sweep, magnitude and shape of blade pre-curve, material stiffness, and rotor diameter. The FEA simulations resulted in substantial insights into the structural response of these blades. The trends were used to identify geometries and rotor configurations that showed the greatest promise for achieving beneficial aeroelastic response. The ADAMS code was used to perform complete aeroelastic simulations of selected rotor configurations; however, the results of these simulations were not satisfactory. This report documents the challenges encountered with the ADAMS simulations and presents recommendations for further development of this concept for aeroelastically tailored small wind turbine blades.

Griffin, Dayton A.

2005-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

90

Fatigue Testing of 9 m Carbon Fiber Wind Turbine Research Blades  

SciTech Connect

Fatigue testing was conducted on Carbon Experimental and Twist-Bend Experimental (CX-100 and TX-100) 9-m wind turbine research blades. The CX-100 blade was designed to investigate the use of a carbon spar cap to reduce weight and increase stiffness while being incorporated using conventional manufacturing techniques. The TX-100 blade used carbon in the outboard portion of the skin to produce twist-bend coupling to passively alleviate aerodynamic loads. In the fatigue tests, the CX-100 blade was loaded by a single hydraulic cylinder while the TX-100 blade was loaded via a hydraulically-actuated resonant loading system called the Universal Resonant Exciter. The blades were outfitted with approximately 30 strain gages as well as displacement and load sensors. Both blades survived to cycle counts sufficient to demonstrate a 20-year operational life. The CX-100 blade failed at approximately 1.6 million cycles because of a buckle and crack that formed and grew just outboard of max-chord. The TX-100 blade failed because of a crack that grew from the termination point of the spar cap at the midspan of the blade. This paper covers the results of the fatigue tests.

Paquette, J.; van Dam, J.; Hughes, S.; Johnson, J.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

User's Guide to MBC3: Multi-Blade Coordinate Transformation Code for 3-Bladed Wind Turbine  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This guide explains how to use MBC3, a MATLAB-based script NREL developed to perform multi-blade coordinate transformation of system matrices for three-bladed wind turbines. In its current form, MBC3 can be applied to system matrices generated by FAST.2.

Bir, G. S.

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Turbine blade squealer tip rail with fence members  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A turbine blade includes an airfoil, a blade tip section, a squealer tip rail, and a plurality of chordally spaced fence members. The blade tip section includes a blade tip floor located at an end of the airfoil distal from the root. The blade tip floor includes a pressure side and a suction side joined together at chordally spaced apart leading and trailing edges of the airfoil. The squealer tip rail extends radially outwardly from the blade tip floor adjacent to the suction side and extends from a first location adjacent to the airfoil trailing edge to a second location adjacent to the airfoil leading edge. The fence members are located between the airfoil leading and trailing edges and extend radially outwardly from the blade tip floor and axially from the squealer tip rail toward the pressure side.

Little, David A

2012-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

93

Blade-Vortex Interactions in High Pressure Steam Turbines  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A detailed experimental and numerical investigation of the transport of streamwise (passage) vortices in high-pressure axial turbines and their interaction with the downstream blade rows was performed. The results indicate large variations in the downstream flow field, notably the development of the secondary flows. The mechanism of passage vortex transport was studied in two differently configured high-pressure turbine stages. In the first configuration, the blades are radially stacked while the second configuration features three-dimensionally stacked high-pressure steam turbine blading. The stator hub passage vortex is chopped by the downstream blade row in a similar way to the wake. The bowed vortex tube near the inlet to the rotor appeared to develop two counter-rotating legs extending back to the leading edges of the adjacent blades. These were termed the suction side leg and the pressure side leg. The two legs of the incoming passage vortex then convect with the respective velocities on the blade surfaces. The results are discussed for the radially stacked turbine and the 3-D turbine separately.

Venkata Siva Prasad Chaluvadi

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Fatigue of Composite Material Beam Elements Representative of Wind Turbine Blade Substructure  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The database and analysis methods used to predict wind turbine blade structural performance for stiffness, static strength, dynamic response,and fatigue lifetime are validated through the design, fabrication, and testing of substructural elements. We chose a test specimen representative of wind turbine blade primary substructure to represent the spar area of a typical wind turbine blade. We then designed an I-beam with flanges and web to represent blade structure, using materials typical of many U.S.-manufactured blades. Our study included the fabrication and fatigue testing of 52 beams and many coupons of beam material. Fatigue lifetimes were consistent with predictions based on the coupon database. The final beam specimen proved to be a very useful tool for validating strength and lifetime predictions for a variety of flange and web materials, and is serving as a test bed to ongoing studies of structural details and the interaction between manufacturing and structural performance. Th e beam test results provide a significant validation of the coupon database and the methodologies for predicting fatigue of composite material beam elements.

Mandell, J. F.; Samborsky, D. D.; Combs, D. W.; Scott, M. E.; Cairns, D. S. (Department of Chemical Engineering, Montana State University)

1998-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

95

Dynamically Adjustable Wind Turbine Blades: Adaptive Turbine Blades, Blown Wing Technology for Low-Cost Wind Power  

SciTech Connect

Broad Funding Opportunity Announcement Project: Caitin is developing wind turbines with a control system that delivers compressed air from special slots located in the surface of its blades. The compressed air dynamically adjusts the aerodynamic performance of the blades, and can essentially be used to control lift, drag, and ultimately power. This control system has been shown to exhibit high levels of control in combination with an exceptionally fast response rate. The deployment of such a control system in modern wind turbines would lead to better management of the load on the system during peak usage, allowing larger blades to be deployed with a resulting increase in energy production.

2010-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

96

Sinomatech Wind Power Blade aka Sinoma Science Technology Wind Turbine  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Sinomatech Wind Power Blade aka Sinoma Science Technology Wind Turbine Sinomatech Wind Power Blade aka Sinoma Science Technology Wind Turbine Blade Co Ltd Jump to: navigation, search Name Sinomatech Wind Power Blade (aka Sinoma Science & Technology Wind Turbine Blade Co Ltd) Place Nanjing, Jiangsu Province, China Zip 210012 Sector Wind energy Product Jiangsu-based wind turbine blade manufactuer. Coordinates 32.0485°, 118.778969° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":32.0485,"lon":118.778969,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

97

An evaluation of wind turbine blade cross section analysis techniques.  

SciTech Connect

The blades of a modern wind turbine are critical components central to capturing and transmitting most of the load experienced by the system. They are complex structural items composed of many layers of fiber and resin composite material and typically, one or more shear webs. Large turbine blades being developed today are beyond the point of effective trial-and-error design of the past and design for reliability is always extremely important. Section analysis tools are used to reduce the three-dimensional continuum blade structure to a simpler beam representation for use in system response calculations to support full system design and certification. One model simplification approach is to analyze the two-dimensional blade cross sections to determine the properties for the beam. Another technique is to determine beam properties using static deflections of a full three-dimensional finite element model of a blade. This paper provides insight into discrepancies observed in outputs from each approach. Simple two-dimensional geometries and three-dimensional blade models are analyzed in this investigation. Finally, a subset of computational and experimental section properties for a full turbine blade are compared.

Paquette, Joshua A.; Griffith, Daniel Todd; Laird, Daniel L.; Resor, Brian Ray

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Flow Integrating Section for a Gas Turbine Engine in Which Turbine Blades are Cooled by Full Compressor Flow  

SciTech Connect

Routing of full compressor flow through hollow turbine blades achieves unusually effective blade cooling and allows a significant increase in turbine inlet gas temperature and, hence, engine efficiency. The invention, ''flow integrating section'' alleviates the turbine dissipation of kinetic energy of air jets leaving the hollow blades as they enter the compressor diffuser.

Steward, W. Gene

1999-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

99

Flow Integrating Section for a Gas Turbine Engine in Which Turbine Blades are Cooled by Full Compressor Flow  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Routing of full compressor flow through hollow turbine blades achieves unusually effective blade cooling and allows a significant increase in turbine inlet gas temperature and, hence, engine efficiency. The invention, ''flow integrating section'' alleviates the turbine dissipation of kinetic energy of air jets leaving the hollow blades as they enter the compressor diffuser.

Steward, W. Gene

1999-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

100

ADVANCED COMPOSITE WIND TURBINE BLADE DESIGN BASED ON DURABILITY AND DAMAGE TOLERANCE  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of the program was to demonstrate and verify Certification-by-Analysis (CBA) capability for wind turbine blades made from advanced lightweight composite materials. The approach integrated durability and damage tolerance analysis with robust design and virtual testing capabilities to deliver superior, durable, low weight, low cost, long life, and reliable wind blade design. The GENOA durability and life prediction software suite was be used as the primary simulation tool. First, a micromechanics-based computational approach was used to assess the durability of composite laminates with ply drop features commonly used in wind turbine applications. Ply drops occur in composite joints and closures of wind turbine blades to reduce skin thicknesses along the blade span. They increase localized stress concentration, which may cause premature delamination failure in composite and reduced fatigue service life. Durability and damage tolerance (D&DT) were evaluated utilizing a multi-scale micro-macro progressive failure analysis (PFA) technique. PFA is finite element based and is capable of detecting all stages of material damage including initiation and propagation of delamination. It assesses multiple failure criteria and includes the effects of manufacturing anomalies (i.e., void, fiber waviness). Two different approaches have been used within PFA. The first approach is Virtual Crack Closure Technique (VCCT) PFA while the second one is strength-based. Constituent stiffness and strength properties for glass and carbon based material systems were reverse engineered for use in D&DT evaluation of coupons with ply drops under static loading. Lamina and laminate properties calculated using manufacturing and composite architecture details matched closely published test data. Similarly, resin properties were determined for fatigue life calculation. The simulation not only reproduced static strength and fatigue life as observed in the test, it also showed composite damage and fracture modes that resemble those reported in the tests. The results show that computational simulation can be relied on to enhance the design of tapered composite structures such as the ones used in turbine wind blades. A computational simulation for durability, damage tolerance (D&DT) and reliability of composite wind turbine blade structures in presence of uncertainties in material properties was performed. A composite turbine blade was first assessed with finite element based multi-scale progressive failure analysis to determine failure modes and locations as well as the fracture load. D&DT analyses were then validated with static test performed at Sandia National Laboratories. The work was followed by detailed weight analysis to identify contribution of various materials to the overall weight of the blade. The methodology ensured that certain types of failure modes, such as delamination progression, are contained to reduce risk to the structure. Probabilistic analysis indicated that composite shear strength has a great influence on the blade ultimate load under static loading. Weight was reduced by 12% with robust design without loss in reliability or D&DT. Structural benefits obtained with the use of enhanced matrix properties through nanoparticles infusion were also assessed. Thin unidirectional fiberglass layers enriched with silica nanoparticles were applied to the outer surfaces of a wind blade to improve its overall structural performance and durability. The wind blade was a 9-meter prototype structure manufactured and tested subject to three saddle static loading at Sandia National Laboratory (SNL). The blade manufacturing did not include the use of any nano-material. With silica nanoparticles in glass composite applied to the exterior surfaces of the blade, the durability and damage tolerance (D&DT) results from multi-scale PFA showed an increase in ultimate load of the blade by 9.2% as compared to baseline structural performance (without nano). The use of nanoparticles lead to a delay in the onset of delamination. Load-displacement relati

Galib Abumeri; Frank Abdi (PhD)

2012-02-16T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "turbine blade manufacturer" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Numerical Simulation of Directional Solidification of Turbine Blade ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A very strict process control is needed to avoid stray grains. In recent years, liquid metal cooling (LMC) is used as a new process in manufacturing of the blade ...

102

On the impact of variability and assembly on turbine blade cooling flow and oxidation life  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The life of a turbine blade is dependent on the quantity and temperature of the cooling flow sup- plied to the blade. The focus of this thesis is the impact of variability on blade cooling flow and, subsequently, its impact ...

Sidwell, Carroll Vincent, 1972-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Evolution of Turbine Blade Deposits in an Accelerated Deposition Facility: Roughness and Thermal Analysis.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??During the operation of a gas turbine, ingested contaminants present in the air form deposits on the surfaces of the turbine blades. These deposits grow… (more)

Wammack, James Edward 1979-

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

The Production of Advanced Turbine Blades from P/M Superalloy ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Introduction. The continual increase in the severity of gas turbine operating conditions has led to a progressive replacement of forged turbine blades from the first.

105

Estimation of Blade and Tower Properties for the Gearbox Research Collaborative Wind Turbine  

SciTech Connect

This report documents the structural and modal properties of the blade and tower of a 3-bladed 750-kW upwind turbine to develop an aeroelastic model of the wind turbine.

Bir, G.S.; Oyague, F.

2007-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

NREL: Wind Research - Fabric-Covered Blades Could Make Wind Turbines...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fabric-Covered Blades Could Make Wind Turbines Cheaper and More Efficient A photo of a crew of workers watching as a wind blade is hauled up to a turbine for assembly. A new...

107

Experimental evaluation and modeling of a turbine blade with potassium evaporative cooling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A new method of turbine blade cooling, the Return Flow Cascade, has been developed in which vaporization of a liquid metal such as potassium is used to maintain the blade surface at a nearly uniform temperature. Turbine ...

Townsend, Jessica Lee

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Impact of aerothermal modeling on the estimation of turbine blade life  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The impact of aerothermal modeling on estimates of turbine blade heat transfer and life was assessed for three high pressure turbine blades. The work was conducted as part of a project aimed at the evaluation of the effect ...

Collin, Jean E., 1978-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

SMI 2012: Full Paper: Medial design of blades for hydroelectric turbines and ship propellers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present a method for constructing blades of hydroelectric turbines and ship propellers based on design parameters that possess a clear hydraulic meaning. The design process corresponds to the classical construction of a blade using the medial surface ... Keywords: B-spline representation, CAD-model, Hydroelectric turbine blade, Medial axis-based design, Propeller blade

M. Rossgatterer; B. Jüttler; M. Kapl; G. Della Vecchia

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Advanced multistage turbine blade aerodynamics, performance, cooling, and heat transfer  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The gas turbine has the potential for power production at the highest possible efficiency. The challenge is to ensure that gas turbines operate at the optimum efficiency so as to use the least fuel and produce minimum emissions. A key component to meeting this challenge is the turbine. Turbine performance, both aerodynamics and heat transfer, is one of the barrier advanced gas turbine development technologies. This is a result of the complex, highly three-dimensional and unsteady flow phenomena in the turbine. Improved turbine aerodynamic performance has been achieved with three-dimensional highly-loaded airfoil designs, accomplished utilizing Euler or Navier-Stokes Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) codes. These design codes consider steady flow through isolated blade rows. Thus they do not account for unsteady flow effects. However, unsteady flow effects have a significant impact on performance. Also, CFD codes predict the complete flow field. The experimental verification of these codes has traditionally been accomplished with point data - not corresponding plane field measurements. Thus, although advanced CFD predictions of the highly complex and three-dimensional turbine flow fields are available, corresponding data are not. To improve the design capability for high temperature turbines, a detailed understanding of the highly unsteady and three-dimensional flow through multi-stage turbines is necessary. Thus, unique data are required which quantify the unsteady three-dimensional flow through multi-stage turbine blade rows, including the effect of the film coolant flow. Also, as design CFD codes do not account for unsteady flow effects, the next logical challenge and the current thrust in CFD code development is multiple-stage analyses that account for the interactions between neighboring blade rows. Again, to verify and or direct the development of these advanced codes, complete three-dimensional unsteady flow field data are needed.

Fleeter, S.; Lawless, P.B. [Purdue Univ., West Lafayette, IN (United States). School of Mechanical Engineering

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

111

High Temperature Capabililty and Innovative Cooling with a Spar and Shell Turbine Blade - Florida Turbine Technologies  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Temperature Capability and Temperature Capability and Innovative Cooling with a Spar and Shell Turbine Blade-Florida Turbine Technologies Background Florida Turbine Technologies, Inc. (FTT) is currently developing advanced aerothermal technologies centered on spar and shell airfoil concepts meant to provide highly durable turbine components that require the lowest cooling flow possible. The spar-shell system represents a unique opportunity for the use of advanced, high-temperature materials

112

DOE Research Grant Leads to Gas Turbine Manufacturing Improvements...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DOE Research Grant Leads to Gas Turbine Manufacturing Improvements DOE Research Grant Leads to Gas Turbine Manufacturing Improvements August 16, 2011 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington,...

113

Gas Turbine Superalloy Material Property Handbook for Blades  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Published material property data on superalloy bucket (blade) materials used in land-based combustion turbines is meager and widely scattered in literature. This handbook provides a comprehensive resource of material property data for superalloys used in combustion turbine buckets. Such data are critical for use in remaining life assessment calculations, failure analysis, comparison of various alloys, and alloy selection. The material data presented in this handbook were developed from experimental alloy...

2003-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

114

WindPACT Turbine Design Scaling Studies Technical Area 1-Composite Blades for 80- to 120-Meter Rotor  

SciTech Connect

The United States Department of Energy (DOE) through the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) implemented the Wind Partnership for Advanced Component Technologies (WindPACT) program. As part of the WindPACT program, Global Energy Concepts, LLC (GEC), was awarded contract number YAM-0-30203-01 to examine Technical Area 1-Blade Scaling, Technical Area 2-Turbine Rotor and Blade Logistics, and Technical Area 3-Self-Erecting Towers. This report documents the results of GEC's Technical Area 1-Blade Scaling. The primary objectives of the Blade-Scaling Study are to assess the scaling of current materials and manufacturing technologies for blades of 40 to 60 meters in length, and to develop scaling curves of estimated cost and mass for rotor blades in that size range.

Griffin, D.A.

2001-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

115

Aerodynamic testing of a rotating wind turbine blade  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Aerodynamic, load, flow-visualization, and inflow measurements were taken on a downwind horizontal-axis wind turbine (HAWT). A video camera mounted on the rotor recorded video images of tufts attached to the low-pressure side of the blade. Strain gages, mounted every 10% of the blade's span, provided load and pressure measurements. Pressure taps at 32 chordwise positions recorded pressure distributions. Wind inflow was measured via a vertical-plane array of anemometers located 10 m upwind. The objectives of the test were to address whether airfoil pressure distributions measured on a rotating blade differed from those measured in the wind tunnel, if radial flow near or in the boundary layer of the airfoil affected pressure distributions, if dynamic stall could result in increased dynamic loads, and if the location of the separation boundary measured on the rotating blade agreed with that measured in two-dimensional flow in the wind tunnel. 6 refs., 9 figs., 1 tab.

Butterfield, C.P.; Nelsen, E.N.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

The application of nondestructive techniques to the testing of a wind turbine blade  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

NonDestructive Testing (NDT) is commonly used to monitor structures before, during and after testing. This paper reports on the use of two NDT techniques to monitor the behavior of a typical wind turbine blade during a quasi-static test-to-failure. The test used a three-point spanwise load distribution to load a 7.9-m blade to failure. The two NDT techniques used were acoustic emission and coherent optical. The former monitors the acoustic energy produced by the blade as it is loaded. The latter uses electronic shearography to measure the differences in surface displacements between two load states with an accuracy of a few microns. Typical results are presented to demonstrate the ability of these two techniques to locate and monitor both high damage regions and flaws in the blade structure. Further, this experiment highlights the limitations in the techniques that must be addressed before one or both can be transferred, with a high probability of success, to the inspection and monitoring of turbine blades during the manufacturing process and under normal operating conditions.

Sutherland, H.J. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (US); Musial, W. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (US)

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Oxide-dispersion-strengthened turbine blades, volume 1. [MA6000 alloy  

SciTech Connect

The objective of Project 4 was to develop a high-temperature, uncooled gas turbine blade using MA6000 alloy. The program objectives were achieved. Production scale up of the MA6000 alloy was achieved with a fair degree of tolerance to nonoptimum processing. The blade manufacturing process was also optimized. The mechanical, environmental, and physical property evaluations of MA6000 were conducted. The ultimate tensile strength, to about 704 C (130 F), is higher than DS MAR-M 247 but with a corresponding lower tensile elongation. Also, above 982 C (180 F) MA6000 tensile strength does not decrease as rapidly as MAR-M 247 because the ODS mechanism still remains active. Based on oxidation resistance and diffusional stability considerations, NiCrAlY coatings are recommended. CoCrAly coating should be applied on top of a thin NiCrAlY coating. Vibration tests, whirlpit tests, and a high-rotor-rig test were conducted to ensure successful completion of the engine test of the MA6000 TFE731 high pressure turbine blades. The results of these tests were acceptable. In production quantities, the cost of the Project 4 MA6000 blade is estimated to be about twice that of a cast DS MAR-M 247 blade.

Millan, P.P. Jr.; Mays, J.C.

1986-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Aeroelastic tailoring in wind-turbine blade applications  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper reviews issues related to the use of aeroelastic tailoring as a cost-effective, passive means to shape the power curve and reduce loads. Wind turbine blades bend and twist during operation, effectively altering the angle of attack, which in turn affects loads and energy production. There are blades now in use that have significant aeroelastic couplings, either on purpose or because of flexible and light-weight designs. Since aeroelastic effects are almost unavoidable in flexible blade designs, it may be desirable to tailor these effects to the authors advantage. Efforts have been directed at adding flexible devices to a blade, or blade tip, to passively regulate power (or speed) in high winds. It is also possible to build a small amount of desirable twisting into the load response of a blade with proper asymmetric fiber lay up in the blade skin. (Such coupling is akin to distributed {delta}{sub 3} without mechanical hinges.) The tailored twisting can create an aeroelastic effect that has payoff in either better power production or in vibration alleviation, or both. Several research efforts have addressed different parts of this issue. Research and development in the use of aeroelastic tailoring on helicopter rotors is reviewed. Potential energy gains as a function of twist coupling are reviewed. The effects of such coupling on rotor stability have been studied and are presented here. The ability to design in twist coupling with either stretching or bending loads is examined also.

Veers, P.; Lobitz, D. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Bir, G. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States). National Wind Technology Center

1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

A surface definition code for turbine blade surfaces  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A numerical interpolation scheme has been developed for generating the three-dimensional geometry of wind turbine blades. The numerical scheme consists of (1) creating the frame of the blade through the input of two or more airfoils at some specific spanwise stations and then scaling and twisting them according to the prescribed distributions of chord, thickness, and twist along the span of the blade; (2) transforming the physical coordinates of the blade frame into a computational domain that complies with the interpolation requirements; and finally (3) applying the bi-tension spline interpolation method, in the computational domain, to determine the coordinates of any point on the blade surface. Detailed descriptions of the overall approach to and philosophy of the code development are given along with the operation of the code. To show the usefulness of the bi-tension spline interpolation code developed, two examples are given, namely CARTER and MICON blade surface generation. Numerical results are presented in both graphic data forms. The solutions obtained in this work show that the computer code developed can be a powerful tool for generating the surface coordinates for any three-dimensional blade.

Yang, S.L. [Michigan Technological Univ., Houghton, MI (United States); Oryang, D.; Ho, M.J. [Tuskegee Univ., AL (United States)

1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Development of Inconel Alloy MA 6000 Turbine Blades for ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

the alloy by gas turbine manufacturers in the U.S. ceased. This was the case in the U.S. until ... the required process technologies. The vehicle for the work was a

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "turbine blade manufacturer" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Aero engine test experience with CMSX-4{reg_sign} alloy single-crystal turbine blades  

SciTech Connect

A team approach involving a turbine engine company (Rolls-Royce), its single-crystal casting facilities, and a superalloy developer and ingot manufacturer (Cannon-Muskegon), utilizing the concepts of simultaneous engineering, has been used to develop CMSX-4 alloy successfully for turbine blade applications. CMSX-4 alloy is a second-generation nickel-base single-crystal superalloy containing 3 percent (wt) rhenium (Re) and 70 percent volume fraction of the coherent {gamma}{prime} precipitate strengthening phase. The paper details the single-crystal casting process and heat treatment manufacturing development for turbine blades in CMSX-4 alloy. Competitive single-crystal casting yields are being achieved in production and extensive vacuum heat treatment experience confirms CMSX-4 alloy to have a practical production solution heat treat/homogenization ``window.`` The creep-rupture data-base on CMSX-4 alloy now includes 325 data points from 17 heats including 3,630 kg (8,000 lb) production size heats. An appreciable portion of this data was machined-from-blade (MFB) properties, which indicate turbine blade component capabilities based on single-crystal casting process, component configuration, and heat treatment. The use of hot isostatic pressing (HIP) has been shown to eliminate single-crystal casting micropores, which along with the essential absence of {gamma}/{gamma}{prime} eutectic phase, carbides, stable oxide, nitride and sulfide inclusions, results in remarkably high mechanical fatigue properties, with smooth and particularly notched specimens. The Re addition has been shown not only to benefit creep and mechanical fatigue strength, but also bare oxidation, hot corrosion, and coating performance. The high level of balanced properties determined by extensive laboratory evaluation has been confirmed during engine testing of the Rolls-Royce Pegasus turbofan.

Fullagar, K.P.L.; Broomfield, R.W.; Hulands, M. [Rolls-Royce PLC, Derby (United Kingdom). Aerospace Group; Harris, K.; Erickson, G.L.; Sikkenga, S.L. [Cannon-Muskegon Corp., Muskegon, MI (United States). SPS Technologies

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Verification of creep performance of a ceramic gas turbine blade  

SciTech Connect

Tensile creep tests were carried out on a Norton NT164 silicon nitride ceramic turbine blade containing 4 wt. % Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} sintering additive at 1,370 C in air under selected stress levels. The objective of this study was to measure the creep properties of test specimens extracted from a complex shaped ceramic gas turbine blade to verify the response of actual components. The creep results indicated that specimens from both the airfoil and dovetail sections exhibited creep rates that were about 4 to 100 times higher than those obtained from both the buttonhead and dogbone creep specimens machined from the developmental billets fabricated with the same composition and processing procedures. Electron microscopy analyses suggested that high creep rates and short lifetimes observed in specimens extracted from the turbine blade resulted from a higher glassy phase(s) content and smaller number density of elongated grain microstructure. Silicon nitride ceramics with an in-situ reinforced elongated microstructure have been the primary candidates for both advanced automotive and land-based gas turbine engine applications.

Lin, H.T.; Becher, P.F.; Ferber, M.K. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Metals and Ceramics Div.; Parthasarathy, V. [Solar Turbines Inc., San Diego, CA (United States)

1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Application of BSTRAIN software for wind turbine blade testing  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

NREL currently operates the largest structural testing facility in US for testing wind turbine blades. A data acquisition system was developed to measure blade response and monitor test status; it is called BSTRAIN (Blade Structural Test Real-time Acquisition Interface Network). Software objectives were to develop a robust, easy-to-use computer program that could automatically collect data from static and fatigue blade tests without missing any significant events or overloading the computer with excess data. The program currently accepts inputs from up to 32 channels but can be expanded to over 1000 channels. In order to reduce the large amount of data collected during long fatigue tests, options for real-time data processing were developed including peak-valley series collection, peak-valley decimation, block decimation, and continuous recording of all data. Other BSTRAIN features include automated blade stiffness checks, remote terminal access to blade test status, and automated VCR control for continuous test recording. Results from tests conducted with the software revealed areas for improvement including test accuracy, post-processing analysis, and further data reduction.

Musial, W D; Clark, M E [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States); Stensland, T [Stensland (T.), Lakewood, CO (United States)

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Experimental Investigation of Film Cooling Effectiveness on Gas Turbine Blades  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

High turbine inlet temperature becomes necessary for increasing thermal efficiency of modern gas turbines. To prevent failure of turbine components, advance cooling technologies have been applied to different portions of turbine blades. The detailed film cooling effectiveness distributions along a rotor blade has been studied under combined effects of upstream trailing edge unsteady wake with coolant ejection by the pressure sensitive paint (PSP). The experiment is conducted in a low speed wind tunnel with a five blade linear cascade and exit Reynolds number is 370,000. The density ratios for both blade and trailing edge coolant ejection range from 1.5 to 2.0. Blade blowing ratios are 0.5 and 1.0 on suction surface and 1.0 and 2.0 on pressure surface. Trailing edge jet blowing ratio and Strouhal number are 1.0 and 0.12, respectively. Results show the unsteady wake reduces overall effectiveness. However, the unsteady wake with trailing edge coolant ejection enhances overall effectiveness. Results also show that the overall effectiveness increases by using heavier coolant for ejection and blade film cooling. Leading edge film cooling has been investigated using PSP. There are two test models: seven and three-row of film holes for simulating vane and blade, respectively. Four film holes’ configurations are used for both models: radial angle cylindrical holes, compound angle cylindrical holes, radial angle shaped holes, and compound angle shaped holes. Density ratios are 1.0 to 2.0 while blowing ratios are 0.5 to 1.5. Experiments were conducted in a low speed wind tunnel with Reynolds number 100,900. The turbulence intensity near test model is about 7%. The results show the shaped holes have overall higher effectiveness than cylindrical holes for both designs. As increasing density ratio, density effect on shaped holes becomes evident. Radial angle holes perform better than compound angle holes as increasing blowing and density ratios. Increasing density ratio generally increases overall effectiveness for all configurations and blowing ratios. One exception occurs for compound angle and radial angle shaped hole of three-row design at lower blowing ratio. Effectiveness along stagnation row reduces as increasing density ratio due to coolant jet with insufficient momentum caused by heavier density coolant, shaped hole, and stagnation row.

Li, Shiou-Jiuan

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Examination, evaluation, and repair of laminated wood blades after service on the Mod-OA wind turbine  

SciTech Connect

As a result of about 7 years of effort at the NASA Lewis Research Center, laminated wood blades were designed, fabricated, and installed on a 200-kW wind turbine (Mod-OA). The machine uses a two-blade rotor with a diameter of 38.1 m (125 ft). Each blade weighs less than 1361 kg (3000 lb). After operating in the field, two blade sets were returned for inspection. One set had been in Hawaii for 17 months (7844 h of operation) and the other had been at Block Island, Rhode Island, for 26 months (22 months operating - 7564 h). The Hawaii set was returned because one of the studs that holds the blade to the hub had failed. This was found to be caused by a combination of improper installation and inadequate corrosion protection. No other problems were found. The broken stud (along with four others that were badly corroded) was replaced and the blades are now in storage. The Block Island set of blades was returned at the completion of the test program, but one blade was found to have developed a crack in the leading edge along the entire span. This crack was found to be the result of a manufacturing process problem but was not structurally critical. When a load-deflection test was conducted on the cracked blade, the response was identical to that measured before installation. In general, the laminate quality of both blade sets was excellent. No significant internal delamination or structural defects were found in any blade. The stud bonding process requires close tolerance control and adequate corrosion protection, but studs can be removed and replaced without major problems. Moisture content stabilization does not appear to be a problem, and laminated wood blades are satisfactory for long-term operation on Mod-OA wind turbines.

Faddoul, J.R.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Aluminum-blade development for the Mod-0A 200-kilowatt wind turbine  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report documents the operating experience with two aluminum blades used on the DOE/NASA Mod-0A 200-kilowatt wind turbine located at Clayton, New Mexico. Each Mod-0A aluminum blade is 59.9 feet long and weighs 2360 pounds. The aluminum Mod-0A blade design requirements, the selected design, fabrication procedures, and the blade analyses are discussed. A detailed chronology is presented on the operating experience of the Mod-0A aluminum blades used at Clayton, New Mexico. Blade structural damage was experienced. Inspection and damage assessment were required. Structural modifications that were incorporated to the blades successfully extended the useful operating life of the blades. The aluminum blades completed the planned 2 years of operation of the Clayton wind turbine. The blades were removed from service in August 1980 to allow testing of advanced technology wood composite blades.

Linscott, B.S.; Shaltens, R.K.; Eggers, A.G.

1981-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Steam as turbine blade coolant: Experimental data generation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Steam as a coolant is a possible option to cool blades in high temperature gas turbines; however there is practically no experimental data. This work deals with an attempt to generate such data and with the design of an experimental setup used for the purpose. Initially, in order to guide the direction of experiments, a preliminary theoretical and empirical prediction of the expected experimental data is performed and is presented here. This initial analysis also compares the coolant properties of steam and air.

Wilmsen, B.; Engeda, A.; Lloyd, J.R. [Michigan State Univ., East Lansing, MI (United States). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

128

Preform spar cap for a wind turbine rotor blade  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A spar cap for a wind turbine rotor blade. The spar cap may include multiple preform components. The multiple preform components may be planar sheets having a swept shape with a first end and a second end. The multiple preform components may be joined by mating the first end of a first preform component to the second end of a next preform component, forming the spar cap.

Livingston, Jamie T. (Simpsonville, SC); Driver, Howard D. (Greer, SC); van Breugel, Sjef (Enschede, NL); Jenkins, Thomas B. (Cantonment, FL); Bakhuis, Jan Willem (Nijverdal, NL); Billen, Andrew J. (Daarlerveen, NL); Riahi, Amir (Pensacola, FL)

2011-07-12T23:59:59.000Z

129

Vibration and Structural Response of Hybrid Wind Turbine Blades  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Renewable energy is a serious alternative to deliver the energy needs of an increasing world population and improve economic activity. Wind energy provides better environmental and economic benefits in comparison with the other renewable energy sources. Wind energy is capable of providing 72 TW (TW = 10^12 W) of electric power, which is approximately four and half times the world energy consumption of 15.8 TW as reported in 2006. Since power output extracted from wind turbines is proportional to the square of the blade length and the cube of the wind speed, wind turbine size has grown rapidly in the last two decades to match the increase in power output. As the blade length increases, so does its weight opening up design possibilities to introduce hybrid glass and carbon fiber composite materials as lightweight structural load bearing alternatives. Herein, we investigate the feasibility of introducing modular composite tubulars as well as hybrid sandwich composite skins in the next generation blades. After selecting a target energy output, 8 MW with 80 m blade, airfoil geometry and the layup for the skin as well as internal reinforcements are proposed. They are incorporated into the computational blade via linear shell elements for the skin, and linear beam elements for the composite tubulars to assess the relationship between weight reduction and structural performance. Computational simulations are undertaken to understand the static and dynamic regimes; specifically, displacements, stresses, and vibration modes. The results showed that the composite layers did not exhibit any damage. However, in the balsa core of the sandwich skin, the von Mises stress exceeded its allowable at wind speeds ranging from 11.0 m/sec to 12.6 m/sec. In the blades with composite tubular reinforcement, two different types of damage are observed: a. Stress concentrations at the tubular-skin attachments, and b. Highest von Mises stress caused by the flapping bending moment. The vibration studies revealed a strong coupling mode, bending and twist, at the higher natural frequencies of the blade with tubular truss configuration. The weight saving measures in developing lighter blades in this study did not detract from the blades structural response for the selected load cases.

