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1

Property:Overseeing Organization | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Overseeing Organization Overseeing Organization Jump to: navigation, search Property Name Overseeing Organization Property Type Page Pages using the property "Overseeing Organization" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) 1 1.5-ft Wave Flume Facility + United States Army Corp of Engineers (ERDC) + 10-ft Wave Flume Facility + United States Army Corp of Engineers (ERDC) + 11-ft Wave Flume Facility + United States Army Corp of Engineers (ERDC) + 2 2-ft Flume Facility + United States Army Corp of Engineers (ERDC) + 3 3-ft Wave Flume Facility + United States Army Corp of Engineers (ERDC) + 5 5-ft Wave Flume Facility + United States Army Corp of Engineers (ERDC) + 6 6-ft Wave Flume Facility + United States Army Corp of Engineers (ERDC) + A Alden Large Flume + Alden Research Laboratory, Inc +

2

Property:Main Overseeing Organization | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Main Overseeing Organization Main Overseeing Organization Jump to: navigation, search Pages using the property "Main Overseeing Organization" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) M MHK Projects/40MW Lewis project + Aquamarine Power + MHK Projects/ADM 3 + Wavebob + MHK Projects/ADM 4 + Wavebob + MHK Projects/ADM 5 + Wavebob + MHK Projects/AW Energy EMEC + AW Energy + MHK Projects/AWS II + AWS Ocean Energy formerly Oceanergia + MHK Projects/Admirality Inlet Tidal Energy Project + Public Utility District No 1 of Snohomish County + MHK Projects/Agucadoura + Pelamis Wave Power formerly Ocean Power Delivery + MHK Projects/Alaska 1 + Hydro Green Energy + MHK Projects/Alaska 13 + Hydro Green Energy + MHK Projects/Alaska 17 + Hydro Green Energy + MHK Projects/Alaska 18 + Hydro Green Energy +

3

Carderock Large Cavitation Tunnel | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Large Cavitation Tunnel Large Cavitation Tunnel Jump to: navigation, search Basic Specifications Facility Name Carderock Large Cavitation Tunnel Overseeing Organization United States Naval Surface Warfare Center Hydrodynamic Testing Facility Type Tunnel Length(m) 13.1 Beam(m) 3.0 Depth(m) 3.0 Water Type Freshwater Cost(per day) Contact POC Special Physical Features The Large Cavitation Channel was designed as a variable pressure, recirculating, cavitation tunnel with a very low acoustic background level; test section pressure: 3.5-414 kPa (0.03 to 4 atmospheres, 0.5 to 60 psia); air content: 10% to 100% saturation Towing Capabilities Towing Capabilities None Wavemaking Capabilities Wavemaking Capabilities None Channel/Tunnel/Flume Velocity(m/s) 18 Recirculating Yes Wind Capabilities

4

Penn Large Water Tunnel | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Penn Large Water Tunnel Penn Large Water Tunnel Jump to: navigation, search Basic Specifications Facility Name Penn Large Water Tunnel Overseeing Organization Pennsylvania State University Hydrodynamics Hydrodynamic Testing Facility Type Tunnel Length(m) 4.3 Beam(m) 1.2 Depth(m) 1.2 Water Type Freshwater Cost(per day) Contact POC Special Physical Features Closed loop; Turbulence level = 0.1%; Pressure range = 3-60psi; Controlled cavitation = # >0.1; Control Air content = >1ppm per mole Towing Capabilities Towing Capabilities None Wavemaking Capabilities Wavemaking Capabilities None Channel/Tunnel/Flume Channel/Tunnel/Flume Yes Velocity(m/s) 16.8 Recirculating Yes Pressure Range(Psi) 3 - 60 Wind Capabilities Wind Capabilities None Control and Data Acquisition Description National Instruments steady 24 bit

5

Penn Small Water Tunnel | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Water Tunnel Water Tunnel Jump to: navigation, search Basic Specifications Facility Name Penn Small Water Tunnel Overseeing Organization Pennsylvania State University Hydrodynamics Hydrodynamic Testing Facility Type Tunnel Length(m) 0.8 Beam(m) 0.3 Depth(m) 0.3 Water Type Freshwater Cost(per day) Contact POC Special Physical Features Closed loop; Turbulence level = 0.1%; Pressure range = 3-60psi; Controlled cavitation = # >0.1; Control Air content = >1ppm per mole Towing Capabilities Towing Capabilities None Wavemaking Capabilities Wavemaking Capabilities None Channel/Tunnel/Flume Channel/Tunnel/Flume Yes Velocity(m/s) 21 Recirculating Yes Pressure Range(Psi) 3 - 60 Wind Capabilities Wind Capabilities None Control and Data Acquisition Description National Instruments dynamic analyzer, 24-bit

6

Space Institute Tunnel | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Tunnel Tunnel Jump to: navigation, search Basic Specifications Facility Name Space Institute Tunnel Overseeing Organization University of Tennessee Hydrodynamic Testing Facility Type Tunnel Length(m) 1.5 Beam(m) 0.4 Depth(m) 0.5 Cost(per day) ~$1000 (Contact POC for estimate) Towing Capabilities Towing Capabilities None Wavemaking Capabilities Wavemaking Capabilities None Channel/Tunnel/Flume Channel/Tunnel/Flume Yes Velocity(m/s) 0.9 Recirculating Yes Wind Capabilities Wind Capabilities None Control and Data Acquisition Description Computer with National Instruments SCXI DAS Chassis Number of channels 32 Bandwidth(kHz) Varies with number of channels and specific module/board Cameras Yes Available Sensors Flow, Strain, Turbulence Data Generation Capability

7

Carderock 2-ft Variable Pressure Cavitation Water Tunnel | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

2-ft Variable Pressure Cavitation Water Tunnel 2-ft Variable Pressure Cavitation Water Tunnel Jump to: navigation, search Basic Specifications Facility Name Carderock 2-ft Variable Pressure Cavitation Water Tunnel Overseeing Organization United States Naval Surface Warfare Center Hydrodynamic Testing Facility Type Tunnel Beam(m) 0.6 Depth(m) 0.6 Water Type Freshwater Cost(per day) Contact POC Special Physical Features The 2-Foot Variable Pressure Cavitation Water Tunnel is a vertical plane, closed recirculating, variable-speed, variable-pressure, open jet test section, closed jet test section, and semi-rectangular test section. Towing Capabilities Towing Capabilities None Wavemaking Capabilities Wavemaking Capabilities None Channel/Tunnel/Flume Channel/Tunnel/Flume Yes Velocity(m/s) 17 Recirculating Yes

8

Carderock 3-ft Variable Pressure Cavitation Water Tunnel | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Variable Pressure Cavitation Water Tunnel Variable Pressure Cavitation Water Tunnel Jump to: navigation, search Basic Specifications Facility Name Carderock 3-ft Variable Pressure Cavitation Water Tunnel Overseeing Organization United States Naval Surface Warfare Center Hydrodynamic Testing Facility Type Tunnel Beam(m) 0.7 Depth(m) 0.7 Water Type Freshwater Cost(per day) Contact POC Special Physical Features The 3-ft Variable Pressure Cavitation Water Tunnel is a vertical plane, closed recirculating with resorber, variable-speed, variable-pressure, two interchangeable circular test sections. Towing Capabilities Towing Capabilities None Wavemaking Capabilities Wavemaking Capabilities None Channel/Tunnel/Flume Channel/Tunnel/Flume Yes Velocity(m/s) 25.8 Recirculating Yes Wind Capabilities Wind Capabilities None

9

Carderock Subsonic Wind Tunnel | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Subsonic Wind Tunnel Subsonic Wind Tunnel Jump to: navigation, search Basic Specifications Facility Name Carderock Subsonic Wind Tunnel Overseeing Organization United States Naval Surface Warfare Center Hydrodynamic Testing Facility Type Tunnel Length(m) 4.3 Beam(m) 3.0 Depth(m) 2.4 Water Type Freshwater Cost(per day) Contact POC Special Physical Features The Subsonic Wind Tunnel is a continuous flow, closed-circuit facility with a closed jet test section. Test models may be supported by strut mounts using the external balance or by sting mounts using any of a wide selection of internal strain gauge balances. Adjustable surface planes are available for simulation of ground or water surfaces. Full-width floor and ceiling turntables provide additional flexibility in model mounting and manipulation.

10

MHL Student Tunnel | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Student Tunnel Student Tunnel Jump to: navigation, search Basic Specifications Facility Name MHL Student Tunnel Overseeing Organization University of Michigan Hydrodynamics Hydrodynamic Testing Facility Type Channel Length(m) 1.4 Beam(m) 0.4 Depth(m) 0.3 Cost(per day) $2000(+ Labor/Materials) Towing Capabilities Towing Capabilities None Wavemaking Capabilities Wavemaking Capabilities None Channel/Tunnel/Flume Channel/Tunnel/Flume Yes Velocity(m/s) 4.6 Recirculating No Wind Capabilities Wind Capabilities None Control and Data Acquisition Description Custom Data Acquisition System using National Instruments hardware; system compatible with Planing Hull and Floating Beam Dynamometers Number of channels 16 Bandwidth(kHz) 20 Cameras Yes Description of Camera Types Wide variety of analog & digital surface cameras; high speed above and underwater cameras

11

Recrossing and Heavy-atom Tunneling in Common Organic Reactions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Non-statistical recrossing in ketene cycloadditions with alkenes, heavy-atom tunneling and the mechanism of the decarboxylation of Mandelylthiamin is investigated in this dissertation. A combination of experimental kinetic isotope effects and theoretical models and kinetic isotope effects is utilized for this endeavor. This dissertation also describes how the use of quasiclassical dynamic trajectories, microcanonical RRKM calculations, and canonical variational transition state theory in combination with small-curvature tunneling approximations is utilized to help advance our research methodology to better understand mechanism. In the cycloaddition of dichloroketene with cis-2-butene, significant amounts of recrossing is observed using quasiclassical dynamic trajectories. An unusual inverse 13C intramolecular KIE lead us to investigate the role that heavy atoms play in non-statistical recrossing. More importantly, this discovery has uncovered a new phenomena of entropic intermediates that not only applies to ketene cycloadditions, but can also be applicable to other "concerted" reactions such as Diels-Alder reactions. The ring-opening of cyclopropylcarbinyl radical has revealed that heavy-atom tunneling plays a major role. The intramolecular 13C kinetic isotope effects for the ring-opening of cyclopropylcarbinyl radical were unprecedentedly large and in combination with theoretical predictions and multidimensional tunneling corrections, the role of tunneling in this reaction can be better understood. The mechanism decarboxylation of mandelylthiamin has been extensively studied in the literature. However, until the use of theoretically predicted KIEs and theoretical binding motifs the rate-limiting step of this reaction has been hotly debated. In this dissertation, a discussion of how the theoretical KIEs indicate the initial C-C bond as the rate-limiting step and chelating binding motifs of pyridinium and mandelylthiamin to explain the observed catalysis is given.

James, Ollie

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Intermediate-band photosensitive device with quantum dots having tunneling barrier embedded in organic matrix  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A plurality of quantum dots each have a shell. The quantum dots are embedded in an organic matrix. At least the quantum dots and the organic matrix are photoconductive semiconductors. The shell of each quantum dot is arranged as a tunneling barrier to require a charge carrier (an electron or a hole) at a base of the tunneling barrier in the organic matrix to perform quantum mechanical tunneling to reach the respective quantum dot. A first quantum state in each quantum dot is between a lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (LUMO) and a highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO) of the organic matrix. Wave functions of the first quantum state of the plurality of quantum dots may overlap to form an intermediate band.

Forrest, Stephen R. (Ann Arbor, MI)

2008-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

13

May 28, 2010: Chu helps oversee BP's "top kill" efforts | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

May 28, 2010: Chu helps oversee BP's "top kill" efforts May 28, 2010: Chu helps oversee BP's "top kill" efforts May 28, 2010: Chu helps oversee BP's "top kill" efforts May 28, 2010: Chu helps oversee BP's "top kill" efforts May 28, 2010 Secretary Chu concludes several days in Houston monitoring the "top kill" attempt to stop the oil well leak in the Gulf of Mexico, analyzing the data as it comes in and helping to develop strategies to give it the best chances of success. In the days leading up to the top kill attempt, the Secretary and his team of scientists provided expert advice and technical support to test the assumptions behind BP's work and to offer analytical rigor. When diagnostic and pressure tests were conducted to inform BP's decision on whether to attempt the top kill, the Secretary and

14

Low temperature tunneling magnetoresistance on (La,Sr)MnO{sub 3}/Co junctions with organic spacer layers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper concerns with giant magnetoresistance (MR) effects in organic spin valves, which are realized as layered (La,Sr)MnO{sub 3} (LSMO)-based junctions with tris-(8, hydroxyquinoline) aluminum (Alq{sub 3})-spacer and ferromagnetic top layers. The experimental work was focused on the understanding of the transport behavior in this type of magnetic switching elements. The device preparation was carried out in an ultrahigh vacuum chamber equipped with a mask changer by evaporation and sputtering on SrTiO{sub 3} substrates with LSMO stripes deposited by pulsed laser technique. The field and temperature dependences of the MR of the prepared elements are studied. Spin-valve effects at 4.2 K have been observed in a broad resistance interval from 50 {omega} to M{omega} range, however, without systematic dependence on spacer layer thickness and device area. In some samples, the MR changes sign as a function of the bias voltage. The observed similarity in the bias voltages dependences of the MR in comparison with conventional magnetic tunnel junctions with oxide barriers suggests a description of the found effects within the classical tunneling concept. This assumption is also confirmed by a similar switching behavior observed on ferromagnetically contacted carbon nanotube devices. The proposed model implies the realization of the transport via local Co chains embedded in the Alq{sub 3} layer and spin dependent tunneling over barriers at the interface Co grains/Alq{sub 3}/LSMO. The existence of conducting Co chains within the organics is supported by transmission electron microscopic/electron energy loss spectroscopic studies on cross-sectional samples from analogous layer stacks.

Vinzelberg, H.; Schumann, J.; Elefant, D.; Gangineni, R. B.; Thomas, J.; Buechner, B. [Leibniz Institute for Solid State and Materials Research Dresden, IFW Dresden, P.O. Box 270116, D-01171 Dresden (Germany)

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Ivar Giaever, Tunneling, and Superconductors  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Ivar Giaever, Tunneling, and Superconductors Ivar Giaever, Tunneling, and Superconductors Resources with Additional Information · Patents Ivar Giaever Courtesy of Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute 'Dr. Giaever received his engineering degree at the Norwegian Institute of Technology. After college, he emigrated to Canada, where he worked as a mechanical engineer with General Electric, and later transferred to GE's Development Center in Schenectady, N.Y. There, he shifted his interest to physics, and did graduate work at Rensselaer, receiving a Ph.D. in 1964. From 1958 to 1970, Dr. Giaever worked in the fields of thin films, tunneling, and superconductivity,'1 research that resulted in his receiving the Nobel Prize in Physics in 1973. '[I]n 1971, Dr. Giaever began studying the behavior of organic molecules at solid surfaces, and the interaction of cells with surfaces. In 1988, he became an Institute Professor of Science at Rensselaer.' 1

16

Calibrations of Johnson-Williams Liquid Water Content Meters in a High-Speed Icing Tunnel  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Wind tunnel tests have provided calibrations and intercomparisons of 14 Johnson-Williams (J–W) cloud liquid water content (LWC) measuring devices with 23 sensor heads from 10 research organizations. The absolute tunnel LWC was deduced using a ...

J. Walter Strapp; Robert S. Schemenauer

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Tunnel closure calculations  

SciTech Connect

When a deeply penetrating munition explodes above the roof of a tunnel, the amount of rubble that falls inside the tunnel is primarily a function of three parameters: first the cube-root scaled distance from the center of the explosive to the roof of the tunnel. Second the material properties of the rock around the tunnel, and in particular the shear strength of that rock, its RQD (Rock Quality Designator), and the extent and orientation of joints. And third the ratio of the tunnel diameter to the standoff distance (distance between the center of explosive and the tunnel roof). The authors have used CALE, a well-established 2-D hydrodynamic computer code, to calculate the amount of rubble that falls inside a tunnel as a function of standoff distance for two different tunnel diameters. In particular they calculated three of the tunnel collapse experiments conducted in an iron ore mine near Kirkeness, Norway in the summer of 1994. The failure model that they used in their calculations combines an equivalent plastic strain criterion with a maximum tensile strength criterion and can be calibrated for different rocks using cratering data as well as laboratory experiments. These calculations are intended to test and improve the understanding of both the Norway Experiments and the ACE (Array of conventional Explosive) phenomenology.

Moran, B.; Attia, A.

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Superconductivity and electron tunneling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Experiments on the tunneling of electrons through a thin dielectric layer separating two superconducting metals are reported. Data are presented for the pairs AI-Pb, Sn-Pb, and In-Sn. Particular attention is paid to the form of the tunneling current ...

S. Shapiro; P. H. Smith; J. Nicol; J. L. Miles; P. F. Strong

1962-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

MHK Technologies/Tunneled Wave Energy Converter TWEC | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Tunneled Wave Energy Converter TWEC Tunneled Wave Energy Converter TWEC < MHK Technologies Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Tunneled Wave Energy Converter TWEC.jpg Technology Profile Primary Organization SeWave Ltd Project(s) where this technology is utilized *MHK Projects/TWEC Project Technology Resource Click here Wave Technology Type Click here Oscillating Water Column Technology Readiness Level Click here TRL 1-3: Discovery / Concept Definition / Early Stage Development & Design & Engineering Technology Description The Tunneled Wave Energy Converter TWEC utilizes the OWC principle through its use of a proposed bored out tunnel within a cliff side of the Faroe Islands Technology Dimensions Device Testing Date Submitted 10/8/2010 << Return to the MHK database homepage

20

Risk analysis for tunneling projects  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Tunnel construction is increasing world wide. Although the majority of tunnel construction projects have been completed safely, there have been several incidents that have resulted in delays, cost overruns, and sometimes ...

Sousa. Rita L

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tunnel overseeing organization" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Quantum tunneling time  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A simple model of a quantum clock is applied to the old and controversial problem of how long a particle takes to tunnel through a quantum barrier. The model I employ has the advantage of yielding sensible results for energy eigenstates, and does not require the use of time-dependant wave packets. Although the treatment does not forbid superluminal tunneling velocities, there is no implication of faster-than-light signaling because only the transit duration is measurable, not the absolute time of transit. A comparison is given with the weak-measurement post-selection calculations of Steinberg.

P. C. W. Davies

2004-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Organization  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Organization Print Organization Print 2012-12 org chart A complete ALS organization chart (June 2013) is available in PDF. Appointed and elected members of advisory panels provide guidance to Berkeley Lab and ALS management in developing the ALS scientific and user programs. ALS Staff Photo staff photo thumb Click on the image to see a recent photo of ALS staff in front of the dome. The photo was taken on May 14, 2013. ALS Management and Advisory Team Steve Kevan, Deputy Division Director, Science Michael J. Banda, Deputy Division Director, Operations Robert W. Schoenlein, Senior Staff Scientist, Next Generation Light Source Initiative Janos Kirz, Scientific Advisor Paul Adams, Division Deputy for Biosciences ALS Scientific, Technical, and User Support Groups Accelerator Physics

23

Antiparticle creation in tunneling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study particle interaction with a Dirac step potential. In the standard Klein energy zone, the hypothesis of Klein pair production predicts the existence of free/oscillatory antiparticles. In this paper, we discuss the tunneling energy zone characterized by evanescent wave functions in the classically forbidden region. We ask the question of the nature, particle or antiparticle, of the densities within the classically forbidden region. The answer to this question is relevant to the correct form of the reflection coefficient.

Stefano De Leo; Pietro Rotelli

2013-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

24

Nanoscale heat conduction across tunnel junctions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?2005? Nanoscale heat conduction across tunnel junctions Y.May 2005? Nanoscale heat conduction across tunnel junctionsprevailing theory of heat conduction in highly disordered

Ju, Y. Sungtaek; Hung, M T; Carey, M J; Cyrille, M C; Childress, J R

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Flatback airfoil wind tunnel experiment.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A computational fluid dynamics study of thick wind turbine section shapes in the test section of the UC Davis wind tunnel at a chord Reynolds number of one million is presented. The goals of this study are to validate standard wind tunnel wall corrections for high solid blockage conditions and to reaffirm the favorable effect of a blunt trailing edge or flatback on the performance characteristics of a representative thick airfoil shape prior to building the wind tunnel models and conducting the experiment. The numerical simulations prove the standard wind tunnel corrections to be largely valid for the proposed test of 40% maximum thickness to chord ratio airfoils at a solid blockage ratio of 10%. Comparison of the computed lift characteristics of a sharp trailing edge baseline airfoil and derived flatback airfoils reaffirms the earlier observed trend of reduced sensitivity to surface contamination with increasing trailing edge thickness.

Mayda, Edward A. (University of California, Davis, CA); van Dam, C.P. (University of California, Davis, CA); Chao, David D. (University of California, Davis, CA); Berg, Dale E.

2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Resonant Tunneling Device Logic Circuits  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This report is a summary of the activities in the field of resonant tunneling device circuit design. The presented work has been performed by the Department of Microelectronics of the University of Dortmund (UNIDO) and the Solid-State Electronics Department of the Gerhard-Mercator University of Duisburg (GMUD) during the first year of the Microelectronics Advanced Research Initiative projects ANSWERS (Autonomous Nanoelectronic Systems with Extended Replication and Signalling) and LOCOM (Logic Circuits with Reduced Complexity based on Devices with Higher Functionality). As part of the ANSWERS work-package the principal task of UNIDO is to investigate novel logic circuit architectures for resonant tunneling devices, to perform circuit simulations, and to specify the electrical device parameters. The basic device configuration is a monolithically integrated resonant tunneling diode heterostructure field-effect transistor (RTD-HFET). This device and the demonstrator circuits are fabricated by the LOCOM partner GMUD.

Christian Pacha; Peter Glösekötter; Karl Goser; Werner Prost; Uwe Auer; Franz-J. Tegude

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Resonance tunneling spectroscopy of heteropoly compounds  

SciTech Connect

The electron tunneling spectra of phosphomolybdic and phosphomolybdovanadic acids have been measured using a scanning tunneling microscope. A new mechanism of negative differential resistance (NDR) formation in tunneling nanocontacts is established, which is general for all systems featuring the Wannier-Stark localization effect. A two-center inelastic resonance tunneling model is constructed, which allows the values of both electron and vibrational energy parameters to be determined from the measured spectra.

Dalidchik, F. I., E-mail: domfdal@mail.ru; Budanov, B. A.; Kolchenko, N. N.; Balashov, E. M.; Kovalevskii, S. A. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Semenov Institute of Chemical Physics (Russian Federation)

2012-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

28

Tunable Compression of Wind Tunnel Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Tunable Compression of Wind Tunnel Data. Summary: Measurements of pressures exerted by wind on buildings, as are ...

2010-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

29

Simulating scanning tunneling microscope measurements  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

One of the largest problems in scanning tunneling microscopy design is noise control. It is the burden of the designer to determine if money should be used to build a floating room for vibration isolation or for top-of-the-line ...

Venkatachalam, Vivek

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Macroscopic quantum tunneling with decoherence  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The tunneling probability for a system modelling macroscopic quantum tunneling is computed. We consider an open quantum system with one degree of freedom consisting of a particle trapped in a cubic potential interacting with an environment characterized by a dissipative and a diffusion parameter. A representation based on the energy eigenfunctions of the isolated system, i. e. the system uncoupled to the environment, is used to write the dynamical master equation for the reduced Wigner function of the open quantum system. This equation becomes very simple in that representation. The use of the WKB approximation for the eigenfunctions suggests an approximation which allows an analytic computation of the tunneling rate, in this real time formalism, when the system is initially trapped in the false ground state. We find that the decoherence produced by the environment suppresses tunneling in agreement with results in other macroscopic quantum systems with different potentials. We confront our analytical predictions with an experiment where the escape rate from the zero voltage state was measured for a current-biased Josephson junction shunted with a resistor.

Esteban Calzetta; Enric Verdaguer

2004-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

31

Photon Aided and Inhibited Tunneling of Photons  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In the light of the interest in the transport of single photons in arrays of waveguides, fiber couplers, photonic crystals, etc., we consider the quantum mechanical process of the tunneling of photons through evanescently or otherwise coupled structures. We specifically examine the issue of tunneling between two structures when one structure already contains few photons. We demonstrate the possibility of both photon aided and inhibited tunneling of photons. The Bosonic nature of photons enhances the tunneling probability. We also show how the multiphoton tunneling probability can be either enhanced or inhibited due to the presence of photons. We find similar results for the higher order tunneling. Finally, we show that the presence of a squeezed field changes the nature of tunneling considerably.

liu, xuele

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Chaos regularization of quantum tunneling rates  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Quantum tunneling rates through a barrier separating two-dimensional, symmetric, double-well potentials are shown to depend on the classical dynamics of the billiard trajectories in each well and, hence, on the shape of the wells. For shapes that lead to regular (integrable) classical dynamics the tunneling rates fluctuate greatly with eigenenergies of the states sometimes by over two orders of magnitude. Contrarily, shapes that lead to completely chaotic trajectories lead to tunneling rates whose fluctuations are greatly reduced, a phenomenon we call regularization of tunneling rates. We show that a random-plane-wave theory of tunneling accounts for the mean tunneling rates and the small fluctuation variances for the chaotic systems.

Pecora, Louis M.; Wu Dongho [Materials Physics and Sensors, US Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375 (United States); Lee, Hoshik [Department of Physics, College of William and Mary, Williamsburg, Virginia 23187 (United States); Antonsen, Thomas; Lee, Ming-Jer; Ott, Edward [Physics and Electrical Engineering Departments, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland 20742 (United States)

2011-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

33

Wind tunnel model testing of offshore platforms.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? The purpose of this thesis is to highlight some of the areas of interest when it comes to wind tunnel experimenting of offshore platforms… (more)

Abrahamsen, Ida Sinnes

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

About EIA - Organization - U.S. Energy Information Administration ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

... nuclear reactors, ... Environment. Greenhouse gas data, ... He provides leadership and direction to oversee the management and operation of EIA's employee ...

35

Hanford facility dangerous waste permit application, PUREX storage tunnels  

SciTech Connect

The Hanford Facility Dangerous Waste Permit Application is considered to be a single application organized into a General Information Portion (document number DOE/RL-91-28) and a Unit-Specific Portion. The scope of the Unit-Specific Portion is limited to Part B permit application documentation submitted for individual, operating treatment, storage, and/or disposal units, such as the PUREX Storage Tunnels (this document, DOE/RL-90-24). Both the General Information and Unit-Specific portions of the Hanford Facility Dangerous Waste Permit Application address the content of the Part B permit application guidance prepared by the Washington State Department of Ecology (Ecology 1996) and the US Environmental Protection Agency (40 Code of Federal Regulations 270), with additional information needs defined by the Hazardous and Solid Waste Amendments and revisions of Washington Administrative Code 173-303. For ease of reference, the Washington State Department of Ecology alpha-numeric section identifiers from the permit application guidance documentation (Ecology 1996) follow, in brackets, the chapter headings and subheadings. A checklist indicating where information is contained in the PUREX Storage Tunnels permit application documentation, in relation to the Washington State Department of Ecology guidance, is located in the Contents Section. Documentation contained in the General Information Portion is broader in nature and could be used by multiple treatment, storage, and/or disposal units (e.g., the glossary provided in the General Information Portion). Wherever appropriate, the PUREX Storage Tunnels permit application documentation makes cross-reference to the General Information Portion, rather than duplicating text. Information provided in this PUREX Storage Tunnels permit application documentation is current as of April 1997.

Price, S.M.

1997-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

36

Topological tunneling with Dynamical overlap fermions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Tunneling between different topological sectors with dynamical chiral fermions is difficult because of a poor mass scaling of the pseudo-fermion estimate of the determinant. For small fermion masses it is virtually impossible using standard methods. However, by projecting out the small Wilson eigenvectors from the overlap operator, and treating the correction determinant exactly, we can significantly increase the rate of topological sector tunneling and reduce substantially the auto-correlation time. We present and compare a number of different approaches, and advocate a method which allows topological tunneling even at low mass with little addition to the computational cost.

Nigel Cundy; Stefan Krieg; Thomas Lippert; Andreas Schaefer

2008-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

37

Methods for the fabrication of thermally stable magnetic tunnel junctions  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Magnetic tunnel junctions and method for making the magnetic tunnel junctions are provided. The magnetic tunnel junctions are characterized by a tunnel barrier oxide layer sandwiched between two ferromagnetic layers. The methods used to fabricate the magnetic tunnel junctions are capable of completely and selectively oxidizing a tunnel junction precursor material using an oxidizing gas containing a mixture of gases to provide a tunnel junction oxide without oxidizing the adjacent ferromagnetic materials. In some embodiments the gas mixture is a mixture of CO and CO.sub.2 or a mixture of H.sub.2 and H.sub.2O.

Chang, Y. Austin (Middleton, WI); Yang, Jianhua J. (Madison, WI); Ladwig, Peter F. (Hutchinson, MN)

2009-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

38

Soliton in a Well. Dynamics and Tunneling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We derive the leading order radiation through tunneling of an oscillating soliton in a well. We use the hydrodynamic formulation with a rigorous control of the errors for finite times.

V. Fleurov; A. Soffer

2013-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

39

Dissociative recombination: Crossing and tunneling modes  

SciTech Connect

This report discusses the process of dissociative reconsiderations. The particular topics covered are: Upper Limit to Rate Coefficient; Tunneling Dissociative Recombinations; and Signature of Polyatomic Ion Dissociative Recombination. 210 refs., 151 figs., 7 tabs.

Bates, D.R. [Queen`s Univ. of Belfast (United Kingdom)

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

40

How big around is the tunnel at...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

actually two linear accelerators linked by arcs at the ends. There is also a web-based tour of the accelerator that you might find entertaining. What we do in the tunnel could...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tunnel overseeing organization" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Semiconductor tunnel junction with enhancement layer  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The incorporation of a pseudomorphic GaAsSb layer in a runnel diode structure affords a new degree of freedom in designing runnel junctions for p-n junction device interconnects. Previously only doping levels could be varied to control the tunneling properties. This invention uses the valence band alignment band of the GaAsSb with respect to the surrounding materials to greatly relax the doping requirements for tunneling.

Klem, John F. (Sandia Park, NM); Zolper, John C. (Albuquerque, NM)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Hoosac tunnel geothermal heat source. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Hoosac Rail Tunnel has been analyzed as a central element in a district heating system for the City of North Adams. The tunnel has been viewed as a collector of the earth's geothermal heat and a seasonal heat storage facility with heat piped to the tunnel in summer from existing facilities at a distance. Heated fluid would be transported in winter from the tunnel to users who would boost the temperature with individual heat pumps. It was concluded the tunnel is a poor source of geothermal heat. The maximum extractable energy is only 2200 million BTU (20000 gallons of oil) at 58/sup 0/F. The tunnel is a poor heat storage facility. The rock conductivity is so high that 75% of the heat injected would escape into the mountain before it could be recaptured for use. A low temperature system, with individual heat pumps for temperature boost could be economically attractive if a low cost fuel (byproduct, solid waste, cogeneration) or a cost effective seasonal heat storage were available.

Not Available

1982-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

43

Method of fabricating a solar cell with a tunnel dielectric layer  

SciTech Connect

Methods of fabricating solar cells with tunnel dielectric layers are described. Solar cells with tunnel dielectric layers are also described.

Dennis, Tim; Harrington, Scott; Manning, Jane; Smith, David; Waldhauer, Ann

2012-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

44

Fabrication of magnetic tunnel junctions with epitaxial and textured ferromagnetic layers  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention relates to magnetic tunnel junctions and methods for making the magnetic tunnel junctions. The magnetic tunnel junctions include a tunnel barrier oxide layer sandwiched between two ferromagnetic layers both of which are epitaxial or textured with respect to the underlying substrate upon which the magnetic tunnel junctions are grown. The magnetic tunnel junctions provide improved magnetic properties, sharper interfaces and few defects.

Chang, Y. Austin (Middleton, WI); Yang, Jianhua Joshua (Madison, WI)

2008-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

45

A Note on Real Tunneling Geometries  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In the Hartle-Hawking ``no boundary'' approach to quantum cosmology, a real tunneling geometry is a configuration that represents a transition from a compact Riemannian spacetime to a Lorentzian universe. I complete an earlier proof that in three spacetime dimensions, such a transition is ``probable,'' in the sense that the required Riemannian geometry yields a genuine maximum of the semiclassical wave function.

S. Carlip

2005-08-17T23:59:59.000Z

46

Nonequilibrium transport in superconducting tunneling structures.  

SciTech Connect

We derive the current-voltage (I-V) characteristics of far from equilibrium superconducting tunneling arrays and find that the energy relaxation ensuring the charge transfer occurs in two stages: (i) the energy exchange between charge carriers and the intermediate bosonic agent, environment, and (ii) relaxing the energy further to the (phonon) thermostat, the bath, provided the rate of the environmental modes-phonon interactions is slower than their energy exchange rate with the tunneling junction. For a single junction we find I {proportional_to} (V/R)ln({Lambda}/V), where R is the bare tunnel resistance of the junction and {Lambda} is the high energy cut-off of the electron-environment interaction. In large tunneling arrays comprised of macroscopic number of junctions, low-temperature transport is governed by the cotunneling processes losing energy to the electron-hole environment. Below some critical temperature, T*, the Coulomb interactions open a finite gap in the environment excitations spectrum blocking simultaneously Cooper pair and normal excitations currents through the array; this is the microscopic mechanism of the insulator-to-superinsulator transition.

Chtchelkatchev, N. M.; Vinokur, V. M.; Baturina, T. I. (Materials Science Division); (Moscow Inst. Physics and Technology); (Inst. Semiconductor Physics)

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Tunnel magnetoresistance in epitaxially grown magnetic tunnel junctions using Heusler alloy electrode and MgO barrier  

SciTech Connect

Epitaxially grown magnetic tunnel junctions (MTJs) with a stacking structure of Co{sub 2}MnSi/MgO/CoFe were fabricated. Their tunnel magnetoresistance (TMR) effects were investigated. The TMR ratio and tunnelling conductance characteristics of MTJs were considerably different between those with an MgO barrier prepared using sputtering (SP-MTJ) and those prepared using EB evaporation (EB-MTJ). The EB-MTJ exhibited a very large TMR ratio of 217% at room temperature and 753% at 2 K. The bias voltage dependence of the tunnelling conductance in the parallel magnetic configuration for the EB-MTJ suggests that the observed large TMR ratio at RT results from the coherent tunnelling process through the crystalline MgO barrier. The tunnelling conductance in the anti-parallel magnetic configuration suggests that the large temperature dependence of the TMR ratio results from the inelastic spin-flip tunnelling process.

Tsunegi, S.; Sakuraba, Y.; Oogane, M.; Telling, N. D.; Shelford, L. R.; Arenholz, E.; van der Laan, G.; Hicken, R. J.; Takanashi, K.; Ando, Y.

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Charged fermions tunneling from regular black holes  

SciTech Connect

We study Hawking radiation of charged fermions as a tunneling process from charged regular black holes, i.e., the Bardeen and ABGB black holes. For this purpose, we apply the semiclassical WKB approximation to the general covariant Dirac equation for charged particles and evaluate the tunneling probabilities. We recover the Hawking temperature corresponding to these charged regular black holes. Further, we consider the back-reaction effects of the emitted spin particles from black holes and calculate their corresponding quantum corrections to the radiation spectrum. We find that this radiation spectrum is not purely thermal due to the energy and charge conservation but has some corrections. In the absence of charge, e = 0, our results are consistent with those already present in the literature.

Sharif, M., E-mail: msharif.math@pu.edu.pk; Javed, W., E-mail: wajihajaved84@yahoo.com [University of the Punjab, Department of Mathematics (Pakistan)

2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

49

PUREX storage tunnels waste analysis plan  

SciTech Connect

Washington Administrative Code 173-303-300 requires that a facility develop and follow a written waste analysis plan which describes the procedures that will be followed to ensure that its dangerous waste is managed properly. This document covers the activities at the PUREX Storage Tunnels used to characterize and designate waste that is generated within the PUREX Plant, as well as waste received from other on-site sources.

Haas, C.R., Westinghouse Hanford

1996-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

50

Dynamical overlap fermions with increased topological tunnelling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present two improvements to our previous dynamical overlap HMC algorithm. We introduce a new method of differentiating the eigenvectors of the Kernel operator, which removes an instability in the fermionic force. Secondly, by simulating part of the fermion determinant exactly, without pseudo-fermions, we are able to increase the rate of topological tunnelling by a factor of more than ten, reducing the auto-correlation.

N. Cundy; S. Krieg; T. Lippert; A Schaefer

2007-10-09T23:59:59.000Z

51

The Quantum Hydrodynamic Description of Tunneling  

SciTech Connect

The quantum hydrodynamic approach is based on the de Broglie-Bohm formulation of quantum mechanics. The resulting fluid-like equations of motion describe the flow of probability and an accurate solution to these equations is equivalent to solving the time-dependent Schroedinger equation. Furthermore, the hydrodynamic approach provides new insight into the mechanisms as well as an alternative computational approach for treating tunneling phenomena. New concepts include well-defined 'quantum trajectories', 'quantum potential', and 'quantum force' all of which have classical analogues. The quantum potential and its associated force give rise to all quantum mechanical effects such as zero point energy, tunneling, and interference. A new numerical approach called the Iterative Finite Difference Method (IFDM) will be discussed. The IFDM is used to solve the set of non-linear coupled hydrodynamic equations. It is 2nd-order accurate in both space and time and exhibits exponential convergence with respect to the iteration count. The stability and computational efficiency of the IFDM is significantly improved by using a 'smart' Eulerian grid which has the same computational advantages as a Lagrangian or Arbitrary Lagrangian Eulerian (ALE) grid. The IFDM is also capable of treating anharmonic potentials. Example calculations using the IFDM will be presented which include: a one-dimensional Gaussian wave packet tunneling through an Eckart barrier, a one-dimensional bound-state Morse oscillator, and a two-dimensional (2D) model collinear reaction using an anharmonic potential energy surface. Approximate treatments of the quantum hydrodynamic equations will also be discussed which could allow scaling of the calculations to hundreds of degrees of freedom which is important for treating tunneling phenomena in condensed phase systems.

Kendrick, Brian K. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

52

Resonant tunneling diodes: Models and properties  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The resonant tunneling diode (RTD) has been widely studied because of its importance in the field of nanoelectronic science and technology and its potential applications in very high speed/functionality devices and circuits. Even though much progress has been made in this regard, additional work is needed to realize the full potential of RTD’s. As research on RTD’s continues, we will try in this tutorial review to provide the reader with an overall and succinct picture of where we stand in this exciting field of research and to address the following questions: What makes RTD’s so attractive? To what extent can RTD’s be modeled for design purposes? What are the required and achievable device properties in terms of digital logic applications? To address these issues, we review the device operational principles, various modeling approaches, and major device properties. Comparisons among the various RTD physical models and major features of RTD’s, resonant interband tunneling diodes, and Esaki tunnel diodes are presented. The tutorial and analysis provided in this paper may help the reader in becoming familiar with current research efforts, as well as to examine the important aspects in further RTD developments and their circuit applications.

Jian Ping Sun; George I. Haddad; Pinaki Mazumder; Joel N. Schulman

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Property:Channel/Tunnel/Flume | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Channel/Tunnel/Flume Channel/Tunnel/Flume Jump to: navigation, search Property Name Channel/Tunnel/Flume Property Type String Pages using the property "Channel/Tunnel/Flume" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) 1 1.5-ft Wave Flume Facility + Yes + 10-ft Wave Flume Facility + Yes + 11-ft Wave Flume Facility + None + 2 2-ft Flume Facility + Yes + 3 3-ft Wave Flume Facility + None + 5 5-ft Wave Flume Facility + Yes + 6 6-ft Wave Flume Facility + Yes + A Alden Large Flume + Yes + Alden Small Flume + Yes + Alden Tow Tank + None + Alden Wave Basin + None + B Breakwater Research Facility + None + Bucknell Hydraulic Flume + Yes + C Carderock 2-ft Variable Pressure Cavitation Water Tunnel + Yes + Carderock 3-ft Variable Pressure Cavitation Water Tunnel + Yes +

54

Using Daylight to Light the Access Zone of Road Tunnels  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Using Daylight to Light the Access Zone of Road Tunnels Using Daylight to Light the Access Zone of Road Tunnels Speaker(s): Eliyahu Ne'eman Date: March 4, 2003 - 12:00pm Location: Bldg. 90 Lighting guides for roadway tunnels specify relatively high luminances for the "access zone" into the tunnel. They are needed to allow the eyes of the driver sufficient time to adapt during the short period of the transition from the outdoor natural daylight levels to the fairly low luminances along the main length of the tunnel. Usually, the necessary high luminances are provided by rows of costly luminaries which consume a lot of electricity during peak use periods and need a good deal of maintenance. To save some electric power, controls are used to dim the lighting on cloudy hours. Daylight has been used for the access zone in several tunnels around the

55

Regular Scanning Tunneling Microscope Tips can be Intrinsically Chiral  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We report our discovery that regular scanning tunneling microscope tips can themselves be chiral. This chirality leads to differences in electron tunneling efficiencies through left- and right-handed molecules, and, when using the tip to electrically excite molecular rotation, large differences in rotation rate were observed which correlated with molecular chirality. As scanning tunneling microscopy is a widely used technique, this result may have unforeseen consequences for the measurement of asymmetric surface phenomena in a variety of important fields.

Tierney, Heather L.; Murphy, Colin J.; Sykes, E. Charles H. [Department of Chemistry, Tufts University, Medford, Massachusetts 02155-5813 (United States)

2011-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

56

Vacuum gaps with small tunnel currents at large electric field...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

gap can help to reduce tunnel currents. We discuss applications of this technology for energy storage, charge storage, and power supplies. Speaker Bio: Professor Alfred Hubler...

57

Geologic mapping of tunnels using photogrammetry: Camera and target positioning  

SciTech Connect

A photogrammetric method has been developed by the US Geological Survey and the US Bureau of Reclamation for the use in geologic mapping of tunnels (drifts). The method requires photographing the tunnel walls and roof with a calibrated small-format camera to obtain stereo pairs of photos which are then oriented in an analytical stereo plotter for measurement of geologic features. The method was tested in G-tunnel at Rainier Mesa on the Nevada Test Site. Calculations necessary to determine camera and target positions and problems encountered during testing were used to develop a set of generic formulas that can be applied to any tunnel. 7 figs.

Coe, J.A. [Geological Survey, Denver, CO (United States); Dueholm, K.S. [Danmarks Tekniske Hoejskole, Lyngby (Denmark). Inst. of Surveying and Photogrammetry

1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Calculation of tunneling rates across a barrier with continuous potential  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Here, approximate, but accurate expressions for calculation of wavefunctions and tunneling rates are obtained using the method of uniform asymptotic expansion.

Sina Khorasani

2011-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

59

Competition between cotunneling, Kondo effect, and direct tunneling in discontinuous high-anisotropy magnetic tunnel junctions  

SciTech Connect

The transition between Kondo and Coulomb blockade effects in discontinuous double magnetic tunnel junctions is explored as a function of the size of the CoPt magnetic clusters embedded between AlO{sub x} tunnel barriers. A gradual competition between cotunneling enhancement of the tunneling magnetoresistance (TMR) and the TMR suppression due to the Kondo effect has been found in these junctions, with both effects having been found to coexist even in the same sample. It is possible to tune between these two states with temperature (at a temperature far below the cluster blocking temperature). In addition, when further decreasing the size of the CoPt clusters, another gradual transition between the Kondo effect and direct tunneling between the electrodes takes place. This second transition shows that the spin-flip processes found in junctions with impurities in the barrier are in fact due to the Kondo effect. A simple theoretical model able to account for these experimental results is proposed.

Ciudad D.; Arena D.; We, Z.-C.; Hindmarch, A.T.; Negusse, E.; Han, X.-F.Han; Marrows, C.H.

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

60

Comparison Between Field Data and NASA Ames Wind Tunnel Data  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of this analysis is to compare the measured data from the NASA Ames wind tunnel experiment to those collected in the field at the National Wind Technology Center (NWTC) with the same turbine configuration. The results of this analysis provide insight into what measurements can be made in the field as opposed to wind tunnel testing.

Corbus, D.

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tunnel overseeing organization" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Vibration-Assisted Electron Tunneling in C140 Transistors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We measure electron tunneling in transistors made from C140, a molecule with a mass?spring?mass geometry chosen as a model system to study electron-vibration coupling. We observe vibration-assisted tunneling at an energy corresponding to the stretching mode of C140. Molecular modeling provides explanations for why this mode couples more strongly to electron tunneling than to the other internal modes of the molecule. We make comparisons between the observed tunneling rates and those expected from the Franck?Condon model. When electrons travel through molecules, vibrational modes of the molecules can affect current flow. Molecular-vibrationassisted tunneling was first measured in the 1960s using devices whose tunnel barriers contained many molecules. 1 Recently, effects of vibrations in single molecules have been measured using scanning tunneling microscopes, 2 singlemolecule transistors, 3,4 and mechanical break junctions. 5 Theoretical considerations suggest that different regimes may exist depending on whether tunneling electrons occupy resonant energy levels on the molecule, and also on the * Corresponding author.

A. N. Pasupathy; J. Park; C. Chang; A. V. Soldatov; S. Lebedkin; R. C. Bialczak; J. E. Grose; L. A. K. Donev; J. P. Sethna; D. C. Ralph; P. L. Mceuen

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

What is wrong in the current models of tunneling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper we show that the conventional quantum-mechanical model of a non-resonant tunneling, as a subprocess of a one-dimensional completed scattering (OCS), is non-complete. It does not allow tracing the tunneling dynamics at all stages of scattering, what makes it impossible to resolve the tunneling time problem without coming into conflict with the (macro-)causality principle. As is shown, all timekeeping procedures to underlie the tunneling-time concepts and experiments presented in the tunneling time literature (TTL) fill this gap in the current description of the tunneling dynamics by 'self-evident' assumptions which are erroneous on closer inspection. We present the alternative model of the OCS, which allows tracing the tunneling dynamics at all stages of scattering and, as a consequence, is free from those paradoxes that flood the current TTL. By this model, among two fundamental velocity concepts of the wave dynamics -- the flow velocity and the group one -- only the former can be used to determine the velocity of tunneling particles in the barrier region.

