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Sample records for tunnel carderock tow

  1. Carderock Tow Tank 3 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    3 Jump to: navigation, search Basic Specifications Facility Name Carderock Tow Tank 3 Overseeing Organization United States Naval Surface Warfare Center Hydrodynamic Testing...

  2. Carderock 3-ft Variable Pressure Cavitation Water Tunnel | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    3-ft Variable Pressure Cavitation Water Tunnel Jump to: navigation, search Basic Specifications Facility Name Carderock 3-ft Variable Pressure Cavitation Water Tunnel Overseeing...

  3. Carderock Subsonic Wind Tunnel | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Subsonic Wind Tunnel is a continuous flow, closed-circuit facility with a closed jet test section. Test models may be supported by strut mounts using the external balance or by...

  4. Carderock 2-ft Variable Pressure Cavitation Water Tunnel | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    is a vertical plane, closed recirculating, variable-speed, variable-pressure, open jet test section, closed jet test section, and semi-rectangular test section. Towing...

  5. Property:Towing Capabilities | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Alden Small Flume + None + Alden Tow Tank + Yes + Alden Wave Basin + None + B Breakwater Research Facility + None + Bucknell Hydraulic Flume + Yes + C Carderock 2-ft Variable...

  6. Carderock Tow Tank 1 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    None Wind Capabilities Wind Capabilities None Control and Data Acquisition Cameras None Data Generation Capability Real-Time No Test Services Test Services None Special...

  7. Carderock Tow Tank 2 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    The wave absorber spans the full width of the basin at the end opposite the wavemaker dome, the absorbers are a discontinuous 12 degree slope type made up of 12 permeable layers...

  8. Property:Channel/Tunnel/Flume | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Alden Small Flume + Yes + Alden Tow Tank + None + Alden Wave Basin + None + B Breakwater Research Facility + None + Bucknell Hydraulic Flume + Yes + C Carderock 2-ft Variable...

  9. Carderock Large Cavitation Tunnel | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    None Control and Data Acquisition Cameras None Available Sensors Pressure Range(psi) Data Generation Capability Real-Time No Test Services Test Services None Special...

  10. Carderock Rotating Arm Tow Tank | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    None Wind Capabilities Wind Capabilities None Control and Data Acquisition Cameras None Data Generation Capability Real-Time No Test Services Test Services None Special...

  11. Property:Cameras | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    + Yes Alden Small Flume + Yes Alden Tow Tank + Yes Alden Wave Basin + Yes B Breakwater Research Facility + None C Carderock 2-ft Variable Pressure Cavitation Water Tunnel + None...

  12. Tow Tank | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Tow Tank Jump to: navigation, search Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleTowTank&oldid596389" Feedback Contact needs updating Image needs updating Reference...

  13. Tow Vessel | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Tow Vessel Jump to: navigation, search Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleTowVessel&oldid596390" Feedback Contact needs updating Image needs updating...

  14. Ship Towing Tank | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    day) Contact POC Special Physical Features Towed 3DPIV; contactless motion tracking; free surface measurement mapping Towing Capabilities Towing Capabilities Yes Maximum...

  15. TowPath Renewable Ventures | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    TowPath Renewable Ventures Jump to: navigation, search Name: TowPath Renewable Ventures Place: Washington, Washington, DC Zip: 20007 Sector: Renewable Energy Product: TowPath...

  16. MIT Tow Tank | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Institute of Technology Hydrodynamics Hydrodynamic Testing Facility Type Tow Tank Length(m) 36.6 Beam(m) 2.4 Depth(m) 1.2 Water Type Saltwater Cost(per day) 750 Towing...

  17. Ohmsett Tow Tank | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Tank Overseeing Organization Ohmsett Hydrodynamic Testing Facility Type Tow Tank Length(m) 203.0 Beam(m) 19.8 Depth(m) 2.4 Water Type Freshwater Cost(per day) Contact POC Towing...

  18. Haynes Tow Tank | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    labor) Special Physical Features The tank includes a 7.6m by 3.7m by 1.5m deep sediment pit. Towing Capabilities Towing Capabilities Yes Maximum Velocity(ms) 1.8 Length of...

  19. Property:Hydrodynamic Testing Facility Type | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Flume + Flume + Alden Tow Tank + Tow Tank + Alden Wave Basin + Wave Basin + B Breakwater Research Facility + Wave Basin + Bucknell Hydraulic Flume + Flume + C Carderock 2-ft...

  20. Property:Length of Effective Tow(m) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    of Effective Tow(m) Jump to: navigation, search Property Name Length of Effective Tow(m) Property Type String Pages using the property "Length of Effective Tow(m)" Showing 20 pages...

  1. Property:Wavemaking Capabilities | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    + Alden Small Flume + Yes + Alden Tow Tank + None + Alden Wave Basin + Yes + B Breakwater Research Facility + Yes + Bucknell Hydraulic Flume + None + C Carderock 2-ft Variable...

  2. Property:Special Characteristics | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    + Alden Small Flume + Yes + Alden Tow Tank + None + Alden Wave Basin + Yes + B Breakwater Research Facility + None + Bucknell Hydraulic Flume + Yes + C Carderock 2-ft Variable...

  3. Property:Wind Capabilities | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    + Alden Small Flume + Yes + Alden Tow Tank + Yes + Alden Wave Basin + Yes + B Breakwater Research Facility + None + Bucknell Hydraulic Flume + None + C Carderock 2-ft Variable...

  4. Property:Real-Time | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    + Alden Small Flume + Yes + Alden Tow Tank + Yes + Alden Wave Basin + Yes + B Breakwater Research Facility + No + Bucknell Hydraulic Flume + No + C Carderock 2-ft Variable...

  5. Channel tunnel

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2011-04-25

    Jacques Lemley, américain et "chief executif" parle du projet de l'Eurotunnel - tunnel sous la manche

  6. Field experiments on an intelligent towed vehicle ``Flying Fish``

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koterayama, W.; Yamaguchi, S.; Nakamura, M.

    1995-12-31

    A depth, pitch and roll controllable towed vehicle, ``Flying Fish`` is being developed to measure the ocean current, temperature, salinity, dissolved oxygen, pH, turbidity, chlorophyll and total inorganic hydrocarbon. The first field experiments on its performance were carried out in the Japan sea last summer. The motion data of the ``Flying Fish`` are compared with those of numerical simulations.

  7. Method and apparatus for deregistering multi-filament tow and product thereof

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lukhard, Craig R. (Newark, DE); Potter, Jerry F. (Seaford, DE); Todd, Maurice C. (Chadds Ford, PA)

    1995-01-01

    A method and apparatus for deregistering drawn crimped nylon multifilament tow includes the steps of stretching the tow under constant controlled tension at a temperature below the glass transition temperature of the nylon. The apparatus includes means for sensing the tension of the tow between the feed and draw sections of a stretching device and producing a signal representative of the tension sensed and a controller for changing the speed of the draw section actuated by said signal.

  8. Carderock Maneuvering & Seakeeping Basin | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    6.1 Water Type Freshwater Cost(per day) Contact POC Special Physical Features 10.7m deep x 15.2m wide trench along length of tank; the Maneuvering & Seakeeping Basin is spanned...

  9. Carderock Circulating Water Channel | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Features The Circulating Water Channel is a vertical plane, open to the atmosphere test section with a free surface in a closed recirculating water circuit, variable speed,...

  10. Property:Recirculating | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Flume Facility + No + A Alden Large Flume + Yes + Alden Small Flume + No + B Bucknell Hydraulic Flume + Yes + C Carderock 2-ft Variable Pressure Cavitation Water Tunnel + Yes +...

  11. Tunnel | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Tunnel Jump to: navigation, search Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleTunnel&oldid596391" Feedback Contact needs updating Image needs updating Reference...

  12. eGSE America Electric Baggage Tow Tractor (EBTT) Technical Specifications

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    EBTT Technical Specifications 9/2/04 eGSE America: Electric Baggage Tow Tractor (EBTT) Technical Specifications Revision 00 August 2004 Prepared by Electric Transportation Applications eGSE America: EBTT Technical Specifications 9/2/04 1.0 SCOPE: This document outlines the design and performance requirements for a battery- powered electric tow tractor for the handling of baggage or cargo trailers in airline service. The use of "shall" in this document indicates a mandatory requirement.

  13. A Tow-Level Progressive Damage for Simulating Carbon-Fiber Textile Composites: Interim Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zywicz, E.

    2000-07-01

    A numerical approach to model the elasto-plastic and tensile damage response of tri-axially braided carbon-fiber polymeric-matrix composites is developed. It is micromechanically based and consists of a simplified unit cell geometry, a plane-stress tow-level constitutive relationship, a one-dimensional undulation constitutive law, and a non-traditional shell element integration rule. The braided composite lamina is idealized as periodic in the plane, and a simplified three-layer representative volume (RV) is assembled from axial and braider tows and pure resin regions. The constituents in each layer are homogenized with an iso-strain assumption in the fiber-direction and an iso-stress condition in the other directions. In the upper and lower layers, the fiber-direction strain is additively decomposed into an undulation and a tow portion. A finite-deformation tow model predicts the plane-stress tow response and is coupled to the undulation constitutive relationship. The overall braid model is implemented in DYNA3D and works with traditional shell elements. The finite-deformation tow constitutive relationship is derived from the fiber elasticity and the isotropic elasto-plastic power-law hardening matrix response using a thermodynamic framework and simple homogenization assumptions. The model replicates tensile damage evolution, in a smeared sense, parallel and perpendicular to the fiber axis and is regularized to yield mesh independent results. The tow-level model demonstrates reasonable agreement, prior to damage, with detailed three-dimensional FE (finite element) elasto-plastic simulations of aligned, periodically arranged, uni-directional composites. The 3-layer braid model response is compared with predictions obtained from detailed micromechanical simulations of the braid's unit cell in uni-axial extension, shear, and flexure for three braid angles. The elastic properties show good agreement as does the non-linear response for loadings dominated by the axial tows. In loadings dominated by the braider tow response, the absence of a non-linear undulation model deteriorates the agreement. Nonetheless, the present approach is applicable to a broad range of tri-axially braided composites as well as for unidirectional composites, but presently lacks any compressive failure mechanisms and an adequate non-linear undulation model.

  14. Collegiate Wind Competition Wind Tunnel Specifications | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Collegiate Wind Competition Wind Tunnel Specifications Collegiate Wind Competition Wind Tunnel Specifications Collegiate Wind Competition Wind Tunnel Specifications Teams competing...

  15. Scanning tunneling microscope nanoetching method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Li, Yun-Zhong (West Lafayette, IN); Reifenberger, Ronald G. (West Lafayette, IN); Andres, Ronald P. (West Lafayette, IN)

    1990-01-01

    A method is described for forming uniform nanometer sized depressions on the surface of a conducting substrate. A tunneling tip is used to apply tunneling current density sufficient to vaporize a localized area of the substrate surface. The resulting depressions or craters in the substrate surface can be formed in information encoding patterns readable with a scanning tunneling microscope.

  16. ANDREW W. TUNNELL

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ANDREW W. TUNNELL t: (205) 226-3439 f: (205) 488-5858 e: atunnell@balch.com October 20, 2014 By Electronic Submission Comments on draft National Electric Transmission Study c/o David Meyer Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability (OE) U.S. Department of Energy 1000 Independence Avenue SW Washington, DC 20585 Congestionstudy.comments@hq.doe.gov Re: Draft National Electric Transmission Congestion Study Comments of Southern Company Services, Inc. Southern Company Services, Inc.

  17. Wind Tunnel Specifications | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Wind Tunnel Specifications Wind Tunnel Specifications This document shows the basic wind tunnel configuration. Please use these specifications when designing test turbines for the Collegiate Wind Competition. PDF icon Wind Tunnel Specifications More Documents & Publications Collegiate Wind Competition 2014 Rules and Regulations Collegiate Wind Competition Rules and Regulations Building the Basic PVC Wind Turbine

  18. Flatback airfoil wind tunnel experiment.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mayda, Edward A.; van Dam, C.P.; Chao, David D.; Berg, Dale E.

    2008-04-01

    A computational fluid dynamics study of thick wind turbine section shapes in the test section of the UC Davis wind tunnel at a chord Reynolds number of one million is presented. The goals of this study are to validate standard wind tunnel wall corrections for high solid blockage conditions and to reaffirm the favorable effect of a blunt trailing edge or flatback on the performance characteristics of a representative thick airfoil shape prior to building the wind tunnel models and conducting the experiment. The numerical simulations prove the standard wind tunnel corrections to be largely valid for the proposed test of 40% maximum thickness to chord ratio airfoils at a solid blockage ratio of 10%. Comparison of the computed lift characteristics of a sharp trailing edge baseline airfoil and derived flatback airfoils reaffirms the earlier observed trend of reduced sensitivity to surface contamination with increasing trailing edge thickness.

  19. Collegiate Wind Competition Wind Tunnel Specifications

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Tunnel Specifications The basic wind tunnel configuration is shown below. The dimensions of the test chamber are 4 ft x 4 ft x 8 ft (48 in x 48 in x 96 in). There are inlet and outlet components of the wind tunnel that extend beyond the test chamber as shown. The tunnel has a "draw down" configuration. That is, the air is "sucked through" the test section-entering at the left, exiting at the right-with the draw down being induced by the fan on the right side of the tunnel. A

  20. Observing remnants by fermions' tunneling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, D.Y.; Wu, H.W.; Yang, H. E-mail: iverwu@uestc.edu.cn

    2014-03-01

    The standard Hawking formula predicts the complete evaporation of black holes. In this paper, we introduce effects of quantum gravity into fermions' tunneling from Reissner-Nordstrom and Kerr black holes. The quantum gravity effects slow down the increase of Hawking temperatures. This property naturally leads to a residue mass in black hole evaporation. The corrected temperatures are affected by the quantum numbers of emitted fermions. Meanwhile, the temperature of the Kerr black hole is a function of ? due to the rotation.

  1. Ivar Giaever, Tunneling, and Superconductors

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Ivar Giaever, Tunneling, and Superconductors Resources with Additional Information * Patents Ivar Giaever Courtesy of Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute 'Dr. Giaever received his engineering degree at the Norwegian Institute of Technology. After college, he emigrated to Canada, where he worked as a mechanical engineer with General Electric, and later transferred to GE's Development Center in Schenectady, N.Y. There, he shifted his interest to physics, and did graduate work at Rensselaer, receiving

  2. Enhancement of tunnel magnetoresistance in magnetic tunnel junction by a superlattice barrier

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, C. H.; Hsueh, W. J.

    2014-01-27

    Tunnel magnetoresistance of magnetic tunnel junction improved by a superlattice barrier composed of alternate layers of a nonmagnetic metal and an insulator is proposed. The forbidden band of the superlattice is used to predict the low transmission range in the superlattice barrier. By forbidding electron transport in the anti-parallel configuration, the tunnel magnetoresistance is enhanced in the superlattice junction. The results show that the tunnel magnetoresistance ratio for a superlattice magnetic tunnel junction is greater than that for traditional single or double barrier junctions.

  3. Enhancing metal-insulator-insulator-metal tunnel diodes via defect enhanced direct tunneling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alimardani, Nasir; Conley, John F.

    2014-08-25

    Metal-insulator-insulator-metal tunnel diodes with dissimilar work function electrodes and nanolaminate Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-Ta{sub 2}O{sub 5} bilayer tunnel barriers deposited by atomic layer deposition are investigated. This combination of high and low electron affinity insulators, each with different dominant conduction mechanisms (tunneling and Frenkel-Poole emission), results in improved low voltage asymmetry and non-linearity of current versus voltage behavior. These improvements are due to defect enhanced direct tunneling in which electrons transport across the Ta{sub 2}O{sub 5} via defect based conduction before tunneling directly through the Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, effectively narrowing the tunnel barrier. Conduction through the device is dominated by tunneling, and operation is relatively insensitive to temperature.

  4. Wind tunnel performance data for the Darrieus wind turbine with...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Wind tunnel performance data for the Darrieus wind turbine with NACA 0012 blades Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Wind tunnel performance data for the Darrieus wind...

  5. Design and Commissioning of a Wind Tunnel for Integrated Physical...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Commissioning of a Wind Tunnel for Integrated Physical and Chemical Measurements of PM Dispersing Plume of Heavy Duty Diesel Truck Design and Commissioning of a Wind Tunnel for ...

  6. Influence of quasiparticle multi-tunneling on the energy flow through the superconducting tunnel junction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Samedov, V. V.; Tulinov, B. M.

    2011-07-01

    Superconducting tunnel junction (STJ) detector consists of two layers of superconducting material separated by thin insulating barrier. An incident particle produces in superconductor excess nonequilibrium quasiparticles. Each quasiparticle in superconductor should be considered as quantum superposition of electron-like and hole-like excitations. This duality nature of quasiparticle leads to the effect of multi-tunneling. Quasiparticle starts to tunnel back and forth through the insulating barrier. After tunneling from biased electrode quasiparticle loses its energy via phonon emission. Eventually, the energy that equals to the difference in quasiparticle energy between two electrodes is deposited in the signal electrode. Because of the process of multi-tunneling, one quasiparticle can deposit energy more than once. In this work, the theory of branching cascade processes was applied to the process of energy deposition caused by the quasiparticle multi-tunneling. The formulae for the mean value and variance of the energy transferred by one quasiparticle into heat were derived. (authors)

  7. Methods for the fabrication of thermally stable magnetic tunnel junctions

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chang, Y. Austin (Middleton, WI); Yang, Jianhua J. (Madison, WI); Ladwig, Peter F. (Hutchinson, MN)

    2009-08-25

    Magnetic tunnel junctions and method for making the magnetic tunnel junctions are provided. The magnetic tunnel junctions are characterized by a tunnel barrier oxide layer sandwiched between two ferromagnetic layers. The methods used to fabricate the magnetic tunnel junctions are capable of completely and selectively oxidizing a tunnel junction precursor material using an oxidizing gas containing a mixture of gases to provide a tunnel junction oxide without oxidizing the adjacent ferromagnetic materials. In some embodiments the gas mixture is a mixture of CO and CO.sub.2 or a mixture of H.sub.2 and H.sub.2O.

  8. Rock mechanics design in mining and tunneling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bieniawski, Z.T.

    1984-01-01

    This book introduces the design process as applied to rock mechanics aspects of underground mining and tunneling. Topics covered include a historical perspective, the design process in engineering, empirical methods of design, observational methods of design, and guided design.

  9. Modeling direct interband tunneling. I. Bulk semiconductors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pan, Andrew; Chui, Chi On

    2014-08-07

    Interband tunneling is frequently studied using the semiclassical Kane model, despite uncertainty about its validity. Revisiting the physical basis of this formula, we find that it neglects coupling to other bands and underestimates transverse tunneling. As a result, significant errors can arise at low and high fields for small and large gap materials, respectively. We derive a simple multiband tunneling model to correct these defects analytically without arbitrary parameters. Through extensive comparison with band structure and quantum transport calculations for bulk InGaAs, InAs, and InSb, we probe the accuracy of the Kane and multiband formulas and establish the superiority of the latter. We also show that the nonlocal average electric field should be used when applying either of these models to nonuniform potentials. Our findings are important for efficient analysis and simulation of bulk semiconductor devices involving tunneling.

  10. Collegiate Wind Competition Wind Tunnel Specifications | Department of

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Energy Collegiate Wind Competition Wind Tunnel Specifications Collegiate Wind Competition Wind Tunnel Specifications Collegiate Wind Competition Wind Tunnel Specifications Teams competing in the U.S. Department of Energy Collegiate Wind Competition must design a prototype wind turbine that fits inside the wind tunnel created to test the performance of each team's project. The tunnel has a "draw down" configuration, introduced by the fan, that sucks air through the box. There are

  11. Semiconductor tunnel junction with enhancement layer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Klem, J.F.; Zolper, J.C.

    1997-10-21

    The incorporation of a pseudomorphic GaAsSb layer in a runnel diode structure affords a new degree of freedom in designing runnel junctions for p-n junction device interconnects. Previously only doping levels could be varied to control the tunneling properties. This invention uses the valence band alignment band of the GaAsSb with respect to the surrounding materials to greatly relax the doping requirements for tunneling. 5 figs.

  12. Semiconductor tunnel junction with enhancement layer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Klem, John F. (Sandia Park, NM); Zolper, John C. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1997-01-01

    The incorporation of a pseudomorphic GaAsSb layer in a runnel diode structure affords a new degree of freedom in designing runnel junctions for p-n junction device interconnects. Previously only doping levels could be varied to control the tunneling properties. This invention uses the valence band alignment band of the GaAsSb with respect to the surrounding materials to greatly relax the doping requirements for tunneling.

  13. Le LHC, un tunnel cosmique

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2011-10-06

    Et si la lumière au bout du tunnel du LHC était cosmique ? En d?autres termes, qu?est-ce que le LHC peut nous apporter dans la connaissance de l?Univers ? Car la montée en énergie des accélérateurs de particules nous permet de mieux appréhender l?univers primordial, chaud et dense. Mais dans quel sens dit-on que le LHC reproduit des conditions proches du Big bang ? Quelles informations nous apporte-t-il sur le contenu de l?Univers ? La matière noire est-elle détectable au LHC ? L?énergie noire ? Pourquoi l?antimatière accumulée au CERN est-elle si rare dans l?Univers ? Et si le CERN a bâti sa réputation sur l?exploration des forces faibles et fortes qui opèrent au sein des atomes et de leurs noyaux, est-ce que le LHC peut nous apporter des informations sur la force gravitationnelle qui gouverne l?évolution cosmique ? Depuis une trentaine d?années, notre compréhension de l?univers dans ses plus grandes dimensions et l?appréhension de son comportement aux plus petites distances sont intimement liées : en quoi le LHC va-t-il tester expérimentalement cette vision unifiée ? Tout public, entrée libre / Réservations au +41 (0)22 767 76 76

  14. A new technique to measure tunneling barrier height in solid...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    A new technique to measure tunneling barrier height in solid media Citation Details In-Document Search Title: A new technique to measure tunneling barrier height in solid media ...

  15. Method of fabricating a solar cell with a tunnel dielectric layer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dennis, Tim; Harrington, Scott; Manning, Jane; Smith, David D.; Waldhauer, Ann

    2015-08-18

    Method of fabricating solar cells with tunnel dielectric layers are described. Solar cells with tunnel dielectric layers are also described.

  16. Method of fabricating a solar cell with a tunnel dielectric layer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dennis, Tim; Harrington, Scott; Manning, Jane; Smith, David; Waldhauer, Ann

    2012-12-18

    Methods of fabricating solar cells with tunnel dielectric layers are described. Solar cells with tunnel dielectric layers are also described.

  17. Method of fabricating a solar cell with a tunnel dielectric layer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dennis, Tim; Harrington, Scott; Manning, Jane; Smith, David D; Waldhauer, Ann

    2014-04-29

    Methods of fabricating solar cells with tunnel dielectric layers are described. Solar cells with tunnel dielectric layers are also described.

  18. Fabrication of magnetic tunnel junctions with epitaxial and textured ferromagnetic layers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chang, Y. Austin (Middleton, WI); Yang, Jianhua Joshua (Madison, WI)

    2008-11-11

    This invention relates to magnetic tunnel junctions and methods for making the magnetic tunnel junctions. The magnetic tunnel junctions include a tunnel barrier oxide layer sandwiched between two ferromagnetic layers both of which are epitaxial or textured with respect to the underlying substrate upon which the magnetic tunnel junctions are grown. The magnetic tunnel junctions provide improved magnetic properties, sharper interfaces and few defects.

  19. Resonant tunnelling in a quantum oxide superlattice

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Choi, Woo Seok; Lee, Sang A.; You, Jeong Ho; Lee, Suyoun; Lee, Ho Nyung

    2015-06-24

    Resonant tunneling is a quantum mechanical process that has long been attracting both scientific and technological attention owing to its intriguing underlying physics and unique applications for high-speed electronics. The materials system exhibiting resonant tunneling, however, has been largely limited to the conventional semiconductors, partially due to their excellent crystalline quality. Here we show that a deliberately designed transition metal oxide superlattice exhibits a resonant tunneling behaviour with a clear negative differential resistance. The tunneling occurred through an atomically thin, lanthanum δ- doped SrTiO3 layer, and the negative differential resistance was realized on top of the bi-polar resistance switching typically observed for perovskite oxide junctions. This combined process resulted in an extremely large resistance ratio (~105) between the high and low resistance states. Lastly, the unprecedentedly large control found in atomically thin δ-doped oxide superlattices can open a door to novel oxide-based high-frequency logic devices.

  20. Resonant tunnelling in a quantum oxide superlattice

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Choi, Woo Seok; Lee, Sang A.; You, Jeong Ho; Lee, Suyoun; Lee, Ho Nyung

    2015-06-24

    Resonant tunneling is a quantum mechanical process that has long been attracting both scientific and technological attention owing to its intriguing underlying physics and unique applications for high-speed electronics. The materials system exhibiting resonant tunneling, however, has been largely limited to the conventional semiconductors, partially due to their excellent crystalline quality. Here we show that a deliberately designed transition metal oxide superlattice exhibits a resonant tunneling behaviour with a clear negative differential resistance. The tunneling occurred through an atomically thin, lanthanum δ- doped SrTiO3 layer, and the negative differential resistance was realized on top of the bi-polar resistance switching typicallymore » observed for perovskite oxide junctions. This combined process resulted in an extremely large resistance ratio (~105) between the high and low resistance states. Lastly, the unprecedentedly large control found in atomically thin δ-doped oxide superlattices can open a door to novel oxide-based high-frequency logic devices.« less

  1. DOE - NNSA/NFO -- News & Views Tunnel Test

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Tunnel Tests Span 35 years of Nevada Test Site History Photo - Rainer a 1.7 kiloton tunnel test On August 10, 1957, a zero-yield safety experiment named "Saturn" was detonated in C-Tunnel. Since then tests have been conducted in 16 different tunnels in Rainier Mesa on the Nevada Test Site. Today, there is only one active tunnel used by the Defense Nuclear Agency (DNA). The DNA evaluates the effects of nuclear weapons explosions, thermal radiation, blast, shock, x-rays and gamma rays,

  2. Superpoissonian shot noise in organic magnetic tunnel junctions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cascales, Juan Pedro; Martinez, Isidoro; Aliev, Farkhad G.; Hong, Jhen-Yong; Lin, Minn-Tsong; Szczepański, Tomasz; Dugaev, Vitalii K.; Barnaś, Józef

    2014-12-08

    Organic molecules have recently revolutionized ways to create new spintronic devices. Despite intense studies, the statistics of tunneling electrons through organic barriers remains unclear. Here, we investigate conductance and shot noise in magnetic tunnel junctions with 3,4,9,10-perylene-teracarboxylic dianhydride (PTCDA) barriers a few nm thick. For junctions in the electron tunneling regime, with magnetoresistance ratios between 10% and 40%, we observe superpoissonian shot noise. The Fano factor exceeds in 1.5–2 times the maximum values reported for magnetic tunnel junctions with inorganic barriers, indicating spin dependent bunching in tunneling. We explain our main findings in terms of a model which includes tunneling through a two level (or multilevel) system, originated from interfacial bonds of the PTCDA molecules. Our results suggest that interfaces play an important role in the control of shot noise when electrons tunnel through organic barriers.

  3. Scanning tunneling microscope assembly, reactor, and system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tao, Feng; Salmeron, Miquel; Somorjai, Gabor A

    2014-11-18

    An embodiment of a scanning tunneling microscope (STM) reactor includes a pressure vessel, an STM assembly, and three spring coupling objects. The pressure vessel includes a sealable port, an interior, and an exterior. An embodiment of an STM system includes a vacuum chamber, an STM reactor, and three springs. The three springs couple the STM reactor to the vacuum chamber and are operable to suspend the scanning tunneling microscope reactor within the interior of the vacuum chamber during operation of the STM reactor. An embodiment of an STM assembly includes a coarse displacement arrangement, a piezoelectric fine displacement scanning tube coupled to the coarse displacement arrangement, and a receiver. The piezoelectric fine displacement scanning tube is coupled to the coarse displacement arrangement. The receiver is coupled to the piezoelectric scanning tube and is operable to receive a tip holder, and the tip holder is operable to receive a tip.

  4. Highly Charged Ion (HCI) Modified Tunnel Junctions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pomeroy, J. M.; Grube, H. [Atomic Physics Division, National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) 100 Bureau Dr., MS 8423, Gaithersburg, MD 20899-8423 (United States)

    2009-03-10

    The neutralization energy carried by highly charged ions (HCIs) provides an alternative method for localizing energy on a target's surface, producing features and modifying surfaces with fluences and kinetic energy damage that are negligible compared to singly ionized atoms. Since each HCI can deposit an enormous amount of energy into a small volume of the surface (e.g., Xe{sup 44+} delivers 51 keV of neutralization energy per HCI), each individual HCI's interaction with the target can produce a nanoscale feature. Many studies of HCI-surface features have characterized some basic principles of this unique ion-surface interaction, but the activity reported here has been focused on studying ensembles of HCI features in ultra-thin insulating films by fabricating multi-layer tunnel junction devices. The ultra-thin insulating barriers allow current to flow by tunneling, providing a very sensitive means of detecting changes in the barrier due to highly charged ion irradiation and, conversely, HCI modification provides a method of finely tuning the transparency of the tunnel junctions that spans several orders of magnitude for devices produced from a single process recipe. Systematic variation of junction bias, temperature, magnetic field and other parameters provides determination of the transport mechanism, defect densities, and magnetic properties of these nano-features and this novel approach to device fabrication.

  5. Enhancement of Spin-transfer torque switching via resonant tunneling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chatterji, Niladri; Tulapurkar, Ashwin A.; Muralidharan, Bhaskaran

    2014-12-08

    We propose the use of resonant tunneling as a route to enhance the spin-transfer torque switching characteristics of magnetic tunnel junctions. The proposed device structure is a resonant tunneling magnetic tunnel junction based on a MgO-semiconductor heterostructure sandwiched between a fixed magnet and a free magnet. Using the non-equilibrium Green's function formalism coupled self consistently with the Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert-Slonczewski equation, we demonstrate enhanced tunnel magneto-resistance characteristics as well as lower switching voltages in comparison with traditional trilayer devices. Two device designs based on MgO based heterostructures are presented, where the physics of resonant tunneling leads to an enhanced spin transfer torque thereby reducing the critical switching voltage by up to 44%. It is envisioned that the proof-of-concept presented here may lead to practical device designs via rigorous materials and interface studies.

  6. Self-contained instrument for measuring subterranean tunnel wall deflection

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rasmussen, Donald Edgar (Kennewick, WA); Hof, Jr., Peter John (Richland, WA)

    1978-01-01

    The deflection of a subterranean tunnel is measured with a rod-like, self-contained instrument that is adapted to be inserted into a radially extending bore of the tunnel adjacent an end of the tunnel where the tunnel is being dug. One end of the instrument is anchored at the end of the bore remote from the tunnel wall, while the other end of the intrument is anchored adjacent the end of the wall in proximity to the tunnel wall. The two ends of the instrument are linearly displaceable relative to each other; the displacement is measured by a transducer means mounted on the instrument. Included in the instrument is a data storage means including a paper tape recorder periodically responsive to a parallel binary signal indicative of the measured displacement.

  7. Ferroelectric tunneling element and memory applications which utilize the tunneling element

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kalinin, Sergei V. [Knoxville, TN; Christen, Hans M. [Knoxville, TN; Baddorf, Arthur P. [Knoxville, TN; Meunier, Vincent [Knoxville, TN; Lee, Ho Nyung [Oak Ridge, TN

    2010-07-20

    A tunneling element includes a thin film layer of ferroelectric material and a pair of dissimilar electrically-conductive layers disposed on opposite sides of the ferroelectric layer. Because of the dissimilarity in composition or construction between the electrically-conductive layers, the electron transport behavior of the electrically-conductive layers is polarization dependent when the tunneling element is below the Curie temperature of the layer of ferroelectric material. The element can be used as a basis of compact 1R type non-volatile random access memory (RAM). The advantages include extremely simple architecture, ultimate scalability and fast access times generic for all ferroelectric memories.

  8. Boundary conformal field theory and tunneling of edge quasiparticles in

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    non-Abelian topological states (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Boundary conformal field theory and tunneling of edge quasiparticles in non-Abelian topological states Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Boundary conformal field theory and tunneling of edge quasiparticles in non-Abelian topological states We explain how (perturbed) boundary conformal field theory allows us to understand the tunneling of edge quasiparticles in non-Abelian topological states. The coupling between a

  9. Competition between cotunneling, Kondo effect, and direct tunneling...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    the cluster blocking temperature). In addition, when further decreasing the size of the CoPt clusters, another gradual transition between the Kondo effect and direct tunneling ...

  10. Mitigation of wind tunnel wall interactions in subsonic cavity flows

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wagner, Justin L.; Casper, Katya Marie; Beresh, Steven J.; Henfling, John F.; Spillers, Russell Wayne; Pruett, Brian Owen Matthew

    2015-03-06

    In this study, the flow over an open aircraft bay is often represented in a wind tunnel with a cavity. In flight, this flow is unconfined, though in experiments, the cavity is surrounded by wind tunnel walls. If untreated, wind tunnel wall effects can lead to significant distortions of cavity acoustics in subsonic flows. To understand and mitigate these cavitytunnel interactions, a parametric approach was taken for flow over an L/D = 7 cavity at Mach numbers 0.60.8. With solid tunnel walls, a dominant cavity tone was observed, likely due to an interaction with a tunnel duct mode. Furthermore, an acoustic liner opposite the cavity decreased the amplitude of the dominant mode and its harmonics, a result observed by previous researchers. Acoustic dampeners were also placed in the tunnel sidewalls, which further decreased the dominant mode amplitudes and peak amplitudes associated with nonlinear interactions between cavity modes. This then indicates that cavity resonance can be altered by tunnel sidewalls and that spanwise coupling should be addressed when conducting subsonic cavity experiments. Though mechanisms for dominant modes and nonlinear interactions likely exist in unconfined cavity flows, these effects can be amplified by the wind tunnel walls.

  11. Enhanced tunnelling electroresistance effect due to a ferroelectricall...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Enhanced tunnelling electroresistance effect due to a ferroelectrically induced phase transition at a magnetic complex oxide interface Citation Details In-Document Search Title:...

  12. Mitigation of wind tunnel wall interactions in subsonic cavity flows

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Wagner, Justin L.; Casper, Katya Marie; Beresh, Steven J.; Henfling, John F.; Spillers, Russell Wayne; Pruett, Brian Owen Matthew

    2015-03-06

    In this study, the flow over an open aircraft bay is often represented in a wind tunnel with a cavity. In flight, this flow is unconfined, though in experiments, the cavity is surrounded by wind tunnel walls. If untreated, wind tunnel wall effects can lead to significant distortions of cavity acoustics in subsonic flows. To understand and mitigate these cavity–tunnel interactions, a parametric approach was taken for flow over an L/D = 7 cavity at Mach numbers 0.6–0.8. With solid tunnel walls, a dominant cavity tone was observed, likely due to an interaction with a tunnel duct mode. Furthermore, anmore » acoustic liner opposite the cavity decreased the amplitude of the dominant mode and its harmonics, a result observed by previous researchers. Acoustic dampeners were also placed in the tunnel sidewalls, which further decreased the dominant mode amplitudes and peak amplitudes associated with nonlinear interactions between cavity modes. This then indicates that cavity resonance can be altered by tunnel sidewalls and that spanwise coupling should be addressed when conducting subsonic cavity experiments. Though mechanisms for dominant modes and nonlinear interactions likely exist in unconfined cavity flows, these effects can be amplified by the wind tunnel walls.« less

  13. Competition between cotunneling, Kondo effect, and direct tunneling in discontinuous high-anisotropy magnetic tunnel junctions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ciudad D.; Arena D.; We, Z.-C.; Hindmarch, A.T.; Negusse, E.; Han, X.-F.Han; Marrows, C.H.

    2012-06-07

    The transition between Kondo and Coulomb blockade effects in discontinuous double magnetic tunnel junctions is explored as a function of the size of the CoPt magnetic clusters embedded between AlO{sub x} tunnel barriers. A gradual competition between cotunneling enhancement of the tunneling magnetoresistance (TMR) and the TMR suppression due to the Kondo effect has been found in these junctions, with both effects having been found to coexist even in the same sample. It is possible to tune between these two states with temperature (at a temperature far below the cluster blocking temperature). In addition, when further decreasing the size of the CoPt clusters, another gradual transition between the Kondo effect and direct tunneling between the electrodes takes place. This second transition shows that the spin-flip processes found in junctions with impurities in the barrier are in fact due to the Kondo effect. A simple theoretical model able to account for these experimental results is proposed.

  14. Optical isolation via unidirectional resonant photon tunneling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moccia, Massimo; Castaldi, Giuseppe; Galdi, Vincenzo; Al, Andrea; Engheta, Nader

    2014-01-28

    We show that tri-layer structures combining epsilon-negative and magneto-optical material layers can exhibit unidirectional resonant photon tunneling phenomena that can discriminate between circularly polarized (CP) waves of given handedness impinging from opposite directions, or between CP waves with different handedness impinging from the same direction. This physical principle, which can also be interpreted in terms of a Fabry-Perot-type resonance, may be utilized to design compact optical isolators for CP waves. Within this framework, we derive simple analytical conditions and design formulae, and quantitatively assess the isolation performance, also taking into account the unavoidable imperfections and nonidealities.