Nanami, Norimichi

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Spanwise aerodynamic loads on a rotating wind turbine blade  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Wind turbine performance and load predictions depend on accurate airfoil performance data. Wind tunnel test data are typically used which accurately describe two-dimensional airfoil performance characteristics. Usually these data are only available for a range of angles of attack from 0 to 15 deg, which excludes the stall characteristics. Airfoils on stall-controlled wind turbines operate in deep stall in medium to high winds. Therefore it is very important to know how the airfoil will perform in these high load conditions. Butterfield et al. have shown that three-dimensional effects and rotation of the blade modify the two-dimensional performance of the airfoil. These effects are modified to different degrees throughout the blade span. The Solar Energy Research Institute (SERI) has conducted a series of tests to measure the spanwise variation of airfoil performance characteristics on a rotating wind turbine blade. Maximum lift coefficients were measured to be 200% greater than wind tunnel results at the 30% span. Stall characteristics were generally modified throughout the span. Lift characteristics were unmodified for low to medium angles of attack. This paper discusses these test results for four spanwise locations. 8 refs., 12 figs.

Butterfield, C.P.; Simms, D.; Musial, W.; Scott, G.

1990-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

NREL: Technology Transfer - Fabric-Covered Blades Could Make Wind Turbines  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fabric-Covered Blades Could Make Wind Turbines Cheaper and More Efficient Fabric-Covered Blades Could Make Wind Turbines Cheaper and More Efficient A photo of a crew of workers watching as a wind blade is hauled up to a turbine for assembly. A new fabric-wrapped wind blade could eventually replace the traditional fiberglass blade, providing for lighter turbine components that could be built and assembled on site. January 2, 2013 A new design that calls for wrapping architectural fabric around metal wind turbine blades-instead of the traditional fiberglass-could be the latest revolution in dramatically reducing the cost of wind-produced power. That's the focus of a new project that partners NREL with General Electric (GE) and Virginia Polytechnic Institute & State University. Together, they are rethinking the way wind blades are designed,

132

Fish Passage Assessment of an Advanced Hydropower Turbine and Conventional Turbine Using Blade-strike Modeling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the Columbia and Snake River basins, several species of Pacific salmon were listed under the Endangered Species Act of 1973 due to significant declines of fish population. Dam operators and design engineers are thus faced with the task of making those hydroelectric facilities more ecologically friendly through changes in hydro-turbine design and operation. Public Utility District No. 2 of Grant County, Washington, applied for re-licensing from the U.S. Federal Energy Regulatory Commission to replace the 10 turbines at Wanapum Dam with advanced hydropower turbines that were designed to increase power generation and improve fish passage conditions. We applied both deterministic and stochastic blade-strike models to the newly installed turbine and an existing turbine. Modeled probabilities were compared to the results of a large-scale live fish survival study and a sensor fish study under the same operational parameters. Overall, injury rates predicted by the deterministic model were higher than experimental rates of injury while those predicted by the stochastic model were in close agreement with experiment results. Fish orientation at the time of entry into the plane of the leading edges of the turbine runner blades was an important factor contributing to uncertainty in modeled results. The advanced design turbine had slightly higher modeled injury rates than the existing turbine design; however, there was no statistical evidence that suggested significant differences in blade-strike injuries between the two turbines and the hypothesis that direct fish survival rate through the advanced hydropower turbine is equal or better than that through the conventional turbine could not be rejected.

Deng, Zhiqun; Carlson, Thomas J.; Dauble, Dennis D.; Ploskey, Gene R.

2011-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

133

Microsoft Word - Turbine Manufactures MOU FINAL_5-31-08_.doc...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Microsoft Word - Turbine Manufactures MOU FINAL5-31-08.doc Microsoft Word - Turbine Manufactures MOU FINAL5-31-08.doc Microsoft Word - Turbine Manufactures MOU...

134

Parametric Study of Turbine Blade Internal Cooling and Film Cooling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Gas turbine engines are extensively used in the aviation and power generation industries. They are used as topping cycles in combined cycle power plants, or as stand alone power generation units. Gains in thermodynamic efficiency can be realized by increasing the turbine inlet temperatures. Since modern turbine inlet temperatures exceed the melting point of the constituent superalloys, it is necessary to provide an aggressive cooling system. Relatively cool air, ducted from the compressor of the engine is used to remove heat from the hot turbine blade. This air flows through passages in the hollow blade (internal cooling), and is also ejected onto the surface of the blade to form an insulating film (film cooling). Modern land-based gas turbine engines use high Reynolds number internal flow to cool their internal passages. The first part of this study focuses on experiments pertaining to passages with Reynolds numbers of up to 400,000. Common turbulator designs (45degree parallel sharp-edged and round-edged) ribs are studied. Older correlations are found to require corrections in order to be valid in the high Reynolds number parameter space. The effect of rotation on heat transfer in a typical three-pass serpentine channel is studied using a computational model with near-wall refinement. Results from this computational study indicate that the hub experiences abnormally high heat transfer under rotation. An experimental study is conducted at Buoyancy numbers similar to an actual engine on a wedge shaped model trailing edge, roughened with pin-fins and equipped with slot ejection. Results show an asymmetery between the leading and trailing surfaces due to rotation - a difference which is subdued due to the provision of pin-fins. Film cooling effectiveness is measured by the PSP mass transfer analogy technique in two different configurations: a flat plate and a typical high pressure turbine blade. Parameters studied include a step immediately upstream of a row of holes; the Strouhal number (quantifying rotor-stator interaction) and coolant to mainstream density ratio. Results show a deterioration in film cooling effectiveness with on increasing the Strouhal number. Using a coolant with a higher density results in higher film cooling effectiveness.

Rallabandi, Akhilesh P.

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Rotationally Augmented Flow Structures and Time Varying Loads on Turbine Blades: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

To better understand wind turbine flow physics, time dependent blade surface pressure data were acquired from the NREL Unsteady Aerodynamics Experiment.

Schreck, S. J.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Angel wing seals for blades of a gas turbine and methods for ...  

Wind Energy; Partners (27) Visual Patent Search; Success Stories; News; Events; Angel wing seals for blades of a gas turbine and methods for determining angel wing ...

137

Structural Testing of 9 m Carbon Fiber Wind Turbine Research Blades: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper outlines the results of tests conducted on three 9-m carbon fiber wind turbine blades designed through a research program initiated by Sandia National Laboratories.

Paquette, J.; van Dam, J.; Hughes, S.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Evaluation of the Distortion of a Hydro Turbine Blade during Heat ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Evaluation of the Distortion of a Hydro Turbine Blade during Heat Treatment Process. Author(s), Jinwu Kang. On-Site Speaker (Planned) ...

139

PPG and MAG Team Up for Turbine Blade Research | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

PPG and MAG Team Up for Turbine Blade Research PPG and MAG Team Up for Turbine Blade Research PPG and MAG Team Up for Turbine Blade Research May 14, 2010 - 12:39pm Addthis Lindsay Gsell For more than 15 years, PPG Industries has been supplying fiberglass to the wind turbine production industry. Now, with more than $700,000 in Recovery Act funds, PPG and partner MAG Industrial Automation Systems are researching materials and processes that could result in stronger and more reliable wind blades. "Current materials need to be optimized to meet the demanding performance needs of today's largest wind blade designs," said Cheryl Richards, PPG global marketing manager in wind energy. According to Cheryl, wind turbine blades are produced by combining dry fiber glass fabrics with a strong resin to form a composite. This method is widely used in production,

140

Multi-piece wind turbine rotor blades and wind turbines incorporating same  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A multisection blade for a wind turbine includes a hub extender having a pitch bearing at one end, a skirt or fairing having a hole therethrough and configured to mount over the hub extender, and an outboard section configured to couple to the pitch bearing.

Moroz; Emilian Mieczyslaw (San Diego, CA)

2008-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "turbine blade manufacturer" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Modal testing of the TX-100 wind turbine blade.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This test report covers the SNL modal test results for two nominally identical TX-100 wind turbine blades. The TX-100 blade design is unique in that it features a passive braking, force-shedding mechanism where bending and torsion are coupled to produce desirable aerodynamic characteristics. A specific aim of this test is to characterize the coupling between bending and torsional dynamics. The results of the modal tests and the subsequent analysis characterize the natural frequencies, damping, and mode shapes of the individual blades. The results of this report are expected to be used for model validation--the frequencies and mode shapes from the experimental analysis can be compared with those of a finite-element analysis. Damping values are included in the results of these tests to potentially improve the fidelity of numerical simulations, although numerical finite element models typically have no means of predicting structural damping characteristics. Thereafter, an additional objective of the test is achieved in evaluating the test to test and unit variation in the modal parameters of the two blades.

Reese, Sarah; Griffith, Daniel Todd; Casias, Miguel; Simmermacher, Todd William; Smith, Gregory A.

2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Iskra Wind Turbine Manufacturers Ltd | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Iskra Wind Turbine Manufacturers Ltd Iskra Wind Turbine Manufacturers Ltd Jump to: navigation, search Name Iskra Wind Turbine Manufacturers Ltd Place Nottingham, United Kingdom Sector Wind energy Product Iskra manufactures and markets the AT5-1 home-sized wind turbine rated at 5.3 kW, suitable for low wind speeds. References Iskra Wind Turbine Manufacturers Ltd[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Iskra Wind Turbine Manufacturers Ltd is a company located in Nottingham, United Kingdom . References ↑ "Iskra Wind Turbine Manufacturers Ltd" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Iskra_Wind_Turbine_Manufacturers_Ltd&oldid=347129" Categories: Clean Energy Organizations

143

An Innovative Technique for Evaluating the Integrity and Durability of Wind Turbine Blade Composites - Final Project Report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

To build increasingly larger, lightweight, and robust wind turbine blades for improved power output and cost efficiency, durability of the blade, largely resulting from its structural composites selection and aerodynamic shape design, is of paramount concern. The safe/reliable operation of structural components depends critically on the selection of materials that are resistant to damage and failure in the expected service environment. An effective surveillance program is also necessary to monitor the degradation of the materials in the course of service. Composite materials having high specific strength/stiffness are desirable for the construction of wind turbines. However, most high-strength materials tend to exhibit low fracture toughness. That is why the fracture toughness of the composite materials under consideration for the manufacture of the next generation of wind turbines deserves special attention. In order to achieve the above we have proposed to develop an innovative technology, based on spiral notch torsion test (SNTT) methodology, to effectively investigate the material performance of turbine blade composites. SNTT approach was successfully demonstrated and extended to both epoxy and glass fiber composite materials for wind turbine blades during the performance period. In addition to typical Mode I failure mechanism, the mixed-mode failure mechanism induced by the wind turbine service environments and/or the material mismatch of the composite materials was also effectively investigated using SNTT approach. The SNTT results indicate that the proposed protocol not only provides significant advance in understanding the composite failure mechanism, but also can be readily utilized to assist the development of new turbine blade composites.

Wang, Jy-An John [ORNL; Ren, Fei [ORNL; Tan, Ting [ORNL; Mandell, John [Montana State University; Agastra, Pancasatya [Montana State University

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Blade Offset and Pitch Effects on a High Solidity Vertical Axis Wind Turbine  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ABSTRACT A high solidity, small scale, 2.5m diameter by 3m high Vertical Axis Wind Turbine (VAWT, performance 1. INTRODUCTION Small scale vertical axis wind turbines (VAWTs) show potential for urban rooftop turbines. Keywords: Vertical Axis Wind Turbine, VAWT, airfoil, pitch, blade, mount, offset, high solidity

Tullis, Stephen

145

PREDICTION OF DELAM INATION IN WIND TURBINE BLADE STRUCTURAL DETAILS John F. Mandell, Douglas S. Cairns  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in Reference 3, available on the Sandia web site www.sandia.gov/Renewable_Energy/Wind_Energy/. DELAMINATION1 PREDICTION OF DELAM INATION IN WIND TURBINE BLADE STRUCTURAL DETAILS John F. Mandell, Douglas S materials structures such as wind turbine blades. Design methodologies to prevent such failures have

146

Ceramic blade attachment system  

SciTech Connect

A retainer ring is arranged to mount turbine blades to a turbine disk so that aerodynamic forces produced by a gas turbine engine are transferred from the turbine blades to the turbine disk to cause the turbine blades and turbine disk to rotate, but so that centrifugal forces of the turbine blades resulting from the rotation of the turbine blades and turbine disk are not transferred from the turbine blades to the turbine disk.

Boyd, Gary L. (Alpine, CA)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Ceramic blade attachment system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A retainer ring is arranged to mount turbine blades to a turbine disk so that aerodynamic forces produced by a gas turbine engine are transferred from the turbine blades to the turbine disk to cause the turbine blades and turbine disk to rotate, but so that centrifugal forces of the turbine blades resulting from the rotation of the turbine blades and turbine disk are not transferred from the turbine blades to the turbine disk. 6 figures.

Boyd, G.L.

1995-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

148

Ceramic turbine components research and development. Part 1. Ceramic rotor-blade development. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The principal objective of this program was to develop (through design, analysis and laboratory spin testing) the design techniques for uncooled ceramic rotor blades. Present-day materials, fabrication techniques and system operating conditions were assumed in the program. The unique compound curvature dovetail attachment concept was generated and two configurations of this concept were generated for detailed study. In addition a three-piece blade assembly consisting of ceramic blade/superalloy intermediate piece/metal disk was conceived. An additional important design feature was the use of a compliant layer pad between ceramic and metal contact surfaces. Silicon nitride root forms of two preliminary root designs with flat surface dovetails and of the two configurations with compound curvature dovetails were manufactured and spin tested to failure with very encouraging results. A statistical assessment of failures was conducted by combining results from finite element stress analysis and the statistical mechanical properties of Norton NC 132 silicon nitride. This provided a failure prediction method that correlated well with the spin test results. The significant influence of surface finish that translates to surface flaw severity and orientation was dramatically illustrated in this study and points to the need for improved methods of manufacturing ceramic components for gas turbine application.

Anderson, C.A.; Boorer, C.R. Jr.

1980-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Proceedings: Workshop on Corrosion of Steam Turbine Blading and Disks in the Phase Transition Zone  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Most outage hours for steam turbines are due to corrosion of low pressure (LP) blades and disks in the phase transition zone (PTZ). EPRI's Workshop on Corrosion of Steam Turbine Blading and Disks in the PTZ critically reviewed the state of knowledge of corrosion fatigue and stress corrosion cracking of LP blade and disk materials, with particular emphasis on the influence of the local environment.

1998-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

150

Composite Wind Turbine Blade Effects of Defects: Part B--Progressive Damage Modeling of Fiberglass/Epoxy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Composite Wind Turbine Blade Effects of Defects: Part B-- Progressive Damage Modeling of Fiberglass for the reliability of modern composite wind turbine blades. The DOE has sponsored a comprehensive study to a wind turbine blade reliability infrastructure. To support this development of a reliability

151

DEVELOPMENT OF PROTECTIVE COATINGS FOR SINGLE CRYSTAL TURBINE BLADES  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Turbine blades in coal derived syngas systems are subject to oxidation and corrosion due to high steam temperature and pressure. Thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) are developed to address these problems. The emphasis is on prime-reliant design and a better coating architecture, having high temperature and corrosion resistance properties for turbine blades. In Phase I, UES Inc. proposed to develop, characterize and optimize a prime reliant TBC system, having smooth and defect-free NiCoCrAlY bond layer and a defect free oxide sublayer, using a filtered arc technology. Phase I work demonstrated the deposition of highly dense, smooth and defect free NiCoCrAlY bond coat on a single crystal CMSX-4 substrate and the deposition of alpha-alumina and yttrium aluminum garnet (YAG) sublayer on top of the bond coat. Isothermal and cyclic oxidation test and pre- and post-characterization of these layers, in Phase I work, (with and without top TBC layer of commercial EB PVD YSZ) revealed significant performance enhancement.

Amarendra K. Rai

2006-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

152

Design studies for twist-coupled wind turbine blades.  

SciTech Connect

This study presents results obtained for four hybrid designs of the Northern Power Systems (NPS) 9.2-meter prototype version of the ERS-100 wind turbine rotor blade. The ERS-100 wind turbine rotor blade was designed and developed by TPI composites. The baseline design uses e-glass unidirectional fibers in combination with {+-}45-degree and random mat layers for the skin and spar cap. This project involves developing structural finite element models of the baseline design and carbon hybrid designs with and without twist-bend coupling. All designs were evaluated for a unit load condition and two extreme wind conditions. The unit load condition was used to evaluate the static deflection, twist and twist-coupling parameter. Maximum deflections and strains were determined for the extreme wind conditions. Linear and nonlinear buckling loads were determined for a tip load condition. The results indicate that carbon fibers can be used to produce twist-coupled designs with comparable deflections, strains and buckling loads to the e-glass baseline.

Valencia, Ulyses (Wichita State University, Wichita, KS); Locke, James (Wichita State University, Wichita, KS)

2004-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Experimental investigation of film cooling effectiveness on gas turbine blades  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The hot gas temperature in gas turbine engines is far above the permissible metal temperatures. Advanced cooling technologies must be applied to cool the blades, so they can withstand the extreme conditions. Film cooling is widely used in modern high temperature and high pressure blades as an active cooling scheme. In this study, the film cooling effectiveness in different regions of gas turbine blades was investigated with various film hole/slot configurations and mainstream flow conditions. The study consisted of four parts: 1) effect of upstream wake on blade surface film cooling, 2) effect of upstream vortex on platform purge flow cooling, 3) influence of hole shape and angle on leading edge film cooling and 4) slot film cooling on trailing edge. Pressure sensitive paint (PSP) technique was used to get the conduction-free film cooling effectiveness distribution. For the blade surface film cooling, the effectiveness from axial shaped holes and compound angle shaped holes were examined. Results showed that the compound angle shaped holes offer better film effectiveness than the axial shaped holes. The upstream stationary wakes have detrimental effect on film effectiveness in certain wake rod phase positions. For platform purge flow cooling, the stator-rotor gap was simulated by a typical labyrinth-like seal. Delta wings were used to generate vortex and modeled the passage vortex generated by the upstream vanes. Results showed that the upstream vortex reduces the film cooling effectiveness on the platform. For the leading edge film cooling, two film cooling designs, each with four film cooling hole configurations, were investigated. Results showed that the shaped holes provide higher film cooling effectiveness than the cylindrical holes at higher average blowing ratios. In the same range of average blowing ratio, the radial angle holes produce better effectiveness than the compound angle holes. The seven-row design results in much higher effectiveness than the three-row design. For the trailing edge slot cooling, the effect of slot lip thickness on film effectiveness under the two mainstream conditions was investigated. Results showed thinner lips offer higher effectiveness. The film effectiveness on the slots reduces when the incoming mainstream boundary layer thickness decreases.

Gao, Zhihong

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Remote Monitoring of the Structural Health of Hydrokinetic Composite Turbine Blades  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A health monitoring approach is investigated for hydrokinetic turbine blade applications. In-service monitoring is critical due to the difficult environment for blade inspection and the cost of inspection downtime. Composite blade designs have advantages that include long life in marine environments and great control over mechanical properties. Experimental strain characteristics are determined for static loads and free-vibration loads. These experiments are designed to simulate the dynamic characteristics of hydrokinetic turbine blades. Carbon/epoxy symmetric composite laminates are manufactured using an autoclave process. Four-layer composite beams, eight-layer composite beams, and two-dimensional eight-layer composite blades are instrumented for strain. Experimental results for strain measurements from electrical resistance gages are validated with theoretical characteristics obtained from in-house finite-element analysis for all sample cases. These preliminary tests on the composite samples show good correlation between experimental and finite-element strain results. A health monitoring system is proposed in which damage to a composite structure, e.g. delamination and fiber breakage, causes changes in the strain signature behavior. The system is based on embedded strain sensors and embedded motes in which strain information is demodulated for wireless transmission. In-service monitoring is critical due to the difficult environment for blade inspection and the cost of inspection downtime. Composite blade designs provide a medium for embedding sensors into the blades for in-situ health monitoring. The major challenge with in-situ health monitoring is transmission of sensor signals from the remote rotating reference frame of the blade to the system monitoring station. In the presented work, a novel system for relaying in-situ blade health measurements in hydrokinetic systems is described and demonstrated. An ultrasonic communication system is used to transmit sensor data underwater from the rotating frame of the blade to a fixed relay station. Data are then broadcast via radio waves to a remote monitoring station. Results indicate that the assembled system can transmit simulated sensor data with an accuracy of ±5% at a maximum sampling rate of 500 samples/sec. A power investigation of the transmitter within the blade shows that continuous max-sampling operation is only possible for short durations (~days), and is limited due to the capacity of the battery power source. However, intermittent sampling, with long periods between samples, allows for the system to last for very long durations (~years). Finally, because the data transmission system can operate at a high sampling rate for short durations or at a lower sampling rate/higher duty cycle for long durations, it is well-suited for short-term prototype and environmental testing, as well as long-term commercially-deployed hydrokinetic machines.

J.L. Rovey K. Chandrashekhara

2012-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

155

A simple method of estimating wind turbine blade fatigue at potential wind turbine sites  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents a technique of estimating blade fatigue damage at potential wind turbine sites. The cornerstone of this technique is a simple model for the blade`s root flap bending moment. The model requires as input a simple set of wind measurements which may be obtained as part of a routine site characterization study. By using the model to simulate a time series of the root flap bending moment, fatigue damage rates may be estimated. The technique is evaluated by comparing these estimates with damage estimates derived from actual bending moment data; the agreement between the two is quite good. The simple connection between wind measurements and fatigue provided by the model now allows one to readily discriminate between damaging and more benign wind environments.

Barnard, J.C.; Wendell, L.L.

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Materials Issues in Innovative Turbine Blade Designs - Oak Ridge National Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Materials Issues in Innovative Turbine Materials Issues in Innovative Turbine Blade Designs-Oak Ridge National Laboratory Background Gas turbine efficiency and service life are strongly affected by the turbine expansion process, where the working fluid's high thermal energy gas is converted into mechanical energy to drive the compressor and the electric generator. The most effective way to increase the efficiency of the expansion process is to raise the temperature of the turbine's working fluid.

157

Structural damage identification in wind turbine blades using piezoelectric active sensing with ultrasonic validation  

SciTech Connect

This paper gives a brief overview of a new project at LANL in structural damage identification for wind turbines. This project makes use of modeling capabilities and sensing technology to understand realistic blade loading on large turbine blades, with the goal of developing the technology needed to automatically detect early damage. Several structural health monitoring (SHM) techniques using piezoelectric active materials are being investigated for the development of wireless, low power sensors that interrogate sections of the wind turbine blade using Lamb wave propagation data, frequency response functions (FRFs), and time-series analysis methods. The modeling and sensor research will be compared with extensive experimental testing, including wind tunnel experiments, load and fatigue tests, and ultrasonic scans - on small- to mid-scale turbine blades. Furthermore, this study will investigate the effect of local damage on the global response of the blade by monitoring low-frequency response changes.

Claytor, Thomas N [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Ammerman, Curtt N [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Park, Gyu Hae [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Farinholt, Kevin M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Farrar, Charles R [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Atterbury, Marie K [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Reduced Order Structural Modeling of Wind Turbine Blades  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Conventional three dimensional structural analysis methods prove to be expensive for the preliminary design of wind turbine blades. However, wind turbine blades are large slender members with complex cross sections. They can be accurately modeled using beam models. The accuracy in the predictions of the structural behavior using beam models depends on the accuracy in the prediction of their effective section properties. Several techniques were proposed in the literature for predicting the effective section properties. Most of these existing techniques have limitations because of the assumptions made in their approaches. Two generalized beam theories, Generalized Timoshenko and Generalized Euler-Bernoulli, for the static analysis based on the principles of the simple 1D-theories are developed here. Homogenization based on the strain energy equivalence principle is employed to predict the effective properties for these generalized beam theories. Two efficient methods, Quasi-3D and Unit Cell, are developed which can accurately predict the 3D deformations in beams under the six fundamental deformation modes: extension, two shears, torsion and two flexures. These methods help in predicting the effective properties using the homogenization technique. Also they can recover the detailed 3D deformations from the predictions of 1D beam analysis. The developed tools can analyze two types of slender members 1) slender members with invariant geometric features along the length and 2) slender members with periodically varying geometric features along the length. Several configurations were analyzed for the effective section properties and the predictions were validated using the expensive 3D analysis, strength of materials and Variational Asymptotic Beam Section Analysis (VABS). The predictions from the new tools showed excellent agreement with full 3D analysis. The predictions from the strength of materials showed disagreement in shear and torsional properties. Explanations for the same are provided recalling the assumptions made in the strength of materials approach.

Jonnalagadda, Yellavenkatasunil

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

The effects of manufacturing variability on turbine vane performance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Gas turbine vanes have airfoil shapes optimized to deliver specific flow conditions to turbine rotors. The limitations of the manufacturing process with regards to accuracy and precision mean that no vane will exactly match ...

Duffner, John D

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

The effects of manufacturing variability on turbine vane performance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Gas turbine vanes have airfoil shapes optimized to deliver specific flow conditions to turbine rotors. The limitations of the manufacturing process with regards to accuracy and precision mean that no vane will exactly match ...

Duffner, John D.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "turbine blade manufacturer" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

WindPACT Turbine Design Scaling Studies Technical Area 2: Turbine, Rotor and Blade Logistics  

SciTech Connect

Through the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), the United States Department of Energy (DOE) implemented the Wind Partnership for Advanced Component Technologies (WindPACT) program. This program will explore advanced technologies that may reduce the cost of energy (COE) from wind turbines. The initial step in the WindPACT program is a series of preliminary scaling studies intended to determine the optimum sizes for future turbines, help define sizing limits for certain critical technologies, and explore the potential for advanced technologies to contribute to reduced COE as turbine scales increase. This report documents the results of Technical Area 2-Turbine Rotor and Blade Logistics. For this report, we investigated the transportation, assembly, and crane logistics and costs associated with installation of a range of multi-megawatt-scale wind turbines. We focused on using currently available equipment, assembly techniques, and transportation system capabilities and limitations to hypothetically transport and install 50 wind turbines at a facility in south-central South Dakota.

Smith, K.

2001-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

162

Approach to the fatigue analysis of vertical-axis wind-turbine blades  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A cursory analysis of the stress history of wind turbine blades indicates that a single stress level at each wind speed does not adequately describe the blade stress history. A statistical description is required. Blade stress data collected from the DOE/ALCOA Low Cost experimental turbines indicate that the Rayleigh probability density function adequately describes the distribution of vibratory stresses at each wind speed. The Rayleigh probability density function allows the distribution of vibratory stresses to be described by the RMS of the stress vs. time signal. With the RMS stress level described for all wind speeds, the complete stress history of the turbine blades is known. Miner's linear cumulative damage rule is used as a basis for summing the fatigue damage over all operating conditions. An analytical expression is derived to predict blade fatigue life.

Veers, P.S.

1981-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Resonant Vibrations Resulting from the Re-Engineering of a Constant-Speed 2-Bladed Turbine to a Variable-Speed 3-Bladed Turbine  

SciTech Connect

The CART3 (Controls Advanced Research Turbine, 3-bladed) at the National Wind Technology Center has recently been converted from a 2-bladed constant speed machine to a 3-bladed variable speed machine designed specically for controls research. The purpose of this conversion was to develop an advanced controls field-testing platform which has the more typical 3-bladed configuration. A result of this conversion was the emergence of several resonant vibrations, some of which initially prevented operation of the turbine until they could be explained and resolved. In this paper, the investigations into these vibrations are presented as 'lessons-learned'. Additionally, a frequency-domain technique called waterfall plotting is discussed and its usefulness in this research is illustrated.

Fleming, P.; Wright, A. D.; Finersh, L. J.

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Resonant Vibrations Resulting from the Re-Engineering of a Constant-Speed 2-Bladed Turbine to a Variable-Speed 3-Bladed Turbine  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The CART3 (Controls Advanced Research Turbine, 3-bladed) at the National Wind Technology Center has recently been converted from a 2-bladed constant speed machine to a 3-bladed variable speed machine designed specically for controls research. The purpose of this conversion was to develop an advanced controls field-testing platform which has the more typical 3-bladed configuration. A result of this conversion was the emergence of several resonant vibrations, some of which initially prevented operation of the turbine until they could be explained and resolved. In this paper, the investigations into these vibrations are presented as 'lessons-learned'. Additionally, a frequency-domain technique called waterfall plotting is discussed and its usefulness in this research is illustrated.

Fleming, P.; Wright, A. D.; Finersh, L. J.

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Modal analysis and SHM investigation of CX-100 wind turbine blade  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper presents the dynamic characterization of a CX-100 wind turbine blade using modal testing. Obtaining a thorough dynamic characterization of turbine blades is important because they are complex structures, making them very difficult to accurately model without supplementing with experimental data. The results of this dynamic characterization can be used to validate a numerical model and understand the effect of structural damage on the performance of the blades. Also covered is an exploration into Structural Health Monitoring (SHM) techniques employed on the blade surface to detect changes in the blade dynamic properties. SHM design parameters such as traveling distance of the wave were examined . Results obtained during modal and SHM testing will provide a baseline for future work in blade damage detection and mitigation.

Deines, Krystal E [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Marinone, Timothy [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Schultz, Ryan A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Farinholt, Kevin R [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Park, Gyuhae [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2010-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

166

Experimental Study of Stability Limits for Slender Wind Turbine Blades.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??There is a growing interest in extracting more power per turbine by increasing the rotor size in offshore wind turbines. As a result, the turbine… (more)

Ladge, Shruti

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

Program on Technology Innovation: Wireless Vibration Measurement of Low-Pressure Steam Turbine Blades  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes Phase 2 of a research and development effort to define a turbine blade vibration sensor (TBVS) system for measuring the mechanical vibrational spectrum of large steam turbine blades as they rotate. In Phase 1, the design concept and a number of alternative system components were considered for a wireless electronic device called a mote. In the Phase 2 research covered in this report, the final design of a custom accelerometer capable of operating under very high sustained centrifuga...

2010-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

168

Program on Technology Innovation: Wireless Vibration Measurement of Turbine and Compressor Blades: Phase 3 -- Electronic System  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes Phase 3 of a multiphase research and development effort to define a turbine blade vibration sensor (TBVS) system for measuring the vibration spectrum of a complete row of operating large steam turbine or compressor blades. In Phase 1, the design concept and several alternative system components were considered for a wireless electronic device called a mote (see the Electric Power Research Institute [EPRI] report 1020697). In Phase 2, the design of a custom accelerometer capable of o...

2011-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

169

Program on Technology Innovation: Wireless Vibration Measurement of Turbine and Compressor Blades  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes Phase 4 of a multiyear research effort to develop a turbine blade vibration sensor (TBVS) system design. The sensor system application is the monitoring of the mechanical vibration spectrum of large steam turbine and compressor blades during operation. In Phase 1, the design concept as well as several alternative system components were considered for a wireless electronic device, called a mote. In Phase 2, the design parameters of a custom microelectromechanical (MEMS) ...

2012-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

170

Advanced Gas Turbine Guidelines: Rotating Blade Temperature Measurement System (BTMS): Durability Surveillance at Potomac Electric P ower Company's Station H  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The blade scans performed by EPRI's Blade Temperature Measurement System (BTMS) represent an important source of blade metal temperature data. These advanced gas turbine guidelines describe the design, installation, and operation of the BTMS in a utility power plant. The guidelines include an analysis of blade temperature scans as well as a summary of lessons learned.

1999-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

171

Proof-of-Concept Manufacturing and Testing of Composite Wind Generator Blades Made by HCBMP (High Compression Bladder Molded Prepreg)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Proof-of-Concept Manufacturing and Testing of Composite Wind Generator Blades Made by HCBMP (High Compression Bladder Molded Prepreg)

William C. Leighty; DOE Project Officer - Keith Bennett

2005-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

172

FATIGUE RESISTANT FIBERGLASS LAMINATES FOR WIND TURBINE BLADES (published for Wind Energy 1996, ASME, pp. 46-51)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

FATIGUE RESISTANT FIBERGLASS LAMINATES FOR WIND TURBINE BLADES (published for Wind Energy 1996/MSU database to lifetime prediction as described in Ref. [1]. INTRODUCTION Most U.S. fiberglass wind turbine Turbine Blade Lifetime Predictions" Proc. 1996 ASME Wind Energy Symposium. (To be published) 2. J

173

Hot spot detection system for vanes or blades of a combustion turbine  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention includes a detection system that can determine if a turbine component, such as a turbine vane or blade, has exceeded a critical temperature, such as a melting point, along any point along the entire surface of the vane or blade. This system can be employed in a conventional combustion turbine having a compressor, a combustor and a turbine section. Included within this system is a chemical coating disposed along the entire interior surface of a vane or blade and a closed loop cooling system that circulates a coolant through the interior of the vane or blade. If the temperature of the vane or blade exceeds a critical temperature, the chemical coating will be expelled from the vane or blade into the coolant. Since while traversing the closed loop cooling system the coolant passes through a detector, the presence of the chemical coating in the coolant will be sensed by the system. If the chemical coating is detected, this indicates that the vane or blade has exceeded a critical temperature.