Nikolay Chuprikov

2013-03-22T23:59:59.000Z

63

Long-term behaviour of twin tunnels in London clay  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-state settlement RT, RTi Tunnel radius, and initial value S Settlement s Deviatoric stress tensor xxxi CONTENTS s¯ Deviatoric stress tensor stated relative to rotated yield surface axis Sintc , S int cmid Additional Scmax(ss) due to twin-tunnel interaction...

Laver, Richard George

2011-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

64

Nonlinear Landau-Zener tunneling in coupled waveguide arrays  

SciTech Connect

The possibility of direct observation of the nonlinear Landau-Zener tunneling effect with a device consisting of two waveguide arrays connected to a tilted reduced refractive index barrier is discussed. Numerical simulations on this realistic setup are interpreted via a simplified double-well system and different asymmetric tunneling scenarios are predicted varying just the injected beam intensity.

Khomeriki, Ramaz [Physics Department, Tbilisi State University, 3 Chavchavadze, 0128 Tbilisi (Georgia) and Max-Planck-Institut fuer Physik komplexer Systeme, Noethnitzerstrasse 38, D-01187 Dresden (Germany)

2010-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

65

Langley 16-Ft. Transonic Tunnel Pressure Sensitive Paint System  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes the NASA Langley 16-Ft. Transonic Tunnel Pressure Sensitive Paint (PSP) System and presents results of a test conducted June 22-23, 2000 in the tunnel to validate the PSP system. The PSP system provides global surface pressure measurements ...

Sprinkle Danny R.; Obara Clifford J.; Amer Tahani R.; Leighty Bradley D.; Carmine Michael T.; Burkett Cecil G.; Sealey Bradley S.

2001-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Saving Money in Reno's Wind Tunnels | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Saving Money in Reno's Wind Tunnels Saving Money in Reno's Wind Tunnels Saving Money in Reno's Wind Tunnels June 28, 2010 - 5:14pm Addthis Located in one of Reno's natural wind tunnels, City Hall proved to be the perfect location for one of the city's nine new wind turbines. | Photo courtesy of the City of Reno Located in one of Reno's natural wind tunnels, City Hall proved to be the perfect location for one of the city's nine new wind turbines. | Photo courtesy of the City of Reno On the street level in Reno, it may be easy to forget that every time the breeze blows off the Truckee River and past the 17-story City Hall, the town is quietly saving money. But the $11,000 the city is expected to save each year from wind power will be a friendly reminder. Installed in early June, the two 1.5-kilowatt wind

67

Saving Money in Reno's Wind Tunnels | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Money in Reno's Wind Tunnels Money in Reno's Wind Tunnels Saving Money in Reno's Wind Tunnels June 28, 2010 - 5:14pm Addthis Located in one of Reno's natural wind tunnels, City Hall proved to be the perfect location for one of the city's nine new wind turbines. | Photo courtesy of the City of Reno Located in one of Reno's natural wind tunnels, City Hall proved to be the perfect location for one of the city's nine new wind turbines. | Photo courtesy of the City of Reno On the street level in Reno, it may be easy to forget that every time the breeze blows off the Truckee River and past the 17-story City Hall, the town is quietly saving money. But the $11,000 the city is expected to save each year from wind power will be a friendly reminder. Installed in early June, the two 1.5-kilowatt wind

68

Construction monitoring activities in the ESF starter tunnel  

SciTech Connect

In situ design verification activities am being conducted in the North Ramp Starter Tunnel of the Yucca Mountain Project Exploratory Studies Facility. These activities include: monitoring the peak particle velocities and evaluating the damage to the rock mass associated with construction blasting, assessing the rock mass quality surrounding the tunnel, monitoring the performance of the installed ground support, and monitoring the stability of the tunnel. In this paper, examples of the data that have been collected and preliminary conclusions from the data are presented.

Pott, J. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Carlisle, S. [Agapito (J.F.T.) and Associates, Inc., Grand Junction, CO (United States)

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

MST: Organizations: Organic Materials  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Adhesive Bonding Adhesive Bonding Composites Encapsulation Materials Characterization Mechanical Testing Molding, Thermoforming, & Compounding Organizations Organic Materials Composite-to-metal adhesive bond Experimental/analytical study of composit-to-metal adhesive bond. The Organic Materials department in the Advanced Manufacturing and Processing Laboratory provides innovative prototype fabrication, full service small lot production, materials technology, processing expertise, and a broad range of organic material characterization and mechanical testing techniques. We encapsulate, we join and bond, we foam, we analyze and image, we build composite structures. We strive to make you, our customers, successful! We partner with you to find the right combination of materials, processing, and fixturing that will result in the highest value

70

Computational design and analysis of flatback airfoil wind tunnel experiment.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A computational fluid dynamics study of thick wind turbine section shapes in the test section of the UC Davis wind tunnel at a chord Reynolds number of one million is presented. The goals of this study are to validate standard wind tunnel wall corrections for high solid blockage conditions and to reaffirm the favorable effect of a blunt trailing edge or flatback on the performance characteristics of a representative thick airfoil shape prior to building the wind tunnel models and conducting the experiment. The numerical simulations prove the standard wind tunnel corrections to be largely valid for the proposed test of 40% maximum thickness to chord ratio airfoils at a solid blockage ratio of 10%. Comparison of the computed lift characteristics of a sharp trailing edge baseline airfoil and derived flatback airfoils reaffirms the earlier observed trend of reduced sensitivity to surface contamination with increasing trailing edge thickness.

Mayda, Edward A. (University of California, Davis, CA); van Dam, C.P. (University of California, Davis, CA); Chao, David D. (University of California, Davis, CA); Berg, Dale E.

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Polarization Control of Electron Tunneling into Ferroelectric Surfaces  

SciTech Connect

We demonstrate a highly reproducible control of local electron transport through a ferroelectric oxide via its spontaneous polarization. Electrons are injected from the tip of an atomic force microscope into a thin film of lead-zirconate titanate, Pb(Zr0.2Ti0.8)O3, in the regime of electron tunneling assisted by a high electric field (Fowler-Nordheim tunneling). The tunneling current exhibits a pronounced hysteresis with abrupt switching events that coincide, within experimental resolution, with the local switching of ferroelectric polarization. The large spontaneous polarization of the PZT film results in up to 500-fold amplification of the tunneling current upon ferroelectric switching. The magnitude of the effect is subject to electrostatic control via ferroelectric switching, suggesting possible applications in ultrahigh-density data storage and spintronics.

Maksymovych, Petro [ORNL; Jesse, Stephen [ORNL; Yu, Pu [University of California, Berkeley; Ramesh, R. [University of California, Berkeley; Baddorf, Arthur P [ORNL; Kalinin, Sergei V [ORNL

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

A Vertical Wind Tunnel for Snow Process Studies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A vertical wind tunnel using an artificially generated supercooled cloud was constructed to study snowfall processes. It is 18 m high and operates to a temperature as low as ?25°C. Ultrasonic atomizers supply the supercooled water droplets, and ...

Tsuneya Takahashi; Chikara Inoue; Yoshinori Furukawa; Tatsuo Endoh; Renji Naruse

1986-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Response of continuous pipelines to tunnel induced ground deformations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis develops analytical solutions for estimating the bending moments and axial loads in a buried pipeline due to ground movements caused by tunnel construction in soft ground. The solutions combine closed-form, ...

Ieronymaki, Evangelia S

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Hybrid high-temperature superconductor-semiconductor tunnel diode  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We report the demonstration of hybrid high-Tc-superconductor-semiconductor tunnel junctions, enabling new interdisciplinary directions in condensed matter research. The devices were fabricated by our newly-developed mechanical bonding technique, resulting in high-Tc-semiconductor planar junctions acting as superconducting tunnel diodes. Tunneling-spectra characterization of the hybrid junctions of Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8+{\\delta} combined with bulk GaAs, or a GaAs/AlGaAs quantum well, exhibits excess voltage and nonlinearity - in good agreement with theoretical predictions for a d-wave superconductor-normal material junction, and similar to spectra obtained in scanning tunneling microscopy. Additional junctions are demonstrated using Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8+{\\delta} combined with graphite or Bi2Te3. Our results pave the way for new methods in unconventional superconductivity studies, novel materials and quantum technology applications.

Alex Hayat; Parisa Zareapour; Shu Yang F. Zhao; Achint Jain; Igor G. Savelyev; Marina Blumin; Zhijun Xu; Alina Yang; G. D. Gu; Harry E. Ruda; Shuang Jia; R. J. Cava; Aephraim M. Steinberg; Kenneth S. Burch

2013-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

75

Reexamination of Riming Electrification in a Wind Tunnel  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Riming electrification experiments have been conducted in a wind tunnel, focusing on the substantial difference in results reported by Takahashi in 1978 and by Jayaratne et al. in 1983. Three critical regimes were selected, differing in ...

Tsutomu Takahashi; Kuniko Miyawaki

2002-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Icing Wind Tunnel Tests on the CSIRO Liquid Water Probe  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Wet wind tunnel tests have been Performed on several versions of the CSIRO probe designed for the airborne measurement of liquid water content. Four different controller units and 17 different Probe sensors (including half-size and shielded ...

W. D. King; J. E. Dye; D. Baumgardner; J. W. Strapp; D. Huffman

1985-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Superluminal tunneling of microwaves in smoothly varying transmission lines  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Tunneling of microwaves through a smooth barrier in a transmission line is considered. In contrast to standard wave barriers, we study the case where the dielectric permittivity is positive, and the barrier is caused by the inhomogeneous dielectric profile. It is found that reflectionless, superluminal tunneling can take place for waves with a finite spectral width. The consequences of these findings are discussed, and an experimental setup testing our predictions is proposed.

Shvartsburg, A B; Brodin, G; Stenflo, L

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Quantum tunneling, quantum computing, and high temperature superconductivity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this dissertation, I have studied four theoretical problems in quantum tunneling, quantum computing, and high-temperature superconductivity. I have developed a generally-useful numerical tool for analyzing impurity-induced resonant-state images observed with scanning tunneling microscope (STM) in high temperature superconductors. The integrated tunneling intensities on all predominant sites have been estimated. The results can be used to test the predictions of any tight-binding model calculation. I have numerically simulated two-dimensional time-dependent tunneling of a Gaussian wave packet through a barrier, which contains charged ions. We have found that a negative ion in the barrier directly below the tunneling tip can deflect the tunneling electrons and drastically reduce the probability for them to reach the point in the target plane directly below the tunneling tip. I have studied an infinite family of sure-success quantum algorithms, which are introduced by C.-R. Hu [Phys. Rev. A {\\bf 66}, 042301 (2002)], for solving a generalized Grover search problem. Rigorous proofs are found for several conjectures made by Hu and explicit equations are obtained for finding the values of two phase parameters which make the algorithms sure success. Using self-consistent Hartree-Fock theory, I have studied an extended Hubbard model which includes quasi-long-range Coulomb interaction between the holes (characterized by parameter V). I have found that for sufficiently large V/t, doubly-charged-antiphase-island do become energetically favored localized objects in this system for moderate values of U/t, thus supporting a recent conjecture by C.-R. Hu [Int. J. Mod. Phys. B {\\bf 17}, 3284 (2003)].

Wang, Qian

2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Report Tunneling Cost Reduction Study prepared for Fermilab  

SciTech Connect

Fermi National Accelerator Laboratories has a need to review the costs of constructing the very long tunnels which would be required for housing the equipment for the proposed Very Large Hadron Collider (VLHC) project. Current tunneling costs are high, and the identification of potential means of significantly reducing them, and thereby helping to keep overall project costs within an acceptable budget, has assumed great importance. Fermilab has contracted with The Robbins Company to provide an up-to-date appraisal of tunneling technology, and to review the potential for substantially improving currently the state-of-practice performance and construction costs in particular. The Robbins Company was chosen for this task because of its long and successful experience in hard rock mechanical tunnel boring. In the past 40 years, Robbins has manufactured over 250 tunneling machines, the vast majority for hard rock applications. In addition to also supplying back-up equipment, Robbins has recently established a division dedicated to the manufacture of continuous conveying equipment for the efficient support of tunneling operations. The study extends beyond the tunnel boring machine (TBM) itself, and into the critical area of the logistics of the support of the machine as it advances, including manpower. It is restricted to proven methods using conventional technology, and its potential for incremental but meaningful improvement, rather than examining exotic and undeveloped means of rock excavation that have been proposed from time to time by the technical community. This is the first phase of what is expected to be a number of studies in increasing depth of technical detail, and as such has been restricted to the issues connected with the initial 34 kilometer circumference booster tunnel, and not the proposed 500 kilometer circumference tunnel housing the VLHC itself. The booster tunnel is entirely sited within low to medium strength limestone and dolomite formations, typical of the Chicago area. The rock is generally competent with widely spaced jointing, and slowdown of the operation for the installation of rock support is expected to be minimal. The tunneling system will have to be equipped with the necessary equipment for an efficient response to poor rock conditions however. Because the ground conditions are expected to be very favorable, a state-of-the-art TBM should have no difficulty in excavating at a high penetration rate of 10 meters per hour or more in rock of the average of the range of strengths stated to exist. Disc cutter changes will be few as the rock has very low abrasivity. However, experience has shown that overall tunneling rates are a relatively low percentage of the machine's penetration rate capability. Therefore the main focus of improvement is guaranteeing that the support systems, including mucking and advance of the utilities do not impede the operation. Improved mechanization of the support systems, along with automation where practicable to reduce manpower, is seen as the best means of raising the overall speed of the operation, and reducing its cost. The first phase of the study is mainly involved with establishing the baseline for current performance, and in identifying areas of improvement. It contains information on existing machine design concepts and provides data on many aspects of the mechanical tunneling process, including costs and labor requirements. While it contains suggestions for technical improvements of the various system, the time limitations of this phase have not permitted any detailed concept development. This should be a major part of the next phase.

1999-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

80

Organization Chart  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and Mission Organization Staff - Organization Chart About Us Bob Cottingham, 865-241-0554 Computational Biology and Bioinformatics Meghan Drake 865-241-8288 Michael...

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to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Science Organizations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Organizations Science Organizations National security depends on science and technology. The United States relies on Los Alamos National Laboratory for the best of both. No place...

82

Getting Traffic Lights Talking to Improve Topeka's Traffic Tunnel |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Getting Traffic Lights Talking to Improve Topeka's Traffic Tunnel Getting Traffic Lights Talking to Improve Topeka's Traffic Tunnel Getting Traffic Lights Talking to Improve Topeka's Traffic Tunnel October 8, 2010 - 11:16am Addthis Topeka is using Recovery Act funding to resynchronize 22 traffic lights. | Photo by Linda Voss Topeka is using Recovery Act funding to resynchronize 22 traffic lights. | Photo by Linda Voss Lindsay Gsell The five-lane 21st street corridor in Topeka is a hub for restaurants, shopping and entertainment. "This is where everyone in Topeka goes to shop," says Topeka resident Linda Voss. In addition to food and fun, the one-mile corridor is home to seven traffic lights-and for drivers, a potential traffic stop every 754 feet, or a little more than two football fields. "The traffic signals are a challenge to time in this area," says Voss,

83

Calibration of Johnson–Williams and PMS ASSP Probes in a Wind Tunnel  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Wet wind tunnel tests have provided calibrations and intercomparisons of the LAMP's cloud liquid water content probes (three Johnson–Williams sensor heads and one PMS ASSP). The tunnel liquid water content was deduced with a rotating cyclinder ...

J. F. Gayet

1986-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Development of the resource model for the Decision Aids for Tunneling (DAT)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Decision Aids for Tunneling (DAT) are a computer based method with which distributions of tunnel construction time and cost as well as required and produced resources can be estimated considering uncertainties in ...

Min, Sangyoon, 1973-

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Effects of tunneling on groundwater flow and swelling of clay-sulfate rocks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

[1] Swelling of clay-sulfate rocks is a major threat in tunneling. It is triggered by the transformation of the sulfate mineral anhydrite into gypsum as a result of water inflow in anhydrite-containing layers after tunnel ...

Butscher, Christoph

86

Organization | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

About Us Organization Organization Leadership Organization History Careers Contact Us Organization...

87

Actinide Sorption in Rainier Mesa Tunnel Waters from the Nevada Test Site  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The sorption behavior of americium (Am), plutonium (Pu), neptunium (Np), and uranium (U) in perched Rainier Mesa tunnel water was investigated. Both volcanic zeolitized tuff samples and groundwater samples were collected from Rainier Mesa, Nevada Test Site, NV for a series of batch sorption experiments. Sorption in groundwater with and without the presence of dissolved organic matter (DOM) was investigated. Am(III) and Pu(IV) are more soluble in groundwater that has high concentrations of DOM. The sorption K{sub d} for Am(III) and Pu(IV) on volcanic zeolitized tuff was up to two orders of magnitude lower in samples with high DOM (15 to 19 mg C/L) compared to samples with DOM removed (Rainier Mesa, the low actinide Kd values measured in groundwater with high DOM concentrations must be incorporated in predictive transport models.

Zhao, P; Zavarin, M; Leif, R; Powell, B; Singleton, M; Lindvall, R; Kersting, A

2007-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

88

A Cross-Platform for Tunnel Blast Design and Simulation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Digital Mine has become the inevitable development trend of the future mines. Blasting is a essential process during the exploration and development of practical mining engineering. The blasting always plays a direct influence on the efficiency of each ... Keywords: Digital Mine, Blasting parameters, Parameters design, Tunnel blast design, Cross-platform

Tingting Zhu; Chao Wang; Mingmin Zhang; Zhigeng Pan

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Coherent resonant tunneling through an artificial molecule C. A. Stafford  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Coherent resonant tunneling through an artificial molecule C. A. Stafford Fakulta¨t fu¨r Physik PRB 58C. A. STAFFORD, R. KOTLYAR, AND S. DAS SARMA #12;Coulomb blockade12 for C Cg to a ballistic /e 1 follows from the particle-hole symmetry of Eq. 1 . 7094 PRB 58C. A. STAFFORD, R. KOTLYAR, AND S

Stafford, Charles

90

Incompatibility of the tunneling limit with laser fields  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Schwinger limit refers to longitudinal electric fields that are sufficiently strong to "polarize the vacuum" into electron-positron pairs by a tunneling mechanism. Laser fields are transverse electromagnetic fields for which the Schwinger limit has no relevance. Longitudinal and transverse fields are fundamentally different because of the different values of the F^{{\\mu}{\

H. R. Reiss

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Improved tunnel resistance of silvered-polymer mirrors  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report documents the research performed at the Solar Energy Research Institute during fiscal year (FY) 1991 to develop ways to prevent delamination failure (known as tunneling) of silvered-polymer reflector materials. Several promising approaches have been identified and demonstrated that substantially reduce such failures. These approaches include (1) use of Tedlar edge tape rather than the manufacturer-recommended ECP-244 tape, (2) thermal treatment of laminated reflector/substrate constructions, and (3) application of silver to the polymer film through an alternative deposition process. Approaches 1 and 2 offer readily available engineering solutions to the delamination problem. Approaches 2 and 3 provide tunnel resistance over the entire surface of the reflector material, including the edges. Tedlar (a polyvinyl fluoride from DuPont) tape is an opaque white tape available in different widths from 3M Company. The base material has demonstrated outstanding outdoor durability. Thermal treatment of ECP-305 laminated to substrate materials has demonstrated outstanding resistance to tunneling. Alternative silver deposition techniques such as sputtering (rather than thermal evaporation) offer increased resistance to tunneling. 15 refs., 10 figs.

Jorgensen, G.; Schissel, P.; Kennedy, C.; Shinton, Y.; Powell, D.; Siebarth, J.

1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Laboratory and Wind Tunnel Evaluations of the Rosemount Icing Detector  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Rosemount model 871FA ice detector was evaluated during a number of laboratory and wind tunnel studies. The purpose of this evaluation was to determine the sensitivity of the detector to a variety of icing conditions and to determine its ...

Darrel Baumgardner; Alfred Rodi

1989-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Pressurized Icing Tunnel for Graupel, Hail and Secondary Raindrop Production  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The closed-circuit icing wind tunnel with pressure control serves for experiments on the growth and melting of ice particles, such as graupel and hailstones, and the observation of shedding of rain-sized drops by growing and melting hailstones. ...

Roland List; G. B. Lesins; F. García-García; D. B. McDonald

1987-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Macroscopic quantum tunnelling in a current biased Josephson junction  

SciTech Connect

We discuss in this work an attempt to answer experimentally the question: do macroscopic variables obey quantum mechanics. More precisely, this experiment deals with the question of quantum-mechanical tunnelling of a macroscopic variable, a subject related to the famous Schrodinger's cat problem in the theory of measurement.

Martinis, J.M.; Devoret, M.H.; Clarke, J.; Urbina, C.

1984-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Safety analysis of natural gas vehicles transiting highway tunnel  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A safety analysis was performed to assess the relative hazard of compressed natural gas (CNG) fueled vehicles traveling on various tunnels and bridges in New York City. The study considered those hazards arising from the release of fuel from CNG vehicles ranging in size from a passenger sedan to a full size 53 passenger bus. The approach used was to compare the fuel hazard of CNG vehicles to the fuel hazard of gasoline vehicles. The risk was assessed by estimating the frequency of occurrence and the severity of the hazard. The methodology was a combination of analyzing accident data, performing a diffusion analysis of the gas released in the tunnel and determining the consequences of ignition. Diffusion analysis was performed using the TEMPEST code for various accident scenarios resulting in CNG release inside the Holland Tunnel. The study concluded that the overall hazard of CNG vehicles transiting a ventilated tunnel is less than the hazard from a comparable gasoline fueled vehicle. 134 refs., 23 figs., 24 tabs.

Shaaban, S.H.; Zuzovsky, M.; Anigstein, R.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

High-Lift Flight Tunnel---Phase II Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The High-Lift Flight Tunnel (HiLiFT) concept is a revolutionary approach to aerodynamic ground testing. This concept utilizes magnetic levitation and linear motors to propel an aerodynamic model through a tube containing a quiescent test medium. This ...

Lofftus David; Lund Thomas; Rote Donald

2000-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Tunnel junction multiple wavelength light-emitting diodes  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A multiple wavelength LED having a monolithic cascade cell structure comprising at least two p-n junctions, wherein each of said at least two p-n junctions have substantially different band gaps, and electrical connector means by which said at least two p-n junctions may be collectively energized; and wherein said diode comprises a tunnel junction or interconnect. 5 figs.

Olson, J.M.; Kurtz, S.R.

1992-11-24T23:59:59.000Z

98

Tunnel junction multiple wavelength light-emitting diodes  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A multiple wavelength LED having a monolithic cascade cell structure comprising at least two p-n junctions, wherein each of said at least two p-n junctions have substantially different band gaps, and electrical connector means by which said at least two p-n junctions may be collectively energized; and wherein said diode comprises a tunnel junction or interconnect.

Olson, Jerry M. (Lakewood, CO); Kurtz, Sarah R. (Golden, CO)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

NIST Organization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... What We Do; Organization Chart; Budget Information; Office of the Director; Laboratories & Major Programs; Locations; Staff Directory; Working With ...

2013-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

100

Symposium Organizer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Volunteer Training Module. March 2013. 1. Your Professional Partner for Career Advancement. Symposium Organizer. Online Training Module. March 2013 ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tunnel overseeing organization" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Giant tunneling magnetoresistance in Co{sub 2}MnSi/Al-O/Co{sub 2}MnSi magnetic tunnel junctions  

SciTech Connect

Magnetic tunnel junctions (MTJs) with a stacking structure of Co{sub 2}MnSi/Al-O/Co{sub 2}MnSi were fabricated using magnetron sputtering system. Fabricated MTJ exhibited an extremely large tunneling magnetoresistance (TMR) ratio of 570% at low temperature, which is the highest TMR ratio reported to date for an amorphous Al-O tunneling barrier. The observed dependence of tunneling conductance on bias voltage clearly reveals the half-metallic energy gap of Co{sub 2}MnSi. The origins of large temperature dependence of TMR ratio were discussed on the basis of the present results.

Sakuraba, Y.; Hattori, M.; Oogane, M.; Ando, Y.; Kato, H.; Sakuma, A.; Miyazaki, T.; Kubota, H. [Department of Applied Physics, Graduate School of Engineering, Tohoku University, Aoba-yama 6-6-05, Aramaki, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8579 (Japan); Nanoelectronics Research Institute, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), 1-1-1 Umezono, Tsukuba 305-8568 (Japan)

2006-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

102

Polarization-engineered GaN/InGaN/GaN tunnel diodes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We report on the design and demonstration of polarization-engineered GaN/InGaN/GaN tunnel junction diodes with high current density and low tunneling turn-on voltage. Wentzel-Kramers-Brillouin (WKB) calculations were used to model and design tunnel junctions with narrow bandgap InGaN-based barrier layers. N-polar p-GaN/In0.33Ga0.67N/n-GaN heterostructure tunnel diodes were grown using molecular beam epitaxy. Efficient zero bias tunneling turn-on with a high current density of 118 A/cm2 at a reverse bias of 1V, reaching a maximum current density up to 9.2 kA/cm2 were obtained. These results represent the highest current density reported in III-nitride tunnel junctions, and demonstrate the potential of III-nitride tunnel devices for a broad range of optoelectronic and electronic applications.

Sriram Krishnamoorthy; Digbijoy N. Nath; Fatih Akyol; Pil Sung Park; Michele Esposto; Siddharth Rajan

2010-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

103

A Model for the Behavior of Magnetic Tunnel Junctions  

SciTech Connect

A magnetic tunnel junction is a device that changes its electrical resistance with a change in an applied magnetic field. A typical junction consists of two magnetic electrodes separated by a nonmagnetic insulating layer. The magnetizations of the two electrodes can have two possible extreme configurations, parallel and antiparallel. The antiparallel configuration is observed to have the higher measured resistance and the parallel configuration has the lower resistance. To switch between these two configurations a magnetic field is applied to the device which is primarily used to change the orientation of the magnetization of one electrode usually called the free layer, although with sufficient high magnetic field the orientation of the magnetizations of both of the electrodes can be changed. The most commonly used models for describing and explaining the electronic behavior of tunnel junctions are the Simmons model and the Brinkman model. However, both of these models were designed for simple, spin independent tunneling. The Simmons model does not address the issue of applied magnetic fields nor does it address the form of the electronic band structure in the metallic electrodes, including the important factor of spin polarization. The Brinkman model is similar, the main difference between the two models being the shape of the tunneling barrier potential between the two electrodes. Therefore, the research conducted in this thesis has developed a new theoretical model that addresses these important issues starting from basic principles. The main features of the new model include: the development of equations for true spin dependent tunneling through the insulating barrier, the differences in the orientations of the electrode magnetizations on either side of the barrier, and the effects of the density of states function on the behavior of the junction. The present work has explored densities of states that are more realistic than the simplified free electron density of states function, and has developed an exact analytic solution for the case of an electron band of finite width. The approach taken in this thesis easily allows extension to cases where the band structure is different on either side of the barrier (known as heterojunctions) which are of greater interest in real magnetic tunnel junction devices rather than the simple, identical band structure devices.

Bryan John Baker

2003-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

104

Low-Frequency Electromagnetic Backscatter from Buried Tunnels  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This progress report is submitted under a contract between the Special Project Office of DARPA and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The Project Manager at DARPA is Dr. Michael Zatman. Our purpose under this contract is to investigate interactions between electromagnetic waves and a class of buried targets located in multilayered media with rough interfaces. In this report, we investigate three preliminary problems. In each case our specific goal is to understand various aspects of the electromagnetic wave interaction mechanisms with targets in layered media. The first problem, discussed in Section 2, is that of low-frequency electromagnetic backscattering from a tunnel that is cut into a lossy dielectric half-space. In this problem, the interface between the upper (free space) region and the lower (ground) region is smooth. The tunnel is assumed to be a cylindrical free-space region of infinite extent in its axial direction and with a diameter that is small in comparison to the free-space wavelength. Because its diameter is small, the tunnel can be modeled as a buried ''wire'' described by an equivalent impedance per unit length. In Section 3 we extend the analysis to include a statistically rough interface between the air and ground regions. The interface is modeled as a random-phase screen. Such a screen reduces the coherent power in a plane wave that is transmitted through it, scattering some of the total power into an incoherent field. Our analysis of this second problem quantifies the reduction in the coherent power backscattered from the buried tunnel that is caused by the roughness of the air-ground interface. The problem of low-frequency electromagnetic backscattering from two buried tunnels, parallel to each other but at different locations in the ground, is considered in Section 4. In this analysis, we wish to determine the conditions under which the presence of more than one tunnel can be detected via backscattering. Section 5 concludes the report with a summary of the investigations discussed herein and recommendations for future work on problems of this class.

Casey, K; Pao, H

2006-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

105

Small Corrections to the Tunneling Phase Time Formulation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

After reexamining the above barrier diffusion problem where we notice that the wave packet collision implies the existence of {\\em multiple} reflected and transmitted wave packets, we analyze the way of obtaining phase times for tunneling/reflecting particles in a particular colliding configuration where the idea of multiple peak decomposition is recovered. To partially overcome the analytical incongruities which frequently rise up when the stationary phase method is adopted for computing the (tunneling) phase time expressions, we present a theoretical exercise involving a symmetrical collision between two identical wave packets and a unidimensional squared potential barrier where the scattered wave packets can be recomposed by summing the amplitudes of simultaneously reflected and transmitted wave components so that the conditions for applying the stationary phase principle are totally recovered. Lessons concerning the use of the stationary phase method are drawn.

Alex E. Bernardini

2007-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

106

Optical modulation in a resonant tunneling relaxation oscillator  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We report high speed optical modulation in a resonant tunneling relaxation oscillator consisting of a resonant tunneling diode (RTD) integrated with a unipolar optical waveguide and incorporated in a package with a coplanar waveguide transmission line. When appropriately biased, the RTD can provide wide-bandwidth electrical gain. For wavelengths near the material band-edge, small changes of the applied voltage give rise to large, high-speed electro-absorption modulation of the light. We have observed optical modulation at frequencies up to 14 GHz, associated with sub harmonic injection locking of the RTD oscillation at the fundamental mode of the coplanar transmission line, as well as generation of 33 ps optical pulses due to relaxation oscillation.

Figueiredo, J M L; Boyd, A R; Ironside, C N

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Probing water structures in nanopores using tunneling currents  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study the effect of volumetric constraints on the structure and electronic transport properties of distilled water in a nanopore with embedded electrodes. Combining classical molecular dynamics simulations with quantum scattering theory, we show that the structural motifs water assumes inside the pore can be probed directly by tunneling. In particular, we show that the current does not follow a simple exponential curve at a critical pore diameter of about 8 {\\AA}, rather it is larger than the one expected from simple tunneling through a barrier. This is due to a structural transition from bulk-like to "nanodroplet" water domains. Our results can be tested with present experimental capabilities to develop our understanding of water as a complex medium at nanometer length scales.

P. Boynton; M. Di Ventra

2013-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

108

A Wind Tunnel and Theoretical Study of the Melting Behavior of Atmospheric Ice Particles. I: A Wind Tunnel Study of Frozen Drops of Radius < 500 ?m  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A study has been made on the melting behavior of frozen drops suspended freely at terminal velocity in the UCLA Cloud Tunnel. The relative humidity of the air ranged between 25 and 95%. The warming rates of the tunnel air stream ranged from 2 to ...

R. Rasmussen; H. R. Pruppacher

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Organization Chart  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

spacer spacer spacer About DOE Organization News Contact Us Search Search Go spacer U.S. Department of Energy header image Science & Technology Energy Sources Energy Efficiency...

110

The development of magnetic tunnel junction fabrication techniques  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. The effect of grain size, shape, voltage bias, temperature, layer thickness and roughness should be understood and controllable, in order to produce reproducible junctions. The most problematic requirement has been that of low resistance. Magnetic tunnel... . The effect of roughness, aluminium thickness and voltage on the number of pinholes and weak-links per unit area was studied. High frequency testing of read heads at wafer level was performed with a network analyser. Design implications for read head...

Elwell, Clifford Alastair

111

A 233 km tunnel for lepton and hadron colliders  

SciTech Connect

A decade ago, a cost analysis was conducted to bore a 233 km circumference Very Large Hadron Collider (VLHC) tunnel passing through Fermilab. Here we outline implementations of e{sup +}e{sup -}, pp-bar , and {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -} collider rings in this tunnel using recent technological innovations. The 240 and 500 GeV e{sup +}e{sup -} colliders employ Crab Waist Crossings, ultra low emittance damped bunches, short vertical IP focal lengths, superconducting RF, and low coercivity, grain oriented silicon steel/concrete dipoles. Some details are also provided for a high luminosity 240 GeV e{sup +}e{sup -} collider and 1.75 TeV muon accelerator in a Fermilab site filler tunnel. The 40 TeV pp-bar collider uses the high intensity Fermilab p-bar source, exploits high cross sections for pp-bar production of high mass states, and uses 2 Tesla ultra low carbon steel/YBCO superconducting magnets run with liquid neon. The 35 TeV muon ring ramps the 2 Tesla superconducting magnets at 9 Hz every 0.4 seconds, uses 250 GV of superconducting RF to accelerate muons from 1.75 to 17.5 TeV in 63 orbits with 71% survival, and mitigates neutrino radiation with phase shifting, roller coaster motion in a FODO lattice.

Summers, D. J.; Cremaldi, L. M.; Datta, A.; Duraisamy, M.; Luo, T.; Lyons, G. T. [Dept. of Physics and Astronomy, University of Mississippi-Oxford, University, MS 38677 (United States)

2012-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

112

Investigation of Data Quality for Wind Tunnel Internal Balance Testing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Achieving high quality, consistency, and testing efficiency in wind tunnel tests using internal balances is accomplished through the use of new testing methods, analysis of data output, and standardized documentation of test procedures at the Texas A&M Low Speed Wind Tunnel. The wind tunnel is capable of performing internal balance testing on models that experience less than 500 pounds of normal force. Testing has shown less than a 3% mean flow variation with the sting mount installed and a turbulence intensity of less than 0.25%. Documentation of procedures and check- lists for installation of internal balance testing equipment and test execution provide higher efficiency and consistency during a test. A step-by-step examination of the data analysis routines and associated uncertainty equations show uncertainty in the force and moment coefficients for the Mark XIII internal balance to be approximately ± 0.05 and ± 0.02, respectively. Quantifying the uncertainty of the primary output parameters and showing repeatability of the data within the defined uncertainty limits achieved higher quality results.

Hidore, John Preston

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

On the Relation between Perfect Tunneling and Band Gaps for SNG Metamaterial Structures  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this article we have proposed a compact classification of isotropic and homogenous single negative (SNG) electromagnetic metamaterial based perfect tunneling unit cells. This has been made by means of the band gap theories and properties of the arrays made up of these unit cells. Based on their reported characteristics, we have proposed new structures that simultaneously show perfect tunneling band and complete band gap (CBG - omni directional stop band for both polarizations). Besides, we have identified perfect tunneling which can be considered as "phase shifted perfect tunneling". Several interesting and new phenomena like Complete Perfect Tunneling (CPT - omni-directional perfect tunneling for both polarizations), Band Gap Shifting, CBG in Double Positive (DPS) material range, etc. have been reported with proper physical and mathematical explanations.

Mahdy, M R C; Shawon, Jubayer; Al-Quaderi, Golam Dastegir; Matin, M A

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Baker-Barry Tunnel Lighting: Evaluation of a Potential GATEWAY Demonstrations Project  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is evaluating the Baker-Barry Tunnel as a potential GATEWAY Demonstrations project for deployment of solid-state lighting (SSL) technology. The National Park Service (NPS) views this project as a possible proving ground and template for implementation of light-emitting diode (LED) luminaires in other NPS tunnels, thereby expanding the estimated 40% energy savings from 132 MWh/yr for this tunnel to a much larger figure national

Tuenge, Jason R.

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Facility Closure Report for T-Tunnel (U12t), Area 12, Nevada Test Site, Nevada  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Facility Closure Report (FCR) has been prepared to document the actions taken to permanently close the remaining accessible areas of U12t-Tunnel (T-Tunnel) in Area 12 of the Nevada Test Site (NTS). The closure of T-Tunnel was a prerequisite to transfer facility ownership from the Defense Threat Reduction Agency (DTRA) to the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO). Closure of the facility was accomplished with the cooperation and concurrence of both NNSA/NSO and the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP). The purpose of this FCR is to document that the closure of T-Tunnel complied with the closure requirements specified in the Facility Closure Plan for N- and T-Tunnels Area 12, Nevada Test Site (Appendix D) and that the facility is ready for transfer to NNSA/NSO. The Facility Closure Plan (FCP) is provided in Appendix D. T-Tunnel is located approximately 42 miles north of Mercury in Area 12 of the NTS (Figure 1). Between 1970 and 1987, T-Tunnel was used for six Nuclear Weapons Effects Tests (NWETs). The tunnel was excavated horizontally into the volcanic tuffs of Rainier Mesa. The T-Tunnel complex consists of a main access drift with two NWET containment structures, a Gas Seal Plug (GSP), and a Gas Seal Door (GSD) (Figure 2). The T-Tunnel complex was mothballed in 1993 to preserve the tunnel for resumption of testing, should it happen in the future, to stop the discharge of tunnel effluent, and to prevent unauthorized access. This was accomplished by sealing the main drift GSD.

NSTec Environmental Restoration

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

MISTY ECHO Tunnel Dynamics Experiment--Data report: Volume 1; Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project  

SciTech Connect

Tunnel damage resulting from seismic loading is an important issue for the Yucca Mountain nuclear waste repository. The tunnel dynamics experiment was designed to obtain and document ground motions, permanent displacements, observable changes in fracture patterns, and visible damage at ground motion levels of interest to the Yucca Mountain Project. Even though the maximum free-field loading on this tunnel was 28 g, the damage observed was minor. Fielding details, data obtained, and supporting documentation are reported.

Phillips, J.S.; Luke, B.A.; Long, J.W.; Lee, J.G.

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

MISTY ECHO tunnel dynamics experiment data report; Volume 2, Appendices: Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project  

SciTech Connect

Tunnel damage resulting from seismic loading is an important issue for the Yucca Mountain nuclear waste repository. The tunnel dynamics experiment was designed to obtain and document ground motions, permanent displacements, observable changes in fracture patterns, and visible damage at ground motion levels of interest to the Yucca Mountain Project. Even though the maximum free-field loading on this tunnel was 28 g, the damage observed was minor. Fielding details, data obtained, and supporting documentation are reported.

Phillips, J.S.; Luke, B.A.; Long, J.W.; Lee, J.G.

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

EE2, Regrown InGaAs Tunnel Junctions for TFETs - Programmaster ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

CBr4 and elemental Si were used as the dopant sources in the MBE ... Current-voltage (I-V) characteristics of regrown tunnel junctions on the ...

119

Vital Alert's C1000 mine and tunnel radios use magnetic induction...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Vital Alert's C1000 mine and tunnel radios use magnetic induction, advanced digital communications techniques and ultra-low frequency transmission to wirelessly provide...

120

Scanning tunneling optical resonance microscopy applied to indium arsenide quantum dot structures.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The technique of Scanning Tunneling Optical Resonance Microscopy (STORM) has been investigated for use on nanostructures. It has been demonstrated as a viable technique to… (more)

Byrnes, Daniel P.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tunnel overseeing organization" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Developing a Practical Wind Tunnel Test Engineering Course for Undergraduate Aerospace Engineering Students  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis describes the development and assessment of an undergraduate wind tunnel test engineering course utilizing the 7ft by 10ft Oran W. Nicks Low Speed Wind Tunnel (LSWT). Only 5 other universities in the United States have a wind tunnel of similar size and none have an undergraduate wind tunnel test engineering course built around it. Many universities use smaller wind tunnels for laboratory instruction, but these experiments are meant to only demonstrate basic concepts. Students go beyond conceptual learning in this wind tunnel test engineering course and conduct real-world experiments in the LSWT. This course puts knowledge into practice and further prepares students whether continuing on to graduate school or industry. Course content mainly originates from the chapters in Low Speed Wind Tunnel Testing by Barlow, Rae, and Pope. This is the most comprehensive book that addresses the specific requirements of large scale, low speed wind tunnel testing. It is not a textbook for novices. The three experiments used in the course are modeled on actual experiments that were performed at the LSWT. They are exactly what a commercial entity would want performed although the time scale is drastically reduced because of class requirements. Students complete the course with a working knowledge of the requirements of large scale, low speed wind tunnel tests because they have successfully performed real-world tests and have performed data reduction that is needed for high-quality industrial tests.

Recla, Benjamin Jeremiah

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

How Does Law Affect Finance? An Examination of Financial Tunneling in an Emerging Market  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

How Does Law Affect Finance? An Examination of FinancialWilliam Davidson Institute. How Does Law Affect Finance? Anfinancial tunneling, Prior work does not distinguish between

Black, Bernard; Atanasov, Vladimir; Ciccotello, Conrad S.; Gyoshev, Stanley B.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Optimization of light emitting diodes based on bipolar double-barrier resonant-tunneling structures  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A bipolar double-barrier resonant-tunneling light emitting diode will have maximum emitted light intensity if (1) electrons and holes simultaneously resonant-tunnel into the quantum well, (2) the charge carriers are entirely trapped in the well as the ... Keywords: Poisson equation, Schrodinger equation, automated computer code, bipolar double-barrier RTD structures, charge carriers, chemical compositions, doping profiles, electroluminescence, electroluminescence spectrum profile, electron-hole recombination, electron-hole recombination rate, geometric structures, light emitting diodes, near zero-field condition, optimisation, quantum well, resonant tunnelling diodes, resonant-tunneling LED, semiconductor device models, semiconductor quantum wells, temperature stability, theoretical modeling, thermal stability

A. Kindlihagen; K. A. Chao; M. Willander; J. Genoe

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Interaction-induced fractional Bloch and tunneling oscillations  

SciTech Connect

We study the dynamics of few interacting bosons in a one-dimensional lattice with dc bias. In the absence of interactions the system displays single-particle Bloch oscillations. For strong interaction the Bloch oscillation regime re-emerges with fractional Bloch periods which are inversely proportional to the number of bosons clustered into a bound state. The interaction strength affects the oscillation amplitude. Excellent agreement is found between numerical data and a composite particle dynamics approach. For specific values of the interaction strength, a particle will tunnel from the interacting cloud to a well-defined distant lattice location.

Khomeriki, Ramaz [Max Planck Institute for the Physics of Complex Systems, Noethnitzer Strasse 38, D-01187 Dresden (Germany); Physics Department, Tbilisi State University, Chavchavadze 3, 0128 Tbilisi (Georgia); Krimer, Dmitry O.; Haque, Masudul; Flach, Sergej [Max Planck Institute for the Physics of Complex Systems, Noethnitzer Strasse 38, D-01187 Dresden (Germany)

2010-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

125

Results from Point Contact Tunnelling Spectroscopy and Atomic Layer Deposition  

SciTech Connect

We have shown previously that magnetic niobium oxides can influence the superconducting density of states at the surface of cavity-grade niobium coupons. We will present recent results obtained by Point Contact Tunneling spectroscopy (PCT) on coupons removed from hot and cold spots in a niobium cavity, as well as a comparative study of magnetic oxides on mild baked/unbaked electropolished coupons. We will also describe recent results obtained from coated cavities, ALD films properties and new materials using Atomic Layer Deposition (ALD).

Proslier, Th. [Illinois Institute of Technology; Zasadzinski, J. [Illinois Institute of Technology; Ciovati, Gianluigi [JLAB; Kneisel, Peter K. [JLAB; Elam, J. W. [ANL; Norem, J. [ANL; Pellin, M. J. [ANL

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Tunneling through a parabolic barrier viewed from Wigner phase space  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We analyze the tunneling of a particle through a repulsive potential resulting from an inverted harmonic oscillator in the quantum mechanical phase space described by the Wigner function. In particular, we solve the partial differential equations in phase space determining the Wigner function of an energy eigenstate of the inverted oscillator. The reflection or transmission coefficients $R$ or $T$ are then given by the total weight of all classical phase space trajectories corresponding to energies below, or above the top of the barrier given by the Wigner function.

D. M. Heim; W. P. Schleich; P. M. Alsing; J. P. Dahl; S. Varro

2013-02-05T23:59:59.000Z

127

A magnetic tunnel junction based zero standby leakage current retention flip-flop  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recently, a magnetic tunnel junction (MTJ), which is a strong candidate as a next-generation memory element, has been used not only as a memory cell but also in spintronics logic because of its excellent properties of nonvolatility, no silicon area occupation, ... Keywords: magnetic tunnel junction (MTJ) logic, nonvolatile flip-flop, retention flip-flop, spintronics logic

Kyungho Ryu, Jisu Kim, Jiwan Jung, Jung Pill Kim, Seung H. Kang, Seong-Ook Jung

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Performing bitwise logic operations in cache using spintronics-based magnetic tunnel junctions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recent exciting developments in the emerging field of spintronics have enabled rapid advances in spintronic devices such as magnetic tunnel junctions (MTJs). While MTJs are being primarily used as the basic devices in non-volatile memory, they have also ... Keywords: magnetic tunnel junctions, spintronic logic functions, spintronics logic in memory

Shruti Patil; David J. Lilja

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Wind Tunnel and Field Test of Three 2D Sonic Anemometers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Wind Tunnel and Field Test of Three 2D Sonic Anemometers Wiel Wauben R&D Information and Observation Technology, KNMI September 17, 2007 #12;#12;Wind Tunnel and Field Test of Three 2D Sonic.....................................................................................................1 2. Wind sensors

Stoffelen, Ad

130

Performance of a Counterflow Virtual Impactor in the NASA Icing Research Tunnel  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A counterflow virtual impactor (CVI) designed for aircraft use was evaluated at the NASA Icing Research Tunnel in Cleveland, Ohio. Tests were conducted for tunnel speeds of 67 and 100 m s?1, for liquid water contents of 0.23–1.4 g m?3, and for a ...