  15. Pyrotechnic ignition studies using a gun tunnel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Evans, N.A.

    1989-01-01

    A gun tunnel is being used to investigate the ignition characteristics of center-hole iron/potassium perchlorate thermal battery discs. Details are given of the construction, operation, and data reduction method for the gun tunnel. To simulate an igniter, this system can readily produce a pulse of hot argon at maximum pressures and temperatures up to P/sub max/ = 8 MPa and T/sub max/ = 4000K, respectively, with flow times of the order of 3 msec. For a single battery disc, a segment of the ignition boundary was found to lie in the region of T/sub max/ = 1200 to 1300K and 0.7 MPa < P/sub max/ < 2.0 MPa. The results also showed two types of ignition: prompt ignition, requiring an average delivered enthalpy /ovr /Delta/H//sub ig/ = 6 cal during an average flow time /ovr /Delta/t//sub ig/ = 0.7 msec, and delayed ignition, with /ovr /Delta/H//sub ig/ = 16 cal and /ovr /Delta/t//sub ig/ = 2.4 msec. In addition, near an ignition boundary, high speed motion photography showed the ignition delay increased to 6 msec with significant spatial non-uniformity. 1 ref., 6 figs.

  16. Emptying and filling a tunnel bronze

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Marley, Peter M.; Abtew, Tesfaye A.; Farley, Katie E.; Horrocks, Gregory A.; Dennis, Robert V.; Zhang, Peihong; Banerjee, Sarbajit

    2015-01-13

    The classical orthorhombic layered phase of V2O5 has long been regarded as the thermodynamic sink for binary vanadium oxides and has found great practical utility as a result of its open framework and easily accessible redox states. Herein, we exploit a cation-exchange mechanism to synthesize a new stable tunnel-structured polymorph of V2O5 (ζ-V2O5) and demonstrate the subsequent ability of this framework to accommodate Li and Mg ions. The facile extraction and insertion of cations and stabilization of the novel tunnel framework is facilitated by the nanometer-sized dimensions of the materials, which leads to accommodation of strain without amorphization. The topotacticmore » approach demonstrated here indicates not just novel intercalation chemistry accessible at nanoscale dimensions but also suggests a facile synthetic route to ternary vanadium oxide bronzes (MxV2O5) exhibiting intriguing physical properties that range from electronic phase transitions to charge ordering and superconductivity.« less

  17. Sensor integration study for a shallow tunnel detection system.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yee, Mark L.; Abbott, Robert E.; Bonal, Nedra; Elbring, Gregory Jay; Senglaub, Michael E.

    2010-02-01

    During the past several years, there has been a growing recognition of the threats posed by the use of shallow tunnels against both international border security and the integrity of critical facilities. This has led to the development and testing of a variety of geophysical and surveillance techniques for the detection of these clandestine tunnels. The challenges of detection of these tunnels arising from the complexity of the near surface environment, the subtlety of the tunnel signatures themselves, and the frequent siting of these tunnels in urban environments with a high level of cultural noise, have time and again shown that any single technique is not robust enough to solve the tunnel detection problem in all cases. The question then arises as to how to best combine the multiple techniques currently available to create an integrated system that results in the best chance of detecting these tunnels in a variety of clutter environments and geologies. This study utilizes Taguchi analysis with simulated sensor detection performance to address this question. The analysis results show that ambient noise has the most effect on detection performance over the effects of tunnel characteristics and geological factors.

  18. Resonant tunneling of fluctuation Cooper pairs

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Galda, Alexey; Mel'nikov, A. S.; Vinokur, V. M.

    2015-02-09

    Superconducting fluctuations have proved to be an irreplaceable source of information about microscopic and macroscopic material parameters that could be inferred from the experiment. According to common wisdom, the effect of thermodynamic fluctuations in the vicinity of the superconducting transition temperature, Tc, is to round off all of the sharp corners and discontinuities, which otherwise would have been expected to occur at Tc. Here we report the current spikes due to radiation-induced resonant tunneling of fluctuation Cooper pairs between two superconductors which grow even sharper and more pronounced upon approach to Tc. This striking effect offers an unprecedented tool formore » direct measurements of fluctuation Cooper pair lifetime, which is key to our understanding of the fluctuation regime, most notably to nature of the pseudogap state in high-temperature superconductors. Our finding marks a radical departure from the conventional view of superconducting fluctuations as a blurring and rounding phenomenon.« less

  19. Resonant tunneling of fluctuation Cooper pairs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Galda, Alexey; Mel'nikov, A. S.; Vinokur, V. M.

    2015-02-09

    Superconducting fluctuations have proved to be an irreplaceable source of information about microscopic and macroscopic material parameters that could be inferred from the experiment. According to common wisdom, the effect of thermodynamic fluctuations in the vicinity of the superconducting transition temperature, Tc, is to round off all of the sharp corners and discontinuities, which otherwise would have been expected to occur at Tc. Here we report the current spikes due to radiation-induced resonant tunneling of fluctuation Cooper pairs between two superconductors which grow even sharper and more pronounced upon approach to Tc. This striking effect offers an unprecedented tool for direct measurements of fluctuation Cooper pair lifetime, which is key to our understanding of the fluctuation regime, most notably to nature of the pseudogap state in high-temperature superconductors. Our finding marks a radical departure from the conventional view of superconducting fluctuations as a blurring and rounding phenomenon.

  20. Computational modeling of electrophotonics nanomaterials: Tunneling in double quantum dots

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vlahovic, Branislav Filikhin, Igor

    2014-10-06

    Single electron localization and tunneling in double quantum dots (DQD) and rings (DQR) and in particular the localized-delocalized states and their spectral distributions are considered in dependence on the geometry of the DQDs (DQRs). The effect of violation of symmetry of DQDs geometry on the tunneling is studied in details. The cases of regular and chaotic geometries are considered. It will be shown that a small violation of symmetry drastically affects localization of electron and that anti-crossing of the levels is the mechanism of tunneling between the localized and delocalized states in DQRs.

  1. Modeling direct interband tunneling. II. Lower-dimensional structures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pan, Andrew; Chui, Chi On

    2014-08-07

    We investigate the applicability of the two-band Hamiltonian and the widely used Kane analytical formula to interband tunneling along unconfined directions in nanostructures. Through comparisons with kp and tight-binding calculations and quantum transport simulations, we find that the primary correction is the change in effective band gap. For both constant fields and realistic tunnel field-effect transistors, dimensionally consistent band gap scaling of the Kane formula allows analytical and numerical device simulations to approximate non-equilibrium Green's function current characteristics without arbitrary fitting. This allows efficient first-order calibration of semiclassical models for interband tunneling in nanodevices.

  2. Resonant spin tunneling in randomly oriented nanospheres of Mn?? acetate

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Lendinez, S.; Billinge, S. J. L.; Zarzuela, R.; Tejada, J.; Terban, M. W.; Espin, J.; Imaz, I.; Maspoch, D.; Chudnovsky, E. M.

    2015-01-06

    We report measurements and theoretical analysis of resonant spin tunneling in randomly oriented nanospheres of a molecular magnet. Amorphous nanospheres of Mn?? acetate have been fabricated and characterized by chemical, infrared, TEM, X-ray, and magnetic methods. Magnetic measurements have revealed sharp tunneling peaks in the field derivative of the magnetization that occur at the typical resonant field values for the Mn?? acetate crystal in the field parallel to the easy axis.Theoretical analysis is provided that explains these observations. We argue that resonant spin tunneling in a molecular magnet can be established in a powder sample, without the need for amoresingle crystal and without aligning the easy magnetization axes of the molecules. This is confirmed by re-analyzing the old data on a powdered sample of non-oriented micron-size crystals of Mn?? acetate. Our findings can greatly simplify the selection of candidates for quantum spin tunneling among newly synthesized molecular magnets.less

  3. Computational design and analysis of flatback airfoil wind tunnel experiment.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mayda, Edward A.; van Dam, C.P.; Chao, David D.; Berg, Dale E.

    2008-03-01

    A computational fluid dynamics study of thick wind turbine section shapes in the test section of the UC Davis wind tunnel at a chord Reynolds number of one million is presented. The goals of this study are to validate standard wind tunnel wall corrections for high solid blockage conditions and to reaffirm the favorable effect of a blunt trailing edge or flatback on the performance characteristics of a representative thick airfoil shape prior to building the wind tunnel models and conducting the experiment. The numerical simulations prove the standard wind tunnel corrections to be largely valid for the proposed test of 40% maximum thickness to chord ratio airfoils at a solid blockage ratio of 10%. Comparison of the computed lift characteristics of a sharp trailing edge baseline airfoil and derived flatback airfoils reaffirms the earlier observed trend of reduced sensitivity to surface contamination with increasing trailing edge thickness.

  4. Quantum tunneling resonant electron transfer process in Lorentzian plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hong, Woo-Pyo; Jung, Young-Dae

    2014-08-15

    The quantum tunneling resonant electron transfer process between a positive ion and a neutral atom collision is investigated in nonthermal generalized Lorentzian plasmas. The result shows that the nonthermal effect enhances the resonant electron transfer cross section in Lorentzian plasmas. It is found that the nonthermal effect on the classical resonant electron transfer cross section is more significant than that on the quantum tunneling resonant charge transfer cross section. It is shown that the nonthermal effect on the resonant electron transfer cross section decreases with an increase of the Debye length. In addition, the nonthermal effect on the quantum tunneling resonant electron transfer cross section decreases with increasing collision energy. The variation of nonthermal and plasma shielding effects on the quantum tunneling resonant electron transfer process is also discussed.

  5. Vacuum gaps with small tunnel currents at large electric field...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    small tunnel currents at large electric field and its potential applications for energy storage, charge storage and power supplies. Friday, May 27, 2011 - 4:00pm SSRL Conference...

  6. PP-99 St. Clair Tunnel Company | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Border PDF icon PP-99 St. Clair Tunnel Company More Documents & Publications PP-48-3 El Paso Eelctric Company PP-90-1 Imperial Irrigation District PP-76 The Vermont Electric...

  7. Warning: Single Lane Tunnel Ahead | The Ames Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Warning: Single Lane Tunnel Ahead A new theory shows that reactivity at catalytic sites inside narrow pores is controlled by how molecules move at the pore openings. Like cars approaching a single lane tunnel from which other cars are emerging, the movement of molecules depends on their distance into the pore; near the ends of the pores, exchange is rapid compared to further into the pores. Dynamics at the openings of these pores controls the penetration of reactants and thus overall conversion

  8. From: Tunnell, Andrew To: Congestion Study Comments Subject:

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    RE: Southern Companies" Comments to Draft National Electric Transmission Congestion Study Date: Monday, October 20, 2014 3:28:05 PM Attachments: DOE Congestion Comments.pdf I'm resending the comments described below as I did not receive any confirmation email. Please contact me at the number provided below if there is anything else that needs to be done in this regard. Thanks Andrew Tunnell From: Tunnell, Andrew Sent: Monday, October 20, 2014 2:17 PM To:

  9. Tunneling magnetoresistance phenomenon utilizing graphene magnet electrode

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hashimoto, T.; Kamikawa, S.; Haruyama, J.; Soriano, D.; Pedersen, J. G.; Roche, S.

    2014-11-03

    Using magnetic rare-metals for spintronic devices is facing serious problems for the environmental contamination and the limited material-resource. In contrast, by fabricating ferromagnetic graphene nanopore arrays (FGNPAs) consisting of honeycomb-like array of hexagonal nanopores with hydrogen-terminated zigzag-type atomic structure edges, we reported observation of polarized electron spins spontaneously driven from the pore edge states, resulting in rare-metal-free flat-energy-band ferromagnetism. Here, we demonstrate observation of tunneling magnetoresistance (TMR) behaviors on the junction of cobalt/SiO{sub 2}/FGNPA electrode, serving as a prototype structure for future rare-metal free TMR devices using magnetic graphene electrodes. Gradual change in TMR ratios is observed across zero-magnetic field, arising from specified alignment between pore-edge- and cobalt-spins. The TMR ratios can be controlled by applying back-gate voltage and by modulating interpore distance. Annealing the SiO{sub 2}/FGNPA junction also drastically enhances TMR ratios up to ∼100%.

  10. Ferromagnetic tunnel contacts to graphene: Contact resistance and spin signal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cubukcu, M.; Laczkowski, P.; Vergnaud, C.; Marty, A.; Attan, J.-P.; Notin, L.; Vila, L. Jamet, M.; Martin, M.-B.; Seneor, P.; Anane, A.; Deranlot, C.; Fert, A.; Auffret, S.; Ducruet, C.

    2015-02-28

    We report spin transport in CVD graphene-based lateral spin valves using different magnetic contacts. We compared the spin signal amplitude measured on devices where the cobalt layer is directly in contact with the graphene to the one obtained using tunnel contacts. Although a sizeable spin signal (up to ?2 ?) is obtained with direct contacts, the signal is strongly enhanced (?400 ?) by inserting a tunnel barrier. In addition, we studied the resistance-area product (R.A) of a variety of contacts on CVD graphene. In particular, we compared the R.A products of alumina and magnesium oxide tunnel barriers grown by sputtering deposition of aluminum or magnesium and subsequent natural oxidation under pure oxygen atmosphere or by plasma. When using an alumina tunnel barrier on CVD graphene, the R.A product is high and exhibits a large dispersion. This dispersion can be highly reduced by using a magnesium oxide tunnel barrier, as for the R.A value. This study gives insight in the material quest for reproducible and efficient spin injection in CVD graphene.

  11. New Flexible Channels for Room Temperature Tunneling Field Effect Transistors

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Hao, Boyi; Asthana, Anjana; Hazaveh, Paniz Khanmohammadi; Bergstrom, Paul L.; Banyai, Douglas; Savaikar, Madhusudan A.; Jaszczak, John A.; Yap, Yoke Khin

    2016-02-05

    Tunneling field effect transistors (TFETs) have been proposed to overcome the fundamental issues of Si based transistors, such as short channel effect, finite leakage current, and high contact resistance. Unfortunately, most if not all TFETs are operational only at cryogenic temperatures. Here we report that iron (Fe) quantum dots functionalized boron nitride nanotubes (QDs-BNNTs) can be used as the flexible tunneling channels of TFETs at room temperatures. The electrical insulating BNNTs are used as the one-dimensional (1D) substrates to confine the uniform formation of Fe QDs on their surface as the flexible tunneling channel. Consistent semiconductor-like transport behaviors under variousmore » bending conditions are detected by scanning tunneling spectroscopy in a transmission electron microscopy system (insitu STM-TEM). Ultimately, as suggested by computer simulation, the uniform distribution of Fe QDs enable an averaging effect on the possible electron tunneling pathways, which is responsible for the consistent transport properties that are not sensitive to bending.« less

  12. H-CANYON AIR EXHAUST TUNNEL INSPECTION VEHICLE DEVELOPMENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Minichan, R.; Fogle, R.; Marzolf, A.

    2011-05-24

    The H-Canyon at Savannah River Site is a large concrete structure designed for chemical separation processes of radioactive material. The facility requires a large ventilation system to maintain negative pressure in process areas for radioactive contamination control and personnel protection. The ventilation exhaust is directed through a concrete tunnel under the facility which is approximately five feet wide and 8 feet tall that leads to a sand filter and stack. Acidic vapors in the exhaust have had a degrading effect on the surface of the concrete tunnels. Some areas have been inspected; however, the condition of other areas is unknown. Experience from historical inspections with remote controlled vehicles will be discussed along with the current challenge of inspecting levels below available access points. The area of interest in the exhaust tunnel must be accessed through a 14 X 14 inch concrete plug in the floor of the hot gang valve corridor. The purpose for the inspection is to determine the condition of the inside of the air tunnel and establish if there are any structural concerns. Various landmarks, pipe hangers and exposed rebar are used as reference points for the structural engineers when evaluating the current integrity of the air tunnel.

  13. Category:Hydrodynamic Testing Facility Type | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    out of 9 total. C Channel F Flow Table Flume O Offshore Berth R Reverberant Tank T Tow Tank T cont. Tow Vessel Tunnel W Wave Basin Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgw...

  14. Engineering ferroelectric tunnel junctions through potential profile shaping

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boyn, S.; Garcia, V. Fusil, S.; Carrtro, C.; Garcia, K.; Collin, S.; Deranlot, C.; Bibes, M.; Barthlmy, A.

    2015-06-01

    We explore the influence of the top electrode materials (W, Co, Ni, Ir) on the electronic band profile in ferroelectric tunnel junctions based on super-tetragonal BiFeO{sub 3}. Large variations of the transport properties are observed at room temperature. In particular, the analysis of current vs. voltage curves by a direct tunneling model indicates that the metal/ferroelectric interfacial barrier height increases with the top-electrode work function. While larger metal work functions result in larger OFF/ON ratios, they also produce a large internal electric field which results in large and potentially destructive switching voltages.

  15. Rainier Mesa Sub-CAU Model for N-Tunnel (Conference) | SciTech...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Conference: Rainier Mesa Sub-CAU Model for N-Tunnel Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Rainier Mesa Sub-CAU Model for N-Tunnel You are accessing a document from the...

  16. Tunneling control using classical non-linear oscillator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kar, Susmita; Bhattacharyya, S. P.

    2014-04-24

    A quantum particle is placed in symmetric double well potential which is coupled to a classical non-linear oscillator via a coupling function. With different spatial symmetry of the coupling and under various controlling fashions, the tunneling of the quantum particle can be enhanced or suppressed, or totally destroyed.

  17. The first tunnel section of the Superconducting Super Collider project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lundin, T.K.; Laughton, C.; Nelson, P.P.

    1990-11-01

    The Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) project will be constructed for the United States Department of Energy at a competitively-selected site in Ellis County, Texas, about 30 mile (50 km) south of the central business district of Dallas. The injector system and main collider ring will be housed in 70 mile (110 km) of tunnel, and the project will include additional shafts and underground enclosures with clear spans up to 30 ft (10 m) at depths of more than 250 ft (75 m). The first tunnel segment to be designed and constructed will include approximately 5.9 mile (9.4 km) of 12 ft (3.7 m) finished internal diameter tunnel, four shafts up to 55 ft (16.8 m) diameter, and various connecting tunnels and adits. Construction will be in weak rock lithologies, including mudstones, marls, and chalks with compressive strengths typically between 300 and 2500 psi (2.0 and 17.2 MPa). Design is underway, with an expected bid date before the end of 1990, and with start of construction following in the spring of 1991. 7 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab.

  18. Tunnel junction multiple wavelength light-emitting diodes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Olson, Jerry M. (Lakewood, CO); Kurtz, Sarah R. (Golden, CO)

    1992-01-01

    A multiple wavelength LED having a monolithic cascade cell structure comprising at least two p-n junctions, wherein each of said at least two p-n junctions have substantially different band gaps, and electrical connector means by which said at least two p-n junctions may be collectively energized; and wherein said diode comprises a tunnel junction or interconnect.

  19. Tunnel junction multiple wavelength light-emitting diodes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Olson, J.M.; Kurtz, S.R.

    1992-11-24

    A multiple wavelength LED having a monolithic cascade cell structure comprising at least two p-n junctions, wherein each of said at least two p-n junctions have substantially different band gaps, and electrical connector means by which said at least two p-n junctions may be collectively energized; and wherein said diode comprises a tunnel junction or interconnect. 5 figs.

  20. Assessment of Scaled Rotors for Wind Tunnel Experiments.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maniaci, David Charles; Kelley, Christopher Lee; Chiu, Phillip

    2015-07-01

    Rotor design and analysis work has been performed to support the conceptualization of a wind tunnel test focused on studying wake dynamics. This wind tunnel test would serve as part of a larger model validation campaign that is part of the Department of Energy Wind and Water Power Programs Atmosphere to electrons (A2e) initiative. The first phase of this effort was directed towards designing a functionally scaled rotor based on the same design process and target full-scale turbine used for new rotors for the DOE/SNL SWiFT site. The second phase focused on assessing the capabilities of an already available rotor, the G1, designed and built by researchers at the Technical University of Mnchen.

  1. Tunnel and Subsurface Void Detection and Range to Target Measurement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Phillip B. West

    2009-06-01

    Engineers and technicians at the Idaho National Laboratory invented, designed, built and tested a device capable of detecting and measuring the distance to, an underground void, or tunnel. Preliminary tests demonstrated positive detection of, and range to, a void thru as much as 30 meters of top-soil earth. Device uses acoustic driving point impedance principles pioneered by the Laboratory for well-bore physical properties logging. Data receipts recorded by the device indicates constructive-destructive interference patterns characteristic of acoustic wave reflection from a downward step-change in impedance mismatch. Prototype tests demonstrated that interference patterns in receipt waves could depict the patterns indicative of specific distances. A tool with this capability can quickly (in seconds) indicate the presence and depth/distance of a void or tunnel. Using such a device, border security and military personnel can identify threats of intrusion or weapons caches in most all soil conditions including moist and rocky.

  2. Leading Edge Erosion Phase II Wind Tunnel Test Begins

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Edge Erosion Phase II Wind Tunnel Test Begins - Sandia Energy Energy Search Icon Sandia Home Locations Contact Us Employee Locator Energy & Climate Secure & Sustainable Energy Future Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Solar Energy Wind Energy Water Power Supercritical CO2 Geothermal Natural Gas Safety, Security & Resilience of the Energy Infrastructure Energy Storage Nuclear Power & Engineering Grid Modernization Battery Testing Nuclear Fuel Cycle Defense Waste

  3. Scanning Tunneling Microscope Data Acquistion and Control System

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    1995-02-01

    SHOESCAN is a PC based code that acquires and displays data for Scanning Tunneling Microscopes (STM). SHOESCAN interfaces with the STM through external electronic feedback and raster control circuits that are controlled by I/O boards on the PC bus. Data is displayed on a separate color monitor that is interfaced to the PC through an additional frame-grabber board. SHOESCAN can acquire a wide range of surface topographic information as well as surface electronic structure information.

  4. A 233 km tunnel for lepton and hadron colliders

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Summers, D. J.; Cremaldi, L. M.; Datta, A.; Duraisamy, M.; Luo, T.; Lyons, G. T.

    2012-12-21

    A decade ago, a cost analysis was conducted to bore a 233 km circumference Very Large Hadron Collider (VLHC) tunnel passing through Fermilab. Here we outline implementations of e{sup +}e{sup -}, pp-bar , and {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -} collider rings in this tunnel using recent technological innovations. The 240 and 500 GeV e{sup +}e{sup -} colliders employ Crab Waist Crossings, ultra low emittance damped bunches, short vertical IP focal lengths, superconducting RF, and low coercivity, grain oriented silicon steel/concrete dipoles. Some details are also provided for a high luminosity 240 GeV e{sup +}e{sup -} collider and 1.75 TeV muon accelerator in a Fermilab site filler tunnel. The 40 TeV pp-bar collider uses the high intensity Fermilab p-bar source, exploits high cross sections for pp-bar production of high mass states, and uses 2 Tesla ultra low carbon steel/YBCO superconducting magnets run with liquid neon. The 35 TeV muon ring ramps the 2 Tesla superconducting magnets at 9 Hz every 0.4 seconds, uses 250 GV of superconducting RF to accelerate muons from 1.75 to 17.5 TeV in 63 orbits with 71% survival, and mitigates neutrino radiation with phase shifting, roller coaster motion in a FODO lattice.

  5. Analysis of different tunneling mechanisms of In{sub x}Ga{sub 1?x}As/AlGaAs tunnel junction light-emitting transistors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu, Cheng-Han; Wu, Chao-Hsin

    2014-10-27

    The electrical and optical characteristics of tunnel junction light-emitting transistors (TJLETs) with different indium mole fractions (x?=?5% and 2.5%) of the In{sub x}Ga{sub 1?x}As base-collector tunnel junctions have been investigated. Two electron tunneling mechanisms (photon-assisted or direct tunneling) provide additional currents to electrical output and resupply holes back to the base region, resulting in the upward slope of I-V curves and enhanced optical output under forward-active operation. The larger direct tunneling probability and stronger Franz-Keldysh absorption for 5% TJLET lead to higher collector current slope and less optical intensity enhancement when base-collector junction is under reverse-biased.

  6. Baker-Barry Tunnel Lighting: Evaluation of a Potential GATEWAY Demonstrations Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tuenge, Jason R.

    2011-06-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is evaluating the Baker-Barry Tunnel as a potential GATEWAY Demonstrations project for deployment of solid-state lighting (SSL) technology. The National Park Service (NPS) views this project as a possible proving ground and template for implementation of light-emitting diode (LED) luminaires in other NPS tunnels, thereby expanding the estimated 40% energy savings from 132 MWh/yr for this tunnel to a much larger figure national

  7. Facility Closure Report for T-Tunnel (U12t), Area 12, Nevada Test Site, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NSTec Environmental Restoration

    2008-08-01

    This Facility Closure Report (FCR) has been prepared to document the actions taken to permanently close the remaining accessible areas of U12t-Tunnel (T-Tunnel) in Area 12 of the Nevada Test Site (NTS). The closure of T-Tunnel was a prerequisite to transfer facility ownership from the Defense Threat Reduction Agency (DTRA) to the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO). Closure of the facility was accomplished with the cooperation and concurrence of both NNSA/NSO and the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP). The purpose of this FCR is to document that the closure of T-Tunnel complied with the closure requirements specified in the Facility Closure Plan for N- and T-Tunnels Area 12, Nevada Test Site (Appendix D) and that the facility is ready for transfer to NNSA/NSO. The Facility Closure Plan (FCP) is provided in Appendix D. T-Tunnel is located approximately 42 miles north of Mercury in Area 12 of the NTS (Figure 1). Between 1970 and 1987, T-Tunnel was used for six Nuclear Weapons Effects Tests (NWETs). The tunnel was excavated horizontally into the volcanic tuffs of Rainier Mesa. The T-Tunnel complex consists of a main access drift with two NWET containment structures, a Gas Seal Plug (GSP), and a Gas Seal Door (GSD) (Figure 2). The T-Tunnel complex was mothballed in 1993 to preserve the tunnel for resumption of testing, should it happen in the future, to stop the discharge of tunnel effluent, and to prevent unauthorized access. This was accomplished by sealing the main drift GSD.

  8. Collegiate Wind Competition Turbines go Blade-to-Blade in Wind Tunnel Tests

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    at WINDPOWER | Department of Energy Turbines go Blade-to-Blade in Wind Tunnel Tests at WINDPOWER Collegiate Wind Competition Turbines go Blade-to-Blade in Wind Tunnel Tests at WINDPOWER March 28, 2014 - 5:11pm Addthis This wind tunnel constructed by NREL engineers will test the small wind turbines designed by 10 university teams competing in DOE's Collegiate Wind Competition. This wind tunnel constructed by NREL engineers will test the small wind turbines designed by 10 university teams

  9. Observation of diamond turned OFHC copper using Scanning Tunneling Microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grigg, D.A.; Russell, P.E.; Dow, T.A.

    1988-12-01

    Diamond turned OFHC copper samples have been observed within the past few months using the Scanning Tunneling Microscope. Initial results have shown evidence of artifacts which may be used to better understand the diamond turning process. The STM`s high resolution capability and three dimensional data representation allows observation and study of surface features unobtainable with conventional profilometry systems. Also, the STM offers a better quantitative means by which to analyze surface structures than the SEM. This paper discusses findings on several diamond turned OFHC copper samples having different cutting conditions. Each sample has been cross referenced using STM and SEM.

  10. Ramp-edge structured tunneling devices using ferromagnet electrodes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kwon, Chuhee (Long Beach, CA); Jia, Quanxi (Los Alamos, NM)

    2002-09-03

    The fabrication of ferromagnet-insulator-ferromagnet magnetic tunneling junction devices using a ramp-edge geometry based on, e.g., (La.sub.0.7 Sr.sub.0.3) MnO.sub.3, ferromagnetic electrodes and a SrTiO.sub.3 insulator is disclosed. The maximum junction magnetoresistance (JMR) as large as 23% was observed below 300 Oe at low temperatures (T<100 K). These ramp-edge junctions exhibited JMR of 6% at 200 K with a field less than 100 Oe.

  11. Facility Closure Report for Tunnel U16a, Area 16, Nevada Test Site, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NSTec Environmental Restoration

    2009-07-01

    U16a is not listed in the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order. The closure of U16a was sponsored by the Defense Threat Reduction Agency (DTRA) and performed with the cooperation of the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office and the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection. This report documents closure of this site as identified in the DTRA Fiscal Year 2008 Statement of Work, Task 6.3. Closure activities included: Removing and disposing of a shack and its contents Disposing of debris from within the shack and in the vicinity of the tunnel entrance Verifying that the tunnel is empty Welding screened covers over tunnel vent holes to limit access and allow ventilation Constructing a full-tunnel cross-section fibercrete bulkhead to prevent access to the tunnel Field activities were conducted from July to August 2008.

  12. Combined Experiment Phase 1. [Horizontal axis wind turbines: wind tunnel testing versus field testing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Butterfield, C.P.; Musial, W.P.; Simms, D.A.

    1992-10-01

    How does wind tunnel airfoil data differ from the airfoil performance on an operating horizontal axis wind turbine (HAWT) The National Renewable Energy laboratory has been conducting a comprehensive test program focused on answering this question and understanding the basic fluid mechanics of rotating HAWT stall aerodynamics. The basic approach was to instrument a wind rotor, using an airfoil that was well documented by wind tunnel tests, and measure operating pressure distributions on the rotating blade. Based an the integrated values of the pressure data, airfoil performance coefficients were obtained, and comparisons were made between the rotating data and the wind tunnel data. Care was taken to the aerodynamic and geometric differences between the rotating and the wind tunnel models. This is the first of two reports describing the Combined Experiment Program and its results. This Phase I report covers background information such as test setup and instrumentation. It also includes wind tunnel test results and roughness testing.

  13. Theory of multiphoton and tunnel ionization in a bichromatic field

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bagulov, D. S.; Kotelnikov, I. A.

    2013-01-15

    The imaginary-time method [6, 7] is used to calculate the multiphoton and tunnel ionization probabilities for atoms in a laser radiation field part of which is converted into the second harmonic. We assume that the first harmonic has a linear or elliptical polarization and the second harmonic is polarized linearly, with its polarization vector making an arbitrary angle with that of the first harmonic. The mean momentum of the photoelectrons knocked out from atoms is shown to depend on the phase shift between the first and second harmonics and their mutual polarization and to be identically equal to zero for a monochromatic field. An important difference between the case of elliptical polarization and the case of linear polarization of both harmonics is the absence of conditions under which the conditions for dominance of one of the two generation mechanisms considered here can be identified during the generation of terahertz radiation from the region of optical breakdown in a gas.

  14. Ferroelectric modulation on resonant tunneling through perovskite double-barriers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Du, Ruifang; Qiu, Xiangbiao; Li, Aidong; Wu, Di

    2014-04-07

    The negative differential resistance (NDR) due to resonance tunneling is achieved at room temperature in perovskite double-barrier heterostructures composed of a 10 unit-cell-thick SrTiO{sub 3} quantum well sandwiched in two 10 unit-cell-thick LaAlO{sub 3} barriers. The NDR occurs at 1.2?V and does not change with voltage cycling. When the paraelectric SrTiO{sub 3} quantum well is replaced by a ferroelectric BaTiO{sub 3}, the onset of the NDR can be modulated by polarization switching in the ultrathin BaTiO{sub 3}. A polarization pointing to the collector lowers the NDR voltage but a polarization pointing to the emitter increases it. The shift of the NDR voltage is ascribed to reversal of the extra electric field in the quantum well due to the polarization switching.

  15. Cavity-enhanced resonant tunneling photodetector at telecommunication wavelengths

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pfenning, Andreas Hartmann, Fabian; Langer, Fabian; Hfling, Sven; Kamp, Martin; Worschech, Lukas

    2014-03-10

    An AlGaAs/GaAs double barrier resonant tunneling diode (RTD) with a nearby lattice-matched GaInNAs absorption layer was integrated into an optical cavity consisting of five and seven GaAs/AlAs layers to demonstrate cavity enhanced photodetection at the telecommunication wavelength 1.3??m. The samples were grown by molecular beam epitaxy and RTD-mesas with ring-shaped contacts were fabricated. Electrical and optical properties were investigated at room temperature. The detector shows maximum photocurrent for the optical resonance at a wavelength of 1.29??m. At resonance a high sensitivity of 3.110{sup 4} A/W and a response up to several pA per photon at room temperature were found.

  16. Single-charge detection by an atomic precision tunnel junction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    House, M. G. Peretz, E.; Keizer, J. G.; Hile, S. J.; Simmons, M. Y.

    2014-03-17

    We demonstrate sensitive detection of single charges using a planar tunnel junction 8.5?nm wide and 17.2?nm long defined by an atomically precise phosphorus doping profile in silicon. The conductance of the junction responds to a nearby gate potential and also to changes in the charge state of a quantum dot patterned 52?nm away. The response of this detector is monotonic across the entire working voltage range of the device, which will make it particularly useful for studying systems of multiple quantum dots. The charge sensitivity is maximized when the junction is most conductive, suggesting that more sensitive detection can be achieved by shortening the length of the junction to increase its conductance.

  17. Insensitivity of tunneling anisotropic magnetoresistance to non-magnetic electrodes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Y. Y.; Song, C. Wang, G. Y.; Zeng, F.; Pan, F.

    2013-11-11

    Ferromagnetic electrodes play a crucial role in magnetoresistance effect and spin injection, whereas the essential features of non-magnetic metal electrodes in spintronics are commonly ignored except for their electrical conductivity. Here, we verify that the room-temperature tunneling anisotropic magnetoresistance (TAMR) behavior in antiferromagnet-based [Pt/Co]/IrMn/AlO{sub x}/metal (metal = Pt, Au, Cu, Al) junctions is insensitive to the top metal electrodes. Similar out-of-plane signals are detected for different electrodes, in contrast to the varied shapes of in-plane TAMR curves which are most likely attributed to the differences in the multidomain structure of the magnetic electrode. This would add a different dimension to spintronics.

  18. High energy storage capacitor by embedding tunneling nano-structures

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Holme, Timothy P; Prinz, Friedrich B; Van Stockum, Philip B

    2014-11-04

    In an All-Electron Battery (AEB), inclusions embedded in an active region between two electrodes of a capacitor provide enhanced energy storage. Electrons can tunnel to/from and/or between the inclusions, thereby increasing the charge storage density relative to a conventional capacitor. One or more barrier layers is present in an AEB to block DC current flow through the device. The AEB effect can be enhanced by using multi-layer active regions having inclusion layers with the inclusions separated by spacer layers that don't have the inclusions. The use of cylindrical geometry or wrap around electrodes and/or barrier layers in a planar geometry can enhance the basic AEB effect. Other physical effects that can be employed in connection with the AEB effect are excited state energy storage, and formation of a Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC).

  19. Radioactive air emissions notice of construction for deactivation of the PUREX storage tunnel number 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    JOHNSON, R.E.

    1999-10-11

    The Plutonium-Uranium Extraction (PUREX) Plant Storage Tunnel Number 2 (hereafter referred to as the PUREX Tunnel) was built in 1964. Since that time, the PUREX Tunnel has been used for storage of radioactive and mixed waste. In 1991, the PUREX Plant ceased operations and was transitioned to deactivation. The PUREX Tunnel continued to receive PUREX Plant waste material for storage during transition activities. Before 1995, a decision was made to store radioactive and mixed waste in the PUREX Tunnel generated from other onsite sources, on a case-by-case basis. This notice of construction (NOC) describes the activities associated with the reactivation of the PUREX Tunnel ventilation system and the transfer of up to 3.5 million curies (MCi) of radioactive waste to the PUREX Tunnel from any location on the Hanford Site. The unabated total effective dose equivalent (TEDE) estimated for the hypothetical offsite maximally exposed individual (MEI) is 5.6 E-2 millirem (mrem). The abated TEDE conservatively is estimated to account for 1.9 E-5 mrem to the MEI. The following text provides information requirements of Appendix A of Washington Administrative Code (WAC) 246-247 (requirements 1 through 18).

  20. Physical properties and analytical models of band-to-band tunneling in low-bandgap semiconductors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shih, Chun-Hsing Dang Chien, Nguyen

    2014-01-28

    Low-bandgap semiconductors, such as InAs and InSb, are widely considered to be ideal for use in tunnel field-effect transistors to ensure sufficient on-current boosting at low voltages. This work elucidates the physical and mathematical considerations of applying conventional band-to-band tunneling models in low-bandgap semiconductors, and presents a new analytical alternative for practical use. The high-bandgap tunneling generates most at maximum field region with shortest tunnel path, whereas the low-bandgap generations occur dispersedly because of narrow tunnel barrier. The local electrical field associated with tunneling-electron numbers dominates in low-bandgap materials. This work proposes decoupled electric-field terms in the pre-exponential factor and exponential function of generation-rate expressions. Without fitting, the analytical results and approximated forms exhibit great agreements with the sophisticated forms both in high- and low-bandgap semiconductors. Neither nonlocal nor local field is appropriate to be used in numerical simulations for predicting the tunneling generations in a variety of low- and high-bandgap semiconductors.

  1. The importance of Fe surface states for spintronic devices based on magnetic tunnel junctions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chantis, Athanasios N

    2008-01-01

    In this article we give a review of our recent theoretical studies of the influence of Fe(001) surface (interface) states on spin-polarized electron transport across magnetic tunnel junctions with Fe electrodes. We show that minority-spin surface (interface) states are responsible for at least two effects which are important for spin electronics. First, they can produce a sizable tunneling anisotropic magnetoresistance in magnetic tunnel junctions with a single Fe electrode. The effect is driven by a Rashba shift of the resonant surface band when the magnetization changes direction. This can introduce a new class of spintronic devices, namely, tunneling magnetoresistance junctions with a single ferromagnetic electrode. Second, in Fe/GaAs(001) magnetic tunnel junctions minority-spin interface states produce a strong dependence of the tunneling current spin polarization on applied electrical bias. A dramatic sign reversal within a voltage range of just a few tenths of an eV is predicted. This explains the observed sign reversal of spin polarization in recent experiments of electrical spin injection in Fe/GaAs(001) and related reversal of tunneling magnetoresistance through vertical Fe/GaAs/Fe trilayers.

  2. AlGaAs/InGaAlP tunnel junctions for multijunction solar cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    SHARPS,P.R.; LI,N.Y.; HILLS,J.S.; HOU,H.; CHANG,PING-CHIH; BACA,ALBERT G.