Twerdochlib, Michael (Oviedo, FL)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Hot spot detection system for vanes or blades of a combustion turbine  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention includes a detection system that can determine if a turbine component, such as a turbine vane or blade, has exceeded a critical temperature, such as a melting point, along any point along the entire surface of the vane or blade. This system can be employed in a conventional combustion turbine having a compressor, a combustor and a turbine section. Included within this system is a chemical coating disposed along the entire interior surface of a vane or blade and a closed loop cooling system that circulates a coolant through the interior of the vane or blade. If the temperature of the vane or blade exceeds a critical temperature, the chemical coating will be expelled from the vane or blade into the coolant. Since while traversing the closed loop cooling system the coolant passes through a detector, the presence of the chemical coating in the coolant will be sensed by the system. If the chemical coating is detected, this indicates that the vane or blade has exceeded a critical temperature. 5 figs.

Twerdochlib, M.

1999-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

175

Development of Low-Cost Directionally-Solidified Turbine Blades  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

blade cost was realized. As a result, the new DS Mar-M 247 blade has been selected for production in the TFE731-B-100, an advanced version of the TFE731 -3 ...

176

Evaluation of Blade-Strike Models for Estimating the Biological Performance of Large Kaplan Hydro Turbines  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

BioIndex testing of hydro-turbines is sought as an analog to the hydraulic index testing conducted on hydro-turbines to optimize their power production efficiency. In BioIndex testing the goal is to identify those operations within the range identified by Index testing where the survival of fish passing through the turbine is maximized. BioIndex testing includes the immediate tailrace region as well as the turbine environment between a turbine's intake trashracks and the exit of its draft tube. The US Army Corps of Engineers and the Department of Energy have been evaluating a variety of means, such as numerical and physical turbine models, to investigate the quality of flow through a hydro-turbine and other aspects of the turbine environment that determine its safety for fish. The goal is to use these tools to develop hypotheses identifying turbine operations and predictions of their biological performance that can be tested at prototype scales. Acceptance of hypotheses would be the means for validation of new operating rules for the turbine tested that would be in place when fish were passing through the turbines. The overall goal of this project is to evaluate the performance of numerical blade strike models as a tool to aid development of testable hypotheses for bioIndexing. Evaluation of the performance of numerical blade strike models is accomplished by comparing predictions of fish mortality resulting from strike by turbine runner blades with observations made using live test fish at mainstem Columbia River Dams and with other predictions of blade strike made using observations of beads passing through a 1:25 scale physical turbine model.

Deng, Zhiqun; Carlson, Thomas J.; Ploskey, Gene R.; Richmond, Marshall C.

2005-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

177

Structural health monitoring of wind turbine blades : SE 265 Final Project.  

SciTech Connect

ACME Wind Turbine Corporation has contacted our dynamic analysis firm regarding structural health monitoring of their wind turbine blades. ACME has had several failures in previous years. Examples are shown in Figure 1. These failures have resulted in economic loss for the company due to down time of the turbines (lost revenue) and repair costs. Blade failures can occur in several modes, which may depend on the type of construction and load history. Cracking and delamination are some typical modes of blade failure. ACME warranties its turbines and wishes to decrease the number of blade failures they have to repair and replace. The company wishes to implement a real time structural health monitoring system in order to better understand when blade replacement is necessary. Because of warranty costs incurred to date, ACME is interested in either changing the warranty period for the blades in question or predicting imminent failure before it occurs. ACME's current practice is to increase the number of physical inspections when blades are approaching the end of their fatigue lives. Implementation of an in situ monitoring system would eliminate or greatly reduce the need for such physical inspections. Another benefit of such a monitoring system is that the life of any given component could be extended since real conditions would be monitored. The SHM system designed for ACME must be able to operate while the wind turbine is in service. This means that wireless communication options will likely be implemented. Because blade failures occur due to cyclic stresses in the blade material, the sensing system will focus on monitoring strain at various points.

Barkley, W. C.(Walter C.); Jacobs, Laura D.; Rutherford, A. C.(Amanda C.); Puckett, Anthony

2006-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

178

Structural health monitoring of wind turbine blades : SE 265 Final Project.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

ACME Wind Turbine Corporation has contacted our dynamic analysis firm regarding structural health monitoring of their wind turbine blades. ACME has had several failures in previous years. Examples are shown in Figure 1. These failures have resulted in economic loss for the company due to down time of the turbines (lost revenue) and repair costs. Blade failures can occur in several modes, which may depend on the type of construction and load history. Cracking and delamination are some typical modes of blade failure. ACME warranties its turbines and wishes to decrease the number of blade failures they have to repair and replace. The company wishes to implement a real time structural health monitoring system in order to better understand when blade replacement is necessary. Because of warranty costs incurred to date, ACME is interested in either changing the warranty period for the blades in question or predicting imminent failure before it occurs. ACME's current practice is to increase the number of physical inspections when blades are approaching the end of their fatigue lives. Implementation of an in situ monitoring system would eliminate or greatly reduce the need for such physical inspections. Another benefit of such a monitoring system is that the life of any given component could be extended since real conditions would be monitored. The SHM system designed for ACME must be able to operate while the wind turbine is in service. This means that wireless communication options will likely be implemented. Because blade failures occur due to cyclic stresses in the blade material, the sensing system will focus on monitoring strain at various points.

Barkley, W. C. (Walter C.); Jacobs, Laura D.; Rutherford, A. C. (Amanda C.); Puckett, Anthony

2006-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

179

Program on Technology Innovation: Wireless Vibration Measurement of Low Pressure Steam Turbine Blades  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Large turbine blades in the low pressure section of a steam turbine occasionally fatigue over time and break free of the turbine shaft. The damage is often substantial and the cost of an event, including the cost of the downtime, ranges from $3 million to $30 million--and in rare cases can reach hundreds of millions of dollars. Incipient failure can often be detected by monitoring changes in the vibration spectrum of the blades. This report describes the preliminary design and analysis of a wireless ele...

2010-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

180

An Innovative Technique for Evaluating the Integrity and Durability of Wind Turbine Blade Composites  

SciTech Connect

Wind turbine blades are subjected to complex multiaxial stress states during operation. A review of the literature suggests that mixed mode fracture toughness can be significantly less than that of the tensile opening mode (Mode I), implying that fracture failure can occur at a much lower load capacity if the structure is subject to mixed-mode loading. Thus, it will be necessary to identify the mechanisms that might lead to failure in blade materials under mixed-mode loading conditions. Meanwhile, wind turbine blades are typically fabricated from fiber reinforced polymeric materials, e.g. fiber glass composites. Due to the large degree of anisotropy in mechanical properties that is usually associated with laminates, the fracture behavior of these composite materials is likely to be strongly dependent on the loading conditions. This may further strengthen the need to study the effect of mixed-mode loading on the integrity and durability of the wind turbine blade composites. To quantify the fracture behavior of composite structures under mixed mode loading conditions, particularly under combined Mode I (flexural or normal tensile stress) and Mode III (torsional shear stress) loading, a new testing technique is proposed based on the spiral notch torsion test (SNTT). As a 2002 R&D 100 Award winner, SNTT is a novel fracture testing technology. SNTT has many advantages over conventional fracture toughness methods and has been used to determine fracture toughness values on a wide spectrum of materials. The current project is the first attempt to utilize SNTT on polymeric and polymer-based composite materials. It is expected that mixed-mode failure mechanisms of wind turbine blades induced by typical in-service loading conditions, such as delamination, matrix cracking, fiber pull-out and fracture, can be effectively and economically investigated by using this methodology. This project consists of two phases. The Phase I (FY2010) effort includes (1) preparation of testing material and testing equipment set-up, including calibration of associated instruments/sensors, (2) development of design protocols for the proposed SNTT samples for both polymer and composite materials, such as sample geometries and fabrication techniques, (3) manufacture of SNTT samples, and (4) fracture toughness testing using the SNTT method. The major milestone achieved in Phase I is the understanding of fracture behaviors of polymeric matrix materials from testing numerous epoxy SNTT samples. Totals of 30 epoxy SNTT samples were fabricated from two types of epoxy materials provided by our industrial partners Gougeon Brothers, Inc. and Molded Fiber Glass Companies. These samples were tested with SNTT in three groups: (1) fracture due to monotonic loading, (2) fracture due to fatigue cyclic loading, and (3) monotonic loading applied to fatigue-precracked samples. Brittle fractures were observed on all tested samples, implying linear elastic fracture mechanics analysis can be effectively used to estimate the fracture toughness of these materials with confidence. Appropriate fatigue precracking protocols were established to achieve controllable crack growth using the SNTT approach under pure torsion loading. These fatigue protocols provide the significant insights of the mechanical behavior of epoxy polymeric materials and their associated rate-dependent characteristics. Effects of mixed-mode loading on the fracture behavior of epoxy materials was studied. It was found that all epoxy samples failed in brittle tensile failure mode; the fracture surfaces always follow a 45o spiral plane that corresponded to Mode I tensile failure, even when the initial pitch angle of the machined spiral grooves was not at 45o. In addition, general observation from the fatigue experiments implied that loading rate played an important role determining the fracture behavior of epoxy materials, such that a higher loading rate resulted in a shorter fatigue life. A detailed study of loading rate effect will be continued in the Phase II. On the other hand, analytical finite element ana

Wang, Jy-An John [ORNL; Ren, Fei [ORNL

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "turbine blade manufacturer" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

NREL Wind Turbine Blade Structural Testing of the Modular Wind Energy MW45 Blade: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-09-354  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This CRADA was a purely funds-in CRADA with Modular Wind Energy (MWE). MWE had a need to perform full-scale testing of a 45-m wind turbine blade. NREL/NWTC provided the capabilities, facilities, and equipment to test this large-scale MWE wind turbine blade. Full-scale testing is required to demonstrate the ability of the wind turbine blade to withstand static design load cases and demonstrate the fatigue durability. Structural testing is also necessary to meet international blade testing certification requirements. Through this CRADA, MWE would obtain test results necessary for product development and certification, and NREL would benefit by working with an industrial partner to better understand the unique test requirements for wind turbine blades with advanced structural designs.

Hughes, S.

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Advanced turbine design for coal-fueled engines. Phase 1, Erosion of turbine hot gas path blading: Final report  

SciTech Connect

The investigators conclude that: (1) Turbine erosion resistance was shown to be improved by a factor of 5 by varying the turbine design. Increasing the number of stages and increasing the mean radius reduces the peak predicted erosion rates for 2-D flows on the blade airfoil from values which are 6 times those of the vane to values of erosion which are comparable to those of the vane airfoils. (2) Turbine erosion was a strong function of airfoil shape depending on particle diameter. Different airfoil shapes for the same turbine operating condition resulted in a factor of 7 change in airfoil erosion for the smallest particles studied (5 micron). (3) Predicted erosion for the various turbines analyzed was a strong function of particle diameter and weaker function of particle density. (4) Three dimensional secondary flows were shown to cause increases in peak and average erosion on the vane and blade airfoils. Additionally, the interblade secondary flows and stationary outer case caused unique erosion patterns which were not obtainable with 2-D analyses. (5) Analysis of the results indicate that hot gas cleanup systems are necessary to achieve acceptable turbine life in direct-fired, coal-fueled systems. In addition, serious consequences arise when hot gas filter systems fail for even short time periods. For a complete failure of the filter system, a 0.030 in. thick corrosion-resistant protective coating on a turbine blade would be eroded at some locations within eight minutes.

Wagner, J.H.; Johnson, B.V.

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

DOE Research Grant Leads to Gas Turbine Manufacturing Improvements |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Research Grant Leads to Gas Turbine Manufacturing Improvements Research Grant Leads to Gas Turbine Manufacturing Improvements DOE Research Grant Leads to Gas Turbine Manufacturing Improvements August 16, 2011 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - Research sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Fossil Energy (FE) has led to a new licensing agreement that will improve the performance of state-of-the-art gas turbines, resulting in cleaner, more reliable and affordable energy. The collaborative technology license agreement, penned by Mikro Systems Inc. and Siemens Energy Inc., reflects growth in U.S.-based manufacturing know-how and leadership in cutting-edge technology development and rapid implementation. Gas turbines, which are used to produce electricity for industrial or central power generation applications, consist sequentially of compressor,

184

Deposition of Alternative (Syngas) Fuels on Turbine Blades with Film Cooling  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ACERC ACERC Dr. Jeffrey Bons and Dr. Thomas Fletcher BRIGHAM YOUNG UNIVERSITY SCIES Project 05-01-SR-120 with support from General Electric, Siemens-Westinghouse, Solar Turbines, Praxair UTSR Peer Workshop III, Clemson University, SC Oct. 18-20, 2005 Deposition of Alternative ( Deposition of Alternative ( Syngas Syngas ) Fuels on ) Fuels on Turbine Blades with Film Cooling Turbine Blades with Film Cooling Alternate fuels (e.g. coal, petcoke, and biomass) are being cons Alternate fuels (e.g. coal, petcoke, and biomass) are being cons idered to idered to produce produce syngas syngas fuels to replace natural gas in power turbines fuels to replace natural gas in power turbines Despite gas cleanup, small levels of airborne particulate (e.g. Despite gas cleanup, small levels of airborne particulate (e.g. 0.1 0.1 ppmw

185

Modal analysis and SHM investigation of CX-100 wind turbine blade  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper presents the dynamic characterization of a CX100 blade using modal testing. Obtaining a thorough dynamic characterization of these turbine blades is important because they are complex structures, making them difficult to monitor for damage initiation and subsequent growth. This dynamic characterization was compared to a numerical model developed for validation. Structural Health Monitoring (SHM) techniques involving Lamb wave propagation, frequency response functions, and impedance based methods were also used to provide insight into blade dynamic response. SHM design parameters such as traveling distance of the wave, sensing region of the sensor and the power requirements were examined. Results obtained during modal and SHM testing will provide a baseline for future damage detection and mitigation techniques for wind turbine blades.

Deines, Krystal E [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Marinone, Timothy [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Schultz, Ryan A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Farinholt, Kevin M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Park, Gyuhae [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2011-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

186

Department of Energy to Invest up to $4 Million for Wind Turbine Blade  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

up to $4 Million for Wind Turbine up to $4 Million for Wind Turbine Blade Testing Facilities Department of Energy to Invest up to $4 Million for Wind Turbine Blade Testing Facilities June 25, 2007 - 2:07pm Addthis New facilities in Massachusetts and Texas will bring cutting-edge technology to wind research WASHINGTON, DC - The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Secretary Samuel W. Bodman today announced that DOE has selected the Commonwealth of Massachusetts Partnership in Massachusetts, and the Lone Star Wind Alliance in Texas, to each receive up to $2 million in test equipment to develop large-scale wind blade test facilities, accelerating the commercial availability of wind energy. These consortia have been selected to negotiate cooperative research and development agreements (CRADAs) to

187

Fiber-Optic Defect and Damage Locator System for Wind Turbine Blades  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

IFOS in collaboration with Auburn University demonstrated the feasibility of a Fiber Bragg Grating (FBG) integrated sensor system capable of providing real time in-situ defect detection, localization and quantification of damage. In addition, the system is capable of validating wind turbine blade structural models, using recent advances in non-contact, non-destructive dynamic testing of composite structures. This new generation method makes it possible to analyze wind turbine blades not only non-destructively, but also without physically contacting or implanting intrusive electrical elements and transducers into the structure. Phase I successfully demonstrated the feasibility of the technology with the construction of a 1.5 kHz sensor interrogator and preliminary instrumentation and testing of both composite material coupons and a wind turbine blade.

Dr. Vahid Sotoudeh; Dr. Richard J. Black; Dr. Behzad Moslehi; Mr. Aleks Plavsic

2010-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

188

Mechanical Design, Analysis, and Testing of a Two-Bladed Wind Turbine Hub  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Researchers at the National Wind Technology Center (NWTC) in Golden, Colorado, began performing the Unsteady Aerodynamics Experiment in 1993 to better understand the unsteady aerodynamics and structural responses of horizontal-axis wind turbines. The experiment consists of an extensively instrumented, downwind, three-bladed, 20-kilowatt wind turbine. In May 1995, I received a request from the NWTC to design a two-bladed hub for the experiment. For my thesis, I present the results of the mechanical design, analysis, and testing of the hub. The hub I designed is unique because it runs in rigid, teetering, or independent blade-flapping modes. In addition, the design is unusual because it uses two servomotors to pitch the blades independently. These features are used to investigate new load reduction, noise reduction, blade pitch optimization, and yaw control techniques for two-bladed turbines. I used a methodology by G. Phal and W. Bietz to design the hub. The hub meets all the performance specifications except that it achieves only 90% of the specified teeter range. In my thesis, I focus on the analysis and testing of the hub body. I performed solid-mechanics calculations, ran a finite-element analysis simulation, and experimentally investigated the structural integrity of the hub body.

Cotrell, J.

2002-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Beijing Goldwind Kechuang Wind Turbine Manufacturer | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Goldwind Kechuang Wind Turbine Manufacturer Goldwind Kechuang Wind Turbine Manufacturer Jump to: navigation, search Name Beijing Goldwind Kechuang Wind Turbine Manufacturer Place Beijing, Beijing Municipality, China Zip 100000 Sector Wind energy Product A manufacturer set up by Goldwind in Beijing for producing wind turbines. Coordinates 39.90601°, 116.387909° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":39.90601,"lon":116.387909,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

190

Recent results from data analysis of dynamic stall on wind turbine blades  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Wind turbines are subjected to dynamic loading from a variety of different sources. Wind shear and turbulence cause time-varying inflow that results in unsteady airloads. Tower shadow, upwind turbine wakes, and yaw angles also introduce unsteady inflow to wind turbine rotors. Wind turbine designers must predict these loads accurately in order to adequately design blades, hubs, and the remaining support structure to achieve a 30-year life. Structural analysts have not been able to predict mean or dynamic loads accurately enough to predict the fatigue life of major wind turbine components with confidence. Part of the problem is due to uncertainty in the stochastic wind environments as mentioned earlier. Another important part of the problem is the lack of basic knowledge of rotary wing airfoil stall performance. There is mounting evidence that dynamic stall may be related to dynamic loads that are greater than predictions. This paper describes some results of investigations of unsteady aerodynamic loads measured on a wind turbine blade. The objective of the investigation is to understand the steady and unsteady stall behavior of wind turbine blades. 13 refs.

Butterfield, C.P.; Simms, D. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States); Huyer, S. [Colorado Univ., Boulder, CO (United States)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Application of the U.S. high cycle fatigue data base to wind turbine blade lifetime predictions  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper demonstrates a methodology for predicting the service lifetime of wind turbine blades using the high-cycle fatigue data base for typical U.S. blade materials developed by Mandell, et al. (1995). The first step in the analysis is to normalize the data base (composed primarily of data obtained from specialized, relatively small coupons) with fatigue data from typical industrial laminates to obtain a Goodman Diagram that is suitable for analyzing wind turbine blades. The LIFE2 fatigue analysis code for wind turbines is then used for the fatigue analysis of a typical turbine blade with a known load spectrum. In the analysis, a linear damage model, Miner`s Rule, is used to demonstrate the prediction of the service lifetime for a typical wind turbine blade under assumed operating strain ranges and stress concentration factors. In contrast to typical European data, the asymmetry in this data base predicts failures under typical loads to be compressive.

Sutherland, H.J. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Mandell, J.F. [Montana State Univ., Bozeman, MT (United States)

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Survey of techniques for reduction of wind turbine blade trailing edge noise.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Aerodynamic noise from wind turbine rotors leads to constraints in both rotor design and turbine siting. The primary source of aerodynamic noise on wind turbine rotors is the interaction of turbulent boundary layers on the blades with the blade trailing edges. This report surveys concepts that have been proposed for trailing edge noise reduction, with emphasis on concepts that have been tested at either sub-scale or full-scale. These concepts include trailing edge serrations, low-noise airfoil designs, trailing edge brushes, and porous trailing edges. The demonstrated noise reductions of these concepts are cited, along with their impacts on aerodynamic performance. An assessment is made of future research opportunities in trailing edge noise reduction for wind turbine rotors.

Barone, Matthew Franklin

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Passive aeroelastic tailoring of wind turbine blades : a numerical analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This research aims to have an impact towards a sustainable energy supply. In wind power generation losses occur at tip speed ratios which the rotor was not designed for. Since the ideal blade shape changes nonlinearly with ...

Deilmann, Christian

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Property:WindTurbineManufacturer | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

WindTurbineManufacturer WindTurbineManufacturer Jump to: navigation, search This is a property of type Page. Pages using the property "WindTurbineManufacturer" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) 3 3-D Metals + Northern Power Systems + A AB Tehachapi Wind Farm + Vestas + AFCEE MMR Turbines + GE Energy + AG Land 1 + GE Energy + AG Land 2 + GE Energy + AG Land 3 + GE Energy + AG Land 4 + GE Energy + AG Land 5 + GE Energy + AG Land 6 + GE Energy + AVTEC + Northern Power Systems + Adair Wind Farm I + Vestas + Adair Wind Farm II + Siemens + Adams Wind Project + Alstom + Aeroman Repower Wind Farm + GE Energy + Affinity Wind Farm + Suzlon Energy Company + Agassiz Beach Wind Farm + Vestas + Agriwind Wind Farm + Suzlon Energy Company + Ainsworth Wind Energy Facility + Vestas +

195

Experimental Study of Gas Turbine Blade Film Cooling and Heat Transfer  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Modern gas turbine engines require higher turbine-entry gas temperature to improve their thermal efficiency and thereby their performance. A major accompanying concern is the heat-up of the turbine components which are already subject to high thermal and mechanical stresses. This heat-up can be reduced by: (i) applying thermal barrier coating (TBC) on the surface, and (ii) providing coolant to the surface by injecting secondary air discharged from the compressor. However, as the bleeding off of compressor discharge air exacts a penalty on engine performance, the cooling functions must be accomplished with the smallest possible secondary air injection. This necessitates a detailed and systematic study of the various flow and geometrical parameters that may have a bearing on the cooling pattern. In the present study, experiments were performed in three regions of a non-rotating gas turbine blade cascade: blade platform, blade span, and blade tip. The blade platform and blade span studies were carried out on a high pressure turbine rotor blade cascade in medium flow conditions. Film-cooling effectiveness or degree of cooling was assessed in terms of cooling hole geometry, blowing ratio, freestream turbulence, coolant-to-mainstream density ratio, purge flow rate, upstream vortex for blade platform cooling and blowing ratio, and upstream vortex for blade span cooling. The blade tip study was performed in a blow-down flow loop in a transonic flow environment. The degree of cooling was assessed in terms of blowing ratio and tip clearance. Limited heat transfer coefficient measurements were also carried out. Mainstream pressure loss was also measured for blade platform and blade tip film-cooling with the help of pitot-static probes. The pressure sensitive paint (PSP) and temperature sensitive paint (TSP) techniques were used for measuring film-cooling effectiveness whereas for heat transfer coefficient measurement, temperature sensitive paint (TSP) technique was employed. Results indicated that the blade platform cooling requires a combination of upstream purge flow and downstream discrete film-cooling holes to cool the entire platform. The shaped cooling holes provided wider film coverage and higher film-cooling effectiveness than the cylindrical holes while also creating lesser mainstream pressure losses. Higher coolant-to-mainstream density ratio resulted in higher effectiveness levels from the cooling holes. On the blade span, at any given blowing ratio, the suction side showed better coolant coverage than the pressure side even though the former had two fewer rows of holes. Film-cooling effectiveness increased with blowing ratio on both sides of the blade. Whereas the pressure side effectiveness continued to increase with blowing ratio, the increase in suction side effectiveness slowed down at higher blowing ratios (M=0.9 and 1.2). Upstream wake had a detrimental effect on film coverage. 0% and 25% wake phase positions significantly decreased film-cooling effectiveness magnitude. Comparison between the compound shaped hole and the compound cylindrical hole design showed higher effectiveness values for shaped holes on the suction side. The cylindrical holes performed marginally better in the curved portion of the pressure side. Finally, the concept tip proved to be better than the baseline tip in terms of reducing mainstream flow leakage and mainstream pressure loss. The film-cooling effectiveness on the concept blade increased with increasing blowing ratio and tip gap. However, the film-coverage on the leading tip portion was almost negligible.

Narzary, Diganta P.

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Wind turbine blade fatigue tests: lessons learned and application to SHM system development  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper presents experimental results of several structural health monitoring (SHM) methods applied to a 9-meter CX-100 wind turbine blade that underwent fatigue loading. The blade was instrumented with piezoelectric transducers, accelerometers, acoustic emission sensors, and foil strain gauges. It underwent harmonic excitation at its first natural frequency using a hydraulically actuated resonant excitation system. The blade was initially excited at 25% of its design load, and then with steadily increasing loads until it failed. Various data were collected between and during fatigue loading sessions. The data were measured over multiple frequency ranges using a variety of acquisition equipment, including off-the-shelf systems and specially designed hardware developed by the authors. Modal response, diffuse wave-field transfer functions, and ultrasonic guided wave methods were applied to assess the condition of the wind turbine blade. The piezoelectric sensors themselves were also monitored using a sensor diagnostics procedure. This paper summarizes experimental procedures and results, focusing particularly on fatigue crack detection, and concludes with considerations for implementing such damage identification systems, which will be used as a guideline for future SHM system development for operating wind turbine blades.

Taylor, Stuart G. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Farinholt, Kevin M. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Jeong, Hyomi [Chonbuk National University, Korea; Jang, JaeKyung [Chonbuk National University, Korea; Park, Gyu Hae [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Todd, Michael D. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Farrar, Charles R. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Ammerman, Curtt N. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

197

Measurement and analysis of gas turbine blade endwall heat transfer.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??For many years it has been recognized that the design of an efficient high pressure turbine with adequate component life is crucial to the success… (more)

Lee, Joon Ho

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Gas Turbine Superalloy Material Property Handbook for Blades  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Feb 10, 2007 ... This handbook offers a comprehensive resource of material property data for superalloys used in combustion turbine buckets. Such data are ...

199

Application of piezoelectric active-sensors for SHM of wind turbine blades  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The goal of this study is to characterize the dynamic response of a CX-100 wind blade and the design parameters of SHM techniques as they apply to wind turbine blades, and to investigate the performance of high-frequency active-sensing SHM techniques, including lamb wave and frequency response functions, as a way to monitor the health of a wind turbine blade. The results of the dynamic characterization will be used to validate a numerical model and understand the effect of structural damage on the performance of the blades. The focus of SHM study is to assess and compare the performance of each method in identifying incipient damage, with a special consideration given to field deployability. For experiments, a 9-m CX-100 blade was used. Overall, the methods yielded sufficient damage detection to warrant further investigation into field deployment. This paper also summarizes the SHM results of a full-scale fatigue test of 9-m CX-100 blade using piezoelectric active-sensors.

Park, Gyuhae [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Taylor, Stuart G. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Farinholt, Kevin M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Farrar, Charles R [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2010-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

200

Guidelines for reducing dynamic loads in two-bladed teetering-hub downwind wind turbines  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A major goal of the federal Wind Energy Program is the rapid development and validation of structural models to determine loads and response for a wide variety of different wind turbine configurations operating under extreme conditions. Such codes are crucial to the successful design of future advanced wind turbines. In previous papers the authors described steps they took to develop a model of a two-bladed teetering-hub downwind wind turbine using ADAMS{reg_sign} (Automatic Dynamic Analysis of Mechanical Systems), as well as comparison of model predictions to test data. In this paper they show the use of this analytical model to study the influence of various turbine parameters on predicted system loads. They concentrate their study on turbine response in the frequency range of six to ten times the rotor rotational frequency (6P to 10P). Their goal is to identify the most important parameters which influence the response of this type of machine in this frequency range and give turbine designers some general design guidelines for designing two-bladed teetering-hub machines to be less susceptible to vibration. They study the effects of such parameters as blade edgewise and flapwise stiffness, tower top stiffness, blade tip-brake mass, low-speed shaft stiffness, nacelle mass momenta of inertia, and rotor speed. They show which parameters can be varied in order to make the turbine less responsive to such atmospheric inputs as wind shear and tower shadow. They then give designers a set of design guidelines in order to show how these machines can be designed to be less responsive to these inputs.

Wright, A.D.; Bir, G.S.; Butterfield, C.D.

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "turbine blade manufacturer" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Wind Turbine Blade Test Definition of the DeWind DW90 Rotor Blade: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-09-326  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This CRADA was developed as a funds-in CRADA with DeWind to assess the suitability of facilities and equipment at the NWTC for performing certification blade testing on wind turbine blades made from advanced materials. DeWind produces a wind turbine blade which includes the use of high-strength and stiffness materials. NREL and DeWind had a mutual interest in defining the necessary facilities, equipment, and test methods for testing large wind turbine blades which incorporate advanced materials and adaptive structures, as the demands on test equipment and infrastructure are greater than current capabilities. Work under this CRADA would enable DeWind to verify domestic capability for certification-class static and fatigue testing, while NREL would be able to identify and develop specialized test capabilities based on the test requirements.

Hughes, S.

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Stress and Fracture Analysis of a Class of Bonded Joints in Wind Turbine Blades  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A simplified model is proposed to investigate the stress fields and the strain energy release rate (SERR) associated with cracks in bonded joints in wind turbine blades. The proposed two-dimensional model consists of nonparallel upper and lower shells with adhesive between the shells at the tapered end. Nonlinear finite element analysis (FEA) is performed in a systematic parametric study of material and geo- metric properties. Two failure modes and their locations are predicted at different combinations of parameters: yielding at the outside end of the adhesive and interface cracking at the inside end of the bondline. Effect of the shell curvature on the stress fields is also considered. Based on the classic beam theory and the beam-on-elastic-foundation (BOEF) assumption, stress and displacement fields of the adhesively-bonded joint were determined by a new theoretical model to support the results from the numerical computation. The failure analysis is continued by studying the effects of manufacturing defects in the adhesive bond. Single and multiple voids are embedded to simulate air bubble trapped in the interface. The numerical and analytical studies are conducted to investigate SERR associated with the voids and results are provided to illustrate the effects of void position and void size.

Chen, Chang

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Fluid flow modeling of resin transfer molding for composite material wind turbine blade structures.  

SciTech Connect

Resin transfer molding (RTM) is a closed mold process for making composite materials. It has the potential to produce parts more cost effectively than hand lay-up or other methods. However, fluid flow tends to be unpredictable and parts the size of a wind turbine blade are difficult to engineer without some predictive method for resin flow. There were five goals of this study. The first was to determine permeabilities for three fabrics commonly used for RTM over a useful range of fiber volume fractions. Next, relations to estimate permeabilities in mixed fabric lay-ups were evaluated. Flow in blade substructures was analyzed and compared to predictions. Flow in a full-scale blade was predicted and substructure results were used to validate the accuracy of a full-scale blade prediction.

Cairns, Douglas S. (Montana State University, Bozeman, MT); Rossel, Scott M. (Montana State University, Bozeman, MT)

2004-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Effects of blade configurations on flow distribution and power output of a Zephyr vertical axis wind turbine  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Numerical simulations with FLUENT software were conducted to investigate the fluid flow through a novel vertical axis wind turbine (VAWT). Simulation of flow through the turbine rotor was performed with the aim of predicting the performance characteristics ... Keywords: blade configuration, power output, rotor, simulation, vertical axis wind turbine

J. O. Ajedegba; G. F. Naterer; M. A. Rosen; E. Tsang

2008-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Development of a Wave Energy -Responsive Self-Actuated Blade Articulation Mechanism for an OWC Turbine  

SciTech Connect

The Phase I SBIR effort completed the feasibility design, fabrication, and wind tunnel testing of a self-actuated blade articulation mechanism that uses a torsion bar and a lightweight airfoil to affect the articulation of the Wells airfoil. The articulation is affected only by the air stream incident on the airfoil. The self-actuating blade eliminates the complex and costly linkage mechanism that is now needed to perform this function on either a variable pitch Wells-type or Dennis-Auld air turbine. Using the results reported by independent researchers, the projected improvement in the Wells-type turbine efficiency is 20-40%, in addition to an increase in the operating air flow range by 50-100%, therefore enabling a smaller or slower single turbine to be used.

Francis A. Di Bella

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Structural Design of a Horizontal-Axis Tidal Current Turbine Composite Blade  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper describes the structural design of a tidal composite blade. The structural design is preceded by two steps: hydrodynamic design and determination of extreme loads. The hydrodynamic design provides the chord and twist distributions along the blade length that result in optimal performance of the tidal turbine over its lifetime. The extreme loads, i.e. the extreme flap and edgewise loads that the blade would likely encounter over its lifetime, are associated with extreme tidal flow conditions and are obtained using a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) software. Given the blade external shape and the extreme loads, we use a laminate-theory-based structural design to determine the optimal layout of composite laminas such that the ultimate-strength and buckling-resistance criteria are satisfied at all points in the blade. The structural design approach allows for arbitrary specification of the chord, twist, and airfoil geometry along the blade and an arbitrary number of shear webs. In addition, certain fabrication criteria are imposed, for example, each composite laminate must be an integral multiple of its constituent ply thickness. In the present effort, the structural design uses only static extreme loads; dynamic-loads-based fatigue design will be addressed in the future. Following the blade design, we compute the distributed structural properties, i.e. flap stiffness, edgewise stiffness, torsion stiffness, mass, moments of inertia, elastic-axis offset, and center-of-mass offset along the blade. Such properties are required by hydro-elastic codes to model the tidal current turbine and to perform modal, stability, loads, and response analyses.

Bir, G. S.; Lawson, M. J.; Li, Y.

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

MaNufactuRiNG DeMONstRatiON  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

new markets. Utilizing Neutron Science for Industry Reconstructed images of a turbine blade using neutron tomography complementary Manufacturing Research World-Leading Research...