C. H. Twohy; J. W. Strapp; M. Wendisch

2003-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Acoustic Survey of a 3/8-Scale Automotive Wind Tunnel  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An acoustic survey that consists of insertion loss and flow noise measurements was conducted at key locations around the circuit of a 3/8-scale automotive acoustic wind tunnel. Descriptions of the test, the instrumentation, and the wind tunnel facility ...

Jr Earl R. Booth; Romberg Gary; Hansen Larry; Lutz Ron

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Robust algorithm for tunnel closing in 3D volumetric objects based on topological characteristics of points  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this letter, we propose a robust, linear in time modification of Aktouf, Bertrand and Perroton's algorithm for tunnel (3D hole) closing in 3D volumetric objects. Our algorithm is insensitive to small distortions and branches. The algorithm has been ... Keywords: 3D image processing, Crack bridging, Skeletonisation, Topological numbers, Tunnel closing

Marcin Janaszewski; Micha? Postolski; Laurent Babout

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Low-Speed Wind-Tunnel Investigation of the Stability and Control Characteristics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A wind-tunnel investigation was conducted in the Langley 12-Foot Low-Speed Tunnel to study the low-speed stability and control characteristics of a series of four flying wings over an extended range of angle of attack (-8\\deg to 48\\deg). Because of the ...

Fears Scott P.; Ross Holly M.; Moul Thomas M.

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Novel Resonant-Tunneling Multiple-Threshold Logic Circuit Based on Switching Sequence Detection  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present a novel multiple-threshold circuit using resonant-tunneling diodes (RTDs). The logic operation is based on detecting a switching sequence in the RTD circuit. This scheme enables us to increase the number of threshold voltages by more than ... Keywords: Resonant-tunneling diode, Multiple-threshold, analog-to-digital converter

Takao Waho; Kazufumi Hattori; Kouji Honda

2000-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Petrology and geochemistry of samples from bed-contact zones in Tunnel Bed 5, U12g-Tunnel, Nevada Test Site  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report summarizes the detailed geologic characterization of samples of bed-contact zones and surrounding nonwelded bedded tuffs, both within Tunnel Bed 5, that are exposed in the G-Tunnel complex beneath Rainier Mesa on the Nevada Test Site (NTS). Original planning studies treated the bed-contact zones in Tunnel Bed 5 as simple planar surfaces of relatively high permeability. Detailed characterization, however, indicates that these zones have a finite thickness, are depositional in origin, vary considerably over short vertical and horizontal distances, and are internally complex. Fluid flow in a sequence of nonwelded zeolitized ash-flow or bedded tuffs and thin intervening reworked zones appears to be a porous-medium phenomenon, regardless of the presence of layering. There are no consistent differences in either bulk composition or detailed mineralogy between bedded tuffs and bed-contact zones in Tunnel Bed 5. Although the original bulk composition of Tunnel Bed 5 was probably peralkaline, extensive zeolitization has resulted in a present peraluminous bulk composition of both bedded tuffs and bed-contact zones. The major zeolite present, clinoptilolite, is intermediate (Ca:K:Na = 26:35:39) and effectively uniform in composition. This composition is similar to that of clinoptilolite from the tuffaceous beds of Calico Hills above the static water level in hole USW G-1, but somewhat different from that reported for zeolites from below the static water level in USW G-2. Tunnel Bed 5 also contains abundant hydrous manganese oxides. The similarity in composition of the clinoptilolites from Tunnel Bed 5 and those above the static water level at Yucca Mountain indicates that many of the results of nuclide-migration experiments in Tunnel Bed 5 would be transferrable to zeolitized nonwelded tuffs above the static water level at Yucca Mountain.

Connolly, J.R.; Keil, K.; Mansker, W.L.; Allen, C.C.; Husler, J.; Lowy, R.; Fortney, D.R.; Lappin, A.R.

1984-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Topeka's "Green Light Tunnel" Saves Fuel and Time | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Topeka's "Green Light Tunnel" Saves Fuel and Time Topeka's "Green Light Tunnel" Saves Fuel and Time Topeka's "Green Light Tunnel" Saves Fuel and Time April 22, 2011 - 1:50pm Addthis Topeka, Kansas, has activated the first of three key traffic corridors to receive a "green light tunnel," a real-time adaptive traffic signal system that synchronizes signals to create a series of green lights for motorists. The result is fewer stops, less travel time and -- most importantly -- a lot of saved gasoline. Sallie Glaize Project Officer, Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy What does this project do? Saves motorists in Topeka time and money. The first of three key traffic corridors in Topeka, Kansas has received a "green light tunnel," a real-time adaptive traffic signal system that

137

Facility Closure Report for Tunnel U16a, Area 16, Nevada Test Site, Nevada  

SciTech Connect

U16a is not listed in the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order. The closure of U16a was sponsored by the Defense Threat Reduction Agency (DTRA) and performed with the cooperation of the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office and the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection. This report documents closure of this site as identified in the DTRA Fiscal Year 2008 Statement of Work, Task 6.3. Closure activities included: · Removing and disposing of a shack and its contents · Disposing of debris from within the shack and in the vicinity of the tunnel entrance · Verifying that the tunnel is empty · Welding screened covers over tunnel vent holes to limit access and allow ventilation · Constructing a full-tunnel cross-section fibercrete bulkhead to prevent access to the tunnel Field activities were conducted from July to August 2008.

NSTec Environmental Restoration

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Combined Experiment Phase 1. [Horizontal axis wind turbines: wind tunnel testing versus field testing  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

How does wind tunnel airfoil data differ from the airfoil performance on an operating horizontal axis wind turbine (HAWT) The National Renewable Energy laboratory has been conducting a comprehensive test program focused on answering this question and understanding the basic fluid mechanics of rotating HAWT stall aerodynamics. The basic approach was to instrument a wind rotor, using an airfoil that was well documented by wind tunnel tests, and measure operating pressure distributions on the rotating blade. Based an the integrated values of the pressure data, airfoil performance coefficients were obtained, and comparisons were made between the rotating data and the wind tunnel data. Care was taken to the aerodynamic and geometric differences between the rotating and the wind tunnel models. This is the first of two reports describing the Combined Experiment Program and its results. This Phase I report covers background information such as test setup and instrumentation. It also includes wind tunnel test results and roughness testing.

Butterfield, C.P.; Musial, W.P.; Simms, D.A.

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

The Influence of Strain Relaxation on the Electrical Properties of Submicron Si/SiGe Resonant-Tunneling Diodes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Resonant tunneling devices (RTDs) and resonant tunneling transistors (RTTs) are possible building blocks with increased functionality of future microelectronic circuits. These quantum devices can be made in the Si/SiGe system, which is compatible with ... Keywords: SiGe, resonant tunneling, strain relaxation

P. W. Lukey; J. Caro; T. Zijlstra; E. van der Drift; S. Radelaar

2000-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Properties of tunnel junctions with fluorocarbon dielectric barriers  

SciTech Connect

Thesis. The electrical characteristics of In/I/In and In/I/Pb superconducting tunnel junctions have been studied in detail. Since In does not readily form pinhole free oxide layers, a thin insulating dielectric was formed on freshly deposited In film by passing an electric discharge through an atmosphere of fluorocarbon gas. Junctions were then completed by depositing a thin counter electrode of In or Pb. The same process was used to prepare high resistance junctions with Au as the base electrode; these were not however, studied in detail. In/I/In and In/I/Pb junctions were produced with resistances in the range 0.01 ohms to 10/sup 10/ ohms at liquid helium temperatures. Low resistance junctions exhibited nonlinear electrical characteristics associated with good quality oxide'' superconducting junctions including (a) the dc Josephson effcct, (b) quasiparticle tunneling characteristics. (c) phonon structure and (d) inelastic tunneling phenomena. The magnitude of the Josephson current for In/I/In junctions agreed to within a few percent of the value predicted by strong coupling theory. Current voltage (I-V) and first and second derivative curves for In/I/In and In/I/Pb were compared with curves for Al/I/In and Pb/I/Pb junctions. Discrepancies between the characteristics can be, for the most part, explained on the basis of existing theories of phonon mediated superconductivity using recent data from inelastic neutron scattering studies of In. Nonlinear structure at voltages below the phonon spectrum was observed and is most likely associated with Kohn singularities. At higher voltages, second derivative curves exhibited resonances characteristic of CH and OH impurities in the barrier as well as a complex spectrum associated with the vibrational spectrum of the fluorocarbon dielectric. To better characterize this dielectric, a variety of surface analytic techniques were used to determine the complex index of refraction, the chemical composition and chemical homogeneity of the barrier. I-V curves for high resistance junctions were used to determine the potential at the metal-insulator interface. (auth)

Jack, M.D.

1973-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tunnel overseeing organization" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Axial Ge/Si nanowire heterostructure tunnel FETs  

SciTech Connect

The vapor-liquid-solid (VLS) growth of semiconductor nanowires allows doping and composition modulation along their axis and the realization of axial 1 D heterostructures. This provides additional flexibility in energy band-edge engineering along the transport direction which is difficult to attain by planar materials growth and processing techniques. We report here on the design, growth, fabrication, and characterization of asymmetric heterostructure tunnel field-effect transistors (HTFETs) based on 100% compositionally modulated Si/Ge axial NWs for high on-current operation and low ambipolar transport behavior. We discuss the optimization of band-offsets and Schottky barrier heights for high performance HTFETs and issues surrounding their experimental realization. Our HTFET devices with 10 nm PECVD SiN{sub x} gate dielectric resulted in a measured current drive exceeding 100 {mu}A/{mu}m (I/{pi}D) and 10{sup 5} I{sub on}/I{sub off} ratios.

Picraux, Sanuel T [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Daych, Shadi A [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

A millikelvin scanning tunneling microscope with two independent scanning systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We describe the design, construction and operation of a scanning tunneling microscope (STM) with two tips that can independently acquire simultaneous scans of a sample. The STM is mounted on a dilution refrigerator and the setup includes vibration isolation, rf-filtered wiring, an ultra high vacuum (UHV) sample preparation chamber and sample transfer mechanism. We present images and spectroscopy taken with superconducting Nb tips with the refrigerator at 35 mK that indicate that the effective temperature of our tips/sample is approximately 184 mK, corresponding to an energy resolution of 16 $\\mu$eV. Atomic resolution topographic images of an Au(100) surface taken with the inner and outer tips were found to have root mean square roughness of 1.75 $\\pm$ 0.01 pm and 3.55 $\\pm$ 0.03 pm respectively.

Roychowdhury, A; Anderson, J R; Lobb, C J; Wellstood, F C; Dreyer, M

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Survey of radon and radon daughter concentrations in selected Rainier Mesa tunnels  

SciTech Connect

A survey of radon and radon daughter concentrations (RDCs) in selected tunnels on Rainier Mesa at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) was conducted as a part of the underground testing program at NTS. Measurements were taken in three tunnels, N, T, and G. Results of preliminary measurements indicate that N and T Tunnels have low RDCs, i.e., 0.01 WL (working level) (3% of the EPA standard), with normal ventilation conditions. However, it was demonstrated that RDCs can rise to relatively high levels, i.e., 0.24 WL when ventilation rates are significantly lowered. The radon daughter concentrations measured in G Tunnel were an order of magnitude higher than those in N and T Tunnels. The average RDC in the rock mechanics drift (the ''worst-case'' location in G Tunnel) was 0.13 WL with a range from 0.07 WL to 0.23 WL. Elevated RDCs found in the rock mechanics drift of G Tunnel seemed to be attributable to a lower ventilation rate in conjunction with the more highly fractured nature of the ''welded tuff'' rock formation in which the incline drift was mined. By increasing the ventilation rate, a 60% reduction in RDCs from an average of 0.13 Wl to an average of 0.05 WL was achieved.

Fauver, D.N.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Applicant Organization: | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Applicant Organization: Applicant Organization: Applicant Organization: More Documents & Publications BlueFire Ethanol, Inc. Applicant Organization: Applicant Organization:...

145

ScanningTunneling Luminescence of Grain Boundaries in Cu(In,Ga)Se2  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

At the Laboratory, photon emission in semiconductors has been mapped in the nanoscale using scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). In this Solar Program Review Meeting, we report on the latest results obtained in Cu(In,Ga)Se2 (CIGS) thin films by this adapted STM. Scanning tunneling luminescence (STL) spectroscopy suggests that photons are emitted near the surface of CIGS. STL is excited either by (1) diffusion of tunneling electrons and subsequent recombination with available holes in CIGS or (2) impact ionization by hot electrons. Which process becomes predominant depends on the voltage applied to the STM tip. Photon mapping shows electronically active, extended defects near the surface of CIGS thin films.

Romero, M. J.; Jiang, C.-S.; Al-Jassim, M. M.; Noufi, R.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Dynamical tunneling in molecules: role of the classical resonances and chaos  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this letter we study dynamical tunneling in highly excited symmetric molecules. The role of classical phase space structures like resonances and chaos on the tunneling splittings are illustrated using the water molecule as an example. It is argued that the enhancements in the splittings due to resonances (near-integrable phase space) and due to chaos (mixed phase space) are best understood away from the fluctuations associated with avoided crossings. In particular we provide an essential difference between the two mechanisms in terms of high order perturbation theory. The analysis, apart from testing the validity of a perturbative approach, suggests such systems as prime candidates for studying dynamical tunneling.

Srihari Keshavamurthy

2002-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

147

Investigation of the tunneling emitter bipolar transistor as spin-injector into silicon  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this thesis is discussed the tunneling emitter bipolar transistor as a possible spin-injector into silicon. The transistor has a metallic emitter which as a spin-injector will be a ferromagnet. Spin-polarized electrons ...

Van Veenhuizen, Marc Julien

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Riming of Graupel: Wind Tunnel Investigations of Collection Kernels and Growth Regimes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Laboratory experiments were carried out in the vertical wind tunnel in Mainz, Germany, to study the collision coalescence growth of single spherical ice particles having initial radii between 290 and 380 ?m while they were freely floated in a ...

Nadine von Blohn; Karoline Diehl; Subir K. Mitra; Stephan Borrmann

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Atomic-Scale Chemical Imaging via Combination of Scanning Tunneling and Electron Energy Loss Spectroscopies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Atomic-Scale Chemical Imaging via Combination of Scanning Tunneling and Electron Energy Loss visualization of chemical reaction pathways to provide mechanistic understanding for catalytically important systems at atomic level Develop atomically resolved chemical imaging platform via combination of low

150

Fire modeling for Building 221-T - T Plant Canyon Deck and Railroad Tunnel  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report was prepared by Hughes Associates, Inc. to document the results of fire models for building 221-T Canyon Deck and Railroad Tunnel. Backup data is contained in document No. WHC-SD-CP-ANAL-010, Rev. 0.

Oar, D.L.

1994-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

151

Propeller design optimization for tunnel bow thrusters in the bollard pull condition  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Tunnel bow thrusters are often used by large ships to provide low-speed lateral maneuverability when docking. Required to provide high thrust while essentially at a standstill, the design point for these thrusters is the ...

Wilkins, James R., IV

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Turbulence Spectra and Dissipation Rates in a Wind Tunnel Model of the Atmospheric Convective Boundary Layer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A model of the atmospheric convective boundary layer (CBL) is realized in the thermally stratified wind tunnel of the Institute of Hydrology and Water Resources, University of Karlsruhe. Further experimental results from this model are presented. ...

Rolf Kaiser; Evgeni Fedorovich

1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Earth pressure balance (EPB) tunneling induced settlements in the Tren Urbano Project, Rio Piedras, Puerto Rico  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Underground construction of the Rio Piedras section of the Tren Urbano project involved the construction of twin tunnels (6.3m diameter) with Earth Pressure Balance machines in weathered alluvial soil. The depth of the ...

Abrams, Alejandro J

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Wind Tunnel Tests of Parabolic Trough Solar Collectors: March 2001--August 2003  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Conducted extensive wind-tunnel tests on parabolic trough solar collectors to determine practical wind loads applicable to structural design for stress and deformation, and local component design for concentrator reflectors.

Hosoya, N.; Peterka, J. A.; Gee, R. C.; Kearney, D.

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Sponginess and Drop Shedding of Gyrating Hailstones in a Pressure-Controlled Icing Wind Tunnel  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Artificial hailstones were grown in an icing wind tunnel under simulated natural conditions, starting from oblate ice spheroids with major and minor diameters of 2.0 and 1.3 cm respectively, while undergoing symmetric gyration. The experiments ...

G. B. Lesins; Roland List

1986-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Simulation study of an ultra thin body silicon on insulator tunnel field effect transistor  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents a modified UTB SOI TFET structure and a thorough simulation study of various device design parameters on this structure. Keywords: UTB-SOI-TFET, band-to-band tunneling, sub-threshold swing

Partha Sarathi Gupta; Sayan Kanungo; Hafizur Rahaman; Partha Sarathi Dasgupta

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Double Barrier Resonant Tunneling Transistor with a Fully Two Dimensional Emitter  

SciTech Connect

A novel planar resonant tunneling transistor is demonstrated. The growth structure is similar to that of a double-barrier resonant tunneling diode (RTD), except for a fully two-dimensional (2D) emitter formed by a quantum well. Current is fed laterally into the emitter, and the 2D--2D resonant tunneling current is controlled by a surface gate. This unique device structure achieves figures-of-merit, i.e. peak current densities and peak voltages, approaching that of state-of-the-art RTDs. Most importantly, sensitive control of the peak current and voltage is achieved by gating of the emitter quantum well subband energy. This quantum tunneling transistor shows exceptional promise for ultra-high speed and multifunctional operation at room temperature.

MOON,J.S.; SIMMONS,JERRY A.; RENO,JOHN L.; BACA,WES E.; BLOUNT,MARK A.; HIETALA,VINCENT M.; JONES,ERIC D.

2000-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

158

Analyses of coupled hydrological-mechanical effects during drilling of the FEBEX tunnel at Grimsel  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

fluid pressure responses observed during TBM drilling of thefluid- pressure responses observed in the rock mass during TBM drillingdrilling, the open boundary at the tunnel wall controls the fluid

Rutqvist, J.; Rejeb, A.; Tijani, M.; Tsang, C.-F.

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Vacuum gaps with small tunnel currents at large electric field and its  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Vacuum gaps with small tunnel currents at large electric field and its Vacuum gaps with small tunnel currents at large electric field and its potential applications for energy storage, charge storage and power supplies. Friday, May 27, 2011 - 4:00pm SSRL Conference Room 137-226 Alfred Hubler, Department of Physics, University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign We study tunnel currents and electric break down in vacuum gaps experimentally and theoretically. We find that electric field at break down in nano vacuum gaps is 3 order of magnitude larger than in macroscopic capacitors. Pointed electrodes increase the limiting field even further. Eigen states in the gap can help to reduce tunnel currents. We discuss applications of this technology for energy storage, charge storage, and power supplies. Speaker Bio: Professor Alfred Hubler is the director of the Center for

160

Reading Comprehension - Organs and Organ Systems  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

together in a group make up an organ system. Examples of organ systems are cats and dogs the circulatory system and the respiratory system the stomacular system and...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tunnel overseeing organization" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Quantum-limited detection of millimeter waves using superconducting tunnel junctions  

SciTech Connect

The quasiparticle tunneling current in a superconductor-insulator- superconductor (SIS) tunnel junction is highly nonlinear. Such a nonlinearity can be used to mix two millimeter wave signals to produce a signal at a much lower intermediate frequency. We have constructed several millimeter and sub-millimeter wave SIS mixers in order to study high frequency response of the quasiparticle tunneling current and the physics of high frequency mixing. We have made the first measurement of the out-of-phase tunneling currents in an SIS tunnel junction. We have developed a method that allows us to determine the parameters of the high frequency embedding circuit by studying the details of the pumped I-V curve. We have constructed a 80--110 GHz waveguide-based mixer test apparatus that allows us to accurately measure the gain and added noise of the SIS mixer under test. Using extremely high quality tunnel junctions, we have measured an added mixer noise of 0.61 {plus_minus} 0.36 quanta, which is within 25 percent of the quantum limit imposed by the Heisenberg uncertainty principle. This measured performance is in excellent agreement with that predicted by Tucker`s theory of quantum mixing. We have also studied quasioptically coupled millimeter- and submillimeter-wave mixers using several types of integrated tuning elements. 83 refs.

Mears, C.A.

1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Quantum-limited detection of millimeter waves using superconducting tunnel junctions  

SciTech Connect

The quasiparticle tunneling current in a superconductor-insulator- superconductor (SIS) tunnel junction is highly nonlinear. Such a nonlinearity can be used to mix two millimeter wave signals to produce a signal at a much lower intermediate frequency. We have constructed several millimeter and sub-millimeter wave SIS mixers in order to study high frequency response of the quasiparticle tunneling current and the physics of high frequency mixing. We have made the first measurement of the out-of-phase tunneling currents in an SIS tunnel junction. We have developed a method that allows us to determine the parameters of the high frequency embedding circuit by studying the details of the pumped I-V curve. We have constructed a 80--110 GHz waveguide-based mixer test apparatus that allows us to accurately measure the gain and added noise of the SIS mixer under test. Using extremely high quality tunnel junctions, we have measured an added mixer noise of 0.61 {plus minus} 0.36 quanta, which is within 25 percent of the quantum limit imposed by the Heisenberg uncertainty principle. This measured performance is in excellent agreement with that predicted by Tucker's theory of quantum mixing. We have also studied quasioptically coupled millimeter- and submillimeter-wave mixers using several types of integrated tuning elements. 83 refs.

Mears, C.A.

1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Conductance fluctuations in chaotic systems with tunnel barriers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Quantum effects are expected to disappear in the short-wavelength, semiclassical limit. As a matter of fact, recent investigations of transport through quantum chaotic systems have demonstrated the exponential suppression of the weak localization corrections to the conductance and of the Fano factor for shot-noise when the Ehrenfest time exceeds the electronic dwell time. On the other hand, conductance fluctuations, an effect of quantum coherence, retain their universal value in the limit of the ratio of Ehrenfest time over dwell time to infinity, when the system is ideally coupled to external leads. Motivated by this intriguing result we investigate conductance fluctuations through quantum chaotic cavities coupled to external leads via (tunnel) barriers of arbitrary transparency. Using the trajectory-based semiclassical theory of transport, we find a linear Ehrenfest time-dependence of the conductance variance showing a nonmonotonous, sinusoidal behavior as a function of the transperancy. Most notably, we find an increase of the conductance fluctuations with the Ehrenfest time, above their universal value, for the transparency less than 0.5. These results, confirmed by numerical simulations, show that, contrarily to the common wisdom, effects of quantum coherence may increase in the semiclassical limit, under special circumstances.

Daniel Waltner; Jack Kuipers; Philippe Jacquod; Klaus Richter

2011-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

164

Ultra-low voltage resonant tunnelling diode electroabsorption modulator  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Embedding a double barrier resonant tunnelling diode (RTD) in an unipolar InGaAlAs optical waveguide gives rise to a very low driving voltage electroabsorption modulator (EAM) at optical wavelengths around 1550 nm. The presence of the RTD within the waveguide core introduces high non-linearity and negative differential resistance in the current-voltage (I-V) characteristic of the waveguide. This makes the electric field distribution across the waveguide core strongly dependent on the bias voltage: when the current decreases from the peak to the valley there is an increase of the electric field across the depleted core. The electric field enhancement in the core-depleted layer causes the Franz-Keldysh absorption band-edge to red shift, which is responsible for the electroabsorption effect. High frequency ac signals as low as 100 mV can induce electric field high speed switching, producing substantial light modulation (up to 15 dB) at photon energies slightly lower than the waveguide core band-gap energy. The k...

Figueiredo, J M L; Stanley, C R

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Actinide Sorption in Rainier Mesa Tunnel Waters from the Nevada Test Site  

SciTech Connect

The sorption behavior of americium (Am), plutonium (Pu), neptunium (Np), and uranium (U) in perched Rainier Mesa tunnel water was investigated. Both volcanic zeolitized tuff samples and groundwater samples were collected from Rainier Mesa, Nevada Test Site, NV for a series of batch sorption experiments. Sorption in groundwater with and without the presence of dissolved organic matter (DOM) was investigated. Am(III) and Pu(IV) are more soluble in groundwater that has high concentrations of DOM. The sorption K{sub d} for Am(III) and Pu(IV) on volcanic zeolitized tuff was up to two orders of magnitude lower in samples with high DOM (15 to 19 mg C/L) compared to samples with DOM removed (< 0.4 mg C/L) or samples with naturally low DOM (0.2 mg C/L). In contrast, Np(V) and U(VI) sorption to zeolitized tuff was much less affected by the presence of DOM. The Np(V) and U(VI) sorption Kds were low under all conditions. Importantly, the DOM was not found to significantly sorb to the zeolitized tuff during these experiment. The concentration of DOM in groundwater affects the transport behavior of actinides in the subsurface. The mobility of Am(III) and Pu(IV) is significantly higher in groundwater with elevated levels of DOM resulting in potentially enhanced transport. To accurately model the transport behavior of actinides in groundwater at Rainier Mesa, the low actinide Kd values measured in groundwater with high DOM concentrations must be incorporated in predictive transport models.

Zhao, P; Zavarin, M; Leif, R; Powell, B; Singleton, M; Lindvall, R; Kersting, A

2007-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

166

Some investigations on the enhancement of boiling heat transfer from planer surface embedded with continuous open tunnels  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Boiling heat transfer from a flat surface can be enhanced if continuous open tunnel type structures are embedded in it. Further, improvement of boiling heat transfer from such surfaces has been tried by two separate avenues. At first, inclined tunnels are embedded over the solid surface and an effort is made to optimize the tunnel inclination for boiling heat transfer. Surfaces are manufactured in house with four different inclinations of the tunnels with or without a reentrant circular pocket at the end of the tunnel. Experiments conducted in the nucleate boiling regime showed that 45 deg inclination of the tunnels for both with and without base geometry provides the highest heat transfer coefficient. Next, active fluid rotation was imposed to enhance the heat transfer from tunnel type surfaces with and without the base geometry. Rotational speed imparted by mechanical stirrer was varied over a wide range. It was observed that fluid rotation enhances the heat transfer coefficient only up to a certain value of stirrer speed. Rotational speed values, beyond this limit, reduce the boiling heat transfer severely. A comparison shows that embedding continuous tunnel turns out to be a better option for the increase of heat transfer coefficient compared to the imposition of fluid rotation. But the behavior of inclined tunnels under the action of fluid rotation is yet to be established and can be treated as a future scope of the work. (author)

Das, A.K.; Das, P.K.; Saha, P. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology, Kharagpur 721 302 (India)

2010-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

167

MHL 2D Wind/Wave | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

MHL 2D Wind/Wave MHL 2D Wind/Wave Jump to: navigation, search Basic Specifications Facility Name MHL 2D Wind/Wave Overseeing Organization University of Michigan Hydrodynamics Hydrodynamic Testing Facility Type Tunnel Length(m) 35.1 Beam(m) 0.7 Depth(m) 1.2 Cost(per day) $2000 (+ Labor/Materials) Towing Capabilities Towing Capabilities None Wavemaking Capabilities Wavemaking Capabilities Yes Maximum Wave Height(m) 0.2 Wave Period Range(s) 0.0 Current Velocity Range(m/s) 0.0 Programmable Wavemaking Yes Wavemaking Description Regular and irregular wave spectrum Wave Direction Uni-Directional Simulated Beach Yes Description of Beach Removable beach Channel/Tunnel/Flume Channel/Tunnel/Flume Yes Recirculating No Wind Capabilities Wind Capabilities Yes Wind Velocity Range(m/s) 20.4

168

Final Report on LDRD Project: Development of Quantum Tunneling Transistors for Practical Circuit Applications  

SciTech Connect

The goal of this LDRD was to engineer further improvements in a novel electron tunneling device, the double electron layer tunneling transistor (DELTT). The DELTT is a three terminal quantum device, which does not require lateral depletion or lateral confinement, but rather is entirely planar in configuration. The DELTT's operation is based on 2D-2D tunneling between two parallel 2D electron layers in a semiconductor double quantum well heterostructure. The only critical dimensions reside in the growth direction, thus taking full advantage of the single atomic layer resolution of existing semiconductor growth techniques such as molecular beam epitaxy. Despite these advances, the original DELTT design suffered from a number of performance short comings that would need to be overcome for practical applications. These included (i)a peak voltage too low ({approx}20 mV) to interface with conventional electronics and to be robust against environmental noise, (ii) a low peak current density, (iii) a relatively weak dependence of the peak voltage on applied gate voltage, and (iv) an operating temperature that, while fairly high, remained below room temperature. In this LDRD we designed and demonstrated an advanced resonant tunneling transistor that incorporates structural elements both of the DELTT and of conventional double barrier resonant tunneling diodes (RTDs). Specifically, the device is similar to the DELTT in that it is based on 2D-2D tunneling and is controlled by a surface gate, yet is also similar to the RTD in that it has a double barrier structure and a third collector region. Indeed, the device may be thought of either as an RTD with a gate-controlled, fully 2D emitter, or alternatively, as a ''3-layer DELTT,'' the name we have chosen for the device. This new resonant tunneling transistor retains the original DELTT advantages of a planar geometry and sharp 2D-2D tunneling characteristics, yet also overcomes the performance shortcomings of the original DELTT design. In particular, it exhibits the high peak voltages and current densities associated with conventional RTDs, allows sensitive control of the peak voltage by the control gate, and operates nearly at room temperature. Finally, we note under this LDRD we also investigated the use of three layer DELTT structures as long wavelength (Terahertz) detectors using photon-assisted tunneling. We have recently observed a narrowband (resonant) tunable photoresponse in related structures consisting of grating-gated double quantum wells, and report on that work here as well.

SIMMONS, JERRY A.; MOON, JUENG-SUN; BLOUNT, MARK; LYO, SUNGKWUN K.; BACA, WES E.; RENO, JOHN L.; LILLY, MICHAEL P.; WENDT, JOEL R.; WANKE, MICHAEL C.; PERALTA, X.G.; EISENSTEIN, J.P.; BURKE, P.J.

2002-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

e+ e- collider in the VLHC tunnel. Proceedings, Workshop, Chicago, USA, March 9-11, 2001  

SciTech Connect

This document is a collection of the contributions made to the March IIT workshop on an e{sup +}e{sup -} collider in the VLHC tunnel. This machine, which is based on a relatively conservative extrapolation of LEP technology, has a baseline luminosity of 10{sup 33}/cm{sup 2}/s at a CM energy of 370 GeV. The overall parameters and general description of such a machine is described in T. Sen and J. Norem, ''A Very Large Lepton Collider in the VLHC Tunnel'', to be published. A preprint of this paper is included as Appendix 2 of this report. The intention of the workshop was to define the parameters of such a collider and make them available to the community for use in further physics studies. It is clear that the machine cannot compete with a full scale linear collider. Its main interest would be if a VLHC were built and if a linear collider did not already exist. In this case, it could provide a limited and perhaps crucial view of low mass Higgs states. Although the study is incomplete, it does define rather well the parameters of the machine, as well as the challenges that the design faces. The study benefited greatly from the participation of the machine experts that were willing to spend time looking at the design. In this document, the workshop contributions are organized into sections which cover the physics motivation for the machine; the injector; beam dynamics issues in the collider; and accelerator systems. The physics section describes luminosity benchmarks for study of a light Higgs boson, and machine performance issues related to lineshape measurements at the t{bar t} threshold. The contribution on the injector presents a design for a 45 GeV injector. The injection energy is motivated by two considerations: the collider has potential stability problems at injection, which are mitigated by a relatively high injection energy; and, at this energy, the injector can also serve as a Z{sup 0} factory. One of the principal conclusions of the IIT workshop was that this was the most natural way to provide a high-luminosity Z{sup 0} factory with polarized beams. The beam dynamics contributions cover a range of topics, including experience from LEP, design options for the lattice and IR's that aim at increasing the luminosity to close to 10{sup 34}/cm{sup 2}/s, and considerations on beam stability, rf system distribution, beam separation, and radiative spin polarization of the beams. The magnet, vacuum system, and rf system required for the machine are discussed in the accelerator systems contributions. Finally, in the conclusions section, the leading R&D issues for the machine, as identified at the workshop, are summarized. In an Appendix, some thoughts on beam-beam considerations for a VLLC are provided.

Dugan, D., (ed.); /Cornell U., LEPP; Tollestrup, A., (ed.); /Fermilab

2001-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Wind Tunnel Aeroacoustic Tests of Six Airfoils for Use on Small Wind Turbines: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Aeroacoustic tests of seven airfoils were performed in an open jet anechoic wind tunnel. Six of the airfoils are candidates for use on small wind turbines operating at low Reynolds number. One airfoil was tested for comparison to benchmark data. Tests were conducted with and without boundary layer tripping. In some cases a turbulence grid was placed upstream in the test section to investigate inflow turbulence noise. An array of 48 microphones was used to locate noise sources and separate airfoil noise from extraneous tunnel noise. Trailing edge noise was dominant for all airfoils in clean tunnel flow. With the boundary layer untripped, several airfoils exhibited pure tones that disappeared after proper tripping was applied. In the presence of inflow turbulence, leading edge noise was dominant for all airfoils.

Migliore, P.; Oerlemans, S.

2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Measurement of the Equivalent Thermal Resistance of Rooftop Lawns in a Hot-Climate Wind Tunnel  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In a very hot summer equivalent to a Guangzhou summer, the reduction of heat coming into rooms is very important with respect to thermal comfort and energy efficiency. The objective of this study is to investigate the evaporation cooling effect on a rooftop lawn. A hot-climate wind tunnel experiment was carried out in order to obtain and analyze the heat and moisture transport in the rooftop lawn. Furthermore, a calculation with the energy conservation equation was carried out using the results of the hot-climate wind tunnel experiment. The calculated equivalent thermal resistance and synthesis exterior surface heat transfer coefficient were in fairly good agreement with that in the design standard for energy efficiency of residential buildings in the hot summer and warm winter zone, while the average velocity in hot-climate wind tunnel equals the summer average outdoor velocity in Guangzhou.

Meng, Q.; Zhang, Y.; Zhang, L.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Characteristics of wind power on Savonius rotor using a guide-box tunnel  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study investigates to improve and adjust the output power of Savonius rotor under various wind power and suggests the method of prevention the rotor from strong wind disaster. In this study, as the appropriate device to achieve the purpose of it, a guide-box tunnel is employed. The guide-box tunnel is like a rectangular box as wind passage in which a test rotor is included. The area ratio between the inlet and exit of it is variable to adjust the inlet mass flow rate or input power. At first, the experiment was conducted to find the adequate configuration which would provide the best relative performance. The present experiment, however, does not include the test to retain the guide-box tunnel from the strong wind. The experiments include the static torque test of the fixed rotor at any phase angle and the dynamic torque test at rotation of them. Consequently, it was found that the maximum rotor rotational speed was achieved in the range of the guide-box area ratio between 0.3 and 0.7 and the value of the output power coefficient of the rotor with guide-box tunnel of the area ratio 0.43 increases about 1.5 times with three blades and 1.23 times with two blades greater than that without guide-box tunnel, respectively. It seemed that the performance of Savonius rotor within the guide-box tunnel is comparable enough with other methods for augmentation and control of the output. (author)

Irabu, Kunio; Roy, Jitendro Nath [Faculty of Mechanical Engineering, University of the Ryukyus, Senbaru-1, Nishihara, Okinawa 903-0213 (Japan)

2007-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

173

Regulation of the intersubunit ammonia tunnel in Mycobacterium tuberculosis glutamine-dependent NAD[superscript +] synthetase  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Glutamine-dependent NAD{sup +} synthetase is an essential enzyme and a validated drug target in Mycobacterium tuberculosis (mtuNadE). It catalyses the ATP-dependent formation of NAD{sup +} from NaAD{sup +} (nicotinic acid-adenine dinucleotide) at the synthetase active site and glutamine hydrolysis at the glutaminase active site. An ammonia tunnel 40 {angstrom} (1 {angstrom} = 0.1 nm) long allows transfer of ammonia from one active site to the other. The enzyme displays stringent kinetic synergism; however, its regulatory mechanism is unclear. In the present paper, we report the structures of the inactive glutaminase C176A variant in an apo form and in three synthetase-ligand complexes with substrates (NaAD{sup +}/ATP), substrate analogue {l_brace}NaAD{sup +}/AMP-CPP (adenosine 5'-[{alpha},{beta}-methylene]triphosphate){r_brace} and intermediate analogues (NaAD{sup +}/AMP/PPi), as well as the structure of wild-type mtuNadE in a product complex (NAD{sup +}/AMP/PPi/glutamate). This series of structures provides snapshots of the ammonia tunnel during the catalytic cycle supported also by kinetics and mutagenesis studies. Three major constriction sites are observed in the tunnel: (i) at the entrance near the glutaminase active site; (ii) in the middle of the tunnel; and (iii) at the end near the synthetase active site. Variation in the number and radius of the tunnel constrictions is apparent in the crystal structures and is related to ligand binding at the synthetase domain. These results provide new insight into the regulation of ammonia transport in the intermolecular tunnel of mtuNadE.

Chuenchor, Watchalee; Doukov, Tzanko I.; Resto, Melissa; Chang, Andrew; Gerratana, Barbara (SSRL); (Maryland)

2012-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

174

Effects of diesel exhaust on the microbiota within a tuffaceous tunnel system  

SciTech Connect

The abundance and distribution of microbiota that may be impacted by diesel and diesel exhaust were investigated from three depths into the walls and invert (floor) of U12n tunnel at Rainier Mesa, Nevada Test Site, a potential geological analog of Yucca Mountain. Enumerations included total cell counts, and numbers of aerobic heterotrophic, sulfate-reducing, nitrate-reducing, and diesel-degrading bacteria. Additionally, the disappearance of total petroleum hydrocarbons was determined in microcosms containing subsurface materials that were amended with diesel fuel. Results revealed that microbes capable of utilizing diesel and diesel combustion products were present in the subsurface in both the walls and the invert of the tunnel. The abundance of specific bacterial types in the tunnel invert, a perturbed environment, was greater than that observed in the tunnel wall. Few trends of microbial distribution either into the tunnel wall or the invert were noted with the exception of aerobic heterotrophic abundance which increased with depth into the wall and decreased with depth into the invert. No correlation between microbiota and a specific introduced chemical species have yet been determined. The potential for microbial contamination of the tunnel wall during sampling was determined to be negligible by the use of fluorescently labeled latex spheres (1{mu}m in dia.) as tracers. Results indicate that additional investigations might be needed to examine the microbiota and their possible impacts on the geology and geochemistry of the subsurface, both indigenous microbiota and those microorganisms that will likely be introduced by anthropogenic activity associated with the construction of a high-level waste repository.

Haldeman, D.L.; Lagadinos, T.; Amy, P.S. [Univ. of Nevada, Las Vegas, NV (United States); Hersman, L. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Meike, A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., Livermore, CA (United States)

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

A Wind Tunnel Investigation of the Effect of an External, Vertical Electric Field on the Shape of Electrically Uncharged Rain Drops  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Results are presented of a recent wind tunnel experiment in which electrically unchanged water drops of 1000–3000 ?m equivalent radius were freely suspended in the vertical air stream of the UCLA Cloud Tunnel. During their suspension, the drops ...

R. Rasmussen; C. Walcek; H.R. Pruppacher; S.K. Mitra; J. Lew; V. Levizzani; P.K. Wang; U. Barth

1985-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Wind Tunnel Measurements of the Response of Hot-Wire Liquid Water Content Instruments to Large Droplets  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Wet wind tunnel tests were performed on more than 23 cloud liquid water content (LWC) probes and drop spectrometers at the NASA Icing Research Tunnel, with a main objective to characterize their response to large-droplet conditions. As a part of ...

J. W. Strapp; J. Oldenburg; R. Ide; L. Lilie; S. Bacic; Z. Vukovic; M. Oleskiw; D. Miller; E. Emery; G. Leone

2003-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Estimation of gate-to-channel tunneling current in ultra-thin oxide sub-50nm double gate devices  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Double gate (DG) FETs have emerged as the most promising technology for sub-50nm transistor design. However, analysis and control of the gate tunneling leakage in DGFET is necessary to fully exploit their advantages. In this paper we have modeled (numerically ... Keywords: Direct tunneling, Double gate, Leakage, Quantum confinement

Saibal Mukhopadhyay; Keunwoo Kim; Jae-Joon Kim; Shih-Hsien Lo; Rajiv V. Joshi; Ching-Te Chuang; Kaushik Roy

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Attachments for fire modeling for Building 221-T, T Plant canyon deck and railroad tunnel  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this attachment is to provide historical information and documentation for Document No. WHC-SD-CP-ANAL-008 Rev 0, ``Fire Modeling for Building 221-T--T Plant Canyon Deck and Railroad Tunnel``, dated September 29, 1994. This data compilation contains the following: Resumes of the Technical Director, Senior Engineer and Junior Engineer; Review and Comment Record; Software Files; CFAST Input and Output Files; Calculation Control Sheets; and Estimating Sprinkler Actuation Time in the Canyon and Railroad Tunnel. The T Plant was originally a fuel reprocessing facility. It was modified later to decontaminate and repair PuRex process equipment.

Oar, D.L. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States)

1995-01-23T23:59:59.000Z

179

Bose-Hubbard dimer scattered from a potential barrier: from co-tunneling to dissociation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We consider a Bose-Hubbard dimer scattered from a potential barrier. A numerical approach has been developed to treat the stationary scattering problem. It allows to compute the tunneling and dissociation probabilities for arbitrary shape of the potential barrier and arbitrary kinetic energy of the dimer. The obtained results are shown to be in agreement with previous studies of the dimer wave-packet dynamics [A.R.Kolovsky, J.Link, and S.Wimberger, New J. of Phys. {\\bf 14}, 075002 (2012)]. In particular, we reproduce the effect of resonant tunneling found in the cited paper and show that this effect can be enhanced by decreasing the dimer kinetic energy.

Dmitrii N. Maksimov; Andrey R. Kolovsky

2013-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

180

Using tevatron magnets for HE-LHC or new ring in LHC tunnel  

SciTech Connect

Two injector accelerator options for HE-LHC of p{sup +} - p{sup +} collisions at 33 TeV cms energy are briefly outlined. One option is based on the Super-SPS (S-SPS) accelerator in the SPS tunnel, and the other one is based on the LER (Low-Energy-Ring) accelerator in the LHC tunnel. Expectations of performance of the main arc accelerator magnets considered for the construction of the S-SPS and of the LER accelerators are used to tentatively devise some selected properties of these accelerators as potential injectors to HE-LHC.

Piekarz, Henryk; /Fermilab

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

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181

Monolithic interconnected module with a tunnel junction for enhanced electrical and optical performance  

SciTech Connect

An improved thermophotovoltaic (TPV) n/p/n device is provided. Monolithic Interconnected Modules (MIMS), semiconductor devices converting infrared radiation to electricity, have been developed with improved electrical and optical performance. The structure is an n-type emitter on a p-type base with an n-type lateral conduction layer. The incorporation of a tunnel junction and the reduction in the amount of p-type material used results in negligible parasitic absorption, decreased series resistance, increased voltage and increased active area. The novel use of a tunnel junction results in the potential for a TPV device with efficiency greater than 24%.

Murray, Christopher S. (Bethel Park, PA); Wilt, David M. (Bay Village, OH)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

A Monolithic Interconnected module with a tunnel Junction for Enhanced Electrical and Optical Performance  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved thermophotovoltaic (TPV) n/p/n device is provided. Monolithic Interconnected Modules (MIMs), semiconductor devices converting infrared radiation to electricity, have been developed with improved electrical and optical performance. The structure is an n-type emitter on a p-type base with an n-type lateral conduction layer. The incorporation of a tunnel junction and the reduction in the amount of p-type material used results in negligible parasitic absorption, decreased series resistance, increased voltage and increased active area. The novel use of a tunnel junction results in the potential for a TPV device with efficiency greater than 24%.

Murray, Christopher Sean; Wilt, David Morgan

1999-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

183

Thin-film metal coated insulation barrier in a Josephson tunnel junction. [Patent application  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A highly stable, durable, and reproducible Josephson tunnel junction consists of a thin-film electrode of a hard superconductor, a thin oxide insulation layer over the electrode constituting a Josephson tunnel junction barrier, a thin-film layer of stabilizing metal over the barrier, and a second thin-film hard superconductive electrode over the stabilizing film. The thin stabilizing metal film is made only thick enough to limit penetration of the electrode material through the insulation layer so as to prevent a superconductive short.

Hawkins, G.A.; Clarke, J.

1975-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

184

Effects of boron composition on tunneling magnetoresistance ratio and microstructure of CoFeB/MgO/CoFeB pseudo-spin-valve magnetic tunnel junctions  

SciTech Connect

The effect of B concentration on the tunneling magnetoresistance (TMR) of (Co{sub 25}Fe{sub 75}){sub 100-x}B{sub x}/MgO/(Co{sub 25}Fe{sub 75}){sub 100-x}B{sub x} (x = 22 and 33) pseudo-spin-valve (P-SV) magnetic tunnel junctions (MTJs) was investigated. The TMR ratios for optimally annealed MTJs with x = 22 and 33 were 340% and 170%, respectively, at room temperature. High resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) observation showed a weaker (001) texture in the MgO barrier in the MTJ with x = 33. The bottom electrode was not fully crystallized even with a considerable amount of B in the (Co{sub 25}Fe{sub 75}){sub 67}B{sub 33}, while good epitaxy was observed between (001) textured MgO and (Co{sub 25}Fe{sub 75}){sub 78}B{sub 22} electrodes.