    2000-05-16

    Optimization of GaInP{sub 2}/GaAs dual and GaInP{sub 2}/GaAs/Ge triple junction cells, and development of future generation monolithic multi-junction cells will involve the development of suitable high bandgap tunnel junctions. There are three criteria that a tunnel junction must meet. First, the resistance of the junction must be kept low enough so that the series resistance of the overall device is not increased. For AMO, 1 sun operation, the tunnel junction resistance should be below 5 x 10{sup {minus}2} {Omega}-cm. Secondly, the peak current density for the tunnel junction must also be larger than the J{sub sc} of the cell so that the tunnel junction I-V curve does not have a deleterious effect on the I-V curve of the multi-junction device. Finally, the tunnel junction must be optically transparent, i.e., there must be a minimum of optical absorption of photons that will be collected by the underlying subcells. The paper reports the investigation of four high bandgap tunnel junctions grown by metal-organic chemical vapor deposition.

  3. ScanningTunneling Luminescence of Grain Boundaries in Cu(In,Ga)Se2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Romero, M. J.; Jiang, C.-S.; Al-Jassim, M. M.; Noufi, R.

    2005-01-01

    At the Laboratory, photon emission in semiconductors has been mapped in the nanoscale using scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). In this Solar Program Review Meeting, we report on the latest results obtained in Cu(In,Ga)Se2 (CIGS) thin films by this adapted STM. Scanning tunneling luminescence (STL) spectroscopy suggests that photons are emitted near the surface of CIGS. STL is excited either by (1) diffusion of tunneling electrons and subsequent recombination with available holes in CIGS or (2) impact ionization by hot electrons. Which process becomes predominant depends on the voltage applied to the STM tip. Photon mapping shows electronically active, extended defects near the surface of CIGS thin films.

  4. Characterization of aluminum oxide tunnel barriers by combining transport measurements and transmission electron microscopy imaging

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aref, T.; Averin, A.; Nguyend, H. Q.; Pekola, J. P.; Dijken, S. van; Yao, L. D.; Ferring, A.; Koberidze, M.; Nieminen, R. M.

    2014-08-21

    We present two approaches for studying the uniformity of a tunnel barrier. The first approach is based on measuring single-electron and two-electron tunneling in a hybrid single-electron transistor. Our measurements indicate that the effective area of a conduction channel is about one order of magnitude larger than predicted by theoretical calculations. With the second method, transmission electron microscopy, we demonstrate that variations in the barrier thickness are a plausible explanation for the larger effective area and an enhancement of higher order tunneling processes.

  5. Wind Tunnel Tests of Parabolic Trough Solar Collectors: March 2001--August 2003

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hosoya, N.; Peterka, J. A.; Gee, R. C.; Kearney, D.

    2008-05-01

    Conducted extensive wind-tunnel tests on parabolic trough solar collectors to determine practical wind loads applicable to structural design for stress and deformation, and local component design for concentrator reflectors.

  6. Resonant tunneling device with two-dimensional quantum well emitter and base layers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Simmons, Jerry A.; Sherwin, Marc E.; Drummond, Timothy J.; Weckwerth, Mark V.

    1998-01-01

    A double electron layer tunneling device is presented. Electrons tunnel from a two dimensional emitter layer to a two dimensional tunneling layer and continue traveling to a collector at a lower voltage. The emitter layer is interrupted by an isolation etch, a depletion gate, or an ion implant to prevent electrons from traveling from the source along the emitter to the drain. The collector is similarly interrupted by a backgate, an isolation etch, or an ion implant. When the device is used as a transistor, a control gate is added to control the allowed energy states of the emitter layer. The tunnel gate may be recessed to change the operating range of the device and allow for integrated complementary devices. Methods of forming the device are also set forth, utilizing epoxy-bond and stop etch (EBASE), pre-growth implantation of the backgate or post-growth implantation.

  7. Resonant tunneling device with two-dimensional quantum well emitter and base layers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Simmons, J.A.; Sherwin, M.E.; Drummond, T.J.; Weckwerth, M.V.

    1998-10-20

    A double electron layer tunneling device is presented. Electrons tunnel from a two dimensional emitter layer to a two dimensional tunneling layer and continue traveling to a collector at a lower voltage. The emitter layer is interrupted by an isolation etch, a depletion gate, or an ion implant to prevent electrons from traveling from the source along the emitter to the drain. The collector is similarly interrupted by a backgate, an isolation etch, or an ion implant. When the device is used as a transistor, a control gate is added to control the allowed energy states of the emitter layer. The tunnel gate may be recessed to change the operating range of the device and allow for integrated complementary devices. Methods of forming the device are also set forth, utilizing epoxy-bond and stop etch (EBASE), pre-growth implantation of the backgate or post-growth implantation. 43 figs.

  8. Troll Phase I pipelines: Tie-ins to the subsea tunnel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hove, F.; Kuhlmann, H.

    1995-12-31

    Subsea approaches to the Norwegian coast are characterized by very rugged topography. Landfall of offshore pipelines therefore often require dedicated subsea tunnel and pipeline tie in concepts. To land the 36 inch and 40 inch offshore pipelines associated with the Troll Phase 1 development, a 4 km long landfall tunnel was constructed terminating at a water depth of 165 m with vertical shaft connections to the seabed. This paper describes the design of the Troll Phase 1 tie-ins of offshore to tunnel pipeline sections. These comprise two main elements, i.e. 180 Te tie-in spools -- which are installed between the offshore pipelines and the piercing shafts -- and prefabricated 450 Te riser bundles -- which are installed into the vertical tunnel piercing shafts.

  9. Demonstration of forward inter-band tunneling in GaN by polarization engineering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krishnamoorthy, Sriram; Park, Pil Sung; Rajan, Siddharth

    2011-12-05

    We report on the design, fabrication, and characterization of GaN interband tunnel junction showing forward tunneling characteristics. We have achieved very high forward tunneling currents (153 mA/cm{sup 2} at 10 mV, and 17.7 A/cm{sup 2} peak current) in polarization-engineered GaN/InGaN/GaN heterojunction diodes grown by plasma assisted molecular beam epitaxy. We also report the observation of repeatable negative differential resistance in interband III-Nitride tunnel junctions, with peak-valley current ratio of 4 at room temperature. The forward current density achieved in this work meets the typical current drive requirements of a multi-junction solar cell.

  10. Suppression criteria of parasitic mode oscillations in a gyrotron beam tunnel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kumar, Nitin; Singh, Udaybir; Sinha, A. K.; Singh, T. P.

    2011-02-15

    This paper presents the design criteria of the parasitic mode oscillations suppression for a periodic, ceramic, and copper loaded gyrotron beam tunnel. In such a type of beam tunnel, the suppression of parasitic mode oscillations is an important design problem. A method of beam-wave coupling coefficient and its mathematical formulation are presented. The developed design criteria are used in the beam tunnel design of a 42 GHz gyrotron to be developed for the Indian TOKAMAK system. The role of the thickness and the radius of the beam tunnel copper rings to obtain the developed design criteria are also discussed. The commercially available electromagnetic code CST and the electron trajectory code EGUN are used for the simulations.

  11. Vacuum gaps with small tunnel currents at large electric field and its

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    potential applications for energy storage, charge storage and power supplies. | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource Vacuum gaps with small tunnel currents at large electric field and its potential applications for energy storage, charge storage and power supplies. Friday, May 27, 2011 - 4:00pm SSRL Conference Room 137-226 Alfred Hubler, Department of Physics, University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign We study tunnel currents and electric break down in vacuum gaps experimentally and

  12. A new technique to measure tunneling barrier height in solid media

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    (Conference) | SciTech Connect A new technique to measure tunneling barrier height in solid media Citation Details In-Document Search Title: A new technique to measure tunneling barrier height in solid media Authors: Mason, Thomas A [1] ; Dattelbaum, Andrew M [1] ; Mara, Nathan A [1] ; Kaschner, George C [1] ; Johnson, Oliver K [2] ; Seegmiller, Daniel [2] ; Fullwood, David T [2] + Show Author Affiliations Los Alamos National Laboratory BYU Publication Date: 2011-05-24 OSTI Identifier:

  13. Electromagnetic model for near-field microwave microscope with atomic resolution: Determination of tunnel junction impedance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reznik, Alexander N.

    2014-08-25

    An electrodynamic model is proposed for the tunneling microwave microscope with subnanometer space resolution as developed by Lee et al. [Appl. Phys. Lett. 97, 183111 (2010)]. Tip-sample impedance Z{sub a} was introduced and studied in the tunneling and non-tunneling regimes. At tunneling breakdown, the microwave current between probe and sample flows along two parallel channels characterized by impedances Z{sub p} and Z{sub t} that add up to form overall impedance Z{sub a}. Quantity Z{sub p} is the capacitive impedance determined by the near field of the probe and Z{sub t} is the impedance of the tunnel junction. By taking into account the distance dependences of effective tip radius r{sub 0}(z) and tunnel resistance R{sub t}(z)?=?Re[Z{sub t}(z)], we were able to explain the experimentally observed dependences of resonance frequency f{sub r}(z) and quality factor Q{sub L}(z) of the microscope. The obtained microwave resistance R{sub t}(z) and direct current tunnel resistance R{sub t}{sup dc}(z) exhibit qualitatively similar behavior, although being largely different in both magnitude and the characteristic scale of height dependence. Interpretation of the microwave images of the atomic structure of test samples proved possible by taking into account the inductive component of tunnel impedance ImZ{sub t}?=??L{sub t}. Relation ?L{sub t}/R{sub t}???0.235 was obtained.

  14. Design and Commissioning of a Wind Tunnel for Integrated Physical and

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Chemical Measurements of PM Dispersing Plume of Heavy Duty Diesel Truck | Department of Energy Commissioning of a Wind Tunnel for Integrated Physical and Chemical Measurements of PM Dispersing Plume of Heavy Duty Diesel Truck Design and Commissioning of a Wind Tunnel for Integrated Physical and Chemical Measurements of PM Dispersing Plume of Heavy Duty Diesel Truck Presents plume characterization of three vehicles with different aftertreatment configuration, representative of legacy, current

  15. Strain-assisted current-induced magnetization reversal in magnetic tunnel

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    junctions: A micromagnetic study with phase-field microelasticity (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Strain-assisted current-induced magnetization reversal in magnetic tunnel junctions: A micromagnetic study with phase-field microelasticity Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Strain-assisted current-induced magnetization reversal in magnetic tunnel junctions: A micromagnetic study with phase-field microelasticity Effect of substrate misfit strain on current-induced in-plane

  16. The fluid dynamics of a miniature dilution tunnel for internal-combustion engine aerosol measurement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kommer, Eric M.; Puzinauskas, Paulius V.; Buckley, Steven G.

    2007-11-15

    This paper investigates the fluid dynamics of a particular mini-dilution tunnel using LDV, flow visualization, a tracer sample technique and CFD. The mini-dilution tunnel studied had a 3.175 mm inside diameter tube discharging on the centerline of the tunnel where the diameter increases in a single step to 7.62 cm. The large diameter portion of the tunnel was 75 cm long. Most of the testing was performed at a flow rate of 15 l/min. The experimental investigation indicates that the flow field in the particular dilution tunnel tested has a persistent jet throughout its length, and this confined jet creates eddy recirculation zones which may cause the temperature and dilution histories of particles trapped in these eddies to be significantly different than particles which remain in the jet until extracted by the sample probe. Similarly, the location of the sample probe could also affect measured size distribution profiles, particularly if it were moved in or out of the path of the persistent jet. In addition to the simple tunnel geometry with a single abrupt expansion, a conical diffuser and a perforated plate were separately tested to investigate their effects on the tunnel fluid dynamics. The particular diffuser tested appeared to cause the jet to stall and therefore led to an even more unpredictable path for the fluid within. Limited testing with the perforated plate indicated that it increased the jet deceleration and laminarization, and therefore could lead to a more predictable flow path for aerosol sampled from the tunnel. (author)

  17. Can p-channel tunnel field-effect transistors perform as good as n-channel?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Verhulst, A. S. Pourghaderi, M. A.; Collaert, N.; Thean, A. V.-Y.; Verreck, D.; Van de Put, M.; Groeseneken, G.; Sore, B.

    2014-07-28

    We show that bulk semiconductor materials do not allow perfectly complementary p- and n-channel tunnel field-effect transistors (TFETs), due to the presence of a heavy-hole band. When tunneling in p-TFETs is oriented towards the gate-dielectric, field-induced quantum confinement results in a highest-energy subband which is heavy-hole like. In direct-bandgap IIIV materials, the most promising TFET materials, phonon-assisted tunneling to this subband degrades the subthreshold swing and leads to at least 10 smaller on-current than the desired ballistic on-current. This is demonstrated with quantum-mechanical predictions for p-TFETs with tunneling orthogonal to the gate, made out of InP, In{sub 0.53}Ga{sub 0.47}As, InAs, and a modified version of In{sub 0.53}Ga{sub 0.47}As with an artificially increased conduction-band density-of-states. We further show that even if the phonon-assisted current would be negligible, the build-up of a heavy-hole-based inversion layer prevents efficient ballistic tunneling, especially at low supply voltages. For p-TFET, a strongly confined n-i-p or n-p-i-p configuration is therefore recommended, as well as a tensily strained line-tunneling configuration.

  18. Selective p-i-n photodetector with resonant tunneling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mil'shtein, S.; Wilson, S.; Pillai, A.

    2014-05-15

    There are different fundamental approaches to designing selective photodetectors, where the selectivity of optical spectra is produced by a filtering aperture. However, manufacturing of multilayered filters is cumbersome for epitaxial technology. In the current study, we offer a novel approach in design of selective photodetectors. A p-i-n photodetector with superlattices in top n-layer becomes transparent for photons where h?<>E{sub ng}+E{sub n1}, the light will be absorbed, simultaneously producing high energy (hot) electrons. The designed thickness of the structure does prevent thermal relaxation of high energy electrons by thus enhancing the selectivity of the photodetector. However the most important selectivity element is the resonant tunneling which does happen only for electrons occupying E{sub n1} energy levels as they transfer to levels E{sub i1}aligned under reverse biasing.

  19. Subgap biasing of superconducting tunnel junctions without a magnetic field

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Segall, K.; Moyer, J.; Mazo, Juan J.

    2008-08-15

    Superconducting tunnel junctions (STJs) have been successfully used as single-photon detectors but require the use of a magnetic field to operate. A recent paper has proposed the idea to use a circuit of three junctions in place of a single junction in order to achieve the necessary biasing without applying a magnetic field. The nonlinear interaction between the different junctions in the circuit causes the existence of a stable subgap state for one of the junctions, which acts as the detector junction. In this paper, we present the first measurements demonstrating the existence of such a biasing state feasible for STJ detectors. Single junction measurements with an applied magnetic field help determine the functional form of the subgap current versus voltage; then the operating point of a three-junction circuit is measured and fit to theory. The excellent match between theory and experiment demonstrates the existence of the subgap biasing state. The outlook for possible use in detector applications is discussed.

  20. Preliminary studies of tunnel interface response modeling using test data from underground storage facilities.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sobolik, Steven Ronald; Bartel, Lewis Clark

    2010-11-01

    In attempting to detect and map out underground facilities, whether they be large-scale hardened deeply-buried targets (HDBT's) or small-scale tunnels for clandestine border or perimeter crossing, seismic imaging using reflections from the tunnel interface has been seen as one of the better ways to both detect and delineate tunnels from the surface. The large seismic impedance contrast at the tunnel/rock boundary should provide a strong, distinguishable seismic response, but in practice, such strong indicators are often lacking. One explanation for the lack of a good seismic reflection at such a strong contrast boundary is that the damage caused by the tunneling itself creates a zone of altered seismic properties that significantly changes the nature of this boundary. This report examines existing geomechanical data that define the extent of an excavation damage zone around underground tunnels, and the potential impact on rock properties such as P-wave and S-wave velocities. The data presented from this report are associated with sites used for the development of underground repositories for the disposal of radioactive waste; these sites have been excavated in volcanic tuff (Yucca Mountain) and granite (HRL in Sweden, URL in Canada). Using the data from Yucca Mountain, a numerical simulation effort was undertaken to evaluate the effects of the damage zone on seismic responses. Calculations were performed using the parallelized version of the time-domain finitedifference seismic wave propagation code developed in the Geophysics Department at Sandia National Laboratories. From these numerical simulations, the damage zone does not have a significant effect upon the tunnel response, either for a purely elastic case or an anelastic case. However, what was discovered is that the largest responses are not true reflections, but rather reradiated Stoneley waves generated as the air/earth interface of the tunnel. Because of this, data processed in the usual way may not correctly image the tunnel. This report represents a preliminary step in the development of a methodology to convert numerical predictions of rock properties to an estimation of the extent of rock damage around an underground facility and its corresponding seismic velocity, and the corresponding application to design a testing methodology for tunnel detection.

  1. Lakefront Tow Tank | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    None Control and Data Acquisition Description Multiple PC-based systems Cameras None Data Generation Capability Real-Time No Test Services Test Services None Special...

  2. MHL Tow Tank | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    16 Bandwidth(kHz) 20 Cameras Yes Description of Camera Types Wide variety of analog & digital surface cameras; high speed above and underwater cameras Available Sensors...

  3. Chase Tow Tank | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    components. Optical measurement system for observing kinematics of a model under test in the wave mode. Number of channels 8 Cameras Yes Number of Color Cameras 1 Available...

  4. Ice Towing Tank | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Real-Time Yes Test Services Test Services Yes On-Site fabrication capabilityequipment Machine shop, carpenter shop, welding shop, instrumentation and electronics shop Past...

  5. Small Towing Tank | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Real-Time Yes Test Services Test Services Yes On-Site fabrication capabilityequipment Machine shop, carpenter shop, welding shop, instrumentation and electronics shop Past...

  6. Maine Tow Tank | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Wind Capabilities None Control and Data Acquisition Description National Instruments LabviewCompact DAQ - 8 Module platform; Analog IO, Digital IO. Number of channels 32...

  7. Alden Tow Tank | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Differential pressure transducers, acoustic profiling, propeller meters, load cells, computer data acquisition systems. Number of channels Designed as needed Cameras Yes Number of...

  8. Stennis Tow Tank | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    and Data Acquisition Description Fully automated data collectioncarriage control computer system for mechanical current meters only. Number of channels 4 Cameras None...

  9. Davidson Laboratory Tow Tank | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Elsewhere PIV system for flow field measurement; in-house divers for installation and retrieval as needed Hydro | Hydrodynamic Testing Facilities Retrieved from "http:...

  10. Assessment of tunnel ground conditions for a two-year stand-by period, January 1994. UTAP report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1994-01-28

    This report summarizes observations, assessment of ground conditions, and recommendations pertaining to the Collider main ring tunnel at the Superconducting Super Collider (SSC).

  11. Chemical beam epitaxy growth of AlGaAs/GaAs tunnel junctions using trimethyl aluminium for multijunction solar cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paquette, B.; DeVita, M.; Turala, A.; Kolhatkar, G.; Boucherif, A.; Jaouad, A.; Aimez, V.; Ars, R.; Wilkins, M.; Wheeldon, J. F.; Walker, A. W.; Hinzer, K.; Fafard, S.

    2013-09-27

    AlGaAs/GaAs tunnel junctions for use in high concentration multijunction solar cells were designed and grown by chemical beam epitaxy (CBE) using trimethyl aluminium (TMA) as the p-dopant source for the AlGaAs active layer. Controlled hole concentration up to 4?10{sup 20} cm{sup ?3} was achieved through variation in growth parameters. Fabricated tunnel junctions have a peak tunneling current up to 6140 A/cm{sup 2}. These are suitable for high concentration use and outperform GaAs/GaAs tunnel junctions.

  12. Increased efficiency in multijunction solar cells through the incorporation of semimetallic ErAs nanoparticles into the tunnel junction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zide, J.M.O.; Kleiman-Shwarsctein, A.; Strandwitz, N.C.; Zimmerman, J.D.; Steenblock-Smith, T.; Gossard, A.C.; Forman, A.; Ivanovskaya, A.; Stucky, G.D.

    2006-04-17

    We report the molecular beam epitaxy growth of Al{sub 0.3}Ga{sub 0.7}As/GaAs multijunction solar cells with epitaxial, semimetallic ErAs nanoparticles at the interface of the tunnel junction. The states provided by these nanoparticles reduce the bias required to pass current through the tunnel junction by three orders of magnitude, and therefore drastically reduce the voltage losses in the tunnel junction. We have measured open-circuit voltages which are 97% of the sum of the constituent cells, which result in nearly double the efficiency of our multijunction cell with a conventional tunnel junction.

  13. A Historical Evaluation of the U16a Tunnel, Nevada National Security Site, Nye County, Nevada Volume 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jones, Roberrt C; Drollinger, Harold

    2013-06-01

    This report presents a historical evaluation of the U16a Tunnel on the Nevada National Security Site in southern Nevada. The work was conducted by the Desert Research Institute at the request of the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office and the U.S. Department of Defense, Defense Threat Reduction Agency. The U16a Tunnel was used for underground nuclear weapons effects tests in Shoshone Mountain in Area 16 of the Nevada National Security Site. Six nuclear tests were conducted in the U16a Tunnel from 1962 to 1971. These tests are Marshmallow, Gum Drop, Double Play, Ming Vase, Diamond Dust, and Diamond Mine. The U.S. Department of Defense Threat Reduction Agency, with participation from Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and Las Alamos National Laboratory, sponsored the tests. Fifteen high explosives tests were also conducted at the tunnel. Two were calibration tests during nuclear testing and the remaining were U.S. Department of Defense, Defense Threat Reduction Agency tunnel defeat tests. The U16a Tunnel complex is on the top and slopes of Shoshone Mountain, encompassing an area of approximately 16.7 hectares (41.1 acres). Major modifications to the landscape are a result of three principal activities, road construction and maintenance, mining activities related to development of the tunnel complex, and site preparation for activities related to testing. Forty-seven cultural features were recorded at the portal and on the slopes of Shoshone Mountain. At the portal area, features relate to the mining, construction, testing, and general every day operational support activities within the tunnel. These include concrete foundations for buildings, equipment pads, and rail lines. Features on the slopes above the tunnel relate to tunnel ventilation, borehole drilling, and data recording. Feature types include soil-covered bunkers, concrete foundations, instrument cable holes, drill holes, and ventilation shafts. The U16a Tunnel complex is eligible to the National Register of Historic Places under criteria a and c, consideration g of 36 CFR Part 60.4 as a historic landscape. Scientific research conducted at the tunnel has made significant contributions to the broad patterns of our history, particularly in regard to the Cold War era that was characterized by competing social, economic, and political ideologies between the former Soviet Union and the United States. The tunnel also possesses distinctive construction and engineering methods for conducting underground nuclear tests. The Desert Research Institute recommends that the U16a Tunnel area be left in place in its current condition and that the U16a Tunnel historic landscape be included in the Nevada National Security Site monitoring program and monitored on a regular basis.

  14. A Historical Evaluation of the U16a Tunnel, Nevada National Security Site, Nye County, Nevada Volume 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jones, robert C; Drollinger, Harold; Bullard, Thomas F; Ashbaugh, Laurence J; Griffin, Wayne R

    2013-06-01

    This report presents a historical evaluation of the U16a Tunnel on the Nevada National Security Site in southern Nevada. The work was conducted by the Desert Research Institute at the request of the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office and the U.S. Department of Defense, Defense Threat Reduction Agency. The U16a Tunnel was used for underground nuclear weapons effects tests in Shoshone Mountain in Area 16 of the Nevada National Security Site. Six nuclear tests were conducted in the U16a Tunnel from 1962 to 1971. These tests are Marshmallow, Gum Drop, Double Play, Ming Vase, Diamond Dust, and Diamond Mine. The U.S. Department of Defense Threat Reduction Agency, with participation from Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and Las Alamos National Laboratory, sponsored the tests. Fifteen high explosives tests were also conducted at the tunnel. Two were calibration tests during nuclear testing and the remaining were U.S. Department of Defense, Defense Threat Reduction Agency tunnel defeat tests. The U16a Tunnel complex is on the top and slopes of Shoshone Mountain, encompassing an area of approximately 16.7 hectares (41.1 acres). Major modifications to the landscape are a result of three principal activities, road construction and maintenance, mining activities related to development of the tunnel complex, and site preparation for activities related to testing. Forty-seven cultural features were recorded at the portal and on the slopes of Shoshone Mountain. At the portal area, features relate to the mining, construction, testing, and general every day operational support activities within the tunnel. These include concrete foundations for buildings, equipment pads, and rail lines. Features on the slopes above the tunnel relate to tunnel ventilation, borehole drilling, and data recording. Feature types include soil-covered bunkers, concrete foundations, instrument cable holes, drill holes, and ventilation shafts. The U16a Tunnel complex is eligible to the National Register of Historic Places under criteria a and c, consideration g of 36 CFR Part 60.4 as a historic landscape. Scientific research conducted at the tunnel has made significant contributions to the broad patterns of our history, particularly in regard to the Cold War era that was characterized by competing social, economic, and political ideologies between the former Soviet Union and the United States. The tunnel also possesses distinctive construction and engineering methods for conducting underground nuclear tests. The Desert Research Institute recommends that the U16a Tunnel area be left in place in its current condition and that the U16a Tunnel historic landscape be included in the Nevada National Security Site monitoring program and monitored on a regular basis.

  15. Intermediate-band photosensitive device with quantum dots having tunneling barrier embedded in organic matrix

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Forrest, Stephen R. (Ann Arbor, MI)

    2008-08-19

    A plurality of quantum dots each have a shell. The quantum dots are embedded in an organic matrix. At least the quantum dots and the organic matrix are photoconductive semiconductors. The shell of each quantum dot is arranged as a tunneling barrier to require a charge carrier (an electron or a hole) at a base of the tunneling barrier in the organic matrix to perform quantum mechanical tunneling to reach the respective quantum dot. A first quantum state in each quantum dot is between a lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (LUMO) and a highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO) of the organic matrix. Wave functions of the first quantum state of the plurality of quantum dots may overlap to form an intermediate band.

  16. Two-band lasing in epitaxially stacked tunnel-junction semiconductor lasers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vinokurov, D. A.; Ladugin, M. A.; Lyutetskii, A. V.; Marmalyuk, A. A.; Petrunov, A. N.; Pikhtin, N. A.; Slipchenko, S. O. Sokolova, Z. N.; Stankevich, A. L.; Fetisova, N. V.; Shashkin, I. S.; Averkiev, N. S.; Tarasov, I. S.

    2010-06-15

    Epitaxially stacked tunnel-junction laser hetero structures were grown by hydride metalorganic vapor-phase epitaxy in the system of AlGaAs/GaAs/In GaAs alloys. Based on such structures, mesa stripe lasers with an aperture of 150 s- 7 m were fabricated. The possibility of controlling the lasing wavelength by varying the active region thickness in each tunnel-junction laser structure was demonstrated. Independent two-band lasing at wavelengths of 914 and 925 nm (the difference frequency is 2.3 THz) was achieved at a maximum optical radiation power of 20 W in each band of the epitaxially stacked tunnel-junction semiconductor laser.

  17. Large-scale fabrication of BN tunnel barriers for graphene spintronics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fu, Wangyang; Makk, Péter; Maurand, Romain; Bräuninger, Matthias; Schönenberger, Christian

    2014-08-21

    We have fabricated graphene spin-valve devices utilizing scalable materials made from chemical vapor deposition (CVD). Both the spin-transporting graphene and the tunnel barrier material are CVD-grown. The tunnel barrier is realized by Hexagonal boron nitride, used either as a monolayer or bilayer and placed over the graphene. Spin transport experiments were performed using ferromagnetic contacts deposited onto the barrier. We find that spin injection is still greatly suppressed in devices with a monolayer tunneling barrier due to resistance mismatch. This is, however, not the case for devices with bilayer barriers. For those devices, a spin relaxation time of ∼260 ps intrinsic to the CVD graphene material is deduced. This time scale is comparable to those reported for exfoliated graphene, suggesting that this CVD approach is promising for spintronic applications which require scalable materials.

  18. Multiferroic tunnel junctions and ferroelectric control of magnetic state at interface (invited)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yin, Y. W.; Raju, M.; Li, Qi; Hu, W. J.; Burton, J. D.; Gruverman, A.; Tsymbal, E. Y.; Kim, Y.-M.; Borisevich, A. Y.; Pennycook, S. J.; Yang, S. M.; Noh, T. W.; Li, X. G.; Zhang, Z. D.

    2015-05-07

    As semiconductor devices reach ever smaller dimensions, the challenge of power dissipation and quantum effect place a serious limit on the future device scaling. Recently, a multiferroic tunnel junction (MFTJ) with a ferroelectric barrier sandwiched between two ferromagnetic electrodes has drawn enormous interest due to its potential applications not only in multi-level data storage but also in electric field controlled spintronics and nanoferronics. Here, we present our investigations on four-level resistance states, giant tunneling electroresistance (TER) due to interfacial magnetoelectric coupling, and ferroelectric control of spin polarized tunneling in MFTJs. Coexistence of large tunneling magnetoresistance and TER has been observed in manganite/(Ba, Sr)TiO{sub 3}/manganite MFTJs at low temperatures and room temperature four-resistance state devices were also obtained. To enhance the TER for potential logic operation with a magnetic memory, La{sub 0.7}Sr{sub 0.3}MnO{sub 3}/BaTiO{sub 3}/La{sub 0.5}Ca{sub 0.5}MnO{sub 3} /La{sub 0.7}Sr{sub 0.3}MnO{sub 3} MFTJs were designed by utilizing a bilayer tunneling barrier in which BaTiO{sub 3} is ferroelectric and La{sub 0.5}Ca{sub 0.5}MnO{sub 3} is close to ferromagnetic metal to antiferromagnetic insulator phase transition. The phase transition occurs when the ferroelectric polarization is reversed, resulting in an increase of TER by two orders of magnitude. Tunneling magnetoresistance can also be controlled by the ferroelectric polarization reversal, indicating strong magnetoelectric coupling at the interface.

  19. Tunneling splitting in double-proton transfer: Direct diagonalization results for porphycene

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smedarchina, Zorka; Siebrand, Willem; Fernndez-Ramos, Antonio

    2014-11-07

    Zero-point and excited level splittings due to double-proton tunneling are calculated for porphycene and the results are compared with experiment. The calculation makes use of a multidimensional imaginary-mode Hamiltonian, diagonalized directly by an effective reduction of its dimensionality. Porphycene has a complex potential energy surface with nine stationary configurations that allow a variety of tunneling paths, many of which include classically accessible regions. A symmetry-based approach is used to show that the zero-point level, although located above the cis minimum, corresponds to concerted tunneling along a direct trans ? trans path; a corresponding cis ? cis path is predicted at higher energy. This supports the conclusion of a previous paper [Z. Smedarchina, W. Siebrand, and A. Fernndez-Ramos, J. Chem. Phys. 127, 174513 (2007)] based on the instanton approach to a model Hamiltonian of correlated double-proton transfer. A multidimensional tunneling Hamiltonian is then generated, based on a double-minimum potential along the coordinate of concerted proton motion, which is newly evaluated at the RI-CC2/cc-pVTZ level of theory. To make it suitable for diagonalization, its dimensionality is reduced by treating fast weakly coupled modes in the adiabatic approximation. This results in a coordinate-dependent mass of tunneling, which is included in a unique Hermitian form into the kinetic energy operator. The reduced Hamiltonian contains three symmetric and one antisymmetric mode coupled to the tunneling mode and is diagonalized by a modified Jacobi-Davidson algorithm implemented in the Jadamilu software for sparse matrices. The results are in satisfactory agreement with the observed splitting of the zero-point level and several vibrational fundamentals after a partial reassignment, imposed by recently derived selection rules. They also agree well with instanton calculations based on the same Hamiltonian.

  20. Using tevatron magnets for HE-LHC or new ring in LHC tunnel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Piekarz, Henryk; /Fermilab

    2011-08-01

    Two injector accelerator options for HE-LHC of p{sup +} - p{sup +} collisions at 33 TeV cms energy are briefly outlined. One option is based on the Super-SPS (S-SPS) accelerator in the SPS tunnel, and the other one is based on the LER (Low-Energy-Ring) accelerator in the LHC tunnel. Expectations of performance of the main arc accelerator magnets considered for the construction of the S-SPS and of the LER accelerators are used to tentatively devise some selected properties of these accelerators as potential injectors to HE-LHC.

  1. Note: Long-range scanning tunneling microscope for the study of nanostructures on insulating substrates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Molina-Mendoza, Aday J.; Rodrigo, Jos G.; Rubio-Bollinger, Gabino; Island, Joshua; Burzuri, Enrique; Zant, Herre S. J. van der; Agrat, Nicols; Condensed Matter Physics Center and Instituto Universitario de Ciencia de Materiales Nicols Cabrera, Universidad Autnoma de Madrid, Campus de Cantoblanco, E-28049 Madrid; Instituto Madrileo de Estudios Avanzados en Nanociencia IMDEA-Nanociencia, E-28049 Madrid

    2014-02-15

    The scanning tunneling microscope (STM) is a powerful tool for studying the electronic properties at the atomic level, however, it is of relatively small scanning range and the fact that it can only operate on conducting samples prevents its application to study heterogeneous samples consisting of conducting and insulating regions. Here we present a long-range scanning tunneling microscope capable of detecting conducting micro and nanostructures on insulating substrates using a technique based on the capacitance between the tip and the sample and performing STM studies.

  2. Negative differential resistance in GaN tunneling hot electron transistors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, Zhichao; Nath, Digbijoy; Rajan, Siddharth

    2014-11-17

    Room temperature negative differential resistance is demonstrated in a unipolar GaN-based tunneling hot electron transistor. Such a device employs tunnel-injected electrons to vary the electron energy and change the fraction of reflected electrons, and shows repeatable negative differential resistance with a peak to valley current ratio of 7.2. The device was stable when biased in the negative resistance regime and tunable by changing collector bias. Good repeatability and double-sweep characteristics at room temperature show the potential of such device for high frequency oscillators based on quasi-ballistic transport.

  3. A Monolithic Interconnected module with a tunnel Junction for Enhanced Electrical and Optical Performance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Murray, Christopher Sean; Wilt, David Morgan

    1999-06-30

    An improved thermophotovoltaic (TPV) n/p/n device is provided. Monolithic Interconnected Modules (MIMs), semiconductor devices converting infrared radiation to electricity, have been developed with improved electrical and optical performance. The structure is an n-type emitter on a p-type base with an n-type lateral conduction layer. The incorporation of a tunnel junction and the reduction in the amount of p-type material used results in negligible parasitic absorption, decreased series resistance, increased voltage and increased active area. The novel use of a tunnel junction results in the potential for a TPV device with efficiency greater than 24%.

  4. HFiTT - Higgs Factory in Tevatron Tunnel (Technical Report) | SciTech

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Connect Technical Report: HFiTT - Higgs Factory in Tevatron Tunnel Citation Details In-Document Search Title: HFiTT - Higgs Factory in Tevatron Tunnel Authors: Chou, Weiren ; Mourou, Gerard ; Solyak, Nikolay ; Tajima, Toshiki ; Velasco, Mayda Publication Date: 2013-05-22 OSTI Identifier: 1128013 Report Number(s): FERMILAB-TM-2558-APC arXiv eprint number arXiv:1305.5202 DOE Contract Number: AC02-07CH11359 Resource Type: Technical Report Resource Relation: Conference: Community Summer Study

  5. Tunneling characteristics in chemical vapor deposited graphenehexagonal boron nitridegraphene junctions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roy, T.; Hesabi, Z. R.; Joiner, C. A.; Vogel, E. M. [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, 771 Ferst Drive, Atlanta, Georgia 30332 (United States); Liu, L.; Gu, G. [Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, University of Tennessee, 1520 Middle Drive, Knoxville, Tennessee 37996 (United States); Barrera, S. de la; Feenstra, R. M. [Department of Physics, Carnegie Mellon University, 5000 Forbes Ave., Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15213 (United States); Chakrabarti, B. [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, 771 Ferst Drive, Atlanta, Georgia 30332 (United States); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Texas at Dallas, 800 West Campbell Rd., Richardson, Texas 75080 (United States)

    2014-03-24

    Large area chemical vapor deposited graphene and hexagonal boron nitride was used to fabricate graphenehexagonal boron nitridegraphene symmetric field effect transistors. Gate control of the tunneling characteristics is observed similar to previously reported results for exfoliated graphenehexagonal boron nitridegraphene devices. Density-of-states features are observed in the tunneling characteristics of the devices, although without large resonant peaks that would arise from lateral momentum conservation. The lack of distinct resonant behavior is attributed to disorder in the devices, and a possible source of the disorder is discussed.

  6. A micrometer-size movable light emitting area in a resonant tunneling light emitting diode

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pettinari, G., E-mail: giorgio.pettinari@cnr.it [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Nottingham, Nottingham NG7 2RD (United Kingdom); National Research Council (CNR), Institute for Photonics and Nanotechnologies (IFN-CNR), Via Cineto Romano 42, 00156 Roma (Italy); Balakrishnan, N.; Makarovsky, O.; Campion, R. P.; Patan, A. [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Nottingham, Nottingham NG7 2RD (United Kingdom)] [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Nottingham, Nottingham NG7 2RD (United Kingdom); Polimeni, A.; Capizzi, M. [CNISM-Dipartimento di Fisica, Sapienza Universit di Roma, P.le A. Moro 2, 00185 Roma (Italy)] [CNISM-Dipartimento di Fisica, Sapienza Universit di Roma, P.le A. Moro 2, 00185 Roma (Italy)

    2013-12-09

    We report on the fabrication of a micrometer-size movable light emitting area in a GaAs/AlAs quantum well resonant tunneling p-i-n diode. The spatial position of the micrometer-size light emitting area shifts linearly with increasing applied bias, up to 30??m for a bias increment of 0.2?V. Also, the simultaneous resonant tunneling injection of both electrons and holes into the quantum well states is achieved at specific positions of the diode, thus resulting in a tenfold increase of the electroluminescence intensity.