208

Supply Chain and Blade Manufacturing Considerations in the Global Wind Industry (Presentation)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This briefing provides an overview of supply chain developments in the global wind industry and a detailed assessment of blade manufacturing considerations for U.S. end-markets. The report discusses the international trade flows of wind power equipment, blade manufacturing and logistical costs, and qualitative issues that often influence factory location decisions. To help guide policy and research and development strategy decisions, this report offers a comprehensive perspective of both quantitative and qualitative factors that affect selected supply chain developments in the growing wind power industry.

James, T.; Goodrich, A.

2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Design and fabrication of a composite wind turbine blade  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes the design considerations leading to the innovative combination of materials used for the MOD-I wind turbine generator rotor and the fabrication processes which were required to accomplish it.

Brown, R.A. (Boeing Engineering and Construction, Seattle, WA); Haley, R.G.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Simulation of winds as seen by a rotating vertical axis wind turbine blade  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of this report is to provide turbulent wind analyses relevant to the design and testing of Vertical Axis Wind Turbines (VAWT). A technique was developed for utilizing high-speed turbulence wind data from a line of seven anemometers at a single level to simulate the wind seen by a rotating VAWT blade. Twelve data cases, representing a range of wind speeds and stability classes, were selected from the large volume of data available from the Clayton, New Mexico, Vertical Plane Array (VPA) project. Simulations were run of the rotationally sampled wind speed relative to the earth, as well as the tangential and radial wind speeds, which are relative to the rotating wind turbine blade. Spectral analysis is used to compare and assess wind simulations from the different wind regimes, as well as from alternate wind measurement techniques. The variance in the wind speed at frequencies at or above the blade rotation rate is computed for all cases, and is used to quantitatively compare the VAWT simulations with Horizontal Axis Wind Turbine (HAWT) simulations. Qualitative comparisons are also made with direct wind measurements from a VAWT blade.

George, R.L.

1984-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Materials/manufacturing element of the Advanced Turbine Systems Program  

SciTech Connect

The technology based portion of the Advanced Turbine Systems Program (ATS) contains several subelements which address generic technology issues for land-based gas-turbine systems. One subelement is the Materials/ Manufacturing Technology Program which is coordinated by DOE Oak Ridge Operations and Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The work in this subelement is being performed predominantly by industry with assistance from universities and the national laboratories. Projects in this sub-element are aimed toward hastening the incorporation of new materials and components in gas turbines.

Karnitz, M.A.; Holcomb, R.S.; Wright, I.G.; Ferber, M.K. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Hoffman, E.E. [USDOE Oak Ridge Operations Office, TN (United States)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

212

Materials/manufacturing element of the Advanced Turbine System Program  

SciTech Connect

One of the supporting elements of the Advanced Turbine Systems (ATS) Program is the materials/manufacturing technologies task. The objective of this element is to address critical materials issues for both industrial and utility gas turbines. DOE Oak Ridge Operations Office (ORO) will manage this element of the program, and a team from DOE-ORO and Oak Ridge National Laboratory is coordinating the planning for the materials/manufacturing effort. This paper describes that planning activity which is in the early stages.

Karnitz, M.A.; Devan, J.H.; Holcomb, R.S.; Ferber, M.K.; Harrison, R.W.

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Needs assessment for manufacturing ceramic gas turbine components  

SciTech Connect

An assessment of needs for the manufacturing of ceramic gas turbine components was undertaken to provide a technical basis for planning R&D activities to support DOE`s gas turbine programs. The manufacturing processes for ceramic turbine engine components were examined from design through final inspection and testing. The following technology needs were identified: Concurrent engineering early in the design phase to develop ceramic components that are more readily manufacturable. Additional effort in determining the boundaries of acceptable design dimensions and tolerances through experimental and/or analytical means. Provision, by the designer, of a CAD based model of the component early in the design cycle. Standardization in the way turbine components are dimensioned and toleranced, and in the way component datum features are defined. Rapid means of fabricating hard tooling, including intelligent systems for design of tooling and rapid prototyping of tooling. Determination of process capabilities by manufacturing significant numbers of parts. Development of more robust ceramic manufacturing processes which are tolerant of process variations. Development of intelligent processing as a means of controlling yield and quality of components. Development of computer models of key manufacturing steps, such as green forming to reduce the number of iterations required to manufacture intolerance components. Development of creep feed or other low-damage precision grinding for finish machining of components. Improved means of fixturing components for finish machining. Fewer and lower-cost final inspection requirements. Standard procedures, including consistent terminology and analytical software for dimensional inspection of components. Uniform data requirements from the US turbine engine companies. An agreed-upon system of naming ceramic materials and updating the name when changes have been made.

Johnson, D.R.; McSpadden, S.B.; Morris, T.O.; Pasto, A.E.

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Investigations of flow and film cooling on turbine blade edge regions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The inlet temperature of modern gas turbine engines has been increased to achieve higher thermal efficiency and increased output. The blade edge regions, including the blade tip, the leading edge, and the platform, are exposed to the most extreme heat loads, and therefore, must be adequately cooled to maintain safety. For the blade tip, there is tip leakage flow due to the pressure gradient across the tip. This leakage flow not only reduces the blade aerodynamic performance, but also yields a high heat load due to the thin boundary layer and high speed. Various tip configurations, such as plane tip, double side squealer tip, and single suction side squealer tip, have been studied to find which one is the best configuration to reduce the tip leakage flow and the heat load. In addition to the flow and heat transfer on the blade tip, film cooling with various arrangements, including camber line, upstream, and two row configurations, have been studied. Besides these cases of low inlet/outlet pressure ratio, low temperature, non-rotating, the high inlet/outlet pressure ratio, high temperature, and rotating cases have been investigated, since they are closer to real turbine working conditions. The leading edge of the rotor blade experiences high heat transfer because of the stagnation flow. Film cooling on the rotor leading edge in a 1-1/2 turbine stage has been numerically studied for the design and off-design conditions. Simulations find that the increasing rotating speed shifts the stagnation line from the pressure side, to the leading edge and the suction side, while film cooling protection moves in the reverse direction with decreasing cooling effectiveness. Film cooling brings a high unsteady intensity of the heat transfer coefficient, especially on the suction side. The unsteady intensity of film cooling effectiveness is higher than that of the heat transfer coefficient. The film cooling on the rotor platform has gained significant attention due to the usage of low-aspect ratio and low-solidity turbine designs. Film cooling and its heat transfer are strongly influenced by the secondary flow of the end-wall and the stator-rotor interaction. Numerical predictions have been performed for the film cooling on the rotating platform of a whole turbine stage. The design conditions yield a high cooling effectiveness and decrease the cooling effectiveness unsteady intensity, while the high rpm condition dramatically reduces the film cooling effectiveness. High purge flow rates provide a better cooling protection. In addition, the impact of the turbine work process on film cooling effectiveness and heat transfer coefficient has been investigated. The overall cooling effectiveness shows a higher value than the adiabatic effectiveness does.

Yang, Huitao

2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

AIAA-2003-0694 QUANTIFICATION OF PROCESSING PARAMETERS FOR WIND TURBINE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

AIAA-2003-0694 QUANTIFICATION OF PROCESSING PARAMETERS FOR WIND TURBINE BLADES Douglas Cairns, John of processing techniques and can be useful to wind turbine blade manufacturers to prepare processing conditions-3]. This is a consequence of the typical material architectures that are used in wind turbine blades. Figure 1

216

Blade tip clearance effect on the performance and flow field of a three stage axial turbine  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The effect of a 1.5 % blade tip clearance on a rotating three stage turbine under different operating points was investigated using radially and circumferentially traversed five hole pressure probes. The probes were used to obtain flow field total and static pressures, absolute and relative velocities and angles, as well as calculate the blade span distribution of total pressure loss coefficient. Total temperature thermocouple probes were traversed radially and circumferentially to obtain temperature profiles under running conditions. Results showed high discrepancies especially in the blade tip region which is due to high circulation flows occurring at the tip that produce an out of probe calibration range type flow. Engine efficiency and massflow rate was also measured using a venturi flow meter in order to discern the effect the blade tip clearance has on the engine efficiency and performance. Results have shown that the blade tip clearance losses appear to play a smaller role when compared to other losses such as exit losses. This was because the engine efficiency was slightly affected when run using a blade tip clearance.

Abdel-Fattah, Sharef Aly

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Potential for Reducing Blade-Tip Acoustic Emissions for Small Wind Turbines: June 1, 2007 - July 31, 2008  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report provides results of wind tunnel aroacoustic tests conducted on a small wind turbine blade in the open-jet test section of the Georgia Tech Research Institute Flight Simulation Facility.

Migliore, P.

2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

The Forming of AISI 409 sheets for fan blade manufacturing  

SciTech Connect

The necessity of adapting the standardized fan models to conditions of higher temperature has emerged due to the growth of concern referring to the consequences of the gas expelling after the Mont Blanc tunnel accident in Italy and France, where even though, with 100 fans in operation, 41 people died. The objective of this work is to present an alternative to the market standard fans considering a new technology in constructing blades. This new technology introduces the use of the stainless steel AISI 409 due to its good to temperatures of gas exhaust from tunnels in fire situation. The innovation is centered in the process of a deep drawing of metallic sheets in order to keep the ideal aerodynamic superficies for the fan ideal performance. Through the impression of circles on the sheet plane it is shown, experimentally, that, during the pressing process, the more deformed regions on the sheet plane of the blade can not reach the deformation limits of the utilized sheet material.

Foroni, F. D.; Menezes, M. A.; Moreira Filho, L. A. [ITA - Aeronautic Technological Institute, IEM, Praca Mal. Eduardo Gomes, 50 - Vila das Acacias - S. J. Campos, Brasil - CEP 1228-900 (Brazil)

2007-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

219

Wind turbine rotor blade with in-plane sweep and devices using same, and methods for making same  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A wind turbine includes a rotor having a hub and at least one blade having a torsionally rigid root, an inboard section, and an outboard section. The inboard section has a forward sweep relative to an elastic axis of the blade and the outboard section has an aft sweep.

Wetzel, Kyle Kristopher (Lawrence, KS)

2008-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

220

Wind energy conversion. Volume X. Aeroelastic stability of wind turbine rotor blades  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The nonlinear equations of motion of a general wind turbine rotor blade are derived from first principles. The twisted, tapered blade may be preconed out of the plane of rotation, and its root may be offset from the axis of rotation by a small amount. The aerodynamic center, center of mass, shear center, and area centroid are distinct in this derivation. The equations are applicable to studies of forced response or of aeroelastic flutter, however, neither gravity forcing, nor wind shear and gust forcing are included. The equations derived are applied to study the aeroelastic stability of the NASA-ERDA 100 kW wind turbine, and solved using the Galerkin method. The numerical results are used in conjunction with a mathematical comparison to prove the validity of an equivalent hinge model developed by the Wind Energy Conversion Project at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

Wendell, J.

1978-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "turbine blade manufacturer" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Lidar measurement of wind velocity turbulence spectra encountered by a rotating turbine blade  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A homodyne CO/sub 2/ lidar system beam was conically scanned around a horizontal axis to measure the wind speed and turbulence characteristics encountered by a rotating turbine blade. Turbulence spectra obtained from the scanning lidar differed considerably from those calculated from fixed-point anemometer measurements, showing a redistribution of energy from lower to higher frequencies. The differences appeared more pronounced during periods when the atmosphere was stable.

Hardesty, R.M.; Korrell, J.A.; Hall, F.F. Jr.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Design of a 3 kW wind turbine generator with thin airfoil blades  

SciTech Connect

Three blades of a 3 kW prototype wind turbine generator were designed with thin airfoil and a tip speed ratio of 3. The wind turbine has been controlled via two control methods: the variable pitch angle and by regulation of the field current of the generator and examined under real wind conditions. The characteristics of the thin airfoil, called ''Seven arcs thin airfoil'' named so because the airfoil is composed of seven circular arcs, are analyzed with the airfoil design and analysis program XFOIL. The thin airfoil blade is designed and calculated by blade element and momentum theory. The performance characteristics of the machine such as rotational speed, generator output as well as stability for wind speed changes are described. In the case of average wind speeds of 10 m/s and a maximum of 19 m/s, the automatically controlled wind turbine ran safely through rough wind conditions and showed an average generator output of 1105 W and a power coefficient 0.14. (author)

Ameku, Kazumasa; Nagai, Baku M.; Roy, Jitendro Nath [Faculty of Mechanical Engineering, University of the Ryukyus, 1 Senbaru, Nishihara-cho, Okinawa 903-0213 (Japan)

2008-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

223

Comparison of strength and load-based methods for testing wind turbine blades  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The purpose of this paper is to compare two methods of blade test loading and show how they are applied in an actual blade test. Strength and load-based methods were examined to determine the test load for an Atlantic Orient Corporation (AOC) 15/50 wind turbine blade for fatigue and static testing. Fatigue load-based analysis was performed using measured field test loads extrapolated for extreme rare events and scaled to thirty-year spectra. An accelerated constant amplitude fatigue test that gives equivalent damage at critical locations was developed using Miner`s Rule and the material S-N curves. Test load factors were applied to adjust the test loads for uncertainties, and differences between the test and operating environment. Similar analyses were carried, out for the strength-based fatigue test using the strength of the blade and the material properties to determine the load level and number of constant amplitude cycles to failure. Static tests were also developed using load and strength criteria. The resulting test loads were compared and contrasted. The analysis shows that, for the AOC 15/50 blade, the strength-based test loads are higher than any of the static load-based cases considered but were exceeded in the fatigue analysis for a severe hot/wet environment.

Musial, W.D.; Clark, M.E.; Egging, N. [and others

1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Base excitation testing system using spring elements to pivotally mount wind turbine blades  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A system (1100) for fatigue testing wind turbine blades (1102) through forced or resonant excitation of the base (1104) of a blade (1102). The system (1100) includes a test stand (1112) and a restoring spring assembly (1120) mounted on the test stand (1112). The restoring spring assembly (1120) includes a primary spring element (1124) that extends outward from the test stand (1112) to a blade mounting plate (1130) configured to receive a base (1104) of blade (1102). During fatigue testing, a supported base (1104) of a blad (1102) may be pivotally mounted to the test stand (1112) via the restoring spring assembly (1120). The system (1100) may include an excitation input assembly (1140) that is interconnected with the blade mouting plate (1130) to selectively apply flapwise, edgewise, and/or pitch excitation forces. The restoring spring assemply (1120) may include at least one tuning spring member (1127) positioned adjacent to the primary spring element (1124) used to tune the spring constant or stiffness of the primary spring element (1124) in one of the excitation directions.

Cotrell, Jason; Hughes, Scott; Butterfield, Sandy; Lambert, Scott

2013-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

225

Advanced Gas Turbine Guidelines: Rotating Blade Temperature Measurement System (BTMS)--Supplement No. 1: Durability Surveillance at Florida Power & Light Company's Martin Plant  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The blade scans performed by EPRI's Blade Temperature Measurement System (BTMS) represent an important source of blade metal temperature data. These advanced gas turbine guidelines describe the design, installation, and operation of the BTMS in a utility power plant operating General Electric MS7221FA advanced gas turbines. The guidelines include an analysis of blade temperature scans as well as a summary of lessons learned under baseload operating conditions.

1999-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

226

Experimental investigation of turbine blade platform film cooling and rotational effect on trailing edge internal cooling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The present work has been an experimental investigation to evaluate the applicability of gas turbine cooling technology. With the temperature of the mainstream gas entering the turbine elevated above the melting temperature of the metal components, these components must be cooled, so they can withstand prolonged exposure to the mainstream gas. Both external and internal cooling techniques have been studied as a means to increase the life of turbine components. Detailed film cooling effectiveness distributions have been obtained on the turbine blade platform with a variety of cooling configurations. Because the newly developed pressure sensitive paint (PSP) technique has proven to be the most suitable technique for measuring the film effectiveness, it was applied to a variety of platform seal configurations and discrete film flows. From the measurements it was shown advanced seals provide more uniform protection through the passage with less potential for ingestion of the hot mainstream gases into the engine cavity. In addition to protecting the outer surface of the turbine components, via film cooling, heat can also be removed from the components internally. Because the turbine blades are rotating within the engine, it is important to consider the effect of rotation on the heat transfer enhancement within the airfoil cooling channels. Through this experimental investigation, the heat transfer enhancement has been measured in narrow, rectangular channels with various turbulators. The present experimental investigation has shown the turbulators, coupled with the rotation induced Coriolis and buoyancy forces, result in non-uniform levels of heat transfer enhancement in the cooling channels. Advanced turbulator configurations can be used to provide increased heat transfer enhancement. Although these designs result in increased frictional losses, the benefit of the heat transfer enhancement outweighs the frictional losses.

Wright, Lesley Mae

2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Necessity and Requirements of a Collaborative Effort to Develop a Large Wind Turbine Blade Test Facility in North America  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The wind power industry in North America has an immediate need for larger blade test facilities to ensure the survival of the industry. Blade testing is necessary to meet certification and investor requirements and is critical to achieving the reliability and blade life needed for the wind turbine industry to succeed. The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Wind Program is exploring options for collaborating with government, private, or academic entities in a partnership to build larger blade test facilities in North America capable of testing blades up to at least 70 m in length. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) prepared this report for DOE to describe the immediate need to pursue larger blade test facilities in North America, categorize the numerous prospective partners for a North American collaboration, and document the requirements for a North American test facility.

Cotrell, J.; Musial, W.; Hughes, S.

2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Application of a wireless sensor node to health monitoring of operational wind turbine blades  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Structural health monitoring (SHM) is a developing field of research with a variety of applications including civil structures, industrial equipment, and energy infrastructure. An SHM system requires an integrated process of sensing, data interrogation and statistical assessment. The first and most important stage of any SHM system is the sensing system, which is traditionally composed of transducers and data acquisition hardware. However, such hardware is often heavy, bulky, and difficult to install in situ. Furthermore, physical access to the structure being monitored may be limited or restricted, as is the case for rotating wind turbine blades or unmanned aerial vehicles, requiring wireless transmission of sensor readings. This study applies a previously developed compact wireless sensor node to structural health monitoring of rotating small-scale wind turbine blades. The compact sensor node collects low-frequency structural vibration measurements to estimate natural frequencies and operational deflection shapes. The sensor node also has the capability to perform high-frequency impedance measurements to detect changes in local material properties or other physical characteristics. Operational measurements were collected using the wireless sensing system for both healthy and damaged blade conditions. Damage sensitive features were extracted from the collected data, and those features were used to classify the structural condition as healthy or damaged.

Taylor, Stuart G [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Farinholt, Kevin M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Park, Gyuhae [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Farrar, Charles R [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Todd, Michael D [UCSD

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Effect of Load Phase Angle on Wind Turbine Blade Fatigue Damage: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper examines the importance of phase angle variations with respect to fatigue damage. The operating loads on a generic conventional three-bladed upwind 1.5-MW wind turbine blade were analyzed over a range of operating conditions, and an aggregate probability distribution for the actual phase angles between the in-plane (lead-lag) and out-of-plane (flap) loads was determined. Using a finite element model of a generic blade and Miner's Rule, the accumulated theoretical damage (based on axial strains) resulting from a fatigue test with variable phase angles was compared to the damage resulting from a fatigue test with a constant phase angle. The nodal damage distribution at specific blade cross-sections are compared for the constant and variable phase angle cases. The sequence effects of various phase angle progressions were also considered. For this analysis, the finite element results were processed using the nonlinear Marco-Starkey damage accumulation model. Each phase angle sequence was constrained to have the same overall phase angle distribution and the same total number of cycles but the order in which the phase angles were applied was varied.

White, D. L.; Musial, W. D.

2003-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

CFD analysis of rotating two-bladed flatback wind turbine rotor.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The effects of modifying the inboard portion of the NREL Phase VI rotor using a thickened, flatback version of the S809 design airfoil are studied using a three-dimensional Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes method. A motivation for using such a thicker airfoil design coupled with a blunt trailing edge is to alleviate structural constraints while reducing blade weight and maintaining the power performance of the rotor. The calculated results for the baseline Phase VI rotor are benchmarked against wind tunnel results obtained at 10, 7, and 5 meters per second. The calculated results for the modified rotor are compared against those of the baseline rotor. The results of this study demonstrate that a thick, flatback blade profile is viable as a bridge to connect structural requirements with aerodynamic performance in designing future wind turbine rotors.

van Dam, C.P. (University of California, David, CA); Chao, David D.; Berg, Dale E. (University of California, David, CA)

2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Distrubance Tracking and Blade Load Control of Wind Turbines in Variable-Speed Operation: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A composite state-space controller was developed for a multi-objective problem in the variable-speed operation of wind turbines. Disturbance Tracking Control theory was applied to the design of a torque controller to optimize energy capture under the influence of persistent wind disturbances. A limitation in the theory for common multi-state models is described, which led to the design of a complementary pitch controller. The goal of the independent blade pitch design was to minimize blade root fatigue loads. Simulation results indicate an 11% reduction in fatigue damage using the proposed controllers, compared to a conventional torque-only design. Meanwhile, energy capture is almost identical, partly because of nonlinear effects.

Stol, K. A.

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Analysis of SNL/MSU/DOE fatigue database trends for wind turbine blade materials.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report presents an analysis of trends in fatigue results from the Montana State University program on the fatigue of composite materials for wind turbine blades for the period 2005-2009. Test data can be found in the SNL/MSU/DOE Fatigue of Composite Materials Database which is updated annually. This is the fifth report in this series, which summarizes progress of the overall program since its inception in 1989. The primary thrust of this program has been research and testing of a broad range of structural laminate materials of interest to blade structures. The report is focused on current types of infused and prepreg blade materials, either processed in-house or by industry partners. Trends in static and fatigue performance are analyzed for a range of materials, geometries and loading conditions. Materials include: sixteen resins of three general types, five epoxy based paste adhesives, fifteen reinforcing fabrics including three fiber types, three prepregs, many laminate lay-ups and process variations. Significant differences in static and fatigue performance and delamination resistance are quantified for particular materials and process conditions. When blades do fail, the likely cause is fatigue in the structural detail areas or at major flaws. The program is focused strongly on these issues in addition to standard laminates. Structural detail tests allow evaluation of various blade materials options in the context of more realistic representations of blade structure than do the standard test methods. Types of structural details addressed in this report include ply drops used in thickness tapering, and adhesive joints, each tested over a range of fatigue loading conditions. Ply drop studies were in two areas: (1) a combined experimental and finite element study of basic ply drop delamination parameters for glass and carbon prepreg laminates, and (2) the development of a complex structured resin-infused coupon including ply drops, for comparison studies of various resins, fabrics and pry drop thicknesses. Adhesive joint tests using typical blade adhesives included both generic testing of materials parameters using a notched-lap-shear test geometry developed in this study, and also a series of simulated blade web joint geometries fabricated by an industry partner.

Mandell, John F. (Montana State University, Bozeman, MT); Ashwill, Thomas D.; Wilson, Timothy J. (Montana State University, Bozeman, MT); Sears, Aaron T. (Montana State University, Bozeman, MT); Agastra, Pancasatya (Montana State University, Bozeman, MT); Laird, Daniel L.; Samborsky, Daniel D. (Montana State University, Bozeman, MT)

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Inspection system for a turbine blade region of a turbine engine  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An inspection system formed at least from a viewing tube for inspecting aspects of a turbine engine during operation of the turbine engine. An outer housing of the viewing tube may be positioned within a turbine engine using at least one bearing configured to fit into an indentation of a support housing to form a ball and socket joint enabling the viewing tube to move during operation as a result of vibrations and other movements. The viewing tube may also include one or more lenses positioned within the viewing tube for viewing the turbine components. The lenses may be kept free of contamination by maintaining a higher pressure in the viewing tube than a pressure outside of the viewing tube and enabling gases to pass through an aperture in a cap at a viewing end of the viewing tube.

Smed, Jan P. (Winter Springs, FL); Lemieux, Dennis H. (Casselberry, FL); Williams, James P. (Orlando, FL)

2007-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

234

Enhanced Prediction Techniques Based on Time-Accurate Simulations for Turbine Blade Internal Cooling  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Performance Computational Fluid-Thermal Science & Engineering Lab Performance Computational Fluid-Thermal Science & Engineering Lab utsr.dkt.oct05 Enhanced Prediction Techniques Based on Time-Accurate Simulations for Turbine Blade Internal Cooling Danesh Tafti SCIES Project 02- 01- SR100 DOE COOPERATIVE AGREEMENT DE-FC26-02NT41431 Tom J. George, Program Manager, DOE/NETL Richard Wenglarz, Manager of Research, SCIES Project Awarded (5/1/02, 36 Month Duration) $ 331,430 Total Contract Value ($331,430 DOE) High Performance Computational Fluid-Thermal Science & Engineering Lab utsr.dkt.oct05 Gas Turbine Need * Need for higher thermal efficiencies result in higher gas temperatures * Cooling technologies critical for increased durability * Reliable prediction tools for design - reduce costs High Performance Computational Fluid-Thermal Science & Engineering Lab

235

Progress Toward Luminescence-Based VAATE Turbine Blade And Vane Temperature Measurement  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Progress towards fielding luminescence-based temperature measurements for the Versatile Affordable Advanced Turbine Engine (VAATE) program is described. The near term programmatic objective is to monitor turbine vane temperatures and health by luminescence from a rare-earth doped thermal barrier coating (TBC), or from a thermographic phosphor layer coated onto a TBC. The first goal is to establish the temperature measurement capability to 1300 C with 1 percent uncertainty in a test engine. An eventual goal is to address rotating turbine blades in an F135 engine. The project consists of four phases, of which the first two have been completed and are described in this paper. The first phase involved laser heating of a 2.54-cm-diameter test sample, coated with a TBC and a thermographic phosphor layer, to produce a thermal gradient across the TBC layer similar to that expected in a turbine engine. Phosphor temperatures correlated well with those measured by long wavelength pyrometry. In the second phase, 10x10- cm coupons were exposed to a jet fuel flame at a burner rig facility. The thermographic phosphor/TBC combination survived the aggressive flame and high exhaust gas velocity, even though the metal substrate melted. Reliable temperature measurements were made up to about 1400 C using YAG:Dy as the thermographic phosphor. In addition, temperature measurements using YAG:Tm showed very desirable background radiation suppression.

Jenkins, Tom P. [Metrolaser Corporation; Allison, Stephen W [ORNL; Eldridge, Jeffrey I. [NASA-Glenn Research Center, Cleveland; Niska, R. H. [Honeywell Aerospace Services; Condevaux, J. J. [Williams International; Wolfe, Doug E. [Pennsylvania State University; Jordan, Eric H. [University of Connecticut, Storrs; Heeg, Bauke [Lumium

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

WindPACT Turbine Design Scaling Studies Technical Area 2: Turbine, Rotor, and Blade Logistics; March 27, 2000 to December 31, 2000  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1 * NREL/SR-500-29439 1 * NREL/SR-500-29439 Kevin Smith Global Energy Concepts LLC Kirkland, Washington WindPACT Turbine Design Scaling Studies Technical Area 2: Turbine, Rotor, and Blade Logistics March 27, 2000 to December 31, 2000 National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole Boulevard Golden, Colorado 80401-3393 NREL is a U.S. Department of Energy Laboratory Operated by Midwest Research Institute * * * * Battelle * * * * Bechtel Contract No. DE-AC36-99-GO10337 June 2001 * NREL/SR-500-29439 WindPACT Turbine Design Scaling Studies Technical Area 2: Turbine, Rotor, and Blade Logistics March 27, 2000 to December 31, 2000 Kevin Smith Global Energy Concepts LLC Kirkland, Washington NREL Technical Monitor: Alan Laxson Prepared under Subcontract No. YAM-0-30203-01 National Renewable Energy Laboratory

237

Tax Credit for Manufacturers of Small Wind Turbines | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Tax Credit for Manufacturers of Small Wind Turbines Tax Credit for Manufacturers of Small Wind Turbines Tax Credit for Manufacturers of Small Wind Turbines < Back Eligibility Industrial Savings Category Wind Buying & Making Electricity Program Info Start Date 01/01/03 State Oklahoma Program Type Industry Recruitment/Support Rebate Amount Based on square footage of rotor swept area: 25.00/ft^2 for 2005 through 2012 Provider Oklahoma Tax Commission '''''Note: After a 2 year moratorium on all state tax credits, this credit may be claimed for tax year 2012 and subsequent tax years, for small wind turbines manufactured on or after July 1, 2012.''''' Oklahoma offers an income tax credit to the manufacturers of small wind turbines for tax years 2003 through 2012. Oklahoma manufacturers of wind turbines with a rated capacity of between 1 kilowatt (kW) and 50 kW are

238

Water Jet Applications for Gas Turbine Manufacturing - State of the Art  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Water Jet Applications for Gas Turbine Manufacturing - State of the Art ... Impact of Materials Selection on the Sustainability of Wind Energy.

239

Exit blade geometry and part-load performance of small axial flow propeller turbines: An experimental investigation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A detailed experimental investigation of the effects of exit blade geometry on the part-load performance of low-head, axial flow propeller turbines is presented. Even as these turbines find important applications in small-scale energy generation using micro-hydro, the relationship between the layout of blade profile, geometry and turbine performance continues to be poorly characterized. The experimental results presented here help understand the relationship between exit tip angle, discharge through the turbine, shaft power, and efficiency. The modification was implemented on two different propeller runners and it was found that the power and efficiency gains from decreasing the exit tip angle could be explained by a theoretical model presented here based on classical theory of turbomachines. In particular, the focus is on the behaviour of internal parameters like the runner loss coefficient, relative flow angle at exit, mean axial flow velocity and net tangential flow velocity. The study concluded that the effects of exit tip modification were significant. The introspective discussion on the theoretical model's limitation and test facility suggests wider and continued experimentation pertaining to the internal parameters like inlet vortex profile and exit swirl profile. It also recommends thorough validation of the model and its improvement so that it can be made capable for accurate characterization of blade geometric effects. (author)

Singh, Punit; Nestmann, Franz [Institute for Water and River Basin Management (IWG), University of Karlsruhe, Kaiser Str. 12, D 76128 Karlsruhe (Germany)

2010-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

240

Evaluation of the New B-REX Fatigue Testing System for Multi-Megawatt Wind Turbine Blades: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) recently developed a new hybrid fatigue testing system called the Blade Resonance Excitation (B-REX) test system. The new system uses 65% less energy to test large wind turbine blades in half the time of NREL's dual-axis forced-displacement test method with lower equipment and operating costs. The B-REX is a dual-axis test system that combines resonance excitation with forced hydraulic loading to reduce the total test time required while representing the operating strains on the critical inboard blade stations more accurately than a single-axis test system. The analysis and testing required to fully implement the B-REX was significant. To control unanticipated blade motion and vibrations caused by dynamic coupling between the flap, lead-lag, and torsional directions, we needed to incorporate additional test hardware and control software. We evaluated the B-REX test system under stable operating conditions using a combination of various sensors. We then compared our results with results from the same blade, tested previously using NREL's dual-axis forced-displacement test method. Experimental results indicate that strain levels produced by the B-REX system accurately replicated the forced-displacement method. This paper describes the challenges we encountered while developing the new blade fatigue test system and the experimental results that validate its accuracy.

White, D.; Musial, W.; Engberg, S.

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "turbine blade manufacturer" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Fluid turbine  

SciTech Connect

A fluid turbine designed for increased power output includes an annular housing provided with a semi-spherical dome for directing incoming fluid flow to impinge on a plurality of rotor blades within the housing fixed to a vertical output shaft. An angle on the order of between 5 to 85/sup 0/, in the direction of rotation of the shaft, exists between the upper (Leading) and lower (Trailing) edges of each blade. The blades are manufactured from a plurality of aerodynamically-shaped, radially spaced ribs covered with a skin. The leading edge of each rib is curved, while the trailing edge is straight. The straight edge of the ribs in each blade approach a vertical plane through the vertical axis of the housing output shaft as the ribs progress radially inwardly towards the output shaft. The housing has fluid exit passages in its base so that deenergized fluid can be quickly flushed from the housing by the downwardly directed flow in combination with the novel blade configuration, which acts as a screw or force multiplier, to expel deenergized fluid. The airfoil shaped ribs also provide the blades with a contour for increasing the fluid velocity on the underside of the blades adjacent the fluid exit passage to aid in expelling the deenergized air while providing the turbine with both impulse and axial-flow, fluid impingement on the blades, resulting in a force vector of increased magnitude. A downwardly directed, substantially semi-cylindrical deflector frame connected to the housing blocks the path of flow of ambient fluid to create a low pressure area beneath the base to aid in continuously drawing fluid into the housing at high velocity to impinge on the rotor blades. The increased flow velocity and force on the blades along with the enhanced removal of deenergized fluid results in increased power output of the turbine.

Lebost, B.A.

1980-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

242

WindPACT Turbine Design Scaling Studies Technical Area 1ÂŒComposite Blades for 80- to 120-Meter Rotor  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1 * NREL/SR-500-29492 1 * NREL/SR-500-29492 Dayton A. Griffin Global Energy Concepts Kirkland, Washington WindPACT Turbine Design Scaling Studies Technical Area 1-Composite Blades for 80- to 120-Meter Rotor March 21, 2000 - March 15, 2001 National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole Boulevard Golden, Colorado 80401-3393 NREL is a U.S. Department of Energy Laboratory Operated by Midwest Research Institute * * * * Battelle * * * * Bechtel Contract No. DE-AC36-99-GO10337 April 2001 * NREL/SR-500-29492 WindPACT Turbine Design Scaling Studies Technical Area 1-Composite Blades for 80- to 120-Meter Rotor March 21, 2000 - March 15, 2001 Dayton A. Griffin Global Energy Concepts Kirkland, Washington NREL Technical Monitor: Alan Laxson Prepared under Subcontract No. YAM-0-30203-01 National Renewable Energy Laboratory

243

Low-Order Modelling of Blade-Induced Turbulence for RANS Actuator Disk Computations of Wind and Tidal Turbines  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Modelling of turbine blade-induced turbulence (BIT) is discussed within the framework of three-dimensional Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) actuator disk computations. We first propose a generic (baseline) BIT model, which is applied only to the actuator disk surface, does not include any model coefficients (other than those used in the original RANS turbulence model) and is expected to be valid in the limiting case where BIT is fully isotropic and in energy equilibrium. The baseline model is then combined with correction functions applied to the region behind the disk to account for the effect of rotor tip vortices causing a mismatch of Reynolds shear stress between short- and long-time averaged flow fields. Results are compared with wake measurements of a two-bladed wind turbine model of Medici and Alfredsson [Wind Energy, Vol. 9, 2006, pp. 219-236] to demonstrate the capability of the new model.