Kodzuka, M. [Graduate School of Pure and Applied Sciences, University of Tsukuba, Tsukuba 305-0047 (Japan); Ohkubo, T. [National Institute for Materials Science, Tsukuba 305-0047 (Japan); Hono, K. [Graduate School of Pure and Applied Sciences, University of Tsukuba, Tsukuba 305-0047 (Japan); National Institute for Materials Science, Tsukuba 305-0047 (Japan); Ikeda, S.; Ohno, H. [Center for Spintronics Integrated Systems, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan); Laboratory for Nanoelectronics and Spintronics, Research Institute of Electrical Communication, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan); Gan, H. D. [Center for Spintronics Integrated Systems, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan)

2012-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

185

Giant tunneling magnetoresistance up to 330% at room temperature in sputter deposited Co{sub 2}FeAl/MgO/CoFe magnetic tunnel junctions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Magnetoresistance ratio up to 330% at room temperature (700% at 10 K) has been obtained in a spin-valve-type magnetic tunnel junction (MTJ) consisting of a full-Heusler alloy Co{sub 2}FeAl electrode and a MgO tunnel barrier fabricated on a single crystal MgO (001) substrate by sputtering method. The output voltage of the MTJ at one-half of the zero-bias value was found to be as high as 425 mV, which is the largest reported to date in MTJs using Heusler alloy electrodes. The present finding suggests that Co{sub 2}FeAl may be one of the most promising candidates for future spintronics devices applications.

Wang Wenhong; Sukegawa, Hiroaki; Shan, Rong; Mitani, Seiji; Inomata, Koichiro [Magnetic Materials Center, National Institute for Materials Science (NIMS), 1-2-1 Sengen, Tsukuba 305-0047 (Japan)

2009-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

186

Understanding Tunneling Magnetoresistance During Thermal Annealing in MgO-based Junctions with CoFeB Electrodes  

SciTech Connect

The competition between the interface crystallization and diffusion processes, their influence on the onset of symmetry-filtering coherent tunneling of {Delta}{sub 1} band electrons in the MgO-based magnetic tunnel junctions is investigated. Systematic study of the transport and magnetoresistance during thermal annealing of these junctions shows a unique behavior of the tunneling conductance in the parallel state. The optimal annealing time for achieving giant tunneling magnetoresistance at different temperatures is determined. The evolution of magnetoresistance consists of three distinct regions, responsible by different contributions from CoFeB electrodes and the MgO barrier. The whole phenomenon can be understood through an empirical model based on the Landauer tunneling picture.

Wang, W.; Ni, C; Miao, X; Weiland, C; Shah, L; Fan, X; Parson, P; Jordan-Sweet, J; Kou, X; Zhang, Y

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Organization | Department of Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Organization Leadership Organization Contact Us The Office of Economic Impact and Diversity is comprised of six offices: The Office of the Director- contact us Office of...

188

SSRL Users' Organization Ballot  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2003 SSRL Users' Organization Executive Committee (SSRLUO-EC) Ballot The SSRL Users' Organization Executive Committee represents the scientific user community to the SSRL...

189

Electron tunneling in MIS capacitors with the MBE-grown fluoride layers on Si(111) and Ge(111): Role of transverse momentum conservation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The current-voltage characteristics of the metal-insulator-semiconductor tunneling structures with calcium fluoride are simulated using different theoretical models. The results are compared to the data of current measurements on the fabricated capacitors ... Keywords: Calcium fluoride, MIS capacitors, Transverse momentum conservation, Tunnel emitter phototransistor, Tunneling current

Y. Y. Illarionov; M. I. Vexler; S. M. Suturin; V. V. Fedorov; N. S. Sokolov; K. Tsutsui; K. Takahashi

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Organic Electronics: Organic thin-film magnetometers  

SciTech Connect

Magnetometry usually requires large probes and bulky instrumentation. Organic diodes have now been used in small probes that can measure moderate magnetic fields with 10 ppm precision.

Shinar, Joseph

2012-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

191

Mobile Sensor Routing for Parameter Estimation of Distributed Systems Using the Parallel Tunneling Method  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The paper deals with the problem of optimal path planning for a sensor network with mutliple mobile nodes, whose measurements are supposed to be primarily used to estimate unknown parameters of a system modelled by a partial differential equation. The ... Keywords: Distributed Parameter Systems, Optimum Experimental Design, Parallel Computing, Sensor Network, Tunneling Algorithm

Tomasz Zi?ba; Dariusz Uci?ski

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Fast recovery from dual-link or single-node failures in IP networks using tunneling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper develops novel mechanisms for recovering from failures in IP networks with proactive backup path calculations and Internet Protocol (IP) tunneling. The primary scheme provides resilience for up to two link failures along a path. The highlight ... Keywords: IP fast reroute, failure recovery, independent trees, multiple-link failure, network protection, node failure

Shrinivasa Kini; Srinivasan Ramasubramanian; Amund Kvalbein; Audun Fosselie Hansen

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Unsteady Aerodynamics Experiment Phase VI: Wind Tunnel Test Configurations and Available Data Campaigns  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The primary objective of the insteady aerodynamics experiment was to provide information needed to quantify the full-scale, three-dimensional aerodynamic behavior of horizontal-axis wind turbines. This report is intended to familiarize the user with the entire scope of the wind tunnel test and to support the use of the resulting data.

Hand, M. M.; Simms, D. A.; Fingersh, L. J.; Jager, D. W.; Cotrell, J. R.; Schreck, S.; Larwood, S. M.

2001-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Investigating the IPv6 teredo tunnelling capability and performance of internet clients  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Teredo auto-tunnelling protocol allows IPv6 hosts behind IPv4 NATs to communicate with other IPv6 hosts. It is enabled by default on Windows Vista and Windows 7. But Windows clients are self-constrained: if their only IPv6 access is Teredo, they ... Keywords: ipv6, teredo

Sebastian Zander; Lachlan L.H. Andrew; Grenville Armitage; Geoff Huston; George Michaelson

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Density-gradient theory: a macroscopic approach to quantum confinement and tunneling in semiconductor devices  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Density-gradient theory provides a macroscopic approach to modeling quantum transport that is particularly well adapted to semiconductor device analysis and engineering. After some introductory observations, the basis of the theory in macroscopic and ... Keywords: Continuum, Density-gradient, Electron transport, Quantum confinement, Quantum tunneling, Semiconductor device simulation, Thermodynamics

M. G. Ancona

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

WIND-TUNNEL STUDY ON AERODYNAMIC PERFORMANCE OF SMALL VERTICAL-AXIS WIND TURBINES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of a building was explored [2]. Referred to such applications, a VAWT can be so small in physical size that its by the present authors to study the aerodynamic performance of small VAWTs using the experimental and numerical1 WIND-TUNNEL STUDY ON AERODYNAMIC PERFORMANCE OF SMALL VERTICAL-AXIS WIND TURBINES J. J. Miau*1

Leu, Tzong-Shyng "Jeremy"

197

Charged fermion tunnelling from electrically and magnetically charged rotating black hole in de Sitter space  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Thermal radiation of electrically charged fermions from rotating black hole with electric and magnetic charges in de Sitter space is considered. The tunnelling probabilities for outgoing and incoming particles are obtained and the Hawking temperature is calculated. The relation for the classical action for the particles in the black hole's background is also found.

M. M. Stetsko

2013-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

198

The black-hole area spectrum in the tunneling formalism with GUP  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The black hole area spectrum has been studied in the framework of tunneling mechanism, where a Generalized Uncertainty Principle (GUP) has been considered. The results implies in a non evenly spaced spectrum for the black hole area which becomes increasingly spaced as the black hole evaporates.

Silva, C A S

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

The black-hole area spectrum in the tunneling formalism with GUP  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The black hole area spectrum has been studied in the framework of tunneling mechanism, where a Generalized Uncertainty Principle (GUP) has been considered. The results implies in a non evenly spaced spectrum for the black hole area which becomes increasingly spaced as the black hole evaporates.

C. A. S. Silva; R. R. Landim

2011-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

200

A Wind Tunnel Investigation on the Riming of Snowflakes. Part I: Porous Disks and Large Stellars  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The effects of porosity on the accretional growth characteristics of ice crystal aggregates (snowflakes) are investigated by riming circular disks of ice in a cloud tunnel. Twelve disk models were used, sized 5 to 6 mm and 10 to 11 mm in diameter,...

Jeffrey K. Lew; Derek C. Montague; Hans R. Pruppacher; Roy M. Rasmussen

1986-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tunnel overseeing organization" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Wind Tunnel Experiment for Predicting a Visible Plume Region from a Nuclear Power Plant Cooling Tower  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The current paper introduces a wind tunnel experiment to study the effect of the cooling tower of a Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) on the flow and the characteristics of visible plume regions. The relevant characteristics of the flow field near the ...

Guo Dong-peng; Yao Ren-tai; Fan Dan

202

A Wind Tunnel Investigation on the Riming of Snowflakes. Part II: Natural and Synthetic Aggregates  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Natural and artificial snowflakes have been rimed both in free fall and while suspended on a thin flexible fiber in the UCLA cloud tunnel. The results of these experiments show that during the early stage of riming, the motions exhibited by a ...

Jeffrey K. Lew; Derek C. Montague; Hans R. Pruppacher; Roy M. Rasmussen

1986-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

A Simple Technique for Simultaneous Suspension of Multiple Drops in a Small Vertical Wind Tunnel  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A simple technique is described by which multiple millimeter-size water drops can be simultaneously suspended in an air stream above the test section of a 12 × 12 cm cross section of a vertical wind tunnel. Horizontal profiles of the vertical air ...

A. K. Kamra; D. V. Ahire

1985-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Tunneling vs. thermionic currents in multi-quantum well photovoltaic structures  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Photogeneration in the intrinsic region of a p-i-n device excites carriers in the conduction bands with non-zero currents. A special class of multi-quantum well photovoltaic structures (mqw-PV) is p-i-n PV structures where photo-generation may cause ... Keywords: microelectronics, quantum wells, solar cells, superlattices, tunneling

Argyrios C. Varonides; Robert A. Spalletta

2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Smart bridges, smart tunnels: Transforming wireless sensor networks from research prototypes into robust engineering infrastructure  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We instrumented large civil engineering infrastructure items, such as bridges and tunnels, with sensors that monitor their operational performance and deterioration. In so doing we discovered that commercial offerings of wireless sensor networks (WSNs) ... Keywords: Civil engineering, Deployment, Radio propagation, Realworld experience, Security, Wireless sensor networks

Frank Stajano; Neil Hoult; Ian Wassell; Peter Bennett; Campbell Middleton; Kenichi Soga

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Transportation Organization and Functions  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Office of Packaging and Transportation list of organizations and functions, with a list of acronyms.

207

TREC Organization User Agreement  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Organization Application to use the TREC Information- Retrieval Text Research Collections. The _____ ...

208

Standards Development Organization Overview  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Standards Organizations NFPA (National Fire Protection Association) ... Fire News – Annual directory – NFPA Buyer's Guide ... Headquarters ...

2010-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

209

The Control System for the Cryogenics in the LHC Tunnel  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Large Hadron Collider makes extensive use of superconductors, in magnets for bending and focusing the particles, and in RF cavities for accelerating them, which are operated at 1.9 K and 4.5 K. The process automation for the cryogenic distribution around the accelerator circumference is based on 16 Programmable Logic Controllers, each running 250 control loops, 500 alarms and interlocks, and a phase sequencer. Spread along 27 km and under ionizing radiation, 15 000 cryogenic sensors and actuators are accessed through industrial field networks. We describe the main hardware and software components of the control system, their deployment and commissioning, together with the project organization, challenges faced, and solutions found.

Gomes, P; Antoniotti, F; Avramidou, R; Balle, Ch; Blanco-Viñuela, E; Carminati, Ch; Casas-Cubillos, J; Ciechanowski, M; Dragoneas, A; Dubert, P; Fampris, X; Fluder, C; Fortescue, E; Gaj, W; Gousiou, E; Jeanmonod, N; Jod?owski, P; Karagiannis, F; Klisch, M; López, A; Macuda, P; Malinowski, P; Molina, E; Paiva, S; Patsouli, A; Penacoba, G; Sosin, M; Soubiran, M; Suraci, A; Tovar, A; Vauthier, N; Wolak, T; Zwalinski, L

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Organic photovoltaics and concentrators  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The separation of light harvesting and charge generation offers several advantages in the design of organic photovoltaics and organic solar concentrators for the ultimate end goal of achieving a lower cost solar electric ...

Mapel, Jonathan King

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

MHK Projects/US Navy Wave Energy Technology WET Program at Marine...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

of Devices Deployed 6 Number of Build Out Units Deployed 7 Main Overseeing Organization Ocean Power Technologies Project Technology *MHK TechnologiesPowerBuoy Project Timeline and...

212

MHK Projects/NPI 021 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

? Main Overseeing Organization Northland Power Mississippi River LLC Project Licensing FERC License Docket Number P-13989 Environmental Monitoring and Mitigation Efforts See...

213

Alongwind Dispersion—A Simple Similarity Formula Compared with Observations at 11 Field Sites and in One Wind Tunnel  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Observations of alongwind dispersion of clouds were collected from 11 field sites and from one wind tunnel and were used to test simple similarity relations. Because most of the observations consist of concentration time series from fixed ...

Steven R. Hanna; Pasquale Franzese

2000-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Wind Tunnel Study of Turbulent Flow Structure in the Convective Boundary Layer Capped by a Temperature Inversion  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Experiments on simulating the atmospheric convective boundary layer (CBL), capped by a temperature inversion and affected by surface shear, were carried out in the thermally stratified wind tunnel of the Institute of Hydrology and Water Resources,...

Evgeni Fedorovich; Rolf Kaiser; Matthias Rau; Erich Plate

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Nitric Acid Oxidized ZrO$_2$ as the Tunneling Oxide of Cobalt Silicide Nanocrystal Memory Devices  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this study, ZrO$_2$ formed by the nitric acid oxidation method is proposed to be the tunneling oxide for nonvolatile memory device applications. The sputtered Zr thin film was oxidized ...

Chih-Wei Hu; Ting-Chang Chang; Chun-Hao Tu; Yang-Dong Chen; Chao-Cheng Lin; Min-Chen Chen; Jian-Yang Lin; Simon M. Sze; Tseung-Yuen Tseng

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Modeling of Plume Downwash and Enhanced Diffusion near Buildings: Comparison to Wind Tunnel Observations for in Arctic Industrial Site  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The ability of a modified Industrial Source Complex model to simulate concentration distributions resulting from high wind speeds (neutral conditions) has been evaluated by comparison to data from a wind tunnel study of a Prudhoe Bay, AK oil-...

Alex Guenther; Brian Lamb; Ronald Petersen

1989-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Earth pressure balance (EPB) shield tunneling in Bangkok : ground response and prediction of surface settlements using artificial neural networks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Although Earth Pressure Balance (EPB) shields have been used for several decades, very little information exists about the actual mechanisms of shield-ground interaction. The ground response mechanism induced by EPB tunneling ...

Suwansawat, Suchatvee, 1972-

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

A Historical Evaluation of the U12t Tunnel, Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada, Volume 2 of 6  

SciTech Connect

This report presents a historical evaluation of the U12t Tunnel on the Nevada Test Site in southern Nevada. The work was conducted by the Desert Research Institute at the request of the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office and the U.S. Department of Defense, Defense Threat Reduction Agency (DTRA). The U12t Tunnel is one of a series of tunnels used for underground nuclear weapons effects tests on the east side of Rainier and Aqueduct Mesas. Six nuclear weapons effects tests, Mint Leaf, Diamond Sculls, Husky Pup, Midas Myth/Milagro, Mighty Oak, and Mission Ghost, and one high explosive test, SPLAT, were conducted within the U12t Tunnel from 1970 to 1987. All six of the nuclear weapons effects tests and the high explosive test were sponsored by DTRA. Two conventional weapons experiments, Dipole Knight and Divine Eagle, were conducted in the tunnel portal area in 1997 and 1998. These experiments were sponsored by the Defense Special Weapons Agency. The U12t Tunnel complex is composed of the Portal and Mesa Areas and includes an underground tunnel with a main access drift and nine primary drifts, a substantial tailings pile fronting the tunnel portal, a series of discharge ponds downslope of the tailings pile, and two instrumentation trailer parks and 16 drill holes on top of Aqueduct Mesa. A total of 89 cultural features were recorded: 54 at the portal and 35 on the mesa. In the Portal Area, cultural features are mostly concrete pads and building foundations; other features include the portal, rail lines, the camel back, ventilation and cooling system components, communication equipment, and electrical equipment. On the mesa are drill holes, a few concrete pads, a loading ramp, and electrical equipment.

Harold Drollinger; Robert C. Jones; and Thomas F. Bullard; Desert Research Institute, Laurence J. Ashbaugh, Southern Nevada Courier Service and Wayne R. Griffin, Stoller-Navarro Joint Venture

2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

A Historical Evaluation of the U12t Tunnel, Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada, Volume 4 of 6  

SciTech Connect

This report presents a historical evaluation of the U12t Tunnel on the Nevada Test Site in southern Nevada. The work was conducted by the Desert Research Institute at the request of the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office and the U.S. Department of Defense, Defense Threat Reduction Agency (DTRA). The U12t Tunnel is one of a series of tunnels used for underground nuclear weapons effects tests on the east side of Rainier and Aqueduct Mesas. Six nuclear weapons effects tests, Mint Leaf, Diamond Sculls, Husky Pup, Midas Myth/Milagro, Mighty Oak, and Mission Ghost, and one high explosive test, SPLAT, were conducted within the U12t Tunnel from 1970 to 1987. All six of the nuclear weapons effects tests and the high explosive test were sponsored by DTRA. Two conventional weapons experiments, Dipole Knight and Divine Eagle, were conducted in the tunnel portal area in 1997 and 1998. These experiments were sponsored by the Defense Special Weapons Agency. The U12t Tunnel complex is composed of the Portal and Mesa Areas and includes an underground tunnel with a main access drift and nine primary drifts, a substantial tailings pile fronting the tunnel portal, a series of discharge ponds downslope of the tailings pile, and two instrumentation trailer parks and 16 drill holes on top of Aqueduct Mesa. A total of 89 cultural features were recorded: 54 at the portal and 35 on the mesa. In the Portal Area, cultural features are mostly concrete pads and building foundations; other features include the portal, rail lines, the camel back, ventilation and cooling system components, communication equipment, and electrical equipment. On the mesa are drill holes, a few concrete pads, a loading ramp, and electrical equipment.

Harold Drollinger; Robert C. Jones; and Thomas F. Bullard; Desert Research Institute, Laurence J. Ashbaugh, Southern Nevada Courier Service and Wayne R. Griffin, Stoller-Navarro Joint Venture

2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

A Historical Evaluation of the U12t Tunnel, Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada, Volume 1 of 6  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents a historical evaluation of the U12t Tunnel on the Nevada Test Site in southern Nevada. The work was conducted by the Desert Research Institute at the request of the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office and the U.S. Department of Defense, Defense Threat Reduction Agency (DTRA). The U12t Tunnel is one of a series of tunnels used for underground nuclear weapons effects tests on the east side of Rainier and Aqueduct Mesas. Six nuclear weapons effects tests, Mint Leaf, Diamond Sculls, Husky Pup, Midas Myth/Milagro, Mighty Oak, and Mission Ghost, and one high explosive test, SPLAT, were conducted within the U12t Tunnel from 1970 to 1987. All six of the nuclear weapons effects tests and the high explosive test were sponsored by DTRA. Two conventional weapons experiments, Dipole Knight and Divine Eagle, were conducted in the tunnel portal area in 1997 and 1998. These experiments were sponsored by the Defense Special Weapons Agency. The U12t Tunnel complex is composed of the Portal and Mesa Areas and includes an underground tunnel with a main access drift and nine primary drifts, a substantial tailings pile fronting the tunnel portal, a series of discharge ponds downslope of the tailings pile, and two instrumentation trailer parks and 16 drill holes on top of Aqueduct Mesa. A total of 89 cultural features were recorded: 54 at the portal and 35 on the mesa. In the Portal Area, cultural features are mostly concrete pads and building foundations; other features include the portal, rail lines, the camel back, ventilation and cooling system components, communication equipment, and electrical equipment. On the mesa are drill holes, a few concrete pads, a loading ramp, and electrical equipment.

Harold Drollinger; Robert C. Jones; and Thomas F. Bullard; Desert Research Institute, Laurence J. Ashbaugh, Southern Nevada Courier Service and Wayne R. Griffin, Stoller-Navarro Joint Venture

2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tunnel overseeing organization" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

A Historical Evaluation of the U12t Tunnel, Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada, Volume 6 of 6  

SciTech Connect

This report presents a historical evaluation of the U12t Tunnel on the Nevada Test Site in southern Nevada. The work was conducted by the Desert Research Institute at the request of the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office and the U.S. Department of Defense, Defense Threat Reduction Agency (DTRA). The U12t Tunnel is one of a series of tunnels used for underground nuclear weapons effects tests on the east side of Rainier and Aqueduct Mesas. Six nuclear weapons effects tests, Mint Leaf, Diamond Sculls, Husky Pup, Midas Myth/Milagro, Mighty Oak, and Mission Ghost, and one high explosive test, SPLAT, were conducted within the U12t Tunnel from 1970 to 1987. All six of the nuclear weapons effects tests and the high explosive test were sponsored by DTRA. Two conventional weapons experiments, Dipole Knight and Divine Eagle, were conducted in the tunnel portal area in 1997 and 1998. These experiments were sponsored by the Defense Special Weapons Agency. The U12t Tunnel complex is composed of the Portal and Mesa Areas and includes an underground tunnel with a main access drift and nine primary drifts, a substantial tailings pile fronting the tunnel portal, a series of discharge ponds downslope of the tailings pile, and two instrumentation trailer parks and 16 drill holes on top of Aqueduct Mesa. A total of 89 cultural features were recorded: 54 at the portal and 35 on the mesa. In the Portal Area, cultural features are mostly concrete pads and building foundations; other features include the portal, rail lines, the camel back, ventilation and cooling system components, communication equipment, and electrical equipment. On the mesa are drill holes, a few concrete pads, a loading ramp, and electrical equipment.

Harold Drollinger; Robert C. Jones; and Thomas F. Bullard; Desert Research Institute, Laurence J. Ashbaugh, Southern Nevada Courier Service and Wayne R. Griffin, Stoller-Navarro Joint Venture

2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

A Historical Evaluation of the U12t Tunnel, Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada, Volume 3 of 6  

SciTech Connect

This report presents a historical evaluation of the U12t Tunnel on the Nevada Test Site in southern Nevada. The work was conducted by the Desert Research Institute at the request of the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office and the U.S. Department of Defense, Defense Threat Reduction Agency (DTRA). The U12t Tunnel is one of a series of tunnels used for underground nuclear weapons effects tests on the east side of Rainier and Aqueduct Mesas. Six nuclear weapons effects tests, Mint Leaf, Diamond Sculls, Husky Pup, Midas Myth/Milagro, Mighty Oak, and Mission Ghost, and one high explosive test, SPLAT, were conducted within the U12t Tunnel from 1970 to 1987. All six of the nuclear weapons effects tests and the high explosive test were sponsored by DTRA. Two conventional weapons experiments, Dipole Knight and Divine Eagle, were conducted in the tunnel portal area in 1997 and 1998. These experiments were sponsored by the Defense Special Weapons Agency. The U12t Tunnel complex is composed of the Portal and Mesa Areas and includes an underground tunnel with a main access drift and nine primary drifts, a substantial tailings pile fronting the tunnel portal, a series of discharge ponds downslope of the tailings pile, and two instrumentation trailer parks and 16 drill holes on top of Aqueduct Mesa. A total of 89 cultural features were recorded: 54 at the portal and 35 on the mesa. In the Portal Area, cultural features are mostly concrete pads and building foundations; other features include the portal, rail lines, the camel back, ventilation and cooling system components, communication equipment, and electrical equipment. On the mesa are drill holes, a few concrete pads, a loading ramp, and electrical equipment.

Harold Drollinger; Robert C. Jones; and Thomas F. Bullard; Desert Research Institute, Laurence J. Ashbaugh, Southern Nevada Courier Service and Wayne R. Griffin, Stoller-Navarro Joint Venture

2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

A Historical Evaluation of the U12t Tunnel, Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada, Volume 5 of 6  

SciTech Connect

This report presents a historical evaluation of the U12t Tunnel on the Nevada Test Site in southern Nevada. The work was conducted by the Desert Research Institute at the request of the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office and the U.S. Department of Defense, Defense Threat Reduction Agency (DTRA). The U12t Tunnel is one of a series of tunnels used for underground nuclear weapons effects tests on the east side of Rainier and Aqueduct Mesas. Six nuclear weapons effects tests, Mint Leaf, Diamond Sculls, Husky Pup, Midas Myth/Milagro, Mighty Oak, and Mission Ghost, and one high explosive test, SPLAT, were conducted within the U12t Tunnel from 1970 to 1987. All six of the nuclear weapons effects tests and the high explosive test were sponsored by DTRA. Two conventional weapons experiments, Dipole Knight and Divine Eagle, were conducted in the tunnel portal area in 1997 and 1998. These experiments were sponsored by the Defense Special Weapons Agency. The U12t Tunnel complex is composed of the Portal and Mesa Areas and includes an underground tunnel with a main access drift and nine primary drifts, a substantial tailings pile fronting the tunnel portal, a series of discharge ponds downslope of the tailings pile, and two instrumentation trailer parks and 16 drill holes on top of Aqueduct Mesa. A total of 89 cultural features were recorded: 54 at the portal and 35 on the mesa. In the Portal Area, cultural features are mostly concrete pads and building foundations; other features include the portal, rail lines, the camel back, ventilation and cooling system components, communication equipment, and electrical equipment. On the mesa are drill holes, a few concrete pads, a loading ramp, and electrical equipment.

Harold Drollinger; Robert C. Jones; and Thomas F. Bullard; Desert Research Institute, Laurence J. Ashbaugh, Southern Nevada Courier Service and Wayne R. Griffin, Stoller-Navarro Joint Venture

2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Modeling of Damage, Permeability Changes and Pressure Responses during Excavation of the TSX Tunnel in Granitic Rock at URL, Canada  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents numerical modeling of excavation-induced damage, permeability changes, and fluid-pressure responses during excavation of the TSX tunnel at the underground research laboratory (URL) in Canada. Four different numerical models were applied, using a wide range of approaches to model damage and permeability changes in the excavation disturbed zone (EDZ) around the tunnel. Using in situ calibration of model parameters the modeling could reproduce observed spatial distribution of damage and permeability changes around the tunnel, as a combination of disturbance induced by stress redistribution around the tunnel and by the drill-and-blast operation. The modeling showed that stress-induced permeability increase above the tunnel is a result of micro and macrofracturing under high deviatoric (shear) stress, whereas permeability increases alongside the tunnel as a result of opening of existing microfractures under decreased mean stress. The remaining observed fracturing and permeability changes around the periphery of the tunnel were attributed to damage from the drill-and-blast operation. Moreover, a reasonably good agreement was achieved between simulated and observed excavation-induced pressure responses around the TSX tunnel for 1 year following its excavation. The simulations showed that these pressure responses are caused by poroelastic effects as a result of increasing or decreasing mean stress, with corresponding contraction or expansion of the pore volume. The simulation results for pressure evolution were consistent with previous studies, indicating that the observed pressure responses could be captured in a Biot model using a relatively low Biot-Willis coefficient, {alpha} {approx} 0.2, a porosity of n {approx} 0.007, and a relatively low permeability of k {approx} 2 x 10{sup -22} m{sup 2}, which is consistent with the very tight, unfractured granite at the site.

Rutqvist, Jonny; Borgesson, Lennart; Chijimatsu, Masakazu; Hernelind, Jan; Jing, Lanru; Kobayashi, Akira; Nguyen, Son

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Spectroscopy and capacitance measurements of tunneling resonances in an Sb-implanted point contact.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We fabricated a split-gate defined point contact in a double gate enhancement mode Si-MOS device, and implanted Sb donor atoms using a self-aligned process. E-beam lithography in combination with a timed implant gives us excellent control over the placement of dopant atoms, and acts as a stepping stone to focused ion beam implantation of single donors. Our approach allows us considerable latitude in experimental design in-situ. We have identified two resonance conditions in the point contact conductance as a function of split gate voltage. Using tunneling spectroscopy, we probed their electronic structure as a function of temperature and magnetic field. We also determine the capacitive coupling between the resonant feature and several gates. Comparison between experimental values and extensive quasi-classical simulations constrain the location and energy of the resonant level. We discuss our results and how they may apply to resonant tunneling through a single donor.

Wendt, Joel Robert; Rahman, Rajib; Ten Eyck, Gregory A.; Eng, Kevin; Carroll, Malcolm S.; Young, Ralph Watson; Lilly, Michael Patrick; Stalford, Harold Lenn; Bishop, Nathaniel; Bielejec, Edward Salvador

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Evaluation of barrier uniformity in magnetic tunnel junctions prepared using natural oxidation of thin Mg layers  

SciTech Connect

We fabricated submicron magnetic tunnel junctions (MTJs) using natural oxidation of thin Mg layers deposited by dc sputtering. The MTJs exhibited magnetoresistance (MR) ratios of up to about 150% with a low resistance-area product (R{sub p}A) of 8 {Omega} {mu}m{sup 2}, which are comparable to those for radio-frequency-sputtered MgO barriers. The submicron MTJs had highly variable MR and R{sub p}A values due to a high pinhole density (20 {mu}m{sup -2}) in the barriers, whereas current-in-plane-tunneling (CIPT) measurements on the same MTJ films revealed highly reproducible MR and R{sub p}A values. This indicates that reproducible CIPT measurements do not necessarily give accurate results of MR and R{sub p}A at high pinhole densities.

Seki, Takayuki; Kubota, Hitoshi; Fukushima, Akio; Yakushiji, Kay; Yuasa, Shinji; Ando, Koji [National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science Technology (AIST), Spintronics Research Center, Central 2, Umezono 1-1-1, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8568 (Japan); Maehara, Hiroki; Yamagata, Shinji; Okuyama, Hiroki; Tsunekawa, Koji [Department of Spin Technology Development, Process Development Center, Canon ANELVA Corporation, Kurigi 2-5-1, Asao, Kawasaki, Kanagawa 215-8550 (Japan)

2010-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

227

Role of Amorphous Silicon and Tunneling in Heterojunction with Intrinsic Thin Layer (HIT) Solar Cells  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This work analyzes heterojunction with intrinsic thin layer (HIT) solar cells using numerical simulations. The differences between the device physics of cells with p- and n-type crystalline silicon (c-Si) wafers are substantial. HIT solar cells with n-type wafers essentially form a n/p/n structure, where tunneling across the junction heterointerfaces is a critical transport mechanism required to attain performance exceeding 20%. For HIT cells with p-type wafers, only tunneling at the back-contact barrier may be important. For p-wafer cells, the hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) between the indium tin oxide (ITO) and crystalline silicon may act as a passivating buffer layer but, otherwise, does not significantly contribute to device performance. For n-wafer cells, the carrier concentration and band alignment of this a-Si:H layer are critical to device performance.

Kanevce, A.; Metzger, W. K.

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Atomic-scale properties of semiconductor heterostructures probed by scanning tunneling microscopy  

SciTech Connect

The engineering of advanced semiconductor heterostructure materials and devices requires a detailed understanding of, and control over, the structure and properties of semiconductor materials and devices at the atomic to nanometer scale. Cross-sectional scanning tunneling microscopy has emerged as a unique and powerful method to characterize structural morphology and electronic properties in semiconductor epitaxial layers and device structures at these length scales. The basic experimental techniques in cross-sectional scanning tunneling microscopy are described, and some representative applications to semiconductor heterostructure characterization drawn from recent investigations in the authors laboratory are discussed. Specifically, they describe some recent studies of InP/InAsP and InAsP/InAsSb heterostructures in which nanoscale compositional clustering has been observed and analyzed.

Yu, E.T.; Zuo, S.L.; Bi, W.G.; Tu, C.W. [Univ. of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA (United States). Dept. of Electrical and Computer Engineering; Biefeld, R.M.; Allerman, A.A. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1998-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Energy and Effective Mass Dependence of Electron Tunnelling Through Multiple Quantum barriers in Different Heterostructures  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Tunneling of electrons through the barriers in heterostructures has been studied, within unified transfer matrix approach. The effect of barrier width on the transmission coefficient of the electrons has been investigated for different pairs of semi conducting materials that are gaining much importance recently. These pairs include CdS/CdSe, AlGaAs/GaAs and InAs/AlSb. Barrier dimensions have been reduced from 20nm to 5nm to observe the effect of scaling on tunneling properties. Material depended is highlighted for electrons with energy varying from below the barrier height to above it. The electron effective mass inside the barrier and the well are often different. The results show that the coupling effect leads to significant changes on the transmission effect. . The effective-mass dependant transmission coefficient has been plotted with respect to electron energy. The computation is based on the transfer matrix method by using MATLAB.

Jatindranath Gain; Madhumita Das Sarkar; Sudakshina Kundu

2010-02-09T23:59:59.000Z

230

First-principles study of the critical thickness in asymmetric ferroelectric tunnel junctions  

SciTech Connect

The absent critical thickness of fully relaxed asymmetric ferroelectric tunnel junctions is investigated by first-principles calculations. The results show that PbTiO{sub 3} thin film between Pt and SrRuO{sub 3} electrodes can still retain a significant and stable polarization down to thicknesses as small as 0.8 nm, quite unlike the case of symmetric ferroelectric tunnel junctions. We trace this surprising result to the generation of a large electric field by the charge transfer between the electrodes caused by their different electronic environments, which acts against the depolarization field and enhances the ferroelectricity, leading to the reduction, or even complete elimination, for the critical thickness.

Cai Mengqiu [State Key Laboratory of Powder Metallurgy, Central South University, Changsha, Hunan 410083 (China); School of Physics and Microelectronics Science, Hunan University, Changsha 410082, Hunan (China); State Key Laboratory of Optoelectronic Materials and Technologies, Zhongshan University, Guangzhou 510275, Guangdong (China); Du Yong; Huang Boyun [State Key Laboratory of Powder Metallurgy, Central South University, Changsha, Hunan 410083 (China)

2011-03-07T23:59:59.000Z

231

Organization | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Organization Organization Organization Office of Indian Energy Organizational Structure As a program office at DOE responsible for implementing energy programs, the Office of Indian Energy is structurally organized under the Office of the Under Secretary. This programmatic structure also focuses and facilitates the coordination between the Office of Indian Energy and the other companion program offices such as the Office of Fossil Energy, Office of Electricity and Energy Reliability and Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy. The Office of Indian Energy is organized around its major statutory functions, namely, policy and programs: Indian Energy Policy. The Office of Indian Energy coordinates participation in the development, refinement, training, and advice

232

Effects of elemental distributions on the behavior of MgO-based magnetic tunnel junctions.  

SciTech Connect

Three-dimensional atom-probe tomography and transmission electron microscopy have been utilized to study the effects of Ta getter presputtering and either a Mg or Ru free-layer cap on the elemental distributions and properties of MgO-based magnetic tunnel junctions after annealing. Annealing the samples resulted in crystallization of the amorphous CoFeB layer and diffusion of the majority of the boron away from the crystallized CoFeB layers. The Ta getter presputter is found to reduce the segregation of boron at the MgO/CoFeB interface after annealing, improving the tunneling magnetoresistance of the tunnel junction. This effect is observed for samples with either a Ru free-layer cap or a Mg free-layer cap and is thought to be a result of a reduced oxygen concentration within the MgO due to the effect of Ta getter presputtering. A Ru free-layer cap provides superior magnetic and magnetotransport properties compared to a Mg free-layer cap. Mg from the Mg free-layer cap is observed to diffuse toward the MgO tunnel barrier upon annealing, degrading both the crystalline quality of the CoFeB and magnetic isolation of the CoFeB free-layer from the CoFeB reference-layer. Lateral variations in the B distribution within the CoFeB free-layer are observed in the samples with a Ru free-layer cap, which are associated with crystalline and amorphous grains. The B-rich, amorphous grains are found to be depleted in Fe, while the B-poor crystalline grains are slightly enriched in Fe.

Schreiber, D. K.; Choi, Y. S.; Liu, Y.; Chiaramonti, A. N.; Seidman, D. N.; Petford-Long, A. K. (Center for Nanoscale Materials); ( MSD); (Northwestern Univ.); (Canon-ANELVA Corp.)

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Coherent generation of nonclassical light on a chip via photon-induced tunneling and blockade  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We report the observation of nonclassical light generated via photon blockade in a photonic crystal cavity with a strongly coupled quantum dot. By tuning the frequency of the probe laser with respect to the cavity and quantum dot resonance we can probe the system in either photon blockade or photon-induced tunneling regime. The transition from one regime to the other is confirmed by the measurement of the second order correlation that changes from anti-bunching to bunching.

Andrei Faraon; Ilya Fushman; Dirk Englund; Nick Stoltz; Pierre Petroff; Jelena Vuckovic

2008-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

234

High resolution seismic imaging of Rainier Mesa using surface reflection and surface to tunnel tomography  

SciTech Connect

In the interpretation of seismic data to infer properties of an explosion source, it is necessary to account for wave propagation effects. In order to understand and remove these propagation effects, it is necessary to have a model. An open question concerning this matter is the detail and accuracy which must be present in the velocity model in order to produce reliable estimates in the estimated source properties. While it would appear that the reliability of the results would be directly related to the accuracy of the velocity and density models used in the interpretation, it may be that certain deficiencies in these models can be compensated by the and amount of seismic data which is used in the inversion. The NPE provided an opportunity to test questions of this sort. In August 1993, two high resolution seismic experiments were performed in N-Tunnel and on the surface of Rainier Mesa above it. The first involved a surface-to-tunnel imaging experiment with sources on the surface and receivers in tunnel U12n.23 about 88 meters west of the NPE. It was possible to estimate the apparent average velocity between the tunnel and the surface. In a separate experiment, a high resolution reflection experiment was performed in order to image the lithology in Rainier Mesa. Good quality, broad band, reflections were obtained from depths extending into the Paleozoic basement. A high velocity layer near the surface is underlain by a thick section of low velocity material, providing a nonuniform but low average velocity between the depth of the NPE and the surface.

Majer, E.L.; Johnson, L.R.; Karageorgi, E.K.; Peterson, J.E.

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Wind tunnel test of 1/30 scale heliostat field array model. Test report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

From 9 January through 20 January 1978, Honeywell conducted a wind tunnel test on a 1/30 scale partial heliostat field. The heliostats were per Honeywell's design developed under the 10 megawatt central receiver pilot electrical power plant subsystem research experiment contract. Likewise, the scaled section of the field geometry duplicated the proposed circular layout. Testing was conducted at the Georgia Institute of Technology's 9 foot subsonic tunnel. The objective of the test was to ascertain from a qualitative standpoint the field effects upon wind loading within a heliostat field. To accomplish this, numerous pressure tap measurements at different heights and at different field positions were taken with varying wind speeds, fence designs, and heliostat gimbal orientations. The Department of Energy specified boundary layer profile was also scaled by 1/30 in order to simulate the total wind effects as accurately as possible taking into account the potentially severe scaling or Reynolds number effects at a 1/30 scale. After initial model set-up within the tunnel and scaled boundary layer generated, 91 separate runs were accomplished. The results do demonstrate the high sensitivity of wind loading upon the collector field due to the actual heliostat orientation and fence geometry. Vertical pressure gradients within the model field and flow reentry angles provide a good qualitative feel as to the full scale environment that might be expected and point to the need for specific additional testing to further explore potentially dangerous conditions.

Brown, G. L.

1978-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

236

ST/EL and ST/CV services for TI2 & TI8 LHC injection tunnels  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper describes the ST/EL and ST/CV services for TI2 & TI8 LHC injection tunnels. The cooling and ventilation part describes the requirements for design and installation of more than 10 km of pipeline that is going to be laid down in the tunnels. Main operating parameters as well as manufacture procedures are explained. Preliminary work schedule with the cost estimate is also presented. Electrical power will be distributed from the LHC side and the SPS side for the machine and the general services. All power converters will be installed on surface buildings. The link between the main bend converters and the main bend magnets will be realised with water-cooled cables. Rest of the magnets will be cabled by using conventional copper and aluminium cables. Due to long lengths of the injection tunnels a dry 18kV transformer will be installed in TJ8 to serve the general services for TI8. The same will apply to TI2 by installing a transformer at the bottom of the PMI2 shaft.

Akhtar, S; CERN. Geneva. ST Division

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Giromill wind tunnel test and analysis. Volume II. Technical discussion. Final report, June 1976--October 1977  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A wind tunnel test of a Giromill rotor was conducted. The objective of this test was to substantiate the performance computed by the Larsen cyclogiro vortex theory. Additional objectives were to obtain performance comparison data between the Giromill, a sinusoidal blade modulation Giromill, a Darrieus rotor, and a modified Darrieus rotor that flips the blades a few degrees. A three bladed Giromill rotor having a diameter of 2.13 m (7 ft) and a span of 1.52 m (5 ft) was tested in the McDonnell Aircraft Company 15 x 20 ft Mini Speed Wind Tunnel. The blade modulations were accomplished through use of a cam and push rod arrangement. Replaceable cams provided the desired blade modulation at the various operating points. Various operating conditions were achieved by adjusting the rotor RPM and tunnel speed. The results show that the Giromill has good performance, equal to or much better than that predicted by theory, and outperforms the other types of vertical axis wind turbines tested.

Moran, W.A.

1977-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Tunnel-injection GaN quantum dot ultraviolet light-emitting diodes  

SciTech Connect

We demonstrate a GaN quantum dot ultraviolet light-emitting diode that uses tunnel injection of carriers through AlN barriers into the active region. The quantum dot heterostructure is grown by molecular beam epitaxy on AlN templates. The large lattice mismatch between GaN and AlN favors the formation of GaN quantum dots in the Stranski-Krastanov growth mode. Carrier injection by tunneling can mitigate losses incurred in hot-carrier injection in light emitting heterostructures. To achieve tunnel injection, relatively low composition AlGaN is used for n- and p-type layers to simultaneously take advantage of effective band alignment and efficient doping. The small height of the quantum dots results in short-wavelength emission and are simultaneously an effective tool to fight the reduction of oscillator strength from quantum-confined Stark effect due to polarization fields. The strong quantum confinement results in room-temperature electroluminescence peaks at 261 and 340 nm, well above the 365 nm bandgap of bulk GaN. The demonstration opens the doorway to exploit many varied features of quantum dot physics to realize high-efficiency short-wavelength light sources.