  7. Monolithic interconnected module with a tunnel junction for enhanced electrical and optical performance

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Murray, Christopher S. (Bethel Park, PA); Wilt, David M. (Bay Village, OH)

    2000-01-01

    An improved thermophotovoltaic (TPV) n/p/n device is provided. Monolithic Interconnected Modules (MIMS), semiconductor devices converting infrared radiation to electricity, have been developed with improved electrical and optical performance. The structure is an n-type emitter on a p-type base with an n-type lateral conduction layer. The incorporation of a tunnel junction and the reduction in the amount of p-type material used results in negligible parasitic absorption, decreased series resistance, increased voltage and increased active area. The novel use of a tunnel junction results in the potential for a TPV device with efficiency greater than 24%.

  8. Effects of boron composition on tunneling magnetoresistance ratio and microstructure of CoFeB/MgO/CoFeB pseudo-spin-valve magnetic tunnel junctions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kodzuka, M.; Ohkubo, T.; Hono, K.; Ikeda, S.; Ohno, H.; Gan, H. D.

    2012-02-15

    The effect of B concentration on the tunneling magnetoresistance (TMR) of (Co{sub 25}Fe{sub 75}){sub 100-x}B{sub x}/MgO/(Co{sub 25}Fe{sub 75}){sub 100-x}B{sub x} (x = 22 and 33) pseudo-spin-valve (P-SV) magnetic tunnel junctions (MTJs) was investigated. The TMR ratios for optimally annealed MTJs with x = 22 and 33 were 340% and 170%, respectively, at room temperature. High resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) observation showed a weaker (001) texture in the MgO barrier in the MTJ with x = 33. The bottom electrode was not fully crystallized even with a considerable amount of B in the (Co{sub 25}Fe{sub 75}){sub 67}B{sub 33}, while good epitaxy was observed between (001) textured MgO and (Co{sub 25}Fe{sub 75}){sub 78}B{sub 22} electrodes.

  9. Response of a Spent Fuel Transportation Cask to a Tunnel Fire Event

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bajwa, C. S.

    2003-02-25

    The staff of the Spent Fuel Project Office at the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission undertook the investigation and thermal analysis of the Baltimore tunnel fire event. This event occurred in the Howard Street tunnel, in Baltimore, Maryland, on July 18, 2001. The staff was tasked with assessing the consequences of this event on the transportation of spent nuclear fuel. This paper describes the staff's coordination with the following government and laboratory organizations: the National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB), to determine the details of the train derailment and fire; the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), to quantify the thermal conditions within the tunnel; the Center for Nuclear Waste Regulatory Analysis (CNWRA), to validate the NIST evaluations, and the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), to assist in the thermal analysis. The results of the staff's review and analysis efforts are also discussed. The staff has concluded that had the spent fuel transportation cask analyzed, a design approved under 10 CFR Part 71, been subjected to the Howard Street tunnel fire, no release of radioactive materials would have resulted from this postulated event, and the health and safety of the public would have been maintained.

  10. The tunneling solutions of the time-dependent Schroedinger equation for a square-potential barrier

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elci, A.; Hjalmarson, H. P.

    2009-10-15

    The exact tunneling solutions of the time-dependent Schroedinger equation with a square-potential barrier are derived using the continuous symmetry group G{sub S} for the partial differential equation. The infinitesimal generators and the elements for G{sub S} are represented and derived in the jet space. There exist six classes of wave functions. The representative (canonical) wave functions for the classes are labeled by the eigenvalue sets, whose elements arise partially from the reducibility of a Lie subgroup G{sub LS} of G{sub S} and partially from the separation of variables. Each eigenvalue set provides two or more time scales for the wave function. The ratio of two time scales can act as the duration of an intrinsic clock for the particle motion. The exact solutions of the time-dependent Schroedinger equation presented here can produce tunneling currents that are orders of magnitude larger than those produced by the energy eigenfunctions. The exact solutions show that tunneling current can be quantized under appropriate boundary conditions and tunneling probability can be affected by a transverse acceleration.

  11. Resonant spin tunneling in randomly oriented nanospheres of Mn12 acetate

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Lendínez, S.; Zarzuela, R.; Tejada, J.; Terban, M. W.; Billinge, S. J. L.; Espin, J.; Imaz, I.; Maspoch, D.; Chudnovsky, E. M.

    2015-01-06

    We report measurements and theoretical analysis of resonant spin tunneling in randomly oriented nanospheres of a molecular magnet. Amorphous nanospheres of Mn₁₂ acetate have been fabricated and characterized by chemical, infrared, TEM, X-ray, and magnetic methods. Magnetic measurements have revealed sharp tunneling peaks in the field derivative of the magnetization that occur at the typical resonant field values for the Mn₁₂ acetate crystal in the field parallel to the easy axis.Theoretical analysis is provided that explains these observations. We argue that resonant spin tunneling in a molecular magnet can be established in a powder sample, without the need for amore » single crystal and without aligning the easy magnetization axes of the molecules. This is confirmed by re-analyzing the old data on a powdered sample of non-oriented micron-size crystals of Mn₁₂ acetate. In conclusion, our findings can greatly simplify the selection of candidates for quantum spin tunneling among newly synthesized molecular magnets.« less

  12. Simultaneous topographic and elemental chemical and magnetic contrast in scanning tunneling microscopy

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rose, Volker; Preissner, Curt A; Hla, Saw-Wai; Wang, Kangkang; Rosenmann, Daniel

    2014-09-30

    A method and system for performing simultaneous topographic and elemental chemical and magnetic contrast analysis in a scanning, tunneling microscope. The method and system also includes nanofabricated coaxial multilayer tips with a nanoscale conducting apex and a programmable in-situ nanomanipulator to fabricate these tips and also to rotate tips controllably.

  13. Interface characterization of epitaxial Fe/MgO/Fe magnetic tunnel junctions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Shouguo; Ward, R. C. C.; Zhang, Xiaoguang; Kohn, A.; Ma, Q. L.; Zhang, J.; Liu, H. F.; Han, Prof. X. F.

    2012-01-01

    Following predictions by first-principles theory of huge tunnel magnetoresistance (TMR) effect in epitaxial Fe/MgO/Fe magnetic tunnel junctions (MTJs), measured magnetoresistance (MR) ratio about 200% at room temperature (RT) have been reported in MgO-based epitaxial MTJs. Recently, MR ratio of about 600% has been reported at RT in MgO-based amorphous MTJs with core structure of CoFeB/MgO/CoFeB grown by magnetron sputtering with amorphous CoFeB layers. The sputtered CoFeB/MgO/CoFeB MTJs shows a great potential application in spintronic devices. Although epitaxial structure will probably not be used in devices, it remains an excellent model system to compare theoretical calculations with experimental results and to enhance our understanding of the spin dependent tunneling. Both theoretical calculations and experimental results clearly indicate that the interfacial structure plays a crucial role on coherent tunneling across single crystalMgO barrier, especially in epitaxial MgO-based MTJs grown by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE). Surface X-ray diffraction, Auger electron spectroscopy, X-ray absorption spectra, and X-ray magnetic circular dichroism have been used for interface characterization. However, no consistent viewpoint has been reached, and this is still an open issue. In this article, recent studies on the interface characterization in MgO-based epitaxial MTJs will be introduced, with a focus on research by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, high resolution transmission electron microscopy, and spin dependent tunneling spectroscopy.

  14. Estimation of deformation and stiffness of fractures close to tunnels using data from single-hole hydraulic testing and grouting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fransson, A.; Tsang, C.-F.; Rutqvist, J.; Gustafson, G.

    2010-05-01

    Sealing of tunnels in fractured rocks is commonly performed by pre- or post-excavation grouting. The grouting boreholes are frequently drilled close to the tunnel wall, an area where rock stresses can be low and fractures can more easily open up during grout pressurization. In this paper we suggest that data from hydraulic testing and grouting can be used to identify grout-induced fracture opening, to estimate fracture stiffness of such fractures, and to evaluate its impact on the grout performance. A conceptual model and a method are presented for estimating fracture stiffness. The method is demonstrated using grouting data from four pre-excavation grouting boreholes at a shallow tunnel (50 m) in Nygard, Sweden, and two post-excavation grouting boreholes at a deep tunnel (450 m) in Aespoe HRL, Sweden. The estimated stiffness of intersecting fractures for the boreholes at the shallow Nygard tunnel are low (2-5 GPa/m) and in agreement with literature data from field experiments at other fractured rock sites. Higher stiffness was obtained for the deeper tunnel boreholes at Aespoe which is reasonable considering that generally higher rock stresses are expected at greater depths. Our method of identifying and evaluating the properties and impact of deforming fractures might be most applicable when grouting takes place in boreholes adjacent to the tunnel wall, where local stresses might be low and where deforming (opening) fractures may take most of the grout.

  15. Integrating atomic layer deposition and ultra-high vacuum physical vapor deposition for in situ fabrication of tunnel junctions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elliot, Alan J. E-mail: jwu@ku.edu; Malek, Gary A.; Lu, Rongtao; Han, Siyuan; Wu, Judy Z. E-mail: jwu@ku.edu; Yu, Haifeng; Zhao, Shiping

    2014-07-15

    Atomic Layer Deposition (ALD) is a promising technique for growing ultrathin, pristine dielectrics on metal substrates, which is essential to many electronic devices. Tunnel junctions are an excellent example which require a leak-free, ultrathin dielectric tunnel barrier of typical thickness around 1 nm between two metal electrodes. A challenge in the development of ultrathin dielectric tunnel barriers using ALD is controlling the nucleation of dielectrics on metals with minimal formation of native oxides at the metal surface for high-quality interfaces between the tunnel barrier and metal electrodes. This poses a critical need for integrating ALD with ultra-high vacuum (UHV) physical vapor deposition. In order to address these challenges, a viscous-flow ALD chamber was designed and interfaced to an UHV magnetron sputtering chamber via a load lock. A sample transportation system was implemented for in situ sample transfer between the ALD, load lock, and sputtering chambers. Using this integrated ALD-UHV sputtering system, superconductor-insulator-superconductor (SIS) Nb-Al/Al{sub 2}O{sub 2}/Nb Josephson tunnel junctions were fabricated with tunnel barriers of thickness varied from sub-nm to ?1 nm. The suitability of using an Al wetting layer for initiation of the ALD Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} tunnel barrier was investigated with ellipsometry, atomic force microscopy, and electrical transport measurements. With optimized processing conditions, leak-free SIS tunnel junctions were obtained, demonstrating the viability of this integrated ALD-UHV sputtering system for the fabrication of tunnel junctions and devices comprised of metal-dielectric-metal multilayers.

  16. Elastic tunneling charge transport mechanisms in silicon quantum dots /SiO{sub 2} thin films and superlattices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Illera, S. Prades, J. D.; Cirera, A.

    2015-05-07

    The role of different charge transport mechanisms in Si/SiO{sub 2} structures has been studied. A theoretical model based on the Transfer Hamiltonian Formalism has been developed to explain experimental current trends in terms of three different elastic tunneling processes: (1) trap assisted tunneling; (2) transport through an intermediate quantum dot; and (3) direct tunneling between leads. In general, at low fields carrier transport is dominated by the quantum dots whereas, for moderate and high fields, transport through deep traps inherent to the SiO{sub 2} is the most relevant process. Besides, current trends in Si/SiO{sub 2} superlattice structure have been properly reproduced.

  17. Design procedures for coal mine tunnels. Open file report 1 Oct 79-31 Dec 82 (final)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bieniawski, Z.T.

    1983-03-31

    Although coal mine tunnels such as the main haulageways or roadways are the lifelines of coal mines, little attention has been paid to them in the United States in terms of preconstruction planning and design. This report summarizes the results of a 3-year research project aimed at improving the design procedures for coal mine tunnels. A new design approach was developed for this purpose and roof-support design charts were prepared for mine tunnels and their intersections. Analytical studies, 'base friction' model experiments, and in situ rock stress measurements were performed during this research.

  18. A Historical Evaluation of the U12n Tunnel, Nevada National Security Site, Nye County, Nevada Part 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Drollinger, Harold; Jones, Robert C; Bullard, Thomas F; Ashbaugh, Laurence J; Griffin, Wayne R

    2011-06-01

    This report presents a historical evaluation of the U12n Tunnel on the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) in southern Nevada. The work was conducted by the Desert Research Institute at the request of the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office and the U.S. Department of Defense, Defense Threat Reduction Agency (DTRA). The U12n Tunnel was one of a series of tunnels used for underground nuclear weapons effects tests in Rainier and Aqueduct Mesas. A total of 22 nuclear tests were conducted in the U12n Tunnel from 1967 to 1992. These tests include Midi Mist, Hudson Seal, Diana Mist, Misty North, Husky Ace, Ming Blade, Hybla Fair, Mighty Epic, Diablo Hawk, Miners Iron, Huron Landing, Diamond Ace, Mini Jade, Tomme/Midnight Zephyr, Misty Rain, Mill Yard, Diamond Beech, Middle Note, Misty Echo, Mineral Quarry, Randsburg, and Hunters Trophy. DTRA sponsored all tests except Tomme and Randsburg which were sponsored by the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. Midnight Zephyr, sponsored by DTRA, was an add on experiment to the Tomme test. Eleven high explosive tests were also conducted in the tunnel and included a Stemming Plan Test, the Pre-Mill Yard test, the two seismic Non-Proliferation Experiment tests, and seven Dipole Hail tests. The U12n Tunnel complex is composed of the portal and mesa areas, encompassing a total area of approximately 600 acres (240 hectares). Major modifications to the landscape have resulted from four principal activities. These are road construction and maintenance, mining activities related to development of the tunnel complex, site preparation for activities related to testing, and construction of retention ponds. A total of 202 cultural features were recorded for the portal and mesa areas. At the portal area, features relate to the mining, construction, testing, and general everyday operational support activities within the tunnel. These include concrete foundations for buildings, ventilation equipment, air compressors, communications equipment, mining equipment, rail lines, retention ponds to impound tunnel effluent, and storage containers. Features on the mesa above the tunnel generally relate to tunnel ventilation and cooling, borehole drilling, and data recording facilities. Feature types include concrete foundations, instrument cable holes, drill holes, equipment pads, ventilation shafts, and ventilation equipment. The U12n Tunnel complex is eligible to the National Register of Historic Places under criteria a and c, consideration g of 36 CFR Part 60.4 as a historic landscape. Scientific research conducted at the tunnel has made significant contributions to the broad patterns of our history, particularly in regard to the Cold War era that was characterized by competing social, economic, and political ideologies between the former Soviet Union and the United States. The tunnel also possesses distinctive construction and engineering methods for conducting underground nuclear tests. The Desert Research Institute recommends that the U12n Tunnel area be left in place in its current condition and that the U12n Tunnel historic landscape be included in the NNSS monitoring program and monitored for disturbances or alterations on a regular basis.

  19. A Historical Evaluation of the U12n Tunnel, Nevada national Security Site, Nye County, Nevada Part 2 of 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Drollinger, Harold; Jones, Robert C; Bullard, Thomas F; Ashbaugh, Laurence J; Griffin, Wayne R

    2011-06-01

    This report presents a historical evaluation of the U12n Tunnel on the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) in southern Nevada. The work was conducted by the Desert Research Institute at the request of the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office and the U.S. Department of Defense, Defense Threat Reduction Agency (DTRA). The U12n Tunnel was one of a series of tunnels used for underground nuclear weapons effects tests in Rainier and Aqueduct Mesas. A total of 22 nuclear tests were conducted in the U12n Tunnel from 1967 to 1992. These tests include Midi Mist, Hudson Seal, Diana Mist, Misty North, Husky Ace, Ming Blade, Hybla Fair, Mighty Epic, Diablo Hawk, Miners Iron, Huron Landing, Diamond Ace, Mini Jade, Tomme/Midnight Zephyr, Misty Rain, Mill Yard, Diamond Beech, Middle Note, Misty Echo, Mineral Quarry, Randsburg, and Hunters Trophy. DTRA sponsored all tests except Tomme and Randsburg which were sponsored by the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. Midnight Zephyr, sponsored by DTRA, was an add on experiment to the Tomme test. Eleven high explosive tests were also conducted in the tunnel and included a Stemming Plan Test, the Pre-Mill Yard test, the two seismic Non-Proliferation Experiment tests, and seven Dipole Hail tests. The U12n Tunnel complex is composed of the portal and mesa areas, encompassing a total area of approximately 600 acres (240 hectares). Major modifications to the landscape have resulted from four principal activities. These are road construction and maintenance, mining activities related to development of the tunnel complex, site preparation for activities related to testing, and construction of retention ponds. A total of 202 cultural features were recorded for the portal and mesa areas. At the portal area, features relate to the mining, construction, testing, and general everyday operational support activities within the tunnel. These include concrete foundations for buildings, ventilation equipment, air compressors, communications equipment, mining equipment, rail lines, retention ponds to impound tunnel effluent, and storage containers. Features on the mesa above the tunnel generally relate to tunnel ventilation and cooling, borehole drilling, and data recording facilities. Feature types include concrete foundations, instrument cable holes, drill holes, equipment pads, ventilation shafts, and ventilation equipment. The U12n Tunnel complex is eligible to the National Register of Historic Places under criteria a and c, consideration g of 36 CFR Part 60.4 as a historic landscape. Scientific research conducted at the tunnel has made significant contributions to the broad patterns of our history, particularly in regard to the Cold War era that was characterized by competing social, economic, and political ideologies between the former Soviet Union and the United States. The tunnel also possesses distinctive construction and engineering methods for conducting underground nuclear tests. The Desert Research Institute recommends that the U12n Tunnel area be left in place in its current condition and that the U12n Tunnel historic landscape be included in the NNSS monitoring program and monitored for disturbances or alterations on a regular basis.

  20. Tunnel magnetoresistance and linear conductance of double quantum dots strongly coupled to ferromagnetic leads

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weymann, Ireneusz

    2015-05-07

    We analyze the spin-dependent linear-response transport properties of double quantum dots strongly coupled to external ferromagnetic leads. By using the numerical renormalization group method, we determine the dependence of the linear conductance and tunnel magnetoresistance on the degree of spin polarization of the leads and the position of the double dot levels. We focus on the transport regime where the system exhibits the SU(4) Kondo effect. It is shown that the presence of ferromagnets generally leads the suppression of the linear conductance due to the presence of an exchange field. Moreover, the exchange field gives rise to a transition from the SU(4) to the orbital SU(2) Kondo effect. We also analyze the dependence of the tunnel magnetoresistance on the double dot levels' positions and show that it exhibits a very nontrivial behavior.

  1. Bohm-Aharonov and Kondo effects on tunneling currents in a mesoscopic ring

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davidovich, M.A.; Anda, E.V.; Chiappe, G.

    1997-03-01

    We present an analysis of the Kondo effect on the Bohm-Aharonov oscillations of the tunneling currents in a mesoscopic ring with a quantum dot inserted in one of its arms. The system is described by an Anderson-impurity tight-binding Hamiltonian where the electron-electron interaction is restricted to the dot. The currents are obtained using nonequilibrium Green functions calculated through a cumulant diagrammatic expansion in the chain approximation. It is shown that at low temperature, even with the system out of resonance, the Kondo peak provides a channel for the electron to tunnel through the dot, giving rise to the Bohm-Aharonov oscillations of the current. At high temperature these oscillations are important only if the dot level is aligned to the Fermi level, when the resonance condition is satisfied. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  2. Spectroscopy and capacitance measurements of tunneling resonances in an Sb-implanted point contact.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wendt, Joel Robert; Rahman, Rajib; Ten Eyck, Gregory A.; Eng, Kevin; Carroll, Malcolm S.; Young, Ralph Watson; Lilly, Michael Patrick; Stalford, Harold Lenn; Bishop, Nathaniel; Bielejec, Edward Salvador

    2010-08-01

    We fabricated a split-gate defined point contact in a double gate enhancement mode Si-MOS device, and implanted Sb donor atoms using a self-aligned process. E-beam lithography in combination with a timed implant gives us excellent control over the placement of dopant atoms, and acts as a stepping stone to focused ion beam implantation of single donors. Our approach allows us considerable latitude in experimental design in-situ. We have identified two resonance conditions in the point contact conductance as a function of split gate voltage. Using tunneling spectroscopy, we probed their electronic structure as a function of temperature and magnetic field. We also determine the capacitive coupling between the resonant feature and several gates. Comparison between experimental values and extensive quasi-classical simulations constrain the location and energy of the resonant level. We discuss our results and how they may apply to resonant tunneling through a single donor.

  3. Macroscopic quantum tunneling in small Josephson junctions in a magnetic field.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ovchinnikov, Yu. N.; Barone, A.; Varlamov, A. A.; Materials Science Division; Max-Planck Inst. for Physics of Complex Systems; Landau Inst. Theoretical Physics; Univ. di Napoli Federico II; Coherentia-INFM, CNR

    2007-01-01

    We study the phenomenon of macroscopic quantum tunneling (MQT) in small Josephson junctions (JJ) with an externally applied magnetic field. The latter results in the appearance of the Fraunhofer type modulation of the current density along the barrier. The problem of MQT for a pointlike JJ is reduced to the motion of the quantum particle in the washboard potential. In the case of a finite size JJ under consideration, this problem corresponds to a MQT in a potential which itself, besides the phase, depends on space variables. The general expression for the crossover temperature To between thermally activated and macroscopic quantum tunneling regimes and the escaping time {tau}{sub esc} have been calculated.

  4. DEVELOPMENT AND APPLICATION OF A FAST-RUNNING TOOL TO CHARACTERIZE SHOCK DAMAGE WITHIN TUNNEL STRUCTURES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Glascoe, L; Morris, J; Glenn, L; Krnjajic, M

    2009-03-31

    Successful but time-intensive use of high-fidelity computational capabilities for shock loading events and resultant effects on and within enclosed structures, e.g., tunnels, has led to an interest in developing more expedient methods of analysis. While several tools are currently available for the general study of the failure of structures under dynamic shock loads at a distance, presented are a pair of statistics- and physics-based tools that can be used to differentiate different types of damage (e.g., breach versus yield) as well as quantify the amount of damage within tunnels for loads close-in and with standoff. Use of such faster running tools allows for scoping and planning of more detailed model and test analysis and provides a way to address parametric sensitivity over a large multivariate space.

  5. Perpendicular magnetic tunnel junctions with double barrier and single or synthetic antiferromagnetic storage layer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cuchet, La; Rodmacq, Bernard; Auffret, Stphane; Sousa, Ricardo C.; Prejbeanu, Ioan L.; Dieny, Bernard

    2015-06-21

    The magnetic properties of double tunnel junctions with perpendicular anisotropy were investigated. Two synthetic antiferromagnetic references are used, while the middle storage magnetic layer can be either a single ferromagnetic or a synthetic antiferromagnetic FeCoB-based layer, with a critical thickness as large as 3.0?nm. Among the different achievable magnetic configurations in zero field, those with either antiparallel references, and single ferromagnetic storage layer, or parallel references, and synthetic antiferromagnetic storage layer, are of particular interest since they allow increasing the efficiency of spin transfer torque writing and the thermal stability of the stored information as compared to single tunnel junctions. The latter configuration can be preferred when stray fields would favour a parallel orientation of the reference layers. In this case, the synthetic antiferromagnetic storage layer is also less sensitive to residual stray fields.

  6. Vector spin modeling for magnetic tunnel junctions with voltage dependent effects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Manipatruni, Sasikanth Nikonov, Dmitri E.; Young, Ian A.

    2014-05-07

    Integration and co-design of CMOS and spin transfer devices requires accurate vector spin conduction modeling of magnetic tunnel junction (MTJ) devices. A physically realistic model of the MTJ should comprehend the spin torque dynamics of nanomagnet interacting with an injected vector spin current and the voltage dependent spin torque. Vector spin modeling allows for calculation of 3 component spin currents and potentials along with the charge currents/potentials in non-collinear magnetic systems. Here, we show 4-component vector spin conduction modeling of magnetic tunnel junction devices coupled with spin transfer torque in the nanomagnet. Nanomagnet dynamics, voltage dependent spin transport, and thermal noise are comprehended in a self-consistent fashion. We show comparison of the model with experimental magnetoresistance (MR) of MTJs and voltage degradation of MR with voltage. Proposed model enables MTJ circuit design that comprehends voltage dependent spin torque effects, switching error rates, spin degradation, and back hopping effects.

  7. Improved tunneling magnetoresistance at low temperature in manganite junctions grown by molecular beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Werner, R.; Kleiner, R.; Koelle, D.; Petrov, A. Yu.; Davidson, B. A.; Mino, L. Alvarez

    2011-04-18

    We report resistance versus magnetic field measurements for a La{sub 0.65}Sr{sub 0.35}MnO{sub 3}/SrTiO{sub 3}/La{sub 0.65}Sr{sub 0.35}MnO{sub 3} tunnel junction grown by molecular-beam epitaxy, that show a large field window of extremely high tunneling magnetoresistance (TMR) at low temperature. Scanning the in-plane applied field orientation through 360 deg., the TMR shows fourfold symmetry, i.e., biaxial anisotropy, aligned with the crystalline axis but not the junction geometrical long axis. The TMR reaches {approx}1900% at 4 K, corresponding to an interfacial spin polarization of >95% assuming identical interfaces. These results show that uniaxial anisotropy is not necessary for large TMR, and lay the groundwork for future improvements in TMR in manganite junctions.

  8. Modeling of Damage, Permeability Changes and Pressure Responses during Excavation of the TSX Tunnel in Granitic Rock at URL, Canada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rutqvist, Jonny; Borgesson, Lennart; Chijimatsu, Masakazu; Hernelind, Jan; Jing, Lanru; Kobayashi, Akira; Nguyen, Son

    2008-08-01

    This paper presents numerical modeling of excavation-induced damage, permeability changes, and fluid-pressure responses during excavation of the TSX tunnel at the underground research laboratory (URL) in Canada. Four different numerical models were applied, using a wide range of approaches to model damage and permeability changes in the excavation disturbed zone (EDZ) around the tunnel. Using in situ calibration of model parameters the modeling could reproduce observed spatial distribution of damage and permeability changes around the tunnel, as a combination of disturbance induced by stress redistribution around the tunnel and by the drill-and-blast operation. The modeling showed that stress-induced permeability increase above the tunnel is a result of micro and macrofracturing under high deviatoric (shear) stress, whereas permeability increases alongside the tunnel as a result of opening of existing microfractures under decreased mean stress. The remaining observed fracturing and permeability changes around the periphery of the tunnel were attributed to damage from the drill-and-blast operation. Moreover, a reasonably good agreement was achieved between simulated and observed excavation-induced pressure responses around the TSX tunnel for 1 year following its excavation. The simulations showed that these pressure responses are caused by poroelastic effects as a result of increasing or decreasing mean stress, with corresponding contraction or expansion of the pore volume. The simulation results for pressure evolution were consistent with previous studies, indicating that the observed pressure responses could be captured in a Biot model using a relatively low Biot-Willis coefficient, {alpha} {approx} 0.2, a porosity of n {approx} 0.007, and a relatively low permeability of k {approx} 2 x 10{sup -22} m{sup 2}, which is consistent with the very tight, unfractured granite at the site.

  9. A Historical Evaluation of the U12t Tunnel, Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada, Volume 1 of 6

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harold Drollinger; Robert C. Jones; and Thomas F. Bullard; Desert Research Institute, Laurence J. Ashbaugh, Southern Nevada Courier Service and Wayne R. Griffin, Stoller-Navarro Joint Venture

    2009-02-01

    This report presents a historical evaluation of the U12t Tunnel on the Nevada Test Site in southern Nevada. The work was conducted by the Desert Research Institute at the request of the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office and the U.S. Department of Defense, Defense Threat Reduction Agency (DTRA). The U12t Tunnel is one of a series of tunnels used for underground nuclear weapons effects tests on the east side of Rainier and Aqueduct Mesas. Six nuclear weapons effects tests, Mint Leaf, Diamond Sculls, Husky Pup, Midas Myth/Milagro, Mighty Oak, and Mission Ghost, and one high explosive test, SPLAT, were conducted within the U12t Tunnel from 1970 to 1987. All six of the nuclear weapons effects tests and the high explosive test were sponsored by DTRA. Two conventional weapons experiments, Dipole Knight and Divine Eagle, were conducted in the tunnel portal area in 1997 and 1998. These experiments were sponsored by the Defense Special Weapons Agency. The U12t Tunnel complex is composed of the Portal and Mesa Areas and includes an underground tunnel with a main access drift and nine primary drifts, a substantial tailings pile fronting the tunnel portal, a series of discharge ponds downslope of the tailings pile, and two instrumentation trailer parks and 16 drill holes on top of Aqueduct Mesa. A total of 89 cultural features were recorded: 54 at the portal and 35 on the mesa. In the Portal Area, cultural features are mostly concrete pads and building foundations; other features include the portal, rail lines, the camel back, ventilation and cooling system components, communication equipment, and electrical equipment. On the mesa are drill holes, a few concrete pads, a loading ramp, and electrical equipment.

  10. A Historical Evaluation of the U12t Tunnel, Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada, Volume 5 of 6

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harold Drollinger; Robert C. Jones; and Thomas F. Bullard; Desert Research Institute, Laurence J. Ashbaugh, Southern Nevada Courier Service and Wayne R. Griffin, Stoller-Navarro Joint Venture

    2009-02-01

    This report presents a historical evaluation of the U12t Tunnel on the Nevada Test Site in southern Nevada. The work was conducted by the Desert Research Institute at the request of the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office and the U.S. Department of Defense, Defense Threat Reduction Agency (DTRA). The U12t Tunnel is one of a series of tunnels used for underground nuclear weapons effects tests on the east side of Rainier and Aqueduct Mesas. Six nuclear weapons effects tests, Mint Leaf, Diamond Sculls, Husky Pup, Midas Myth/Milagro, Mighty Oak, and Mission Ghost, and one high explosive test, SPLAT, were conducted within the U12t Tunnel from 1970 to 1987. All six of the nuclear weapons effects tests and the high explosive test were sponsored by DTRA. Two conventional weapons experiments, Dipole Knight and Divine Eagle, were conducted in the tunnel portal area in 1997 and 1998. These experiments were sponsored by the Defense Special Weapons Agency. The U12t Tunnel complex is composed of the Portal and Mesa Areas and includes an underground tunnel with a main access drift and nine primary drifts, a substantial tailings pile fronting the tunnel portal, a series of discharge ponds downslope of the tailings pile, and two instrumentation trailer parks and 16 drill holes on top of Aqueduct Mesa. A total of 89 cultural features were recorded: 54 at the portal and 35 on the mesa. In the Portal Area, cultural features are mostly concrete pads and building foundations; other features include the portal, rail lines, the camel back, ventilation and cooling system components, communication equipment, and electrical equipment. On the mesa are drill holes, a few concrete pads, a loading ramp, and electrical equipment.

  11. A Historical Evaluation of the U12t Tunnel, Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada, Volume 6 of 6

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harold Drollinger; Robert C. Jones; and Thomas F. Bullard; Desert Research Institute, Laurence J. Ashbaugh, Southern Nevada Courier Service and Wayne R. Griffin, Stoller-Navarro Joint Venture

    2009-02-01

    This report presents a historical evaluation of the U12t Tunnel on the Nevada Test Site in southern Nevada. The work was conducted by the Desert Research Institute at the request of the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office and the U.S. Department of Defense, Defense Threat Reduction Agency (DTRA). The U12t Tunnel is one of a series of tunnels used for underground nuclear weapons effects tests on the east side of Rainier and Aqueduct Mesas. Six nuclear weapons effects tests, Mint Leaf, Diamond Sculls, Husky Pup, Midas Myth/Milagro, Mighty Oak, and Mission Ghost, and one high explosive test, SPLAT, were conducted within the U12t Tunnel from 1970 to 1987. All six of the nuclear weapons effects tests and the high explosive test were sponsored by DTRA. Two conventional weapons experiments, Dipole Knight and Divine Eagle, were conducted in the tunnel portal area in 1997 and 1998. These experiments were sponsored by the Defense Special Weapons Agency. The U12t Tunnel complex is composed of the Portal and Mesa Areas and includes an underground tunnel with a main access drift and nine primary drifts, a substantial tailings pile fronting the tunnel portal, a series of discharge ponds downslope of the tailings pile, and two instrumentation trailer parks and 16 drill holes on top of Aqueduct Mesa. A total of 89 cultural features were recorded: 54 at the portal and 35 on the mesa. In the Portal Area, cultural features are mostly concrete pads and building foundations; other features include the portal, rail lines, the camel back, ventilation and cooling system components, communication equipment, and electrical equipment. On the mesa are drill holes, a few concrete pads, a loading ramp, and electrical equipment.

  12. A Historical Evaluation of the U12t Tunnel, Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada, Volume 2 of 6

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harold Drollinger; Robert C. Jones; and Thomas F. Bullard; Desert Research Institute, Laurence J. Ashbaugh, Southern Nevada Courier Service and Wayne R. Griffin, Stoller-Navarro Joint Venture

    2009-02-01

    This report presents a historical evaluation of the U12t Tunnel on the Nevada Test Site in southern Nevada. The work was conducted by the Desert Research Institute at the request of the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office and the U.S. Department of Defense, Defense Threat Reduction Agency (DTRA). The U12t Tunnel is one of a series of tunnels used for underground nuclear weapons effects tests on the east side of Rainier and Aqueduct Mesas. Six nuclear weapons effects tests, Mint Leaf, Diamond Sculls, Husky Pup, Midas Myth/Milagro, Mighty Oak, and Mission Ghost, and one high explosive test, SPLAT, were conducted within the U12t Tunnel from 1970 to 1987. All six of the nuclear weapons effects tests and the high explosive test were sponsored by DTRA. Two conventional weapons experiments, Dipole Knight and Divine Eagle, were conducted in the tunnel portal area in 1997 and 1998. These experiments were sponsored by the Defense Special Weapons Agency. The U12t Tunnel complex is composed of the Portal and Mesa Areas and includes an underground tunnel with a main access drift and nine primary drifts, a substantial tailings pile fronting the tunnel portal, a series of discharge ponds downslope of the tailings pile, and two instrumentation trailer parks and 16 drill holes on top of Aqueduct Mesa. A total of 89 cultural features were recorded: 54 at the portal and 35 on the mesa. In the Portal Area, cultural features are mostly concrete pads and building foundations; other features include the portal, rail lines, the camel back, ventilation and cooling system components, communication equipment, and electrical equipment. On the mesa are drill holes, a few concrete pads, a loading ramp, and electrical equipment.

  13. Trend of tunnel magnetoresistance and variation in threshold voltage for keeping data load robustness of metal–oxide–semiconductor/magnetic tunnel junction hybrid latches

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ohsawa, T.; Ikeda, S.; Hanyu, T.; Ohno, H.; Endoh, T.

    2014-05-07

    The robustness of data load of metal–oxide–semiconductor/magnetic tunnel junction (MOS/MTJ) hybrid latches at power-on is examined by using Monte Carlo simulation with the variations in magnetoresistances for MTJs and in threshold voltages for MOSFETs involved in 90 nm technology node. Three differential pair type spin-transfer-torque-magnetic random access memory cells (4T2MTJ, 6T2MTJ, and 8T2MTJ) are compared for their successful data load at power-on. It is found that the 4T2MTJ cell has the largest pass area in the shmoo plot in TMR ratio (tunnel magnetoresistance ratio) and V{sub dd} in which a whole 256 kb cell array can be powered-on successfully. The minimum TMR ratio for the 4T2MTJ in 0.9 V < V{sub dd} < 1.9 V is 140%, while the 6T2MTJ and the 8T2MTJ cells require TMR ratio larger than 170%.

  14. Soil erosion rates from mixed soil and gravel surfaces in a wind tunnel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ligotke, M.W.; Klopfer, D.C.

    1990-08-01

    Protective barriers have been identified as integral components of plans to isolate defense waste on the Hanford Site. The use of natural materials to construct protective barriers over waste site is being considered. Design requirements for protective barriers include preventing exposure of buried waste, and restricting penetration or percolation of surface waters through the waste zone. Studies were initiated to evaluate the effects of wind erosion on candidate protective barrier surfaces. A wind tunnel was used to provide controlled erosive stresses and to investigate the erosive effects of wind forces on proposed surface layers for protective barriers. Mixed soil and gravel surfaces were prepared and tested for resistance to wind erosion at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory Aerosol Wind Tunnel Research Facility. These tests were performed to investigate surface deflation caused by suspension of soil from various surface layer configurations and to provide a comparison of the relative resistance of the different surfaces to wind erosion. Planning, testing, and analyzing phases of this wind erosion project were coordinated with other tasks supporting the development of protective barriers. These tasks include climate-change predictions, field studies and modeling efforts. This report provides results of measurements of deflation caused by wind forces over level surfaces. Section 2.0 reviews surface layer characteristics and previous relevant studies on wind erosion, describes effects of erosion, and discusses wind tunnel modeling. Materials and methods of the wind tunnel tests are discussed in Section 3.0. Results and discussion are presented in Section 4.0, and conclusions and recommendations Section 5.0. 53 refs., 29 figs., 7 tabs.