Nishino, Takafumi

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Blade reliability collaborative : collection of defect, damage and repair data.  

SciTech Connect

The Blade Reliability Collaborative (BRC) was started by the Wind Energy Technologies Department of Sandia National Laboratories and DOE in 2010 with the goal of gaining insight into planned and unplanned O&M issues associated with wind turbine blades. A significant part of BRC is the Blade Defect, Damage and Repair Survey task, which will gather data from blade manufacturers, service companies, operators and prior studies to determine details about the largest sources of blade unreliability. This report summarizes the initial findings from this work.

Ashwill, Thomas D.; Ogilvie, Alistair B.; Paquette, Joshua A.

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Memorandum of Understanding between the U.S. Wind Turbine Manufacturers and  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Memorandum of Understanding between the U.S. Wind Turbine Memorandum of Understanding between the U.S. Wind Turbine Manufacturers and the U.S. Department of Energy on Developing a Shared Strategy to Achieve 20% Wind Energy in 2030 Memorandum of Understanding between the U.S. Wind Turbine Manufacturers and the U.S. Department of Energy on Developing a Shared Strategy to Achieve 20% Wind Energy in 2030 this Memorandum of Understanding (MOU), the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the signing members of the wind turbine industry (the Parties) agree to work cooperatively to define and develop the framework for appropriate technology R&D and siting strategies for realizing 20% Wind Energy by 2030. Memorandum of Understanding between the U.S. Wind Turbine Manufacturers and the U.S. Department of Energy on Developing a Shared Strategy to Achieve

246

Ceramic blade attachment system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A turbine blade having a preestablished rate of thermal expansion is attached to a turbine disc having a preestablished rate of thermal expansion being greater than the preestablished rate of thermal expansion of the turbine blade and forms a turbine assembly. The turbine blade has a root portion defining a pair of sides having a pair of grooves therein. The turbine assembly includes a pair of flanges between which the turbine blades are positioned. Each of the pair of flanges has a plurality of grooves defined therein. The grooves within the pair of flanges are aligned with the grooves in the blades and have a space formed therebetween. A plurality of spherical balls are positioned within the space. The plurality of spherical balls has a preestablished rate of thermal expansion being equal to the preestablished rate of thermal expansion of the turbine blade.

Shaffer, James E. (Maitland, FL)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Ceramic blade attachment system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A turbine blade having a preestablished rate of thermal expansion is attached to a turbine disc having a preestablished rate of thermal expansion being greater than the preestablished rate of thermal expansion of the turbine blade and forms a turbine assembly. The turbine blade has a root portion defining a pair of sides having a pair of grooves therein. The turbine assembly includes a pair of flanges between which the turbine blades are positioned. Each of the pair of flanges has a plurality of grooves defined therein. The grooves within the pair of flanges are aligned with the grooves in the blades and have a space formed therebetween. A plurality of spherical balls are positioned within the space. The plurality of spherical balls has a preestablished rate of thermal expansion being equal to the preestablished rate of thermal expansion of the turbine blade. 4 figs.

Shaffer, J.E.

1995-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

248

Experimental investigation of full coverage film cooling on the pressure surface of a gas turbine blade  

SciTech Connect

Coolant was injected from three holes on the center line of the pressure surface of a gas turbine blade. The density ratio and mass flow ratio covered the ranges of 1.0 {approximately} 3.0 and 0.1 {approximately} 1.5, respectively. The film cooling effectiveness on the center line was mainly governed by the momentum ratio, and the optimum momentum ratio is about 0.01. An empirical formula for the film cooling effectiveness on the center line is presented as a function of the dimensionless streamwise distance form the injection hole and the momentum ratio. The maximum and mean errors of this equation are 26.8 percent and 9.2 percent, respectively. The normalized dimensionless spanwise distribution of the film cooling effectiveness agreed well with the Gaussian error function. By using the above results and the principle of superposition, one can predict the distribution of full coverage film cooling effectiveness on the pressure surface under optimum conditions.

Kikkawa, S. (Dept. of Mechanical Engineering, Doshisha Univ. (JP)); Sakaguchi, K. (Graduate School, Doshisha Univ. (JP))

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Transient growth mechanisms of low Reynolds number flow over a low-pressure turbine blade  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A direct transient growth analysis for three-dimensional perturbations to flow past a periodic array of T-106/300 low-pressure turbine fan blades is presented. The methodology is based on a singular value decomposition of the flow evolution operator, linearised about a steady or periodic base flow. This analysis yields the optimal growth modes. Previous work on global mode stability analysis of this flow geometry showed the flow is asymptotically stable, indicating a non-modal explanation of transition may be more appropriate. The present work extends previous investigations into the transient growth around a steady base flow, to higher Reynolds numbers and periodic base flows. It is found that the notable transient growth of the optimal modes suggests a plausible route to transition in comparison to modal growth for this configuration. The spatial extent and localisation of the optimal modes is examined and possible physical triggering mechanisms are discussed. It is found that for longer times and longer sp...

Sharma, AS; Sherwin, SJ; Theofilis, V; 10.1007/s00162-010-0183-9

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Measured and predicted rotor performance for the SERI advanced wind turbine blades  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Measured and predicted rotor performance for the SERI advanced wind turbine blades were compared to assess the accuracy of predictions and to identify the sources of error affecting both predictions and measurements. An awareness of these sources of error contributes to improved prediction and measurement methods that will ultimately benefit future rotor design efforts. Propeller/vane anemometers were found to underestimate the wind speed in turbulent environments such as the San Gorgonio Pass wind farm area. Using sonic or cup anemometers, good agreement was achieved between predicted and measured power output for wind speeds up to 8 m/sec. At higher wind speeds an optimistic predicted power output and the occurrence of peak power at wind speeds lower than measurements resulted from the omission of turbulence and yaw error. In addition, accurate two-dimensional (2-D) airfoil data prior to stall and a post stall airfoil data synthesization method that reflects three-dimensional (3-D) effects were found to be essential for accurate performance prediction. 11 refs.

Tangler, J.; Smith, B.; Kelley, N.; Jager, D.

1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

A wind turbine blade is ready to be lifted into place at the Windy Point Wind Farm in the Columbia River Gorge. Photo: C. Bruce Forster  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A wind turbine blade is ready to be lifted into place at the Windy Point Wind Farm in the Columbia with juvenile bypass systems to keep the smolts out of the turbines. But given the gravity of the [salmon 1956 12 MW Chief Joseph Columbia, WA 1958 2,458 MW Cougar McKenzie, OR 1963 25 MW Detroit Santiam

252

Heat transfer in leading and trailing edge cooling channels of the gas turbine blade under high rotation numbers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The gas turbine blade/vane internal cooling is achieved by circulating the compressed air through the cooling passages inside the turbine blade. Leading edge and trailing edge of the turbine blade are two critical regions which need to be properly cooled. Leading edge region receives extremely hot mainstream flow and high heat transfer enhancement is required. Trailing edge region usually has narrow shaped geometry and applicable cooling techniques are restricted. Heat transfer will be investigated in the leading edge and trailing edge cooling channels at high rotation numbers close to the engine condition. Heat transfer and pressure drop has been investigated in an equilateral triangular channel (Dh=1.83cm) to simulate the cooling channel near the leading edge of the gas turbine blade. Three different rib configurations (45°, inverted 45°, and 90°) were tested at four different Reynolds numbers (10000-40000), each with five different rotational speeds (0-400 rpm). By varying the Reynolds numbers (10000-40000) and the rotational speeds (0-400 rpm), the rotation number and buoyancy parameter reached in this study were 0-0.58 and 0-2.3, respectively. 45° angled ribs show the highest thermal performance at stationary condition. 90° ribs have the highest thermal performance at the highest rotation number of 0.58. Heat transfer coefficients are also experimentally measured in a wedge-shaped cooling channel (Dh =2.22cm, Ac=7.62cm2) to model an internal cooling passage near the trailing edge of a gas turbine blade where the coolant discharges through the slot to the mainstream flow. Tapered ribs are put on the leading and trailing surfaces with an angle of attack of 45°. The ribs are parallel with staggered arrangement on opposite walls. The inlet Reynolds number of the coolant varies from 10,000 to 40,000 and the rotational speeds varies from 0 to 500 rpm. The inlet rotation number is from 0 - 1.0. The local rotation number and buoyancy parameter are determined by the rotational speeds and the local Reynolds number at each region. Results show that heat transfer is high near the regions where strong slot ejection exists. Both the rotation number and buoyancy parameter have been correlated to predict the rotational heat transfer enhancement.

Liu, Yao-Hsien

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Vibration and crack detection in gas turbine engine compressor blades using Eddy current sensors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

(cont.) in the ECS signal, no definitive method for sensing blade vibration using an ECS has yet been developed.

Lackner, Matthew, 1980-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Nantong Casc Wanyuan Acciona Wind Turbine Manufacture Co Ltd NCWA | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Casc Wanyuan Acciona Wind Turbine Manufacture Co Ltd NCWA Casc Wanyuan Acciona Wind Turbine Manufacture Co Ltd NCWA Jump to: navigation, search Name Nantong Casc Wanyuan Acciona Wind Turbine Manufacture Co Ltd (NCWA) Place Nantong, Jiangxi Province, China Zip 226017 Sector Wind energy Product Nantong-based wind turbine manufacturer. Coordinates 32.087399°, 121.062218° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":32.087399,"lon":121.062218,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

255

Materials/manufacturing support element for the Advanced Turbine Systems Program  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In 1993, DOE initiated a program to develop advanced gas turbines for power generation in utility and industrial applications. A materials/manufacturing plan was developed in several stages with input from gas turbine manufacturers, materials suppliers, universities, and government laboratories. This plan was developed by a small advanced materials and turbine technology team over a 6-month period. The technology plan calls for initiation of several high priority projects in FY 1995. The technical program for the materials/manufacturing element focuses on generic materials issues, components, and manufacturing processes. Categories include coatings and process development, turbine airfoil development, ceramics adaptation, directional solidification and single crystal airfoils manufactoring technology, materials characterization, catalytic combustor materials, and technology information exchange.

Karnitz, M.A.; Hoffman, E.E.; Parks, W.P.

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

256

Memorandum of Understanding between the U.S. Wind Turbine Manufacturer...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

U.S. Department of Energy on Developing a Shared Strategy to Achieve 20% Wind Energy in 2030 Memorandum of Understanding between the U.S. Wind Turbine Manufacturers and the U.S....

257

Memorandum of Understanding between the U.S. Wind Turbine Manufacturer...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Memorandum of Understanding between the U.S. Wind Turbine Manufacturers and the U.S. Department of Energy on Developing a Shared Strategy to Achieve 20% Wind Energy in 2030...

258

A Kind of Innovative Design Methodology of Wind Turbine Blade Based on Natural Structure  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Based on the mid axis pattern configuration, the topology adaption of the plant leaf vein is discussed in the first place., Secondly, combined with the blade principal stress field distribution cases, the adaptive design is applied in the blade structure ... Keywords: adaptation, blade, hybrid composites, mid axis pattern, stress field

Wangyu Liu; Jiaxing Gong; Xifeng Liu; Xin Zhang

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Program on Technology Innovation: Development of a Corrosion-Fatigue Prediction Methodology for Steam Turbines – Test Results for 12% Cr Blade Steel (403/410 Stainless Steel)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The useful life of a steam turbine and the establishment of turbine outage schedules are often determined by corrosion to the low pressure (LP) blades and disks in the phase transition zone (PTZ). Developing an effective corrosion damage prediction methodology is an important step to successfully reduce the number of unscheduled steam turbine outages. This report provides test data and a methodology to assess risk for failure associated with corrosion-fatigue of Type 403 stainless steel steam ...

2013-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

260

innovati nNREL Innovations Contribute to an Award-Winning Small Wind Turbine  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

innovati nNREL Innovations Contribute to an Award-Winning Small Wind Turbine The Skystream 3.7 wind (NREL) and Southwest Windpower, a commercially successful small wind turbine manufacturer. NREL drew blade design that makes the wind turbine more efficient and quieter than most. Small wind turbines

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "turbine blade manufacturer" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Wind Turbine Blade Flow Fields and Prospects for Active Aerodynamic Control: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper describes wind turbine flow fields that can cause adverse aerodynamic loading and can impact active aerodynamic control methodologies currently contemplated for wind turbine applications.

Schreck, S.; Robinson, M.

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

A Parametric Physics Based Creep Life Prediction Approach to Gas Turbine Blade Conceptual Design .  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The required useful service lives of gas turbine components and parts are naturally one of the major design constraints limiting the gas turbine design space.… (more)

Smith, Marcus Edward Brockbank

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

3X-100 blade field test.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In support of a Work-For-Other (WFO) agreement between the Wind Energy Technology Department at Sandia National Laboratories and 3TEX, one of the three Micon 65/13M wind turbines at the USDA Agriculture Research Service (ARS) center in Bushland, Texas, has been used to test a set of 9 meter wind turbine blades, manufactured by TPI composites using the 3TEX carbon material for the spar cap. Data collected from the test has been analyzed to evaluate both the aerodynamic performance and the structural response from the blades. The blades aerodynamic and structural performance, the meteorological inflow and the wind turbine structural response has been monitored with an array of 57 instruments: 15 to characterize the blades, 13 to characterize inflow, and 15 to characterize the time-varying state of the turbine. For the test, data was sampled at a rate of 40 Hz using the ATLAS II (Accurate GPS Time-Linked Data Acquisition System) data acquisition system. The system features a time-synchronized continuous data stream and telemetered data from the turbine rotor. This paper documents the instruments and infrastructure that have been developed to monitor these blades, turbines and inflow, as well as both modeling and field testing results.

Zayas, Jose R.; Johnson, Wesley D.

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Turbine Component Rapid Manufacturing Via Electron Beam Melting...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Electrochemical Machining- Barber-Nichols Background Development of new, more efficient gas turbine engines is achieved by a lengthy process of maximizing performance through...

265

Manufacturing technology  

SciTech Connect

This bulletin depicts current research on manufacturing technology at Sandia laboratories. An automated, adaptive process removes grit overspray from jet engine turbine blades. Advanced electronic ceramics are chemically prepared from solution for use in high- voltage varistors. Selective laser sintering automates wax casting pattern fabrication. Numerical modeling improves performance of photoresist stripper (simulation on Cray supercomputer reveals path to uniform plasma). And mathematical models help make dream of low- cost ceramic composites come true.

Leonard, J.A.; Floyd, H.L.; Goetsch, B.; Doran, L. [eds.

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Blade system design studies volume II : preliminary blade designs and recommended test matrix.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

As part of the U.S. Department of Energy's Wind Partnerships for Advanced Component Technologies (WindPACT) program, Global Energy Concepts, LLC is performing a Blade System Design Study (BSDS) concerning innovations in materials, processes and structural configurations for application to wind turbine blades in the multi-megawatt range. The BSDS Volume I project report addresses issues and constraints identified to scaling conventional blade designs to the megawatt size range, and evaluated candidate materials, manufacturing and design innovations for overcoming and improving large blade economics. The current report (Volume II), presents additional discussion of materials and manufacturing issues for large blades, including a summary of current trends in commercial blade manufacturing. Specifications are then developed to guide the preliminary design of MW-scale blades. Using preliminary design calculations for a 3.0 MW blade, parametric analyses are performed to quantify the potential benefits in stiffness and decreased gravity loading by replacement of a baseline fiberglass spar with carbon-fiberglass hybrid material. Complete preliminary designs are then presented for 3.0 MW and 5.0 MW blades that incorporate fiberglass-to-carbon transitions at mid-span. Based on analysis of these designs, technical issues are identified and discussed. Finally, recommendations are made for composites testing under Part I1 of the BSDS, and the initial planned test matrix for that program is presented.

Griffin, Dayton A. (Global Energy Concepts, LLC, Kirkland, WA)

2004-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Blade system design studies volume II : preliminary blade designs and recommended test matrix.  

SciTech Connect

As part of the U.S. Department of Energy's Wind Partnerships for Advanced Component Technologies (WindPACT) program, Global Energy Concepts, LLC is performing a Blade System Design Study (BSDS) concerning innovations in materials, processes and structural configurations for application to wind turbine blades in the multi-megawatt range. The BSDS Volume I project report addresses issues and constraints identified to scaling conventional blade designs to the megawatt size range, and evaluated candidate materials, manufacturing and design innovations for overcoming and improving large blade economics. The current report (Volume II), presents additional discussion of materials and manufacturing issues for large blades, including a summary of current trends in commercial blade manufacturing. Specifications are then developed to guide the preliminary design of MW-scale blades. Using preliminary design calculations for a 3.0 MW blade, parametric analyses are performed to quantify the potential benefits in stiffness and decreased gravity loading by replacement of a baseline fiberglass spar with carbon-fiberglass hybrid material. Complete preliminary designs are then presented for 3.0 MW and 5.0 MW blades that incorporate fiberglass-to-carbon transitions at mid-span. Based on analysis of these designs, technical issues are identified and discussed. Finally, recommendations are made for composites testing under Part I1 of the BSDS, and the initial planned test matrix for that program is presented.

Griffin, Dayton A. (Global Energy Concepts, LLC, Kirkland, WA)

2004-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Experimental study of gas turbine blade film cooling and internal turbulated heat transfer at large Reynolds numbers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Film cooling effectiveness on a gas turbine blade tip on the near tip pressure side and on the squealer cavity floor is investigated. Optimal arrangement of film cooling holes, effect of a full squealer and a cutback squealer, varying blowing ratios and squealer cavity depth are also examined on film cooling effectiveness. The film-cooling effectiveness distributions are measured on the blade tip, near tip pressure side and the inner pressure and suction side rim walls using a Pressure Sensitive Paint (PSP) technique. A blowing ratio of 1.0 is found to give best results on the pressure side whereas the other tip surfaces give best results for blowing ratios of 2. Film cooling effectiveness tests are also performed on the span of a fully-cooled high pressure turbine blade in a 5 bladed linear cascade using the PSP technique. Film cooling effectiveness over the entire blade region is determined from full coverage film cooling, showerhead cooling and from each individual row with and without an upstream wake. The effect of superposition of film cooling effectiveness from each individual row is then compared with full coverage film cooling. Results show that an upstream wake can result in lower film cooling effectiveness on the blade. Effectiveness magnitudes from superposition of effectiveness data from individual rows are comparable with that from full coverage film cooling. Internal heat transfer measurements are also performed in a high aspect ratio channel and from jet array impingement on a turbulated target wall at large Reynolds numbers. For the channel, three dimple and one discrete rib configurations are tested on one of the wide walls for Reynolds numbers up to 1.3 million. The presence of a turbulated wall and its effect on heat transfer enhancement against a smooth surface is investigated. Heat transfer enhancement is found to decrease at high Re with the discrete rib configurations providing the best enhancement but highest pressure losses. Experiments to investigate heat transfer and pressure loss from jet array impingement are also performed on the target wall at Reynolds numbers up to 450,000. The heat transfer from a turbulated target wall and two jet plates is investigated. A target wall with short pins provides the best heat transfer with the dimpled target wall giving the lowest heat transfer among the three geometries studied.

Mhetras, Shantanu

2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Design of a self-regulating composite bearingless blade wind turbine. Final report, October 15, 1976-August 15, 1977  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A study was undertaken to design a 40-ft diameter wind turbine employing the UTRC/ERDA Self-Regulating Composite Bearingless Rotor (CBR) concept. The CBR concept was developed at United Technologies for rotary wing applications and is now in use on Sikorsky helicopters. The concept was further developed for wind turbine applications at UTRC under an ERDA contract in 1975-76. Successful wind tunnel tests were conducted during that contract, which demonstrated the self-starting and self-regulating features. The latest contract was to design a 40-ft system in the 5 kW - 15 kW power range. This effort included performance tradeoff studies, stress analyses of the blade and tower structure, a stability investigation, and engineering drawings of the complete system. However an overall cost analysis was not performed in this study.

Spierings, P.A.M.; Cheney, M.C.

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Sinomatech Wind Power Blade aka Sinoma Science Technology Wind...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Sinomatech Wind Power Blade aka Sinoma Science Technology Wind Turbine Blade Co Ltd Jump to: navigation, search Name Sinomatech Wind Power Blade (aka Sinoma Science & Technology...

271

Process demonstration and cost analysis of a mass production forging technique for automotive turbine wheels: Phase II. Final report, January 1975--March 1977  

SciTech Connect

Low cost fabrication of integrally-bladed automotive turbine wheels utilizing the GATORIZING forging process was demonstrated. The capability of the forging process was characterized as to blade shape, and the effect of the blade shape on Chrysler baseline engine turbine efficiency was analytically defined. Actual baseline engine turbine wheels were fabricated from IN100 and AF2-1DA for evaluation. A mass production cost estimate was generated for manufacturing large production quantities.

Allen, M.M.; Larson, K.J.; Walker, B.H.

1977-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Electrodynamic enhancement of film cooling of turbine blades Chin-Cheng Wang and Subrata Roya  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

) Turbine Plant Equipment (23) Turbine Plant Equipment (23) Electric Plant Equipment (24) Electric Plant.90 0.96 1.00 Turbine ­Generator Building 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 Other Structures & Improvements 0.60 0.00 1.00 1.00 All Other Power Core Equipment 0.85 0.94 0.94 1.00 23 Turbine Plant Equipment 1.00 1.00 1

Roy, Subrata

273

Ceramic blade attachment system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A turbine blade having a preestablished rate of thermal expansion is attached to a turbine wheel having a preestablished rate of thermal expansion being greater than the preestablished rate of thermal expansion of the turbine blade. The turbine blade has a root portion having a first groove and a second groove therein. The turbine wheel includes a plurality of openings in which the turbine blade is positioned. Each of the openings has a first groove and a second groove therein. The space or void formed between the first grooves and the second grooves has a plurality of spherical balls positioned therein. The plurality of spherical balls has a preestablished rate of thermal expansion being equal to the preestablished rate of thermal expansion of the turbine blade.

Shaffer, James E. (Maitland, FL)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Ceramic blade attachment system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A turbine blade having a preestablished rate of thermal expansion is attached to a turbine wheel having a preestablished rate of thermal expansion being greater than the preestablished rate of thermal expansion of the turbine blade. The turbine blade has a root portion having a first groove and a second groove therein. The turbine wheel includes a plurality of openings in which the turbine blade is positioned. Each of the openings has a first groove and a second groove therein. The space or void formed between the first grooves and the second grooves has a plurality of spherical balls positioned therein. The plurality of spherical balls has a preestablished rate of thermal expansion being equal to the preestablished rate of thermal expansion of the turbine blade. 4 figures.

Shaffer, J.E.

1995-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

275

TX-100 manufacturing final project report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report details the work completed under the TX-100 blade manufacturing portion of the Carbon-Hybrid Blade Developments: Standard and Twist-Coupled Prototype project. The TX-100 blade is a 9 meter prototype blade designed with bend-twist coupling to augment the mitigation of peak loads during normal turbine operation. This structural coupling was achieved by locating off axis carbon fiber in the outboard portion of the blade skins. The report will present the tooling selection, blade production, blade instrumentation, blade shipping and adapter plate design and fabrication. The baseline blade used for this project was the ERS-100 (Revision D) wind turbine blade. The molds used for the production of the TX-100 were originally built for the production of the CX-100 blade. The same high pressure and low pressure skin molds were used to manufacture the TX-100 skins. In order to compensate for the difference in skin thickness between the CX-100 and the TX-100, however, a new TX-100 shear web plug and mold were required. Both the blade assembly fixture and the root stud insertion fixture used for the CX-100 blades could be utilized for the TX-100 blades. A production run of seven TX-100 prototype blades was undertaken at TPI Composites during the month of October, 2004. Of those seven blades, four were instrumented with strain gauges before final assembly. After production at the TPI Composites facility in Rhode Island, the blades were shipped to various test sites: two blades to the National Wind Technology Center at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory in Boulder, Colorado, two blades to Sandia National Laboratory in Albuquerque, New Mexico and three blades to the United States Department of Agriculture turbine field test facility in Bushland, Texas. An adapter plate was designed to allow the TX-100 blades to be installed on existing Micon 65/13M turbines at the USDA site. The conclusion of this program is the kick-off of the TX-100 blade testing at the three testing facilities.

Ashwill, Thomas D.; Berry, Derek S. (TPI Composites, Inc., Warren, RI)

2007-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Blade Alloys - TMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

PDF PRESENTATION: Evolution of Ni-Based Superalloy Turbine Blades Highlights alloy development programs, as well as various processes, 1, 1272, Lynette ...

277

Round Robin NDE Testing and Evaluation of Combustion Turbine Blade Coatings  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The first stage blades on General Electric (GE) Frame 7FA and 9FA pose major operations and maintenance (O&M) concerns due to short operating life (20,000 hours) and high replacement cost ($2,000,000). Because of the higher operating temperature, the performance and durability of the first stage blades has become one of the prime life limiting factors. EPRI has initiated a program to test, evaluate, and develop a field-deployable nondestructive evaluation (NDE) system for life assessment of blade coating...

2000-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

278

Liquid impact erosion mechanism and theoretical impact stress analysis in TiN-coated steam turbine blade materials  

SciTech Connect

Coating of TiN film was done by reactive magnetron sputter ion plating to improve the liquid impact erosion resistance of steam turbine blade materials, 12Cr steel and Stellite 6B, for nuclear power plant application. TiN-coated blade materials were initially deformed with depressions due to plastic deformation of the ductile substrate. The increase in the curvature in the depressions induced stress concentration with increasing number of impacts, followed by circumferential fracture of the TiN coating due to the circular propagation of cracks. The liquid impact erosion resistance of the blade materials was greatly improved by TiN coating done with the optimum ion plating condition. Damage decreased with increasing TiN coating thickness. According to the theoretical analysis of stresses generated by liquid impact, TiN coating alleviated the impact stress of 12Cr steel and Stellite 6B due to stress attenuation and stress wave reactions such as reflection and transmission at the coating-substrate interface.

Lee, M.K.; Kim, W.W.; Rhee, C.K.; Lee, W.J. [Korea Advanced Inst. of Science and Technology, Taejon (Korea, Republic of). Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering

1999-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Wind Energy & Manufacturing | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Wind Energy & Manufacturing Wind Energy & Manufacturing Jump to: navigation, search Blades manufactured at Gamesa's factory in Ebensburg, Pennsylvania, await delivery for development of wind farms across the country in the United States. Photo from Gamesa, NREL 16001 Wind power creates new high-paying jobs in a wide variety of industries. This includes direct jobs installing, operating, and maintaining wind turbines, as well as jobs at manufacturing facilities that produce wind turbines, blades, electronic components, gearboxes, generators, towers, and other equipment. Indirect jobs in the industries that support these activities are also created.[1] In 2012, 72% of the wind turbine equipment (including towers, blades, and gears) installed in the United States during the year was made in

280

Energetx Composites: Retooling Manufacturing, Creating Michigan Jobs |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Energetx Composites: Retooling Manufacturing, Creating Michigan Energetx Composites: Retooling Manufacturing, Creating Michigan Jobs Energetx Composites: Retooling Manufacturing, Creating Michigan Jobs July 23, 2012 - 4:58pm Addthis Using its fiberglass technology expertise and a grant from the Energy Department's State Energy Program (SEP), Energetx Composites was able to shift its operations to producing wind turbine blades. | Photo courtesy of Energetx Composites. Using its fiberglass technology expertise and a grant from the Energy Department's State Energy Program (SEP), Energetx Composites was able to shift its operations to producing wind turbine blades. | Photo courtesy of Energetx Composites. Kristin Swineford Communication Specialist, Weatherization and Intergovernmental Programs What does this mean for me?

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "turbine blade manufacturer" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Help Wanted at Kansas Wind Blade Company | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Help Wanted at Kansas Wind Blade Company Help Wanted at Kansas Wind Blade Company Help Wanted at Kansas Wind Blade Company July 12, 2010 - 12:00pm Addthis Stephen Graff Former Writer & editor for Energy Empowers, EERE Last year, Israel Sanchez, a 31-year-old Newton, Kan., resident, was painting the blades of wind turbines for Enertech, Inc., a small-scale wind manufacturer. Now he's assembling the entire system. "They promoted me," says Sanchez, taking a quick break from the assembly line in the 10,000 square-foot plant in Newton. "It's a new field for me, but I'm excited because it's all new experiences every day." Sanchez is assembling Enertech's new wind models using an innovative blade design licensed from the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) in Golden, Colo., on its 40 kW turbines.

282

Help Wanted at Kansas Wind Blade Company | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Wanted at Kansas Wind Blade Company Wanted at Kansas Wind Blade Company Help Wanted at Kansas Wind Blade Company July 12, 2010 - 12:00pm Addthis Stephen Graff Former Writer & editor for Energy Empowers, EERE Last year, Israel Sanchez, a 31-year-old Newton, Kan., resident, was painting the blades of wind turbines for Enertech, Inc., a small-scale wind manufacturer. Now he's assembling the entire system. "They promoted me," says Sanchez, taking a quick break from the assembly line in the 10,000 square-foot plant in Newton. "It's a new field for me, but I'm excited because it's all new experiences every day." Sanchez is assembling Enertech's new wind models using an innovative blade design licensed from the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) in Golden, Colo., on its 40 kW turbines.

283

Assessment of Strike of Adult Killer Whales by an OpenHydro Tidal Turbine Blade  

SciTech Connect

Report to DOE on an analysis to determine the effects of a potential impact to an endangered whale from tidal turbines proposed for deployment in Puget Sound.

Carlson, Thomas J.; Elster, Jennifer L.; Jones, Mark E.; Watson, Bruce E.; Copping, Andrea E.; Watkins, Michael L.; Jepsen, Richard A.; Metzinger, Kurt

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Local heat transfer and film effectiveness of a film cooled gas turbine blade tip.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Gas turbine engines due to high operating temperatures undergo severe thermal stress and fatigue during operation. Cooling of these components is a very important issue… (more)

Adewusi, Adedapo Oluyomi

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Numerical simulation and prediction of loads in marine current turbine full-scale rotor blades.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Marine current turbines are submerged structures and subjected to loading conditions from both the currents and wave effects. The associated phenomena posed significant challenge to… (more)

Senat, Junior.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

Effect of Blade Torsion on Modeling Results for the Small Wind Research Turbine (SWRT): Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper summarizes modeling results from both the FAST and ADAMS aeroelastic simulators characterizing small wind turbine loads and dynamic behavior.

Corbus, D.; Hansen, A. C.; Minnema, J.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

An Experimental Investigation on the Control of Tip Vortices from Wind Turbine Blade.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Wind turbine dynamics, wake effects and environmental impacts have been identified the most significant research topics needed for wind resource characterization and wind power generation.… (more)

Ning, Zhe

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Metallurgical Guidebook for Steam Turbine Rotors and Discs, Volume 1: Chemistry, Manufacturing, Service Degradation, Life Assessment , and Repair  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This guide is a compilation of information concerning steam turbine rotors and discs. Due to the variety of operating temperatures and conditions involved, factors such as material composition, manufacturing and heat treatment condition methods, and property requirements may differ from one steam turbine to another. Specifically, this guide addresses turbine rotor and disc materials used, vintages, manufacturing history, quality conditions, and chemical and mechanical properties, and it provides utility ...

2009-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

289

A comparison of spanwise aerodynamic loads estimated from measured bending moments versus direct pressure measurements on horizontal axis wind turbine blades  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Two methods can be used to determine aerodynamic loads on a rotating wind turbine blade. The first is to make direct pressure measurements on the blade surface. This is a difficult process requiring costly pressure instrumentation. The second method uses measured flap bending moments in conjunction with analytical techniques to estimate airloads. This method, called ALEST, was originally developed for use on helicopter rotors and was modified for use on horizontal axis wind turbine blades. Estimating airloads using flap bending moments in much simpler and less costly because measurements can be made with conventional strain gages and equipment. This paper presents results of airload estimates obtained using both methods under a variety of operating conditions. Insights on the limitations and usefulness of the ALEST bending moment technique are also included. 10 refs., 6 figs.

Simms, D A; Butterfield, C P

1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Ceramic blade attachment system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A turbine blade having a preestablished rate of thermal expansion is attached to a turbine wheel having a preestablished rate of thermal expansion being greater than the preestablished rate of thermal expansion of the turbine blade. The turbine blade has a root portion having a pair of recessed portions thereon. The turbine wheel includes a plurality of openings in which the turbine blade is positioned. Each of the openings have a pair of grooves therein in which are positioned a pair of pins having a generally rectangular cross-section and a reaction surface thereon. A pair of cylindrical rollers interposed respective ones of the pair of reaction surfaces and the pair of recessed portions. The attachment system or turbine assembly provides an economical, reliable and effective attachment of a component having a preestablished rate of thermal expansion to a component having a greater preestablished rate of thermal expansion.