Verma, Jai; Kandaswamy, Prem Kumar; Protasenko, Vladimir; Verma, Amit; Grace Xing, Huili; Jena, Debdeep [Department of Electrical Engineering, University of Notre Dame, Indiana 46556 (United States)] [Department of Electrical Engineering, University of Notre Dame, Indiana 46556 (United States)

2013-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

239

Sediment Basin Flume | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Sediment Basin Flume Sediment Basin Flume Jump to: navigation, search Basic Specifications Facility Name Sediment Basin Flume Overseeing Organization University of Iowa Hydrodynamic Testing Facility Type Flume Length(m) 22.7 Beam(m) 5.1 Depth(m) 1.2 Cost(per day) Contact POC Special Physical Features Two pumps provide up to 18 cfs of flow capacity Towing Capabilities Towing Capabilities None Wavemaking Capabilities Wavemaking Capabilities None Channel/Tunnel/Flume Channel/Tunnel/Flume Yes Recirculating No Wind Capabilities Wind Capabilities None Control and Data Acquisition Cameras None Available Sensors Acoustics, Flow, Thermal, Turbulence, Velocity Data Generation Capability Real-Time Yes Test Services Test Services Yes On-Site fabrication capability/equipment Machine shop, carpenter shop, welding shop, instrumentation and electronics shop

240

2-ft Flume Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

2-ft Flume Facility 2-ft Flume Facility Jump to: navigation, search Basic Specifications Facility Name 2-ft Flume Facility Overseeing Organization United States Army Corp of Engineers (ERDC) Hydrodynamic Testing Facility Type Flume Length(m) 61.0 Beam(m) 0.6 Depth(m) 1.8 Water Type Freshwater Cost(per day) Contact POC Towing Capabilities Towing Capabilities None Wavemaking Capabilities Wavemaking Capabilities Yes Maximum Wave Height(m) 0.6 Maximum Wave Height(m) at Wave Period(s) 10.0 Wave Period Range(s) 10.0 Current Velocity Range(m/s) 0.0 Programmable Wavemaking Yes Simulated Beach No Channel/Tunnel/Flume Channel/Tunnel/Flume Yes Wind Capabilities Wind Capabilities None Control and Data Acquisition Description Automated data acquisition and control system Cameras None

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tunnel overseeing organization" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Steep Gradient Flume | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Steep Gradient Flume Steep Gradient Flume Jump to: navigation, search Basic Specifications Facility Name Steep Gradient Flume Overseeing Organization University of Iowa Hydrodynamic Testing Facility Type Flume Length(m) 20.1 Beam(m) 0.9 Depth(m) 0.5 Cost(per day) Contact POC Special Physical Features Tilting flume from -1.5 to +16% slope; <3mm sedimentation recirculation capabilities; instrumentation rails Towing Capabilities Towing Capabilities None Wavemaking Capabilities Wavemaking Capabilities None Channel/Tunnel/Flume Channel/Tunnel/Flume Yes Recirculating Yes Wind Capabilities Wind Capabilities None Control and Data Acquisition Cameras Yes Number of Color Cameras 1 Available Sensors Acoustics, Flow, Thermal, Turbulence, Velocity Data Generation Capability Real-Time Yes

242

1.5-ft Wave Flume Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

-ft Wave Flume Facility -ft Wave Flume Facility Jump to: navigation, search Basic Specifications Facility Name 1.5-ft Wave Flume Facility Overseeing Organization United States Army Corp of Engineers (ERDC) Hydrodynamic Testing Facility Type Flume Length(m) 45.1 Beam(m) 0.5 Depth(m) 0.9 Water Type Freshwater Cost(per day) Contact POC Towing Capabilities Towing Capabilities None Wavemaking Capabilities Wavemaking Capabilities Yes Maximum Wave Height(m) 0.2 Maximum Wave Height(m) at Wave Period(s) 10.0 Wave Period Range(s) 10.0 Current Velocity Range(m/s) 0.0 Programmable Wavemaking Yes Simulated Beach No Channel/Tunnel/Flume Channel/Tunnel/Flume Yes Recirculating No Wind Capabilities Wind Capabilities None Control and Data Acquisition Description Automated data acquisition and control system

243

11-ft Wave Flume Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

ft Wave Flume Facility ft Wave Flume Facility Jump to: navigation, search Basic Specifications Facility Name Wave Flume Facility Overseeing Organization United States Army Corp of Engineers (ERDC) Hydrodynamic Testing Facility Type Flume Length(m) 77.4 Beam(m) 3.4 Depth(m) 1.8 Water Type Freshwater Cost(per day) Contact POC Towing Capabilities Towing Capabilities None Wavemaking Capabilities Wavemaking Capabilities Yes Maximum Wave Height(m) 0.4 Maximum Wave Height(m) at Wave Period(s) 10.0 Wave Period Range(s) 10.0 Current Velocity Range(m/s) 0.0 Programmable Wavemaking Yes Simulated Beach No Channel/Tunnel/Flume Channel/Tunnel/Flume None Wind Capabilities Wind Capabilities Yes Control and Data Acquisition Description Automated data acquisition and control system Cameras None

244

Carderock Tow Tank 1 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

1 1 Overseeing Organization United States Naval Surface Warfare Center Hydrodynamic Testing Facility Type Tow Tank Length(m) 271.0 Beam(m) 15.5 Depth(m) 6.7 Water Type Freshwater Cost(per day) Contact POC Special Physical Features Carriage 1 is located on this basin Towing Capabilities Towing Capabilities Yes Maximum Velocity(m/s) 9.3 Wavemaking Capabilities Wavemaking Capabilities None Channel/Tunnel/Flume Channel/Tunnel/Flume None Wind Capabilities Wind Capabilities None Control and Data Acquisition Cameras None Data Generation Capability Real-Time No Test Services Test Services None Special Characteristics Special Characteristics None Hydro | Hydrodynamic Testing Facilities Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Carderock_Tow_Tank_1&oldid=602146

245

MMA Tugboat/ Barge/ Vessel | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

MMA Tugboat/ Barge/ Vessel MMA Tugboat/ Barge/ Vessel Jump to: navigation, search Basic Specifications Facility Name MMA Tugboat/ Barge/ Vessel Overseeing Organization Maine Maritime Academy Hydrodynamic Testing Facility Type Tow Vessel Depth(m) 15.2 Water Type Saltwater Cost(per day) Contact POC Special Physical Features Tug: 73 ft (2)16V-92 Detroits Barge: 43 ft by 230ft Research Vessel Friendship: 40 foot vessel w/ 6 cylinder Cummins diesel engine and A-Frame crane Towing Capabilities Towing Capabilities Yes Maximum Velocity(m/s) 5.1 Wavemaking Capabilities Wavemaking Capabilities None Channel/Tunnel/Flume Channel/Tunnel/Flume None Wind Capabilities Wind Capabilities None Control and Data Acquisition Description Full onbard Navigation, GPS, marine radar and depth plotter; standard PC onboard can be configured as needed for data acquisition needs

246

Environmental Flume | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Environmental Flume Environmental Flume Jump to: navigation, search Basic Specifications Facility Name Environmental Flume Overseeing Organization University of Iowa Hydrodynamic Testing Facility Type Flume Length(m) 30.5 Beam(m) 3.1 Depth(m) 2.3 Cost(per day) Contact POC Special Physical Features Dual pumps up to 150 cfs; glass walls Towing Capabilities Towing Capabilities None Wavemaking Capabilities Wavemaking Capabilities None Channel/Tunnel/Flume Channel/Tunnel/Flume Yes Recirculating No Wind Capabilities Wind Capabilities None Control and Data Acquisition Cameras None Available Sensors Acoustics, Thermal, Turbulence, Velocity Data Generation Capability Real-Time Yes Test Services Test Services Yes On-Site fabrication capability/equipment Machine shop, carpenter shop, welding shop, instrumentation and electronics shop

247

MHL Tow Tank | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Tow Tank Tow Tank Jump to: navigation, search Basic Specifications Facility Name MHL Tow Tank Overseeing Organization University of Michigan Hydrodynamics Hydrodynamic Testing Facility Type Tow Tank Length(m) 109.7 Beam(m) 6.7 Depth(m) 3.7 Cost(per day) $2000 (+ Labor/Materials) Towing Capabilities Towing Capabilities Yes Maximum Velocity(m/s) 6.7 Length of Effective Tow(m) 103.6 Wavemaking Capabilities Wavemaking Capabilities Yes Maximum Wave Height(m) 0.5 Wave Period Range(s) 0.0 Current Velocity Range(m/s) 0.0 Programmable Wavemaking Yes Wavemaking Description Regular and irregular wave spectrum Wave Direction Uni-Directional Simulated Beach Yes Description of Beach Concrete beach Channel/Tunnel/Flume Channel/Tunnel/Flume None Wind Capabilities Wind Capabilities None

248

Stennis Tow Tank | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Stennis Tow Tank Stennis Tow Tank Jump to: navigation, search Basic Specifications Facility Name Stennis Tow Tank Overseeing Organization United States Geological Survey, HIF Hydrodynamic Testing Facility Type Tow Tank Length(m) 137.2 Beam(m) 3.7 Depth(m) 3.7 Cost(per day) $1200(+ setup charges) Towing Capabilities Towing Capabilities Yes Maximum Velocity(m/s) 4.6 Length of Effective Tow(m) 114.3 Wavemaking Capabilities Wavemaking Capabilities None Channel/Tunnel/Flume Channel/Tunnel/Flume None Wind Capabilities Wind Capabilities None Control and Data Acquisition Description Fully automated data collection/carriage control computer system for mechanical current meters only. Number of channels 4 Cameras None Available Sensors Acceleration, Velocity Data Generation Capability

249

3-ft Wave Flume Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

3-ft Wave Flume Facility 3-ft Wave Flume Facility Overseeing Organization United States Army Corp of Engineers (ERDC) Hydrodynamic Testing Facility Type Flume Length(m) 45.1 Beam(m) 0.9 Depth(m) 0.9 Water Type Freshwater Cost(per day) Contact POC Towing Capabilities Towing Capabilities None Wavemaking Capabilities Wavemaking Capabilities Yes Maximum Wave Height(m) 0.2 Maximum Wave Height(m) at Wave Period(s) 10.0 Wave Period Range(s) 10.0 Current Velocity Range(m/s) 0.0 Programmable Wavemaking Yes Simulated Beach No Channel/Tunnel/Flume Channel/Tunnel/Flume None Wind Capabilities Wind Capabilities None Control and Data Acquisition Description Automated data acquisition and control system Cameras None Available Sensors Flow, Pressure Range(psi), Turbulence, Velocity, Wave Probe

250

Alden Small Flume | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Flume Flume Jump to: navigation, search Basic Specifications Facility Name Alden Small Flume Overseeing Organization Alden Research Laboratory, Inc Hydrodynamic Testing Facility Type Flume Length(m) 17.1 Beam(m) 1.8 Depth(m) 1.8 Water Type Freshwater Cost(per day) $2500/week Towing Capabilities Towing Capabilities None Wavemaking Capabilities Wavemaking Capabilities Yes Maximum Wave Height(m) 0.2 Maximum Wave Length(m) Variable Wave Period Range(s) 0.0 Current Velocity Range(m/s) 0.0 Programmable Wavemaking Yes Wavemaking Description Period adjustable electronically, height adjustable mechanically Wave Direction Uni-Directional Simulated Beach No Channel/Tunnel/Flume Channel/Tunnel/Flume Yes Velocity(m/s) >0.9 Recirculating No Wind Capabilities Wind Capabilities Yes

251

Tidal Energy Test Platform | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Test Platform Test Platform Jump to: navigation, search Basic Specifications Facility Name Tidal Energy Test Platform Overseeing Organization University of New Hampshire Hydrodynamics Hydrodynamic Testing Facility Type Offshore Berth Water Type Saltwater Cost(per day) Contact POC Special Physical Features The Tidal Testing Platform is presently a 10.7m long x 3m wide pontoon barge with a derrick and an opening for deploying tidal energy devices. The platform is intentionally configured to be adaptive for the changing needs of different devices. Towing Capabilities Towing Capabilities None Wavemaking Capabilities Wavemaking Capabilities None Channel/Tunnel/Flume Channel/Tunnel/Flume None Wind Capabilities Wind Capabilities None Control and Data Acquisition Cameras None

252

Breakwater Research Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Breakwater Research Facility Breakwater Research Facility Jump to: navigation, search Basic Specifications Facility Name Breakwater Research Facility Overseeing Organization United States Army Corp of Engineers (ERDC) Hydrodynamic Testing Facility Type Wave Basin Length(m) 121.9 Beam(m) 55.5 Depth(m) 0.8 Water Type Freshwater Cost(per day) Contact POC Towing Capabilities Towing Capabilities None Wavemaking Capabilities Wavemaking Capabilities Yes Maximum Wave Height(m) 0.0 Wave Period Range(s) 0.0 Current Velocity Range(m/s) 0.0 Programmable Wavemaking No Simulated Beach No Channel/Tunnel/Flume Channel/Tunnel/Flume None Wind Capabilities Wind Capabilities None Control and Data Acquisition Description Automated data acquisition and control system Cameras None Available Sensors Flow, Pressure Range(psi), Turbulence, Velocity, Wave Probe

253

MHL High Speed Cavitation | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

High Speed Cavitation High Speed Cavitation Jump to: navigation, search Basic Specifications Facility Name MHL High Speed Cavitation Overseeing Organization University of Michigan Hydrodynamics Hydrodynamic Testing Facility Type Channel Length(m) 0.8 Beam(m) 0.2 Depth(m) 0.2 Cost(per day) $2000(+ Labor/Materials) Towing Capabilities Towing Capabilities Yes Maximum Velocity(m/s) 25.9 Wavemaking Capabilities Wavemaking Capabilities None Channel/Tunnel/Flume Channel/Tunnel/Flume Yes Velocity(m/s) 25.9 Recirculating No Wind Capabilities Wind Capabilities None Control and Data Acquisition Description Custom Data Acquisition System using National Instruments hardware; system compatible with Planing Hull and Floating Beam Dynamometers Number of channels 16 Bandwidth(kHz) 20 Cameras Yes

254

Penn Reverberant Tank | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Penn Reverberant Tank Penn Reverberant Tank Jump to: navigation, search Basic Specifications Facility Name Penn Reverberant Tank Overseeing Organization Pennsylvania State University Hydrodynamics Hydrodynamic Testing Facility Type Reverberant Tank Length(m) 7.9 Beam(m) 5.3 Depth(m) 5.5 Water Type Freshwater Cost(per day) Contact POC Special Physical Features Structurally isolated hydrodynamic acoustics testing. Lined with an absorber on four sides and bottom with three 0.5x0.5 meter underwater viewing ports. Mechanical oscillation of a small-scale test unit-simulation of oscillating flow for wave or tidal excitation. Towing Capabilities Towing Capabilities None Wavemaking Capabilities Wavemaking Capabilities None Channel/Tunnel/Flume Channel/Tunnel/Flume None Wind Capabilities

255

Precision Flow Table | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Table Table Jump to: navigation, search Basic Specifications Facility Name Flow Table Overseeing Organization United States Army Corp of Engineers (ERDC) Hydrodynamic Testing Facility Type Flow Table Length(m) 2.4 Beam(m) 1.2 Water Type Freshwater Cost(per day) Contact POC Towing Capabilities Towing Capabilities None Wavemaking Capabilities Wavemaking Capabilities None Channel/Tunnel/Flume Channel/Tunnel/Flume Yes Wind Capabilities Wind Capabilities None Control and Data Acquisition Description Automated data acquisition and control system Cameras None Available Sensors Flow, Pressure Range(psi), Turbulence, Velocity, Wave Probe Data Generation Capability Real-Time No Test Services Test Services Yes Past Pertinent Test Experience Users are District Engineers, Planners, and Engineering Consultants

256

10-ft Wave Flume Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

ft Wave Flume Facility ft Wave Flume Facility Jump to: navigation, search Basic Specifications Facility Name 10-ft Wave Flume Facility Overseeing Organization United States Army Corp of Engineers (ERDC) Hydrodynamic Testing Facility Type Flume Length(m) 63.4 Beam(m) 3.0 Depth(m) 1.5 Water Type Freshwater Cost(per day) Contact POC Towing Capabilities Towing Capabilities None Wavemaking Capabilities Wavemaking Capabilities Yes Maximum Wave Height(m) 0.5 Maximum Wave Height(m) at Wave Period(s) 10.0 Wave Period Range(s) 0.0 Current Velocity Range(m/s) 0.0 Programmable Wavemaking Yes Simulated Beach No Channel/Tunnel/Flume Channel/Tunnel/Flume Yes Recirculating No Wind Capabilities Wind Capabilities None Control and Data Acquisition Description Automated data acquisition and control system

257

Sectional Model Flume Facilities | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Sectional Model Flume Facilities Sectional Model Flume Facilities Jump to: navigation, search Basic Specifications Facility Name Sectional Model Flume Facilities Overseeing Organization United States Army Corp of Engineers (ERDC) Hydrodynamic Testing Facility Type Flume Length(m) 21.3 Beam(m) 1.4 Depth(m) 2.4 Water Type Freshwater Cost(per day) Contact POC Towing Capabilities Towing Capabilities None Wavemaking Capabilities Wavemaking Capabilities Yes Maximum Wave Height(m) 0.0 Wave Period Range(s) 0.0 Current Velocity Range(m/s) 0.0 Programmable Wavemaking No Simulated Beach No Channel/Tunnel/Flume Channel/Tunnel/Flume Yes Recirculating No Wind Capabilities Wind Capabilities None Control and Data Acquisition Description Automated data acquisition and control system Cameras None Available Sensors Flow, Pressure Range(psi), Turbulence, Velocity, Wave Probe

258

Carderock Rotating Arm Tow Tank | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Rotating Arm Tow Tank Rotating Arm Tow Tank Jump to: navigation, search Basic Specifications Facility Name Carderock Rotating Arm Tow Tank Overseeing Organization United States Naval Surface Warfare Center Hydrodynamic Testing Facility Type Tow Tank Beam(m) 79.2 Depth(m) 6.1 Water Type Freshwater Cost(per day) Contact POC Special Physical Features Rotating Arm facility is a circular indoor basin 79.2m in diameter. The arm is a bridge-like structure with a span of 39.3m and pivots on a pedestal in the center of the basin. Towing Capabilities Towing Capabilities Yes Maximum Velocity(m/s) 25.8 Wavemaking Capabilities Wavemaking Capabilities None Channel/Tunnel/Flume Channel/Tunnel/Flume None Wind Capabilities Wind Capabilities None Control and Data Acquisition Cameras None

259

6-ft Wave Flume Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Wave Flume Facility Wave Flume Facility Jump to: navigation, search Basic Specifications Facility Name 6-ft Wave Flume Facility Overseeing Organization United States Army Corp of Engineers (ERDC) Hydrodynamic Testing Facility Type Flume Length(m) 105.2 Beam(m) 1.8 Depth(m) 1.8 Water Type Freshwater Cost(per day) Contact POC Towing Capabilities Towing Capabilities None Wavemaking Capabilities Wavemaking Capabilities Yes Maximum Wave Height(m) 0.4 Maximum Wave Height(m) at Wave Period(s) 10.0 Wave Period Range(s) 10.0 Current Velocity Range(m/s) 0.0 Programmable Wavemaking Yes Simulated Beach No Channel/Tunnel/Flume Channel/Tunnel/Flume Yes Recirculating No Wind Capabilities Wind Capabilities None Control and Data Acquisition Description Automated data acquisition and control system

260

Teaching Flume | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Teaching Flume Teaching Flume Jump to: navigation, search Basic Specifications Facility Name Teaching Flume Overseeing Organization University of Iowa Hydrodynamic Testing Facility Type Flume Length(m) 9.1 Beam(m) 0.6 Depth(m) 0.5 Cost(per day) Contact POC Special Physical Features Tilting flume; sedimentation recirculation capabilities; instrumentation rails; various weirs Towing Capabilities Towing Capabilities None Wavemaking Capabilities Wavemaking Capabilities None Channel/Tunnel/Flume Channel/Tunnel/Flume Yes Recirculating Yes Wind Capabilities Wind Capabilities None Control and Data Acquisition Cameras None Available Sensors Acoustics, Flow, Thermal, Turbulence, Velocity Data Generation Capability Real-Time Yes Test Services Test Services Yes On-Site fabrication capability/equipment Machine shop, carpenter shop, welding shop, instrumentation and electronics shop

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tunnel overseeing organization" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Los Angeles and Long Beach Harbors Model | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

and Long Beach Harbors Model and Long Beach Harbors Model Jump to: navigation, search Basic Specifications Facility Name Los Angeles and Long Beach Harbors Model Overseeing Organization United States Army Corp of Engineers (ERDC) Hydrodynamic Testing Facility Type Wave Basin Length(m) 67.1 Beam(m) 79.2 Depth(m) 0.9 Water Type Freshwater Cost(per day) Contact POC Towing Capabilities Towing Capabilities None Wavemaking Capabilities Wavemaking Capabilities Yes Maximum Wave Height(m) 0.1 Maximum Wave Height(m) at Wave Period(s) 2.0 Wave Period Range(s) 2.0 Current Velocity Range(m/s) 0.0 Programmable Wavemaking Yes Wave Direction Uni-Directional Simulated Beach Yes Description of Beach Point Fermin to Huntington Beach, CA Channel/Tunnel/Flume Channel/Tunnel/Flume None Wind Capabilities

262

DeFrees Flume 2 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

DeFrees Flume 2 DeFrees Flume 2 Jump to: navigation, search Basic Specifications Facility Name DeFrees Flume 2 Overseeing Organization Cornell University Hydrodynamics Hydrodynamic Testing Facility Type Flume Length(m) 8.0 Beam(m) 0.6 Depth(m) 0.6 Towing Capabilities Towing Capabilities None Wavemaking Capabilities Wavemaking Capabilities None Channel/Tunnel/Flume Channel/Tunnel/Flume Yes Velocity(m/s) 2 Recirculating No Wind Capabilities Wind Capabilities None Control and Data Acquisition Description National Instruments LabView and Mathworks Matlab DAQ systems Number of channels 64+ Bandwidth(kHz) 1000 Cameras Yes Number of Color Cameras 5 Description of Camera Types 1024 x 1024 x 12 bit to 60 fps, 491 x 656 x 8-bit to 100 fps, others Available Sensors Thermal, Ultrasonic Wave Height, Displacement, Acceleration, Turbulence, Pressure Range(psi), Flow, Acoustics, Velocity

263

Small Towing Tank | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Towing Tank Towing Tank Jump to: navigation, search Basic Specifications Facility Name Small Towing Tank Overseeing Organization University of Iowa Hydrodynamic Testing Facility Type Tow Tank Length(m) 3.7 Beam(m) 0.6 Depth(m) 0.8 Cost(per day) Contact POC Special Physical Features Flows up to 5 gallons per minute Towing Capabilities Towing Capabilities Yes Maximum Velocity(m/s) 0.03 Length of Effective Tow(m) 3.0 Wavemaking Capabilities Wavemaking Capabilities None Channel/Tunnel/Flume Channel/Tunnel/Flume None Wind Capabilities Wind Capabilities None Control and Data Acquisition Cameras None Available Sensors Acoustics, Thermal, Turbulence, Velocity Data Generation Capability Real-Time Yes Test Services Test Services Yes On-Site fabrication capability/equipment Machine shop, carpenter shop, welding shop, instrumentation and electronics shop

264

Stennis Flume | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Stennis Flume Stennis Flume Jump to: navigation, search Basic Specifications Facility Name Stennis Flume Overseeing Organization United States Geological Survey, HIF Hydrodynamic Testing Facility Type Flume Length(m) 76.2 Beam(m) 1.8 Depth(m) 0.9 Cost(per day) $1200 (+ setup charges) Towing Capabilities Towing Capabilities None Wavemaking Capabilities Wavemaking Capabilities None Channel/Tunnel/Flume Channel/Tunnel/Flume Yes Recirculating No Wind Capabilities Wind Capabilities None Control and Data Acquisition Cameras None Data Generation Capability Real-Time No Test Services Test Services Yes Utility Services Available 440/220/110 electric available On-Site fabrication capability/equipment Small machine shop Special Characteristics Special Characteristics Yes Types of Co-located facilities Live velocity Jet Tank facility with 0.6m diameter jet with maximum velocity of 2.5 m/s

265

Coastal Structures Modeling Complex | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Structures Modeling Complex Structures Modeling Complex Jump to: navigation, search Basic Specifications Facility Name Coastal Structures Modeling Complex Overseeing Organization United States Army Corp of Engineers (ERDC) Hydrodynamic Testing Facility Type Wave Basin Length(m) 54.9 Beam(m) 35.4 Depth(m) 1.4 Water Type Freshwater Cost(per day) Contact POC Towing Capabilities Towing Capabilities None Wavemaking Capabilities Wavemaking Capabilities Yes Maximum Wave Height(m) 0.3 Wave Period Range(s) 0.0 Current Velocity Range(m/s) 0.0 Programmable Wavemaking Yes Wave Direction Both Simulated Beach No Channel/Tunnel/Flume Channel/Tunnel/Flume None Wind Capabilities Wind Capabilities None Control and Data Acquisition Description Automated data acquisition and control system Cameras None

266

MIT Tow Tank | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

MIT Tow Tank MIT Tow Tank Overseeing Organization Massachusetts Institute of Technology Hydrodynamics Hydrodynamic Testing Facility Type Tow Tank Length(m) 36.6 Beam(m) 2.4 Depth(m) 1.2 Water Type Saltwater Cost(per day) $750 Towing Capabilities Towing Capabilities Yes Maximum Velocity(m/s) 1.5 Length of Effective Tow(m) 27.4 Wavemaking Capabilities Wavemaking Capabilities Yes Maximum Wave Height(m) 0.1 Maximum Wave Height(m) at Wave Period(s) 3.0 Maximum Wave Length(m) 4.6 Wave Period Range(s) 3.0 Current Velocity Range(m/s) 0.0 Programmable Wavemaking Yes Wavemaking Description Arbitrary spectrum Wave Direction Uni-Directional Simulated Beach No Channel/Tunnel/Flume Channel/Tunnel/Flume None Wind Capabilities Wind Capabilities None Control and Data Acquisition

267

Maine Tow Tank | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Tow Tank Tow Tank Jump to: navigation, search Basic Specifications Facility Name Maine Tow Tank Overseeing Organization University of Maine Hydrodynamics Hydrodynamic Testing Facility Type Tow Tank Length(m) 30.5 Beam(m) 2.4 Depth(m) 1.2 Cost(per day) Contact POC Towing Capabilities Towing Capabilities Yes Maximum Velocity(m/s) 3 Length of Effective Tow(m) 27.4 Wavemaking Capabilities Wavemaking Capabilities Yes Maximum Wave Height(m) 0.0 Wave Period Range(s) 0.0 Current Velocity Range(m/s) 0.0 Programmable Wavemaking Yes Wave Direction Uni-Directional Simulated Beach Yes Description of Beach Simulated beach is framed with PVC/mesh. Has a 4:9 slope. Channel/Tunnel/Flume Channel/Tunnel/Flume None Wind Capabilities Wind Capabilities None Control and Data Acquisition

268

5-ft Wave Flume Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

5-ft Wave Flume Facility 5-ft Wave Flume Facility Overseeing Organization United States Army Corp of Engineers (ERDC) Hydrodynamic Testing Facility Type Flume Length(m) 63.4 Beam(m) 1.5 Depth(m) 1.5 Water Type Freshwater Cost(per day) Contact POC Towing Capabilities Towing Capabilities None Wavemaking Capabilities Wavemaking Capabilities Yes Maximum Wave Height(m) 0.5 Maximum Wave Height(m) at Wave Period(s) 10.0 Wave Period Range(s) 10.0 Current Velocity Range(m/s) 0.0 Programmable Wavemaking Yes Simulated Beach No Channel/Tunnel/Flume Channel/Tunnel/Flume Yes Recirculating No Wind Capabilities Wind Capabilities None Control and Data Acquisition Description Automated data acquisition and control system Cameras None Available Sensors Flow, Pressure Range(psi), Turbulence, Velocity, Wave Probe

269

Alden Large Flume | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Flume Flume Jump to: navigation, search Basic Specifications Facility Name Alden Large Flume Overseeing Organization Alden Research Laboratory, Inc Hydrodynamic Testing Facility Type Flume Length(m) 24.4 Beam(m) 6.1 Depth(m) 3.0 Water Type Freshwater Cost(per day) $5000/week Towing Capabilities Towing Capabilities Yes Maximum Velocity(m/s) 0.9 Maximum Velocity with Constriction(m/s) 3 Wavemaking Capabilities Wavemaking Capabilities Yes Maximum Wave Height(m) 0.0 Maximum Wave Height(m) at Wave Period(s) 0.0 Wave Period Range(s) 2.1 Current Velocity Range(m/s) 3.2 Programmable Wavemaking Yes Wavemaking Description Wave generators not yet designed Simulated Beach No Channel/Tunnel/Flume Channel/Tunnel/Flume Yes Recirculating Yes Wind Capabilities Wind Capabilities Yes

270

Conte Large Flume | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Conte Large Flume Conte Large Flume Overseeing Organization United States Geological Survey, LSC Hydrodynamic Testing Facility Type Flume Length(m) 38.1 Beam(m) 6.1 Depth(m) 5.2 Cost(per day) Contact POC Towing Capabilities Towing Capabilities None Wavemaking Capabilities Wavemaking Capabilities None Channel/Tunnel/Flume Channel/Tunnel/Flume Yes Recirculating No Wind Capabilities Wind Capabilities None Control and Data Acquisition Description National Instruments LabView and other data acquisition systems Number of channels 12 Bandwidth(kHz) 44 Cameras Yes Number of Color Cameras 5 Description of Camera Types Conventional underwater video, 4; high speed (1000 fps), 1 Available Sensors Displacement, Flow, Pressure Range(psi), Thermal, Turbulence, Velocity Data Generation Capability

271

L-Shaped Flume Wave Basin | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

L-Shaped Flume Wave Basin L-Shaped Flume Wave Basin Jump to: navigation, search Basic Specifications Facility Name L-Shaped Flume Wave Basin Overseeing Organization United States Army Corp of Engineers (ERDC) Hydrodynamic Testing Facility Type Wave Basin Length(m) 76.2 Beam(m) 15.2 Depth(m) 1.8 Water Type Freshwater Special Physical Features Contact POC Towing Capabilities Towing Capabilities None Wavemaking Capabilities Wavemaking Capabilities Yes Maximum Wave Height(m) 0.6 Maximum Wave Height(m) at Wave Period(s) 10.0 Wave Period Range(s) 10.0 Current Velocity Range(m/s) 0.0 Programmable Wavemaking Yes Wave Direction Uni-Directional Simulated Beach No Channel/Tunnel/Flume Channel/Tunnel/Flume None Wind Capabilities Wind Capabilities None Control and Data Acquisition Description Automated data acquisition and control sys

272

Conte Small Flume | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Small Flume Small Flume Overseeing Organization United States Geological Survey, LSC Hydrodynamic Testing Facility Type Flume Length(m) 38.1 Beam(m) 3.0 Depth(m) 5.2 Cost(per day) Contact POC Towing Capabilities Towing Capabilities None Wavemaking Capabilities Wavemaking Capabilities None Channel/Tunnel/Flume Channel/Tunnel/Flume Yes Recirculating No Wind Capabilities Wind Capabilities None Control and Data Acquisition Description National Instruments LabView and other data acquisition systems Number of channels 12 Bandwidth(kHz) 44 Cameras Yes Number of Color Cameras 5 Description of Camera Types Conventional underwater video, 4; high speed (1000 fps), 1 Available Sensors Displacement, Flow, Pressure Range(psi), Thermal, Turbulence, Velocity Data Generation Capability

273

DeFrees Flume 4 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Flume 4 Flume 4 Jump to: navigation, search Basic Specifications Facility Name DeFrees Flume 4 Overseeing Organization Cornell University Hydrodynamics Hydrodynamic Testing Facility Type Flume Length(m) 20.0 Beam(m) 1.0 Depth(m) 1.0 Water Type Freshwater Towing Capabilities Towing Capabilities None Wavemaking Capabilities Wavemaking Capabilities None Channel/Tunnel/Flume Channel/Tunnel/Flume Yes Velocity(m/s) 2 Recirculating No Wind Capabilities Wind Capabilities Yes Wind Velocity Range(m/s) 14.1 Other Characteristics Sufficient fetch to generate wind waves Control and Data Acquisition Description National Instruments LabView and Mathworks Matlab DAQ systems Number of channels 64+ Bandwidth(kHz) 1000 Cameras Yes Number of Color Cameras 5 Description of Camera Types 1024 x 1024 x 12 bit to 60 fps, 491 x 656 x 8-bit to 100 fps, others

274

DeFrees Flume 1 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Flume 1 Flume 1 Jump to: navigation, search Basic Specifications Facility Name DeFrees Flume 1 Overseeing Organization Cornell University Hydrodynamics Hydrodynamic Testing Facility Type Flume Length(m) 4.5 Beam(m) 0.6 Depth(m) 0.6 Water Type Freshwater Towing Capabilities Towing Capabilities None Wavemaking Capabilities Wavemaking Capabilities None Channel/Tunnel/Flume Channel/Tunnel/Flume Yes Velocity(m/s) 2 Recirculating No Wind Capabilities Wind Capabilities None Control and Data Acquisition Description National Instruments LabView and Mathworks Matlab DAQ systems Number of channels 64+ Bandwidth(kHz) 1000 Cameras Yes Number of Color Cameras 5 Description of Camera Types 1024 x 1024 x 12 bit to 60 fps, 491 x 656 x 8-bit to 100 fps, others Available Sensors Flow, Turbulence, Ultrasonic Wave Height, Acceleration, Pressure Range(psi), Acoustics, Velocity, Displacement, Thermal

275

Ice Towing Tank | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Ice Towing Tank Ice Towing Tank Jump to: navigation, search Basic Specifications Facility Name Ice Towing Tank Overseeing Organization University of Iowa Hydrodynamic Testing Facility Type Tow Tank Length(m) 21.2 Beam(m) 5.0 Depth(m) 1.3 Cost(per day) Contact POC Special Physical Features Specialized for cold regions research, room temperature can be decreased to -10°F Towing Capabilities Towing Capabilities Yes Maximum Velocity(m/s) 0.5 Length of Effective Tow(m) 15.0 Wavemaking Capabilities Wavemaking Capabilities None Channel/Tunnel/Flume Channel/Tunnel/Flume None Wind Capabilities Wind Capabilities None Control and Data Acquisition Cameras Yes Description of Camera Types Underwater Available Sensors Acoustics, Thermal, Turbulence, Velocity Data Generation Capability

276

MHL Free Surface Channel | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

MHL Free Surface Channel MHL Free Surface Channel Jump to: navigation, search Basic Specifications Facility Name MHL Free Surface Channel Overseeing Organization University of Michigan Hydrodynamics Hydrodynamic Testing Facility Type Channel Beam(m) 1.0 Depth(m) 0.6 Cost(per day) $2000 (+ Labor/Materials) Towing Capabilities Towing Capabilities Yes Maximum Velocity(m/s) 2 Wavemaking Capabilities Wavemaking Capabilities None Channel/Tunnel/Flume Channel/Tunnel/Flume Yes Velocity(m/s) 2 Recirculating No Wind Capabilities Wind Capabilities None Control and Data Acquisition Description Custom Data Acquisition System using National Instruments hardware; system compatible with Planing Hull and Floating Beam Dynamometers Custom Data Acquisition System using National Instruments hardware; system compatible with Planing Hull and Floating Beam Dynamometers

277

Haynes Wave Basin | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Wave Basin Wave Basin Jump to: navigation, search Basic Specifications Facility Name Haynes Wave Basin Overseeing Organization Texas A&M (Haynes) Hydrodynamic Testing Facility Type Wave Basin Length(m) 38.1 Beam(m) 22.9 Depth(m) 1.5 Water Type Freshwater Cost(per day) $150/hour (excluding labor) Towing Capabilities Towing Capabilities None Wavemaking Capabilities Wavemaking Capabilities Yes Maximum Wave Height(m) 0.6 Maximum Wave Height(m) at Wave Period(s) 3.3 Maximum Wave Length(m) 10.7 Wave Period Range(s) 3.3 Current Velocity Range(m/s) 0.2 Programmable Wavemaking Yes Wavemaking Description Directional, irregular, any spectrum, cnoidal or solitary wave Wave Direction Both Simulated Beach Yes Description of Beach Stone Channel/Tunnel/Flume Channel/Tunnel/Flume None

278

DeFrees Flume 3 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Basic Specifications Basic Specifications Facility Name DeFrees Flume 3 Overseeing Organization Cornell University Hydrodynamics Hydrodynamic Testing Facility Type Flume Length(m) 15.0 Beam(m) 2.0 Depth(m) 0.6 Water Type Freshwater Towing Capabilities Towing Capabilities None Wavemaking Capabilities Wavemaking Capabilities None Channel/Tunnel/Flume Channel/Tunnel/Flume Yes Velocity(m/s) 2 Recirculating No Wind Capabilities Wind Capabilities None Control and Data Acquisition Description National Instruments LabView and Mathworks Matlab DAQ systems Number of channels 64+ Cameras Yes Number of Color Cameras 5 Description of Camera Types 1024 x 1024 x 12 bit to 60 fps, 491 x 656 x 8-bit to 100 fps, others Available Sensors Acceleration, Acoustics, Pressure Range(psi), Velocity, Displacement, Turbulence, Flow, Ultrasonic Wave Height, Thermal

279

Coastal Inlet Model Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Inlet Model Facility Inlet Model Facility Jump to: navigation, search Basic Specifications Facility Name Coastal Inlet Model Facility Overseeing Organization United States Army Corp of Engineers (ERDC) Hydrodynamic Testing Facility Type Wave Basin Length(m) 103.6 Beam(m) 48.8 Depth(m) 0.6 Water Type Freshwater Cost(per day) Contact POC Towing Capabilities Towing Capabilities None Wavemaking Capabilities Wavemaking Capabilities Yes Maximum Wave Height(m) 0.2 Maximum Wave Height(m) at Wave Period(s) 2.3 Wave Period Range(s) 2.3 Current Velocity Range(m/s) 0.0 Programmable Wavemaking Yes Wave Direction Uni-Directional Simulated Beach No Channel/Tunnel/Flume Channel/Tunnel/Flume None Wind Capabilities Wind Capabilities None Control and Data Acquisition Description Automated data acquisition and control system

280

Haynes Tow Tank | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Haynes Tow Tank Haynes Tow Tank Jump to: navigation, search Basic Specifications Facility Name Haynes Tow Tank Overseeing Organization Texas A&M (Haynes) Hydrodynamic Testing Facility Type Tow Tank Length(m) 45.7 Beam(m) 3.7 Depth(m) 3.0 Water Type Freshwater Cost(per day) $150/hour (excluding labor) Special Physical Features The tank includes a 7.6m by 3.7m by 1.5m deep sediment pit. Towing Capabilities Towing Capabilities Yes Maximum Velocity(m/s) 1.8 Length of Effective Tow(m) 24.4 Wavemaking Capabilities Wavemaking Capabilities None Channel/Tunnel/Flume Channel/Tunnel/Flume None Wind Capabilities Wind Capabilities None Control and Data Acquisition Description National Instruments LabView Number of channels 40 Cameras Yes Number of Color Cameras 6 Description of Camera Types 3 video; 3 digital

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281

Kennedy Flume | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Flume Flume Jump to: navigation, search Basic Specifications Facility Name Kennedy Flume Overseeing Organization University of Iowa Hydrodynamic Testing Facility Type Flume Length(m) 27.4 Beam(m) 0.9 Depth(m) 0.5 Cost(per day) Contact POC Special Physical Features Tilting flume; sedimentation recirculation capabilities; instrumentation rails; various weirs; dual pumps Towing Capabilities Towing Capabilities None Wavemaking Capabilities Wavemaking Capabilities None Channel/Tunnel/Flume Channel/Tunnel/Flume Yes Recirculating No Wind Capabilities Wind Capabilities None Control and Data Acquisition Cameras None Available Sensors Acoustics, Flow, Thermal, Turbulence, Velocity Data Generation Capability Real-Time Yes Test Services Test Services Yes On-Site fabrication capability/equipment Machine shop, carpenter shop, welding shop, instrumentation and electronics shop

282

Alden Tow Tank | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Tow Tank Tow Tank Jump to: navigation, search Basic Specifications Facility Name Alden Tow Tank Overseeing Organization Alden Research Laboratory, Inc Hydrodynamic Testing Facility Type Tow Tank Length(m) 30.5 Beam(m) 1.2 Depth(m) 1.2 Water Type Freshwater Cost(per day) Depends on study Towing Capabilities Towing Capabilities Yes Wavemaking Capabilities Wavemaking Capabilities None Channel/Tunnel/Flume Channel/Tunnel/Flume None Wind Capabilities Wind Capabilities Yes Wind Velocity Range(m/s) Designed as needed for study objectives Other Characteristics Point measurement capability Control and Data Acquisition Description Differential pressure transducers, acoustic profiling, propeller meters, load cells, computer data acquisition systems. Number of channels Designed as needed

283

Bucknell Hydraulic Flume | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Hydraulic Flume Hydraulic Flume Jump to: navigation, search Basic Specifications Facility Name Bucknell Hydraulic Flume Overseeing Organization Bucknell University Hydrodynamic Testing Facility Type Flume Length(m) 9.8 Beam(m) 1.2 Depth(m) 0.6 Water Type Freshwater Cost(per day) Depends on personnel requirements Towing Capabilities Towing Capabilities Yes Maximum Velocity(m/s) 2.7 Wavemaking Capabilities Wavemaking Capabilities None Channel/Tunnel/Flume Channel/Tunnel/Flume Yes Velocity(m/s) 2.7 Recirculating Yes Wind Capabilities Wind Capabilities None Control and Data Acquisition Description Various sensors available on a test-by-test basis Available Sensors Flow, Velocity Data Generation Capability Real-Time No Integrated Display/Graphics Microsoft Windows based systems

284

Scripps Flume | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Basic Specifications Facility Name Scripps Flume Overseeing Organization University of California, San Diego (Scripps) Hydrodynamic Testing Facility Type Flume Length(m) 16.0 Beam(m) 1.1 Depth(m) 1.1 Cost(per day) Contact POC Special Physical Features Double sided glass wall test section. Towing Capabilities Towing Capabilities None Wavemaking Capabilities Wavemaking Capabilities None Channel/Tunnel/Flume Channel/Tunnel/Flume Yes Velocity(m/s) 1.25 Recirculating No Wind Capabilities Wind Capabilities None Control and Data Acquisition Description Data only, control system separate, pc based, Measurement Computing PCI-DAS6014 card, 16 channel, 16 bit. DAS-Wizard software. Number of channels 16 Bandwidth(kHz) .1 Hz; dependent on number of channels and computer speed

285

Flood Fighting Research Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Fighting Research Facility Fighting Research Facility Jump to: navigation, search Basic Specifications Facility Name Flood Fighting Research Facility Overseeing Organization United States Army Corp of Engineers (ERDC) Hydrodynamic Testing Facility Type Wave Basin Length(m) 45.7 Beam(m) 30.5 Depth(m) 1.2 Water Type Freshwater Cost(per day) Contact POC Towing Capabilities Towing Capabilities None Wavemaking Capabilities Wavemaking Capabilities Yes Maximum Wave Height(m) 0.0 Wave Period Range(s) 0.0 Current Velocity Range(m/s) 0.0 Programmable Wavemaking No Simulated Beach No Channel/Tunnel/Flume Channel/Tunnel/Flume None Wind Capabilities Wind Capabilities None Control and Data Acquisition Description Automated data acquisition and control system Cameras Yes Number of Color Cameras 1

286

Coastal Harbors Modeling Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Modeling Facility Modeling Facility Jump to: navigation, search Basic Specifications Facility Name Coastal Harbors Modeling Facility Overseeing Organization United States Army Corp of Engineers (ERDC) Hydrodynamic Testing Facility Type Wave Basin Length(m) 121.9 Beam(m) 48.8 Depth(m) 0.5 Water Type Freshwater Cost(per day) Contact POC Towing Capabilities Towing Capabilities None Wavemaking Capabilities Wavemaking Capabilities Yes Maximum Wave Height(m) 0.2 Maximum Wave Height(m) at Wave Period(s) 2.3 Wave Period Range(s) 2.3 Current Velocity Range(m/s) 0.0 Programmable Wavemaking Yes Wave Direction Uni-Directional Simulated Beach No Channel/Tunnel/Flume Channel/Tunnel/Flume None Wind Capabilities Wind Capabilities None Control and Data Acquisition Description Automated data acquisition and control system

287

Erosion Flume | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Erosion Flume Erosion Flume Jump to: navigation, search Basic Specifications Facility Name Erosion Flume Overseeing Organization University of Iowa Hydrodynamic Testing Facility Type Flume Length(m) 9.1 Beam(m) 0.6 Depth(m) 0.9 Cost(per day) Contact POC Special Physical Features Tilting flume from -5 to +21% slope; erodibility of grassed boxes; dual pumps up to 50 cfs. Towing Capabilities Towing Capabilities None Wavemaking Capabilities Wavemaking Capabilities None Channel/Tunnel/Flume Channel/Tunnel/Flume Yes Recirculating No Wind Capabilities Wind Capabilities None Control and Data Acquisition Cameras None Available Sensors Acoustics, Thermal, Turbulence, Velocity Data Generation Capability Real-Time Yes Test Services Test Services Yes On-Site fabrication capability/equipment Machine shop, carpenter shop, welding shop, instrumentation and electronics shop

288

APS Users Organization  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

APSUO APSUO By-Laws Steering Commitee Employment Meetings Compton Award Franklin Award APS Users Organization The APSUO is responsible for advising the APS Associate Laboratory Director in the following areas: The Organization will serve as an advocacy group for the Facility and its user community. The Organization will provide advice to the ALD on matters affecting the user community. The Organization will assure good communication between the APS user community and the APS management. APSUO By-Laws The by-laws upon which the APS User Organization is based. List of Steering Committee Members Steering committee for the APS Users Organization. Employment Bulletin Board APS-related employment opportunities. APSUO Steering Committee Meetings Minutes and presentations from the APSUO meetings.

289

Organic dairy production.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The aim of this thesis was to gain further knowledge about the performance of cows in organic dairy production and their ability to adapt to… (more)

Ahlman, Therese

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

ORGANIC PHOTOVOLTAIC DEVICE OPTIMIZATION .  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Polymer based organic photovoltaic (OPV) is making great progress on solar cell performance in the past decade. As a potential alternative to conventional expensive photovoltaic… (more)

Nie, Wanyi

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Technology acceptance in organizations.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??New technology has changed how people do business. With rapid development of technology, it has been difficult for businesses and organizations to successfully implement technology… (more)

Stewart, Laurie

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Organization | ornl.gov  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

About ORNL Fact Sheet Brochure Diversity Leadership Team Organization History Environmental Policy Corporate Giving Research Integrity Who we are, aren't About ORNL Home | ORNL |...

293

Biogas and Cattle Organs.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? A study has been conducted to assess the possibilities to introduce dead cattle organs as the raw material for biogas generation at the rural… (more)

Jamil, Adnan

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

Giant tunneling magnetoresistance up to 410% at room temperature in fully epitaxial Co/MgO/Co magnetic tunnel junctions with bcc Co(001) electrodes  

SciTech Connect

Fully epitaxial Co(001)/MgO(001)/Co(001) magnetic tunnel junctions (MTJs) with metastable bcc Co(001) electrodes were fabricated with molecular beam epitaxy. The MTJs exhibited giant magnetoresistance (MR) ratios up to 410% at room temperature, the highest value reported to date. Temperature dependence of the MR ratio was observed to be very small compared with fully epitaxial Fe/MgO/Fe and textured CoFeB/MgO/CoFeB MTJs. The MR ratio of the Co/MgO/Co MTJ showed larger bias voltage dependence than that of the epitaxial Fe/MgO/Fe MTJs, which probably reflects the band structures of bcc Co and Fe for the k{sub parallel}=0 direction.

Yuasa, Shinji; Fukushima, Akio; Kubota, Hitoshi; Suzuki, Yoshishige; Ando, Koji [National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), Nanoelectronics Research Institute, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8568 (Japan) and SORST, Japan Science and Technology Agency (JST), Kawaguchi, Saitama 332-0012 (Japan); National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), Nanoelectronics Research Institute, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8568 (Japan)

2006-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

295

Proposal for the award of a contract for dismantling, removal and packaging of the existing Heating, Ventilation and Air-Conditioning (HVAC) systems in the PS tunnel  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Proposal for the award of a contract for dismantling, removal and packaging of the existing Heating, Ventilation and Air-Conditioning (HVAC) systems in the PS tunnel

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

Supporting Organizations | National Security | ORNL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Initiatives Facilities Events and Conferences Supporting Organizations National Security Home | Science & Discovery | National Security | Supporting Organizations SHARE Supporting...

297

Organic vapor jet printing system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An organic vapor jet printing system includes a pump for increasing the pressure of an organic flux.