  15. Tumor exosomes induce tunneling nanotubes in lipid raft-enriched regions of human mesothelioma cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thayanithy, Venugopal; Babatunde, Victor; Dickson, Elizabeth L.; Wong, Phillip; Oh, Sanghoon; Ke, Xu; Barlas, Afsar; Fujisawa, Sho; Romin, Yevgeniy; Moreira, Andr L.; Downey, Robert J.; Steer, Clifford J.; Subramanian, Subbaya; Manova-Todorova, Katia; Moore, Malcolm A.S.; Lou, Emil

    2014-04-15

    Tunneling nanotubes (TnTs) are long, non-adherent, actin-based cellular extensions that act as conduits for transport of cellular cargo between connected cells. The mechanisms of nanotube formation and the effects of the tumor microenvironment and cellular signals on TnT formation are unknown. In the present study, we explored exosomes as potential mediators of TnT formation in mesothelioma and the potential relationship of lipid rafts to TnT formation. Mesothelioma cells co-cultured with exogenous mesothelioma-derived exosomes formed more TnTs than cells cultured without exosomes within 2448 h; and this effect was most prominent in media conditions (low-serum, hyperglycemic medium) that support TnT formation (1.31.9-fold difference). Fluorescence and electron microscopy confirmed the purity of isolated exosomes and revealed that they localized predominantly at the base of and within TnTs, in addition to the extracellular environment. Time-lapse microscopic imaging demonstrated uptake of tumor exosomes by TnTs, which facilitated intercellular transfer of these exosomes between connected cells. Mesothelioma cells connected via TnTs were also significantly enriched for lipid rafts at nearly a 2-fold higher number compared with cells not connected by TnTs. Our findings provide supportive evidence of exosomes as potential chemotactic stimuli for TnT formation, and also lipid raft formation as a potential biomarker for TnT-forming cells. - Highlights: Exosomes derived from malignant cells can stimulate an increased rate in the formation of tunneling nanotubes. Tunneling nanotubes can serve as conduits for intercellular transfer of these exosomes. Most notably, exosomes derived from benign mesothelial cells had no effect on nanotube formation. Cells forming nanotubes were enriched in lipid rafts at a greater number compared with cells not forming nanotubes. Our findings suggest causal and potentially synergistic association of exosomes and tunneling nanotubes in cancer.

  16. B61-12 Life Extension Program Undergoes First Full-Scale Wind Tunnel Test |

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    National Nuclear Security Administration Undergoes First Full-Scale Wind Tunnel Test | National Nuclear Security Administration Facebook Twitter Youtube Flickr RSS People Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Library Bios Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press

  17. DOE/NV/26383-109 A Historical Evaluation of the U12t Tunnel,

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    26383-109 A Historical Evaluation of the U12t Tunnel, Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada Prepared by Harold Drollinger, Robert C. Jones, and Thomas F. Bullard, Desert Research Institute Laurence J. Ashbaugh, Southern Nevada Courier Service and Wayne R. Griffin, Stoller-Navarro Joint Venture Prepared for U.S. Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office, Las Vegas, Nevada and U.S. Department of Defense Defense Threat Reduction Agency Nevada Test Site Office,

  18. The impact of disorder on charge transport in three dimensional quantum dot resonant tunneling structures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Puthen-Veettil, B. Patterson, R.; Knig, D.; Conibeer, G.; Green, M. A.

    2014-10-28

    Efficient iso-entropic energy filtering of electronic waves can be realized through nanostructures with three dimensional confinement, such as quantum dot resonant tunneling structures. Large-area deployment of such structures is useful for energy selective contacts but such configuration is susceptible to structural disorders. In this work, the transport properties of quantum-dot-based wide-area resonant tunneling structures, subject to realistic disorder mechanisms, are studied. Positional variations of the quantum dots are shown to reduce the resonant transmission peaks while size variations in the device are shown to reduce as well as broaden the peaks. Increased quantum dot size distribution also results in a peak shift to lower energy which is attributed to large dots dominating transmission. A decrease in barrier thickness reduces the relative peak height while the overall transmission increases dramatically due to lower series resistance. While any shift away from ideality can be intuitively expected to reduce the resonance peak, quantification allows better understanding of the tolerances required for fabricating structures based on resonant tunneling phenomena/.

  19. Terahertz time domain interferometry of a SIS tunnel junction and a quantum point contact

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Karadi, C

    1995-09-01

    The author has applied the Terahertz Time Domain Interferometric (THz-TDI) technique to probe the ultrafast dynamic response of a Superconducting-Insulating-Superconducting (SIS) tunnel junction and a Quantum Point Contact (QPC). The THz-TDI technique involves monitoring changes in the dc current induced by interfering two picosecond electrical pulses on the junction as a function of time delay between them. Measurements of the response of the Nb/AlO{sub x}/Nb SIS tunnel junction from 75--200 GHz are in full agreement with the linear theory for photon-assisted tunneling. Likewise, measurements of the induced current in a QPC as a function of source-drain voltage, gate voltage, frequency, and magnetic field also show strong evidence for photon-assisted transport. These experiments together demonstrate the general applicability of the THz-TDI technique to the characterization of the dynamic response of any micron or nanometer scale device that exhibits a non-linear I-V characteristic. 133 refs., 49 figs.

  20. Tunnel-injection GaN quantum dot ultraviolet light-emitting diodes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Verma, Jai; Kandaswamy, Prem Kumar; Protasenko, Vladimir; Verma, Amit; Grace Xing, Huili; Jena, Debdeep

    2013-01-28

    We demonstrate a GaN quantum dot ultraviolet light-emitting diode that uses tunnel injection of carriers through AlN barriers into the active region. The quantum dot heterostructure is grown by molecular beam epitaxy on AlN templates. The large lattice mismatch between GaN and AlN favors the formation of GaN quantum dots in the Stranski-Krastanov growth mode. Carrier injection by tunneling can mitigate losses incurred in hot-carrier injection in light emitting heterostructures. To achieve tunnel injection, relatively low composition AlGaN is used for n- and p-type layers to simultaneously take advantage of effective band alignment and efficient doping. The small height of the quantum dots results in short-wavelength emission and are simultaneously an effective tool to fight the reduction of oscillator strength from quantum-confined Stark effect due to polarization fields. The strong quantum confinement results in room-temperature electroluminescence peaks at 261 and 340 nm, well above the 365 nm bandgap of bulk GaN. The demonstration opens the doorway to exploit many varied features of quantum dot physics to realize high-efficiency short-wavelength light sources.

  1. Calculating electronic tunnel currents in networks of disordered irregularly shaped nanoparticles by mapping networks to arrays of parallel nonlinear resistors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aghili Yajadda, Mir Massoud

    2014-10-21

    We have shown both theoretically and experimentally that tunnel currents in networks of disordered irregularly shaped nanoparticles (NPs) can be calculated by considering the networks as arrays of parallel nonlinear resistors. Each resistor is described by a one-dimensional or a two-dimensional array of equal size nanoparticles that the tunnel junction gaps between nanoparticles in each resistor is assumed to be equal. The number of tunnel junctions between two contact electrodes and the tunnel junction gaps between nanoparticles are found to be functions of Coulomb blockade energies. In addition, the tunnel barriers between nanoparticles were considered to be tilted at high voltages. Furthermore, the role of thermal expansion coefficient of the tunnel junction gaps on the tunnel current is taken into account. The model calculations fit very well to the experimental data of a network of disordered gold nanoparticles, a forest of multi-wall carbon nanotubes, and a network of few-layer graphene nanoplates over a wide temperature range (5-300 K) at low and high DC bias voltages (0.001 mV50 V). Our investigations indicate, although electron cotunneling in networks of disordered irregularly shaped NPs may occur, non-Arrhenius behavior at low temperatures cannot be described by the cotunneling model due to size distribution in the networks and irregular shape of nanoparticles. Non-Arrhenius behavior of the samples at zero bias voltage limit was attributed to the disorder in the samples. Unlike the electron cotunneling model, we found that the crossover from Arrhenius to non-Arrhenius behavior occurs at two temperatures, one at a high temperature and the other at a low temperature.

  2. Baker-Barry Tunnel Lighting: Evaluation of a Potential GATEWAY Demonstrations Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tuenge, Jason R.

    2011-06-28

    The U.S. Department of Energy is evaluating the Baker-Barry Tunnel as a potential GATEWAY Demonstrations project for deployment of solid-state lighting (SSL) technology. The National Park Service views this project as a possible proving ground and template for implementation of light-emitting diode (LED) luminaires in other tunnels, thereby expanding the estimated 40% energy savings from 132 MWh/yr to a much larger figure nationally. Most of the energy savings in this application is attributable to the instant-restrike capability of LED products and to their high tolerance for frequent on/off switching, used here to separately control either end of the tunnel during daytime hours. Some LED luminaires rival or outperform their high-intensity discharge (HID) counterparts in terms of efficacy, but options are limited, and smaller lumen packages preclude true one-for-one equivalence. However, LED products continue to improve in efficacy and affordability at a rate unmatched by other light source technologies; the estimated simple payback period of eight years (excluding installation costs and maintenance savings) can be expected to improve with time. The proposed revisions to the existing high-pressure sodium (HPS) lighting system would require slightly increased controls complexity and significantly increased luminaire types and quantities. In exchange, substantial annual savings (from reduced maintenance and energy use) would be complemented by improved quantity and quality of illumination. Although advanced lighting controls could offer additional savings, it is unclear whether such a system would prove cost-effective; this topic may be explored in future work.

  3. High-stability cryogenic scanning tunneling microscope based on a closed-cycle cryostat

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hackley, Jason D.; Kislitsyn, Dmitry A.; Beaman, Daniel K.; Nazin, George V.; Ulrich, Stefan

    2014-10-15

    We report on the design and operation of a cryogenic ultra-high vacuum (UHV) scanning tunneling microscope (STM) coupled to a closed-cycle cryostat (CCC). The STM is thermally linked to the CCC through helium exchange gas confined inside a volume enclosed by highly flexible rubber bellows. The STM is thus mechanically decoupled from the CCC, which results in a significant reduction of the mechanical noise transferred from the CCC to the STM. Noise analysis of the tunneling current shows current fluctuations up to 4% of the total current, which translates into tip-sample distance variations of up to 1.5 picometers. This noise level is sufficiently low for atomic-resolution imaging of a wide variety of surfaces. To demonstrate this, atomic-resolution images of Au(111) and NaCl(100)/Au(111) surfaces, as well as of carbon nanotubes deposited on Au(111), were obtained. Thermal drift analysis showed that under optimized conditions, the lateral stability of the STM scanner can be as low as 0.18 /h. Scanning Tunneling Spectroscopy measurements based on the lock-in technique were also carried out, and showed no detectable presence of noise from the closed-cycle cryostat. Using this cooling approach, temperatures as low as 16 K at the STM scanner have been achieved, with the complete cool-down of the system typically taking up to 12 h. These results demonstrate that the constructed CCC-coupled STM is a highly stable instrument capable of highly detailed spectroscopic investigations of materials and surfaces at the atomic scale.

  4. Continuously-tuned tunneling behaviors of ferroelectric tunnel junctions based on BaTiO{sub 3}/La{sub 0.67}Sr{sub 0.33}MnO{sub 3} heterostructure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ou, Xin; Xu, Bo Yin, Qiaonan; Xia, Yidong; Yin, Jiang; Liu, Zhiguo; Gong, Changjie; Lan, Xuexin

    2014-05-15

    In this work, we fabricate BaTiO{sub 3}/La{sub 0.67}Sr{sub 0.33}MnO{sub 3} (BTO/LSMO) ferroelectric tunnel junction on (001) SrTiO{sub 3} substrate by pulsed laser deposition method. Combining piezoresponse force and conductive-tip atomic force microscopy, we demonstrate robust and reproducible polarization-controlled tunneling behaviors with the resulting tunneling electroresistance value reaching about 10{sup 2} in ultrathin BTO films (?1.2 nm) at room temperature. Moreover, local poling areas with different conductivity are finally achieved by controlling the relative proportion of upward and downward domains, and different poling areas exhibit stable transport properties.

  5. Error propagation equations for estimating the uncertainty in high-speed wind tunnel test results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clark, E.L.

    1994-07-01

    Error propagation equations, based on the Taylor series model, are derived for the nondimensional ratios and coefficients most often encountered in high-speed wind tunnel testing. These include pressure ratio and coefficient, static force and moment coefficients, dynamic stability coefficients, and calibration Mach number. The error equations contain partial derivatives, denoted as sensitivity coefficients, which define the influence of free-steam Mach number, M{infinity}, on various aerodynamic ratios. To facilitate use of the error equations, sensitivity coefficients are derived and evaluated for five fundamental aerodynamic ratios which relate free-steam test conditions to a reference condition.

  6. Time delay of wave packets during their tunnelling through a quantum diode

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ivanov, N A; Skalozub, V V

    2014-04-28

    A modified saddle-point method is used to investigate the process of propagation of a wave packet through a quantum diode. A scattering matrix is constructed for the structure in question. The case of tunnelling of a packet with a Gaussian envelope through the diode is considered in detail. The time delay and the shape of the wave packet transmitted are calculated. The dependence of the delay time on the characteristics of the input packet and the internal characteristics of the quantum diode is studied. Possible applications of the results obtained are discussed. (laser applications and other topics in quantum electronics)

  7. Charge ordering in stoichiometric FeTe: Scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Li, Wei; Yin, Wei -Guo; Wang, Lili; He, Ke; Ma, Xucun; Xue, Qi -Kun; Chen, Xi

    2016-01-04

    In this study, we use scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy to reveal a unique stripy charge order in a parent phase of iron-based superconductors in stoichiometric FeTe epitaxy films. The charge order has unusually the same—usually half—period as the spin order. We also found highly anisotropic electron band dispersions being large and little along the ferromagnetic (crystallographic b) and antiferromagnetic (a) directions, respectively. Our data suggest that the microscopic mechanism is likely of the Stoner type driven by interatomic Coulomb repulsion Vij, and that Vij and charge fluctuations, so far much neglected, are important to the understanding of iron-based superconductors.

  8. Spent Fuel Transportation Cask Response to the Caldecott Tunnel Fire Scenario

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adkins, Harold E.; Koeppel, Brian J.; Cuta, Judith M.

    2007-01-01

    On April 7, 1982, a tank truck and trailer carrying 8,800 gallons of gasoline was involved in an accident in the Caldecott tunnel on State Route 24 near Oakland, California. The tank trailer overturned and subsequently caught fire. The United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission (USNRC), one of the agencies responsible for ensuring the safe transportation of radioactive materials in the United States, undertook analyses to determine the possible regulatory implications of this particular event for the transportation of spent nuclear fuel by truck. The Fire Dynamics Simulator (FDS) code developed by National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) was used to determine the thermal environment in the Caldecott tunnel during the fire. The FDS results were used to define boundary conditions for a thermal transient model of a truck transport cask containing spent nuclear fuel. The Nuclear Assurance Corporation (NAC) Legal Weight Truck (LWT) transportation cask was selected for this evaluation, as it represents a typical truck (over-the-road) cask, and can be used to transport a wide variety of spent nuclear fuels. Detailed analysis of the cask response to the fire was performed using the ANSYS computer code to evaluate the thermal performance of the cask design in this fire scenario. This report describes the methods and approach used to assess the thermal response of the selected cask design to the conditions predicted in the Caldecott tunnel fire. The results of the analysis are presented in detail, with an evaluation of the cask response to the fire. The staff concluded that some components of smaller transportation casks resembling the NAC LWT, despite placement within an ISO container, could degrade significantly. Small transportation casks similar to the NAC LWT would probably experience failure of seals in this severe accident scenario. USNRC staff evaluated the radiological consequences of the cask response to the Caldecott tunnel fire. Although some components heated up beyond their service temperatures, the staff determined that there would be no significant release as a result of the fire for the NAC LWT and similar casks.

  9. Dynamical properties of three terminal magnetic tunnel junctions: Spintronics meets spin-orbitronics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tomasello, R.; Carpentieri, M.; Finocchio, G.

    2013-12-16

    This Letter introduces a micromagnetic model able to characterize the magnetization dynamics in three terminal magnetic tunnel junctions, where the effects of spin-transfer torque and spin-orbit torque are taken into account. Our results predict that the possibility to separate electrically those two torque sources is very promising from a technological point of view for both next generation of nanoscale spintronic oscillators and microwave detectors. A scalable synchronization scheme based on the parallel connection of those three terminal devices is also proposed.

  10. Numerical modeling of laser tunneling ionization in explicit particle-in-cell codes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, M.; Cormier-Michel, E.; Geddes, C.G.R.; Bruhwiler, D.L.; Yu, L.L.; Esarey, E.; Schroeder, C.B.; Leemans, W.P.

    2013-03-01

    Methods for the calculation of laser tunneling ionization in explicit particle-in-cell codes used for modeling laserplasma interactions are compared and validated against theoretical predictions. Improved accuracy is obtained by using the direct current form for the ionization rate. Multi level ionization in a single time step and energy conservation have been considered during the ionization process. The effects of grid resolution and number of macro-particles per cell are examined. Implementation of the ionization algorithm in two different particle-in-cell codes is compared for the case of ionization-based electron injection in a laserplasma accelerator.

  11. Bi-Sr-Ca-Cu-O surface studied by means of scanning tunnelling microscope

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Witek, A.; Dabkowski, A.; Rauluszkiewicz, J.

    1989-03-10

    Surface topography of the high-T/sub c/ superconductor BiSrCaCu/sub 2/O/sub x/ has been investigated by means of scanning tunnelling microscope. The measurements were performed on the natural surface of ceramics material in air at room temperature. It can be deduced from the surface images, that bulk orthorhombic crystal structure extends to the surface. The surface seems to be uniform metallic in character and not drastically contaminated. Regular steps observed on the surface correspond to the dimension of the unit cell in z direction or its multiples.

  12. Voltage-controlled inversion of tunnel magnetoresistance in epitaxial nickel/graphene/MgO/cobalt junctions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Godel, F.; Doudin, B.; Henry, Y.; Halley, D. E-mail: dayen@ipcms.unistra.fr; Dayen, J.-F. E-mail: dayen@ipcms.unistra.fr; Venkata Kamalakar, M.

    2014-10-13

    We report on the fabrication and characterization of vertical spin-valve structures using a thick epitaxial MgO barrier as spacer layer and a graphene-passivated Ni film as bottom ferromagnetic electrode. The devices show robust and scalable tunnel magnetoresistance, with several changes of sign upon varying the applied bias voltage. These findings are explained by a model of phonon-assisted transport mechanisms that relies on the peculiarity of the band structure and spin density of states at the hybrid graphene|Ni interface.

  13. An Experiment Study of the Propagation of Radio Waves in a Scaled Model of Long-Wall Coal Mining Tunnels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Han, G.R.; Zhang, W.M.; Zhang, Y.P.

    2009-07-01

    A long-wall coal mining tunnel is the most important working area in a coal mine. It has long been realized that radio communications can improve both productivity and safety in this dangerous area. Hence, many attempts to use radio communications in such an environment have been made. Unfortunately, no radio system has satisfactorily provided communication services there, which, we believe, is partially due to poor understanding of the propagation characteristics of radio waves in the long-wall mining tunnel. To have deeper physical insight into the propagation problem, a scaled model of the long-wall mining tunnel was built, and the propagation characteristics of UHF radio waves were measured. The experiment and the measured results are presented and discussed.

  14. Spin-filtering effect of thin Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} barrier on tunneling magnetoresistance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joo, Sungjung; Jung, K. Y.; Jun, K. I.; Shin, K. H.; Kim, D. S.; Hong, J. K.; Rhie, K. E-mail: krhie@korea.ac.kr; Lee, B. C. E-mail: krhie@korea.ac.kr

    2014-04-14

    Tunneling magnetoresistance (TMR) dependence on the Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} barrier thickness was investigated for CoFe/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/CoFe magnetic tunnel junctions (MTJs). MTJs with very thin Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} layers were grown by inserting an amorphous FeZr buffer layer whose role is only to reduce the roughness of bottom electrode. The TMR decreased as the thickness of the Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} layer was reduced. The results are analyzed with the dependence of the spin-filtering effect on the Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} thickness. It was found that a simple model of separating sp- and d-like electrons does not work, and it may suggest that the tunneling electrons are in rather hybridized state.

  15. Natural convection in tunnels at Yucca Mountain and impact on drift seepage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Halecky, N.; Birkholzer, J.T.; Peterson, P.

    2010-04-15

    The decay heat from radioactive waste that is to be disposed in the once proposed geologic repository at Yucca Mountain (YM) will significantly influence the moisture conditions in the fractured rock near emplacement tunnels (drifts). Additionally, large-scale convective cells will form in the open-air drifts and will serve as an important mechanism for the transport of vaporized pore water from the fractured rock in the drift center to the drift end. Such convective processes would also impact drift seepage, as evaporation could reduce the build up of liquid water at the tunnel wall. Characterizing and understanding these liquid water and vapor transport processes is critical for evaluating the performance of the repository, in terms of water-induced canister corrosion and subsequent radionuclide containment. To study such processes, we previously developed and applied an enhanced version of TOUGH2 that solves for natural convection in the drift. We then used the results from this previous study as a time-dependent boundary condition in a high-resolution seepage model, allowing for a computationally efficient means for simulating these processes. The results from the seepage model show that cases with strong natural convection effects are expected to improve the performance of the repository, since smaller relative humidity values, with reduced local seepage, form a more desirable waste package environment.

  16. Improved source design for p-type tunnel field-effect transistors: Towards truly complementary logic

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Verreck, Devin Groeseneken, Guido; Verhulst, Anne S.; Collaert, Nadine; Mocuta, Anda; Thean, Aaron; Sore, Bart

    2014-12-15

    Complementary logic based on tunnel field-effect transistors (TFETs) would drastically reduce power consumption thanks to the TFET's potential to obtain a sub-60?mV/dec subthreshold swing (SS). However, p-type TFETs typically do not meet the performance of n-TFETs for direct bandgap III-V configurations. The p-TFET SS stays well above 60?mV/dec, due to the low density of states in the conduction band. We therefore propose a source configuration in which a highly doped region is maintained only near the tunnel junction. In the remaining part of the source, the hot carriers in the exponential tail of the Fermi-Dirac distribution are blocked by reducing the doping degeneracy, either with a source section with a lower doping concentration or with a heterostructure. We apply this concept to n-p-i-p configurations consisting of In{sub 0.53}Ga{sub 0.47}As and an InP-InAs heterostructure. 15-band quantum mechanical simulations predict that the configurations with our source design can obtain sub-60?mV/dec SS, with an on-current comparable to the conventional source design.

  17. Magnetotransport in MgO-based magnetic tunnel junctions grown by molecular beam epitaxy (invited)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Andrieu, S. Bonell, F.; Hauet, T.; Montaigne, F.; Lefevre, P.; Bertran, F.

    2014-05-07

    The strong impact of molecular beam epitaxy growth and Synchrotron Radiation characterization tools in the understanding of fundamental issues in nanomagnetism and spintronics is illustrated through the example of fully epitaxial MgO-based Magnetic Tunnel Junctions (MTJs). If ab initio calculations predict very high tunnel magnetoresistance (TMR) in such devices, some discrepancy between theory and experiments still exists. The influence of imperfections in real systems has thus to be considered like surface contaminations, structural defects, unexpected electronic states, etc. The influence of possible oxygen contamination at the Fe/MgO(001) interface is thus studied, and is shown to be not so detrimental to TMR as predicted by ab initio calculations. On the contrary, the decrease of dislocations density in the MgO barrier of MTJs using Fe{sub 1−x}V{sub x} electrodes is shown to significantly increase TMR. Finally, unexpected transport properties in Fe{sub 1−X}Co{sub x}/MgO/Fe{sub 1−X}Co{sub x} (001) are presented. With the help of spin and symmetry resolved photoemission and ab initio calculation, the TMR decrease for Co content higher than 25% is shown to come from the existence of an interface state and the shift of the empty Δ1 minority spin state towards the Fermi level.

  18. Atomic-scale electrochemistry on the surface of a manganite by scanning tunneling microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vasudevan, Rama K. Tselev, Alexander; Baddorf, Arthur P.; Gianfrancesco, Anthony G.

    2015-04-06

    The doped manganese oxides (manganites) have been widely studied for their colossal magnetoresistive effects, for potential applications in oxide spintronics, electroforming in resistive switching devices, and are materials of choice as cathodes in modern solid oxide fuel cells. However, little experimental knowledge of the dynamics of the surfaces of perovskite manganites at the atomic scale exists. Here, through in-situ scanning tunneling microscopy (STM), we demonstrate atomic resolution on samples of La{sub 0.625}Ca{sub 0.375}MnO{sub 3} grown on (001) SrTiO{sub 3} by pulsed laser deposition. Furthermore, by applying triangular DC waveforms of increasing amplitude to the STM tip, and measuring the tunneling current, we demonstrate the ability to both perform and monitor surface electrochemical processes at the atomic level, including formation of oxygen vacancies and removal and deposition of individual atomic units or clusters. Our work paves the way for better understanding of surface oxygen reactions in these systems.

  19. Recent progress in III-V based ferromagnetic semiconductors: Band structure, Fermi level, and tunneling transport

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tanaka, Masaaki; Ohya, Shinobu Nam Hai, Pham

    2014-03-15

    Spin-based electronics or spintronics is an emerging field, in which we try to utilize spin degrees of freedom as well as charge transport in materials and devices. While metal-based spin-devices, such as magnetic-field sensors and magnetoresistive random access memory using giant magnetoresistance and tunneling magnetoresistance, are already put to practical use, semiconductor-based spintronics has greater potential for expansion because of good compatibility with existing semiconductor technology. Many semiconductor-based spintronics devices with useful functionalities have been proposed and explored so far. To realize those devices and functionalities, we definitely need appropriate materials which have both the properties of semiconductors and ferromagnets. Ferromagnetic semiconductors (FMSs), which are alloy semiconductors containing magnetic atoms such as Mn and Fe, are one of the most promising classes of materials for this purpose and thus have been intensively studied for the past two decades. Here, we review the recent progress in the studies of the most prototypical III-V based FMS, p-type (GaMn)As and its heterostructures with focus on tunneling transport, Fermi level, and bandstructure. Furthermore, we cover the properties of a new n-type FMS, (In,Fe)As, which shows electron-induced ferromagnetism. These FMS materials having zinc-blende crystal structure show excellent compatibility with well-developed III-V heterostructures and devices.

  20. Environmental permit tracking and compliance: Central Artery/Tunnel Project, Boston, MA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Forbush, L. )

    1993-01-01

    The Central Artery/Tunnel (CA/T) Project in Boston, Massachusetts involves the replacement of the existing I-93 interstate highway (Central Artery) and the extension of I-90 (Massachusetts Turnpike) to Logan International Airport. To date, approximately 95 environmental and related permits have been obtained for the CA/T Project. At least 200 permits from federal, state and local regulatory agencies will be acquired for the entire Project. The proposed action includes construction activities and permanent structures related to the crossing of three bodies of water: Charles River, Fort Point Channel, and Boston Inner Harbor. The Project also includes work in Massachusetts filled tidelands, relocation or construction of outfalls, disposition of construction dewatering and tunnel drainage fluids, and capping of an abandoned landfill. The number of permits, interrelationships between permits and interfaces with design and construction schedules have necessitated the development and implementation of a permit tracking system. The system tracks permit applications from preparation through public and agency review to permit issuance. The issues are discussed in detail: Phased development of the tracking system; Utilization of Project standard scheduling system software, Primavera Project Planner; How the information generated by the tracking system is used at the Project; Report format and production; Construction phase services and the multidiscipline, integrated Project schedule.

  1. Manipulation of subsurface carbon nanoparticles in Bi?Sr?CaCu?O8+? using a scanning tunneling microscope

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Stollenwerk, A. J.; Gu, G.; Hurley, N.; Beck, B.; Spurgeon, K.; Kidd, T. E.

    2015-03-01

    We present evidence that subsurface carbon nanoparticles in Bi?Sr?CaCu?O8+? can be manipulated with nanometer precision using a scanning tunneling microscope. High resolution images indicate that most of the carbon particles remain subsurface after transport observable as a local increase in height as the particle pushes up on the surface. Tunneling spectra in the vicinity of these protrusions exhibit semiconducting characteristics with a band gap of approximately 1.8 eV, indicating that the incorporation of carbon locally alters the electronic properties near the surface.

  2. GaN-based vertical-cavity laser performance improvements using tunnel-junction-cascaded active regions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Piprek, Joachim

    2014-07-07

    This Letter investigates the output power enhancement achieved by tunnel junction insertion into the InGaN multi-quantum well (MQW) active region of a 410?nm vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser which enables the repeated use of carriers for light generation (carrier recycling). While the number of quantum wells remains unchanged, the tunnel junction eliminates absorption caused by the non-uniform MQW carrier distribution. The thermal resistance drops and the excess bias lead to a surprisingly small rise in self-heating.

  3. Dependency of tunneling magneto-resistance on Fe insertion-layer thickness in Co{sub 2}Fe{sub 6}B{sub 2}/MgO-based magnetic tunneling junctions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chae, Kyo-Suk; Park, Jea-Gun

    2015-04-21

    For Co{sub 2}Fe{sub 6}B{sub 2}/MgO-based perpendicular magnetic tunneling junctions spin valves with [Co/Pd]{sub n}-synthetic-antiferromagnetic (SyAF) layers, the tunneling-magneto-resistance (TMR) ratio strongly depends on the nanoscale Fe insertion-layer thickness (t{sub Fe}) between the Co{sub 2}Fe{sub 6}B{sub 2} pinned layer and MgO tunneling barrier. The TMR ratio rapidly increased as t{sub Fe} increased up to 0.4?nm by improving the crystalline linearity of a MgO tunneling barrier and by suppressing the diffusion of Pd atoms from a [Co/Pd]{sub n}-SyAF. However, it abruptly decreased by further increasing t{sub Fe} in transferring interfacial-perpendicular magnetic anisotropy into the IMA characteristic of the Co{sub 2}Fe{sub 6}B{sub 2} pinned layer. Thus, the TMR ratio peaked at t{sub Fe}?=?0.4?nm: i.e., 120% at 29???m{sup 2}.

  4. Real-time Feynman path integral with Picard–Lefschetz theory and its applications to quantum tunneling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tanizaki, Yuya; Koike, Takayuki

    2014-12-15

    Picard–Lefschetz theory is applied to path integrals of quantum mechanics, in order to compute real-time dynamics directly. After discussing basic properties of real-time path integrals on Lefschetz thimbles, we demonstrate its computational method in a concrete way by solving three simple examples of quantum mechanics. It is applied to quantum mechanics of a double-well potential, and quantum tunneling is discussed. We identify all of the complex saddle points of the classical action, and their properties are discussed in detail. However a big theoretical difficulty turns out to appear in rewriting the original path integral into a sum of path integrals on Lefschetz thimbles. We discuss generality of that problem and mention its importance. Real-time tunneling processes are shown to be described by those complex saddle points, and thus semi-classical description of real-time quantum tunneling becomes possible on solid ground if we could solve that problem. - Highlights: • Real-time path integral is studied based on Picard–Lefschetz theory. • Lucid demonstration is given through simple examples of quantum mechanics. • This technique is applied to quantum mechanics of the double-well potential. • Difficulty for practical applications is revealed, and we discuss its generality. • Quantum tunneling is shown to be closely related to complex classical solutions.

  5. InGaN/GaN tunnel junctions for hole injection in GaN light emitting diodes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krishnamoorthy, Sriram E-mail: rajan@ece.osu.edu; Akyol, Fatih; Rajan, Siddharth E-mail: rajan@ece.osu.edu

    2014-10-06

    InGaN/GaN tunnel junction contacts were grown using plasma assisted molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) on top of a metal-organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD)-grown InGaN/GaN blue (450?nm) light emitting diode. A voltage drop of 5.3?V at 100?mA, forward resistance of 2 10{sup ?2} ? cm{sup 2}, and a higher light output power compared to the reference light emitting diodes (LED) with semi-transparent p-contacts were measured in the tunnel junction LED (TJLED). A forward resistance of 5??10{sup ?4} ? cm{sup 2} was measured in a GaN PN junction with the identical tunnel junction contact as the TJLED, grown completely by MBE. The depletion region due to the impurities at the regrowth interface between the MBE tunnel junction and the MOCVD-grown LED was hence found to limit the forward resistance measured in the TJLED.

  6. Is spin transport through molecules really occurring in organic spin valves? A combined magnetoresistance and inelastic electron tunnelling spectroscopy study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Galbiati, Marta; Tatay, Sergio; Delprat, Sophie; Khanh, Hung Le; Deranlot, Cyrile; Collin, Sophie; Seneor, Pierre Mattana, Richard Petroff, Frédéric

    2015-02-23

    Molecular and organic spintronics is an emerging research field which combines the versatility of chemistry with the non-volatility of spintronics. Organic materials have already proved their potential as tunnel barriers (TBs) or spacers in spintronics devices showing sizable spin valve like magnetoresistance effects. In the last years, a large effort has been focused on the optimization of these organic spintronics devices. Insertion of a thin inorganic tunnel barrier (Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} or MgO) at the bottom ferromagnetic metal (FM)/organic interface seems to improve the spin transport efficiency. However, during the top FM electrode deposition, metal atoms are prone to diffuse through the organic layer and potentially short-circuit it. This may lead to the formation of a working but undesired FM/TB/FM magnetic tunnel junction where the organic plays no role. Indeed, establishing a protocol to demonstrate the effective spin dependent transport through the organic layer remains a key issue. Here, we focus on Co/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/Alq{sub 3}/Co junctions and show that combining magnetoresistance and inelastic electron tunnelling spectroscopy measurements one can sort out working “organic” and short-circuited junctions fabricated on the same wafer.

  7. Preservation of coherence for a two-level atom tunneling through a squeezed vacuum with finite bandwidth

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bhattacharya, Samyadeb Roy, Sisir

    2014-09-15

    Tunneling of a two-state particle through a squeezed vacuum is considered. It has been shown that repetitive measurement or interaction with the external field can preserve the coherence. Moreover, the coherence time in terms of the squeezing parameters has been calculated. A specific condition is derived, under which the coherence is sustainable.

  8. A 2-terminal perovskite/silicon multijunction solar cell enabled by a silicon tunnel junction

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Mailoa, Jonathan P.; Bailie, Colin D.; Johlin, Eric C.; Hoke, Eric T.; Akey, Austin J.; Nguyen, William H.; McGehee, Michael D.; Buonassisi, Tonio

    2015-03-24

    With the advent of efficient high-bandgap metal-halide perovskite photovoltaics, an opportunity exists to make perovskite/silicon tandem solar cells. We fabricate a monolithic tandem by developing a silicon-based interband tunnel junction that facilitates majority-carrier charge recombination between the perovskite and silicon sub-cells. We demonstrate a 1 cm2 2-terminal monolithic perovskite/silicon multijunction solar cell with a VOC as high as 1.65 V. As a result, we achieve a stable 13.7% power conversion efficiency with the perovskite as the current-limiting sub-cell, and identify key challenges for this device architecture to reach efficiencies over 25%.

  9. Scanning tunneling spectroscopy of a magnetic atom on graphene in the Kondo regime

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhuang, Huai -Bin; Sun, Qing -feng; Xie, X. C.

    2009-06-23

    In this study, the Kondo effect in the system consisting of a magnetic adatom on the graphene is studied. By using the non-equilibrium Green function method with the slave-boson mean field approximation, the local density of state (LDOS) and the conductance are calculated. For a doped graphene, the Kondo phase is present at all time. Surprisingly, two kinds of Kondo regimes are revealed. But for the undoped graphene, the Kondo phase only exists if the adatoms energy level is beyond a critical value. The conductance is similar to the LDOS, thus, the Kondo peak in the LDOS can be observed with the scanning tunneling spectroscopy. In addition, in the presence of a direct coupling between the STM tip and the graphene, the conductance may be dramatically enhanced, depending on the coupling site.

  10. Phonon-assisted tunneling and two-channel Kondo physics in molecular junctions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dias Da Silva, Luis G; Dagotto, Elbio R

    2009-01-01

    The interplay between vibrational modes and Kondo physics is a fundamental aspect of transport properties of correlated molecular conductors. We present theoretical results for a single molecule in the Kondo regime connected to left and right metallic leads, creating the usual coupling to a conduction channel with left-right parity even. A center-of-mass vibrational mode introduces an additional phonon-assisted tunneling through the antisymmetric odd channel. A non-Fermi-liquid fixed point, reminiscent of the two-channel Kondo effect, appears at a critical value of the phonon-mediated coupling strength. Our numerical renormalization-group calculations for this system reveal non-Fermi-liquid behavior at low temperatures over lines of critical points. Signatures of this strongly correlated state are prominent in the thermodynamic properties and in the linear conductance.

  11. In situ scanning tunneling microscope tip treatment device for spin polarization imaging

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Li, An-Ping [Oak Ridge, TN; Jianxing, Ma [Oak Ridge, TN; Shen, Jian [Knoxville, TN

    2008-04-22

    A tip treatment device for use in an ultrahigh vacuum in situ scanning tunneling microscope (STM). The device provides spin polarization functionality to new or existing variable temperature STM systems. The tip treatment device readily converts a conventional STM to a spin-polarized tip, and thereby converts a standard STM system into a spin-polarized STM system. The tip treatment device also has functions of tip cleaning and tip flashing a STM tip to high temperature (>2000.degree. C.) in an extremely localized fashion. Tip coating functions can also be carried out, providing the tip sharp end with monolayers of coating materials including magnetic films. The device is also fully compatible with ultrahigh vacuum sample transfer setups.

  12. Mode-hopping mechanism generating colored noise in a magnetic tunnel junction based spin torque oscillator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sharma, Raghav; Drrenfeld, P.; Iacocca, E.; Heinonen, O. G.; kerman, J.; Muduli, P. K.

    2014-09-29

    The frequency noise spectrum of a magnetic tunnel junction based spin torque oscillator is examined where multiple modes and mode-hopping events are observed. The frequency noise spectrum is found to consist of both white noise and 1/f frequency noise. We find a systematic and similar dependence of both white noise and 1/f frequency noise on bias current and the relative angle between the reference and free layers, which changes the effective damping and hence the mode-hopping behavior in this system. The frequency at which the 1/f frequency noise changes to white noise increases as the free layer is aligned away from the anti-parallel orientation w.r.t the reference layer. These results indicate that the origin of 1/f frequency noise is related to mode-hopping, which produces both white noise as well as 1/f frequency noise similar to the case of ring lasers.