Boyd, Gary L. (Alpine, CA)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Ceramic blade attachment system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A turbine blade having a preestablished rate of thermal expansion is attached to a turbine wheel having a preestablished rate of thermal expansion being greater than the preestablished rate of thermal expansion of the turbine blade. The turbine blade has a root portion having a pair of recessed portions thereon. The turbine wheel includes a plurality of openings in which the turbine blade is positioned. Each of the openings have a pair of grooves therein in which are positioned a pair of pins having a generally rectangular cross-section and a reaction surface thereon. A pair of cylindrical rollers interposed respective ones of the pair of reaction surfaces and the pair of recessed portions. The attachment system or turbine assembly provides an economical, reliable and effective attachment of a component having a preestablished rate of thermal expansion to a component having a greater preestablished rate of thermal expansion. 3 figures.

Boyd, G.L.

1994-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

292

Comprehensive testing of Nedwind 12-Meter wind turbine blades at NREL  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper describes the structural testing of two NedWind 25 12-m blades at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL). The tests were conducted under the Standards, Measurement and Testing (SMT) Program in conjunction with tests conducted by four European laboratories to develop a common database of blade testing methods. All of the laboratories tested duplicate copies of blades taken from series production. Blade properties, including weight, center of gravity, natural frequencies, stiffness, and damping, were determined. Static load tests were performed at 110% of the extreme design load for strain verification. NREL performed single-axis and two-axis fatigue tests using business-as-usual testing practices. The single-axis test combined equivalent life loading for the edge and flap spectra into a single resultant load. The two-axis test applied the edge and flap components independently at a phase angle of 90{degree}. Damage areas were observed at (1) the trailing edge, which cracked near the maximum chord; (2) between the steel root collar and the composite, where circumferential cracking was noted; and (3) along the top of the spar between the 2,500-mm and 4,200-mm stations, where a notable increase in acoustic emissions was detected. NREL observed that the onset of damage occurred earlier in the single-axis test.

Larwood, S.; Musial, W.

2000-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

293

Implementation of a Two-Axis Servo-Hydraulic System for Full-Scale Fatigue Testing of Wind Turbine Blades  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Recently, the blade fatigue testing capabilities at NREL were upgraded from single-axis to two-axis loading. To implement this, several practical challenges were addressed, as hardware complexity increased dramatically with two actuators applying the loads at right angles to each other. A custom bellcrank was designed and implemented to minimize the load angle errors and to prevent actuator side loading. The control system was upgraded to accept load and displacement feedback from two actuators. The inherent long strokes uniquely associated with wind turbine blade-tests required substantial real-time corrections for both the control and data systems. A custom data acquisition and control system was developed using a National Instruments LabVIEW platform that interfaces with proprietary servo-hydraulic software developed by MTS Corporation. Before testing, the program is run under quasi-static (slow speed) conditions and iterates to determine the correct operational control parameters for the controller, taking into consideration geometry, test speed, and phase angle errors between the two actuators. Comparisons are made between single-axis and two-axis test loads using actual test load data and load uncertainties are qualitatively described. To date, two fatigue tests have been completed and another is currently ongoing using NREL's two-axis capability.

Hughes, S. D.; Musial, W. D. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (US); Stensland, T. [Stensland Technologies (US)

1999-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

294

In-field use of laser Doppler vibrometer on a wind turbine blade  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

One of our primary goals was to determine how well a laser Doppler vibrometer (LDV) could measure the structural dynamic response of a wind turbine that was parked in the field. We performed a series of preliminary tests in the lab to determine the basic limitations of the LDV for this application. We then instrumented an installed parked horizontal axis wind turbine with accelerometers to determine the natural frequencies, damping, and mode shapes of the wind turbine and rotor as a baseline for the LDV and our other tests. We also wanted to determine if LDV modal information could be obtained from a naturally (wind) excited wind turbine. We compared concurrently obtained accelerometer and LDV data in an attempt to assess the quality of the LDV data. Our test results indicate the LDV can be successfully used in the field environment of an installed wind turbine, but with a few restrictions. We were successful in obtaining modal information from a naturally (wind) excited wind turbine in the field, but the data analysis requires a large number of averaged data sets to obtain reasonable results. An ultimate goal of this continuing project is to develop a technique that will monitor the health of a structure, detect damage, and hopefully predict an impending component failure.

Rumsey, M.; Hurtado, J.; Hansche, B. [and others

1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

295

Wind Turbine Post-Stall Airfoil Performance Characteristics Guidelines for Blade-Element Momentum Methods: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of this study was to provide post-stall airfoil data input guidelines for the prediction of peak and post-peak rotor power when using blade-element momentum theory. A steady-state data set from the Unsteady Aerodynamic Experiment (UAE) rotor test was used to provide guidelines for the development of a global post-stall method for the prediction of post-stall 3-D airfoil characteristics to be used with 2-D airfoil data. Based on these UAE data, methods to emulate the 3-D aerodynamics in the post-stall region were explored. Also suggested are experimental tests needed to better understand the 3-D flow physics and to quantify needed theory or empirical factors for a global post-stall approach to support blade-element momentum methods.

Tangler, J. L.; Kocurek, J. D.

2004-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

Computer subroutine for estimating aerodynamic blade loads on Darrieus vertical axis wind turbines. [FORCE code  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

An important aspect of structural design of the Darrieus rotor is the determination of aerodynamic blade loads. This report describes a load generator which has been used at Sandia for quasi-static and dynamic rotor analyses. The generator is based on the single streamtube aerodynamic flow model and is constructed as a FORTRAN IV subroutine to facilitate its use in finite element structural models. Input and output characteristics of the subroutine are described and a complete listing is attached as an appendix.

Sullivan, W. N.; Leonard, T. M.

1980-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Modern, three-blade wind turbines are 50 to 90 meters in diameter...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of trained and qualified workers to manufacture, construct, operate, and maintain the wind energy facilities. In addition, the nation will continue to need skilled scientists...

298

Biface reduction and blade manufacture at the Gault site (41bl323): a Clovis occupation in Bell County, Texas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This dissertation is a technological study that deals with those techniques employed by the Gault Clovis people in the manufacture of both bifaces and blades. The materials studied were recovered during the 2000 and 2001 field seasons conducted by the Anthropology Department of Texas A&M University. The study involves an analysis that deals with raw material selection, blank production, reduction methods, and problems encountered, and includes a definitive description and metric calculations for each of the various artifact types analyzed. The results are then compared to similar artifact assemblages from known Clovis sites. The conclusions derived from this analysis show that the Gault Clovis people utilized a number of different strategies in both biface and blade reduction. It was found that some of these strategies, previously felt to be restricted to one reductive procedure, were connected and utilized in both procedures. In addition, it was discovered that some techniques thought to be limited to use only within the initial reduction sequence were, in fact, utilized throughout.

Dickens, William A.

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Blade shape for a tropskien type of vertical-axis wind turbine  

SciTech Connect

The equations derived to define a troposkien (the shape a completely flexible cable assumes when it is spun at a constant angular velocity about a vertical axis to which its two ends are attached) are described. The implications of the solutions on the design of a vertical-axis wind turbine are discussed for cases where gravity is neglected.

Blackwell, B.F.; Reis, G.E.

1977-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Heat Transfer in Rectangular Channels (AR=2:1) of the Gas Turbine Blade at High Rotation Numbers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Gas turbine blade/vane cooling is obtained by circulating the high pressure air from compressor to the internal cooling passage of the blade/vane. Heat transfer and cooling effect in the rotating blade is highly affected by rotation. The typical rotation number for the aircraft engine is in the range of 0~0.25 and for the land based power generation turbine in the range of 0~05. Currently, the heat transfer data at high rotation numbers are limited. Besides, the investigation of heat transfer phenomena in the turn region, especially near hub portion is rare. This dissertation is to study the heat transfer in rectangular channels with turns in the tip or the hub portion respectively at high rotation numbers close to the engine condition. The dissertation experimentally investigates the heat transfer phenomena in a two-pass rectangular channel (AR=W/H=2:1) with a 180 degree sharp turn in the tip portion. The flow in the first passage is radial outward and after the turn in the second passage, the flow direction is radial inward. The hydraulic diameter (Dh) of the channel is 16.9 mm. Parallel square ribs with an attack angle (alpha) of 45 degrees are used on leading and trailing surfaces to enhance the heat transfer. The rib height-to-hydraulic diameter ratio (e/Dh) is 0.094. For the baseline smooth case and the case with rib pitch-to-height ratio (P/e) 10, channel orientation angles (beta) of 90 degrees and 135 degrees were tried to model the cooling passage in the mid and rear portion of the blade respectively. Two other P/e ratios of 5 and 7.5 were studied at beta=135 degrees to investigate their effect on heat transfer. The data are presented under high rotation numbers and buoyancy parameters by varying the Reynolds number (Re=10,000~40,000) and rotation speed (rpm=0~400). Corresponding rotation number and buoyancy parameter are ranged as 0~0.45 and 0~0.8 respectively. The dissertation also studies the heat transfer in a two-pass channel (AR=2:1) connected by a 180 degree U bend in the hub portion. The flow in the first passage is radial inward and after the U bend, the flow in the second passage is radial outward. The cross-section dimension of this channel is the same as the previous one. To increase heat transfer, staggered square ribs (e/Dh=0.094) are pasted on leading and trailing walls with an attack angle (alpha) of 45 degrees and pitch-to-height ratio (P/e) of 8. A turning vane in the shape of half circle (R=18.5 mm, t=1.6 mm) is used in the turn region to guide the flow for both smooth and ribbed cases. Channel orientation angles (beta) of 90 degrees and 135 degrees were taken for both smooth and ribbed cases. The heat transfer data were taken at high rotation numbers close to previous test section.

Lei, Jiang 1980-

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "turbine blade manufacturer" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Nondestructive evaluation (NDE) of composite-to-metal bond interface of a wind turbine blade using an acousto-ultrasonic technique  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An acousto-ultrasonic inspection technique was developed to evaluate the structural integrity of the epoxy bond interface between a metal insert and the fiber glass epoxy composite of a wind turbine blade. Data was generated manually as well as with a PC based data acquisition and display system. C-scan imaging using a portable ultrasonic scanning system provided an area mapping of the delamination or disbond due to fatigue testing and normal field operation conditions of the turbine blade. Comparison of the inspection data with a destructive visual examination of the bond interface to determine the extent of the disbond showed good agreement between the acousto-ultrasonic inspection data and the visual data.

Gieske, J.H.; Rumsey, M.A.

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

302

Heat transfer in a two-pass internally ribbed turbine blade coolant channel with cylindrical vortex generators  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The effect of vortex generators on the mass (heat) transfer from the ribbed passage of a two pass turbine blade coolant channel is investigated with the intent of optimizing the vortex generator geometry so that significant enhancements in mass/heat transfer can be achieved. In the experimental configuration considered, ribs are mounted on two opposite walls; all four walls along each pass are active and have mass transfer from their surfaces but the ribs are non-participating. Mass transfer measurements, in the form of Sherwood number ratios, are made along the centerline and in selected inter-rib modules. Results are presented for Reynolds number in the range of 5,000 to 40,000, pitch to rib height ratios of 10.5 and 21, and vortex generator-rib spacing to rib height ratios of 0.55, and 1.5. Centerline and spanwise averaged Sherwood number ratios are presented along with contours of the Sherwood number ratios. Results indicate that the vortex generators induce substantial increases in the local mass transfer rates, particularly along the side walls, and modest increases in the average mass transfer rates. The vortex generators have the effect of making the inter-rib profiles along the ribbed walls more uniform. Along the side walls, horse-shoe vortices that characterize the vortex generator wake are associated with significant mass transfer enhancements. The wake effects and the levels of enhancement decrease somewhat with increasing Reynolds number and decreasing pitch.

Hibbs, R.; Acharya, S.; Chen, Y. [Louisiana State Univ., Baton Rouge, LA (United States)] [and others

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

303

Statistical modeling of root geometrical dimensions of gas turbine blade in creep feed grinding process  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Creep feed grinding is widely used in manufacturing suppe-ralloy materials. The main objectives of this research deal with the influences of major process parameters and their interactions of creep feed grinding process such as wheel speed, workpiece ... Keywords: analysis of variance, creep feed grinding, interactive effect, regression, root geometrical dimensions

A. R. Fazeli Nahrekhalaji

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

The blade flutter measurement based on the blade tip timing method  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper deals with the measurement of the steam turbine blade vibrations in power systems via the blade tip timing (BTT) method. It describes a BTT principle and the sensor instrumentation for the vibration measurement. The introductory part of the ... Keywords: FPGA, blade tip timing, blade vibration, eddy current sensors, turbine

Vja?eslav Georgiev; Michael Holík; Václav Kraus; Aleš Krutina; Zden?k Kubín; Jind?ich Liška; Martin Poupa

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

BLADED IMPELLER FOR TURBOBLOWERS  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A means is given of holding open-sided impeller blades in a turbo-rotor. Two half blades, with dovetail roots of sufficient weight to contain the center of gravity, are fitted into slots cut in the rotor so as to form the desired angle between the blade faces. The adjoining edges of the half blades are welded to form one solid blade that is securely locked an the rotor. This design permits the manufacture of a V shaped impeller blade without the need of machining the entire V shaped contour from a single blank, and furthermore provides excellent locking characteristics for attachment to the rotor.

Baumann, K.

1949-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Analysis and test results for a two-bladed, passive cycle pitch, horizontal-axis wind turbine in free and controlled yaw  

SciTech Connect

This report surveys the analysis and tests performed at Washington University in St. Louis, Missouri, on a horizontal-axis, two-laded wind turbine with teeter hub. The introduction is a brief account of results obtained during the 5-year period ending December 1985. The wind tunnel model and the test turbine (7.6 m [25 ft.] in diameter) at Washington University`s Tyson Research Center had a 67{degree} delta-three angle of the teeter axis. The introduction explains why this configuration was selected and named the passive cycle pitch (PCP) wind turbine. Through the analysis was not limited to the PCP rotor, all tests, including those done from 1986 to 1994, wee conducted with the same teetered wind rotor. The blades are rather stiff and have only a small elastic coning angle and no precone.

Holenemser, K.H. [Washington Univ., St. Louis, MO (United States)

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Pin and roller attachment system for ceramic blades  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

In a turbine, a plurality of blades are attached to a turbine wheel by way of a plurality of joints which form a rolling contact between the blades and the turbine wheel. Each joint includes a pin and a pair of rollers to provide rolling contact between the pin and an adjacent pair of blades. Because of this rolling contact, high stress scuffing between the blades and the turbine wheel reduced, thereby inhibiting catastrophic failure of the blade joints. 3 figs.

Shaffer, J.E.

1995-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

308

Pin and roller attachment system for ceramic blades  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

In a turbine, a plurality of blades are attached to a turbine wheel by way of a plurality of joints which form a rolling contact between the blades and the turbine wheel. Each joint includes a pin and a pair of rollers to provide rolling contact between the pin and an adjacent pair of blades. Because of this rolling contact, high stress scuffing between the blades and the turbine wheel reduced, thereby inhibiting catastrophic failure of the blade joints.

Shaffer, James E. (Maitland, FL)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Astraeus Wind Modifies Manufacturing in Michigan | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Astraeus Wind Modifies Manufacturing in Michigan Astraeus Wind Modifies Manufacturing in Michigan Astraeus Wind Modifies Manufacturing in Michigan May 14, 2010 - 3:35pm Addthis Lindsay Gsell When the assembly line was introduced to the automobile industry, everything changed. Cars were produced in less time with fewer errors, and each one was exactly the same as the last. As a result, the industry boomed. Astraeus Wind LLC hopes to bring this type of success to wind turbine manufacturing by standardizing the blade manufacturing process. The company wants to experiment with new materials to strengthen the blades while creating an automated process to assemble them, creating identical blades in a fast, efficient manner. CEO Jeff Metts says standardizing this process will help ensure each blade has the same measurements, lower the amount of time needed for production

310

Wind Turbine Manufacturers in the U. S.: Locations and Local Impacts (Presentation)  

Wind Powering America (EERE)

by by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. Wind Turbine Manufacturers in the U.S.: Locations and Local Impacts WINDPOWER 2010 Conference and Exhibition Dallas, Texas Suzanne Tegen May 26, 2010 NREL/PR-6A2-47913 Challenges to modeling Renewables Renewables represent new industries * Not isolated as an industry in conventional I/O codes Requires detailed knowledge of project costs and industry specific expenditures * Equipment, Engineering, Labor, Permitting, O&M, etc. The Wind JEDI Model * Provides a project basic project recipe for specific RE technologies * Applies Industry Specific Multipliers derived from IMPLAN National Renewable Energy Laboratory Innovation for Our Energy Future

311

High-temperature Erosion Behavior of Aluminide-coated Turbine ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The high-temperature erosion behavior of an aluminide-coated turbine blade ... The Tensile Property Of A Gas Turbine Engine Fan Blade And Casing Material.

312

Aeroelastic analysis of the troposkien-type wind turbine  

SciTech Connect

The testing of troposkien-type wind turbines has indicated that under certain conditions serious vibrations of the blades can occur, involving flatwise bending, torsion, and chordwise bending. It is the purpose of this report to perform an aeroelastic analysis of the stability of the coupled bending and torsional motion of such blades with a view to determining the cause of these vibrations as a means of suppressing them. The emphasis of the analysis is on obtaining physical understanding rather than exact numerical results. The effect of extreme variation of the chordwise location of the section center of gravity of troposkien-type rotor blades was found to be negligible with regard to blade flutter. This conclusion implies that chordwise mass balancing of the blades is not required, with consequent large reductions in blade design and manufacturing requirements, and therefore in blade cost.

Ham, N.D.

1977-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Ceramic blade attachment system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A turbine blade having a preestablished rate of thermal expansion is attached to a turbine flange having a preestablished rate of thermal expansion being greater than the preestablished rate of thermal expansion of the turbine blade. The turbine flange includes a first upstanding flange and a second upstanding flange having a groove formed therebetween. The turbine flange further includes a recess. Each of the first and second upstanding flanges have a plurality of bores therein. A turbine blade has a first member and a second member positioned in one of the groove and the recess. Each of the first member and the second member have a plurality of bores therein. And, a pin is positioned in respective ones of the plurality of bores in the first and second upstanding members and the first and second members and attach the blade to the turbine flange. The pin has a preestablished rate of thermal expansion being substantially equal to the rate of thermal expansion of the blade.

Frey, deceased, Gary A. (late of Poway, CA); Jimenez, Oscar D. (Escondia, CA)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Ceramic blade attachment system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A turbine blade having a preestablished rate of thermal expansion is attached to a turbine flange having a preestablished rate of thermal expansion being greater than the preestablished rate of thermal expansion of the turbine blade. The turbine flange includes a first upstanding flange and a second upstanding flange having a groove formed between them. The turbine flange further includes a recess. Each of the first and second upstanding flanges have a plurality of bores therein. A turbine blade has a first member and a second member positioned in one of the groove and the recess. Each of the first member and the second member have a plurality of bores therein. A pin is positioned in respective ones of the plurality of bores in the first and second upstanding members and the first and second members and attach the blade to the turbine flange. The pin has a preestablished rate of thermal expansion being substantially equal to the rate of thermal expansion of the blade. 4 figs.

Frey, G.A.; Jimenez, O.D.

1996-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

315

Design of 9-meter carbon-fiberglass prototype blades : CX-100 and TX-100 : final project report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

TPI Composites, Inc. (TPI), Global Energy Concepts, LLC (GEC), and MDZ Consulting (MDZ) have collaborated on a project to design, manufacture, and test prototype carbon-fiberglass hybrid wind turbine blades of 9-m length. The project, funded by Sandia National Laboratories, involves prototype blades in both conventional (unidirectional spar fibers running along the blade span) and ''adaptive'' (carbon fibers in off-axis orientation to achieve bend-twist-coupling) configurations. After manufacture, laboratory testing is being conducted to determine the static and fatigue strength of the prototypes, in conjunction with field testing to evaluate the performance under operational conditions.

Berry, Derek (TPI Composites, Inc., Warren, RI)

2007-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Design of 9-meter carbon-fiberglass prototype blades : CX-100 and TX-100 : final project report.  

SciTech Connect

TPI Composites, Inc. (TPI), Global Energy Concepts, LLC (GEC), and MDZ Consulting (MDZ) have collaborated on a project to design, manufacture, and test prototype carbon-fiberglass hybrid wind turbine blades of 9-m length. The project, funded by Sandia National Laboratories, involves prototype blades in both conventional (unidirectional spar fibers running along the blade span) and ''adaptive'' (carbon fibers in off-axis orientation to achieve bend-twist-coupling) configurations. After manufacture, laboratory testing is being conducted to determine the static and fatigue strength of the prototypes, in conjunction with field testing to evaluate the performance under operational conditions.

Berry, Derek (TPI Composites, Inc., Warren, RI)

2007-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Single Rotor Turbine  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A rotor for use in turbine applications has a centrifugal compressor having axially disposed spaced apart fins forming passages and an axial turbine having hollow turbine blades interleaved with the fins and through which fluid from the centrifugal compressor flows.

Platts, David A. (Los Alamos, NM)

2004-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

318

Wind Turbine Retrofits: An Overview and Economic Analysis of Onshore Retrofit Options Available for Wind Turbines  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides an overview of some of the most promising retrofits available to turbine owners today. The retrofits discussed are those offered by original turbine manufacturers and by third parties; the retrofits deal with rotor blades, pitch and yaw systems, gearboxes and other drive train components, electrical generators, power converters, controls, sensors and monitoring equipment, and others.From the many retrofits discussed, six that showed material near-term potential were ...

2013-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

319

Advanced Turbine Technology Applications Project (ATTAP). 1944 Annual report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report summarizes work performed in development and demonstration of structural ceramics technology for automotive gas turbine engines. At the end of this period, the project name was changed to ``Ceramic Turbine Engine Demonstration Project``, effective Jan. 1995. Objectives are to provide early field experience demonstrating the reliability and durability of ceramic components in a modified, available gas turbine engine application, and to scale up and improve the manufacturing processes for ceramic turbine engine components and demonstrate the application of these processes in the production environment. The 1994 ATTAP activities emphasized demonstration and refinement of the ceramic turbine nozzles in the AlliedSignal/Garrett Model 331-200[CT] engine test bed in preparation for field testing; improvements in understanding the vibration characteristics of the ceramic turbine blades; improvements in critical ceramics technologies; and scaleup of the process used to manufacture ceramic turbine components.

NONE

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

Turbine arrangement  

SciTech Connect

A turbine arrangement is disclosed for a gas turbine engine having a sloped gas flowpath through the turbine. The radial axes of the rotor blades and stator vanes in the sloped flowpath are tilted such that the axes are substantially normal to the mean flow streamline of the gases. This arrangement reduces tip losses and thereby increases engine efficiency.

Johnston, R.P.

1984-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "turbine blade manufacturer" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

NREL Innovations Contribute to an Award-Winning Small Wind Turbine (Fact Sheet)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Skystream 3.7 wind turbine is the result of a decade-long collaboration between the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and Southwest Windpower, a commercially successful small wind turbine manufacturer. NREL drew heavily on its research experience to incorporate innovations into the Skystream 3.7, including a unique blade design that makes the wind turbine more efficient and quieter than most.

Not Available

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

Addendum to a proposal to NSF to sponsor a vertical-axis wind turbine research program  

SciTech Connect

Information is presented concerning the performance evaluation of a 15 foot-diameter test bed Darrieus rotor, Darrieus rotor wind tunnel tests, Savonius rotor wind tunnel tests, blade manufacturing techniques for 15 foot-diameter and 35 foot-diameter wind turbines, static and dynamic structural analysis, production prototype design of a 15 foot-diameter turbine, production prototype design of 35 foot-diameter turbine, and aerodynamic performance studies.

Blackwell, B.F.; Feltz, L.V.; Rightley, E.C.

1974-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

An experimental study of heat transfer in the rectangular coolant passages of a gas turbine rotor blade.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Modern gas turbines have high inlet temperatures to harness maximum power output, which causes different components to experience severe thermal stresses and fatigue. To achieve… (more)

Uddin, Mohammed Jalal

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

LIDAR Wind Speed Measurement Analysis and Feed-Forward Blade Pitch Control for Load Mitigation in Wind Turbines: January 2010--January 2011  

SciTech Connect

This report examines the accuracy of measurements that rely on Doppler LIDAR systems to determine their applicability to wind turbine feed-forward control systems and discusses feed-forward control system designs that use preview wind measurements. Light Detection and Ranging (LIDAR) systems are able to measure the speed of incoming wind before it interacts with a wind turbine rotor. These preview wind measurements can be used in feed-forward control systems designed to reduce turbine loads. However, the degree to which such preview-based control techniques can reduce loads by reacting to turbulence depends on how accurately the incoming wind field can be measured. The first half of this report examines the accuracy of different measurement scenarios that rely on coherent continuous-wave or pulsed Doppler LIDAR systems to determine their applicability to feed-forward control. In particular, the impacts of measurement range and angular offset from the wind direction are studied for various wind conditions. A realistic case involving a scanning LIDAR unit mounted in the spinner of a wind turbine is studied in depth with emphasis on choices for scan radius and preview distance. The effects of turbulence parameters on measurement accuracy are studied as well. Continuous-wave and pulsed LIDAR models based on typical commercially available units were used in the studies present in this report. The second half of this report discusses feed-forward control system designs that use preview wind measurements. Combined feedback/feed-forward blade pitch control is compared to industry standard feedback control when simulated in realistic turbulent above-rated winds. The feed-forward controllers are designed to reduce fatigue loads, increasing turbine lifetime and therefore reducing the cost of energy. Three feed-forward designs are studied: non-causal series expansion, Preview Control, and optimized FIR filter. The input to the feed-forward controller is a measurement of incoming wind speeds that could be provided by LIDAR. Non-causal series expansion and Preview Control methods reduce blade root loads but increase tower bending in simulation results. The optimized FIR filter reduces loads overall, keeps pitch rates low, and maintains rotor speed regulation and power capture, while using imperfect wind measurements provided by the spinning continuous-wave LIDAR model.

Dunne, F.; Simley, E.; Pao, L.Y.

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Ceramic blade with tip seal  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present gas turbine engine includes a disc assembly defining a disc having a plurality of blades attached thereto. The disc has a preestablished rate of thermal expansion and the plurality of blades have a preestablished rate of thermal expansion being less than the preestablished rate of thermal expansion of the disc. A shroud assembly is attached to the gas turbine engine and is spaced from the plurality of blades a preestablished distance forming an interface there between. Positioned in the interface is a seal having a preestablished rate of thermal expansion being generally equal to the rate of thermal expansion of the plurality of blades. 4 figs.

Glezer, B.; Bhardwaj, N.K.; Jones, R.B.

1997-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

326

NREL: Technology Transfer - CRADA Opportunity for Blade ...  

... seeks one or more CRADA partners to develop testing technologies and equipment for static and fatigue testing of wind turbine blades up to ...

327

Structural health and prognostics management for offshore wind turbines : case studies of rotor fault and blade damage with initial O&M cost modeling.  

SciTech Connect

Operations and maintenance costs for offshore wind plants are significantly higher than the current costs for land-based (onshore) wind plants. One way to reduce these costs would be to implement a structural health and prognostic management (SHPM) system as part of a condition based maintenance paradigm with smart load management and utilize a state-based cost model to assess the economics associated with use of the SHPM system. To facilitate the development of such a system a multi-scale modeling approach developed in prior work is used to identify how the underlying physics of the system are affected by the presence of damage and faults, and how these changes manifest themselves in the operational response of a full turbine. This methodology was used to investigate two case studies: (1) the effects of rotor imbalance due to pitch error (aerodynamic imbalance) and mass imbalance and (2) disbond of the shear web; both on a 5-MW offshore wind turbine in the present report. Based on simulations of damage in the turbine model, the operational measurements that demonstrated the highest sensitivity to the damage/faults were the blade tip accelerations and local pitching moments for both imbalance and shear web disbond. The initial cost model provided a great deal of insight into the estimated savings in operations and maintenance costs due to the implementation of an effective SHPM system. The integration of the health monitoring information and O&M cost versus damage/fault severity information provides the initial steps to identify processes to reduce operations and maintenance costs for an offshore wind farm while increasing turbine availability, revenue, and overall profit.

Myrent, Noah J. [Purdue Center for Systems Integrity, Lafayette, IN; Kusnick, Joshua F. [Purdue Center for Systems Integrity, Lafayette, IN; Barrett, Natalie C. [Purdue Center for Systems Integrity, Lafayette, IN; Adams, Douglas E. [Purdue Center for Systems Integrity, Lafayette, IN; Griffith, Daniel Todd

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

Turbine blade platform film cooling with simulated stator-rotor purge flow with varied seal width and upstream wake with vortex  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The turbine blade platform can be protected from hot mainstream gases by injecting cooler air through the gap between stator and rotor. The effectiveness of this film cooling method depends on the geometry of the slot, the quantity of injected air, and the secondary flows near the platform. The purpose of this study was to measure the effect of the upstream vane or stator on this type of platform cooling, as well as the effect of changes in the width of the gap. Film cooling effectiveness distributions were obtained on a turbine blade platform within a linear cascade with upstream slot injection. The width of the slot was varied as well as the mass flow rate of the injected coolant. Obstacles were placed upstream to model the effect of the upstream vane. The coolant was injected through an advanced labyrinth seal to simulate purge flow through a stator-rotor seal. The width of the opening of this seal was varied to simulate the effect of misalignment. Stationary rods were placed upstream of the cascade in four phase locations to model the unsteady wake formed at the trailing edge of the upstream vane. Delta wings were also placed in four positions to create a vortex similar to the passage vortex at the exit of the vane. The film cooling effectiveness distributions were measured using pressure-sensitive paint (PSP). Reducing the width of the slot was found to decrease the area of coolant coverage, although the film cooling effectiveness close to the slot was slightly increased. The unsteady wake was found to have a trivial effect on platform cooling, while the passage vortex from the upstream vane may significantly reduce the film cooling effectiveness.

Blake, Sarah Anne

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Innovation in Materials & Manufacturing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Early spaceflight results have led to such developments as LiquidMetal™ and new turbine blade production methods. These path finding results are only a small ...

330

NETL: Turbines - UTSR Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3 Syngas Particulate Deposition and Erosion at the Leading Edge of a Turbine Blade with Film Cooling Virginia Tech Danesh Tafti Project Dates: 812007 - 9302010 Area of...

331

Analysis of a two-bladed, teetering-hub turbine using the ADAMS{reg_sign} software  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A major goal of the federal wind energy program is the rapid development and validation of structural models to determine loads and response for a wide variety of different wind turbine configurations operating under extreme conditions. Such codes are crucial to the successful design of future advanced wind turbines. In cooperation with R. Lynette & Associates the Wind Technology Division at NREL has developed a full system dynamics model of the AWT-26 Pl machine, using the Automatic Dynamic analysis of Mechanical Systems (ADAMS) software from Mechanical Dynamics, Inc. In this paper, we show validation of sub-models by comparisons with modal test data. We describe the most important system modes involved in this structure and demonstrate how the ADAMS model can be used to tune the structure to avoid interactions. We also identify questions that remain unanswered by ADAMS in modeling this turbine and recommend future directions that DOE code development activities should take.

Wright, A D; Osgood, R O [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States); Malcolm, D J [Lynette (R.) and Associates, Inc., Redmond, WA (United States)

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

Lightning protection system for a wind turbine  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

In a wind turbine (104, 500, 704) having a plurality of blades (132, 404, 516, 744) and a blade rotor hub (120, 712), a lightning protection system (100, 504, 700) for conducting lightning strikes to any one of the blades and the region surrounding the blade hub along a path around the blade hub and critical components of the wind turbine, such as the generator (112, 716), gearbox (708) and main turbine bearings (176, 724).

Costin, Daniel P. (Chelsea, VT); Petter, Jeffrey K. (Williston, VT)

2008-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

333

Energy Basics: Wind Turbines  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Photo of a crane lifting the blades onto a wind turbine that reads 'U.S. Department of Energy, NREL.' You can learn more about horizontal axis turbines from the EERE Wind Program's...

334

Wind turbine  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A wind turbine of the type having an airfoil blade (15) mounted on a flexible beam (20) and a pitch governor (55) which selectively, torsionally twists the flexible beam in response to wind turbine speed thereby setting blade pitch, is provided with a limiter (85) which restricts unwanted pitch change at operating speeds due to torsional creep of the flexible beam. The limiter allows twisting of the beam by the governor under excessive wind velocity conditions to orient the blades in stall pitch positions, thereby preventing overspeed operation of the turbine. In the preferred embodiment, the pitch governor comprises a pendulum (65,70) which responds to changing rotor speed by pivotal movement, the limiter comprising a resilient member (90) which engages an end of the pendulum to restrict further movement thereof, and in turn restrict beam creep and unwanted blade pitch misadjustment.

Cheney, Jr., Marvin C. (Glastonbury, CT)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Turbine seal assembly  

SciTech Connect

A seal assembly that limits gas leakage from a hot gas path to one or more disc cavities in a turbine engine. The seal assembly includes a seal apparatus that limits gas leakage from the hot gas path to a respective one of the disc cavities. The seal apparatus comprises a plurality of blade members rotatable with a blade structure. The blade members are associated with the blade structure and extend toward adjacent stationary components. Each blade member includes a leading edge and a trailing edge, the leading edge of each blade member being located circumferentially in front of the blade member's corresponding trailing edge in a direction of rotation of the turbine rotor. The blade members are arranged such that a space having a component in a circumferential direction is defined between adjacent circumferentially spaced blade members.

Little, David A.

2013-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

336

Angel wing seals for blades of a gas turbine and methods for determining angel wing seal profiles  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A gas turbine has buckets rotatable about an axis, the buckets having angel wing seals. The seals have outer and inner surfaces, at least one of which, and preferably both, extend non-linearly between root radii and the tip of the seal body. The profiles are determined in a manner to minimize the weight of the seal bodies, while maintaining the stresses below predetermined maximum or allowable stresses.

Wang, John Zhiqiang (Greenville, SC)

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Wind turbine ring/shroud drive system - Energy Innovation Portal  

A wind turbine capable of driving multiple electric generators having a ring or shroud structure for reducing blade root bending moments, hub loads, blade fastener ...