Forrest, Stephen R

2012-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

298

Selling body organs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Selling body organs Selling body organs Name: Betty A Laliberte Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: N/A Question: If a tissue donor dies and some of his/her tissue is donated, should the family be given money or some other benefit? I am a freshman at York HS and am doing a bioethics project. Replies: An interesting question. In my opinion, a family should not receive payment for organ donation. That would introduce an economic element into the decision, which does not seem appropriate. One problem is: Who will pay? The recipient? What if he can't afford it? Who gets the organ? The highest bidder? I guess part of my problem with selling organs and tissues is religious in nature. To me, my life and my body were given freely to me and they are not mine to sell to someone else. They certainly do not belong to my family to profit from.

299

Methyl quantum tunneling and nitrogen-14 NQR NMR studies using a SQUID magnetic resonance spectrometer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) and Nuclear Quadrupole Resonance (NQR) techniques have been very successful in obtaining molecular conformation and dynamics information. Unfortunately, standard NMR and NQR spectrometers are unable to adequately detect resonances below a few megahertz due to the frequency dependent sensitivity of their Faraday coil detectors. For this reason a new spectrometer with a dc SQUID (Superconducting Quantum Interference Device) detector, which has no such frequency dependence, has been developed. Previously, this spectrometer was used to observe {sup 11}B and {sup 27}Al NQR resonances. The scope of this study was increased to include {sup 23}Na, {sup 51}V, and {sup 55}Mn NQR transitions. Also, a technique was presented to observe {sup 14}N NQR resonances through cross relaxation of the nitrogen polarization to adjacent proton spins. When the proton Zeeman splitting matches one nitrogen quadrupoler transition the remaining two {sup 14}N transitions can be detected by sweeping a saturating rf field through resonance. Additionally, simultaneous excitation of two nitrogen resonances provides signal enhancement which helps to connect transitions from the same site. In this way, nitrogen-14 resonances were observed in several amino acids and polypeptides. This spectrometer has also been useful in the direct detection of methyl quantum tunneling splittings at 4.2 K. Tunneling, frequencies of a homologous series of carboxylic acids were measured and for solids with equivalent crystal structures, an exponential correlation between the tunneling frequency and the enthalpy of fusion is observed. This correlation provides information about the contribution of intermolecular interactions to the energy barrier for methyl rotation.

Black, B.E. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Chemistry]|[Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States)

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Baker-Barry Tunnel Lighting: Evaluation of a Potential GATEWAY Demonstrations Project  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy is evaluating the Baker-Barry Tunnel as a potential GATEWAY Demonstrations project for deployment of solid-state lighting (SSL) technology. The National Park Service views this project as a possible proving ground and template for implementation of light-emitting diode (LED) luminaires in other tunnels, thereby expanding the estimated 40% energy savings from 132 MWh/yr to a much larger figure nationally. Most of the energy savings in this application is attributable to the instant-restrike capability of LED products and to their high tolerance for frequent on/off switching, used here to separately control either end of the tunnel during daytime hours. Some LED luminaires rival or outperform their high-intensity discharge (HID) counterparts in terms of efficacy, but options are limited, and smaller lumen packages preclude true one-for-one equivalence. However, LED products continue to improve in efficacy and affordability at a rate unmatched by other light source technologies; the estimated simple payback period of eight years (excluding installation costs and maintenance savings) can be expected to improve with time. The proposed revisions to the existing high-pressure sodium (HPS) lighting system would require slightly increased controls complexity and significantly increased luminaire types and quantities. In exchange, substantial annual savings (from reduced maintenance and energy use) would be complemented by improved quantity and quality of illumination. Although advanced lighting controls could offer additional savings, it is unclear whether such a system would prove cost-effective; this topic may be explored in future work.

Tuenge, Jason R.

2011-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tunnel overseeing organization" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Tunneling dynamics and phase transition of a Bose-Fermi mixture in a double well  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The coherent nonlinear tunneling dynamics of a boson-fermion mixture in a double-well potential is studied in this paper. Four types of phase are found for the mixture. The first one is two species localizing in different potential wells. The second one is two species coexisting in the same well. The third one is two species equally populated in two wells. The fourth one is one species equally populated in two wells while the other species is in one well. The phase transitions among these four states have been investigated. The interspecies and intraspecies interactions as well as bosonic and fermionic numbers can dramatically affect these phase transitions.

Qi Pengtang; Duan Wenshan [Department of Physics, Northwest Normal University, Lanzhou, 730070 (China)

2011-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

302

Evidence of strong-coupling superconductivity in CaC{sub 6} from tunneling spectroscopy.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Tunneling in CaC{sub 6} crystals reproducibly reveals superconducting gaps {Delta} of 2.3 {+-} 0.2 meV that are {approx}40% larger than reported earlier. In an isotropic s-wave scenario, that puts CaC{sub 6} into the class of very strongly coupled superconductors, since 2{Delta}/kT{sub c} {approx} 4.6, implying that soft Ca phonons are primarily involved in the superconductivity. This conclusion explains the relatively large Ca isotope effect found recently for CaC{sub 6}, but it could also signal a strong anisotropy in the electron-phonon interaction.

Kurter, C.; Ozyuzer, L.; Mazur, D.; Zasadzinski, J. F.; Rosenmann, D.; Claus, H.; Hinks, D. G.; Gray, K. E.; Materials Science Division; Illinois Inst. Tech.; Izmir Inst. Tech.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Structure and Reactions of Carbon and Hydrogen on Ru(0001): A Scanning Tunneling Microscopy Study  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The interaction between carbon and hydrogen atoms on a Ru(0001) surface was studied using scanning tunneling microscopy (STM), Density Functional Theory (DFT) and STM image calculations. Formation of CH species by reaction between adsorbed H and C was observed to occur readily at 100 K. When the coverage of H increased new complexes of the form CH+nH (n = 1, 2 and 3) were observed. These complexes, never observed before, might be precursors for further hydrogenation reactions. DFT analysis reveals that a considerable energy barrier exists for the CH+H {yields} CH{sub 2} reaction.

Shimizu, Tomoko K.; Mugarza, Aitor; Cerda, Jorge; Salmeron, Miquel

2008-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

304

[Scanning tunnelling microscopy and spectroscopy of ceramic grain boundaries]. [Annual report, September 1992--September 1993  

SciTech Connect

Objective is to study the local geometric and electronic structure at grain boundaries in oxides; this was motivated by the potential to use STM and tunneling spectroscopy on semiconducting ceramics. In order to understand the imaging of low conductivity materials, a number of transition metal oxides were examined: ZnO, TiO{sub 2}. Spatial resolution limits are considered. Conductance profiles across silicon grain boundaries are compared with those across more complex SrTiO{sub 3} grain boundaries. Calculations of space charge in complex oxides are presented. A SEM/STM was constructed which operates in ultrahigh vacuum and has large scale positioning capability (> 1 cm).

Not Available

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Thermal/mechanical analyses of G-Tunnel field experiments at Rainier Mesa, Nevada  

SciTech Connect

Analysis methods (models) are currently being developed to support thermal, mechanical, and thermomechanical aspects of repository design and performance assessment of the candidate Yucca Mountain high-level nuclear waste site. Credibility of these models, and therefore of design and performance analyses, will in part be determined through comparison of calculated and measured response (validation) for large-scale field experiments. This paper discusses the models being developed, the rationale behind the model development, and analyses of experiments performed at G-Tunnel and planned as part of site characterization at Yucca Mountain. 25 refs., 21 figs.

Bauer, S.J.; Costin, L.S.; Chen, E.P.; Tillerson, J.R.

1988-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

306

Tunneling and traversal of ultracold three-level atoms through vacuum-induced potentials  

SciTech Connect

The passage of ultracold three-level atoms through the potential induced by the vacuum cavity mode is discussed using cascade atomic configuration. We study the tunneling or traversal time of the ultracold atoms via a bimodal high-Q cavity. It is found that the phase time, which may be considered as a measure for the time required to traverse the cavity, exhibits superclassical and subclassical behaviors. Further, the dark states and interference effects in cascade atomic configuration may influence the passage time of the atom through the cavity.

Badshah, Fazal; Irfan, Muhammad; Qamar, Shahid [Department of Physics and Applied Mathematics, Pakistan Institute of Engineering and Applied Sciences, Nilore, Islamabad 45650 (Pakistan); Qamar, Sajid [Department of Physics, COMSATS Institute of Information Technology, Islamabad (Pakistan)

2011-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

307

Nanometer-scale tunnel formation in metallic glass by helium ion irradiation  

SciTech Connect

We have shown that upon high fluence helium ion irradiation, metallic glass Cu{sub 50}Zr{sub 45}Ti{sub 5} becomes highly porous at the depth of the helium projected range. The resulting porous region is characterized by the formation of a tunnel like structure and self-linkage of nanometer size gas bubbles. Furthermore, the irradiation leads to the formation of nanometer size Cu{sub x}Zr{sub y} crystals that are randomly distributed. The results of this study indicate that the He-filled bubbles have attractive interactions and experience considerable mobility. Movement of the bubbles is believed to be assisted by ballistic collisions.

Shao Lin [Department of Nuclear Engineering, Texas A and M University, College Station, Texas 77843 (United States); Materials Science and Engineering Program, Texas A and M University, College Station, Texas 77843 (United States); Gorman, Brian P. [Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, Colorado School of Mines, Golden, Colorado 80401 (United States); Aitkaliyeva, Assel [Materials Science and Engineering Program, Texas A and M University, College Station, Texas 77843 (United States); David Theodore, N. [CHD-Fab, Freescale Semiconductor, Inc., Chandler, Arizona 85224 (United States); Xie Guoqiang [Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan)

2012-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

308

An Experiment Study of the Propagation of Radio Waves in a Scaled Model of Long-Wall Coal Mining Tunnels  

SciTech Connect

A long-wall coal mining tunnel is the most important working area in a coal mine. It has long been realized that radio communications can improve both productivity and safety in this dangerous area. Hence, many attempts to use radio communications in such an environment have been made. Unfortunately, no radio system has satisfactorily provided communication services there, which, we believe, is partially due to poor understanding of the propagation characteristics of radio waves in the long-wall mining tunnel. To have deeper physical insight into the propagation problem, a scaled model of the long-wall mining tunnel was built, and the propagation characteristics of UHF radio waves were measured. The experiment and the measured results are presented and discussed.

Han, G.R.; Zhang, W.M.; Zhang, Y.P. [Shanxi University, Taiyuan (China)

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Organization | Department of Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Organization Organization Organization View Office of Management Organization Chart in PDF format. Office of Resource Management and Planning The Office of Resource Management and Planning provides the leadership and centralized management and direction of the Office of Management (MA) planning, budgeting, financial, human resources, and program execution processes; ensures that these processes are effective, and fully integrated and consistent with the Department-wide processes and requirements. Office of Aviation Management The Department of Energy, Aviation Program is the management function for all fleet aircraft and contracted aviation services for the Department. The program and its management personnel operate world-wide. To take advantage of the best communications and information services available, we have

310

Organization | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Us » Organization Us » Organization Organization The organizational structure of the Office of Policy and International Affairs is as follows: *Office of Resource Management (PI-10) *Office of the Deputy Assistant Secretary for Eurasia, Africa and the Middle East (PI-20) *Office of the Deputy Assistant Secretary for Asia, Europe, and the Americas (PI-30) *Office of the Deputy Assistant Secretary for Policy Analysis (PI-40) *Office of the Deputy Assistant Secretary for Climate Change Policy and Technology (PI-50) The organizational chart can be found here. A brief synopsis of each sub-organization follows. Office of Resource Management (PI-10) The mission of the Office of Resource Management is to support the Office of Policy and International Affairs (PI) by: (1) minimizing the

311

Geothermal Drilling Organization  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Geothermal Drilling Organization (GDO), founded in 1982 as a joint Department of Energy (DOE)-Industry organization, develops and funds near-term technology development projects for reducing geothermal drilling costs. Sandia National Laboratories administers DOE funds to assist industry critical cost-shared projects and provides development support for each project. GDO assistance to industry is vital in developing products and procedures to lower drilling costs, in part, because the geothermal industry is small and represents a limited market.

Sattler, A.R.

1999-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

312

FULL-SCALE, WIND TUNNEL AND CFD WIND ENGINEERING STUDIES A variety of methods can be used to obtain wind engineering design information. These include  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

FULL-SCALE, WIND TUNNEL AND CFD WIND ENGINEERING STUDIES A variety of methods can be used to obtain wind engineering design information. These include codes of practice, full-scale, wind tunnel are listed in the table below: Table 1. Relative advantages and disadvantages of wind engineering techniques

Savory, Eric

313

Momentum-resolved tunneling between a Luttinger liquid and a two-dimensional electron gas S. A. Grigera and A. J. Schofield  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Momentum-resolved tunneling between a Luttinger liquid and a two-dimensional electron gas S. A consider momentum resolved tunneling between a Luttinger liquid and a two-dimensional electron gas on both the Luttinger liquid and the two-dimensional electron gas. We show that there are six dispersing

Grigera, Santiago

314

A Wind Tunnel and Theoretical Study of the Melting Behavior of Atmospheric Ice Particles. IV: Experiment and Theory for Snow Flakes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An experiment in the Mainz vertical Cloud Tunnel is described in which natural and laboratory-made aggregates of snow crystals (snow flakes) were melted under free fall conditions in the vertical air stream of the tunnel, which was allowed to ...

S. K. Mitra; O. Vohl; M. Ahr; H. R. Pruppacher

1990-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Alignment-dependent fluorescence emission induced by tunnel ionization of carbon dioxide from lower-lying orbitals  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We show that fluorescence emission induced by strong field tunnel ionization of carbon dioxide from its lower-lying orbitals exhibits a peculiar molecular alignment dependence. The experimentally measured alignment-dependence of the fluorescence agrees with the alignment-dependence of the ionization probability calculated in the framework of the strong field approximation. Our results demonstrate the feasibility of an all-optical approach for shedding more light on the ionization mechanisms of molecules from their lower-lying orbitals in tunnel ionization regime.

Yao, Jinping; Jia, Xinyan; Hao, Xiaolei; Zeng, Bin; Jing, Chenrui; Chu, Wei; Ni, Jielei; Zhang, Haisu; Xie, Hongqiang; Zhang, Chaojin; Zhao, Zengxiu; Chen, Jing; Liu, Xiaojun; Cheng, Ya; Xu, Zhizhan

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Oxygen-Induced Symmetrization and Structural Coherency in Fe/MgO/Fe(001) Magnetic Tunnel Junctions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present x-ray diffraction experiments and multiple-scattering calculations on the structure and transport properties of a Fe/MgO/Fe(001) magnetic tunnel junction (MTJ). Coherent growth of the top Fe electrode on the MgO spacer is observed only for Fe deposition in ambient oxygen atmosphere leading to a coherent and symmetric MTJ structure characterized by FeO layers at both Fe/MgO interfaces. This goes in parallel with calculations indicating large positive tunnel magnetoresistance (TMR) values in such symmetric junctions. The results have important implications for achieving giant TMR values.

Tusche, C.; Meyerheim, H.L.; Ernst, A.; Henk, J.; Bruno, P.; Kirschner, J. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Mikrostrukturphysik, Weinberg 2, D-06120 Halle (Germany); Jedrecy, N. [Institut des NanoSciences de Paris, Universites Paris 6 et 7, et CNRS-UMR 7588, 4 place Jussieu, F-75252 Paris Cedex 05 (France); Renaud, G. [CEA-Grenoble, 17 rue des Martyrs, F-38054 Grenoble (France)

2005-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

317

Giromill wind tunnel test and analysis. Volume I. Executive summary. Final report, June 1976--October 1977  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The study described herein is a continuation of the Giromill investigation in which a wind tunnel test of a model Giromill rotor was performed. The primary objective of the wind tunnel test was to obtain data for comparison with the Larsen cyclogiro vortex theory program employed for predicting the Giromill performance. The model had a rotor diameter of 7 ft. (2.13 meters) and a solidity (total blade area divided by rotor span times diameter) of 0.3. This was achieved by a three bladed rotor having blade chords of 8.4 in. (21.3 cm) and a span of 5 ft. (1.52 meters). The blades were modulated by use of replaceable cams, that simulated the various operating conditions, and a push rod arrangement connected to a bellcrank about the blade pivot point. Rotor RPM control was achieved with an electric motor/generator that could be used to either drive the rotor or absorb the rotor power to maintain RPM.

Moran, W.A.

1977-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Tunneling probability for the birth of an asymptotically de Sitter universe  

SciTech Connect

In the present work, we quantize a closed Friedmann-Robertson-Walker model in the presence of a positive cosmological constant and radiation. It gives rise to a Wheeler-DeWitt equation for the scale factor which has the form of a Schroedinger equation for a potential with a barrier. We solve it numerically and determine the tunneling probability for the birth of a asymptotically DeSitter, inflationary universe, initially, as a function of the mean energy of the initial wave function. Then, we verify that the tunneling probability increases with the cosmological constant, for a fixed value of the mean energy of the initial wave function. Our treatment of the problem is more general than previous ones, based on the WKB approximation. That is the case because we take into account the fact that the scale factor (a) cannot be smaller than zero. It means that, one has to introduce an infinity potential wall at a=0, which forces any wave packet to be zero there. That condition introduces new results, in comparison with previous works.

Acacio de Barros, J. [CSLI, 220 Panama Street, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305-4115 (United States); Correa Silva, E. V.; Monerat, G. A.; Oliveira-Neto, G. [Departamento de Matematica e Computacao, Faculdade de Tecnologia, Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro, Rodovia Presidente Dutra Km 298, Polo Industrial, CEP 27537-000, Resende-RJ (Brazil); Ferreira Filho, L. G. [Departamento de Mecanica e Energia, Faculdade de Tecnologia, Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro, Rodovia Presidente Dutra Km 298, Polo Industrial, CEP 27537-000, Resende-RJ (Brazil); Romildo, P. Jr. [Departamento de Fisica, Instituto de Ciencias Exatas, Universidade Federal de Juiz de Fora, CEP 36036-330, Juiz de Fora, Minas Gerais (Brazil)

2007-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

319

Patency of Femoral Tunneled Hemodialysis Catheters and Factors Predictive of Patency Failure  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To determine the patency rates of and factors associated with increased risk of patency failure in patients with femoral vein tunneled hemodialysis catheters. Methods: All femoral tunneled catheter insertions from 1996 to 2006 were reviewed, during which time 123 catheters were inserted. Of these, 66 were exchanges. Patients with femoral catheter failure versus those with femoral catheter patency were compared. Confounding factors, such as demographic and procedural factors, were incorporated and assessed using univariate and multivariable Cox proportional hazards regression analyses. Results: Mean catheter primary patency failure time was 96.3 days (SE 17.9 days). Primary patency at 30, 60, 90, and 180 days was 53.8%, 45.4%, 32.1%, and 27.1% respectively. Crude rates of risk of catheter failure did not suggest a benefit for patients receiving catheters introduced from one side versus the other, but more cephalad location of catheter tip was associated with improved patency. Multivariate analysis showed that patients whose catheters were on the left side (p = 0.009), were of increasing age at the time of insertion (p = 0.002) and that those who had diabetes (p = 0.001) were at significantly greater risk of catheter failure. The catheter infection rate was 1.4/1000 catheter days. Conclusion: Patients who were of a more advanced age and had diabetes were at greater risk of femoral catheter failure, whereas those who received femoral catheters from the right side were less at risk of catheter failure.

Burton, Kirsteen R. [University Health Network, University of Toronto, Department of Medical Imaging, Division of Vascular and Interventional Radiology (Canada); Guo, Lancia L. Q. [University of Calgary, Department of Radiology (Canada); Tan, Kong T.; Simons, Martin E.; Sniderman, Kenneth W.; Kachura, John R.; Beecroft, John R.; Rajan, Dheeraj K., E-mail: dheeraj.rajan@uhn.on.ca [University Health Network, University of Toronto, Department of Medical Imaging, Division of Vascular and Interventional Radiology (Canada)

2012-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

320

Spin-1 atoms in optical superlattices: Single-atom tunneling and entanglement  

SciTech Connect

We examine spinor Bose-Einstein condensates in optical superlattices theoretically using a Bose-Hubbard Hamiltonian that takes spin effects into account. Assuming that a small number of spin-1 bosons is loaded in an optical potential, we study single-particle tunneling that occurs when one lattice site is ramped up relative to a neighboring site. Spin-dependent effects modify the tunneling events in a qualitative and quantitative way. Depending on the asymmetry of the double well, different types of magnetic order occur, making the system of spin-1 bosons in an optical superlattice a model for mesoscopic magnetism. We use a double-well potential as a unit cell for a one-dimensional superlattice. Homogeneous and inhomogeneous magnetic fields are applied, and the effects of the linear and the quadratic Zeeman shifts are examined. We also investigate the bipartite entanglement between the sites and construct states of maximal entanglement. The entanglement in our system is due to both orbital and spin degrees of freedom. We calculate the contribution of orbital and spin entanglements and show that the sum of these two terms gives a lower bound for the total entanglement.

Wagner, Andreas; Bruder, Christoph; Demler, Eugene [Department of Physics, University of Basel, Klingelbergstrasse 82, CH-4056 Basel (Switzerland); Department of Physics, Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02138 (United States)

2011-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tunnel overseeing organization" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Results of pressurized-slot measurements in the G-Tunnel underground facility  

SciTech Connect

A rock-mechanics field-testing program is underway at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) as part of the YMP. SNL has the responsibility for assessing the repository design and performance as well as characterizing the geomechanical behavior of the rock. SNL has conducted field experiments in G-Tunnel in Rainier Mesa at the NTS, where tuffs similar to those at Yucca Mountain, the potential repository site, are found. Later experiments are planned as part of the YMP Exploratory Shaft investigations at Yucca Mountain. Major geomechanical factors in repository developments are determinations of the stress state and the deformability of the rock mass (described by the modulus of deformation). One feature of SNL`s rock-mechanics program was the development of a testing program for cutting thin slots in a jointed welded tuff and utilizing flatjacks for pressurizing these thin-slots on a relatively, large scale. Objectives in the pressurized-slot testing in G-Tunnel have been to apply and possibly improve methods for (1) utilizing the flatjack cancellation (FC) method for measuring stresses normal to the slot and (2) measuring the modulus of deformation of the jointed rock surrounding the slot. This paper discusses the results of field measurements in and around a single slot and evaluates potential applications and limitations. 10 refs., 1 fig., 4 tabs.

Zimmerman, R.M.; Mann, K.L.; Dodds, D.J.

1989-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

A portable vacuum hammer seismic source for use in tunnel environments  

SciTech Connect

Concern for the measurement of seismic refraction velocities in tunnel areas where cables, construction features, and other sensitive structures render the use of dynamite sources unwise, resulted in the design of a vacuum-driven impact system utilizing a 43-kg (94-lb) weight in a 2-m (6.5-ft) tube. The system is portable, quickly assembled and disassembled, and requires only standard electrical power, an air pressure supply, and a laboratory vacuum pump to operate. The maximum weight of any component is 84 kg (185 lb), the remaining components being significantly lighter. Tests in volcanic rock tunnels in Rainier Mesa at the Nevada Test Site indicate maximum energy generated by the system is in the SV wave. When the system was employed at angles other than vertical, a polarized SH mode was also observed. The hammer was used to obtain velocities in an in-hole survey in a 138-m horizontal hole drilled behind the flat face of the Red Hot chamber after the Red Hot nuclear detonation. A large decrease was observed in compressional velocity compared with pre-event values. Because 20 years have elapsed since the explosion, one cannot separate the effect of ground shock on lowering the velocity from possible effects of destressing around adjacent underground openings over this period.

Carroll, R.D.; Magner, J.E.

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Kinetics of tunneling electron transfer between antimorphous defects in optical crystals with mobile cations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The experimental data on the transient optical absorption of wide-band-gap optical crystals of lithium borates Li{sub 2}B{sub 4}O{sub 7}, LiB{sub 3}O{sub 5}, and Li{sub 6}Gd(BO{sub 3}){sub 3} and potassium (KH{sub 2}PO{sub 4} (KDP)) and ammonium (NH{sub 4}H{sub 2}PO{sub 4} (ADP)) dihydrogen phosphates in the visible and ultraviolet spectral regions are analyzed using the theory of diffusion-controlled tunneling recombination. A nanosecond pulsed radiation action on these crystals is shown to form defect pairs, such as polaron-type hole centers and electron centers based on interstitial cations. The relaxation kinetics of these centers over a wide time range of 10{sup -8}-10 s is described by a proposed model of tunneling electron transfer between antimorphous defects in the cation sublattice under the thermally stimulated mobility of recombination partners. The numerical values of the kinetic parameters are determined and the time dependences of the reaction rate constants are calculated for all crystals under study. As a result, the dynamics of change in the optical properties of these crystals under a pulsed radiation action can be simulated.

Ogorodnikov, I. N., E-mail: igor.ogorodnikov@bk.ru; Kiseleva, M. S. [Ural Federal University (Russian Federation)

2012-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

324

ARM - ARM Organization  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ARMARM Organization ARMARM Organization Laboratory Partners Nine DOE national laboratories share the responsibility of managing and operating the ARM Climate Research Facility. ARM Group Links Science Board SISC Charter Data Archive Data Management Facility Data Quality Program Engineering Support External Data Center ARM Organization The ARM Climate Research Facility operates field research sites around the world for global change research. Three primary locations-Southern Great Plains, Tropical Western Pacific, North Slope of Alaska-plus aircraft and the portable ARM Mobile Facilities-are heavily instrumented to collect massive amounts of atmospheric measurements needed to create data files. Scientists use these data to study the effects and interactions of sunlight, clouds, and radiant energy, as well as interdisciplinary research

325

Organic aerogel microspheres  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Organic aerogel microspheres are disclosed which can be used in capacitors, batteries, thermal insulation, adsorption/filtration media, and chromatographic packings, having diameters ranging from about 1 micron to about 3 mm. The microspheres can be pyrolyzed to form carbon aerogel microspheres. This method involves stirring the aqueous organic phase in mineral oil at elevated temperature until the dispersed organic phase polymerizes and forms nonstick gel spheres. The size of the microspheres depends on the collision rate of the liquid droplets and the reaction rate of the monomers from which the aqueous solution is formed. The collision rate is governed by the volume ratio of the aqueous solution to the mineral oil and the shear rate, while the reaction rate is governed by the chemical formulation and the curing temperature.

Mayer, S.T.; Kong, F.M.; Pekala, R.W.; Kaschmitter, J.L.

1999-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Treatment of organic waste  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An organic waste containing at least one element selected from the group consisting of strontium, cesium, iodine and ruthenium is treated to achieve a substantial reduction in the volume of the waste and provide for fixation of the selected element in an inert salt. The method of treatment comprises introducing the organic waste and a source of oxygen into a molten salt bath maintained at an elevated temperature to produce solid and gaseous reaction products. The gaseous reaction products comprise carbon dioxide and water vapor, and the solid reaction products comprise the inorganic ash constituents of the organic waste and the selected element which is retained in the molten salt. The molten salt bath comprises one or more alkali metal carbonates, and may optionally include from 1 to about 25 wt.% of an alkali metal sulfate.

Grantham, LeRoy F. (Calabasas, CA)

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

MST: Organizations: Bio: Alex Rosler  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Alex Roesler Alex Roesler Alex is the manager of the Ceramic and Glass organization at Sandia National Laboratories. His organization provides expertise in a variety of materials...

328

JGI - Organization Structure  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Organization Structure Organization Structure clickable organizational chart Dan Rokhsar Genomic Technologies Department Nikos Kyrpides Jeremy Schmutz Plant Program Metagenome Program Igor Grigoriev Fungal Program LBNL Director P. Alivisatos Scientific Advisory Committee JGI Director, Eddy Rubin Deputy Director of Science Programs, Jim Bristow S. Canon NERSC JGI Support Team Ray Turner Operations Department Prokaryote Super Program Genomic Technologies Department Len Pennacchio Microbial Program Tanja Woyke Dan Rokhsar Eukaryote Super Program Susannah Tringe Chia-lin Wei Executive Management DOE JGI Director: Eddy Rubin Deputy of Science: Jim Bristow Deputy of Operations: Ray Turner Deputy of Genomic Technologies: Len Pennacchio Departments Operations Deputy of Operations Ray Turner

329

Organic metal neutron detector  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A device for detection of neutrons comprises: as an active neutron sensing element, a conductive organic polymer having an electrical conductivity and a cross-section for said neutrons whereby a detectable change in said conductivity is caused by impingement of said neutrons on the conductive organic polymer which is responsive to a property of said polymer which is altered by impingement of said neutrons on the polymer; and means for associating a change in said alterable property with the presence of neutrons at the location of said device.

Butler, M.A.; Ginley, D.S.

1984-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

330

Flow Distortion by a Solent Sonic Anemometer: Wind Tunnel Calibration and Its Assessment for Flux Measurements over Forest and Field  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Main flow distortion effects caused by the sonic probe (i.e., deflection and attenuation/amplification of the wind vector) as a function of the azimuth angle of the incoming flow were examined by means of wind tunnel measurements at four ...

A. Grelle; A. Lindroth

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

Drop Shapes and Axis Ratio Distributions: Comparison between 2D Video Disdrometer and Wind-Tunnel Measurements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Comparisons of drop shapes between measurements made using 2D video disdrometer (2DVD) and wind-tunnel experiments are presented. Comparisons are made in terms of the mean drop shapes and the axis ratio distributions. Very close agreement of the ...

M. Thurai; V. N. Bringi; M. Szakáll; S. K. Mitra; K. V. Beard; S. Borrmann

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

FORCE SENSING IN SCANNING TUNNELING MICROSCOPY U. DURIG, J.K. GIMZEWSKI, D.W. POHL and R. SCHLITTLER  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

FORCE SENSING IN SCANNING TUNNELING MICROSCOPY U. DURIG, J.K. GIMZEWSKI, D.W. POHL and R, (1986) 930. [3] U. Durig, J.K. Gimzewski, and D.W. Pohl, Phys. Rev. Lett., in press. [4] J. Soler, A

Gimzewski, James

333

Direct measurement of interfacial structure in epitaxial Gd2O3 on GaAs (001) using scanning tunneling microscopy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The epitaxial growth of Gd"2O"3 on GaAs (001) has given a low interfacial density of states, resulting in the demonstration of the first inversion-channel GaAs metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistor. Motivated by the significance of this discovery, ... Keywords: Electronic information, GaAs, Gd2O3, Interfacial stacking, Scanning tunneling microscopy

Y. P. Chiu; M. C. Shih; B. C. Huang; J. Y. Shen; M. L. Huang; W. C. Lee; P. Chang; T. H. Chiang; M. Hong; J. Kwo

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

NRC ISSUES REPORT FOR COMMENT ON SPENT NUCLEAR FUEL TRANSPORTATION CASK RESPONSE TO CALDECOTT TUNNEL FIRE SCENARIO  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Nuclear Regulatory Commission is seeking public comment on a study of how a truck cask for transporting spent nuclear fuel might perform in a severe tunnel fire. The report models the performance of the NAC International Model LWT (NAC) spent fuel cask under the conditions of the April 1982 fire in the Caldecott highway tunnel near Oakland, Calif., when a gasoline tanker carrying 8,800 gallons of gasoline overturned and caught fire. Severe, intense fires such as the Caldecott fire are extremely rare. However, they provide an opportunity to study how transportation packages might perform under very severe accident conditions. The results of this study strongly indicate that any radioactive release from the NAC model or a similar spent fuel shipping cask involved in a severe tunnel fire such as that of the Caldecott highway tunnel accident would be within regulatory limits. The peak internal temperatures predicted for the NAC cask in the analysis of the Caldecott fire scenario were not high enough to result in rupture of the fuel cladding (protective metal tubing around the fuel). Therefore, it would not be expected that any radioactive material (including spent nuclear fuel particles or fission products) would be released from the fuel rods. The maximum cask temperatures experienced around the lid, vent and drain ports exceeded the

unknown authors

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Measuring charge trap occupation and energy level in CdSe/ZnS quantum dots using a scanning tunneling microscope  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We use a scanning tunneling microscope to probe single-electron charging phenomena in individual CdSe/ZnS (core/shell) quantum dots (QDs) at room temperature. The QDs are deposited on top of a bare Au thin film and form a ...

Bulovic, Vladimir

336

Theory of tunneling magnetoresistance of an epitaxial FeMgOFe,,001... junction J. Mathon and A. Umerski  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Umerski Department of Mathematics, City University, London EC1V 0HB, United Kingdom Received 21 December is in excess of 1000% for an MgO barrier of 20 atomic planes and the spin polarization of the tunneling current atomic planes. All these results are explained qualitatively in terms of the Fe majority- and minority

Umerski, Andrey

337

Organic solvent topical report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report is the technical basis for the accident and consequence analyses used in the Hanford Tank Farms Basis for Interim Operation. The report also contains the scientific and engineering information and reference material needed to understand the organic solvent safety issue. This report includes comments received from the Chemical Reactions Subcommittee of the Tank Advisory Panel.

Cowley, W.L.

1998-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

338

Scanning tunneling microscopy reveals LiMnAs is a room temperature anti-ferromagnetic semiconductor  

SciTech Connect

We performed scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy on a LiMnAs(001) thin film epitaxially grown on an InAs(001) substrate by molecular beam epitaxy. While the in situ cleavage exposed only the InAs(110) non-polar planes, the cleavage continued into the LiMnAs thin layer across several facets. We combined both topography and current mappings to confirm that the facets correspond to LiMnAs. By spectroscopy we show that LiMnAs has a band gap. The band gap evidenced in this study, combined with the known Neel temperature well above room temperature, confirms that LiMnAs is a promising candidate for exploring the concepts of high temperature semiconductor spintronics based on antiferromagnets.

Wijnheijmer, A. P.; Koenraad, P. M. [COBRA Inter-University Research Institute, Department of Applied Physics, Eindhoven University of Technology, P. O. Box 513, NL-5600 MB Eindhoven (Netherlands); Marti, X. [Faculty of Mathematics and Physics, Charles University in Prague, Ke Karlovu 3, 121 16 Prague 2 (Czech Republic); Institute of Physics ASCR, v.v.i., Cukrovarnicka 10, 162 53 Prague 6 (Czech Republic); Holy, V. [Faculty of Mathematics and Physics, Charles University in Prague, Ke Karlovu 3, 121 16 Prague 2 (Czech Republic); Cukr, M.; Novak, V. [Institute of Physics ASCR, v.v.i., Cukrovarnicka 10, 162 53 Prague 6 (Czech Republic); Jungwirth, T. [Institute of Physics ASCR, v.v.i., Cukrovarnicka 10, 162 53 Prague 6 (Czech Republic); School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Nottingham, Nottingham NG7 2RD (United Kingdom)

2012-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

339

Magnetism of Semiconductor-Based Magnetic Tunnel Junctions under Electric Field from First Principles  

SciTech Connect

Semiconductor magnetic tunnel junctions (MTJs), composed of diluted magnetic semiconductors (DMSs) sandwiching a semiconductor barrier, have potential applications in spintronics but their development has been slow due to the difficulty of controlling the magnetism of DMSs. In terms of density functional calculations for model semiconductor MTJs, (Zn,Co)O/ZnO/(Zn,Co)O and (Ga,Mn)N/GaN/(Ga,Mn)N, we show that the magnetic coupling between the transition metal ions in each DMS electrode of such semiconductor MTJs can be switched from ferromagnetic to antiferromagnetic, or vice versa, under the application of external electric field across the junctions. Our results suggest a possible avenue for the application of semiconductor MTJs.

Kan, E.; Xiang, H.; Yang, J.; Whangbo, M. H.

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

A theoretical investigation of ferromagnetic tunnel junctions with 4-valued conductances  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In considering a novel function in ferromagnetic tunnel junctions consisting of ferromagnet(FM)/barrier/FM junctions, we theoretically investigate multiple valued (or multi-level) cell property, which is in principle realized by sensing conductances of four states recorded with magnetization configurations of two FMs; that is, (up,up), (up,down), (down,up), (down,down). To obtain such 4-valued conductances, we propose FM1/spin-polarized barrier/FM2 junctions, where the FM1 and FM2 are different ferromagnets, and the barrier has spin dependence. The proposed idea is applied to the case of the barrier having localized spins. Assuming that all the localized spins are pinned parallel to magnetization axes of the FM1 and FM2, 4-valued conductances are explicitly obtained for the case of many localized spins. Furthermore, objectives for an ideal spin-polarized barrier are discussed.

Satoshi Kokado; Kikuo Harigaya

2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tunnel overseeing organization" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Tunneling of Massive Dirac Fermions in Graphene through Time-periodic Potential  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The energy spectrum of graphene sheet with a single barrier structure having a time periodic oscillating height and subjected to magnetic field is analyzed. The corresponding transmission is studied as function of the obtained energy and the potential parameters. Quantum interference within the oscillating barrier has an important effect on quasiparticles tunneling. In particular the time-periodic electromagnetic field generates additional sidebands at energies \\epsilon + l\\hbar \\omega (l=0,\\pm 1, \\cdots) in the transmission probability originating from the photon absorption or emission within the oscillating barrier. Due to numerical difficulties in truncating the resulting coupled channel equations we limited ourselves to low quantum channels, i.e. l=0,\\pm 1.

Ahmed Jellal; Miloud Mekkaoui; El Bouazzaoui Choubabi; Hocine Bahlouli

2013-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

342

STUDIES OF TROPICAL TUNA SWIMMING PERFORMANCE IN A LARGE WATER TUNNEL  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Yellowfin tuna (Thunnus albacares) swimming kinematics was studied in a large water tunnel at controlled swimming velocities (U). Quantified kinematic variables included the tail-beat frequency, stride length (l), caudal amplitude, yaw, the propulsive wavelength, the speed of the propulsive wave (C) and the sweepback angle of the pectoral fins. In general, all variables, except the propulsive wavelength and consequently C, are comparable to values determined for other teleosts. The propulsive wavelength for the tunas (1.23–1.29L, where L is fork length) is 30–60 % longer than in other cruise-adapted teleosts such as salmonids. The resulting thunniform swimming mode and the morphological and anatomical adaptations associated with the long propulsive wavelength (e.g. fusiform body shape, rigid vertebral column) act to minimize anterior resistance and maximize caudal thrust. The long propulsive wavelength also increases the maximum l which, in concert with the elevated muscle temperatures of tunas, increases their maximum swimming velocity.

Iii Kinematics; Heidi Dewar; Jeffrey; B. Graham

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

An apparatus for studying spallation neutrons in the Aberdeen Tunnel laboratory  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper, we describe the design, construction and performance of an apparatus installed in the Aberdeen Tunnel laboratory in Hong Kong for studying spallation neutrons induced by cosmic-ray muons under a vertical rock overburden of 611 meter water equivalent (m.w.e.). The apparatus comprises of six horizontal layers of plastic-scintillator hodoscopes for determining the direction and position of the incident cosmic-ray muons. Sandwiched between the hodoscope planes is a neutron detector filled with 650 kg of liquid scintillator doped with about 0.06% of Gadolinium by weight for improving the e?ciency of detecting the spallation neutrons. Performance of the apparatus is also presented.

S. C. Blyth; Y. L. Chan; X. C. Chen; M. C. Chu; R. L. Hahn; T. H. Ho; Y. B. Hsiung; B. Z. Hu; K. K. Kwan; M. W. Kwok; T. Kwok; Y. P. Lau; K. P. Lee; J. K. C. Leung; K. Y. Leung; G. L. Lin; Y. C. Lin; K. B. Luk; W. H. Luk; H. Y. Ngai; S. Y. Ngan; C. S. J. Pun; K. Shih; Y. H. Tam; R. H. M. Tsang; C. H. Wang; C. M. Wong; H. L. Wong; H. H. C. Wong; K. K. Wong; M. Yeh

2013-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

344

Development of a Digital Controller for a Vertical Wind Tunnel (VWT) Prototype to Mitigate Ball Fluctuations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The objective of this research was to mitigate fluctuations of a levitated ping pong ball within a vertical wind tunnel (VWT) prototype. This was made possible by remodeling the VWT system with its inherent nonlinear characteristics instead of assuming constant parameter relationships. By considering these nonlinearities a more accurate model was developed that better represented the actual system. The gain scheduling controller technique was chosen to control the ball’s vertical displacement within VWT prototype. After remodeling the VWT’s dynamics, the transfer function gain, for three different specified equilibrium points, were found to be within ±35% of the original system dynamics’ gain which explain why ball fluctuation was present. Also, three different controllers were developed to mitigate fluctuations at 0.10m, 0.15m and 0.20m. The three controllers were combined to create the gain scheduled controller; however, no testing has been done due to sudden, last minute hardware malfunction.

Silva, Ramon A.

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Tunneling of a Massless Field through a 3D Gaussian Barrier  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We propose a method for the approximate computation of the Green function of a scalar massless field Phi subjected to potential barriers of given size and shape in spacetime. This technique is applied to the case of a 3D gaussian ellipsoid-like barrier, placed on the axis between two pointlike sources of the field. Instead of the Green function we compute its temporal integral, that gives the static potential energy of the interaction of the two sources. Such interaction takes place in part by tunneling of the quanta of Phi across the barrier. We evaluate numerically the correction to the potential in dependence on the size of the barrier and on the barrier-sources distance.

G. Modanese

1998-08-03T23:59:59.000Z

346

Symbolic-numerical Algorithm for Generating Cluster Eigenfunctions: Tunneling of Clusters Through Repulsive Barriers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A model for quantum tunnelling of a cluster comprising A identical particles, coupled by oscillator-type potential, through short-range repulsive potential barriers is introduced for the first time in the new symmetrized-coordinate representation and studied within the s-wave approximation. The symbolic-numerical algorithms for calculating the effective potentials of the close-coupling equations in terms of the cluster wave functions and the energy of the barrier quasistationary states are formulated and implemented using the Maple computer algebra system. The effect of quantum transparency, manifesting itself in nonmonotonic resonance-type dependence of the transmission coefficient upon the energy of the particles, the number of the particles A=2,3,4, and their symmetry type, is analyzed. It is shown that the resonance behavior of the total transmission coefficient is due to the existence of barrier quasistationary states imbedded in the continuum.

Vinitsky, Sergue; Chuluunbaatar, Ochbadrakh; Rostovtsev, Vitaly; Hai, Luong Le; Derbov, Vladimir; Krassovitskiy, Pavel

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

Coherent destruction of tunneling in a lattice array under selective in-phase modulations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We explore the coherent destruction of tunneling (CDT) in a lattice array under selective in-phase harmonic modulations, in which some selected lattice sites are driven by in-phase harmonic oscillating fields and other lattice sites are undriven. Due to the occurrence of CDT, if the driving amplitude A and the driving frequency {omega} are tuned to satisfy the zeroth-order Bessel function J{sub 0}(A/{omega})=0, the driven lattice sites are approximately decoupled from the undriven lattice sites. The CDT even takes place in lattice systems with high-order couplings between non-nearest-neighbor lattice sites. By using the CDT induced by selective in-phase harmonic modulations, we propose a scheme for realizing directed transport of a single particle. It is possible to observe the CDT in an engineered optical waveguide array, which provides an opportunity for controlling light propagation and designing switchlike couplers.

Luo, Xiaobing [Department of Physics, Jinggangshan University, Ji'an 343009 (China); State Key Laboratory of Optoelectronic Materials and Technologies, School of Physics and Engineering, Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou 510275 (China); Huang, Jiahao; Lee, Chaohong [State Key Laboratory of Optoelectronic Materials and Technologies, School of Physics and Engineering, Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou 510275 (China)

2011-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

348

Tunneling and transmission resonances of a Dirac particle by a double barrier  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We calculate the tunneling process of a Dirac particle across two square barriers separated a distance $d$, as well as the scattering by a double cusp barrier where the centers of the cusps are separated a distance larger than their screening lengths. Using the scattering matrix formalism, we obtain the transmission and reflection amplitudes for the scattering processes of both configurations. We show that, the presence of transmission resonances modifies the Lorentizian shape of the energy resonances and induces the appearance of additional maxima in the transmission coefficient in the range of energies where transmission resonances occur. We calculate the Wigner time-delay and show how their maxima depend on the position of the transmission resonance.

Victor M. Villalba; Luis Gonzalez-Arraga

2010-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

349

Applied Bias Slewing in Transient Wigner Function Simulation of Resonant Tunneling Diodes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Wigner function formulation of quantum mechanics has shown much promise as a basis for accurately modeling quantum electronic devices, especially under transient conditions. In this work, we demonstrate the importance of using a finite applied bias slew rate (as opposed to instantaneous switching) to better approximate experimental device conditions, and thus to produce more accurate transient Wigner function simulation results. We show that the use of instantaneous (and thus unphysical) switching can significantly impact simulation results and lead to incorrect conclusions about device operation. We also find that slewed switching can reduce the high computational demands of transient simulations. The resonant tunneling diode (RTD) is used as a test device, and simulation results are produced with SQUADS (Stanford QUAntum Device Simulator). I. INTRODUCTION T HE WIGNER function formulation of quantum mechanics has proven to be a very effective basis for the numerical simulation ...

Bryan A. Biegel; Student Member; James D. Plummer

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Augmentation of SPICE for Simulation of Circuits Containing Resonant Tunneling Diodes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper describes the incorporation of an accurate physics-based model of the resonant tunneling diode (RTD) into Berkeley SPICE version 3F5 and addresses the related direct current (dc) and transient convergence problems caused by the negative differential resistance (NDR) and the exponential nature of the device characteristics. To circumvent the dc convergence problems, a new continuation technique using artificial parameter embedding and a current limiting algorithm are proposed. The studies made in this paper have shown that these techniques are superior to the in-built continuation methods of SPICE, such as Gmin-stepping and Source-stepping, for a large number of circuits of varying sizes. To improve transient convergence performance, the following three algorithms are added to SPICE: a modified forced-convergence algorithm, a new time-step adjustment algorithm, and a modified device voltage prediction algorithm.

Mayukh Bhattacharya; et al.