  13. A 2-terminal perovskite/silicon multijunction solar cell enabled by a silicon tunnel junction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mailoa, Jonathan P.; Bailie, Colin D.; Johlin, Eric C.; Hoke, Eric T.; Akey, Austin J.; Nguyen, William H.; McGehee, Michael D.; Buonassisi, Tonio

    2015-03-24

    With the advent of efficient high-bandgap metal-halide perovskite photovoltaics, an opportunity exists to make perovskite/silicon tandem solar cells. We fabricate a monolithic tandem by developing a silicon-based interband tunnel junction that facilitates majority-carrier charge recombination between the perovskite and silicon sub-cells. We demonstrate a 1 cm2 2-terminal monolithic perovskite/silicon multijunction solar cell with a VOC as high as 1.65 V. As a result, we achieve a stable 13.7% power conversion efficiency with the perovskite as the current-limiting sub-cell, and identify key challenges for this device architecture to reach efficiencies over 25%.

  14. Scanning tunneling spectroscopy of a magnetic atom on graphene in the Kondo regime

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Zhuang, Huai -Bin; Sun, Qing -feng; Xie, X. C.

    2009-06-23

    In this study, the Kondo effect in the system consisting of a magnetic adatom on the graphene is studied. By using the non-equilibrium Green function method with the slave-boson mean field approximation, the local density of state (LDOS) and the conductance are calculated. For a doped graphene, the Kondo phase is present at all time. Surprisingly, two kinds of Kondo regimes are revealed. But for the undoped graphene, the Kondo phase only exists if the adatoms energy level is beyond a critical value. The conductance is similar to the LDOS, thus, the Kondo peak in the LDOS can be observedmorewith the scanning tunneling spectroscopy. In addition, in the presence of a direct coupling between the STM tip and the graphene, the conductance may be dramatically enhanced, depending on the coupling site.less

  15. Method and apparatus for differential spectroscopic atomic-imaging using scanning tunneling microscopy

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kazmerski, Lawrence L. (Lakewood, CO)

    1990-01-01

    A Method and apparatus for differential spectroscopic atomic-imaging is disclosed for spatial resolution and imaging for display not only individual atoms on a sample surface, but also bonding and the specific atomic species in such bond. The apparatus includes a scanning tunneling microscope (STM) that is modified to include photon biasing, preferably a tuneable laser, modulating electronic surface biasing for the sample, and temperature biasing, preferably a vibration-free refrigerated sample mounting stage. Computer control and data processing and visual display components are also included. The method includes modulating the electronic bias voltage with and without selected photon wavelengths and frequency biasing under a stabilizing (usually cold) bias temperature to detect bonding and specific atomic species in the bonds as the STM rasters the sample. This data is processed along with atomic spatial topography data obtained from the STM raster scan to create a real-time visual image of the atoms on the sample surface.

  16. Si/SiGe electron resonant tunneling diodes with graded spacer wells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paul, D. J.; See, P.; Bates, R.; Griffin, N.; Coonan, B. P.; Redmond, G.; Crean, G. M.; Zozoulenko, I. V.; Berggren, K.-F.; Hollander, B.

    2001-06-25

    Resonant tunneling diodes have been fabricated using graded Si{sub 1{minus}x}Ge{sub x} (x=0.3{r_arrow}0.0) spacer wells and strained Si{sub 0.4}Ge{sub 0.6} barriers on a relaxed Si{sub 0.7}Ge{sub 0.3} n-type substrate which demonstrates negative differential resistance at up to 100 K. This design is aimed at reducing the voltage at which the peak current density is achieved. Peak current densities of 0.08A/cm{sup 2} with peak-to-valley current ratios of 1.67 have been achieved for a low peak voltage of 40 mV at 77 K. This represents an improvement of over an order of magnitude compared to previous work. {copyright} 2001 American Institute of Physics.

  17. Giant electrocaloric effect in asymmetric ferroelectric tunnel junctions at room temperature

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Yang Infante, Ingrid C.; Dkhil, Brahim; Lou, Xiaojie

    2014-02-24

    Room-temperature electrocaloric properties of Pt/BaTiO{sub 3}/SrRuO{sub 3} ferroelectric tunnel junctions (FTJs) are studied by using a multiscale thermodynamic model. It is found that there is a divergence in the adiabatic temperature change ΔT for the two opposite polarization orientations. This difference under a typical writing voltage of 3 V can reach over 1 K as the barrier thickness decreases. Thanks to the ultrahigh external stimulus, a giant electrocaloric effect (1.53 K/V) with ΔT being over 4.5 K can be achieved at room temperature, which demonstrates the perspective of FTJs as a promising solid-state refrigeration.

  18. Scanning tunneling microscopy reveals LiMnAs is a room temperature anti-ferromagnetic semiconductor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wijnheijmer, A. P.; Koenraad, P. M.; Marti, X.; Holy, V.; Cukr, M.; Novak, V.; Jungwirth, T.

    2012-03-12

    We performed scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy on a LiMnAs(001) thin film epitaxially grown on an InAs(001) substrate by molecular beam epitaxy. While the in situ cleavage exposed only the InAs(110) non-polar planes, the cleavage continued into the LiMnAs thin layer across several facets. We combined both topography and current mappings to confirm that the facets correspond to LiMnAs. By spectroscopy we show that LiMnAs has a band gap. The band gap evidenced in this study, combined with the known Neel temperature well above room temperature, confirms that LiMnAs is a promising candidate for exploring the concepts of high temperature semiconductor spintronics based on antiferromagnets.

  19. Three-terminal magnetic tunneling junction device with perpendicular anisotropy CoFeB sensing layer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Honjo, H. Nebashi, R.; Tokutome, K.; Miura, S.; Sakimura, N.; Sugibayashi, T.; Fukami, S.; Kinoshita, K.; Murahata, M.; Kasai, N.; Ishihara, K.; Ohno, H.

    2014-05-07

    We demonstrated read and write characteristics of a three terminal memory device with a perpendicular anisotropy-free layer of a strip of [Co/Ni] and a low-switching perpendicular-anisotropy CoFeB/MgO sensing layer. This new design of the cell results in a small cell area. The switching magnetic field of the sensing layer can be decreased by changing sputtering gas for the Ta-cap from Ar to Kr. An electron energy-loss spectroscopy analysis of the cross-section of the magnetic tunneling junction (MTJ) revealed that the boron content in CoFeB with a Kr-sputtered Ta-cap was smaller than that with an Ar-sputtered one. A change in resistance for the MTJ was observed that corresponded to the magnetic switching of the Co/Ni wire and its magnetoresistance ratio and critical current were 90% and 0.8 mA, respectively.

  20. On the role of disorder on graphene and graphene nanoribbon-based vertical tunneling transistors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ghobadi, Nayereh; Pourfath, Mahdi E-mail: pourfath@iue.tuwien.ac.at

    2014-11-14

    In this work, the characteristics of vertical tunneling field-effect transistors based on graphene (VTGFET) and graphene nanoribbon heterostructure (VTGNRFET) in the presence of disorder are theoretically investigated. An statistical analysis based on an atomistic tight-binding model for the electronic bandstructure along with the non-equilibrium Green's function formalism are employed. We study the dependence of the averaged density of states, transmission probability, on- and off-state conductances, on/off conductance ratio, and transfer characteristics on the substrate induced potential fluctuations and vacancies. In addition, the variabilities of the device characteristics due to the presence of disorder are evaluated. It can be inferred from the results that while introducing vacancies cause a relatively modest suppression of the transmission probability, potential fluctuations lead to the significant increase of transmission probability and conductance of the device. Moreover, the results show that the transport properties of VTGFET are more robust against disorder compared to VTGNRFET.

  1. Effect of tunnel injection through the Schottky gate on the static and noise behavior of GaInAs/AlInAs high electron mobility transistor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moro-Melgar, Diego; Mateos, Javier Gonzlez, Toms Vasallo, Beatriz G.

    2014-12-21

    By using a Monte Carlo simulator, the influence of the tunnel injection through the Schottky contact at the gate electrode of a GaInAs/AlInAs High Electron Mobility Transistor (HEMT) has been studied in terms of the static and noise performance. The method used to characterize the quantum tunnel current has been the Wentzel-Kramers-Brillouin (WKB) approach. The possibility of taking into account the influence of the image charge effect in the potential barrier height has been included as well. Regarding the static behavior, tunnel injection leads to a decrease in the drain current I{sub D} due to an enhancement of the potential barrier controlling the carrier transport through the channel. However, the pinch-off is degraded due to the tunneling current. Regarding the noise behavior, since the fluctuations in the potential barrier height caused by the tunnel-injected electrons are strongly coupled with the drain current fluctuations, a significant increase in the drain-current noise takes place, even when the tunnel effect is hardly noticeable in the static I-V characteristics, fact that must be taken into account when designing scaled HEMT for low-noise applications. In addition, tunnel injection leads to the appearance of full shot noise in the gate current.

  2. On the valve nature of a monolayer of aligned molecular magnets in tunneling spin-polarized electrons: Towards organic molecular spintronics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chakrabarti, Sudipto; Pal, Amlan J.

    2014-01-06

    We form a monolayer of magnetic organic molecules and immobilize their moments pointing either upwards or downwards with respect to the substrate through an electrostatic-binding process. Such a monolayer is probed with a scanning tunneling microscope tip, which is also magnetized with the magnetization vector pointing towards (or away from) apex of the tip. From spin-polarized tunneling current, we show that the current was higher when magnetization vectors of the tip and molecules were parallel as compared to that when they were anti-parallel. We show that for tunneling of spin-polarized electrons, aligned organic molecular magnets can act as a valve.

  3. Low voltage tunneling magnetoresistance in CuCrO{sub 2}-based semiconductor heterojunctions at room temperature

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, X. R.; Han, M. J.; Shan, C.; Hu, Z. G. Zhu, Z. Q.; Chu, J. H.; Wu, J. D.

    2014-12-14

    CuCrO{sub 2}-based heterojunction diodes with rectifying characteristics have been fabricated by combining p-type Mg-doped CuCrO{sub 2} and n-type Al-doped ZnO. It was found that the current for the heterojunction in low bias voltage region is dominated by the trap-assisted tunneling mechanism. Positive magnetoresistance (MR) effect for the heterojunction can be observed at room temperature due to the tunneling-induced antiparallel spin polarization near the heterostructure interface. The MR effect becomes enhanced with the magnetic field, and shows the maximum at a bias voltage around 0.5 V. The phenomena indicate that the CuCrO{sub 2}-based heterojunction is a promising candidate for low-power semiconductor spintronic devices.

  4. A new InGaP/GaAs tunneling heterostructure-emitter bipolar transistor (T-HEBT)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tsai, Jung-Hui; Lee, Ching-Sung; Lour, Wen-Shiung; Ma, Yung-Chun; Ye, Sheng-Shiun

    2011-05-15

    Excellent characteristics of an InGaP/GaAs tunneling heterostructure-emitter bipolar transistor (T-HEBT) are first demonstrated. The insertion of a thin n-GaAs emitter layer between tynneling confinement and base layers effectivelty eliminates the potential spike at base-emitter junction and reduces the collector-emitter offset voltage, while the thin InGaP tunneling confinement layer is employed to reduce the transporting time across emitter region for electrons and maintain the good confinement effect for holes. Experimentally, the studied T-HEBN exhibits a maximum current gain of 285, a relatively low offset voltage of 40 mW, and a current-gain cutoff frequency of 26.4 GHz.

  5. Symmetry-dependent electron-electron interaction in coherent tunnel junctions resolved by measurements of zero-bias anomaly

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Liu, Liang; Niu, Jiasen; Xiang, Li; Wei, Jian; Li, D. -L.; Feng, J. F.; Han, Prof. X. F.; Zhang, Xiaoguang; Coey, J. M. D

    2014-01-01

    We provide experimental evidence that zero bias anomaly in the di erential resistance of magnetic tunnel junctions (MTJs) is due to electron-electron interaction (EEI). Magnon e ect is excluded by measuring at low temperatures down to 0.2 K and with reduced AC measurement voltages down to 0.06 mV. The normalized change of conductance is proportional to ln (eV /kB T ), consistent with the Altshuler-Aronov theory of tunneling with EEI but inconsistent with magnetic impurity scattering. The slope of the ln (eV /kB T ) dependence is symmetry dependent, i.e., MTJs with symmetry filtering show di erent slopes for Pmore » and AP states, while those without symmetry filtering (amorphous barriers) have nearly the same slopes for P and AP.« less

  6. Magnetization switching in a CoFeB/MgO magnetic tunnel junction by combining spin-transfer torque and electric field-effect

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kanai, S.; Nakatani, Y.; Yamanouchi, M.; Ikeda, S.; Sato, H.; Matsukura, F.; Ohno, H.

    2014-05-26

    We propose and demonstrate a scheme for magnetization switching in magnetic tunnel junctions, in which two successive voltage pulses are applied to utilize both spin-transfer torque and electric field effect. Under this switching scheme, a CoFeB/MgO magnetic tunnel junction with perpendicular magnetic easy axis is shown to switch faster than by spin-transfer torque alone and more reliably than that by electric fields alone.

  7. Methane dissociative chemisorption and detailed balance on Pt(111): Dynamical constraints and the modest influence of tunneling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Donald, S. B.; Navin, J. K.; Harrison, I.

    2013-12-07

    A dynamically biased (d-) precursor mediated microcanonical trapping (PMMT) model of the activated dissociative chemisorption of methane on Pt(111) is applied to a wide range of dissociative sticking experiments, and, by detailed balance, to the methane product state distributions from the thermal associative desorption of adsorbed hydrogen with coadsorbed methyl radicals. Tunneling pathways were incorporated into the d-PMMT model to better replicate the translational energy distribution of the desorbing methane product from the laser induced thermal reaction of coadsorbed hydrogen and methyl radicals occurring near T{sub s} = 395 K. Although tunneling is predicted to be inconsequential to the thermal dissociative chemisorption of CH{sub 4} on Pt(111) at the high temperatures of catalytic interest, once the temperature drops to 395 K the tunneling fraction of the reactive thermal flux reaches 15%, and as temperatures drop below 275 K the tunneling fraction exceeds 50%. The d-PMMT model parameters of (E{sub 0} = 58.9?kJ/mol,?s = 2,??{sub v} = 0.40) describe the apparent threshold energy for CH{sub 4}/Pt(111) dissociative chemisorption, the number of surface oscillators involved in the precursor complex, and the efficacy of molecular vibrational energy to promote reaction, relative to translational energy directed along the surface normal. Molecular translations parallel to the surface and rotations are treated as spectator degrees of freedom. Transition state vibrational frequencies are derived from generalized gradient approximation-density functional theory electronic structure calculations. The d-PMMT model replicates the diverse range of experimental data available with good fidelity, including some new effusive molecular beam and ambient gas dissociative sticking measurements. Nevertheless, there are some indications that closer agreement between theory and experiments could be achieved if a surface efficacy less than one was introduced into the modeling as an additional dynamical constraint.

  8. A novel high capacity positive electrode material with tunnel-type structure for aqueous sodium-ion batteries

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Wang, Yuesheng; Mu, Linqin; Liu, Jue; Yang, Zhenzhong; Yu, Xiqian; Gu, Lin; Hu, Yong -Sheng; Li, Hong; Yang, Xiao -Qing; Chen, Liquan; et al

    2015-08-06

    In this study, aqueous sodium-ion batteries have shown desired properties of high safety characteristics and low-cost for large-scale energy storage applications such as smart grid, because of the abundant sodium resources as well as the inherently safer aqueous electrolytes. Among various Na insertion electrode materials, tunnel-type Na0.44MnO2 has been widely investigated as a positive electrode for aqueous sodium-ion batteries. However, the low achievable capacity hinders its practical applications. Here we report a novel sodium rich tunnel-type positive material with a nominal composition of Na0.66[Mn0.66Ti0.34]O2. The tunnel-type structure of Na0.44MnO2 obtained for this compound was confirmed by XRD and atomic-scale STEM/EELS.more » When cycled as positive electrode in full cells using NaTi2(PO4)3/C as negative electrode in 1M Na2SO4 aqueous electrolyte, this material shows the highest capacity of 76 mAh g-1 among the Na insertion oxides with an average operating voltage of 1.2 V at a current rate of 2C. These results demonstrate that Na0.66[Mn0.66Ti0.34]O2 is a promising positive electrode material for rechargeable aqueous sodium-ion batteries.« less

  9. Copper intercalation at the interface of graphene and Ir(111) studied by scanning tunneling microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sicot, M. Fagot-Revurat, Y.; Kierren, B.; Vasseur, G.; Malterre, D.

    2014-11-10

    We report on the intercalation of a submonolayer of copper at 775?K underneath graphene epitaxially grown on Ir(111) studied by means of low energy electron diffraction (LEED) and scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) at 77?K. Nucleation and growth dynamics of Cu below graphene have been investigated, and, most importantly, the intercalation mechanism has been identified. First, LEED patterns reveal the pseudomorphic growth of Cu on Ir under the topmost graphene layer resulting in a large Cu in-plane lattice parameter expansion of about 6% compared to Cu(111). Second, large-scale STM topographs as a function of Cu coverage show that Cu diffusion on Ir below graphene exhibits a low energy barrier resulting in Cu accumulation at Ir step edges. As a result, the graphene sheet undergoes a strong edges reshaping. Finally, atomically-resolved STM images reveal a damaged graphene sheet at the atomic scale after metal intercalation. Point defects in graphene were shown to be carbon vacancies. According to these results, a Cu penetration path beneath graphene is proposed to occur via metal aided defect formation with no or poor self healing of the graphene sheet. This work illustrates the fact that Cu intercalation is harmful for graphene grown on Ir(111) at the atomic scale.

  10. Comparison of two tunnel studies for non methane hydrocarbons in Mexico City

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mugica A, V.; Vega R, E.; Ruiz S, M.E.; Seila, R.

    1998-12-31

    Emissions from vehicles have long been considered a major source of pollutants involved in smog formation and ozone production. During the last few years, different control strategies have been taking place to reduce the high levels of ozone and some other atmospheric pollutants. Some of these strategies are: improvement of fuels, a program for compulsory vehicular emission test and the introduction of catalytic converters to be used in conjunction with unleaded gasoline since 1991. The comparison of the vehicular NMHC emission source profiles measured in a tunnel in Mexico City during March 1992 and May 1996 is presented. Samples were collected using stainless steel SUMMA{reg_sign} canisters and subsequent analyzed by gas chromatography with flame ionized detector. It was found that in general, the source profiles are similar, however, some differences were detected for some species. The sum of acetylene, ethylene and ethane contents, which are a typical combustion products, is lower for the 1996 source profile than for the 1992. In the same way, there is a small decrease of paraffin and olefin contents, except for hexane. Finally, significant differences were found for aromatic compounds, mainly toluene and xylenes which increased in 1996.

  11. Unveiling Stability Criteria of DNA-Carbon Nanotubes Constructs by Scanning Tunneling Microscopy and Computational Modeling

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Kilina, Svetlana; Yarotski, Dzmitry A.; Talin, A. Alec; Tretiak, Sergei; Taylor, Antoinette J.; Balatsky, Alexander V.

    2011-01-01

    We present a combined approach that relies on computational simulations and scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) measurements to reveal morphological properties and stability criteria of carbon nanotube-DNA (CNT-DNA) constructs. Application of STM allows direct observation of very stable CNT-DNA hybrid structures with the well-defined DNA wrapping angle of 63.4 ° and a coiling period of 3.3 nm. Using force field simulations, we determine how the DNA-CNT binding energy depends on the sequence and binding geometry of a single strand DNA. This dependence allows us to quantitatively characterize the stability of a hybrid structure with an optimal π-stacking between DNA nucleotides andmore » the tube surface and better interpret STM data. Our simulations clearly demonstrate the existence of a very stable DNA binding geometry for (6,5) CNT as evidenced by the presence of a well-defined minimum in the binding energy as a function of an angle between DNA strand and the nanotube chiral vector. This novel approach demonstrates the feasibility of CNT-DNA geometry studies with subnanometer resolution and paves the way towards complete characterization of the structural and electronic properties of drug-delivering systems based on DNA-CNT hybrids as a function of DNA sequence and a nanotube chirality.« less

  12. Stability and tunneling dynamics of a dark-bright soliton pair in a harmonic trap

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Karamatskos, E. T.; Stockhofe, J.; Kevrekidis, P. G.; Schmelcher, P.

    2015-04-30

    In this study, we consider a binary repulsive Bose-Einstein condensate in a harmonic trap in one spatial dimension and investigate particular solutions consisting of two dark-bright solitons. There are two different stationary solutions characterized by the phase difference in the bright component, in-phase and out-of-phase states. We show that above a critical particle number in the bright component, a symmetry-breaking bifurcation of the pitchfork type occurs that leads to a new asymmetric solution whereas the parental branch, i.e., the out-of-phase state, becomes unstable. These three different states support different small amplitude oscillations, characterized by an almost stationary density of themore » dark component and a tunneling of the bright component between the two dark solitons. Within a suitable effective double-well picture, these can be understood as the characteristic features of a bosonic Josephson junction (BJJ), and we show within a two-mode approach that all characteristic features of the BJJ phase space are recovered. For larger deviations from the stationary states, the simplifying double-well description breaks down due to the feedback of the bright component onto the dark one, causing the solitons to move. In this regime we observe intricate anharmonic and aperiodic dynamics, exhibiting remnants of the BJJ phase space.« less

  13. Influence of hydrogen patterning gas on electric and magnetic properties of perpendicular magnetic tunnel junctions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jeong, J. H.; Endoh, T.; Kim, Y.; Kim, W. K.; Park, S. O.

    2014-05-07

    To identify the degradation mechanism in magnetic tunnel junctions (MTJs) using hydrogen, the properties of the MTJs were measured by applying an additional hydrogen etch process and a hydrogen plasma process to the patterned MTJs. In these studies, an additional 50?s hydrogen etch process caused the magnetoresistance (MR) to decrease from 103% to 14.7% and the resistance (R) to increase from 6.5?k? to 39?k?. Moreover, an additional 500?s hydrogen plasma process decreased the MR from 103% to 74% and increased R from 6.5?k? to 13.9?k?. These results show that MTJs can be damaged by the hydrogen plasma process as well as by the hydrogen etch process, as the atomic bonds in MgO may break and react with the exposed hydrogen gas. Compounds such as MgO hydrate very easily. We also calculated the damaged layer width (DLW) of the patterned MTJs after the hydrogen etching and plasma processes, to evaluate the downscaling limitations of spin-transfer-torque magnetic random-access memory (STT-MRAM) devices. With these calculations, the maximum DLWs at each side of the MTJ, generated by the etching and plasma processes, were 23.8?nm and 12.8?nm, respectively. This result validates that the hydrogen-based MTJ patterning processes cannot be used exclusively in STT-MRAMs beyond 20?nm.

  14. Zero-point energy, tunneling, and vibrational adiabaticity in the Mu + H2 reaction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mielke, Steven L.; Garrett, Bruce C.; Fleming, Donald G.; Truhlar, Donald G.

    2015-01-09

    Abstract: Isotopic substitution of muonium for hydrogen provides an unparalleled opportunity to deepen our understanding of quantum mass effects on chemical reactions. A recent topical review [Aldegunde et al., Mol. Phys. 111, 3169 (2013)] of the thermal and vibrationally-stateselected reaction of Mu with H2 raises a number of issues that are addressed here. We show that some earlier quantum mechanical calculations of the Mu + H2 reaction, which are highlighted in this review and which have been used to benchmark approximate methods, are in error by as much as 19% in the low-temperature limit. We demonstrate that an approximate treatment of the BornOppenheimer diagonal correction that was used in some recent studies is not valid for treating the vibrationally-state-selected reaction. We also discuss why vibrationally adiabatic potentials that neglect bend zero-point energy are not a useful analytical tool for understanding reaction rates and why vibrationally nonadiabatic transitions cannot be understood by considering tunneling through vibrationally adiabatic potentials. Finally, we present calculations on a hierarchical family of potential energy surfaces to assess the sensitivity of rate constants to the quality of the potential surface.

  15. Development of Ta-based Superconducting Tunnel Junction X-ray Detectors for Fluorescence XAS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Friedrich, S; Drury, O; Hall, J; Cantor, R

    2009-09-23

    We are developing superconducting tunnel junction (STJ) soft X-ray detectors for chemical analysis of dilute samples by fluorescence-detected X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS). Our 36-pixel Nb-based STJ spectrometer covers a solid angle {Omega}/4{pi} {approx} 10{sup -3}, offers an energy resolution of {approx}10-20 eV FWHM for energies up to {approx}1 keV, and can be operated at total count rates of {approx}10{sup 6} counts/s. For increased quantum efficiency and cleaner response function, we have now started the development of Ta-based STJ detector arrays. Initial devices modeled after our Nb-based STJs have an energy resolution below 10 eV FWHM for X-ray energies below 1 keV, and pulse rise time discrimination can be used to improve their response function for energies up to several keV. We discuss the performance of the Ta-STJs and outline steps towards the next-generation of large STJ detector arrays with higher sensitivity.

  16. Implications of the Baltimore Rail Tunnel Fire for Full-Scale Testing of Shipping Casks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Halstead, R. J.; Dilger, F.

    2003-02-25

    The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) does not currently require full-scale physical testing of shipping casks as part of its certification process. Stakeholders have long urged NRC to require full-scale testing as part of certification. NRC is currently preparing a full-scale casktesting proposal as part of the Package Performance Study (PPS) that grew out of the NRC reexamination of the Modal Study. The State of Nevada and Clark County remain committed to the position that demonstration testing would not be an acceptable substitute for a combination of full-scale testing, scale-model tests, and computer simulation of each new cask design prior to certification. Based on previous analyses of cask testing issues, and on preliminary findings regarding the July 2001 Baltimore rail tunnel fire, the authors recommend that NRC prioritize extra-regulatory thermal testing of a large rail cask and the GA-4 truck cask under the PPS. The specific fire conditions and other aspects of the full-scale extra-regulatory tests recommended for the PPS are yet to be determined. NRC, in consultation with stakeholders, must consider past real-world accidents and computer simulations to establish temperature failure thresholds for cask containment and fuel cladding. The cost of extra-regulatory thermal testing is yet to be determined. The minimum cost for regulatory thermal testing of a legal-weight truck cask would likely be $3.3-3.8 million.

  17. Richmond Field Station Tow Tank | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Real-Time Yes Data Comparison to Computational Models Numerous PhD theses involved experimental components that were carried out at the facility Integrated DisplayGraphics...

  18. Survey of [sup 222]Rn concentrations in the air of a tunnel located in Nagano City using the solid-state nuclear track detector method

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Muramatsu, H.; Hasegawa, N.; Misawa, C.; Minami, M.; Tanaka, E.; Asami, K.; Kuroda, C.; Kawakami, A. . Dept. of Chemistry)

    1999-07-01

    The survey of [sup 222]Rn concentration in the air of tunnels constructed during World War II has been performed using a solid-state nuclear track detector technique. For the practical application of this technique t the determination of [sup 222]Rn concentrations in air, some basic properties were experimentally examined on the cellulose nitrate film, Kodak LR 115 type II. The calibration coefficient of the cellulose nitrate film used is determined from a correlation between the [sup 222]Rn concentration in air and the observed number of perforated etched tracks for widespread radon concentrations. The slope of the linear relationship observed yields a calibration coefficient of (0.00209 [+-] 0.00018) tracks cm[sup [minus]2] (Bq m[sup [minus]3] h)[sup [minus]1]. From the survey of [sup 222]Rn concentration in the air of tunnels, the concentration of several thousand Bq m[sup [minus]3] was observed at the inner most area of the tunnel, and the seasonal variation was clearly observed. The exponential distribution of radon concentration as a function of distance from the openings of the tunnel suggests that the radon concentration in the tunnel is basically governed by diffusion and mixing of radon gas with air.

  19. Resonant tunneling with high peak to valley current ratio in SiO{sub 2}/nc-Si/SiO{sub 2} multi-layers at room temperature

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, D. Y.; Sun, Y.; He, Y. J.; Xu, L.; Xu, J.

    2014-01-28

    We have investigated carrier transport in SiO{sub 2}/nc-Si/SiO{sub 2} multi-layers by room temperature current-voltage measurements. Resonant tunneling signatures accompanied by current peaks are observed. Carrier transport in the multi-layers were analyzed by plots of ln(I/V{sup 2}) as a function of 1/V and ln(I) as a function of V{sup 1/2}. Results suggest that besides films quality, nc-Si and barrier sub-layer thicknesses are important parameters that restrict carrier transport. When thicknesses are both small, direct tunneling dominates carrier transport, resonant tunneling occurs only at certain voltages and multi-resonant tunneling related current peaks can be observed but with peak to valley current ratio (PVCR) values smaller than 1.5. When barrier thickness is increased, trap-related and even high field related tunneling is excited, causing that multi-current peaks cannot be observed clearly, only one current peak with higher PVCR value of 7.7 can be observed. While if the thickness of nc-Si is large enough, quantum confinement is not so strong, a broad current peak with PVCR value as high as 60 can be measured, which may be due to small energy difference between the splitting energy levels in the quantum dots of nc-Si. Size distribution in a wide range may cause un-controllability of the peak voltages.

  20. A novel high capacity positive electrode material with tunnel-type structure for aqueous sodium-ion batteries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Yuesheng; Mu, Linqin; Liu, Jue; Yang, Zhenzhong; Yu, Xiqian; Gu, Lin; Hu, Yong -Sheng; Li, Hong; Yang, Xiao -Qing; Chen, Liquan; Huang, Xuejie

    2015-08-06

    In this study, aqueous sodium-ion batteries have shown desired properties of high safety characteristics and low-cost for large-scale energy storage applications such as smart grid, because of the abundant sodium resources as well as the inherently safer aqueous electrolytes. Among various Na insertion electrode materials, tunnel-type Na0.44MnO2 has been widely investigated as a positive electrode for aqueous sodium-ion batteries. However, the low achievable capacity hinders its practical applications. Here we report a novel sodium rich tunnel-type positive material with a nominal composition of Na0.66[Mn0.66Ti0.34]O2. The tunnel-type structure of Na0.44MnO2 obtained for this compound was confirmed by XRD and atomic-scale STEM/EELS. When cycled as positive electrode in full cells using NaTi2(PO4)3/C as negative electrode in 1M Na2SO4 aqueous electrolyte, this material shows the highest capacity of 76 mAh g-1 among the Na insertion oxides with an average operating voltage of 1.2 V at a current rate of 2C. These results demonstrate that Na0.66[Mn0.66Ti0.34]O2 is a promising positive electrode material for rechargeable aqueous sodium-ion batteries.

  1. Ultrafast spin tunneling and injection in coupled nanostructures of InGaAs quantum dots and quantum well

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, Xiao-Jie Kiba, Takayuki; Yamamura, Takafumi; Takayama, Junichi; Subagyo, Agus; Sueoka, Kazuhisa; Murayama, Akihiro

    2014-01-06

    We investigate the electron-spin injection dynamics via tunneling from an In{sub 0.1}Ga{sub 0.9}As quantum well (QW) to In{sub 0.5}Ga{sub 0.5}As quantum dots (QDs) in coupled QW-QDs nanostructures. These coupled nanostructures demonstrate ultrafast (5 to 20 ps) spin injection into the QDs. The degree of spin polarization up to 45% is obtained in the QDs after the injection, essentially depending on the injection time. The spin injection and conservation are enhanced with thinner barriers due to the stronger electronic coupling between the QW and QDs.

  2. Sandia Energy - Inter-Agency Agreement Signed between DOE's Wind...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Inter-Agency Agreement Signed between DOE's Wind and Water Power Program and Carderock Home Renewable Energy Energy Water Power Partnership News News & Events Inter-Agency...

  3. Property:Description of Beach | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    property. A Alden Wave Basin + Designed as needed using commercially available sandsediment C Carderock Maneuvering & Seakeeping Basin + Wave absorbers are a discontinuous 12...

  4. United States Naval Surface Warfare Center | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Warfare Center Jump to: navigation, search Hydro | Hydrodynamic Testing Facilities Name United States Naval Surface Warfare Center Address Carderock, 9500 MacArthur Boulevard...

  5. LER-LHC injector workshop summary and super-ferric fast cycling injector in the SPS tunnel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ambrosio, Giorgio; Hays, Steven; Huang, Yuenian; Johnstone, John; Kashikhin, Vadim; MacLachlan, James; Mokhov, Nikolai; Piekarz, Henryk; Sen, Tanaji; Shiltsev, Vladimir; de Rijk, Gijsbert; /CERN

    2007-03-01

    A Workshop on Low Energy Ring (LER) in the LHC tunnel as main injector was convened at CERN on October 11-12, 2006. We present the outline of the LER based on the presentations, and respond to the raised questions and discussions including the post-workshop studies. We also outline the possibility of using the LER accelerator technologies for the fast cycling injector accelerator in the SPS tunnel (SF-SPS). A primary goal for the LER (Low Energy Ring) injector accelerator is to inject 1.5 TeV proton beams into the LHC, instead of the current injection scheme with 0.45 TeV beams from the SPS. At this new energy, the field harmonics [1] of the LHC magnets are sufficiently satisfactory to prevent the luminosity losses expected to appear when applying the transfer of the 0.45 TeV SPS beams. In addition, a feasibility study of batch slip stacking in the LER has been undertaken with a goal of increasing in this way the LHC luminosity by up to a factor of 4. A combined luminosity increase may, therefore, be in the range of an order of magnitude. In the long term, the LER injector accelerator would greatly facilitate the implementation of a machine, which doubles the LHC energy (DLHC).

  6. Manipulation of subsurface carbon nanoparticles in Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8+δ using a scanning tunneling microscope

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Stollenwerk, A. J.; Hurley, N.; Beck, B.; Spurgeon, K.; Kidd, T. E.; Gu, G.

    2015-03-19

    In this study, we present evidence that subsurface carbon nanoparticles in Bi₂Sr₂CaCu₂O8+δ can be manipulated with nanometer precision using a scanning tunneling microscope. High resolution images indicate that most of the carbon particles remain subsurface after transport observable as a local increase in height as the particle pushes up on the surface. Tunneling spectra in the vicinity of these protrusions exhibit semiconducting characteristics with a band gap of approximately 1.8 eV, indicating that the incorporation of carbon locally alters the electronic properties near the surface.

  7. Manipulation of subsurface carbon nanoparticles in Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8+? using a scanning tunneling microscope

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Stollenwerk, A. J.; Hurley, N.; Beck, B.; Spurgeon, K.; Kidd, T. E.; Gu, G.

    2015-03-19

    In this study, we present evidence that subsurface carbon nanoparticles in Bi?Sr?CaCu?O8+? can be manipulated with nanometer precision using a scanning tunneling microscope. High resolution images indicate that most of the carbon particles remain subsurface after transport observable as a local increase in height as the particle pushes up on the surface. Tunneling spectra in the vicinity of these protrusions exhibit semiconducting characteristics with a band gap of approximately 1.8 eV, indicating that the incorporation of carbon locally alters the electronic properties near the surface.

  8. Wind Tunnel Aerodynamic Tests of Six Airfoils for Use on Small Wind Turbines; Period of Performance: October 31, 2002--January 31, 2003

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Selig, M. S.; McGranahan, B. D.

    2004-10-01

    Wind Tunnel Aerodynamic Tests of Six Airfoils for Use on Small Wind Turbinesrepresents the fourth installment in a series of volumes documenting the ongoing work of th University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Low-Speed Airfoil Tests Program. This particular volume deals with airfoils that are candidates for use on small wind turbines, which operate at low Reynolds numbers.

  9. Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 481: Area 12 T-Tunnel Conditional Release Storage Yard, Nevada Test Site, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NSTec Environmental Restoration

    2008-11-01

    Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 481 is identified in the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) as Area 12 T-Tunnel Conditional Release Storage Yard. CAU 481 is located in Area 12 of the Nevada Test Site, which is approximately 65 miles northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. This CAU consists of one Corrective Action Site (CAS), CAS 12-42-05, Housekeeping Waste. CAU 481 closure activities were conducted by the Defense Threat Reduction Agency from August 2007 through July 2008 according to the FFACO and Revision 3 of the Sectored Clean-up Work Plan for Housekeeping Category Waste Sites. Closure activities included removal and disposal of construction debris and low-level waste. Drained fluids, steel, and lead was recycled as appropriate. Waste generated during closure activities was appropriately managed and disposed.

  10. Effects of Be acceptors on the spin polarization of carriers in p-i-n resonant tunneling diodes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Awan, I. T.; Galvão Gobato, Y.; Galeti, H. V. A.; Brasil, M. J. S. P.; Taylor, D.; Henini, M.

    2014-08-07

    In this paper, we have investigated the effect of Be acceptors on the electroluminescence and the spin polarization in GaAs/AlAs p-i-n resonant tunneling diodes. The quantum well emission comprise two main lines separated by ∼20 meV attributed to excitonic and Be-related transitions, which intensities show remarkably abrupt variations at critical voltages, particularly at the electron resonant peak where it shows a high-frequency bistability. The circular-polarization degree of the quantum-well electroluminescence also shows strong and abrupt variations at the critical bias voltages and it attains relatively large values (of ∼−75% at 15 T). These effects may be explored to design novel devices for spintronic applications such as a high-frequency spin-oscillators.

  11. Safety of natural gas dual-fueled vehicles: Addendum to safety analysis of natural gas vehicles transiting highway tunnels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shaaban, S.H.; Zalak, V.M. )

    1991-01-01

    A safety analysis was performed to assess the relative hazard of vehicles containing both compressed natural gas (CNG) and gasoline, referred to as dual-fueled vehicles, compared to the hazard of a dedicated CNG vehicle. This study expands upon previous work that examined the safety of CNG vehicles transiting highway tunnels. The approach was to examine operational data, test results and to perform thermal analyses to determine if there are any synergistic effects where the total consequences of fuel release might be greater than the sum of the two fuels released separately. This study concluded that a dual-fueled vehicle poses a slightly greater risk than a dedicated CNG vehicle; however, this marginal increase in risk is small and is within the bounds of risk posed by gasoline-powered vehicles. 4 refs.

  12. Separation and counting of single molecules through nanofluidics, programmable electrophoresis, and nanoelectrode-gated tunneling and dielectric detection

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lee, James W.; Thundat, Thomas G.