338

Effects of Materials Parameters and Design Details on the Fatigue of Composite Materials for Wind Turbine Blades  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper presents an analysis of the results of nine years of fatigue testing represented in the USDOE/Montana State University (DOE/MSU) Composite Materials Fatigue Database. The focus of the program has been to explore a broad range of glass-fiber-based materials parameters encompassing over 4500 data points for 130 materials systems. Significant trends and transitions in fatigue resistance are shown as the fiber content and fabric architecture are varied. The effects of structural details including ply drops, bonded stiffeners, and other geometries that produce local variations in fiber packing and geometry are also described. Fatigue tests on composite beam structures are then discussed; these show generally good correlation with coupon fatigue data in the database. Goodman diagrams for fatigue design are presented, and their application to predicting the service lifetime of blades is described.

Mandell, J.F.; Samborsky, D.D.; Sutherland, H.J.

1999-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

339

Microsoft Word - Turbine Manufactures MOU FINAL_5-31-08_.doc  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

this Memorandum of Understanding this Memorandum of Understanding (MOU), the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the signing members of the wind turbine industry (the Parties) agree to work cooperatively to define and develop the framework for appropriate technology R&D and siting strategies for realizing 20% Wind Energy by 2030. The Parties intend to address several specific needs in the following areas: * Turbine Reliability and Operability R&D to create more reliable components, improve turbine capacity factors, and reduce installed and O&M costs. * Siting Strategies to address environmental and technical issues like radar interference in a standardized framework based on industry best practices. * Standards development for turbine certification and universal

340

LIST/BMI Turbines Instrumentation and Infrastructure  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In support of two major SNL programs, the Long-term Inflow and Structural Test (LIST) program and the Blade Manufacturing Initiative (BMI), three Micon 65/13M wind turbines have been erected at the USDA Agriculture Research Service (ARS) center in Bushland, Texas. The inflow and structural response of these turbines are being monitored with an array of 60 instruments: 34 to characterize the inflow, 19 to characterize structural response and 7 to characterize the time-varying state of the turbine. The primary characterization of the inflow into the LIST turbine relies upon an array of five sonic anemometers. Primary characterization of the structural response of the turbine uses several sets of strain gauges to measure bending loads on the blades and the tower and two accelerometers to measure the motion of the nacelle. Data are sampled at a rate of 30 Hz using a newly developed data acquisition system. The system features a time-synchronized continuous data stream and telemetered data from the turbine rotor. This paper documents the instruments and infrastructure that have been developed to monitor these turbines and their inflow. TABLE OF CONTENTS Abstract ......................................................................................................................................3 Table of Contents .......................................................................................................................4 List of Tables .............................................................................................................................7 List of Figures ............................................................................................................................8

Perry L. Jones; Herbert J. Sutherland; Byron A. Neal

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "turbine blade manufacturer" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

LIST/BMI Turbines Instrumentation and Infrastructure  

SciTech Connect

In support of two major SNL programs, the Long-term Inflow and Structural Test (LIST) program and the Blade Manufacturing Initiative (BMI), three Micon 65/13M wind turbines have been erected at the USDA Agriculture Research Service (ARS) center in Bushland, Texas. The inflow and structural response of these turbines are being monitored with an array of 60 instruments: 34 to characterize the inflow, 19 to characterize structural response and 7 to characterize the time-varying state of the turbine. The primary characterization of the inflow into the LIST turbine relies upon an array of five sonic anemometers. Primary characterization of the structural response of the turbine uses several sets of strain gauges to measure bending loads on the blades and the tower and two accelerometers to measure the motion of the nacelle. Data are sampled at a rate of 30 Hz using a newly developed data acquisition system. The system features a time-synchronized continuous data stream and telemetered data from the turbine rotor. This paper documents the instruments and infrastructure that have been developed to monitor these turbines and their inflow.

JONES,PERRY L.; SUTHERLAND,HERBERT J.; NEAL,BYRON A.

2001-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

DOE Technology Successes - "Breakthrough" Gas Turbines | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DOE Technology Successes - "Breakthrough" Gas Turbines DOE Technology Successes - "Breakthrough" Gas Turbines DOE Technology Successes - "Breakthrough" Gas Turbines For years, gas turbine manufacturers faced a barrier that, for all practical purposes, capped power generating efficiencies for turbine-based power generating systems. The barrier was temperature. Above 2300 degrees F, available cooling technologies were insufficient to protect the turbine blades and other internal components from heat degradation. Since higher temperatures are the key to higher efficiencies, this effectively limited the generating efficiency at which a turbine power plant could convert the energy in the fuel into electricity. The Department of Energy's Office of Fossil Energy took on the challenge of turbine temperatures in 1992, and nine years later, its private sector

343

Experimental investigation of film cooling on the suction surface of a gas turbine blade and a trial application of full coverage film coolingcooling  

SciTech Connect

Coolant was injected from three holes on the center line of the suction surface of a gas turbine blade. The density and mass flow ratios were varied in the ranges of 1.0 {approximately} 3.0 and 0.2 {approximately} 0.9, respectively. Film-cooling effectiveness on the center line is mainly governed by the momentum ratio, and the optimum momentum ratio is about 0.05 {approximately} 0.10. In this paper, an empirical relation for film-cooling effectiveness on the center line is presented as a function of only the dimensionless streamwise distance from the injection hole and the momentum ratio. The maximum and mean errors of this relation are 55.8 percent and 8.5 percent, respectively. The normalized dimensionless spanwise distribution of the film-cooling effectiveness agreed well with the Gaussian error function. By using the above results and the principle of superposition, the distribution of full coverage film-cooling effectivness can be predicted on the suction surface under the optimum condition.

Kikkawa, S. (Dept. of Mechanical Engineering, Doshisha Univ. (JP)); Sakaguchi, K. (Graduate School, Doshisha Univ. (JP))

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Investigation of effective parameters on the traverse of root of the gas turbine blade by design of experiments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Creep feed grinding is widely used in manufacturing suppe-ralloy materials. The main objectives of this research deal with the influences of major process parameters and their interactions of creep feed grinding process such as wheel speed, workpiece ... Keywords: analysis of variance, creep feed grinding, interactive effect, regression, traverse

A. R. Fazeli Nahrekhalaji

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

MANUFACTURING  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Energy Efficiency in Buildings: Solid State Climate Control ... TE materials is green job creation, as Table ... can provide 21,454 US jobs in manufacturing ...

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

Manufacturing  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The U.S. Department of Energy funds the research, development, and demonstration of highly efficient and innovative manufacturing technologies. The Energy Department has supported the development...

347

Massachusetts Large Blade Test Facility Final Report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Project Objective: The Massachusetts Clean Energy Center (CEC) will design, construct, and ultimately have responsibility for the operation of the Large Wind Turbine Blade Test Facility, which is an advanced blade testing facility capable of testing wind turbine blades up to at least 90 meters in length on three test stands. Background: Wind turbine blade testing is required to meet international design standards, and is a critical factor in maintaining high levels of reliability and mitigating the technical and financial risk of deploying massproduced wind turbine models. Testing is also needed to identify specific blade design issues that may contribute to reduced wind turbine reliability and performance. Testing is also required to optimize aerodynamics, structural performance, encourage new technologies and materials development making wind even more competitive. The objective of this project is to accelerate the design and construction of a large wind blade testing facility capable of testing blades with minimum queue times at a reasonable cost. This testing facility will encourage and provide the opportunity for the U.S wind industry to conduct more rigorous testing of blades to improve wind turbine reliability.

Rahul Yarala; Rob Priore

2011-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

348

Operation of a third generation wind turbine  

SciTech Connect

A modern wind turbine was installed on May 26, 1982, at the USDA Conservation and Production Research Laboratory, Bushland, Texas. This wind machine was used to provide electrical energy for irrigation pumping and other agricultural loads. The wind turbine purchased for this research is an Enertech Model 44, manufactured by Enertech Corporation, Norwich, Vermont. The horizontal-axis wind turbine has a 13.4 m diameter, three-bladed, fixed-pitch rotor on a 24.4-m tower. The blades are laminated epoxy-wood, and are attached to a steel hub. A 25-kW induction generator provides 240 V, 60 Hz, single-phase electrical power. The wind turbine operated 64 percent of the time, while being available to operate over 94 percent of the time. The unit had a net energy production of over 80,000 kWh in an average windspeed of 5.9 m/s at a height of 10 m in a 16-month period. The blade pitch was originally offset two degrees from design to maintain power production within the limitations of the gearbox, generator, and brakes. A maximum output of 23.2 kW averaged over a 15-second period indicated that with a new brake, the system was capable of handling more power. After a new brake was installed, the blade pitch was changed to one degree from design. The maximum power output measured after the pitch change was 29.3 kW. Modified blade tip brakes were installed on the wind turbine on July 7, 1983. These tip brakes increased power production at lower windspeeds while reducing power at higher windspeeds.

Vosper, F.C.; Clark, R.N.

1983-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Wind Turbine Manufacturers in the United States: Locations and Local Impacts (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect

Suzanne Tegen's presentation about U.S. wind energy manufacturing (presented at WINDPOWER 2010 in Dallas) provides information about challenges to modeling renewables; wind energy's economic "ripple effect"; case studies about wind-related manufacturing in Colorado, Iowa, Ohio, and Indiana; manufacturing maps for the Great Lakes region, Arkansas, and the United States; sample job announcements; and U.S. Treasury Grant 1603 funding.

Tegen, S.

2010-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

350

Advanced Coating Development for Gas Turbine Components  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Sacrificial, oxidation-resistant coatings on turbine blades in high-firing temperature gas turbines are wearing out at an unacceptably rapid rate, resulting in excessive downtime and repair costs for turbine operators. This report summarizes the results of an exploratory development project that assessed the feasibility of decelerating the degradation rate of an MCrAlY coating on several turbine blade alloys.

2000-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Airfoils for wind turbine  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Airfoils for the blade of a wind turbine wherein each airfoil is characterized by a thickness in a range from 16%-24% and a maximum lift coefficient designed to be largely insensitive to roughness effects. The airfoils include a family of airfoils for a blade 15 to 25 meters in length, a family of airfoils for a blade 1 to 5 meters in length, and a family of airfoils for a blade 5 to 10 meters in length.

Tangler, James L. (Boulder, CO); Somers, Dan M. (State College, PA)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Airfoils for wind turbine  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Airfoils are disclosed for the blade of a wind turbine wherein each airfoil is characterized by a thickness in a range from 16%-24% and a maximum lift coefficient designed to be largely insensitive to roughness effects. The airfoils include a family of airfoils for a blade 15 to 25 meters in length, a family of airfoils for a blade 1 to 5 meters in length, and a family of airfoils for a blade 5 to 10 meters in length. 10 figs.

Tangler, J.L.; Somers, D.M.

1996-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

353

Manufacturing  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Manufacturing Manufacturing DUF6 Health Risks line line Accidents Storage Conversion Manufacturing Disposal Transportation Manufacturing of Products Containing Depleted Uranium Discussion of risks and possible impacts associated with fabrication of representative products containing depleted uranium. Beneficial Uses Risk Evaluation The Department has initiated the Depleted Uranium Uses Research and Development Program to explore the potential beneficial uses of the depleted uranium (DU), fluorine, and empty carbon steel DUF6 storage cylinders for effective use of resources and to achieve cost savings to the government. A number of tasks have been initiated related to uses of DU as a shielding material, catalyst, and as a semi-conductor material in electronic devices. An evaluation of the risks associated with the release

354

NREL: Technology Transfer - DOE/NREL/MASSCEC Develop New Blade ...  

... was formed between NREL and the Massachusetts Clean Energy Center (MASSCEC) to produce the nation’s largest wind turbine blade testing facility.

355

Cooperation Reliability Testing of the Clipper Windpower Liberty 2.5 MW Turbine: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-07-210  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Clipper Windpower (CWP) has developed the Liberty 2.5 MW wind turbine. The development, manufacturing, and certification process depends heavily on being able to validate the full-scale system design and performance under load in both an accredited structural test facility and through accredited field testing. CWP requested that DOE/ NREL upgrade blade test capabilities to perform a scope of work including structural testing of the C-96 blade used on the CWP Liberty turbine. This funds-in CRADA was developed to upgrade NREL blade test capability, while enabling certification testing of the C-96 blade through the facility and equipment upgrades. NREL shared resource funds were used to develop hardware necessary to structurally attach a large wind turbine to the test stand at the NWTC. Participant funds-in monies were used for developing the test program.

Hughes, S.

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

Ceramic blade with tip seal  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present gas turbine engine (10) includes a disc assembly (64) defining a disc (66) having a plurality of blades (70) attached thereto. The disc (66) has a preestablished rate of thermal expansion and the plurality of blades have a preestablished rate of thermal expansion being less than the preestablished rate of thermal expansion of the disc (66). A shroud assembly (100) is attached to the gas turbine engine (10) and is spaced from the plurality of blades (70) a preestablished distance forming an interface (108) therebetween. Positioned in the interface is a seal (110) having a preestablished rate of thermal expansion being generally equal to the rate of thermal expansion of the plurality of blades (70).

Glezer, Boris (Del Mar, CA); Bhardwaj, Narender K. (San Diego, CA); Jones, Russell B. (San Diego, CA)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Undercooling Related Casting Defects in Single Crystal Turbine ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

ger problem during the single crystal solidification of turbine blades for stationary gas turbines. Hence the intention of tem- perature measurements during the ...

358

Advanced Materials and Processes for Gas Turbines TABLE OF ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Materials Issues for the Design of Industrial Gas Turbines [pp. 3-13] ... French Developments of Superalloys for Gas Turbine Disks and Blades [pp. 17-28

359

Comparison of Blade-Strike Modeling Results with Empirical Data  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This study is the initial stage of further investigation into the dynamics of injury to fish during passage through a turbine runner. As part of the study, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) estimated the probability of blade strike, and associated injury, as a function of fish length and turbine operating geometry at two adjacent turbines in Powerhouse 1 of Bonneville Dam. Units 5 and 6 had identical intakes, stay vanes, wicket gates, and draft tubes, but Unit 6 had a new runner and curved discharge ring to minimize gaps between the runner hub and blades and between the blade tips and discharge ring. We used a mathematical model to predict blade strike associated with two Kaplan turbines and compared results with empirical data from biological tests conducted in 1999 and 2000. Blade-strike models take into consideration the geometry of the turbine blades and discharges as well as fish length, orientation, and distribution along the runner.

Carlson, Thomas J.; Ploskey, Gene R.

2004-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

360

Deposition of Graded Thermal Barrier Coatings for Gas Turbine ...  

Wind Energy Industrial Technologies Advanced Materials Deposition of Graded Thermal Barrier Coatings for Gas Turbine Blades Sandia National ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "turbine blade manufacturer" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Compressor Dependability: General Electric FA Inlet Blade  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Water droplet erosion and fatigue problems associated with the inlet R0 compressor blade in the GE 7FA and 9FA gas turbines have resulted in an aggressive scope of maintenance and inspection to maintain serviceability. Blade cracks and failure incidents prompted an independent root cause investigation. This report addresses the root cause analysis, damage mitigation approaches, and redesign options for this problem.

2010-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

362

Microstructure and Properties and Manufacturing Technologies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Oct 29, 2013 ... Advances in Hydroelectric Turbine Manufacturing and Repair: Microstructure and Properties and Manufacturing Technologies Sponsored by: ...

363

CX-100 and TX-100 blade field tests.  

SciTech Connect

In support of the DOE Low Wind Speed Turbine (LWST) program two of the three Micon 65/13M wind turbines at the USDA Agricultural Research Service (ARS) center in Bushland, Texas will be used to test two sets of experimental blades, the CX-100 and TX-100. The blade aerodynamic and structural characterization, meteorological inflow and wind turbine structural response will be monitored with an array of 75 instruments: 33 to characterize the blades, 15 to characterize the inflow, and 27 to characterize the time-varying state of the turbine. For both tests, data will be sampled at a rate of 30 Hz using the ATLAS II (Accurate GPS Time-Linked Data Acquisition System) data acquisition system. The system features a time-synchronized continuous data stream and telemetered data from the turbine rotor. This paper documents the instruments and infrastructure that have been developed to monitor these blades, turbines and inflow.

Holman, Adam (USDA-Agriculture Research Service, Bushland, TX); Jones, Perry L.; Zayas, Jose R.

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Torsional Torques and Fatigue Life Expenditure for Large-Scale Steam Turbine-Generator Shafts and Blades Due to Power System Harmonics.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??During the three decades, the torsional impact on turbine-generator sets due to power system disturbances has been extensively discussed in many research works. However, most… (more)

Tsai, Jong-ian

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

Program on Technology Innovation: Erosion Resistant Coatings for Gas and Steam Turbines - Advanced Nano-Coatings and Vendor Evaluati on Results  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Erosion of steam turbine blades and gas turbine compressor blades costs power producers millions of dollars each year. Improved mitigation techniques to reduce erosion damage will improve turbine efficiency and reduce maintenance downtime.

2009-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

366

Advanced Materials, Manufacturing and Design Integration for ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... lbs of new composite turbine blades required ... started developing the vast wind resources available ... NREL) estimates that US offshore winds have a ...

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

Low pressure turbine installation  

SciTech Connect

Low-pressure turbine installation is described comprising a casing, at least two groups of turbine stages mounted in said casing, each turbine stage having blades so arranged that a flow of steam passes through the respective turbine stages in contraflow manner, partition means in said casing for separating the opposed final stages of said turbine stages from each other, and steam exhausting means opened in the side walls of said casing in a direction substantially perpendicular to the axis of said turbine, said steam exhausting means being connected to condensers.

Iizuka, N.; Hisano, K.; Ninomiya, S.; Otawara, Y.

1976-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

368

WEB RESOURCE: Chromalloy Gas Turbine Corporation - TMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Feb 8, 2007 ... Chromalloy Gas Turbine Corporation is a pioneer in the high temperature coating of jet aircraft engine vanes and blades. Through ...

369

The Economic Optimization of Wind Turbine Design .  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This thesis studies the optimization of a variable speed, three blade, horizontal-axis wind turbine. The design parameters considered are the rotor diameter, hub height and… (more)

Schmidt, Michael Frank

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Wind Turbine Design Using A Free-wake Vortex Method With Winglet Application.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Wind turbine blades are traditionally designed with blade element momentum theory (BEMT). This method is incapable of accurately analyzing non-conventional or non-planar blade planforms. Modern… (more)

Maniaci, David

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Aero-Structural Optimization of a 5 MW Wind Turbine Rotor.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??A 5 MW wind turbine rotor blade based on the NREL 5 MW Reference Turbine is optimized for maximum efficiency and minimum flapwise hub bending… (more)

Vesel, Richard W., Jr.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

DoE Turbine Conference Poster 2010-10-13 v7  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

TOMO sm Lithographic Molding for Turbine Blade Cooling DoE Phase II SBIR - Advanced Cooling for Turbine Engines Solid Model 1180 Seminole Trail * Charlottesville, VA 22901 *...

373

Aerothermodynamics of low pressure steam turbines and condensers  

SciTech Connect

This book presents papers on steam turbines and steam condensers. Topics considered include the design of modern low pressure steam turbines, throughflow design methods, three-dimensional flow calculations, the calculation of wet steam stages, aerodynamic development of turbine blades, turbine performance measurement, turbine exhaust system design, and condensers for large turbines.

Moore, M.J.; Sieverding, C.H.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Department of Energy to Invest up to $4 Million for Wind Turbine...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Department of Energy to Invest up to 4 Million for Wind Turbine Blade Testing Facilities Department of Energy to Invest up to 4 Million for Wind Turbine Blade Testing Facilities...

375

Microsoft PowerPoint - STP Blade Failure_Hentschel_SWPA Conf (11 Jun 09).ppt  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

STRONG STRONG Stockton Turbine Blade Failure Spillway Tainter Gates Tailrace Powerhouse Switchyard BUILDING STRONG Stockton Power Plant Cross Section Location of failed blade section Runner Blade Draft Tube Bulkheads Intake Gates Intake Bulkheads BUILDING STRONG Runner Blade Failure * Unit experience severe vibration the morning of 4 Feb 09 activating the vibration alarms * Plant personnel observed cyclic banging and water leakage at the draft tube hatch door * Unit was immediately shut down * A failed blade section (blade #4) was discovered by divers at the bottom of the draft tube * Partial dewatering was performed to inspect turbine runner * Turbine blade #4 experienced a catastrophic failure * Potential cracks were observed on three of the other five blades (blades #2, #5, and #6)

376

Modelling and Validation of Three Dimensional Fan Blade 'Twist ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstract Scope, The numerical results obtained from the finite element analysis of the twist and camber forming of a blade are presented. The manufacturing ...

377

PowerJet Wind Turbine Project  

SciTech Connect

PROJECT OBJECTIVE The PowerJet wind turbine overcomes problems characteristic of the small wind turbines that are on the market today by providing reliable output at a wide range of wind speeds, durability, silent operation at all wind speeds, and bird-safe operation. Prime Energy�s objective for this project was to design and integrate a generator with an electrical controller and mechanical controls to maximize the generation of electricity by its wind turbine. The scope of this project was to design, construct and test a mechanical back plate to control rotational speed in high winds, and an electronic controller to maximize power output and to assist the base plate in controlling rotational speed in high winds. The test model will continue to operate beyond the time frame of the project, with the ultimate goal of manufacturing and marketing the PowerJet worldwide. Increased Understanding of Electronic & Mechanical Controls Integrated With Electricity Generator The PowerJet back plate begins to open as wind speed exceeds 13.5 mps. The pressure inside the turbine and the turbine rotational speed are held constant. Once the back plate has fully opened at approximately 29 mps, the controller begins pulsing back to the generator to limit the rotational speed of the turbine. At a wind speed in excess of 29 mps, the controller shorts the generator and brings the turbine to a complete stop. As the wind speed subsides, the controller releases the turbine and it resumes producing electricity. Data collection and instrumentation problems prevented identification of the exact speeds at which these events occur. However, the turbine, controller and generator survived winds in excess of 36 mps, confirming that the two over-speed controls accomplished their purpose. Technical Effectiveness & Economic Feasibility Maximum Electrical Output The output of electricity is maximized by the integration of an electronic controller and mechanical over-speed controls designed and tested during the course of this project. The output exceeds that of the PowerJet�s 3-bladed counterparts (see Appendix). Durability All components of the PowerJet turbine assembly�including the electronic and mechanical controls designed, manufactured and field tested during the course of this project�proved to be durable through severe weather conditions, with constant operation and no interruption in energy production. Low Cost Materials for the turbine, generator, tower, charge controllers and ancillary parts are available at reasonable prices. Fabrication of these parts is also readily available worldwide. The cost of assembling and installing the turbine is reduced because it has fewer parts and requires less labor to manufacture and assemble, making it competitively priced compared with turbines of similar output manufactured in the U.S. and Europe. The electronic controller is the unique part to be included in the turbine package. The controllers can be manufactured in reasonably-sized production runs to keep the cost below $250 each. The data logger and 24 sensors are for research only and will be unnecessary for the commercial product. Benefit To Public The PowerJet wind-electric system is designed for distributed wind generation in 3 and 4 class winds. This wind turbine meets DOE�s requirements for a quiet, durable, bird-safe turbine that eventually can be deployed as a grid-connected generator in urban and suburban settings. Results As described more fully below and illustrated in the Appendices, the goals and objectives outlined in 2060 SOPO were fully met. Electronic and mechanical controls were successfully designed, manufactured and integrated with the generator. The turbine, tower, controllers and generators operated without incident throughout the test period, surviving severe winter and summer weather conditions such as extreme temperatures, ice and sustained high winds. The electronic controls were contained in weather-proof electrical boxes and the elec

Bartlett, Raymond J

2008-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

378

Development of a low swirl injector concept for gas turbines  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Injector Concept for Gas Turbines Robert K. Cheng * , Scottconcept for ultra- low NO x gas turbines. Low-swirl flamevirtually every industrial gas turbine manufacturer to meet

Cheng, R.K.; Fable, S.A.; Schmidt, D.; Arellano, L.; Smith, K.O.

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Cavitation Erosion of Francis Turbines  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

About this Abstract. Meeting, Materials Science & Technology 2013. Symposium, Advances in Hydroelectric Turbine Manufacturing and Repair. Presentation ...

380

Wind Turbine Maintenance Guide  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This guideline provides component-level information regarding the maintenance of major components associated with a wind turbine. It combines recommendations offered by major equipment manufacturers with lessons learned from owner/operators of wind turbine facilities.

2012-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "turbine blade manufacturer" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Open cycle - OTEC turbine design  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The design of a low-pressure, open cycle ocean thermal energy conversion system (OTEC) is described. Near-surface ocean water at 80 F is allowed to expand in a one-half psi evaporator for passage through a turbine cold water (40 F), pumped upward from a 3,000 ft depth, is used to recondense the steam. Plans for a 2.5-3 MWe prototype plant, as a proof-of-principle project for a 100 MWe plant, include seawater pumps driven off the generator shaft, potable water as a by-product of the condensor, ease of access for O and M, and an integrated, gear-driven deaerator system with reinjection into the warm seawater discharge. An inlet flow of 3,000,000 cu ft/sec, a single stage vertical turbine with 40 ft fiber reinforced composite blades, 200 rpm operation on a 65 ft diameter disk, and an overall efficiency of 3% are features of the 100 MWe plant. A flowfield analysis, a velocity triangle analysis, and a structural dynamics analysis are outlined, along with materials applications and manufacturing process considerations in blade design. The 3MWe OTEC will be one-sixth the size of a 100MWe OTEC.

Coleman, W.H. (Westinghouse Electric Corp., Lester, PA); Rogers, J.D. (TM Development, Inc., Chester, PA); Thompson, D.F. (Delaware University, Newark, DE)

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Gas Turbine Manufacturers Perspective  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

are still comparatively high, the low level and stability of petroleum coke, coal, and oiltar residue feedstock prices can be shown to easily overcome this disadvantage when a...

383

Foam Cleaning of Steam Turbines  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The efficiency and power output of a steam turbine can be dramatically reduced when deposits form on the turbine blades. Disassembly and mechanical cleaning of the turbine is very time consuming and costly. Deposits can be removed from the turbine internals in situ by foaming an appropriate cleaning solution and injecting it through the turbine, dissolving the deposits and removing them from the system. Because disassembly of the turbine is not required, foam cleaning is a much faster and more cost-effective method of removing deposits. In recent years, HydroChem has removed copper deposits from over 130 Westinghouse and General Electric turbines nationwide using patented equipment.

Foster, C.; Curtis, G.; Horvath, J. W.

2000-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Baoding Tianwei Wind Power Blade Co Ltd | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Tianwei Wind Power Blade Co Ltd Tianwei Wind Power Blade Co Ltd Jump to: navigation, search Name Baoding Tianwei Wind Power Blade Co Ltd Place Hebei Province, China Sector Wind energy Product Wind turbine blade maker. References Baoding Tianwei Wind Power Blade Co Ltd[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Baoding Tianwei Wind Power Blade Co Ltd is a company located in Hebei Province, China . References ↑ "Baoding Tianwei Wind Power Blade Co Ltd" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Baoding_Tianwei_Wind_Power_Blade_Co_Ltd&oldid=342529" Categories: Clean Energy Organizations Companies Organizations Stubs What links here Related changes Special pages

385

American Wind Manufacturing | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

manufacturer of wind turbines -- delivered and installed turbine components for the Power County Wind Farm, shown here, in Idaho. Image: Nordex USA, Inc. Date taken: Mon,...

386

Propeller blade stress estimates using lifting line theory  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

OpenProp, an open-source computational tool for the design and analysis of propellers and horizontal-axis turbines, is extended to provide estimates of normal stresses in the blades for both on- and off-design operating ...

Epps, Brenden P.

387

Investigation of Fatigue Failures of Titanium Alloy Blades Used in ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper we present two failure case-studies of titanium alloy used for aeroderivative gas turbine compressor blades. Both are related to a failure of 1st stage ...

388

Advances in steam turbine technology for power generation  

SciTech Connect

This book contains articles presented at the 1990 International Joint Power Generation Conference. It is organized under the following headings: Solid particle erosion in steam turbines, Steam turbine failure analysis, Steam turbine upgrades, steam turbine blading development, Boiler feed pumps and auxiliary steam turbine drives.

Bellanca, C.P. (Dayton Power and Light Company (US))

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Jet spoiler arrangement for wind turbine  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An air jet spoiler arrangement is provided for a Darrieus-type vertical axis wind-powered turbine. Air is drawn into hollow turbine blades through air inlets at the ends thereof and is ejected in the form of air jets through small holes or openings provided along the lengths of the blades. The air jets create flow separation at the surfaces of the turbine blades, thereby inducing stall conditions and reducing the output power. A feedback control unit senses the power output of the turbine and controls the amount of air drawn into the air inlets accordingly.

Cyrus, Jack D. (Corrales, NM); Kadlec, Emil G. (Albuquerque, NM); Klimas, Paul C. (Albuquerque, NM)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Jet spoiler arrangement for wind turbine  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An air jet spoiler arrangement is provided for a Darrieus-type vertical axis wind-powered turbine. Air is drawn into hollow turbine blades through air inlets at the end thereof and is ejected in the form of air jets through small holes or openings provided along the lengths of the blades. The air jets create flow separation at the surfaces of the turbine blades, thereby including stall conditions and reducing the output power. A feedback control unit senses the power output of the turbine and controls the amount of air drawn into the air inlets accordingly.

Cyrus, J.D.; Kadlec, E.G.; Klimas, P.C.

1983-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

391

Blade System Design Study. Part II, final project report (GEC).  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

As part of the U.S. Department of Energy's Low Wind Speed Turbine program, Global Energy Concepts LLC (GEC)1 has studied alternative composite materials for wind turbine blades in the multi-megawatt size range. This work in one of the Blade System Design Studies (BSDS) funded through Sandia National Laboratories. The BSDS program was conducted in two phases. In the Part I BSDS, GEC assessed candidate innovations in composite materials, manufacturing processes, and structural configurations. GEC also made recommendations for testing composite coupons, details, assemblies, and blade substructures to be carried out in the Part II study (BSDS-II). The BSDS-II contract period began in May 2003, and testing was initiated in June 2004. The current report summarizes the results from the BSDS-II test program. Composite materials evaluated include carbon fiber in both pre-impregnated and vacuum-assisted resin transfer molding (VARTM) forms. Initial thin-coupon static testing included a wide range of parameters, including variation in manufacturer, fiber tow size, fabric architecture, and resin type. A smaller set of these materials and process types was also evaluated in thin-coupon fatigue testing, and in ply-drop and ply-transition panels. The majority of materials used epoxy resin, with vinyl ester (VE) resin also used for selected cases. Late in the project, testing of unidirectional fiberglass was added to provide an updated baseline against which to evaluate the carbon material performance. Numerous unidirectional carbon fabrics were considered for evaluation with VARTM infusion. All but one fabric style considered suffered either from poor infusibility or waviness of fibers combined with poor compaction. The exception was a triaxial carbon-fiberglass fabric produced by SAERTEX. This fabric became the primary choice for infused articles throughout the test program. The generally positive results obtained in this program for the SAERTEX material have led to its being used in innovative prototype blades of 9-m and 30-m length, as well as other non-wind related structures.

Griffin, Dayton A. (DNV Global Energy Concepts Inc., Seattle, WA)

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

Rim seal for turbine wheel  

SciTech Connect

A turbine wheel assembly includes a disk having a plurality of blades therearound. A ceramic ring is mounted to the housing of the turbine wheel assembly. A labyrinth rim seal mounted on the disk cooperates with the ceramic ring to seal the hot gases acting on the blades from the disk. The ceramic ring permits a tighter clearance between the labyrinth rim seal and the ceramic ring.

Glezer, Boris (Del Mar, CA); Boyd, Gary L. (Alpine, CA); Norton, Paul F. (San Diego, CA)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Cooling scheme for turbine hot parts  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A closed-loop cooling scheme for cooling stationary combustion turbine components, such as vanes, ring segments and transitions, is provided. The cooling scheme comprises: (1) an annular coolant inlet chamber, situated between the cylinder and blade ring of a turbine, for housing coolant before being distributed to the turbine components; (2) an annular coolant exhaust chamber, situated between the cylinder and the blade ring and proximate the annular coolant inlet chamber, for collecting coolant exhaust from the turbine components; (3) a coolant inlet conduit for supplying the coolant to said coolant inlet chamber; (4) a coolant exhaust conduit for directing coolant from said coolant exhaust chamber; and (5) a piping arrangement for distributing the coolant to and directing coolant exhaust from the turbine components. In preferred embodiments of the invention, the cooling scheme further comprises static seals for sealing the blade ring to the cylinder and flexible joints for attaching the blade ring to the turbine components.