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Accuracy of the Frensley inflow boundary condition for Wigner equations in simulating resonant tunneling diodes  

SciTech Connect

In this paper, the accuracy of the Frensley inflow boundary condition of the Wigner equation is analyzed in computing the I-V characteristics of a resonant tunneling diode (RTD). It is found that the Frensley inflow boundary condition for incoming electrons holds only exactly infinite away from the active device region and its accuracy depends on the length of contacts included in the simulation. For this study, the non-equilibrium Green's function (NEGF) with a Dirichlet to Neumann mapping boundary condition is used for comparison. The I-V characteristics of the RTD are found to agree between self-consistent NEGF and Wigner methods at low bias potentials with sufficiently large GaAs contact lengths. Finally, the relation between the negative differential conductance (NDC) of the RTD and the sizes of contact and buffer in the RTD is investigated using both methods.

Jiang Haiyan [Department of Applied Mathematics, Beijing Institute of Technology, Beijing 100081 (China); Department of Mathematics and Statistics, University of North Carolina at Charlotte, Charlotte, NC 28223-0001 (United States); Cai Wei, E-mail: wcai@uncc.ed [Department of Mathematics and Statistics, University of North Carolina at Charlotte, Charlotte, NC 28223-0001 (United States); Tsu, Raphael [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of North Carolina at Charlotte, Charlotte, NC 28223-0001 (United States)

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Hydrogen adsorption on Ru(001) studied by Scanning TunnelingMicroscopy  

SciTech Connect

The adsorption of hydrogen on Ru(001) was studied by scanning tunneling microscopy at temperatures around 50 K. Hydrogen was found to adsorb dissociatively forming different ordered structures as a function of coverage. In order of increasing coverage {theta} in monolayers (ML) these were ({radical}3 x {radical}3)r30{sup o} at {theta} = 0.3 ML; (2 x 1) at {theta} = 0.50 ML, (2 x 2)-3H at {theta} = 0.75, and (1 x 1) at {theta} = 1.00. Some of these structures were observed to coexist at intermediate coverage values. Close to saturation of 1 ML, H-vacancies (unoccupied three fold fcc hollow Ru sites) were observed either as single entities or forming transient aggregations. These vacancies diffuse and aggregate to form active sites for the dissociative adsorption of hydrogen.

Tatarkhanov, Mous; Rose, Franck; Fomin, Evgeny; Ogletree, D.Frank; Salmeron, Miquel

2008-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

353

Method and apparatus for differential spectroscopic atomic-imaging using scanning tunneling microscopy  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A Method and apparatus for differential spectroscopic atomic-imaging is disclosed for spatial resolution and imaging for display not only individual atoms on a sample surface, but also bonding and the specific atomic species in such bond. The apparatus includes a scanning tunneling microscope (STM) that is modified to include photon biasing, preferably a tuneable laser, modulating electronic surface biasing for the sample, and temperature biasing, preferably a vibration-free refrigerated sample mounting stage. Computer control and data processing and visual display components are also included. The method includes modulating the electronic bias voltage with and without selected photon wavelengths and frequency biasing under a stabilizing (usually cold) bias temperature to detect bonding and specific atomic species in the bonds as the STM rasters the sample. This data is processed along with atomic spatial topography data obtained from the STM raster scan to create a real-time visual image of the atoms on the sample surface.

Kazmerski, Lawrence L. (Lakewood, CO)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Improved Organic Photovoltaics - Energy Innovation Portal  

Solar Photovoltaic Improved Organic Photovoltaics B4 Materials For Organic Semiconductor Applications, Including Molecular Electronics And Organic Photovoltaics

355

Organic solvent topical report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides the basis for closing the organic solvent safety issue. Sufficient information is presented to conclude that risk posed by an organic solvent fire is within risk evaluation guidelines. This report updates information contained in Analysis of Consequences of Postulated Solvent Fires in Hanford Site Waste Tanks. WHC-SD-WM-CN-032. Rev. 0A (Cowley et al. 1996). However, this document will not replace Cowley et al (1996) as the primary reference for the Basis for Interim Operation (BIO) until the recently submitted BIO amendment (Hanson 1999) is approved by the US Department of Energy. This conclusion depends on the use of controls for preventing vehicle fuel fires and for limiting the use of flame cutting in areas where hot metal can fall on the waste surface.The required controls are given in the Tank Waste Remediation System Technical Safety Requirements (Noorani 1997b). This is a significant change from the conclusions presented in Revision 0 of this report. Revision 0 of this calcnote concluded that some organic solvent fire scenarios exceeded risk evaluation guidelines, even with controls imposed.

COWLEY, W.L.

1999-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

356

Increased superconducting transition temperature of a niobium thin-film proximity-coupled to gold nanoparticles using linking organic molecules  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The superconducting critical temperature, TC, of thin Nb films is significantly modified when gold nanoparticles (NPs) are chemically linked to the Nb film, with a consistent enhancement when using 3 nm long disilane linker molecules. The TC increases by up to 10% for certain linker length and NPs size. No change is observed when the nanoparticles are physisorbed with non-linking molecules. Electron tunneling spectra acquired on the linked NPs below TC typically exhibit zero-bias peaks. We attribute these results to a pairing mechanism coupling electrons in the Nb and the NPs, mediated by the organic linkers.

Katzir, Eran; Zeides, Felix; Katz, Nadav; Kalcheim, Yoav; Millo, Oded; Leitus, Gregory; Myasodeyov, Yuri; Shapiro, Boris Ya; Naaman, Ron; Paltiel, Yossi

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Increased superconducting transition temperature of a niobium thin-film proximity-coupled to gold nanoparticles using linking organic molecules  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The superconducting critical temperature, TC, of thin Nb films is significantly modified when gold nanoparticles (NPs) are chemically linked to the Nb film, with a consistent enhancement when using 3 nm long disilane linker molecules. The TC increases by up to 10% for certain linker length and NPs size. No change is observed when the nanoparticles are physisorbed with non-linking molecules. Electron tunneling spectra acquired on the linked NPs below TC typically exhibit zero-bias peaks. We attribute these results to a pairing mechanism coupling electrons in the Nb and the NPs, mediated by the organic linkers.

Eran Katzir; Shira Yochelis; Felix Zeides; Nadav Katz; Yoav Kalcheim; Oded Millo; Gregory Leitus; Yuri Myasodeyov; Boris Ya. Shapiro; Ron Naaman; Yossi Paltiel

2011-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

358

On The Importance of Organic Oxygen for Understanding Organic Aerosol  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

On The Importance of Organic Oxygen for Understanding Organic Aerosol On The Importance of Organic Oxygen for Understanding Organic Aerosol Particles Title On The Importance of Organic Oxygen for Understanding Organic Aerosol Particles Publication Type Journal Article Year of Publication 2006 Authors Pang, Yanbo, B. J. Turpin, and Lara A. Gundel Journal Journal of Aerosol Science and Technology Volume 40 Start Page Chapter Pagination 128-133 Abstract This study shows how aerosol organic oxygen data could provide new and independent information about organic aerosol mass, aqueous solubility of organic aerosols, formation of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) and the relative contributions of anthropogenic and biogenic sources. For more than two decades atmospheric aerosol organic mass concentration has usually been estimated by multiplying the measured carbon content by an assumed organic mass (OM)-to-organic carbon (OC ) factor of 1.4. However, this factor can vary from 1.0 to 2.5 depending on location. This great uncertainty about aerosol organic mass limits our understanding of the influence of organic aerosol on climate, visibility and health.New examination of organic aerosol speciation data shows that the oxygen content is the key factor responsible for the observed range in the OM-to-OC factor. When organic oxygen content is excluded, the ratio of non-oxygen organic mass to carbon mass varies very little across different environments (1.12 to 1.14). The non-oxygen-OM-to-non-oxygen OC factor for all studied sites (urban and non-urban) is 1.13± 0.02. The uncertainty becomes an order of magnitude smaller than the uncertainty in the best current estimates of organic mass to organic carbon ratios (1.6± 0.2 for urban and 2.1± 0.2 for non-urban areas). When aerosol organic oxygen data become available, organic aerosol mass can be quite accurately estimated using just OC and organic oxygen (OO) without the need to know whether the aerosol is fresh or aged. In addition, aerosol organic oxygen data will aid prediction of water solubility since compounds with OO-to-OC higher than 0.4 have water solubilities higher than 1g per 100 g water

359

CFD and Heat Transfer Models of Baking Bread in a Tunnel Oven.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The importance of efficiency in food processing cannot be overemphasized. It is important for an organization to remain consumer- and business-oriented in an increasingly competitive… (more)

Adamic, Raymond Matthew

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Development and Application of a Three-Dimensional Taylor–Galerkin Numerical Model for Air Quality Simulation near Roadway Tunnel Portals  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Since highway traffic has become one of the major emission sources of air pollution, air pollution prediction near roadway tunnel portals is a very important subject. Although many models have been suggested to predict pollutant concentrations ...

Shin’ichi Okamoto; Kazuhiro Sakai; Koichi Matsumoto; Kenji Horiuchi; Keizo Kobayashi

1998-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tunnel overseeing organization" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Forced Boundary-Layer Transition on X-43 (Hyper-X) in NASA LaRC 31-Inch Mach 10 Air Tunnel  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Aeroheating and boundary layer transition characteristics for the X-43 (Hyper-X) configuration have been experimentally examined in the Langley 31-Inch Mach 10 Air Tunnel. Global surface heat transfer distributions, and surface streamline patterns were ...

Berry Scott A.; DiFulvio Michael; Kowalkowski Matthew K.

2000-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

Forced Boundary-Layer Transition on X-43 (Hyper-X) in NASA LaRC 20-Inch Mach 6 Air Tunnel  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Aeroheating and boundary layer transition characteristics for the X-43 (Hyper-X) configuration have been experimentally examined in the Langley 20-Inch Mach 6 Air Tunnel. Global surface heat transfer distributions, and surface streamline patterns were ...

Berry Scott A.; DiFulvio Michael; Kowalkowski Matthew K.

2000-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

Organization and Functions  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Working to Ensure the Safety and Security of Hazardous Material Shipments Working to Ensure the Safety and Security of Hazardous Material Shipments Organization and Functions Mission Unit EM-30 Deputy Assistant Secretary/ADAS Waste Management Director Office of Packaging and Transportation EM-33 Regulations & Standards Support * ANSI * ASME/ ASTM * DHS * DOD FEMA * FMCSA * FRA * IAEA * ICAO * IMO * NRC * Orders * PHMSA TSA * UN TDG SCOE Packaging Certification * CoCs for Type B/AF Packages * DOE Exemptions * DOT Special Permits & COCA * QA * RAMPAC * SCALE * Technical Assistance * Training Program & Site Support * ATMS * EFCOG * EIS Reviews * IPT * Load Securement Guide * PMC * RADCALC * RADTRAN * Secure transport * Technical assistance * Tenders * TMC * TRAGIS

364

X-ray absorption and magnetic circular dichroism studies of Co2FeAl in magnetic tunnel junctions  

SciTech Connect

The bulk magnetic moment and the element specific magnetic moment of Co{sub 2}FeAl thin films were examined as a function of annealing temperature by alternating gradient magnetometer (AGM) and X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS)/X-ray magnetic circular dichroism (XMCD), respectively. A high magnetic moment can be achieved for all annealing temperatures and the predicted bulk and interface magnetic moment of about 5 {tilde A}{sub B} are reached via heating. We will also present tunnel magnetoresistance (TMR) values of up to 153% at room temperature and 260% at 13 K for MgO based magnetic tunnel junctions (MTJs) with Co{sub 2}FeAl and Co-Fe electrodes.

Ebke, D.; Kugler, Z.; Thomas, P.; Schebaum, O.; Schafers, M.; Nissen, D.; Schmalhorst, J.; Hutten, A.; Arenholz, E.; Thomas, A.

2010-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

365

Homogeneous pinhole free 1 nm Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} tunnel barriers on graphene  

SciTech Connect

We report on the topographical and electrical characterisations of 1 nm thick Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} dielectric films on graphene. The Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} is grown by sputtering a 0.6 nm Al layer on graphene and subsequentially oxidizing it in an O{sub 2} atmosphere. The Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} layer presents no pinholes and is homogeneous enough to act as a tunnel barrier. A resistance-area product in the mega-ohm micrometer-square range is found. Comparatively, the growth of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} by evaporation does not lead to well-wetted films on graphene. Application of this high quality sputtered tunnel barrier to efficient spin injection in graphene is discussed.

Dlubak, B.; Martin, M.-B.; Deranlot, C.; Bouzehouane, K.; Fusil, S.; Mattana, R.; Petroff, F.; Anane, A.; Seneor, P.; Fert, A. [Unite Mixte de Physique CNRS/Thales, 91767 Palaiseau (France) and University of Paris-Sud, 91405 Orsay (France)

2012-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

366

MST: Organizations: Bio: Mike Kelly  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Paul C. McKey Paul McKey Paul is the manager of the Meso Manufacturing & Systems Development organization at Sandia National Laboratories. His organization, and his sister...

367

Reticulated Organic Photovoltaics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper shows how the self-assembled interlocking of two nanostructured materials can lead to increased photovoltaic performance. A detailed picture of the reticulated 6-DBTTC/C{sub 60} organic photovoltaic (OPV) heterojunction, which produces devices approaching the theoretical maximum for these materials, is presented from near edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy (NEXAFS), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), Grazing Incidence X-ray diffraction (GIXD) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The complementary suite of techniques shows how self-assembly can be exploited to engineer the interface and morphology between the cables of donor (6-DBTTC) material and a polycrystalline acceptor (C{sub 60}) to create an interpenetrating network of pure phases expected to be optimal for OPV device design. Moreover, we find that there is also a structural and electronic interaction between the two materials at the molecular interface. The data show how molecular self-assembly can facilitate 3-D nanostructured photovoltaic cells that are made with the simplicity and control of bilayer device fabrication. The significant improvement in photovoltaic performance of the reticulated heterojunction over the flat analog highlights the potential of these strategies to improve the efficiency of organic solar cells.

Schiros T.; Yager K.; Mannsfeld S.; Chiu C.-Y.; Ciston J.; Gorodetsky A.; Palma M.; Bullard Z.; Kramer T.; Delongchamp D.; Fischer D.; Kymissis I.; Toney M.F.; Nuckolls C.

2012-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

368

Organization Chart | Argonne National Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Download Organization Charts Argonne National Laboratory Computing, Environment, and Life Sciences Energy Engineering and Systems Analysis Physical Science and Engineering...

369

Organic Chemical Metrology - Staff Directory  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Group. Search for Staff Member. The Search box will accept a name, phone number, organization name, email address, etc.

2013-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

370

MST: Organizations: Bio: Dianna Blair  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Machining Services Electronic Fabrication Manufacturing Process Science & Technology Thin Film, Vacuum, & Packaging Organic Materials Ceramic & Glass Meso Manufacturing &...

371

Preliminary numerical modeling for the G-Tunnel welded tuff mining experiment; Yucca Mountain site characterization project  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Yucca Mountain, located in Southern Nevada, is to be considered as a potential site for a nuclear waste repository. Located in Rainier Mesa on the Nevada Test Site, G-Tunnel has been the site of a series of experiments, part of whose purpose is to evaluate measurement techniques for rock mechanics before testing in the Exploratory Shaft. Rainier Mesa is composed of welded and nonwelded tuffs that have thermal and mechanical properties and stress states similar to those of tuffs expected to be encountered at Yucca Mountain. A series of finite element calculations were performed to aid in designing instrumentation for the experiments in G-Tunnel and later to correlate with measured data. In this report are presented the results of the preliminary finite element calculations performed in conjunction with experimental measurements of drift convergence, or closure, and rock mass relaxation zones made before, during, and after completing the welded tuff mining experiment in G-Tunnel. Tape extensometer measurements of drift convergences and measurements determined by multiple point borehole extensometers are compared with corresponding calculated values using linear elastic and jointed rock material models. 9 refs., 25 figs., 7 tabs.

Johnson, R.L.; Bauer, S.J.

1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

Nuclear Organization and Genome Function  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nuclear Organization and Genome Function Kevin Van Bortle and Victor G. Corces Department-range interactions and have proposed roles in nuclear organization. In this review, we explore recent findings for the roles of insulators in nuclear organization. 163 Annu.Rev.CellDev.Biol.2012.28:163-187.Downloadedfromwww

Corces, Victor G.

373

Development of Ta-based Superconducting Tunnel Junction X-ray Detectors for Fluorescence XAS  

SciTech Connect

We are developing superconducting tunnel junction (STJ) soft X-ray detectors for chemical analysis of dilute samples by fluorescence-detected X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS). Our 36-pixel Nb-based STJ spectrometer covers a solid angle {Omega}/4{pi} {approx} 10{sup -3}, offers an energy resolution of {approx}10-20 eV FWHM for energies up to {approx}1 keV, and can be operated at total count rates of {approx}10{sup 6} counts/s. For increased quantum efficiency and cleaner response function, we have now started the development of Ta-based STJ detector arrays. Initial devices modeled after our Nb-based STJs have an energy resolution below 10 eV FWHM for X-ray energies below 1 keV, and pulse rise time discrimination can be used to improve their response function for energies up to several keV. We discuss the performance of the Ta-STJs and outline steps towards the next-generation of large STJ detector arrays with higher sensitivity.

Friedrich, S; Drury, O; Hall, J; Cantor, R

2009-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

374

Scanning tunneling microscopy observation of Pb-induced superstructures on Si(557)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Pb-induced superstructures on Si(557) are investigated by low-energy-electron diffraction (LEED) and scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). Using an indirect heating method, we have succeeded in obtaining almost perfect single-domain LEED patterns of one-dimensional wire (chain) structures, so called {alpha}x2 and {beta}x2 phases. Careful LEED analysis and STM investigation reveal that these phases are formed on the (223) and (112) facets, respectively. The {alpha}x2 phase has regular bundles of triple wires at low annealing temperature but wider bundles through step bunching after a higher temperature annealing. Along the wires of the {alpha}x2 phase, which was recently reported to exhibit a transition between one-dimensional (1D) metallic and 2D semiconducting conductance, a clear commensurate x2 modulation is observed at 78-120 K in contrast to the incommensurate and disordered structure reported previously. A tentative atomic structure model of the {alpha}x2 phase is proposed based on the dense Pb overlayers on (111) and (223) facets. The details of the STM images of the {beta}x2 phase are discussed.

Morikawa, Harumo; Kim, Keun Su; Jung, Duk Yong; Yeom, Han Woong [Institute of Physics and Applied Physics and Center for Atomic Wires and Layers, Yonsei University, 134 Shinchon, Seoul 120-749 (Korea, Republic of)

2007-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

375

STUDIES OF TROPICAL TUNA SWIMMING PERFORMANCE IN A LARGE WATER TUNNEL  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The metabolic rates (V ? O?) of three tropical tunas [yellowfin tuna (Thunnus albacares), kawakawa (Euthynnus affinis) and skipjack (Katsuwonus pelamis)] were estimated using a large water-tunnel respirometer. Experiments lasting up to 31 h were used to determine the effects of velocity (U) on tuna V ? O ? over a range of U (17?150 cm s ?1) and temperatures (18–30 ?C). Replicate tests were carried out on several fish. The swimming V ? O ? of yellowfin is temperature-dependent (Q10=1.67, determined over intervals of 3–5 ?C). For yellowfin and skipjack, it was also possible to partition metabolic costs between maintenance and locomotion. The standard metabolic rate (SV ? O?) was estimated by extrapolation of the U/V ? O ? function to U=0. Comparisons of SV ? O ? for different size groups of yellowfin show that the mass-specific scaling exponent for V ? O ? is ?0.40. The SV ? O ? of tuna is comparable to values determined previously by stasis respirometry and is approximately three times higher than that of salmonids. Further comparisons with salmonids show that the slope of the U/V ? O ? function is less for tunas, which demonstrate a greater swimming efficiency.

I. Energetics; Heidi Dewar; Jeffrey; B. Graham

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

Studies of tropical tuna swimming performance in a large water tunnel  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The body temperatures (Tb) of nine yellowfin tuna (Thunnus albacares) were monitored while fish swam in a large water tunnel at controlled velocities (U) and ambient temperatures (Ta). Monitoring Tb during step changes in Ta at constant U permitted estimation of the thermal rate coefficient (k), an index of heat transfer. In the yellowfin, k is dependent on both Ta and the direction of the thermal gradient (i.e. whether Ta is greater or less than Tb). Modulation of k in response to Ta was further demonstrated during tests in which U was varied; the elevation of Tb in response to equal increases in U was 3–4 times less at 30 ?C than at 25 and 20 ?C. These experiments demonstrate that the yellowfin tuna can modulate heat transfer. This ability could prevent overheating during intense activity, retard heat loss during a descent into cool water and permit increased heat gain upon returning to warm surface waters (i.e. when Tb

Heidi Dewar; Jeffrey B. Graham; Richard; W. Brill

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Terrestrial LiDAR in tunnels under construction : A study of potential use for engineering geological and operational applications, and work-flow design for data acquisition and processing.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This thesis provides an assessment of the application of terrestrial LiDAR for rock mass characterisation and support design in drill and blast tunnels. The study… (more)

Haugland, Heidi Hefre

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Ohmsett Tow Tank | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Ohmsett Tow Tank Ohmsett Tow Tank Jump to: navigation, search Basic Specifications Facility Name Ohmsett Tow Tank Overseeing Organization Ohmsett Hydrodynamic Testing Facility Type Tow Tank Length(m) 203.0 Beam(m) 19.8 Depth(m) 2.4 Water Type Freshwater Cost(per day) Contact POC Towing Capabilities Towing Capabilities Yes Maximum Velocity(m/s) 3.4 Length of Effective Tow(m) 155.0 Wavemaking Capabilities Wavemaking Capabilities Yes Maximum Wave Height(m) 0.9 Maximum Wave Height(m) at Wave Period(s) 4.1 Maximum Wave Length(m) 18 Wave Period Range(s) 4.1 Current Velocity Range(m/s) 3.4 Programmable Wavemaking Yes Wavemaking Description Programmable frequency Wave Direction Uni-Directional Simulated Beach Yes Description of Beach Wave dampening at downstream end Channel/Tunnel/Flume

379

University of Iowa Wave Basin | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

University of Iowa Wave Basin University of Iowa Wave Basin Overseeing Organization University of Iowa Hydrodynamic Testing Facility Type Wave Basin Length(m) 40.0 Beam(m) 20.0 Depth(m) 3.0 Cost(per day) Contact POC Special Physical Features Towed 3DPIV; contactless motion tracking; free surface measurement mappingv Towing Capabilities Towing Capabilities Yes Maximum Velocity(m/s) 2.5 Length of Effective Tow(m) 25.0 Wavemaking Capabilities Wavemaking Capabilities Yes Maximum Wave Height(m) 0.6 Wave Period Range(s) 0.0 Current Velocity Range(m/s) 0.0 Programmable Wavemaking Yes Wavemaking Description Fully programmable for regular or irregular waves Wave Direction Uni-Directional Simulated Beach Yes Description of Beach Trusses overlaid with lattice and matting Channel/Tunnel/Flume

380

Scanning tunneling microscopy of charge density wave structure in 1T- TaS sub 2  

SciTech Connect

I have used a scanning tunneling microscope (STM) to image simultaneously the atomic lattice and the charge density wave (CDW) superstructure in tantalum disulfide (1T-TaS{sub 2}) over the temperature range of 370-77K. In the lowest temperature (commensurate) phase, present below 180K, the CDW is at an angle of 13.9{degrees} relative to the lattice and is uniformly commensurate. In the incommensurate phase, present above 353K, the CDW is aligned with the lattice. 1T-TaS{sub 2} exhibits two other phases; the triclinic (T) phase which is present between 223K and 283K upon warming the sample, and the nearly-commensurate (NC) phase which is present between 353K and 180K upon cooling the sample and between 283K and 353K upon warming the sample. In both of these phases, discommensurate models where the CDW is arranged in small commensurate domains have been proposed. In the NC phase the CDW is rotated between 10{degrees} and 12.5{degrees} relative to the atomic lattice. Such a rotated CDW would create an interference pattern with the underlying atomic lattice regardless of the existence of a true domain superstructure. Previous work on 1T-TaS{sub 2} has not adequately accounted for the possibility of this moire pattern. However, around each fundamental CDW peak in the Fourier transform of the real space STM images, several satellite spots are visible, which conclusively prove the existence of domains in the NC phase.

Thomson, R.E.

1991-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tunnel overseeing organization" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Scanning tunneling microscopy of charge density wave structure in 1T- TaS{sub 2}  

SciTech Connect

I have used a scanning tunneling microscope (STM) to image simultaneously the atomic lattice and the charge density wave (CDW) superstructure in tantalum disulfide (1T-TaS{sub 2}) over the temperature range of 370-77K. In the lowest temperature (commensurate) phase, present below 180K, the CDW is at an angle of 13.9{degrees} relative to the lattice and is uniformly commensurate. In the incommensurate phase, present above 353K, the CDW is aligned with the lattice. 1T-TaS{sub 2} exhibits two other phases; the triclinic (T) phase which is present between 223K and 283K upon warming the sample, and the nearly-commensurate (NC) phase which is present between 353K and 180K upon cooling the sample and between 283K and 353K upon warming the sample. In both of these phases, discommensurate models where the CDW is arranged in small commensurate domains have been proposed. In the NC phase the CDW is rotated between 10{degrees} and 12.5{degrees} relative to the atomic lattice. Such a rotated CDW would create an interference pattern with the underlying atomic lattice regardless of the existence of a true domain superstructure. Previous work on 1T-TaS{sub 2} has not adequately accounted for the possibility of this moire pattern. However, around each fundamental CDW peak in the Fourier transform of the real space STM images, several satellite spots are visible, which conclusively prove the existence of domains in the NC phase.

Thomson, R.E.

1991-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

About EIA - Organization - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Thomas Williams Thomas D. Williams Print-friendly PDF Thomas Williams Thomas D. Williams Print-friendly PDF Assistant Administrator for Resource & Technology Management E-mail: Thomas.Williams@eia.gov Phone: (202) 586-3100 Address: U.S. Energy Information Administration 1000 Independence Avenue, S.W. Washington, DC 20585 Duties Thomas D. Williams is the Assistant Administrator for Resource & Technology Management. He provides leadership and direction to oversee the management and operation of EIA's employee services, information technology policy and operations, and integrated planning, budget, procurement, evaluation and project management activity. Biography Thom is a career member of the Senior Executive Service with more than 29 years of professional experience in developing, linking, and implementing

383

About EIA - Organization - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Offices Offices Office of Energy Statistics The Office of Energy Statistics conducts a wide range of survey, statistical methods, and integration activities related to: energy consumption and efficiency; electricity; nuclear and renewable energy; oil, gas and coal supply; and petroleum and biofuels. This Office also manages the EIA data collection program and the quality control for weekly, monthly, quarterly, annual and quadrennial statistical reports. Office of Energy Analysis The Office of Energy Analysis analyzes energy supply, demand, and prices including the impact of financial markets on energy markets; prepares reports on current and future energy use; analyzes the impact of energy policies; and develops advanced techniques for conducting energy information analyses. This Office also oversees the planning and execution

384

About EIA - Organization - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

John Conti, Director of the Office of Integrated Analysis and Forecasting John ContiPrint-friendly PDF John Conti, Director of the Office of Integrated Analysis and Forecasting John ContiPrint-friendly PDF Assistant Administrator for Energy Analysis E-mail: john.conti@eia.gov Phone: (202) 586-2222 Fax: (202) 586-3045 Room: 2H-073 Address: U.S. Energy Information Administration 1000 Independence Avenue, S.W. Washington, DC 20585 Duties John Conti is the Assistant Administrator for Energy Analysis and analyzes energy supply, demand, and prices including the impact of financial markets on energy markets; prepares reports on current and future energy use; analyzes the impact of energy policies; and develops advanced techniques for conducting energy information analyses. John also oversees the planning and execution of EIA's analysis and forecasting programs to ensure that EIA

385

MST: Organizations: Bio: Mike Kelly  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Mike Kelly Mike is the manager of the Organic Materials Department in the Manufacturing Science and Technology Center at Sandia National Laboratories. This department provides...

386

Organic Mathematics: Photo Album - CECM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Conference dinner at the Beijing Restaurant: Organizer Jen Chang (CECM) taking care of all these hungry stomachs. Jeff Lagarias (AT&T) lifts his teacup to ...

387

Organization Chart | Advanced Photon Source  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Source (APS) organization comprises three divisions and one project office. Accelerator Systems Division (ASD) ASD provides engineering and physics support for the APS, and...

388

SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory - Organization  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Organization PHOTO: Aerial view of SLAC Campus SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory is operated by Stanford University for the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Science. The...

389

Organic Power | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Organic Power Place Ireland Sector Biomass, Hydro, Wind energy Product Irish project developer active in wind energy, combined heat and power from biomass and pumped hydro...

390

Vehicle Technologies Office: Vehicle Technologies Office Organization...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Organization and Contacts Organization Chart for the Vehicle Technologies Program Fuel Technologies and Deployment, Technology Managers Advanced Combustion Engines, Technology...

391

Renewable Energy Nongovernmental Organization Network (RENOVE...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Nongovernmental Organization Network (RENOVE) Jump to: navigation, search Name Renewable Energy Nongovernmental Organization Network (RENOVE) Place Brasilia, Brazil Phone number...

392

The dark resonances in the case of the absorption of optical radiation in double tunneling-coupled quantum wells  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This work is devoted to the research of conditions of the dark resonance (coherent population trapping) of the interaction of the laser radiation with tunneling-coupled quantum wells. The phase sensitive dependence of dark resonances has been investigated. We obtained that destruction as well as restoration of the dark resonances of the coherent population trapping is possible in dependence on algebraic sum of the phases of exciting fields. It is shown that the phase variation of exciting fields influences on the absorption and dispersion of the probe field in a medium with quantum wells.

A. N. Litvinov; K. A. Barantsev; B. G. Matisov; G. A. Kazakov; Yu. V. Rozhdestvensky

2011-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

393

Evidence of a barrier oxidation dependence on the interfacialmagnetism in co/alumina based magnetic tunnel junctions  

SciTech Connect

Soft x-ray absorption spectroscopy and magnetic circular dichroism at the Co L{sub 2,3} edge have been applied to explore the near-interfacial magnetism of Co electrodes in Co/alumina based magnetic tunnel junctions. By taking into account the formation of CoO at the FM/barrier interface, the change in the total magnetic moment on metallic Co atoms as a function of barrier oxidation has been determined. The results demonstrate a strong correlation between the Co moments and measured TMR values, and an enhancement in the Co moments for moderate oxidation times.

Telling, N.D.; van der Laan, G.; Ladak, S.; Hicken, R.J.; Arenholz, E.

2005-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

394

Large energy gaps in CaC{sub 6} from tunneling spectroscopy : possible evidence of strong-coupling superconductivity.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Tunneling in CaC{sub 6} crystals reproducibly reveals superconducting gaps {Delta} of 2.3 {+-} 0.2 meV that are {approx}40% larger than reported earlier. In an isotropic s-wave scenario, that puts CaC{sub 6} into the class of very strongly coupled superconductors, since 2{Delta}/kT{sub c}-4.6, implying that soft Ca phonons are primarily involved in the superconductivity. This conclusion explains the relatively large Ca isotope effect found recently for CaC{sub 6}, but it could also signal a strong anisotropy in the electron-phonon interaction.

Kurter, C.; Ozyuzer, L.; Mazur, D.; Zasadzinski, J. F.; Rosenmann, D.; Claus, H.; Hinks, D. G.; Gray, K. E.; Materials Science Division; Illinois Inst. of Tech.; Izmir Inst. of Tech.

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

Scanning-tunneling-microscopy studies of disilane adsorption and pyrolytic growth on Si(100)-(2x1)  

SciTech Connect

Scanning tunneling microscopy has been employed to study the adsorption of disilane (Si{sub 2}H{sub 6}) and pyrolytic growth on Si(100)-(2{times}1) at various temperatures. Room-temperature exposures result in a random distribution of dissociation fragments on the surface. Formation of anisotropic monohydride islands and denuded zones as well as island coarsening is observed at higher temperatures. The results are strikingly similar to those reported for growth by molecular-beam epitaxy using pure Si, even though different surface reactions are involved in these two growth processes.

Lin, D.; Hirschorn, E.S.; Chiang, T. (Department of Physics and Materials Research Laboratory, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, Illinois 61801 (United States)); Tsu, R.; Lubben, D.; Greene, J.E. (Department of Materials Science, Coordinated Science Laboratory, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, Illinois 61801 (United States) Materials Research Laboratory, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, Illinois 61801 (United States))

1992-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

396

Census and viewing of organisms  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Census and viewing of organisms Census and viewing of organisms Name: m hariaczyi Status: N/A Age: N/A Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: Around 1993 Question: How many organisms exist in the world today? What is the most powerful microscope that could be used for viewing organism? Replies: The most powerful microscope is called an electron microscope, which can be used for viewing entire organisms, although few organisms are small enough to see all of them at high magnifications allowed by this microscope. So most often its used to look at fixed sections of organisms. Since the electron microscope only works in a vacuum, with no air, you cannot look at live organisms. To do that, probably the most powerful microscope is called a Nomarski, or in technical terms, a "differential interference contrast" microscope. This is a modification of a normal light microscope that allows better contrast in living tissue. It is not any more powerful than a light microscope, and is much less powerful than an electron microscope, but it allows you to see living things much better.

397

Scanning tunneling microscopic studies of SiO2 thin film supported metal nano-clusters  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This dissertation is focused on understanding heterogeneous metal catalysts supported on oxides using a model catalyst system of SiO2 thin film supported metal nano-clusters. The primary technique applied to this study is scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). The most important constituent of this model catalyst system is the SiO2 thin film, as it must be thin and homogeneous enough to apply electron or ion based surface science techniques as well as STM. Ultra-thin SiO2 films were successfully synthesized on a Mo(112) single crystal. The electronic and geometric structure of the SiO2 thin film was investigated by STM combined with LEED, Auger electron spectroscopy (AES), and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The relationship between defects on the SiO2 thin film and the nucleation and growth of metal nano-clusters was also investigated. By monitoring morphology changes during thermal annealing, it was found that the metal-support interaction is strongly dependent on the type of metal as well as on the defect density of the SiO2 thin film. Especially, it was found that oxygen vacancies and Si impurities play an important role in the formation of Pd-silicide. By substituting Ti atoms into the SiO2 thin film network, an atomically mixed TiO2-SiO2 thin film was synthesized. Furthermore, these Ti atoms play a role as heterogeneous defects, resulting in the creation of nucleation sites for Au nano-clusters. A marked increase in Au cluster density due to Ti defects was observed in STM. A TiO2-SiO2 thin film consisting of atomic Ti as well as TiOx islands was also synthesized by using higher amounts of Ti (17 %). More importantly, this oxide surface was found to have sinter resistant properties for Au nano-clusters, which are desirable in order to make highly active Au nano-clusters more stable under reaction conditions.

Min, Byoung Koun

2004-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

Scanning tunneling microscopy studies on the structure and stability of model catalysts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An atomic level understanding of the structure and stability of model catalysts is essential for surface science studies in heterogeneous catalysis. Scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) can operate both in UHV and under realistic pressure conditions with a wide temperature span while providing atomic resolution images. Taking advantage of the ability of STM, our research focuses on 1) investigating the structure and stability of supported Au catalysts, especially under CO oxidation conditions, and 2) synthesizing and characterizing a series of alloy model catalysts for future model catalytic studies. In our study, Au clusters supported on TiO2(110) have been used to model supported Au catalysts. Our STM studies in UHV reveal surface structures of TiO2(110) and show undercoordinated Ti cations play a critical role in the nucleation and stabilization of Au clusters on TiO2(110). Exposing the TiO2(110) surface to water vapor causes the formation of surface hydroxyl groups and subsequently alters the growth kinetics of Au clusters on TiO2(110). STM studies on Au/TiO2(110) during CO oxidation demonstrate the real surface of a working catalyst. Au clusters supported on TiO2(110) sinter rapidly during CO oxidation, but are mostly stable in the single component reactant gas, either CO or O2. The sintering kinetics of supported Au clusters has been measured during CO oxidation and gives an activation energy, which supports the mechanism of CO oxidation induced sintering. CO oxidation was also found to accelerate the surface diffusion of Rh(110). Our results show a direct correlation between the reaction rate of CO oxidation and the diffusion rate of surface metal atoms. Synthesis of alloy model catalysts have also been attempted in our study with their structures successfully characterized. Planar Au-Pd alloy films has been prepared on a Rh(100) surface with surface Au and Pd atoms distinguished by STM. The growth of Au-Ag alloy clusters have been studied by in-situ STM on a cluster-to-cluster basis. Moreover, the atomic structure of a solution-prepared Ru3Sn3 cluster has been resolved on an ultra-thin silica film surface. The atomic structure and adsorption sites of the ultrathin silica film have also been well characterized in our study.

Yang, Fan

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Organization Organization Address Place Zip Notes Website Region  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Organization Organization Address Place Zip Notes Website Region Organization Organization Address Place Zip Notes Website Region Adirondack North Country Association Adirondack North Country Association Main Street Suite Saranac Lake New York http www adirondack org Northeast NY NJ CT PA Area African Renewable Energy Alliance AREA African Renewable Energy Alliance AREA Online http area network ning com xg source msg mes network Alliance for Sustainable Colorado Alliance for Sustainable Colorado Wynkoop Street Denver Colorado Mission of is to catalyze the shift to a truly sustainable world by fostering collaboration among nonprofits businesses governments and academia http www sustainablecolorado org Rockies Area American Clean Skies Foundation American Clean Skies Foundation st Street NE Suite Washington District of Columbia http www cleanskies

400

A preliminary evaluation of the performance of wind tunnel and numerical modeling simulations of the wind flow over a wind farm  

SciTech Connect

This report is an analysis of physical and numerical model simulations of the wind flow over complex terrain. The specific area to which these models were applied is a wind farm in the Altamont Pass area of California. The physical model results were obtained from wind tunnel flow simulations, and the numerical model used was the optimizing version of the NOABL model. The goals of this analysis were (1) to evaluate the relative performance of the two models and (2) to uncover any clues that would point toward improvement of the wind tunnel modeling. The performances of the models were gauged by comparing model simulations to wind observations taken over the modeled area.

Barnard, J.C.; Wegley, H.L.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tunnel overseeing organization" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

High photo-excited carrier multiplication by charged InAs dots in AlAs/GaAs/AlAs resonant tunneling diode  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present an approach for the highly sensitive photon detection based on the quantum dots (QDs) operating at temperature of 77K. The detection structure is based on an AlAs/GaAs/AlAs double barrier resonant tunneling diode combined with a layer of self-assembled InAs QDs (QD-RTD). A photon rate of 115 photons per second had induced 10nA photocurrent in this structure, corresponding to the photo-excited carrier multiplication factor of 10^7. This high multiplication factor is achieved by the quantum dot induced memory effect and the resonant tunneling tuning effect of QD-RTD structure.

Wang, Wangping; Xiong, Dayuan; Li, Ning; Lu, Wei

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

High photo-excited carrier multiplication by charged InAs dots in AlAs/GaAs/AlAs resonant tunneling diode  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present an approach for the highly sensitive photon detection based on the quantum dots (QDs) operating at temperature of 77K. The detection structure is based on an AlAs/GaAs/AlAs double barrier resonant tunneling diode combined with a layer of self-assembled InAs QDs (QD-RTD). A photon rate of 115 photons per second had induced 10nA photocurrent in this structure, corresponding to the photo-excited carrier multiplication factor of 10^7. This high multiplication factor is achieved by the quantum dot induced memory effect and the resonant tunneling tuning effect of QD-RTD structure.

Wangping Wang; Ying Hou; Dayuan Xiong; Ning Li; Wei Lu

2007-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

403

Variational transition state theory calculations of tunneling effects on concerted hydrogen motion in water clusters and formaldehyde/water clusters  

SciTech Connect

The direct participation of water molecules in aqueous phase reaction processes has been postulated to occur via both single-step mechanisms as well as concerted hydrogen atom or proton shifts. In the present work, simple prototypes of concerted hydrogen atom transfer processes are examined for small hydrogen-bonded water clusters -- cyclic trimers and tetramers -- and hydrogen-bonded clusters of formaldehyde with one and two water molecules. Rate constants for the rearrangement processes are computed using variational transition state theory, accounting for quantum mechanical tunneling effects by semiclassical ground-state adiabatic transmission coefficients. The variational transition state theory calculations directly utilize selected information about the potential energy surface along the minimum energy path as parameters of the reaction path Hamiltonian. The potential energy information is obtained from ab ignite electronic structure calculations with an empirical bond additivity correction (the BAC-MP4 method). Tunneling is found to be very important for these concerted rearrangement processes -- the semiclassical ground-state adiabatic transmission coefficients are estimated to be as high as four order of magnitude at room temperature. Effects of the size of the cluster (number of water molecules in the cyclic complex) are also dramatic -- addition of a water molecule is seen to change the calculated rates by orders of magnitude. 36 refs., 10 figs.

Garrett, B.C. (Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (USA)); Melius, C.F. (Sandia National Labs., Livermore, CA (USA))

1990-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

NREL Unsteady Aerodynamics Experiment in the NASA-Ames Wind Tunnel: A Comparison of Predictions to Measurements  

SciTech Connect

Currently, wind turbine designers rely on safety factors to compensate for the effects of unknown loads acting on the turbine structure. This results in components that are overdesigned because precise load levels and load paths are unknown. To advance wind turbine technology, the forces acting on the turbine structure must be accurately characterized because these forces translate directly into loads imparted to the wind turbine structure and resulting power production. Once these forces are more accurately characterized, we will better understand load paths and can therefore optimize turbine structures. To address this problem, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) conducted the Unsteady Aerodynamics Experiment (UAE), which was a test of an extensively instrumented wind turbine in the giant NASA-Ames 24.4-m (80 feet) by 36.6-m (120 feet) wind tunnel. To maximize the benefits from testing, NREL formed a Science Panel of advisers comprised of wind turbine aerodynamics and modeling experts throughout the world. NREL used the Science Panel's guidance to specify the conditions and configurations under which the turbine was operated in the wind tunnel. The panel also helped define test priorities and objectives that would be effective for wind turbine modeling tool development and validation.

Simms, D.; Schreck, S.; Hand, M.; Fingersh, L.J.

2001-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

405

Manufacturing Science and Technology: Organizations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Machining Operations Machining Operations Machining Services Electronic Fabrication Manufacturing Process Science & Technology Thin Film, Vacuum, & Packaging Organic Materials Ceramic & Glass Meso Manufacturing & Systems Development Visiting Us AMTTP Center Organizational chart Organizations Our Business areas Manufacturing Science and Technology David Plummer, Director Manufacturing Enterprise Joe M. Harris, Senior Manager Machining Operations Mathew Donnelly, Manager Machining Services Daryl Reckaway, Acting Manager Electronic Fabrication Phillip L. Gallegos, Manager Manufacturing Process Science and Technology Mark F. Smith, Senior Manager Thin Film, Vacuum, and Packaging Mark F. Smith, Acting Manager Organic Materials Mike Kelly, Manager Ceramic and Glass Alex Roesler, Manager

406

ARM - Measurement - Organic Carbon Concentration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

govMeasurementsOrganic Carbon Concentration govMeasurementsOrganic Carbon Concentration ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Organic Carbon Concentration The concentration of carbon bound in organic compounds. Categories Aerosols Instruments The above measurement is considered scientifically relevant for the following instruments. Refer to the datastream (netcdf) file headers of each instrument for a list of all available measurements, including those recorded for diagnostic or quality assurance purposes. ARM Instruments ACSM : Aerosol Chemical Speciation Monitor Field Campaign Instruments AEROSCARBON : Aerosol Carbon Analyzer AEROSMASSSPEC : Aerosol Mass Spectrometer Datastreams AOS : Aerosol Observing System Datastreams

407

Reducing recombination in organic photovoltaics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this thesis, I consider two methods to improve organic photovoltaic efficiency: energy level cascades and promotion of triplet state excitons. The former relies on a thin layer of material placed between the active ...

Sussman, Jason M. (Jason Michael)

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Management Principles for Nonproliferation Organizations  

SciTech Connect

This paper identifies business models and six management principles that can be applied by a nonproliferation organization to maximize the value and effectiveness of its products. The organizations responsible for reducing the nuclear proliferation threat have experienced a substantial growth in responsibility and visibility since the September 11 attacks. Since then, the international community has witnessed revelations of clandestine nuclear facilities, nuclear black markets, periodic nuclear tests, and a resurgence of interest by countries worldwide in developing nuclear capabilities. The security environment will likely continue to evolve in unexpected ways since most of the proliferation threats with which the world will be forced to contend remain unforeseen. To better prepare for and respond to this evolving security environment, many nonproliferation organizations are interested in finding new or better ways to increase the effectiveness and efficiency of their operations. Of course, all organizations, whether they are market driven or non-profit, must operate effectively and efficiently if they are to succeed. Indeed, as this study demonstrates, many of the management principles that this study recommends can help all organizations succeed. However, this study pays particular attention to nonproliferation organizations because of the mission they are responsible for fulfilling. Nonproliferation organizations, including nonproliferation programs that operate within a larger national security organization, are responsible for reducing the threat of nuclear, chemical and biological weapons. These organizations have an enduring mandate from the public and the international community not to fail in the completion of their mission for failure could have detrimental impacts on international security, public health and the environment. Moreover, the public expects nonproliferation organizations and programs to fulfill their mission, even when resources are limited. They are expected to anticipate and react quickly to prevent a potential threat while staying accountable to their public stakeholders, many of whom remain unaware of the very threats the organization is trying to address. When budgets are flush, it is easy to believe that money will solve all problems; but during times of economic hardship, managers must rely on creative and cost-effective management approaches to implement their missions. Fortunately, managers of nonproliferation organizations can draw on a wealth of research on organizational design and culture to help them identify the management strategies most appropriate for them. Such research can help nonproliferation managers think about their own organizational structures and cultures and adapt accepted management principles to their unique organizational mission. This analytical process is not straight forward, as some managers may find themselves taking risks that others might not take, such as making ostensibly risky investments for the common good, or supporting creative thinking to help mission accomplishment. Some management principles that are relatively straightforward for other organizations may be difficult to envision and implement in a nonproliferation organization. Therefore, the goal of this study is to help nonproliferation managers identify management principles that can be implemented in a nonproliferation organization and, in the process, help maximize the value of the organization's products and effectiveness of its mission.