    2006-04-25

    An apparatus for carrying out the separation, detection, and/or counting of single molecules at nanometer scale. Molecular separation is achieved by driving single molecules through a microfluidic or nanofluidic medium using programmable and coordinated electric fields. In various embodiments, the fluidic medium is a strip of hydrophilic material on nonconductive hydrophobic surface, a trough produced by parallel strips of hydrophobic nonconductive material on a hydrophilic base, or a covered passageway produced by parallel strips of hydrophobic nonconductive material on a hydrophilic base together with a nonconductive cover on the parallel strips of hydrophobic nonconductive material. The molecules are detected and counted using nanoelectrode-gated electron tunneling methods, dielectric monitoring, and other methods.

  13. Investigation of the negative differential resistance reproducibility in AlN/GaN double-barrier resonant tunnelling diodes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boucherit, M.; Soltani, A.; Rousseau, M.; Deresmes, D.; Berthe, M.; Durand, C.; De Jaeger, J.-C.

    2011-10-31

    AlN/GaN double-barrier resonant tunnelling diodes were grown by molecular beam epitaxy on GaN/sapphire template and processed into mesa diameters from 2 {mu}m to 4 {mu}m. The current-voltage characteristics were carried out in direct current operation and under-high vacuum. A sharp negative differential resistance (NDR) was detected in the forward bias at 120 K. The NDR was observed for the mesa size of 2 {mu}m at 4 V with a peak-to-valley current ratio of 3.5. The measurement conditions were chosen to make NDR reproducible more than 50 times and apparent in both scan voltage directions after electrical treatment.

  14. Electron tunneling spectroscopy study of electrically active traps in AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility transistors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, Jie Cui, Sharon; Ma, T. P.; Hung, Ting-Hsiang; Nath, Digbijoy; Krishnamoorthy, Sriram; Rajan, Siddharth

    2013-11-25

    We investigate the energy levels of electron traps in AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility transistors by the use of electron tunneling spectroscopy. Detailed analysis of a typical spectrum, obtained in a wide gate bias range and with both bias polarities, suggests the existence of electron traps both in the bulk of AlGaN and at the AlGaN/GaN interface. The energy levels of the electron traps have been determined to lie within a 0.5?eV band below the conduction band minimum of AlGaN, and there is strong evidence suggesting that these traps contribute to Frenkel-Poole conduction through the AlGaN barrier.

  15. Analysis of single-event upset of magnetic tunnel junction used in spintronic circuits caused by radiation-induced current

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sakimura, N.; Nebashi, R.; Sugibayashi, T.; Natsui, M.; Hanyu, T.; Ohno, H.

    2014-05-07

    This paper describes the possibility of a switching upset of a magnetic tunnel junction (MTJ) caused by a terrestrial radiation-induced single-event-upset (SEU) current in spintronic integrated circuits. The current waveforms were simulated by using a 3-D device simulator in a basic circuit including MTJs designed using 90-nm CMOS parameters and design rules. The waveforms have a 400 -μA peak and a 200-ps elapsed time when neutron particles with a linear energy transfer value of 14 MeV cm{sup 2}/mg enter the silicon surface. The authors also found that the SEU current may cause soft errors with a probability of more than 10{sup −12} per event, which was obtained by approximate solution of the ordinary differential equation of switching probability when the intrinsic critical current (I{sub C0}) became less than 30 μA.

  16. Interfacial spin-filter assisted spin transfer torque effect in Co/BeO/Co magnetic tunnel junction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tang, Y.-H. Chu, F.-C.

    2015-03-07

    The first-principles calculation is employed to demonstrate the spin-selective transport properties and the non-collinear spin-transfer torque (STT) effect in the newly proposed Co/BeO/Co magnetic tunnel junction. The subtle spin-polarized charge transfer solely at O/Co interface gives rise to the interfacial spin-filter (ISF) effect, which can be simulated within the tight binding model to verify the general expression of STT. This allows us to predict the asymmetric bias behavior of non-collinear STT directly via the interplay between the first-principles calculated spin current densities in collinear magnetic configurations. We believe that the ISF effect, introduced by the combination between wurtzite-BeO barrier and the fcc-Co electrode, may open a new and promising route in semiconductor-based spintronics applications.

  17. Passivated Tunneling Contacts to N-Type Wafer Silicon and Their Implementation into High Performance Solar Cells: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stradins, P.; Essig, S.; Nemeth, W.; Lee, B. G.; Young, D.; Norman, A.; Liu, Y.; Luo, J.-W.; Warren, E.; Dameron, A.; LaSalvia, V.; Page, M.; Rohatgi, A.; Upadhyaya, A.; Rounsaville, B.; Ok, Y.-W.; Glunz, S.; Benick, J.; Feldmann, F.; Hermle, M.

    2014-12-01

    We present a case that passivated contacts based on a thin tunneling oxide layer, combined with a transport layer with properly selected work function and band offsets, can lead to high efficiency c-Si solar cells. Passivated contacts contribute to cell efficiency as well as design flexibility, process robustness, and a simplified process flow. Material choices for the transport layer are examined, including transparent n-type oxides and n+-doped poly-Si. SiO2/n+-poly-Si full-area, induced-junction back surface field contacts to n-FZ and n-Cz Si are incorporated into high efficiency cells with deep, passivated boron emitters.

  18. DNA and RNA sequencing by nanoscale reading through programmable electrophoresis and nanoelectrode-gated tunneling and dielectric detection

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lee, James W.; Thundat, Thomas G.

    2005-06-14

    An apparatus and method for performing nucleic acid (DNA and/or RNA) sequencing on a single molecule. The genetic sequence information is obtained by probing through a DNA or RNA molecule base by base at nanometer scale as though looking through a strip of movie film. This DNA sequencing nanotechnology has the theoretical capability of performing DNA sequencing at a maximal rate of about 1,000,000 bases per second. This enhanced performance is made possible by a series of innovations including: novel applications of a fine-tuned nanometer gap for passage of a single DNA or RNA molecule; thin layer microfluidics for sample loading and delivery; and programmable electric fields for precise control of DNA or RNA movement. Detection methods include nanoelectrode-gated tunneling current measurements, dielectric molecular characterization, and atomic force microscopy/electrostatic force microscopy (AFM/EFM) probing for nanoscale reading of the nucleic acid sequences.

  19. Mixed quantum classical calculation of proton transfer reaction rates: From deep tunneling to over the barrier regimes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xie, Weiwei; Xu, Yang; Zhu, Lili; Shi, Qiang

    2014-05-07

    We present mixed quantum classical calculations of the proton transfer (PT) reaction rates represented by a double well system coupled to a dissipative bath. The rate constants are calculated within the so called nontraditional view of the PT reaction, where the proton motion is quantized and the solvent polarization is used as the reaction coordinate. Quantization of the proton degree of freedom results in a problem of non-adiabatic dynamics. By employing the reactive flux formulation of the rate constant, the initial sampling starts from the transition state defined using the collective reaction coordinate. Dynamics of the collective reaction coordinate is treated classically as over damped diffusive motion, for which the equation of motion can be derived using the path integral, or the mixed quantum classical Liouville equation methods. The calculated mixed quantum classical rate constants agree well with the results from the numerically exact hierarchical equation of motion approach for a broad range of model parameters. Moreover, we are able to obtain contributions from each vibrational state to the total reaction rate, which helps to understand the reaction mechanism from the deep tunneling to over the barrier regimes. The numerical results are also compared with those from existing approximate theories based on calculations of the non-adiabatic transmission coefficients. It is found that the two-surface Landau-Zener formula works well in calculating the transmission coefficients in the deep tunneling regime, where the crossing point between the two lowest vibrational states dominates the total reaction rate. When multiple vibrational levels are involved, including additional crossing points on the free energy surfaces is important to obtain the correct reaction rate using the Landau-Zener formula.

  20. Multi-step ion beam etching of sub-30 nm magnetic tunnel junctions for reducing leakage and MgO barrier damage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chun, Sung-woo; Kim, Daehong; Kwon, Jihun; Kim, Bongho; Choi, Seonjun; Lee, Seung-Beck

    2012-04-01

    We have demonstrated the fabrication of sub 30 nm magnetic tunnel junctions (MTJs) with perpendicular magnetic anisotropy. The multi-step ion beam etching (IBE) process performed for 18 min between 45 deg. and 30 deg. , at 500 V combined ion supply voltage, resulted in a 55 nm tall MTJ with 28 nm diameter. We used a negative tone electron beam resist as the hard mask, which maintained its lateral dimension during the IBE, allowing almost vertical pillar side profiles. The measurement results showed a tunnel magneto-resistance ratio of 13% at 1 k{Omega} junction resistance. With further optimization in IBE energy and multi-step etching process, it will be possible to fabricate perpendicularly oriented MTJs for future sub 30 nm non-volatile magnetic memory applications.

  1. GaAs, AlGaAs and InGaP Tunnel Junctions for Multi-Junction Solar Cells Under Concentration: Resistance Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wheeldon, Jeffrey F.; Valdivia, Christopher E.; Walker, Alex; Kolhatkar, Gitanja; Hall, Trevor J.; Hinzer, Karin; Masson, Denis; Riel, Bruno; Fafard, Simon; Jaouad, Abdelatif; Turala, Artur; Ares, Richard; Aimez, Vincent

    2010-10-14

    The following four TJ designs, AlGaAs/AlGaAs, GaAs/GaAs, AlGaAs/InGaP and AlGaAs/GaAs are studied to determine minimum doping concentration to achieve a resistance of <10{sup -4} {omega}{center_dot}cm{sup 2} and a peak tunneling current suitable for MJ solar cells up to 1500-suns concentration (operating current of 21 A/cm{sup 2}). Experimentally calibrated numerical models are used to determine how the resistance changes as a function of doping concentration. The AlGaAs/GaAs TJ design is determined to require the least doping concentration to achieve the specified resistance and peak tunneling current, followed by the GaAs/GaAs, and AlGaAs/AlGaAs TJ designs. The AlGaAs/InGaP TJ design can only achieve resistances >5x10{sup -4} {omega}cm{sup 2}.

  2. Type B Accident Investigation Board Report on the August 5, 1998, Load Haul Dump Accident at U16b Tunnel, Nevada Test Site

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Thisis theType B Accident Investigation Board report of an industrial accident at the Nevada Test site (NTS), U16b tunnel in which a Bechtel Nevada (BN) employee suffered a compressed skull fracture as a result of being struck onthe head by a valve and fitting assembly on the end of a hose whichhad been broken from a water pipe by a moving piece of construction equipment.

  3. Photo-induced tunneling currents in MOS structures with various HfO{sub 2}/SiO{sub 2} stacking dielectrics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pang, Chin-Sheng; Hwu, Jenn-Gwo

    2014-04-15

    In this study, the current conduction mechanisms of structures with tandem high-k dielectric in illumination are discussed. Samples of Al/SiO{sub 2}/Si (S), Al/HfO{sub 2}/SiO{sub 2}/Si (H), and Al/3HfO{sub 2}/SiO{sub 2}/Si (3H) were examined. The significant observation of electron traps of sample H compares to sample S is found under the double bias capacitance-voltage (C-V) measurements in illumination. Moreover, the photo absorption sensitivity of sample H is higher than S due to the formation of HfO{sub 2} dielectric layer, which leads to larger numbers of carriers crowded through the sweep of V{sub G} before the domination of tunneling current. Additionally, the HfO{sub 2} dielectric layer would block the electrons passing through oxide from valance band, which would result in less electron-hole (e{sup ?}-h{sup +}) pairs recombination effect. Also, it was found that both of the samples S and H show perimeter dependency of positive bias currents due to strong fringing field effect in dark and illumination; while sample 3H shows area dependency of positive bias currents in strong illumination. The non-uniform tunneling current through thin dielectric and through HfO{sub 2} stacking layers are importance to MOS(p) tunneling photo diodes.

  4. Final Scientific/Technical Report: Electronics for Large Superconducting Tunnel Junction Detector Arrays for Synchrotron Soft X-ray Research

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Warburton, William K

    2009-03-06

    Superconducting tunnel junction (STJ) detectors offer a an approach to detecting soft x-rays with energy resolutions 4-5 times better and at rates 10 faster than traditions semiconductor detectors. To make such detectors feasible, however, then need to be deployed in large arrays of order 1000 detectors, which in turn implies that their processing electronics must be compact, fully computer controlled, and low cost per channel while still delivering ultra-low noise performance so as to not degrade the STJ's performance. We report on our progress in designing a compact, low cost preamplifier intended for this application. In particular, we were able to produce a prototype preamplifier of 2 sq-cm area and a parts cost of less than $30 that matched the energy resolution of the best conventional system to date and demonstrated its ability to acquire an STJ I-V curve under computer control, the critical step for determining and setting the detectors' operating points under software control.

  5. Corrective Action Decision Document/Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 383: Area E-Tunnel Sites, Nevada Test Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NSTec Environmental Restoration

    2010-03-15

    This Corrective Action Decision Document/Closure Report (CADD/CR) was prepared by the Defense Threat Reduction Agency (DTRA) for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 383, Area 12 E-Tunnel Sites, which is the joint responsibility of DTRA and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO). This CADD/CR is consistent with the requirements of the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) agreed to by the State of Nevada, the DOE, and the U.S. Department of Defense. Corrective Action Unit 383 is comprised of three Corrective Action Sites (CASs) and two adjacent areas: CAS 12-06-06, Muckpile CAS 12-25-02, Oil Spill CAS 12-28-02, Radioactive Material Drainage below the Muckpile Ponds 1, 2, and 3 The purpose of this CADD/CR is to provide justification and documentation to support the recommendation for closure with no further corrective action, by placing use restrictions at the three CASs and two adjacent areas of CAU 383.

  6. Process For Direct Integration Of A Thin-Film Silicon P-N Junction Diode With A Magnetic Tunnel Junction

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Toet, Daniel (Mountain View, CA); Sigmon, Thomas W. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2005-08-23

    A process for direct integration of a thin-film silicon p-n junction diode with a magnetic tunnel junction for use in advanced magnetic random access memory (MRAM) cells for high performance, non-volatile memory arrays. The process is based on pulsed laser processing for the fabrication of vertical polycrystalline silicon electronic device structures, in particular p-n junction diodes, on films of metals deposited onto low temperature-substrates such as ceramics, dielectrics, glass, or polymers. The process preserves underlayers and structures onto which the devices are typically deposited, such as silicon integrated circuits. The process involves the low temperature deposition of at least one layer of silicon, either in an amorphous or a polycrystalline phase on a metal layer. Dopants may be introduced in the silicon film during or after deposition. The film is then irradiated with short pulse laser energy that is efficiently absorbed in the silicon, which results in the crystallization of the film and simultaneously in the activation of the dopants via ultrafast melting and solidification. The silicon film can be patterned either before or after crystallization.

  7. Process for direct integration of a thin-film silicon p-n junction diode with a magnetic tunnel junction

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Toet, Daniel; Sigmon, Thomas W.

    2004-12-07

    A process for direct integration of a thin-film silicon p-n junction diode with a magnetic tunnel junction for use in advanced magnetic random access memory (MRAM) cells for high performance, non-volatile memory arrays. The process is based on pulsed laser processing for the fabrication of vertical polycrystalline silicon electronic device structures, in particular p-n junction diodes, on films of metals deposited onto low temperature-substrates such as ceramics, dielectrics, glass, or polymers. The process preserves underlayers and structures onto which the devices are typically deposited, such as silicon integrated circuits. The process involves the low temperature deposition of at least one layer of silicon, either in an amorphous or a polycrystalline phase on a metal layer. Dopants may be introduced in the silicon film during or after deposition. The film is then irradiated with short pulse laser energy that is efficiently absorbed in the silicon, which results in the crystallization of the film and simultaneously in the activation of the dopants via ultrafast melting and solidification. The silicon film can be patterned either before or after crystallization.

  8. Process for direct integration of a thin-film silicon p-n junction diode with a magnetic tunnel junction

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Toet, Daniel (Mountain View, CA); Sigmon, Thomas W. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2003-01-01

    A process for direct integration of a thin-film silicon p-n junction diode with a magnetic tunnel junction for use in advanced magnetic random access memory (MRAM) cells for high performance, non-volatile memory arrays. The process is based on pulsed laser processing for the fabrication of vertical polycrystalline silicon electronic device structures, in particular p-n junction diodes, on films of metals deposited onto low temperature-substrates such as ceramics, dielectrics, glass, or polymers. The process preserves underlayers and structures onto which the devices are typically deposited, such as silicon integrated circuits. The process involves the low temperature deposition of at least one layer of silicon, either in an amorphous or a polycrystalline phase on a metal layer. Dopants may be introduced in the silicon film during or after deposition. The film is then irradiated with short pulse laser energy that is efficiently absorbed in the silicon, which results in the crystallization of the film and simultaneously in the activation of the dopants via ultrafast melting and solidification. The silicon film can be patterned either before or after crystallization.

  9. An inverted AlGaAs/GaAs patterned-Ge tunnel junction cascade concentrator solar cell

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Venkatasubramanian, R. )

    1993-01-01

    This report describes work to develop inverted-grown Al[sub 0.34]Ga[sub 0.66]As/GaAs cascades. Several significant developments are reported on as follows: (1) The AM1.5 1-sun total-area efficiency of the top Al[sub 0.34]Ga[sub 0.66]As cell for the cascade was improved from 11.3% to 13.2% (NREL measurement [total-area]). (2) The cycled'' organometallic vapor phase epitaxy growth (OMVPE) was studied in detail utilizing a combination of characterization techniques including Hall-data, photoluminescence, and secondary ion mass spectroscopy. (3) A technique called eutectic-metal-bonding (EMB) was developed by strain-free mounting of thin GaAs-AlGaAs films (based on lattice-matched growth on Ge substrates and selective plasma etching of Ge substrates) onto Si carrier substrates. Minority-carrier lifetime in an EMB GaAs double-heterostructure was measured as high as 103 nsec, the highest lifetime report for a freestanding GaAs thin film. (4) A thin-film, inverted-grown GaAs cell with a 1-sun AM1.5 active-area efficiency of 20.3% was obtained. This cell was eutectic-metal-bonded onto Si. (5) A thin-film inverted-grown, Al[sub 0.34]Ga[sub 0.66]As/GaAs cascade with AM1.5 efficiency of 19.9% and 21% at 1-sun and 7-suns, respectively, was obtained. This represents an important milestone in the development of an AlGaAs/GaAs cascade by OMVPE utilizing a tunnel interconnect and demonstrates a proof-of-concept for the inverted-growth approach.

  10. Scanning Tunneling Microscopy and Theoretical Study of Water Adsorption on Fe3O4: Implications for Catalysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rim, Kwang T.; Eom, Daejin; Chan, Siu-Wai; Flytzani-Stephanopoulos, Maria; Flynn, George; Wen, Xiaodong; Batista, Enrique R.

    2012-10-23

    The reduced surface of a natural Hematite single crystal a-Fe2O3(0001) sample has multiple surface domains with di!erent terminations, Fe2O3(0001), FeO(111), and Fe3O4(111). The adsorption of water on this surface was investigated via Scanning Tunneling Microscopy (STM) and first-principle theoretical simulations. Water species are observed only on the Fe-terminated Fe3O4(111) surface at temperatures up to 235 K. Between 235 and 245 K we observed a change in the surface species from intact water molecules and hydroxyl groups bound to the surface to only hydroxyl groups atop the surface terminating FeIII cations. This indicates a low energy barrier for water dissociation on the surface of Fe3O4 that is supported by our theoretical computations. Our first principles simulations con"rm the identity of the surface species proposed from the STM images, finding that the most stable state of a water molecule is the dissociated one (OH + H), with OH atop surface terminating FeIII sites and H atop under-coordinated oxygen sites. Attempts to simulate reaction of the surface OH with coadsorbed CO fail because the only binding sites for CO are the surface FeIII atoms, which are blocked by the much more strongly bound OH. In order to promote this reaction we simulated a surface decorated with gold atoms. The Au adatoms are found to cap the under-coordinated oxygen sites and dosed CO is found to bind to the Au adatom. This newly created binding site for CO not only allows for coexistence of CO and OH on the surface of Fe3O4 but also provides colocation between the two species. These two factors are likely promoters of catalytic activity on Au/Fe3O4(111) surfaces.

  11. CuYb{sub 2}Ge{sub 4}O{sub 12}, a new bidimensionally tunneled structure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Campa, J.A.; Cascales, C.; Gueierrez-Puebla, E.; Monge, M.A.; Rasines, I.; Ruiz Valero, C.

    1996-06-01

    Employing CuO as self flux crystals of CuYb{sub 2}Ge{sub 4}O{sub 12} have been grown for the first time. The crystal structure of CuYb{sub 2}Ge{sub 4}O{sub 12} has been determined by single-crystal X-ray diffraction in the triclinic P1 (No. 2) space group to an R value of 6.1%, with (a) = 7.156(2) {Angstrom}, (b) = 7.937(3) {Angstrom}, (c) = 4.905(3) {Angstrom}, {alpha} = 86.63(3){degrees}, {Beta} = 102.41(4){degrees}, {gamma}=1114.12(3){degrees}, V = 248.2(2) {Angstrom}{sup 3}, Z = 1, and D{sub c} = 5.97 gcm{sup {minus}3}. The novel tridimensional CuYb{sub 2}Ge{sub 4}O{sub 12} structure type can be conceived as formed by layers of (GeO{sub 4}){sub 4} units of vertex-sharing GeO{sub 4} squares connecting (GeO{sub 4}){sub 4} units, with channels or tunnels of size up to 4.08 {Angstrom} in the a and c directions. A comparison is made between the structure types of the title germanate and recently reported CuNd{sub 2}Ge{sub 2}O{sub 8}. The temperature dependence from 350 to 1.8 K of the reciprocal dc magnetic susceptibility for CuYb{sub 2}Ge{sub 4}O{sub 12} is shown and presents a deviation from linearity over the whole temperature range. The infrared spectrum between 1000 and 100 cm{sup {minus}1} is given and related with those of comparable species.

  12. Characterization of one-dimensional molecular chains of 4,4'-biphenyl diisocyanide on Au(111) by scanning tunneling microscopy

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Zhou, Jing; Li, Yan; Zahl, Percy; Sutter, Peter; Stacchiola, Dario J.; White, Michael G.

    2015-03-14

    The morphology and electronic structure of vapor deposited 4,4'-biphenyldiisocyanide (BPDI) on a Au(111) surface were investigated using variable-temperature scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). When deposited at room temperature, BPDI molecules form one-dimensional molecular chains similar to that recently observed for the structurally related 1,4-phenyl diisocyanide (PDI). Compared to PDI, the longer periodicity for the BPDI molecular chains is consistent with the addition of a second phenyl ring and supports a structural model in which the BPDI molecules lie parallel to the surface and interconnected by Au-adatoms. The molecular chains are mostly aligned along the [110] direction of the Au(111) substrate, butmore » exhibit frequent changes in angle that are consistent with directions between fcc and hcp three-fold hollow sites. Dispersion-corrected density functional theory calculations for one-dimensional chains of BPDI molecules bound end-to-end via their isocyanide groups to Au-adatoms reproduce the observed periodicity of the chains and show that this morphology is energetically favored over upright binding with one free –NC group. The spatially resolved conductance (dI/dV) map for BPDI on Au(111) exhibits a feature centered at -0.67 eV below the Fermi level which are delocalized along the chain with maxima at the Au-adatom and biphenyl positions. This occupied resonant feature is close to that previously observed for the PDI in both photoemission and conductance measurements and is attributed to an occupied interfacial state resulting from BPDI-Au interactions« less

  13. Direct observation of electron emission from the grain boundaries of chemical vapour deposition diamond films by tunneling atomic force microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chatterjee, Vijay; Harniman, Robert; May, Paul W.; Barhai, P. K.

    2014-04-28

    The emission of electrons from diamond in vacuum occurs readily as a result of the negative electron affinity of the hydrogenated surface due to features with nanoscale dimensions, which can concentrate electric fields high enough to induce electron emission from them. Electrons can be emitted as a result of an applied electric field (field emission) with possible uses in displays or cold-cathode devices. Alternatively, electrons can be emitted simply by heating the diamond in vacuum to temperatures as low as 350?C (thermionic emission), and this may find applications in solar energy generation or energy harvesting devices. Electron emission studies usually use doped polycrystalline diamond films deposited onto Si or metallic substrates by chemical vapor deposition, and these films have a rough, faceted morphology on the micron or nanometer scale. Electron emission is often improved by patterning the diamond surface into sharp points or needles, the idea being that the field lines concentrate at the points lowering the barrier for electron emission. However, there is little direct evidence that electrons are emitted from these sharp tips. The few reports in the literature that have studied the emission sites suggested that emission came from the grain boundaries and not the protruding regions. We now present direct observation of the emission sites over a large area of polycrystalline diamond using tunneling atomic force microscopy. We confirm that the emission current comes mostly from the grain boundaries, which is consistent with a model for emission in which the non-diamond phase is the source of electrons with a threshold that is determined by the surrounding hydrogenated diamond surface.

  14. Facility for low-temperature spin-polarized-scanning tunneling microscopy studies of magnetic/spintronic materials prepared in situ by nitride molecular beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lin, Wenzhi; Foley, Andrew; Alam, Khan; Wang, Kangkang; Liu, Yinghao; Chen, Tianjiao; Pak, Jeongihm; Smith, Arthur R.

    2014-04-15

    Based on the interest in, as well as exciting outlook for, nitride semiconductor based structures with regard to electronic, optoelectronic, and spintronic applications, it is compelling to investigate these systems using the powerful technique of spin-polarized scanning tunneling microscopy (STM), a technique capable of achieving magnetic resolution down to the atomic scale. However, the delicate surfaces of these materials are easily corrupted by in-air transfers, making it unfeasible to study them in stand-alone ultra-high vacuum STM facilities. Therefore, we have carried out the development of a hybrid system including a nitrogen plasma assisted molecular beam epitaxy/pulsed laser epitaxy facility for sample growth combined with a low-temperature, spin-polarized scanning tunneling microscope system. The custom-designed molecular beam epitaxy growth system supports up to eight sources, including up to seven effusion cells plus a radio frequency nitrogen plasma source, for epitaxially growing a variety of materials, such as nitride semiconductors, magnetic materials, and their hetero-structures, and also incorporating in situ reflection high energy electron diffraction. The growth system also enables integration of pulsed laser epitaxy. The STM unit has a modular design, consisting of an upper body and a lower body. The upper body contains the coarse approach mechanism and the scanner unit, while the lower body accepts molecular beam epitaxy grown samples using compression springs and sample skis. The design of the system employs two stages of vibration isolation as well as a layer of acoustic noise isolation in order to reduce noise during STM measurements. This isolation allows the system to effectively acquire STM data in a typical lab space, which during its construction had no special and highly costly elements included, (such as isolated slabs) which would lower the environmental noise. The design further enables tip exchange and tip coating without breaking vacuum, and convenient visual access to the sample and tip inside a superconducting magnet cryostat. A sample/tip handling system is optimized for both the molecular beam epitaxy growth system and the scanning tunneling microscope system. The sample/tip handing system enables in situ STM studies on epitaxially grown samples, and tip exchange in the superconducting magnet cryostat. The hybrid molecular beam epitaxy and low temperature scanning tunneling microscopy system is capable of growing semiconductor-based hetero-structures with controlled accuracy down to a single atomic-layer and imaging them down to atomic resolution.

  15. Investigation of scanning tunneling spectra on iron-based superconductor FeSe0.5Te0.5(in Chinese)

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Du, Z. -Y.; Fang, D. -L.; Wang, Z. -Y.; Du, G.; Yang, X.; Yang, H.; Gu, G.; -H, Wen H.

    2015-05-05

    FeSe0.5Te0.5 single crystals with superconducting critical temperature of 13.5 K are investigated by scanning tunneling microscopy/spectroscopy (STM/STS) measureflents in detail. STM image on the top surface shows an atomically resolved square lattice consisted by white and dark spots with a constant of about 3.73± 0.03 Å which is consistent with the lattice constant 3.78 Å. The Se and Te atoms with a height difference of about 0.35 Å are successfully identified since the sizes of the two kinds of atoms are different. The tunneling spectra show very large zero-bias conductance value and asymmetric coherent peaks in the superconducting state. Accordingmore » to the positions of coherence peaks, we determine the superconducting gap 2Δ = 5.5 meV, and the reduced gap 2Δ/kBTc = 4.9 is larger than the value predicted by the weak-coupling BCS theory. The zero-bias conductance at 1.7 K only have a decrease of about 40% compared with the normal state conductance, which may originate from some scattering and broadening mechanism in the material. This broadening effect will also make the superconducting gap determined by the distance between the coherence peaks larger than the exact gap value. The asymmetric structure of the tunneling spectra near the superconducting gap is induced by the hump on the background. This hump appears at temperature more than twice the superconducting critical temperature. This kind of hump has also been observed in other iron pnictides and needs further investigation. A possible bosonic mode outside the coherence peak with a mode energy Ω of about 5.5 meV is observed in some tunneling spectra, and the ratio between the mode energy and superconducting transition temperature Ω/kBTc ≈ 4.7 is roughly consistent with the universal ratio 4.3 in iron-based superconductors. The high-energy background of the spectra beyond the superconducting gaps shows a V-shape feature. The slopes of the differential conductance spectra at high energy are very different in the areas of Te-atom cluster and Se-atom cluster, and the difference extends to the energy of more than 300 meV. The differential conductance mapping has very little information about the quasi-particle interference of the superconducting state, which may result from the other strong scattering mechanism in the sample.« less

  16. Origin of InGaN/GaN light-emitting diode efficiency improvements using tunnel-junction-cascaded active regions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Piprek, Joachim

    2014-02-03

    This Letter investigates the efficiency enhancement achieved by tunnel junction insertion into the InGaN/GaN multi-quantum well (MQW) active region of blue light emitting diodes (LEDs). The peak quantum efficiency of such LED exceeds 100%, but the maximum wall-plug efficiency (WPE) hardly changes. However, due to the increased bias, the WPE peaks at much higher input power, i.e., the WPE droop is significantly delayed, and the output power is strongly enhanced. The main physical reason for this improvement lies in the non-uniform vertical carrier distribution typically observed within InGaN MQWs.

  17. Kinetic and Mechanistic Studies of Carbon-to-Metal Hydrogen Atom Transfer Involving Os-Centered Radicals: Evidence for Tunneling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lewandowska-Androlojc, Anna; Grills, David C.; Zhang, Jie; Bullock, R. Morris; Miyazawa, Akira; Kawanishi, Yuji; Fujita, Etsuko

    2014-03-05

    We have investigated the kinetics of novel carbon-to-metal hydrogen atom transfer reactions, in which homolytic cleavage of a C-H bond is accomplished by a single metal-centered radical. Studies by means of time-resolved IR spectroscopic measurements revealed efficient hydrogen atom transfer from xanthene, 9,10-dihydroanthracene and 1,4-cyclohexadiene to Cp(CO)2Os and (n5-iPr4C5H)(CO)2Os radicals, formed by photoinduced homolysis of the corresponding osmium dimers. The rate constants for hydrogen abstraction from these hydrocarbons were found to be in the range 1.54 105 M 1 s 1 -1.73 107 M 1 s-1 at 25 C. For the first time, kinetic isotope effects for carbon-to-metal hydrogen atom transfer were determined. Large primary kinetic isotope effects of 13.4 1.0 and 16.6 1.4 were observed for the hydrogen abstraction from xanthene to form Cp(CO)2OsH and (n5-iPr4C5H)(CO)2OsH, respectively, at 25 C. Temperature-dependent measurements of the kinetic isotope effects over a 60 -C temperature range were carried out to obtain the difference in activation energies and the pre-exponential factor ratio. For hydrogen atom transfer from xanthene to (n5-iPr4C5H)(CO)2Os, the (ED - EH) = 3.25 0.20 kcal/mol and AH/AD = 0.056 0.018 values are greater than the semi-classical limits and thus suggest a quantum mechanical tunneling mechanism. The work at BNL was carried out under contract DE-AC02-98CH10886 with the U.S. Department of Energy and supported by its Division of Chemical Sciences, Geosciences & Biosciences, Office of Basic Energy Sciences. RMB also thanks the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Division of Chemical Sciences, Geosciences & Biosciences for support. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is operated by Battelle for the U.S. Department of Energy.

  18. Progress on First-Principles Calculations and Experimental Results of Single-crystalline Magnetic Tunnel Junctions with MgO barriers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Y.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, Xiaoguang; Wang, Shouguo; Han, Xiufeng

    2009-01-01

    Since the theoretical prediction and experimental observation of giant tunneling magnetoresistance (TMR) effect at room temperature in magnetic tunnel junctions (MTJs) with single-crystalline MgO(001) barrier, MgO-based MTJs have been extensively studied due to their broad potential applications in spintronic devices. In this paper, progress on theoretical calculations and experimental results in MgO-based MTJs is reported. Spin-dependent electronic structure and transport properties of MgO-based MTJs, including structures of Fe(001)/MgO/Fe, Fe(001)/FeO/MgO/Fe, Fe(001)/Mg/MgO/Fe, Fe(001)/Co/MgO/Co/Fe, and Fe(001)/MgO/Fe/MgO/Fe, have been studied using the Layer-KKR first-principles method. The quantitative result not only provide a better way to understand the electronic structures and spin-dependent transport properties of MgO-based MTJs, but also shows a direction to exploit new kinds of spintronic materials with high room-temperature TMR ratio.

  19. Band offset determination of mixed As/Sb type-II staggered gap heterostructure for n-channel tunnel field effect transistor application

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhu, Y.; Jain, N.; Hudait, M. K.; Mohata, D. K.; Datta, S.; Lubyshev, D.; Fastenau, J. M.; Liu, A. K.

    2013-01-14

    The experimental study of the valence band offset ({Delta}E{sub v}) of a mixed As/Sb type-II staggered gap GaAs{sub 0.35}Sb{sub 0.65}/In{sub 0.7}Ga{sub 0.3}As heterostructure used as source/channel junction of n-channel tunnel field effect transistor (TFET) grown by molecular beam epitaxy was investigated by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Cross-sectional transmission electron micrograph shows high crystalline quality at the source/channel heterointerface. XPS results demonstrate a {Delta}E{sub v} of 0.39 {+-} 0.05 eV at the GaAs{sub 0.35}Sb{sub 0.65}/In{sub 0.7}Ga{sub 0.3}As heterointerface. The conduction band offset was calculated to be {approx}0.49 eV using the band gap values of source and channel materials and the measured valence band offset. An effective tunneling barrier height of 0.21 eV was extracted, suggesting a great promise for designing a metamorphic mixed As/Sb type-II staggered gap TFET device structure for low-power logic applications.

  20. Structural properties and band offset determination of p-channel mixed As/Sb type-II staggered gap tunnel field-effect transistor structure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhu, Y.; Jain, N.; Hudait, M. K.; Mohata, D. K.; Datta, S.; Lubyshev, D.; Fastenau, J. M.; Liu, A. K.

    2012-09-10

    The structural properties and band offset determination of p-channel staggered gap In{sub 0.7}Ga{sub 0.3}As/GaAs{sub 0.35}Sb{sub 0.65} heterostructure tunnel field-effect transistor (TFET) grown by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) were investigated. High resolution x-ray diffraction revealed that the active layers are strained with respect to 'virtual substrate.' Dynamic secondary ion mass spectrometry confirmed an abrupt junction profile at the In{sub 0.7}Ga{sub 0.3}As/GaAs{sub 0.35}Sb{sub 0.65} heterointerface and minimal level of intermixing between As and Sb atoms. The valence band offset of 0.37 {+-} 0.05 eV was extracted from x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. A staggered band lineup was confirmed at the heterointerface with an effective tunneling barrier height of 0.13 eV. Thus, MBE-grown staggered gap In{sub 0.7}Ga{sub 0.3}As/GaAs{sub 0.35}Sb{sub 0.65} TFET structures are a promising p-channel option to provide critical guidance for the future design of mixed As/Sb type-II based complementary logic and low power devices.

  1. A 350 mK, 9 T scanning tunneling microscope for the study of superconducting thin films on insulating substrates and single crystals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kamlapure, Anand; Saraswat, Garima; Ganguli, Somesh Chandra; Bagwe, Vivas; Raychaudhuri, Pratap; Pai, Subash P.

    2013-12-15

    We report the construction and performance of a low temperature, high field scanning tunneling microscope (STM) operating down to 350 mK and in magnetic fields up to 9 T, with thin film deposition and in situ single crystal cleaving capabilities. The main focus lies on the simple design of STM head and a sample holder design that allows us to get spectroscopic data on superconducting thin films grown in situ on insulating substrates. Other design details on sample transport, sample preparation chamber, and vibration isolation schemes are also described. We demonstrate the capability of our instrument through the atomic resolution imaging and spectroscopy on NbSe{sub 2} single crystal and spectroscopic maps obtained on homogeneously disordered NbN thin film.

  2. Magnetic tunnel junctions for magnetic field sensor by using CoFeB sensing layer capped with MgO film

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Takenaga, Takashi Tsuzaki, Yosuke; Yoshida, Chikako; Yamazaki, Yuichi; Hatada, Akiyoshi; Nakabayashi, Masaaki; Iba, Yoshihisa; Takahashi, Atsushi; Noshiro, Hideyuki; Tsunoda, Koji; Aoki, Masaki; Furukawa, Taisuke; Fukumoto, Hiroshi; Sugii, Toshihiro

    2014-05-07

    We evaluated MgO-based magnetic tunnel junctions (MTJs) for magnetic field sensors with spin-valve-type structures in the CoFeB sensing layer capped by an MgO film in order to obtain both top and bottom interfaces of MgO/CoFeB exhibiting interfacial perpendicular magnetic anisotropy (PMA). Hysteresis of the CoFeB sensing layer in these MTJs annealed at 275?C was suppressed at a thickness of the sensing layer below 1.2?nm by interfacial PMA. We confirmed that the CoFeB sensing layers capped with MgO suppress the thickness dependences of both the magnetoresistance ratio and the magnetic behaviors of the CoFeB sensing layer more than that of the MTJ with a Ta capping layer. MgO-based MTJs with MgO capping layers can improve the controllability of the characteristics for magnetic field sensors.