Hultgren, Kent Goran (Winter Park, FL); Owen, Brian Charles (Orlando, FL); Dowman, Steven Wayne (Orlando, FL); Nordlund, Raymond Scott (Orlando, FL); Smith, Ricky Lee (Oviedo, FL)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

Wind Turbine Basics | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Wind Turbine Basics Wind Turbine Basics Wind Turbine Basics July 30, 2013 - 2:58pm Addthis Energy 101: Wind Turbines Basics This video explains the basics of how wind turbines operate to produce clean power from an abundant, renewable resource-the wind. Text Version Wind turbine assembly Although all wind turbines operate on similar principles, several varieties are in use today. These include horizontal axis turbines and vertical axis turbines. Horizontal Axis Turbines Horizontal axis turbines are the most common turbine configuration used today. They consist of a tall tower, atop which sits a fan-like rotor that faces into or away from the wind, a generator, a controller, and other components. Most horizontal axis turbines built today are two- or three-bladed. Horizontal axis turbines sit high atop towers to take advantage of the

395

Wind Turbine Basics | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Turbine Basics Turbine Basics Wind Turbine Basics July 30, 2013 - 2:58pm Addthis Energy 101: Wind Turbines Basics This video explains the basics of how wind turbines operate to produce clean power from an abundant, renewable resource-the wind. Text Version Wind turbine assembly Although all wind turbines operate on similar principles, several varieties are in use today. These include horizontal axis turbines and vertical axis turbines. Horizontal Axis Turbines Horizontal axis turbines are the most common turbine configuration used today. They consist of a tall tower, atop which sits a fan-like rotor that faces into or away from the wind, a generator, a controller, and other components. Most horizontal axis turbines built today are two- or three-bladed. Horizontal axis turbines sit high atop towers to take advantage of the

396

Wind turbine spoiler  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An aerodynamic spoiler system for a vertical axis wind turbine includes spoilers on the blades initially stored near the rotor axis to minimize drag. A solenoid latch adjacent the central support tower releases the spoilers and centrifugal force causes the spoilers to move up the turbine blades away from the rotor axis, thereby producing a braking effect and actual slowing of the associated wind turbine, if desired. The spoiler system can also be used as an infinitely variable power control by regulated movement of the spoilers on the blades over the range between the undeployed and fully deployed positions. This is done by the use of a suitable powered reel and cable located at the rotor tower to move the spoilers.

Sullivan, William N. (Albuquerque, NM)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Gas turbine sealing apparatus  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A gas turbine includes forward and aft rows of rotatable blades, a row of stationary vanes between the forward and aft rows of rotatable blades, an annular intermediate disc, and a seal housing apparatus. The forward and aft rows of rotatable blades are coupled to respective first and second portions of a disc/rotor assembly. The annular intermediate disc is coupled to the disc/rotor assembly so as to be rotatable with the disc/rotor assembly during operation of the gas turbine. The annular intermediate disc includes a forward side coupled to the first portion of the disc/rotor assembly and an aft side coupled to the second portion of the disc/rotor assembly. The seal housing apparatus is coupled to the annular intermediate disc so as to be rotatable with the annular intermediate disc and the disc/rotor assembly during operation of the gas turbine.

Wiebe, David J; Wessell, Brian J; Ebert, Todd; Beeck, Alexander; Liang, George; Marussich, Walter H

2013-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

398

Method and apparatus for wind turbine braking  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for braking a wind turbine including at least one rotor blade coupled to a rotor. The method includes selectively controlling an angle of pitch of the at least one rotor blade with respect to a wind direction based on a design parameter of a component of the wind turbine to facilitate reducing a force induced into the wind turbine component as a result of braking.

Barbu, Corneliu (Laguna Hills, CA); Teichmann, Ralph (Nishkayuna, NY); Avagliano, Aaron (Houston, TX); Kammer, Leonardo Cesar (Niskayuna, NY); Pierce, Kirk Gee (Simpsonville, SC); Pesetsky, David Samuel (Greenville, SC); Gauchel, Peter (Muenster, DE)

2009-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

399

DOE-Sponsored Research Improves Gas Turbine Performance  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Small Business Innovative Research Grants Achieve Commercialization Goals for Novel Gas Turbine Manufacturing Technology

400

Heat Transfer from Rotating Blade Platforms with and without Film Cooling  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Transfer from Rotating Blade Transfer from Rotating Blade Platforms with and without Film Cooling J.C. Han and M.T. Schobeiri SCIES Project 03-01-SR113 DOE COOPERATIVE AGREEMENT DE-FC26-02NT41431 Texas A&M University Tom J. George, Program Manager, DOE/NETL Richard Wenglarz, Manager of Research, SCIES Project Awarded 07/01/2003 (36 Month Duration) $461,024 Total Contract Value ($361,024 DOE) Turbine Heat Transfer Laboratory Texas A&M University SR 113 - 10-2005 - JCHan Gas Turbine Needs Need Detailed Heat Transfer Data on Rotating Blade Platforms Improve Current Rotor Blade Cooling Schemes Provide Options for New Rotor Blade Cooling Designs Need Accurate and Efficient CFD Codes to Improve Flow and Heat Transfer Predictions and Guide Rotor Blade Cooling Designs Improved Turbine Power Efficiency by Increasing Turbine

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "turbine blade manufacturer" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Passive load control for large wind turbines.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Wind energy research activities at Sandia National Laboratories focus on developing large rotors that are lighter and more cost-effective than those designed with current technologies. Because gravity scales as the cube of the blade length, gravity loads become a constraining design factor for very large blades. Efforts to passively reduce turbulent loading has shown significant potential to reduce blade weight and capture more energy. Research in passive load reduction for wind turbines began at Sandia in the late 1990's and has moved from analytical studies to blade applications. This paper discusses the test results of two Sandia prototype research blades that incorporate load reduction techniques. The TX-100 is a 9-m long blade that induces bend-twist coupling with the use of off-axis carbon in the skin. The STAR blade is a 27-m long blade that induces bend-twist coupling by sweeping the blade in a geometric fashion.

Ashwill, Thomas D.

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Howden Wind Turbines Ltd | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Howden Wind Turbines Ltd Jump to: navigation, search Name Howden Wind Turbines Ltd Place United Kingdom Sector Wind energy Product Howden was a manufacturer of wind turbines in the...

403

NETL: Turbines - UTSR Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3 Aerodynamics and Heat Transfer Studies of Parameters Specific to the IGCC Requirements: High Mass Flow Endwall Contouring, Leading Edge Filleting and Blade Tip Ejection under Roating Turbine Condition Texas A&M University Meinhard Schobeiri 3 Aerodynamics and Heat Transfer Studies of Parameters Specific to the IGCC Requirements: High Mass Flow Endwall Contouring, Leading Edge Filleting and Blade Tip Ejection under Roating Turbine Condition Texas A&M University Meinhard Schobeiri Project Dates: 10/1/2009 - 9/30/2012 Area of Research: Aero/Heat Transfer Federal Project Manager: Robin Ames Project Objective: This project is advanced research designed to provide the gas turbine industry with a set of quantitative aerodynamic and film cooling effectiveness data essential to understanding the basic physics of complex secondary flows. This includes their influence on the efficiency and performance of gas turbines, and the impact that differing film cooling ejection arrangements have on suppressing the detrimental effect of these

404

Blade Testing Equipment Development and Commercialization: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-09-346  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Blade testing is required to meet wind turbine design standards, reduce machine cost, and reduce the technical and financial risk of deploying mass-produced wind turbine models. NREL?s National Wind Technology Center (NWTC) in Colorado is the only blade test facility in the U.S. capable of performing full-scale static and fatigue testing of multi-megawatt-scale wind turbine blades. Rapid growth in wind turbine size over the past two decades has outstripped the size capacity of the NWTC blade test facility leaving the U.S. wind industry without a suitable means of testing blades for large land-based and offshore turbines. This CRADA will develop and commercialize testing technologies and test equipment, including scaling up, value engineering, and testing of equipment to be used at blade testing facilities in the U.S. and around the world.

Snowberg, D.; Hughes, S.

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Performance optimization of gas turbine engine  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Performance optimization of a gas turbine engine can be expressed in terms of minimizing fuel consumption while maintaining nominal thrust output, maximizing thrust for the same fuel consumption and minimizing turbine blade temperature. Additional control ... Keywords: Fuel control, Gas turbines, Genetic algorithms, Optimization, Temperature control

Valceres V. R. Silva; Wael Khatib; Peter J. Fleming

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Radial-radial single rotor turbine  

SciTech Connect

A rotor for use in turbine applications has a radial compressor/pump having radially disposed spaced apart fins forming passages and a radial turbine having hollow turbine blades interleaved with the fins and through which fluid from the radial compressor/pump flows. The rotor can, in some applications, be used to produce electrical power.

Platts, David A. (Los Alamos, NM)

2006-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

407

Vertical axis wind turbine development. Executive summary. Final report, March 1, 1976-June 30, 1977  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Information is presented concerning the numerical solution of the aerodynamics of cross-flow wind turbines; boundary layer considerations for a vertical axis wind turbine; WVU VAWT outdoor test model; low solidity blade tests; high solidity blade design; cost analysis of the WVU VAWT test model; structural parametric analysis of VAWT blades; and cost study of current WECS.

Walters, R. E.; Fanucci, J. B.; Hill, P. W.; Migliore, P. G.

1979-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Single rotor turbine engine  

SciTech Connect

There has been invented a turbine engine with a single rotor which cools the engine, functions as a radial compressor, pushes air through the engine to the ignition point, and acts as an axial turbine for powering the compressor. The invention engine is designed to use a simple scheme of conventional passage shapes to provide both a radial and axial flow pattern through the single rotor, thereby allowing the radial intake air flow to cool the turbine blades and turbine exhaust gases in an axial flow to be used for energy transfer. In an alternative embodiment, an electric generator is incorporated in the engine to specifically adapt the invention for power generation. Magnets are embedded in the exhaust face of the single rotor proximate to a ring of stationary magnetic cores with windings to provide for the generation of electricity. In this alternative embodiment, the turbine is a radial inflow turbine rather than an axial turbine as used in the first embodiment. Radial inflow passages of conventional design are interleaved with radial compressor passages to allow the intake air to cool the turbine blades.

Platts, David A. (Los Alamos, NM)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

NETL: Turbines  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Turbines Coal and Power Systems Turbines Turbine Animation Turbines have been the world's energy workhorses for generations... - Read More The NETL Turbine Program manages a...

410

Sweep-twist adaptive rotor blade : final project report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Knight & Carver was contracted by Sandia National Laboratories to develop a Sweep Twist Adaptive Rotor (STAR) blade that reduced operating loads, thereby allowing a larger, more productive rotor. The blade design used outer blade sweep to create twist coupling without angled fiber. Knight & Carver successfully designed, fabricated, tested and evaluated STAR prototype blades. Through laboratory and field tests, Knight & Carver showed the STAR blade met the engineering design criteria and economic goals for the program. A STAR prototype was successfully tested in Tehachapi during 2008 and a large data set was collected to support engineering and commercial development of the technology. This report documents the methodology used to develop the STAR blade design and reviews the approach used for laboratory and field testing. The effort demonstrated that STAR technology can provide significantly greater energy capture without higher operating loads on the turbine.

Ashwill, Thomas D.

2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Temperature stratified turbine compressors  

SciTech Connect

A method and apparatus for improving the efficiency of a compressor of a gas turbine engine is disclosed. The inlet gas entering the compressor is stratified into two portions of different temperatures. The higher temperature gas is introduced adjacent the outer tipe of the compressor blades to reduce the relative Mach number of the flow at the area.

Earnest, E.R.; Passinos, B.

1979-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

412

Design method for turbomachine blades with finite thickness by the circulation method  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents a procedure to extend a recently developed three-dimensional inverse method for infinitely thin blades to handle blades with finite thickness. In this inverse method, the prescribed quantities are the blade pressure loading and the blade thickness distributions, and the calculated quantity is the blade mean camber line. The method is formulated in the fully inverse mode whereby the blade shape is determined iteratively using the flow-tangency condition along the blade surfaces. Design calculations are presented for an inlet guide vane, an impulse turbine blade, and a compressor blade in the two-dimensional inviscid- and incompressible-flow limit. Consistency checks are carried out for these design calculations using a panel analysis method and the analytical solution for the Gostelow profile.

Jiang, J.; Dang, T. [Syracuse Univ., NY (United States). Dept. of Mechanical, Aerospace and Manufacturing Engineering

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Wrought TiAl Blades  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

First forged blades have been HPC blades of the Rolls-Royce BR715 engine from Gamma-TAB. The following evolution step was HPC blades for the ...

414

Experience and assessment of the DOE-NASA Mod-1 2000-kilowatt wind turbine generator at Boone, North Carolina  

SciTech Connect

The broad objectives of the Mod-1 program are defined, including the background information leading to the inception of the program. Activities on the Mod-1 program began in 1974, and the turbine was dedicated in July 1979. Rated power generation was accomplished in February 1980. The Mod-1 wind turbine is described in this report. In addition to the steel blade operated on the wind turbine, a composite blade was designed and manufactured. During the early phase of the manufacturing cycle a Mod-1A configuration was designed that identified concepts such as partial span control, a soft tower, and upwind teetered rotors that have been incorporated in second- and third-generation industry designs. The Mod-1 electrical system performed as designed, with voltage flicker characteristics within acceptable utility limits. Power output versus wind speed has equaled or exceeded design predictions. The wind turbine control system was operated successfully at the site and remotely from the utility dispatcher's office in Lenior, NC. During wind turbine operations, television interference was experienced by the local residents. As a consequence, operations were restricted. Although not implemented, two potential solutions were identified. In addition to television interference, a few local residents complained about objectionable sound, particularly the thump as the blade passed behind the tower. To eliminate the residents' objections, the sound generation level was reduced by 10 dB by reducing the rotor speed from 35 rpm to 23 rpm. During January 1981, bolts in the drive train fractured. A solution has been identified but not implemented as yet. During the past 2 years the public reaction toward the Mod-1 Turbine program has been overwhelmingly favorable. This includes the vast majority of Boone residents.

Collins, J.L.; Shaltens, R.K.; Poor, R.H.; Barton, R.S.

1982-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

Wind turbine | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

turbine turbine Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Wind turbine: A machine that converts wind energy to mechanical energy; typically connected to a generator to produce electricity. Other definitions:Wikipedia Reegle Contents 1 Types of Wind Turbines 1.1 Vertical Axis Wind Turbines 1.2 Horizontal Axis Wind Turbines 2 Wind Turbine Sizes 3 Components of a Wind Turbine 4 References Types of Wind Turbines There are two basic wind turbine designs: those with a vertical axis (sometimes referred to as VAWTs) and those with a horizontal axis (sometimes referred to as HAWTs). There are several manufacturers of vertical axis turbines, but they have not penetrated the "utility scale" (100 kW capacity and larger) market to the same degree as horizontal axis turbines.[1]

416

Helicoidal vortex model for wind turbine aeroelastic simulation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The vortex method has been extended to account for blade flexibility, which is a potential source of unsteadiness in the flow past a wind turbine rotor. The code has been validated previously under the assumption of rigid blades. The aerodynamics method ... Keywords: Blade flexibility, Steady and unsteady flows, Tower interference, Vortex model

Jean-Jacques Chattot

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

NORDIC Wind Manufacturing Project Nordic Windpower USA Inc.  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2,2011 2,2011 Record of Categorical Exclusion for NORDIC Wind Manufacturing Project Nordic Windpower USA Inc. Description of Proposed Action: The Department of Energy's (DOE's) proposed action is to issue a loan guarantee to Nordic Windpower USA Inc., for the assembly and testing of two-bladed, patented teeter hub technology wind turbines. The initial production will be of 1 MW N 1 000 Nordic wind turbine nacelles. The assembly and testing operations would take place in an existing facility, Super Hangar Bay 12, within the Kansas City International Airport in Kansas City, Missouri. The Super Hangar facility is located adjacent to Interstate 29 on the east side of the airport. Bay 12 was designed for overhauling large aircraft such as the Boeing 747 and includes ample space for Nordic's assembly and testing operations. Project

418

Definition of a 5-MW Reference Wind Turbine for Offshore System Development  

SciTech Connect

This report describes a three-bladed, upwind, variable-speed, variable blade-pitch-to-feather-controlled multimegawatt wind turbine model developed by NREL to support concept studies aimed at assessing offshore wind technology.

Jonkman, J.; Butterfield, S.; Musial, W.; Scott, G.

2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

Nordic Turbines Inc formerly Vista Dorada Corporation | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Inc formerly Vista Dorada Corporation Inc formerly Vista Dorada Corporation Jump to: navigation, search Name Nordic Turbines Inc (formerly Vista Dorada Corporation) Place Centerville, Massachusetts Zip 02632-2933 Sector Wind energy Product Massachusetts-based manufacturer of large scale two-blade wind turbines. Coordinates 45.751935°, -120.902959° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":45.751935,"lon":-120.902959,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

420

Simulating Collisions for Hydrokinetic Turbines  

SciTech Connect

Evaluations of blade-strike on an axial-flow Marine Hydrokinetic turbine were conducted using a conventional methodology as well as an alternative modeling approach proposed in the present document. The proposed methodology integrates the following components into a Computa- tional Fluid Dynamics (CFD) model: (i) advanced eddy-resolving flow simulations, (ii) ambient turbulence based on field data, (iii) moving turbine blades in highly transient flows, and (iv) Lagrangian particles to mimic the potential fish pathways. The sensitivity of blade-strike prob- ability to the following conditions was also evaluated: (i) to the turbulent environment, (ii) to fish size and (iii) to mean stream flow velocity. The proposed methodology provided fraction of collisions and offered the capability of analyzing the causal relationships between the flow envi- ronment and resulting strikes on rotating blades. Overall, the conventional methodology largely overestimates the probability of strike, and lacks the ability to produce potential fish and aquatic biota trajectories as they interact with the rotating turbine. By using a set of experimental corre- lations of exposure-response of living fish colliding on moving blades, the occurrence, frequency and intensity of the particle collisions was next used to calculate the survival rate of fish crossing the MHK turbine. This step indicated survival rates always greater than 98%. Although the proposed CFD framework is computationally more expensive, it provides the advantage of evaluating multiple mechanisms of stress and injury of hydrokinetic turbine devices on fish.

Richmond, Marshall C.; Romero Gomez, Pedro DJ; Rakowski, Cynthia L.

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "turbine blade manufacturer" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
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421

Blade-forced vibration effects in turbomachinery rotor-stator interaction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis presents the effects of blade-forced vibration in turbomachinery rotor-stator interaction. A quasi-three-dimensional multi-row analysis, based on an Euler/Navier-Stokes solver and a parallel computational algorithm, was used to simulate the unsteady flow in a turbine. Results are presented for non-dimensional pressure, velocity, and entropy in the blade passage. The two-stage turbine flow analysis was completed for the case with blade-forced response as well as the case without blade-forced response for comparison.

Collard, Joseph Eugene

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

Development of a more fish tolerant turbine runner advanced hydropower turbine project. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Hidrostal pump is a single bladed combined screw/centrifugal pump which has been proven to transport fish with minimal injury. The focus of the ARL/NREC research project was to develop a new runner geometry which is effective in downstream fish passage and hydroelectric power generation. A flow of 1,000 cfs and a head in the range of 75 ft to 100 ft were selected for conceptual design of the new runner. Criteria relative to hydraulic characteristics which are favorable for fish passage were prepared based on a reassessment of the available information. Important criteria used to develop the new runner design included low pressure change rates, minimum absolute pressures, and minimum shear. Other criteria which are reflected in the runner design are a minimum number of blades (only two), minimum total length of leading edges, and large flow passages. Flow characteristics of the new runner were analyzed using two- dimensional and three-dimensional Computational Fluid Dynamic (CFD) models. The basic runner geometry was initially selected using the two-dimensional model. The three-dimensional model was used to investigate the flow characteristics in detail through the entire runner and to refine the design by eliminating potential problem areas at the leading and trailing edges. Results of the analyses indicated that the runner has characteristics which should provide safe fish passage with an overall power efficiency of approximately 90%. The size of the new runner, which is larger than conventional turbine runners with the same design flow and head, will provide engineering, fabrication, and installation.challenges related to the turbine components and the civil works. A small reduction in the overall efficiency would reduce the size of the runner considerably, would simplify the turbine manufacturing operations, and would allow installation of the new turbine at more hydroelectric sites.

Cook, T.C.; Hecker, G.E. [Worcester Polytechnic Inst., Holden, MA (United States). Alden Research Lab.; Faulkner, H.B.; Jansen, W. [Northern Research and Engineering Corp., Cambridge, MA (United States)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

Castability of 718Plus® Alloy for Structural Gas Turbine Engine ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This technology will be implemented for the manufacture of gas turbine structural components ... Cast Alloys for Advanced Ultra Supercritical Steam Turbines.

424

How Does a Wind Turbine Work?  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Wind turbines operate on a simple principle. The energy in the wind turns two or three propeller-like blades around a rotor. The rotor is connected to the main shaft, which spins a generator to...

425

Airfoils for wind turbine - Energy Innovation Portal  

Airfoils for the tip and mid-span regions of a wind turbine blade have upper surface and lower surface shapes and contours between a leading edge and a trailing edge ...

426

Thermal Imaging of Medical Saw Blades and Guides  

SciTech Connect

Better Than New, LLC., has developed a surface treatment to reduce the friction and wear of orthopedic saw blades and guides. The medical saw blades were thermally imaged while sawing through fresh animal bone and an IR camera was used to measure the blade temperature as it exited the bone. The thermal performance of as-manufactured saw blades was compared to surface-treated blades, and a freshly used blade was used for temperature calibration purposes in order to account for any emissivity changes due to organic transfer layers. Thermal imaging indicates that the treated saw blades cut faster and cooler than untreated blades. In orthopedic surgery, saw guides are used to perfectly size the bone to accept a prosthesis. However, binding can occur between the blade and guide because of misalignment. This condition increases the saw blade temperature and may result in tissue damage. Both treated ad untreated saw guides were also studied. The treated saw guide operated at a significantly lower temperature than untreated guide. Saw blades and guides that operate at a cooler temperature are expected to reduce the amount of tissue damage (thermal necrosis) and may reduce the number of post-operative complications.

Dinwiddie, Ralph Barton [ORNL; Steffner, Thomas E [ORNL

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

PRICE 9S. 6d. NETExperiments Concerning the Effect of Trailing, Edge Thickness on Blade Loss and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Theoretical assessments of the influence of trailing-edge thickness on turbine blade loss coefficients are reviewed and compared with the results of a cascade tunnel investigation. Tests on a single-stage turbine indicate that efficiency is much more sensitive to stator blade trailing-edge thickness than simple estimates woul d indicate, but rotor blade thickness effects on efficiency are in line with simple prediction.

Turbine Stage Efficiency; I. H. Johnston; D. C. Dransfield; D. J. Fullbrook; Turbine Stage Efficiency; I. H. Johnston; D. C. Dransfield; D. J. Fullbrook

1964-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

Combined gas turbine and steam turbine power station  

SciTech Connect

In order to operate a gas turbine and steam turbine plant with a high temperature at the inlet to the gas turbine plant, the parts located in the hot-gas stream of the gas turbine being steam-cooled, and the cooling steam, thereby raised to a higher temperature, being fed to the steam turbine for further expansion, it is proposed that the waste heat from the gas turbine be led through a two-pressure waste heat boiler, and that the steam, generated in this boiler, be slightly superheated in a cooling-steam superheater, and fed to the hollow inlet vanes and to the rotor blades, which are likewise hollow, the steam, strongly superheated during this cooling process, then being admixed to the steam coming from the intermediate superheater, and being fed to the low-pressure section of the steam turbine.

Mukherjee, D.

1984-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

429

Micro Turbine Generator Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A number of micro turbines generators have recently been announced as currently commercially available for sale to customers, such as end users, utilities, and energy service providers. Manufacturers and others are reporting certain performance capabilities ...

Stephanie L. Hamilton

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

Processing of High Performance Alloys for A-USC Steam Turbine ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fracture Toughness Evaluation of Polymeric Materials for Wind Turbine Blades Using the Spiral Notch Torsion Test · High Performance Alloys for Advanced ...

431

Multiblade Coordinate Transformation and Its Application to Wind Turbine Analysis: Preprint  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes the mulitblade coordinate transformation (MBC) modeling process that integrates the dynamics of individual wind turbine blades and expresses them as fixed frames.

Bir, G.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

Fan blade development. Final report Sep 81-Sep 82  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this program was to develop an improved fan blade that could be utilized in place of the current steel fan blade on the Pedal Ventilator Kit (PVK). The goals of the program were to reduce both the unit cost and weight of the fan while maintaining its effectiveness and reliability. A value analysis study was conducted on the fan blade to determine material/design revisions that offered potential manufacturing economies. Based on the conclusions of the study, two designs were chosen for fabrication. The two fan designs were constructed and tested. As a result of the performance testing, one fan blade emerged as the optimum design. Fifteen fan blades of the optimum design were constructed for FEMA inspection and distribution. Preliminary specifications were generated for the fan blade assembly. in addition, production cost estimates based on a procurement of 100,000 units were formulated for FEMA budgetary purposes.

Buday, J.M.

1982-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

NETL: Turbine Projects - Cost Reduction  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cost Reduction Cost Reduction Turbine Projects Cost Reduction Single Crystal Turbine Blades Enhancing Gas Turbine Efficiency Data/Fact Sheets Enabling and Information Technologies to Increase RAM of Advanced Powerplants Data/Fact Sheets Development of NDE Technology for Environmental Barrier Coating and Residual Life Estimation Data/Fact Sheets Welding and Weld Repair of Single Crystal Gas Turbine Alloy Data/Fact Sheets Combustion Turbine Hot Section Coating Life Management Data/Fact Sheets On-Line Thermal Barrier Coating Monitor for Real-Time Failure Protection and Life Maximization Data/Fact Sheets On-Line Thermal Barrier Coating [PDF] Advanced Monitoring to Improve Combustion Turbine/Combined Cycle RAM Data/Fact Sheets Advanced Monitoring to Improve Combustion Turbine [PDF]

434

Impact-resistant boron/aluminum composites for large fan blades  

SciTech Connect

Blade-like specimens were subjected to static ballistic impact testing to determine their relative FOD impact resistance levels. It was determined that a plus or minus 15 deg layup exhibited good impact resistance. The design of a large solid boron/aluminum fan blade was conducted based on the FOD test results. The CF6 fan blade was used as a baseline for these design studies. The solid boron/aluminum fan blade design was used to fabricate two blades. This effort enabled the assessment of the scale up of existing blade manufacturing details for the fabrication of a large B/Al fan blade. Existing CF6 fan blade tooling was modified for use in fabricating these blades.

Oller, T.L.; Salemme, C.T.; Bowden, J.H.; Doble, G.S.; Melnyk, P.

1977-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

Baseline Gas Turbine Development Program. Twentieth quarterly progress report, October 31, 1977  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Progress is reported for a program whose goals are to demonstrate an experimental Upgraded gas turbine powered automobile which meets the 1978 Federal Emissions Standards, has significantly improved fuel economy, and is competitive in performance, reliability, and potential manufacturing cost with the conventional piston engine powered, compact-size American automobile. Activity during this twentieth program quarter has continued to emphasize development towards correcting power deficiency in the Upgraded Engine. Though no absolute improvements have been realized in this quarter, ssignificant progress has been made in identifying causes, appropriately adjusting original design constraints, and proceeding with corrective designs. Specifically, to reduce endwall and secondary flow losses, a new low velocity compressor turbine inlet duct, and blading both with an increased height and lighter loading is being designed. A large increase in the power turbine annulus is being used to significantly lower blade Mach number and leaving loss. Progress is also being made in uniforming regenerator flow for better heat recovery, and in the development of control system components. A Public Interest Car has been built and has proved effective in communicating overall program benefits and goals. In the area of advanced engine development, work is now underway towards processing sintered alpha silicon carbide into high temperature turbine stage components.

Schmidt, F W; Wagner, C E [comps.] [comps.

1977-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

436

Sustainable Energy Solutions Task 4.2: UV Degradation Prevention on Fiber-Reinforced Composite Blades  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

EXECUTIVE SUMARRY Use of wind energy has expanded very quickly because of the energy prices, environmental concerns and improved efficiency of wind generators. Rather than using metal and alloy based wind turbine blades, larger size fiber (glass and carbon) reinforced composite blades have been recently utilized to increase the efficiency of the wind energy in both high and low wind potential areas. In the current composite manufacturing, pre-preg and vacuum-assisted/heat sensitive resin transfer molding and resin infusion methods are employed. However, these lighter, stiffer and stronger composite blades experience ultraviolet (UV) light degradation where polymers (epoxies and hardeners) used for the blades manufacturing absorb solar UV lights, and cause photolytic, thermo-oxidative and photo-oxidative reactions resulting in breaking of carbon-hydrogen bonds, polymer degradation and internal and external stresses. One of the main reasons is the weak protective coatings/paints on the composite blades. This process accelerates the aging and fatigue cracks, and reduces the overall mechanical properties of the blades. Thus, the lack of technology on coatings for blade manufacturing is forcing many government agencies and private companies (local and national windmill companies) to find a better solution for the composite wind blades. Kansas has a great wind potential for the future energy demand, so efficient wind generators can be an option for continuous energy production. The research goal of the present project was to develop nanocomposite coatings using various inclusions against UV degradation and corrosion, and advance the fundamental understanding of degradation (i.e., physical, chemical and physiochemical property changes) on those coatings. In pursuit of the research goal, the research objective of the present program was to investigate the effects of UV light and duration on various nanocomposites made mainly of carbon nanotubes and graphene nanoflakes, contribute the valuable information to this emerging field of advanced materials and manufacturing and advance the Kansas economy through creation of engineering knowledge and products in the wind energy. The proposed work was involved in a multidisciplinary research program that incorporates nanocomposite fabrication, advanced coating, characterization, surface and colloidal chemistry, physicochemistry, corrosion science, and analysis with a simple and effective testing methodology. The findings were closely related to our hypothesis and approaches that we proposed in this proposal. The data produced in the study offered to advance the physical understanding of the behavior of nanostructured materials for the prevention of UV light at different exposure time and salt fogging. Founding of this proposal enabled the first UV resistive nanocomposite corrosion coating effort in Kansas to impact the local and national wind mill industry. Results of this program provided valuable opportunities for the multidisciplinary training of undergraduate and graduate students at Wichita State University (WSU), as well as a number of aircraft companies (e.g., Cessna, Hawker Beechcraft, Spirit, Boeing and Bombardier/Learjet) and other local and regional industries.

Janet M. Twomey, PhD

2010-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

437

Task 4.2: UV Degradation Prevention on Fiber-Reinforced Composite Blades  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

EXECUTIVE SUMARRY Use of wind energy has expanded very quickly because of the energy prices, environmental concerns and improved efficiency of wind generators. Rather than using metal and alloy based wind turbine blades, larger size fiber (glass and carbon) reinforced composite blades have been recently utilized to increase the efficiency of the wind energy in both high and low wind potential areas. In the current composite manufacturing, pre-preg and vacuum-assisted/heat sensitive resin transfer molding and resin infusion methods are employed. However, these lighter, stiffer and stronger composite blades experience ultraviolet (UV) light degradation where polymers (epoxies and hardeners) used for the blades manufacturing absorb solar UV lights, and cause photolytic, thermo-oxidative and photo-oxidative reactions resulting in breaking of carbon-hydrogen bonds, polymer degradation and internal and external stresses. One of the main reasons is the weak protective coatings/paints on the composite blades. This process accelerates the aging and fatigue cracks, and reduces the overall mechanical properties of the blades. Thus, the lack of technology on coatings for blade manufacturing is forcing many government agencies and private companies (local and national windmill companies) to find a better solution for the composite wind blades. Kansas has a great wind potential for the future energy demand, so efficient wind generators can be an option for continuous energy production. The research goal of the present project was to develop nanocomposite coatings using various inclusions against UV degradation and corrosion, and advance the fundamental understanding of degradation (i.e., physical, chemical and physiochemical property changes) on those coatings. In pursuit of the research goal, the research objective of the present program was to investigate the effects of UV light and duration on various nanocomposites made mainly of carbon nanotubes and graphene nanoflakes, contribute the valuable information to this emerging field of advanced materials and manufacturing and advance the Kansas economy through creation of engineering knowledge and products in the wind energy. The proposed work was involved in a multidisciplinary research program that incorporates nanocomposite fabrication, advanced coating, characterization, surface and colloidal chemistry, physicochemistry, corrosion science, and analysis with a simple and effective testing methodology. The findings were closely related to our hypothesis and approaches that we proposed in this proposal. The data produced in the study offered to advance the physical understanding of the behavior of nanostructured materials for the prevention of UV light at different exposure time and salt fogging. Founding of this proposal enabled the first UV resistive nanocomposite corrosion coating effort in Kansas to impact the local and national wind mill industry. Results of this program provided valuable opportunities for the multidisciplinary training of undergraduate and graduate students at Wichita State University (WSU), as well as a number of aircraft companies (e.g., Cessna, Hawker Beechcraft, Spirit, Boeing and Bombardier/Learjet) and other local and regional industries.

Janet M. Twomey, PhD

2010-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

438

Steam turbine plant  

SciTech Connect

A system for regulating the rate of closing of the turbine intake valve of a steam turbine plant is disclosed. A steam turbine is supplied from a steam generator through a turbine intake valve. A branch line conducts the steam to a bypass valve which is normally closed. In the event of conditions making it necessary to close the turbine intake valve rapidly, a regulator is provided to control the rate of closing of the turbine intake valve and the opening of the bypass valve so that the pressure conditions in the steam generator do not exceed the limits established by the manufacturer. Pressure measuring instruments are placed in the system to sense the pressure immediately upstream from the turbine intake valve and the bypass valve as well as the initial steam supply pressure. These pressure signals are transmitted to a computer which produces a control signal in accordance with predetermined conditions.

Skala, K.

1981-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

439

Wind Turbine Generator System Acoustic Noise Test Report for the Gaia Wind 11-kW Wind Turbine  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report details the acoustic noise test conducted on the Gaia-Wind 11-kW wind turbine at the National Wind Technology Center. The test turbine is a two- bladed, downwind wind turbine with a rated power of 11 kW. The test turbine was tested in accordance with the International Electrotechnical Commission standard, IEC 61400-11 Ed 2.1 2006-11 Wind Turbine Generator Systems -- Part 11 Acoustic Noise Measurement Techniques.

Huskey, A.

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

The helical turbine: A new idea for low-head hydro  

SciTech Connect

Substantial potential exists at small hydro sites where heads are too low for conventional hydraulic turbines. A spiral-bladed turbine may offer a new alternative for tapping that potential in a cost-efficient manner.

Gorlov, A.M. [Northeastern Univ., Boston, MA (United States)

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

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