Frazar, Sarah L.; Hund, Gretchen

2012-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

409

Empirical essays in industrial organization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this dissertation, I present three empirical essays that encompass topics in industrial organization. The first essay examines the degree of competition and spatial differentiation in the retail industry by exploiting ...

Chiou, Lesley C

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

2013 BIOPESTICIDE AND ORGANIC SUPPORT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 2013 BIOPESTICIDE AND ORGANIC SUPPORT RESEARCH PROGRAM GUIDELINES AND GRANT PROPOSAL.................................................................................. 37 Priorities for 2013,000 in total. The level of funding for 2013 is dependent on the amount of federal dollars allocated to IR-4

Garfunkel, Eric

411

Ambient-pressure organic superconductor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A new class of organic superconductors having the formula (ET).sub.2 MX.sub.2 wherein ET represents bis(ethylenedithio)-tetrathiafulvalene, M is a metal such as Au, Ag, In, Tl, Rb, Pd and the like and X is a halide. The superconductor (ET).sub.2 AuI.sub.2 exhibits a transition temperature of 5 K which is high for organic superconductors.

Williams, Jack M. (Downers Grove, IL); Wang, Hsien-Hau (Willowbrook, IL); Beno, Mark A. (Woodridge, IL)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Adsorbate structures and catalytic reactions studied in the torrpressure range by scanning tunneling microscopy  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

High-pressure, high-temperature scanning tunneling microscopy (HPHTSTM) was used to study adsorbate structures and reactions on single crystal model catalytic systems. Studies of the automobile catalytic converter reaction [CO + NO {yields} 1/2 N{sub 2} + CO{sub 2}] on Rh(111) and ethylene hydrogenation [C{sub 2}H{sub 4} + H{sub 2} {yields} C{sub 2}H{sub 6}] on Rh(111) and Pt(111) elucidated information on adsorbate structures in equilibrium with high-pressure gas and the relationship of atomic and molecular mobility to chemistry. STM studies of NO on Rh(111) showed that adsorbed NO forms two high-pressure structures, with the phase transformation from the (2 x 2) structure to the (3 x 3) structure occurring at 0.03 Torr. The (3 x 3) structure only exists when the surface is in equilibrium with the gas phase. The heat of adsorption of this new structure was determined by measuring the pressures and temperatures at which both (2 x 2) and (3 x 3) structures coexisted. The energy barrier between the two structures was calculated by observing the time necessary for the phase transformation to take place. High-pressure STM studies of the coadsorption of CO and NO on Rh(111) showed that CO and NO form a mixed (2 x 2) structure at low NO partial pressures. By comparing surface and gas compositions, the adsorption energy difference between topsite CO and NO was calculated. Occasionally there is exchange between top-site CO and NO, for which we have described a mechanism for. At high NO partial pressures, NO segregates into islands, where the phase transformation to the (3 x 3) structure occurs. The reaction of CO and NO on Rh(111) was monitored by mass spectrometry (MS) and HPHTSTM. From MS studies the apparent activation energy of the catalytic converter reaction was calculated and compared to theory. STM showed that under high-temperature reaction conditions, surface metal atoms become mobile. Ethylene hydrogenation and its poisoning by CO was also studied by STM on Rh(111) and Pt(111). Poisoning was found to coincide with decreased adsorbate mobility. Under ethylene hydrogenation conditions, no order is detected by STM at 300 K, as hydrogen and ethylidyne, the surface species formed by gas-phase ethylene, are too mobile. When CO is introduced, the reaction stops, and ordered structures appear on the surface. For Rh(111), the structure is predominantly a mixed c(4 x 2), though there are some areas of (2 x 2). For Pt(111), the structure is hexagonal and resembles the Moire pattern seen when Pt(111) is exposed to pure CO. From these studies it is concluded that CO poisons by stopping adsorbate mobility. This lack of adsorbate mobility prevents the adsorption of ethylene from the gas phase by hindering the creation of adsorption sites.

Hwang, Kevin Shao-Lin

2003-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

413

Wind Tunnel Aerodynamic Tests of Six Airfoils for Use on Small Wind Turbines; Period of Performance: October 31, 2002--January 31, 2003  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Wind Tunnel Aerodynamic Tests of Six Airfoils for Use on Small Wind Turbinesrepresents the fourth installment in a series of volumes documenting the ongoing work of th University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Low-Speed Airfoil Tests Program. This particular volume deals with airfoils that are candidates for use on small wind turbines, which operate at low Reynolds numbers.

Selig, M. S.; McGranahan, B. D.

2004-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

Testing of the Sunstove Organization`s Sunstove Solar Oven  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A Sunstove Organization`s Sunstove was tested at Sandia`s Solar Thermal Test Facility. It was instrumented with five type K thermocouples to determine warm-up rates when empty and when a pot containing two liters of water was placed inside. It reached inside air temperatures above 115{degrees}C (240{degrees}F). It heated two liters of water from room temperature to 80{degrees}C (175{degrees}F) in about two hours. Observations were made on the cooling and reheating rates during a cloud passage. The adverse effects of wind on the operation of the solar oven were also noted.

Moss, T.A.

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

Bio-Organic Chemistry Quarterly Report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

I). Johannes Ull~.ich, in Bio-Organic Chc! mistry Qiinrtcr-sodium E. A. Shneour, in Bio-Organic Chemistry Quarterly2, Edwige Tyszkiewicz, in Bio-Organic Chemistry Qnarterly

Various

1961-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Form:Policy Organization | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Add a Policy Organization Input your policy organization name below to add to the registry. If your policy organization is already in the registry, the form will be populated with...

417

Ultrathin Co/Pt and Co/Pd superlattice films for MgO-based perpendicular magnetic tunnel junctions  

SciTech Connect

Ultrathin [Co/Pt]{sub n} and [Co/Pd]{sub n} superlattice films consisting of 0.14-0.20-nm-thick Co and Pt(Pd) layers were deposited by sputtering. A large perpendicular magnetic anisotropy [(3-9)x10{sup 6} ergs/cm{sup 3}] and an ideal square out-of-plane hysteresis loop were attained even for ultrathin superlattice films with a total thickness of 1.2-2.4 nm. The films were stable against annealing up to 370 deg. C. MgO-based perpendicular magnetic tunnel junctions with this superlattice layer as the free layer showed a relatively high magnetoresistance ratio (62%) and an ultralow resistance-area product (3.9 {Omega} {mu}m{sup 2}) at room temperature. The use of these films will enable the development of gigabit-scale nonvolatile memory.

Yakushiji, K.; Saruya, T.; Kubota, H.; Fukushima, A.; Nagahama, T.; Yuasa, S.; Ando, K. [Spintronics Research Center, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), 1-1-1 Umezono, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8568 (Japan)

2010-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

418

Tunneling of conduction band electrons driven by a laser field in a double quantum dot: An open systems approach  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper, we investigate tunneling of conduction band electrons in a system of an asymmetric double quantum dot which interacts with an environment. First, we consider the case in which the system only interacts with the environment and demonstrate that as time goes to infinity they both reach an equilibrium, which is expected, and there is always a maximum and minimum for the populations of the states of the system. Then we investigate the case in which an external resonant optical pulse (a laser) is applied to the system interacting with the environment. However, in this case for different intensities we have different populations of the states in equilibrium and as the intensity of the laser gets stronger, the populations of the states in equilibrium approach the same constant.

B. Ahmadi; S. Salimi; A. S. Khorashad

2013-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

419

Static current-voltage characteristics of Au/CaF{sub 2}/n-Si(111) MIS tunneling structures  

SciTech Connect

Using molecular-beam epitaxy, Au/CaF{sub 2}/n-Si(111) structures were fabricated that exhibit lower currents at a given fluoride film thickness (1.5-2 nm) than those of all similar structures studied. At a positive voltage at the metal, the current is in agreement with that calculated within the model with conservation of the transverse component of the wave vector during tunneling transport. Relative contributions of electron and hole components were analyzed for forward and reverse biases. The effect of the nonuniform distribution of the insulator thickness over the area on measured currents was estimated. The thin CaF{sub 2} layers that were grown are potentially applicable as barrier layers in various devices of functional electronics.

Suturin, S. M., E-mail: suturin@mail.ioffe.ru; Banshchikov, A. G.; Sokolov, N. S.; Tyaginov, S. E.; Vexler, M. I. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Ioffe Physicotechnical Institute (Russian Federation)

2008-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

420

GaSb/GaAs quantum dot formation and demolition studied with cross-sectional scanning tunneling microscopy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present a cross-sectional scanning tunneling microscopy study of GaSb/GaAs quantum dots grown by molecular beam epitaxy. Various nanostructures are observed as a function of the growth parameters. During growth, relaxation of the high local strain fields of the nanostructures plays an important role in their formation. Pyramidal dots with a high Sb content are often accompanied by threading dislocations above them. GaSb ring formation is favored by the use of a thin GaAs first cap layer and a high growth temperature of the second cap layer. At these capping conditions, strain-driven Sb diffusion combined with As/Sb exchange and Sb segregation remove the center of a nanostructure, creating a ring. Clusters of GaSb without a well defined morphology also appear regularly, often with a highly inhomogeneous structure which is sometimes divided up in fragments.

Smakman, E. P.; Garleff, J. K.; Rambabu, P.; Koenraad, P. M. [Department of Applied Physics, Eindhoven University of Technology, Eindhoven 5612 AZ (Netherlands); Young, R. J.; Hayne, M. [Department of Physics, Lancaster University, Lancaster LA1 4YB (United Kingdom)

2012-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tunnel overseeing organization" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Scanning tunneling microscopy studies of the surfaces of a-Si:H and a-SiGe:H films  

SciTech Connect

The report contains a detailed description of the experimental complexities encountered in developing scanning tunneling microscope (STM) probing of atomic structure on the surface of freshly-grown hydrogenated-amorphous semiconductors. It also contains a speculative microscopic film-growth model that explains differences between the disorder in CVD grown a-Ge:H versus a-Si:H films. This model is derived from prior results obtained in the chemical analysis of GeH{sub 4} plasmas, combined with surface reaction and thermodynamic considerations. The neutral radical fragments of silane, disilane and germane dissociation in discharges, which dominate the vapor and film-growth reactions, have been deduced from detailed analysis of prior data and are reported. 4 refs., 7 figs.

Gallagher, A.; Ostrom, R.; Tannenbaum, D. (National Inst. of Standards and Technology, Boulder, CO (USA))

1991-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

Transformation-optics generalization of tunnelling effects in bi-layers made of paired epsilon-negative/mu-negative media  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Transformation-media designed by standard transformation-optics (TO) approaches, based on real-valued coordinate-mapping, cannot exhibit single-negative (SNG) character unless such character is already possessed by the domain that is being transformed. In this paper, we show that SNG transformation media can be obtained by transforming a domain featuring double positive (or double-negative) character, via complex analytic continuation of the coordinate transformation rules. Moreover, we apply this concept to the TO-based interpretation of phenomena analogous to the tunnelling effects observable in bilayers made of complementary epsilon-negative (ENG) and mu-negative (MNG) media, and explore their possible TO-inspired extensions and generalizations.

Castaldi, Giuseppe; Galdi, Vincenzo; Alu', Andrea; Engheta, Nader

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

Initial Recognition of a Cellodextrin Chain in the Cellulose-Binding Tunnel May Affect Cellobiohydrolase Directional Specificity  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Initial Initial Recognition of a Cellodextrin Chain in the Cellulose-Binding Tunnel May Affect Cellobiohydrolase Directional Specificity Pavan K. GhattyVenkataKrishna, †‡ Emal M. Alekozai, §{ Gregg T. Beckham, k ** Roland Schulz, {‡‡ Michael F. Crowley, ‡†† * Edward C. Uberbacher, †‡ * and Xiaolin Cheng ‡{‡‡ * † Computational Biology and Bioinformatics Group and ‡ BioEnergy Science Center, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee; § Interdisciplinary Center for Scientific Computing, University of Heidelberg, Heidelberg Germany; { UT/ORNL Center for Molecular Biophysics, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee; k National Bioenergy Center, National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden, Colorado; **Department of Chemical Engineering, Colorado School of Mines, Golden, Colorado; †† Biosciences Center, National

424

Novel Functionalized Nanomaterials for Organic Decontamination  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... oxide (TiO2)-graphene-rhamnolipid for decontamination of organics (methyl orange, phenol and diesel) from water. The results show the advantage of organic ...

425

PI Organization Chart | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Chart PIOrg20130208.pdf More Documents & Publications Office of Policy and International Affairs Organization Chart Office of Policy and International Affairs Organization...

426

Interested Parties - Organization for International Investment...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Organization for International Investment Interested Parties - Organization for International Investment PI.pdf More Documents & Publications Financial and Activity Report - June...

427

Organic pollutants in Swiss compost and digestate.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Composting (aerobic treatment of organic wastes) and digestion (anaerobic treatment of organic wastes combined with biogas production) are important waste management strategies with increasing significance… (more)

Brändli, Rahel Christine

428

Organic pollutants in Swiss compost and digestate.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Composting (aerobic treatment of organic wastes) and digestion (anaerobic treatment of organic wastes combined with biogas production) are important waste management strategies with increasing significance… (more)

Brändli, Rahel Christine

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

Organization  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

develops accelerator diagnostics, and produces specialized control system software. Controls The Controls Group is responsible for the remote actuation, automatic control,...

430

SunShot Initiative: Organic Photovoltaics Research  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Organic Photovoltaics Research to Organic Photovoltaics Research to someone by E-mail Share SunShot Initiative: Organic Photovoltaics Research on Facebook Tweet about SunShot Initiative: Organic Photovoltaics Research on Twitter Bookmark SunShot Initiative: Organic Photovoltaics Research on Google Bookmark SunShot Initiative: Organic Photovoltaics Research on Delicious Rank SunShot Initiative: Organic Photovoltaics Research on Digg Find More places to share SunShot Initiative: Organic Photovoltaics Research on AddThis.com... Concentrating Solar Power Photovoltaics Research & Development Crystalline Silicon Thin Films Multijunctions Organic Photovoltaics Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells Competitive Awards Systems Integration Balance of Systems Organic Photovoltaics Research Graphic showing the seven layers of an organic PV cell: electrode, donor, acceptor, active layer, PEDOT:PSS, transparent conductive oxide, and glass.

431

Raman studies of organic superconductors.  

SciTech Connect

The temperature-dependence of the frequency of one of the components of the v9 (Ag) doublet in the Raman spectra of several organic superconductors has been measured. The frequency of this mode was observed to soften below 100K, in those compounds in which NMR data indicates antiferromagnetic oscillations in the same temperature range. This is evidence for spin-phonon interactions.

Lin, Y.; Eldridge, J. E.; Wang, H. H.; Kini, A. M.; Schlueter, J. A.; Materials Science Division; Univer. of British Columbia

2001-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

432

Enabling information sharing within organizations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Organizations which have invested heavily in Enterprise Resource Planning (ERP) systems, intranets and Enterprise Information Portals (EIP) with standardized workflows, data definitions and a common data repository, have provided the technlogical capability ... Keywords: Benefit sharing, Cross-functional workgroups, Information complementarity, Information equity, Information sharing, Organizational outlook

Anitesh Barua; Suryanarayanan Ravindran; Andrew B. Whinston

2007-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

Organic Aerosol Partition Module Documentation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

With the promulgation of new National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS) for fine particulate matter (PM-2.5), data and analytical tools are needed to support their implementation. This report documents an EPRI modeling component for efficiently simulating aspects of organic aerosol formation. Without this component, simulations would tend to overestimate the contribution of power plant emissions to atmospheric aerosol mass.

1999-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

434

Effect of Biodiesel Blending on the Speciation of Soluble Organic Fraction from a Light Duty Diesel Engine  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Soy methyl ester (SME) biodiesel was volumetrically blended with 2007 certification ultra low sulfur diesel (ULSD) fuel and run in a 1.7L direct-injection common rail diesel engine at one speed-load point (1500rpm, 2.6bar BMEP). Engine fueling rate and injection timing were adjusted to maintain a constant load, while particulate samples were collected in a diesel particulate filter (DPF) and with a dilution tunnel sampling train. The samples collected at these two locations were found to contain different levels of soluble organic fraction (SOF) and the different hydrocarbon species in the SOF. This observation indicates that traditional SOF measurements, in light of the specific sampling procedure used, may not be appropriate to DPF applications.

Strzelec, Andrea [ORNL; Storey, John Morse [ORNL; Lewis Sr, Samuel Arthur [ORNL; Daw, C Stuart [ORNL; Foster, Prof. Dave [University of Wisconsin; Rutland, Prof. Christopher J. [University of Wisconsin

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

Organization Organization Address Place Zip Notes Website Region  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Institute Breakthrough Institute th Street Suite Oakland Institute Breakthrough Institute th Street Suite Oakland California http www thebreakthrough org Bay Area California Fuel Cell Partnership California Fuel Cell Partnership Industrial Blvd West Sacramento California Collaboration of organizations that work together to promote the commercialization of hydrogen fuel cell vehicles http www fuelcellpartnership net Bay Area ClimateWorks ClimateWorks Montgomery Street Suite San Francisco California http www climateworks org Bay Area Rahus Institute Rahus Institute Center Ave Martinez California Research and educational organization with a focus on resource efficiency http www californiasolarcenter org index html Bay Area San Francisco Biofuels Cooperative San Francisco Biofuels Cooperative Post St San Francisco California Mission is to facilitate access to

436

Organization Organization Address Place Zip Notes Website Region  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Environmental Foundation Bonneville Environmental Foundation Environmental Foundation Bonneville Environmental Foundation SW st Avenue Portland Oregon https www b e f org Pacific Northwest Area Earth Share Oregon Earth Share Oregon SW Washington Street Portland Oregon Federation of leading local and national non profit conservation groups that provides a convenient way to support conservation and healthy communities http www earthshare oregon org Pacific Northwest Area Renewable Northwest Project Renewable Northwest Project SW Oak St Ste Portland Oregon Nonprofit Advocacy Organization http www RNP org Pacific Northwest Area Solar Oregon Solar Oregon SE Grand Ave Portland Oregon Non profit membership organization providing public education and community outreach to encourage Oregonians to choose solar energy http www solaroregon org Pacific

437

Organization Organization Address Place Zip Notes Website Region  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AWEA American Wind Energy Association AWEA American Wind Energy Association AWEA M Street NW Suite Washington District of Columbia http www awea org Asociacion Argentina de Energia Eolica Asociacion Argentina de Energia Eolica Buenos Aires Argentina http www argentinaeolica org ar Clean Tech Trade Alliance Clean Tech Trade Alliance Wheaton Way Bremerton Washington Internationally focused hybrid trade alliance that will create a successful Clean Technology business cluster http www cleantechtradealliance org Pacific Northwest Area Clean Technology Sustainable Industries Organization Clean Technology Sustainable Industries Organization Coolidge Hwy Royal Oak Michigan http www ct si org Green Integrated Design Green Integrated Design Tempe Arizona http www GreenIntegratedDesign com Massachusetts Hydrogen Coalition Massachusetts Hydrogen Coalition Cummings

438

PIA - Historical Data for Legal Organizations | Department of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Historical Data for Legal Organizations PIA - Historical Data for Legal Organizations PIA - Historical Data for Legal Organizations PIA - Historical Data for Legal Organizations...

439

Safety Organization and Contact Information  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Organization and Contact Information Print Organization and Contact Information Print Safety Staff Contact Information Contact Extension Location CONTROL ROOM (24/7) 4969 80-140 Floor Operations Floor Operators 7464 (RING) 80-159 Building Manager This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it 7358 80-151 Work Planning/Permit/span> This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it 7358 6793 80-151 80-233 ALS-EHS Program This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it (Interim Manager, EHS Program Management) This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it (Interim Manager, Accelerator Facility Safety)

440

Kitchen antics: humor in organizations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Humor is usually associated with trivial or non-rographics. serious banter', it is however a significant factor in the construction of a social reality. 'This thesis demonstrates this significance as it attempts to increase the ability to understand how humor is used and elects the organizational culture. This thesis is based on an stenographic study of a hotel kitchen. Humor is examined from the perspective of how it functions within a social context. Humor from this case study is classified according to a coding system developed within this study to reveal five types of organizational humor-cooperative, conformity, cyclic, distant and insurgent. The interplay between these humor types creates a humor culture within the organization, which is indicative of the organization's culture as a whole.

Lynch, Owen Hanley, 1972-

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tunnel overseeing organization" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Safety Organization and Contact Information  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Organization and Contact Information Print Organization and Contact Information Print Safety Staff Contact Information Contact Extension Location CONTROL ROOM (24/7) 4969 80-140 Floor Operations Floor Operators 7464 (RING) 80-159 Building Manager This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it 7358 80-151 Work Planning/Permit/span> This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it 7358 6793 80-151 80-233 ALS-EHS Program This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it (Interim Manager, EHS Program Management) This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it (Interim Manager, Accelerator Facility Safety)

442

Our Organization | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Our Organization Our Organization Our Organization Our Organization POWER SYSTEMS ENGINEERING RESEARCH & DEVELOPMENT (PSE R&D) NATIONAL ELECTRICITY DELIVERY DIVISION (NEDD) INFRASTRUCTURE SECURITY & ENERGY RESTORATION (ISER) ENERGY INFRASTRUCTURE MODELING AND ANALYSIS (EIMA) ADVANCED GRID INTEGRATION (AGI) The Power Systems Engineering Research and Development Division is responsible for the development and management of projects for "next generation" electricity delivery technologies and supporting activities to accelerate their introduction to the marketplace. The National Electricity Delivery Division (NEDD) leads the Department's efforts to provide technical assistance to states, regional entities, and tribes to help them develop and improve their programs, policies, and laws that will facilitate the development of reliable and affordable electricity infrastructure. NEDD also authorizes the export of electricity, issues permits for the construction of cross-border transmission lines, and is leading efforts to improve the coordination of Federal transmission permitting on Federal lands. The Infrastructure Security and Energy Restoration Division leads efforts for securing the U.S. energy infrastructure against all hazards, reducing the impact of disruptive events, and responding to and facilitating recovery from energy disruptions, in collaboration with all levels of industry and State and local governments. The Energy Infrastructure Modeling and Analysis Division supports the development of a reliable, secure, resilient, and advanced U.S. energy infrastructure through a range of activities, including electric system modeling, synchrophasor-based tool development, transmission reliability research, reliability assessments, energy security modeling and visualization, and energy infrastructure risk analyses. The Advanced Grid Integration Division leads OE's grid modernization efforts to foster the deployment of smart grid systems and technologies to enhance the reliability, efficiency, and security of the Nation's electric power grid. The Division manages the smart grid investment projects and advances smart grid interoperability and cybersecurity through standards, information exchange and initiatives that increase the efficiency and effectiveness of grid modernization investments.

443

Electrochemical oxidation of organic materials  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention is a method and apparatus for the direct oxidation of organic materials, especially organic wastes, in an electrochemical cell. It fulfills the need for a simple, cost-effective way for generators of small quantities of waste to deal with that waste. It does not use an electron transfer agent, which may be a source of additional hazardous waste. The anode is made of carbon felt; the cathode is platinum; and the electrolyte is a strong oxidizer, preferably nitric acid. The potential difference is 2 to 3 volts; the current density is 0.15 to 0.25 A/cm{sup 2}. The porous barrier is a medium grade alumina frit or an ion exchange membrane. The organic materials are fed to the anode compartment; the resulting oxygen bubbling circumvents the need for stirring or circulating the waste. Many different types of waste (e.g. rubber gloves, TBP, process solutions, etc.) can be fed to the anode compartment without the need to process or store it. 3 figs. (DLC)

Almon, A.C.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

Preparation of hydrophobic organic aeorgels  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Synthetic methods for the preparation of hydrophobic organics aerogels. One method involves the sol-gel polymerization of 1,3-dimethoxybenzene or 1,3,5-trimethoxybenzene with formaldehyde in non-aqueous solvents. Using a procedure analogous to the preparation of resorcinol-formaldehyde (RF) aerogels, this approach generates wet gels that can be dried using either supercritical solvent extraction to generate the new organic aerogels or air dried to produce an xerogel. Other methods involve the sol-gel polymerization of 1,3,5 trihydroxy benzene (phloroglucinol) or 1,3 dihydroxy benzene (resorcinol) and various aldehydes in non-aqueous solvents. These methods use a procedure analogous to the one-step base and two-step base/acid catalyzed polycondensation of phloroglucinol and formaldehyde, but the base catalyst used is triethylamine. These methods can be applied to a variety of other sol-gel precursors and solvent systems. These hydrophobic organics aerogels have numerous application potentials in the field of material absorbers and water-proof insulation.

Baumann, Theodore F. (Tracy, CA); Satcher, Jr., Joe H. (Patterson, CA); Gash, Alexander E. (Livermore, CA)

2007-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

445

Organization Organization Address Place Zip Notes Website Region  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Alliance for Sustainable Colorado Alliance for Sustainable Colorado Wynkoop Street Denver Colorado Mission of is to catalyze the shift to a truly sustainable world by fostering collaboration among nonprofits businesses governments and academia http www sustainablecolorado org Rockies Area American Solar Energy Society American Solar Energy Society Central Ave Boulder Colorado Nonprofit organization dedicated to increasing the use of solar energy energy efficiency and other sustainable technologies in the U S http www ases org Rockies Area Boulder Innovation Center Boulder Innovation Center th Street Boulder Colorado http www boulderinnovationcenter com Rockies Area Clean Economy Network Rockies Clean Economy Network Rockies Denver Colorado http rockies cleaneconomynetwork org Rockies Area

446

PROJECT MANGEMENT PLAN EXAMPLES Project Organization Examples  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Organization Examples Organization Examples Example 8 4.0 PROJECT ORGANIZATION Chapter 4.0 describes the principle project organizations, including their responsibilities and relationships. Other organizations, that have an interest in the project, also are described. 4.1 Principal Project Organizations and Responsibilities The management organization for the 324/327 Buildings Stabilization/Deactivation Project represents a partnership between four principal project organizations responsible for the project. The four project organizations and their associated summary responsibilities are described in the following paragraphs. 4.1.1 U.S. Department of Energy, Headquarters (HQ) The DOE-HQ Office of Nuclear Material and Facility Stabilization (EM-60) is primarily responsible for policy and budget decisions

447

Optimization of the configuration of a symmetric three-barrier resonant-tunneling structure as an active element of a quantum cascade detector  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

On the basis of a model of rectangular potentials and different electron effective masses in wells and barriers of an open resonant-tunneling structure with identical outer barriers, a theory has been developed and the dynamic conductance caused by the interaction of the electromagnetic field with electrons passing through the structure has been calculated. Using the example of the three-barrier resonant-tunneling structure with In{sub 0.53}Ga{sub 0.47}As wells and In{sub 0.52}Al{sub 0.48}As barriers, it is shown that, independently of the geometrical sizes of potential wells and barriers, there exist three geometrical configurations (positions of the inner barrier with respect to outer ones) at which the nanosystem, as an active element, provides optimum operating conditions of the quantum cascade detector.

Tkach, N. V., E-mail: ktf@chnu.edu.ua; Seti, Ju. A. [Fedkovich Chernivtsy National University (Ukraine)

2011-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

448

Wind tunnel simulation of wind effects and associated displacement hazards on flat surface construction materials such as plywood  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Accidents and hazards continue to plague the construction industry. One often overlooked hazard to workers is the potential for flying debris and materials during high winds. This research was designed to evaluate the wind velocity required to create such an airborne hazard with flat surface materials such as plywood. This research was developed to show select correlations between the wind velocity, lifting forces and the susceptibility to movement of large surface area flat sheets of construction material, specifically four feet by eight feet sheets of floordeck plywood weighing 107 pounds. It also examined and evaluated the correlation of a shape coefficient to movement of materials and wind velocities, so that calculations can be made to adequately predict the potential movement of these materials. This will allow construction supervisors to reasonably prepare for such anticipated conditions. The Texas A&M University low speed wind tunnel was used to place a ftffl-scale stack of plywood floor decking material with the air stream flowing over the stack until top sheet separated or lifted from the stack. Next, a half-scale model was placed in the test section of the tunnel with pressure ports attached to a high speed sampling transducer to measure the actual pressures at select velocities. This allowed for a correlation between the ftifl-scale data and the sampled data. Tests were performed for several front and side angles of the wind striking the edge surface of the materials. Velocities were used up to 60 miles per hour full-scale equivalent. The full-scale model achieved lift forces exceeding the material weight of 107 pounds at one orientation angle at a velocity just below 30 miles per hour. This was consistent with the half-scale test pressures for a similar orientation. Various orientations yielded different forces as was anticipated. From this information a pressure coefficient was developed which when applied with a safety factor allows for reasonable calculations to be made to determine potential hazards and adequately secure materials on any sites where large flat materials may be handled or stored.

Madeley, Jack T.

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

Role of Coulomb blockade and spin-flip scattering in tunneling magnetoresistance of FeCo-Si-O nanogranular films  

SciTech Connect

In this work, we report the effect of FeCo atomic fraction (0.33 < x < 0.54) and temperature on the electrical, magnetic, and tunneling magnetoresistance (TMR) properties of FeCo-Si-O granular films prepared by atom beam sputtering technique. Glancing angle x-ray diffraction and TEM studies reveal that films are amorphous in nature. The dipole-dipole interactions (particle-matrix mixing) is evident from zero-field cooled and field-cooled magnetic susceptibility measurements and the presence of oxides (mainly Fe-related) is observed by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis. The presence of Fe-oxides is responsible for the observed reduction of saturation magnetization and rapid increase in coercivity below 50 K. TMR has been observed in a wide temperature range, and a maximum TMR of -4.25% at 300 K is observed for x = 0.39 at a maximum applied field of 60 kOe. The fast decay of maximum TMR at high temperatures and lower TMR values at 300 K when compared to P{sub FeCo}{sup 2}/(1+P{sub FeCo}{sup 2}), where P{sub FeCo} is the spin polarization of FeCo are in accordance with a theoretical model that includes spin-flip scattering processes. The temperature dependent study of TMR effect reveals a remarkably enhanced TMR at low temperatures. The TMR value varies from -2.1% at 300 K to -14.5% at 5 K for x = 0.54 and a large MR value of -18.5% at 5 K for x = 0.39 is explained on the basis of theoretical models involving Coulomb blockade effects. Qualitatively particle-matrix mixing and the presence of Fe-oxides seems to be the source of spin-flip scattering, responsible for fast decay of TMR at high temperatures. A combination of higher order tunneling (in Coulomb blockade regime) and spin-flip scattering (high temperature regime) explains the temperature dependent TMR of these films.

Kumar, Hardeep; Ghosh, Santanu [Nanostech Laboratory, Department of Physics, Indian Institute of Technology Delhi, New Delhi 110016 (India); Buerger, Danilo; Zhou, Shengqiang; Groetzschel, Rainer; Schmidt, Heidemarie [Institute of Ion Beam Physics and Materials Research, Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, P.O. Box 510119, 01314 Dresden (Germany); Li, Lin [Institute of Ion Beam Physics and Materials Research, Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, P.O. Box 510119, 01314 Dresden (Germany); State Key Laboratory of Nuclear Physics and Technology, School of Physics, Peking University, Beijing 100 871 (China); Kabiraj, Debdulal; Avasthi, Devesh Kumar [Inter University Accelerator Centre, Aruna Asaf Ali Marg, New Delhi 110067 (India)

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

Defect assistant band alignment transition from staggered to broken gap in mixed As/Sb tunnel field effect transistor heterostructure  

SciTech Connect

The compositional dependence of effective tunneling barrier height (E{sub beff}) and defect assisted band alignment transition from staggered gap to broken gap in GaAsSb/InGaAs n-channel tunnel field effect transistor (TFET) structures were demonstrated by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). High-resolution x-ray diffraction measurements revealed that the active layers are internally lattice matched. The evolution of defect properties was evaluated using cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy. The defect density at the source/channel heterointerface was controlled by changing the interface properties during growth. By increasing indium (In) and antimony (Sb) alloy compositions from 65% to 70% in In{sub x}Ga{sub 1-x}As and 60% to 65% in GaAs{sub 1-y}Sb{sub y} layers, the E{sub beff} was reduced from 0.30 eV to 0.21 eV, respectively, with the low defect density at the source/channel heterointerface. The transfer characteristics of the fabricated TFET device with an E{sub beff} of 0.21 eV show 2 Multiplication-Sign improvement in ON-state current compared to the device with E{sub beff} of 0.30 eV. On contrary, the value of E{sub beff} was decreased from 0.21 eV to -0.03 eV due to the presence of high defect density at the GaAs{sub 0.35}Sb{sub 0.65}/In{sub 0.7}Ga{sub 0.3}As heterointerface. As a result, the band alignment was converted from staggered gap to broken gap, which leads to 4 orders of magnitude increase in OFF-state leakage current. Therefore, a high quality source/channel interface with a properly selected E{sub beff} and well maintained low defect density is necessary to obtain both high ON-state current and low OFF-state leakage in a mixed As/Sb TFET structure for high-performance and lower-power logic applications.

Zhu, Y.; Jain, N.; Vijayaraghavan, S.; Hudait, M. K. [Bradley Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, Virginia 24061 (United States); Mohata, D. K.; Datta, S. [Electrical Engineering, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, Pennsylvania-16802 (United States); Lubyshev, D.; Fastenau, J. M.; Liu, Amy K. [IQE Inc., Bethlehem, Pennsylvania-18015 (United States); Monsegue, N. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, Virginia 24061 (United States)

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

Structure of Au on Ag(110) studied by scanning tunneling microscopy S. Chiang, S. Rousset,a) D. E. Fowler, and D. D. Chambliss  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Structure of Au on Ag(110) studied by scanning tunneling microscopy S. Chiang, S. Rousset,a) D. E/12(3)/1747/4/$1.00 @1994 American Vacuum Society 1747 #12;1748 Chiang et 81.: Structure of Au on Ag(110) studied by STM Fll 10 min apart; #12;1749 Chiang et al.: Structure of Au on Ag(110) studied by STM FIG. 3. (a) -2 ML Au

Chiang, Shirley

452

Refined tip preparation by electrochemical etching and ultrahigh vacuum treatment to obtain atomically sharp tips for scanning tunneling microscope and atomic force microscope  

SciTech Connect

A modification of the common electrochemical etching setup is presented. The described method reproducibly yields sharp tungsten tips for usage in the scanning tunneling microscope and tuning fork atomic force microscope. In situ treatment under ultrahigh vacuum (p {<=}10{sup -10} mbar) conditions for cleaning and fine sharpening with minimal blunting is described. The structure of the microscopic apex of these tips is atomically resolved with field ion microscopy and cross checked with field emission.

Hagedorn, Till; Ouali, Mehdi El; Paul, William; Oliver, David; Miyahara, Yoichi; Gruetter, Peter [Department of Physics, McGill University, 3600 Rue University, Montreal, QC H3A2T8 (Canada)

2011-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

453

Growth sequence and interface formation in the Fe/MgO/Fe(001) tunnel junction analyzed by surface x-ray diffraction  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present a surface x-ray diffraction study of the interface geometric structure in the Fe/MgO/Fe(001) magnetic tunnel junction (MTJ). While the lower MgO/Fe(001) interface is characterized by a substoichiometric FeO{sub x} (x=0.6{+-}0.1) layer in agreement with previous studies, growth of Fe on the MgO spacer and the upper Fe/MgO interface structure strongly depends on the preparation method. If 0.4 monolayers of Fe are initially deposited in ambient oxygen atmosphere (p=10{sup -7} mbar) followed by Fe deposition under ultrahigh-vacuum (UHV) conditions, structural coherence across the trilayer junction is observed. In this case, substoichiometric FeO{sub x} layers are present at both Fe/MgO interfaces corresponding to a symmetric MTJ structure. In contrast, lattice registry is not preserved if Fe deposition is carried out solely under UHV conditions. Our results might have important implications for the preparation of magnetic tunnel junctions optimized to achieve giant tunneling-magnetoresistance amplitudes.

Tusche, C.; Meyerheim, H. L.; Kirschner, J. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Mikrostrukturphysik, Weinberg 2, D-06120 Halle (Germany); Jedrecy, N. [Institut des NanoSciences de Paris, Universites Paris 6 et 7 et CNRS-UMR 7588, 4 place Jussieu, F-75252 Paris Cedex 05 (France); Renaud, G. [CEA-Grenoble, 17 rue des Martyrs, F-38054 Grenoble (France)

2006-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

454

Self-Organized Network Flows  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A model for traffic flow in street networks or material flows in supply networks is presented, that takes into account the conservation of cars or materials and other significant features of traffic flows such as jam formation, spillovers, and load-dependent transportation times. Furthermore, conflicts or coordination problems of intersecting or merging flows are considered as well. Making assumptions regarding the permeability of the intersection as a function of the conflicting flows and the queue lengths, we find self-organized oscillations in the flows similar to the operation of traffic lights.

Helbing, D; Lämmer, S; Helbing, Dirk; Siegmeier, Jan; L\\"{a}mmer, Stefan

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

455

A Measurement System for Systematic Hydrological Characterization of Unsaturated Fractured Welded Tuff in a Mined Underground Tunnel  

SciTech Connect

A field investigation of unsaturated flow through a lithophysal unit of fractured welded tuff containing lithophysal cavities has been initiated. To characterize flow in this spatially heterogeneous medium, a systematic approach has been developed to perform tests in boreholes drilled at regular intervals in an underground tunnel (drift). In this paper, we describe the test equipment system that has been built for this purpose. Since the field-scale measurements, of liquid flow in the unsaturated, fractured rocks, require continuous testing for periods of days to weeks, the control of test equipment has been fully automated, allowing operation with no human presence at the field site. Preliminary results from the first set of tests are described. These tests give insight into the role of the matrix (perhaps also lithophysal cavities) as potential storage during the initial transient flow prior to the breakthrough of water at the drift crown, as well as the role of connected fractures that provide the subsequent quasi-steady flow. These tests also reveal the impact of evaporation on seepage into the drift.

R. J. Cook; R. Salve; B.M. Freifeld; Y.W. Tsang

2001-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

456

Process For Direct Integration Of A Thin-Film Silicon P-N Junction Diode With A Magnetic Tunnel Junction  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for direct integration of a thin-film silicon p-n junction diode with a magnetic tunnel junction for use in advanced magnetic random access memory (MRAM) cells for high performance, non-volatile memory arrays. The process is based on pulsed laser processing for the fabrication of vertical polycrystalline silicon electronic device structures, in particular p-n junction diodes, on films of metals deposited onto low temperature-substrates such as ceramics, dielectrics, glass, or polymers. The process preserves underlayers and structures onto which the devices are typically deposited, such as silicon integrated circuits. The process involves the low temperature deposition of at least one layer of silicon, either in an amorphous or a polycrystalline phase on a metal layer. Dopants may be introduced in the silicon film during or after deposition. The film is then irradiated with short pulse laser energy that is efficiently absorbed in the silicon, which results in the crystallization of the film and simultaneously in the activation of the dopants via ultrafast melting and solidification. The silicon film can be patterned either before or after crystallization.

Toet, Daniel (Mountain View, CA); Sigmon, Thomas W. (Albuquerque, NM)

2005-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

457

Corrective Action Decision Document/Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 383: Area E-Tunnel Sites, Nevada Test Site  

SciTech Connect

This Corrective Action Decision Document/Closure Report (CADD/CR) was prepared by the Defense Threat Reduction Agency (DTRA) for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 383, Area 12 E-Tunnel Sites, which is the joint responsibility of DTRA and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO). This CADD/CR is consistent with the requirements of the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) agreed to by the State of Nevada, the DOE, and the U.S. Department of Defense. Corrective Action Unit 383 is comprised of three Corrective Action Sites (CASs) and two adjacent areas: • CAS 12-06-06, Muckpile • CAS 12-25-02, Oil Spill • CAS 12-28-02, Radioactive Material • Drainage below the Muckpile • Ponds 1, 2, and 3 The purpose of this CADD/CR is to provide justification and documentation to support the recommendation for closure with no further corrective action, by placing use restrictions at the three CASs and two adjacent areas of CAU 383.

NSTec Environmental Restoration

2010-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

458

Process for direct integration of a thin-film silicon p-n junction diode with a magnetic tunnel junction  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for direct integration of a thin-film silicon p-n junction diode with a magnetic tunnel junction for use in advanced magnetic random access memory (MRAM) cells for high performance, non-volatile memory arrays. The process is based on pulsed laser processing for the fabrication of vertical polycrystalline silicon electronic device structures, in particular p-n junction diodes, on films of metals deposited onto low temperature-substrates such as ceramics, dielectrics, glass, or polymers. The process preserves underlayers and structures onto which the devices are typically deposited, such as silicon integrated circuits. The process involves the low temperature deposition of at least one layer of silicon, either in an amorphous or a polycrystalline phase on a metal layer. Dopants may be introduced in the silicon film during or after deposition. The film is then irradiated with short pulse laser energy that is efficiently absorbed in the silicon, which results in the crystallization of the film and simultaneously in the activation of the dopants via ultrafast melting and solidification. The silicon film can be patterned either before or after crystallization.

Toet, Daniel (Mountain View, CA); Sigmon, Thomas W. (Albuquerque, NM)

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

459

FY 2005 Control Table by Organization  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Organization Organization (dollars in thousands - OMB Scoring) Table of Contents Summary...................................................................................................... 1 Mandatory Funding....................................................................................... 2 National Nuclear Security Administration..................................................... 3 Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy.................................................... 4 Electric Transmission and Distribution......................................................... 4 Fossil Energy................................................................................................ 5 Nuclear Energy, Science and Technology...................................................

460

Clean Technology Sustainable Industries Organization | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Sustainable Industries Organization Sustainable Industries Organization Jump to: navigation, search Name Clean Technology & Sustainable Industries Organization Place Royal Oak, Michigan Zip 48073 Product A non-profit membership industry organization formed to advance the global development and deployment of clean and sustainable technologies References Clean Technology & Sustainable Industries Organization[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Clean Technology & Sustainable Industries Organization is a company located in Royal Oak, Michigan . References ↑ "Clean Technology & Sustainable Industries Organization" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Clean_Technology_Sustainable_Industries_Organization&oldid=343669"

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461

Fabrication and Characterization of Organic Solar Cells  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

treatment  of  indium  tin  oxide  for  organic solar JR.  Criteria for ITO (indium?tin?oxide) an organic  light expansive material, indium thin oxide (ITO) thin films, with

Yengel, Emre

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

462

PNNL: Atmospheric Sciences & Global Change - Organization  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Organization Select the appropriate box to view more information. Organization CharletteGeffen Phil-Rasch Jim-Mather Will-Shaw Beat-Schmid Beat-Schmid Steve-Ghan Marc-Imhoff...

463

EMERGENCY RESPONSE ORGANIZATION TRAINING PROGRAM DESCRIPTION  

SciTech Connect

This document establishes requirements for Emergency Response Organization Training. This program description applies to all Project Hanford Management Contract (PHMC) contractor and subcontractor employees who are identified to fulfill Hanford Site Emergency Response Organization (ERO) positions.

MITCHELL, L.J.

2001-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

464

HPLC Determination of Atmospheric Organic Hydroperoxides  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A high-performance liquid chromatographic analytical technique has been developed for the separation of hydrogen peroxide and low molecular weight organic hydroperoxides. A total of 10 C1–C3 organic hydroperoxides have been separated. The ...

Gregory L. Kok; Scott E. McLaren; Thomas A. Stafflbach

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

465

Total organic carbon (TOC) and chemical oxygen demand (COD) - Monitoring of organic pollutants in wastewater.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? Total organic carbon (TOC) and chemical oxygen demand (COD) are two methods used for measuring organic pollutants in wastewater. Both methods are widely used… (more)

Hodzic, Elvisa

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

466

Safety Organization and Contact Information  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Safety Organization and Contact Information Print Safety Organization and Contact Information Print Safety Staff Contact Information Contact Extension Location CONTROL ROOM (24/7) 4969 80-140 Floor Operations Floor Operators 7464 (RING) 80-159 Building Manager This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it 7358 80-151 Work Planning/Permit/span> This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it 7358 6793 80-151 80-233 ALS-EHS Program This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it (Interim Manager, EHS Program Management) This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it (Interim Manager, Accelerator Facility Safety)

467

Organization Organization Address Place Zip Notes Website Region  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Center for Sustainable Center for Sustainable Energy Balboa Ave San Diego California Helps residents businesses and public agencies save energy reduce grid demand and generate their own power http energycenter org Southern CA Area Clean Tech Los Angeles Clean Tech Los Angeles Los Angeles California Collaboration between CRA LA Caltech DWP JPL Mayor s Office Port UCLA and USC to establish Los Angeles as the global leader in research commercialization and deployment of clean technologies http cleantechlosangeles org Southern CA Area Clean Tech San Diego Clean Tech San Diego Executive Drive San Diego California Non profit membership organization formed to accelerate San Diego as a world leader in the clean technology economy http www cleantechsandiego org Southern CA Area Community Environmental Council Community Environmental Council W Anapamu

468

Project Management Coordination Office Organization Chart  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Project Management Coordination Office Organization Chart, U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy.

469

Metrology For Organic Monolayers On Cobalt Surfaces  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... used in: magnetic recording/storage, catalysis, batteries ... Molecule-metal electrode interface crucial ... formation between organic materials and the ...

2013-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

470

ENHANCEMENT OF ORGANIC PHOTOVOLTAIC CELL OPEN CIRCUIT ...  

enhancement of organic photovoltaic cell open circuit voltage using electron/hole blocking exciton blocking layers united states patent application

471

Contact Organizers - Clean Cities Transportation Workshop for...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Available Presentations Hotels & Accomodations Registration Foreign Visitors to Kazakhstan Sponsorship Opportunities Related Resources Media Coverage Contact Organizers RSS...