  3. Operation of resonant-tunneling diodes with strong back injection from the collector at frequencies up to 1.46 THz

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Feiginov, Michael Kanaya, Hidetoshi; Suzuki, Safumi; Asada, Masahiro

    2014-06-16

    In search for possibilities to increase the operating frequencies of resonant-tunneling diodes (RTDs), we are studying RTDs working in an unusual regime. The collector side of our diodes is so heavily doped that the collector depletion region is fully eliminated in our RTDs and the ground quantum-well subband stays immersed under (or stays close to) the collector quasi-Fermi level. The electron injection from the collector into the RTD quantum well is very strong in our diodes and stays comparable to that from the emitter in the whole range of RTD operating biases. Our RTDs exhibit well pronounced negative-differential-conductance region and peak-to-valley current ratio around 1.8. We demonstrate operation of our diodes in RTD oscillators up to 1.46 THz. We also observe a fine structure in the emission spectra of our RTD oscillators, when they are working in the regime close to the onset of oscillations.

  4. Corrective Action Decision Document/Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 477: Area 12 N-Tunnel Muckpile, Nevada Test Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NSTec Environmental Restoration

    2010-03-15

    This Corrective Action Decision Document (CADD)/Closure Report (CR) was prepared by the Defense Threat Reduction Agency (DTRA) for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 477, N-Tunnel Muckpile. This CADD/CR is consistent with the requirements of the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) agreed to by the State of Nevada, the U.S. Department of Energy, and the U.S. Department of Defense. Corrective Action Unit 477 is comprised of one Corrective Action Site (CAS): 12-06-03, Muckpile The purpose of this CADD/CR is to provide justification and documentation supporting the recommendation for closure with no further action, by placing use restrictions on CAU 477.

  5. Corrective Action Decision Document/Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 476: Area 12 T-Tunnel Muckpile, Nevada Test Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NSTec Environmental Restoration

    2010-03-15

    This Corrective Action Decision Document (CADD)/Closure Report (CR) was prepared by the Defense Threat Reduction Agency (DTRA) for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 476, Area 12 T-Tunnel Muckpile. This CADD/CR is consistent with the requirements of the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) agreed to by the State of Nevada, the U.S. Department of Energy, and the U.S. Department of Defense. Corrective Action Unit 476 is comprised of one Corrective Action Site (CAS): 12-06-02, Muckpile The purpose of this CADD/CR is to provide justification and documentation supporting the recommendation for closure in place with use restrictions for CAU 476.

  6. Double capping of molecular beam epitaxy grown InAs/InP quantum dots studied by cross-sectional scanning tunneling microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ulloa, J. M.; Koenraad, P. M.; Gapihan, E.; Letoublon, A.; Bertru, N.

    2007-08-13

    Cross-sectional scanning tunneling microscopy was used to study at the atomic scale the double capping process of self-assembled InAs/InP quantum dots (QDs) grown by molecular beam epitaxy on a (311)B substrate. The thickness of the first capping layer is found to play a mayor role in determining the final results of the process. For first capping layers up to 3.5 nm, the height of the QDs correspond to the thickness of the first capping layer. Nevertheless, for thicknesses higher than 3.5 nm, a reduction in the dot height compared to the thickness of the first capping layer is observed. These results are interpreted in terms of a transition from a double capping to a classical capping process when the first capping layer is thick enough to completely cover the dots.

  7. Band structure of the epitaxial Fe/MgO/GaAs(001) tunnel junction studied by x-ray and ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lu, Y.; Le Breton, J. C.; Turban, P.; Lepine, B.; Schieffer, P.; Jezequel, G.

    2006-10-09

    The electronic band structure in the epitaxial Fe/MgO/GaAs(001) tunnel junction has been studied by x-ray and ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy measurements. The Schottky barrier height (SBH) of Fe on MgO/GaAs heterostructure is determined to be 3.3{+-}0.1 eV, which sets the Fe Fermi level at about 0.3 eV above the GaAs valence band maximum. This SBH is also exactly the same as that measured from Fe on MgO monocrystal. After Fe deposition, no band bending change is observed in MgO and GaAs underlayers. On the contrary, Au and Al depositions led to clear variation of the band bending in both MgO and GaAs layers. This effect is analyzed as a fingerprint of defect states at the MgO/GaAs interface.

  8. Are Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and MgO tunnel barriers suitable for spin injection in graphene?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dlubak, B.; Seneor, P.; Anane, A.; Barraud, C.; Deranlot, C.; Deneuve, D.; Mattana, R.; Petroff, F.; Fert, A.

    2010-08-30

    We report on the structural impact on graphene and multi-layers graphene of the growth by sputtering of tunnel barriers. Sputtered Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and MgO barriers were chosen for their well-known efficiency as spin injectors in spintronics devices. The impact of the growth on the structure of graphene and up to 4-layer flakes was analyzed by Raman spectroscopy. This study reveals that for Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} growth, the impact is moderate for a monolayer and decreases sharply for bilayers and above. In the case of MgO all the flakes underwent a strong amorphization. Moreover, this reveals that while single layer graphene is believed to offer the best spin transport properties, the better robustness of multilayer graphene may ultimately make it a better choice for spintronics devices.

  9. Potential long-term chemical effects of diesel fuel emissions on a mining environment: A preliminary assessment based on data from a deep subsurface tunnel at Rainer Mesa, Nevada test site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meike, A.; Bourcier, W.L.; Alai, M.

    1995-09-01

    The general purpose of the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project (YMSCP) Introduced Materials Task is to understand and predict potential long-term modifications of natural water chemistry related to the construction and operation of a radioactive waste repository that may significantly affect performance of the waste packages. The present study focuses on diesel exhaust. Although chemical information on diesel exhaust exists in the literature, it is either not explicit or incomplete, and none of it establishes mechanisms that might be used to predict long-term behavior. In addition, the data regarding microbially mediated chemical reactions are not well correlated with the abiotic chemical data. To obtain some of the required long-term information, we chose a historical analog: the U12n tunnel at Rainier Mesa, Nevada Test Site. This choice was based on the tunnel`s extended (30-year) history of diesel usage, its geological similarity to Yucca Mountain, and its availability. The sample site within the tunnel was chosen based on visual inspection and on information gathered from miners who were present during tunnel operations. The thick layer of dark deposit at that site was assumed to consist primarily of rock powder and diesel exhaust. Surface samples and core samples were collected with an intent to analyze the deposit and to measure potential migration of chemical components into the rock. X-ray diffraction (XRD), x-ray fluorescence (XRF), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) with energy dispersive spectra (EDS) analysis, secondary-ion mass spectrometry (SIMS), and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) analysis were used to measure both spatial distribution and concentration for the wide variety of chemical components that were expected based on our literature survey.

  10. [beta]-BaV[sub 2](P[sub 2]O[sub 7])[sub 2]: A new polymorph of barium vanadium (III) pyrophosphate characterized by intersecting tunnels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hwu, Shiou-Jyh; Carroll, R.I.; Serra, D.L. )

    1994-06-01

    Investigation into the synthesis of reduced vanadium phosphate has led to the formation of a new form of the barium vanadium (III) pyrophosphate compound [beta]-BaV[sub 2](P[sub 2]O[sub 7])[sub 2]. It is a polymorph of the previously known BaV[sub 2](P[sub 2]O[sub 7])[sub 2], which is now labeled as the [alpha]-phase. The title compound crystallizes in the P-1 (No. 2) space group with a = 6.269 (1) [angstrom], b = 7.864 (3) [angstrom], c = 6.1592 (9) [angstrom], [alpha] = 101.34 (2)[degree], [beta] = 105.84 (1)[degree], and [gamma] = 96.51 (2)[degree]. The structure consists of corner-shared VO[sub 6] octahedra and PO[sub 4] tetrahedra that are connected in V-O-P-O-V and V-O-P-O-P-O-V bonding arrangements. This interesting three-dimensional framework is characterized by seven types of intersecting tunnels, three of which are occupied by the barium cation, while the others are empty. It is important to know that one of the empty tunnels has a relatively large window with a minimum diagonal distance of 4.4 [angstrom], which facilitates a possible framework for a lithium ion insertion reaction. The barium atom has a 10-coordination sphere, BaO[sub 10], in which the oxygen atoms can be viewed as forming two intersecting pseudohexagonal planes. [beta]-BaV[sub 2](P[sub 2]O[sub 7])[sub 2] appears to form at a relatively higher temperature than its polymorph, [alpha]-BaV[sub 2](P[sub 2]O[sub 7])[sub 2]. A detailed structural analysis and structural comparison with the [alpha]-phase, as well as a brief comparison with SrV[sub 2](P[sub 2]O[sub 7])[sub 2], are presented.

  11. Evaluate and characterize mechanisms controlling transport, fate, and effects of army smokes in the aerosol wind tunnel: Transport, transformations, fate, and terrestrial ecological effects of hexachloroethane obscurant smokes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cataldo, D.A.; Ligotke, M.W.; Bolton, H. Jr.; Fellows, R.J.; Van Voris, P.; McVeety, B.D.; Li, Shu-mei W.; McFadden, K.M.

    1989-09-01

    The terrestrial transport, chemical fate, and ecological effects of hexachloroethane (HC) smoke were evaluated under controlled wind tunnel conditions. The primary objectives of this research program are to characterize and assess the impacts of smoke and obscurants on: (1) natural vegetation characteristic of US Army training sites in the United States; (2) physical and chemical properties of soils representative of these training sites; and (3) soil microbiological and invertebrate communities. Impacts and dose/responses were evaluated based on exposure scenarios, including exposure duration, exposure rate, and sequential cumulative dosing. Key to understanding the environmental impacts of HC smoke/obscurants is establishing the importance of environmental parameters such as relative humidity and wind speed on airborne aerosol characteristics and deposition to receptor surfaces. Direct and indirect biotic effects were evaluated using five plant species and two soil types. HC aerosols were generated in a controlled atmosphere wind tunnel by combustion of hexachloroethane mixtures prepared to simulate normal pot burn rates and conditions. The aerosol was characterized and used to expose plant, soil, and other test systems. Particle sizes of airborne HC ranged from 1.3 to 2.1 {mu}m mass median aerodynamic diameter (MMAD), and particle size was affected by relative humidity over a range of 20% to 85%. Air concentrations employed ranged from 130 to 680 mg/m{sup 3}, depending on exposure scenario. Chlorocarbon concentrations within smokes, deposition rates for plant and soil surfaces, and persistence were determined. The fate of principal inorganic species (Zn, Al, and Cl) in a range of soils was assessed.

  12. Property:Special Physical Features | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    is a vertical plane, closed recirculating, variable-speed, variable-pressure, open jet test section, closed jet test section, and semi-rectangular test section. Carderock 3-ft...

  13. Major sources to waivers - lessons learned and $ saved at two U.S. Navy facilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Klitsch, M.

    1997-12-31

    Naval Surface Warfare Center Carderock Division (NSWCCD) manages 17 US Navy research and development (R and D) facilities across the country. These include two facilities in Maryland -- one in Annapolis and the other in West Bethesda which is better known as Carderock. NO{sub x} is the only air emission which exceeds a threshold limit at both properties. The potential to emit NO{sub x} is 72 tpy for Annapolis and 51 tpy for Carderock. The facilities are in different counties but each county has a trigger limit for NO{sub x} of 25 tpy making both facilities major sources. In preparation for the Title V permit applications to the state of Maryland, Carderock budgeted $150,000 in fiscal year 1996 to have a contractor conduct air emission inventories and prepare the Title V permits for both Carderock and Annapolis. However, the Carderock Air Program Manager did not pursue a contractor to perform the work but personally conducted the air emission inventory for both Annapolis and Carderock. Noticing a large difference between the potential-to-emit and the actual emissions of NO{sub x}, the Air Program Manager began negotiations with the Maryland Department of the Environment (MDE) to waive the requirement for the Title V permit application. MDE responded in December 1996 that if the facility`s actual emissions would not exceed 50% of any of the threshold limits during any 12 month period, then a letter of understanding stating such should be submitted to MDE. This letter of understanding would be recognized by the US EPA and MDE and would act as a waiver to the Title V permit applicability up to July 31, 1998. Carderock and Annapolis meet this requirement and letters of understanding were drafted and sent to MDE in January 1997.

  14. Octonary resistance states in La0.7Sr0.3MnO3/BaTiO3/La0.7Sr0.3MnO3 multiferroic tunnel junctions

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Yue -Wei Yin; Tao, Jing; Huang, Wei -Chuan; Liu, Yu -Kuai; Yang, Sheng -Wei; Dong, Si -Ning; Zhu, Yi -Mei; Li, Qi; Li, Xiao -Guang

    2015-10-06

    General drawbacks of current electronic/spintronic devices are high power consumption and low density storage. A multiferroic tunnel junction (MFTJ), employing a ferroelectric barrier layer sandwiched between two ferromagnetic layers, presents four resistance states in a single device and therefore provides an alternative way to achieve high density memories. Here, an MFTJ device with eight nonvolatile resistance states by further integrating the design of noncollinear magnetization alignments between the ferromagnetic layers is demonstrated. Through the angle-resolved tunneling magnetoresistance investigations on La0.7Sr0.3MnO3/BaTiO3/La0.7Sr0.3MnO3 junctions, it is found that, besides collinear parallel/antiparallel magnetic configurations, the MFTJ shows at least two other stable noncollinear (45°more » and 90°) magnetic configurations. As a result, combining the tunneling electroresistance effect caused by the ferroelectricity reversal of the BaTiO3 barrier, an octonary memory device is obtained, representing potential applications in high density nonvolatile storage in the future.« less

  15. Linewidth of the harmonics in a microwave frequency comb generated by focusing a mode-locked ultrafast laser on a tunneling junction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hagmann, Mark J.; Stenger, Frank S.; Yarotski, Dmitry A.

    2013-12-14

    Previous analyses suggest that microwave frequency combs (MFCs) with harmonics having extremely narrow linewidths could be produced by photodetection with a mode-locked ultrafast laser. In the MFC generated by focusing a passively mode-locked ultrafast laser on a tunneling junction, 200 harmonics from 74.254 MHz to 14.85 GHz have reproducible measured linewidths approximating the 1 Hz resolution bandwidth (RBW) of the spectrum analyzer. However, in new measurements at a RBW of 0.1 Hz, the linewidths are distributed from 0.12 to 1.17 Hz. Measurements and analysis suggest that, because the laser is not stabilized, the stochastic drift in the pulse repetition rate is the cause for the distribution in measured linewidths. It appears that there are three cases in which the RBW is (1) greater than, (2) less than, or (3) comparable with the intrinsic linewidth. The measured spectra in the third class are stochastic and may show two or more peaks at a single harmonic.

  16. In Situ Observation of Water Dissociation with Lattice Incorporation at FeO Particle Edges Using Scanning Tunneling Microscopy and X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deng, Xingyi; Lee, Junseok; Wang, Congjun; Matranga, Christopher; Aksoy, Funda; Liu, Zhi

    2011-03-15

    The dissociation of H2O and formation of adsorbed hydroxyl groups, on FeO particles grown on Au(111) were identified with in situ,: X:ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) at water pressures ranging from 3 x 10-8 to 0.1 Torr. The facile dissociation of H2O takes place at FeO particle edges, and it was successfully observed in situ With atomically resolved scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). The in situ STM studies show that adsorbed hydroxyl groups were formed exclusively along the edges of the FeO particles with the 0 atom becoming directly incorporated into the oxide crystalline lattice The STM results are consistent with coordinatively unsaturated ferrous (CUF) sites along the FeO particle edge causing the observed reactivity with H2O. Our results also directly illustrate how structural defects and under.-coordinated sites participate in chemical reactions.

  17. Tunnel-injection quantum dot deep-ultraviolet light-emitting diodes with polarization-induced doping in III-nitride heterostructures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Verma, Jai Islam, S. M.; Protasenko, Vladimir; Kumar Kandaswamy, Prem; Xing, Huili; Jena, Debdeep

    2014-01-13

    Efficient semiconductor optical emitters in the deep-ultraviolet spectral window are encountering some of the most deep rooted problems of semiconductor physics. In III-Nitride heterostructures, obtaining short-wavelength photon emission requires the use of wide bandgap high Al composition AlGaN active regions. High conductivity electron (n-) and hole (p-) injection layers of even higher bandgaps are necessary for electrical carrier injection. This approach requires the activation of very deep dopants in very wide bandgap semiconductors, which is a difficult task. In this work, an approach is proposed and experimentally demonstrated to counter the challenges. The active region of the heterostructure light emitting diode uses ultrasmall epitaxially grown GaN quantum dots. Remarkably, the optical emission energy from GaN is pushed from 365?nm (3.4?eV, the bulk bandgap) to below 240?nm (>5.2?eV) because of extreme quantum confinement in the dots. This is possible because of the peculiar bandstructure and band alignments in the GaN/AlN system. This active region design crucially enables two further innovations for efficient carrier injection: Tunnel injection of carriers and polarization-induced p-type doping. The combination of these three advances results in major boosts in electroluminescence in deep-ultraviolet light emitting diodes and lays the groundwork for electrically pumped short-wavelength lasers.

  18. Electrical spin injection into InGaAs/GaAs quantum wells: A comparison between MgO tunnel barriers grown by sputtering and molecular beam epitaxy methods

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barate, P.; Zhang, T. T.; Vidal, M.; Renucci, P.; Marie, X.; Amand, T.; Liang, S.; Devaux, X.; Hehn, M.; Mangin, S.; Lu, Y.; Frougier, J.; Jaffrs, H.; George, J. M.; Zheng, Y.; Tao, B.; Han, X. F.

    2014-07-07

    An efficient electrical spin injection into an InGaAs/GaAs quantum well light emitting diode is demonstrated thanks to a CoFeB/MgO spin injector. The textured MgO tunnel barrier is fabricated by two different techniques: sputtering and molecular beam epitaxy. The maximal spin injection efficiency is comparable for both methods. Additionally, the effect of annealing is also investigated for the two types of samples. Both samples show the same trend: an increase of the electroluminescence circular polarization (P{sub c}) with the increase of annealing temperature, followed by a saturation of P{sub c} beyond 350?C annealing. Since the increase of P{sub c} starts well below the crystallization temperature of the full CoFeB bulk layer, this trend could be mainly due to an improvement of chemical structure at the top CoFeB/MgO interface. This study reveals that the control of CoFeB/MgO interface is essential for an optimal spin injection into semiconductor.

  19. Ti-substituted tunnel-type Na0.44MnO2 oxide as a negative electrode for aqueous sodium-ion batteries

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Wang, Yuesheng; Liu, Jue; Lee, Byungju; Qiao, Ruimin; Yang, Zhenzhong; Xu, Shuyin; Yu, Xiqian; Gu, Lin; Hu, Yong-Sheng; Yang, Wanli; et al

    2015-03-25

    The aqueous sodium-ion battery system is a safe and low-cost solution for large-scale energy storage, due to the abundance of sodium and inexpensive aqueous electrolytes. Although several positive electrode materials, e.g., Na0.44MnO2, were proposed, few negative electrode materials, e.g., activated carbon and NaTi2(PO4)3, are available. Here we show that Ti-substituted Na0.44MnO2 (Na0.44[Mn1-xTix]O2) with tunnel structure can be used as a negative electrode material for aqueous sodium-ion batteries. This material exhibits superior cyclability even without the special treatment of oxygen removal from the aqueous solution. Atomic-scale characterizations based on spherical aberration-corrected electron microscopy and ab initio calculations are utilized to accuratelymore » identify the Ti substitution sites and sodium storage mechanism. Ti substitution tunes the charge ordering property and reaction pathway, significantly smoothing the discharge/charge profiles and lowering the storage voltage. Both the fundamental understanding and practical demonstrations suggest that Na0.44[Mn1-xTix]O2 is a promising negative electrode material for aqueous sodium-ion batteries.« less

  20. The structures and dynamics of atomic and molecular adsorbates on metal surfaces by scanning tunneling microscopy and low energy electron diffraction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yoon, Hyungsuk Alexander

    1996-12-01

    Studies of surface structure and dynamics of atoms and molecules on metal surfaces are presented. My research has focused on understanding the nature of adsorbate-adsorbate and adsorbate-substrate interactions through surface studies of coverage dependency and coadsorption using both scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and low energy electron diffraction (LEED). The effect of adsorbate coverage on the surface structures of sulfur on Pt(111) and Rh(111) was examined. On Pt(111), sulfur forms p(2x2) at 0.25 ML of sulfur, which transforms into a more compressed ({radical}3x{radical}3)R30{degrees} at 0.33 ML. On both structures, it was found that sulfur adsorbs only in fcc sites. When the coverage of sulfur exceeds 0.33 ML, it formed more complex c({radical}3x7)rect structure with 3 sulfur atoms per unit cell. In this structure, two different adsorption sites for sulfur atoms were observed - two on fcc sites and one on hcp site within the unit cell.

  1. An inverted AlGaAs/GaAs patterned-Ge tunnel junction cascade concentrator solar cell. Final subcontract report, 1 January 1991--31 August 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Venkatasubramanian, R.

    1993-01-01

    This report describes work to develop inverted-grown Al{sub 0.34}Ga{sub 0.66}As/GaAs cascades. Several significant developments are reported on as follows: (1) The AM1.5 1-sun total-area efficiency of the top Al{sub 0.34}Ga{sub 0.66}As cell for the cascade was improved from 11.3% to 13.2% (NREL measurement [total-area]). (2) The ``cycled`` organometallic vapor phase epitaxy growth (OMVPE) was studied in detail utilizing a combination of characterization techniques including Hall-data, photoluminescence, and secondary ion mass spectroscopy. (3) A technique called eutectic-metal-bonding (EMB) was developed by strain-free mounting of thin GaAs-AlGaAs films (based on lattice-matched growth on Ge substrates and selective plasma etching of Ge substrates) onto Si carrier substrates. Minority-carrier lifetime in an EMB GaAs double-heterostructure was measured as high as 103 nsec, the highest lifetime report for a freestanding GaAs thin film. (4) A thin-film, inverted-grown GaAs cell with a 1-sun AM1.5 active-area efficiency of 20.3% was obtained. This cell was eutectic-metal-bonded onto Si. (5) A thin-film inverted-grown, Al{sub 0.34}Ga{sub 0.66}As/GaAs cascade with AM1.5 efficiency of 19.9% and 21% at 1-sun and 7-suns, respectively, was obtained. This represents an important milestone in the development of an AlGaAs/GaAs cascade by OMVPE utilizing a tunnel interconnect and demonstrates a proof-of-concept for the inverted-growth approach.

  2. Potassium-induced effect on structure and chemical activity of CuxO/Cu(111) (x≤2) surface: A combined scanning tunneling microscopy and density functional theory study

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Liu, Ping; An, Wei; Stacchiola, Dario; Xu, Fang

    2015-10-16

    Potassium (K) plays an essential role in promoting catalytic reaction in many established industrial catalytic processes. Here, we report a combined study using scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and density functional theory (DFT) in understanding the effect of depositing K on the atomic and electronic structures as well as chemical activities of CuxO/Cu(111) (x≤2). The DFT calculations observe a pseudomorphic growth of K on CuxO/Cu(111) up to 0.19 monolayer (ML) of coverage, where K binds the surface via strong ionic interaction with chemisorbed oxygen and the relatively weak electrostatic interactions with copper ions, lower and upper oxygen on the CuxO rings.more » The simulated STM pattern based on the DFT results agrees well with the experimental observations. The deposited K displays great impact on the surface electronic structure of CuxO/Cu(111), which induces significant reduction in work function and leads to a strong electron polarization on the surface. The promotion of K on the surface binding properties is selective. It varies depending on the nature of adsorbates. According to our results, K has little effect on surface acidity, while it enhances the surface basicity significantly. As a consequence, the presence of K does not help for CO adsorption on CuxO/Cu(111), but being able to accelerate the activation of CO2. Thus, such promotion strongly depends on the combinations from both geometric and electronic effects. Our results highlight the origin of promoting effect of alkalis in the design of catalysts for the complex reactions.« less

  3. Lateral transport and far-infrared radiation of electrons in In{sub x}Ga{sub 1-x}As/GaAs heterostructures with the double tunnel-coupled quantum wells in a high electric field

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baidus, N. V.; Belevskii, P. A.; Biriukov, A. A.; Vainberg, V. V.; Vinoslavskii, M. N.; Ikonnikov, A. V.; Zvonkov, B. N.; Pylypchuk, A. S.; Poroshin, V. N.

    2010-11-15

    It is shown that the far-infrared radiation of electrons in the selectively doped heterostructures with double tunnel-coupled quantum wells in high lateral electric fields strongly depends on the level of doping of the wells. At a high impurity concentration in a narrow well, higher than (1-2) x 10{sup 11} cm{sup -2}, the radiation is caused only by indirect intrasubband electron transitions. At a lower concentration, along with the indirect transitions, the direct intersubband transitions also contribute to the radiation. These transitions become possible in high electric fields due to the real-space electron transfer between the quantum wells.

  4. PP-99 St. Clair Tunnel

    Energy Savers [EERE]

  5. Evaluate and characterize mechanisms controlling transport, fate and effects of army smokes in an aerosol wind tunnel: Transport, transformations, fate and terrestrial ecological effects of fog oil obscurant smokes: Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cataldo, D.A.; Van Voris, P.; Ligotke, M.W.; Fellows, R.J.; McVeety, B.D.; Li, Shu-mei W.; Bolton, H. Jr.; Fredrickson, J.K.

    1989-01-01

    The terrestrial transport, chemical fate, and ecological effects of fog oil (FO) smoke obscurants were evaluated under controlled wind tunnel conditions. The primary objectives of this research program are to characterize and assess the impacts of smoke and obscurants on: (1) natural vegetation characteristic of US Army training sites in the United States; (2) physical and chemical properties of soils representative of these training sites; and (3) soil microbiological and invertebrate communities. Impacts and dose/responses were evaluated based on an exposure scenario, including exposure duration, exposure rate, and sequential cumulative dosing. Key to understanding the environmental impacts of fog oil smoke/obscurants is establishing the importance of environmental parameters, such as relative humidity and wind speed on airborne aerosol characteristics and deposition to receptor surfaces. Direct and indirect biotic effects were evaluated using five plant species and three soil types. 29 refs., 35 figs., 32 tabs.

  6. Kinetic isotope effects and tunneling in cyclic double and triple proton transfer between acetic acid and methanol in tetrahydrofuran studied by dynamic /sup 1/H and /sup 2/H NMR spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gerritzen, D.; Limbach, H.H.

    1984-02-22

    Previous studies of proton exchange and hydrogen bonding between acetic acid (A) and methanol (B) in tetrahydrofuran-d/sub 8/ have been extended to the study of the primary kinetic H/D isotope effects of the exchange. For this purpose a new combination of dynamic /sup 1/H and /sup 2/H NMR spectroscopy has been used to perform an ''NMR proton inventory''. The following rate law was obtained at deuterium fractions D=0 and D=1 of the exchangeable protonic sites: NU=k/sup LL/ C/sub A/C/sub B/+k/sub LLL/C/sub A//sup 2/C/sub B/ (L=H,D). This was attributed to a superposition of cyclic double and triple proton exchange involving one and two molecules of acetic acid and one molecule of methanol. Additional experiments were carried out at intermediate deuterium fractions. Thus, the kinetic HH/HD/DD and HHH/HHD/DDD isotope effects of the exchange as a function of the temperature was measured successfully. This has been achieved for the first time for well-defined intermolecular multiple-proton-transfer reactions. The possibility of determining the number of protons transferred in a chemical reaction by performing an NMR proton inventory is discussed. The rule of the geometric mean (RGM) is fulfilled for the kinetic isotope effects of the LLL process, which are almost independent of temperature within the margin of error. By contrast, the RGM is not fullfilled for the LL process, and the kinetic isotope effects depend strongly on the temperature. The energies of activation and frequency factors fit Bell's criteria of tunneling. The kinetic results are in good agreement with predictions of transition-state theory but can be explained by an intermolecular tunneling model. The results are proof that acetic acid and methanol form cyclic hydrogen-bonded 1:1 and 2:1 complexes which have very low concentration in tetrahydrofuran.

  7. A sodium gadolinium phosphate with two different types of tunnel structure: Synthesis, crystal structure, and optical properties of Na{sub 3}GdP{sub 2}O{sub 8}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fang, M.; Cheng, W.-D. Zhang, H.; Zhao, D.; Zhang, W.-L.; Yang, S.-L.

    2008-09-15

    A sodium gadolinium phosphate crystal, Na{sub 3}GdP{sub 2}O{sub 8}, has been synthesized by a high-temperature solution reaction, and it exhibits a new structural family of the alkali-metal-rare-earth phosphate system. Although many compounds with formula M{sub 3}LnP{sub 2}O{sub 8} have been reported, but they were shown to be orthorhombic [R. Salmon, C. Parent, M. Vlasse, G. LeFlem, Mater. Res. Bull. 13 (1978) 439] rather than monoclinic as shown in this paper. Single-crystal X-ray diffraction analysis shows the structure to be monoclinic with space group C2/c and the cell parameters: a=27.55 (25), b=5.312 (4), c=13.935(11) A, {beta}=91.30(1){sup o}, and V=2038.80 A{sup 3}, Z=4. Its structure features a three-dimensional GdP{sub 2}O{sub 8}{sup 3-} anionic framework with two different types of interesting tunnels at where Na atoms are located by different manners. The framework is constructed by Gd polyhedra and isolated PO{sub 4} tetrahedra. It is different from the structure of K{sub 3}NdP{sub 2}O{sub 8} [R. Salmon, C. Parent, M. Vlasse, G. LeFlem, Mater. Res. Bull. 13 (1978) 439] with space group P2{sub 1}/m that shows only one type of tunnel. The emission spectrum and the absorption spectrum of the compound have been investigated. Additionally, the calculations of band structure, density of states, dielectric constants, and refractive indexes have been also performed with the density functional theory method. The obtained results tend to support the experimental data. - Graphical abstract: Projection of the structure of Na{sub 3}GdP{sub 2}O{sub 8} with a unit cell edge along the b-axis. The Na-O bonds are omitted for clarity.

  8. Feasibility Study of Economics and Performance of a Hydroelectric Installation at the Jeddo Mine Drainage Tunnel. A Study Prepared in Partnership with the Environmental Protection Agency for the RE-Powering America's Land Initiative: Siting Renewable Energy on Potentially Contaminated Land and Mine Sites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roberts, J. O.; Mosey, G.

    2013-02-01

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), in accordance with the RE-Powering America's Land initiative, selected the Jeddo Tunnel discharge site for a feasibility study of renewable energy potential. The purpose of this report is to assess technical and economic viability of the site for hydroelectric and geothermal energy production. In addition, the report outlines financing options that could assist in the implementation of a system.

  9. Octonary resistance states in La0.7Sr0.3MnO3/BaTiO3/La0.7Sr0.3MnO3 multiferroic tunnel junctions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yue -Wei Yin; Tao, Jing; Huang, Wei -Chuan; Liu, Yu -Kuai; Yang, Sheng -Wei; Dong, Si -Ning; Zhu, Yi -Mei; Li, Qi; Li, Xiao -Guang

    2015-10-06

    General drawbacks of current electronic/spintronic devices are high power consumption and low density storage. A multiferroic tunnel junction (MFTJ), employing a ferroelectric barrier layer sandwiched between two ferromagnetic layers, presents four resistance states in a single device and therefore provides an alternative way to achieve high density memories. Here, an MFTJ device with eight nonvolatile resistance states by further integrating the design of noncollinear magnetization alignments between the ferromagnetic layers is demonstrated. Through the angle-resolved tunneling magnetoresistance investigations on La0.7Sr0.3MnO3/BaTiO3/La0.7Sr0.3MnO3 junctions, it is found that, besides collinear parallel/antiparallel magnetic configurations, the MFTJ shows at least two other stable noncollinear (45° and 90°) magnetic configurations. As a result, combining the tunneling electroresistance effect caused by the ferroelectricity reversal of the BaTiO3 barrier, an octonary memory device is obtained, representing potential applications in high density nonvolatile storage in the future.

  10. Ti-substituted tunnel-type Na0.44MnO2 oxide as a negative electrode for aqueous sodium-ion batteries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Yuesheng; Liu, Jue; Lee, Byungju; Qiao, Ruimin; Yang, Zhenzhong; Xu, Shuyin; Yu, Xiqian; Gu, Lin; Hu, Yong-Sheng; Yang, Wanli; Kang, Kisuk; Li, Hong; Yang, Xiao-Qing; Chen, Liquan; Huang, Xuejie

    2015-03-25

    The aqueous sodium-ion battery system is a safe and low-cost solution for large-scale energy storage, due to the abundance of sodium and inexpensive aqueous electrolytes. Although several positive electrode materials, e.g., Na0.44MnO2, were proposed, few negative electrode materials, e.g., activated carbon and NaTi2(PO4)3, are available. Here we show that Ti-substituted Na0.44MnO2 (Na0.44[Mn1-xTix]O2) with tunnel structure can be used as a negative electrode material for aqueous sodium-ion batteries. This material exhibits superior cyclability even without the special treatment of oxygen removal from the aqueous solution. Atomic-scale characterizations based on spherical aberration-corrected electron microscopy and ab initio calculations are utilized to accurately identify the Ti substitution sites and sodium storage mechanism. Ti substitution tunes the charge ordering property and reaction pathway, significantly smoothing the discharge/charge profiles and lowering the storage voltage. Both the fundamental understanding and practical demonstrations suggest that Na0.44[Mn1-xTix]O2 is a promising negative electrode material for aqueous sodium-ion batteries.

  11. Potassium-induced effect on structure and chemical activity of CuxO/Cu(111) (x?2) surface: A combined scanning tunneling microscopy and density functional theory study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Ping; An, Wei; Stacchiola, Dario; Xu, Fang

    2015-10-16

    Potassium (K) plays an essential role in promoting catalytic reaction in many established industrial catalytic processes. Here, we report a combined study using scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and density functional theory (DFT) in understanding the effect of depositing K on the atomic and electronic structures as well as chemical activities of CuxO/Cu(111) (x?2). The DFT calculations observe a pseudomorphic growth of K on CuxO/Cu(111) up to 0.19 monolayer (ML) of coverage, where K binds the surface via strong ionic interaction with chemisorbed oxygen and the relatively weak electrostatic interactions with copper ions, lower and upper oxygen on the CuxO rings. The simulated STM pattern based on the DFT results agrees well with the experimental observations. The deposited K displays great impact on the surface electronic structure of CuxO/Cu(111), which induces significant reduction in work function and leads to a strong electron polarization on the surface. The promotion of K on the surface binding properties is selective. It varies depending on the nature of adsorbates. According to our results, K has little effect on surface acidity, while it enhances the surface basicity significantly. As a consequence, the presence of K does not help for CO adsorption on CuxO/Cu(111), but being able to accelerate the activation of CO2. Thus, such promotion strongly depends on the combinations from both geometric and electronic effects. Our results highlight the origin of promoting effect of alkalis in the design of catalysts for the complex reactions.

  12. Nanofabrication with the Scanning Tunneling Microscope

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shedd, G.M.; Russell, P.E.

    1988-12-01

    The Precision Engineering Center has recently begun a research program into applications of STM to Nanotechnology. Few tools permit humans to control events and processes at the manometer level, and of those, the STM is the most well-suited to the task. A versatile new ultra-high-vacuum (UHV) STM is being built to study the use of STM for the manipulation of nanometer-scale particles. Part of the STM`s usefulness will be due to its being positioned directly beneath the focused ion beam (FIB). The interface of the STM with the FIB will allow the STM to take advantage of the FIB for long-range imaging and as a particle source; the FIB can in turn use the STM for in situ, high-resolution imaging of micromachined features.

  13. Penn Large Water Tunnel | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    designs with verification and Validation studies. Integrated DisplayGraphics Microsoft Windows based systems Other Data Capabilites State-of-the-art non-invasive flow...

  14. Penn Small Water Tunnel | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    designs with verification and Validation studies. Integrated DisplayGraphics Microsoft Windows based systems Other Data Capabilites State-of-the-art non-invasive flow...

  15. Integrated resonant tunneling diode based antenna

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hietala, Vincent M. (Placitas, NM); Tiggers, Chris P. (Albuquerque, NM); Plut, Thomas A. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2000-01-01

    An antenna comprising a plurality of negative resistance devices and a method for making same comprising employing a removable standoff layer to form the gap between the microstrip antenna metal and the bottom contact layer.

  16. MHL Student Tunnel | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    16 Bandwidth(kHz) 20 Cameras Yes Description of Camera Types Wide variety of analog & digital surface cameras; high speed above and underwater cameras Available Sensors...

  17. Saving Money in Reno's Wind Tunnels

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Reno, Nevada recently installed 1.5-kilowatt wind turbines on their City Hall -- saving them up to $11,000 each year in energy costs.

  18. Space Institute Tunnel | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Yes Available Sensors Flow, Strain, Turbulence Data Generation Capability Real-Time No Test Services Test Services Yes On-Site fabrication capabilityequipment Machine shop and...

  19. Scripps Flume | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    1.1 Cost(per day) Contact POC Special Physical Features Double sided glass wall test section. Towing Capabilities Towing Capabilities None Wavemaking Capabilities...

  20. Category:Testing Facilities | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Scripps Channel 1 Scripps Channel 2 Scripps Flume Sectional Model Flume Facilities Sediment Basin Flume Sheets Wave Basin Ship Towing Tank Small Towing Tank Space Institute...

  1. University of Iowa | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    "group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":"" Hide Map Testing Facilities Overseen *Sediment Basin Flume *Small Towing Tank *Environmental Flume *Kennedy Flume *Ship Towing Tank...

  2. Subsea production systems - trends in the nineties: Minitemplate/cluster wells; towed flowline bundles; multiphase flowmeters, improved gauges - a proven track record

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jones, J.W.

    1996-04-01

    Subsea production systems have successfully demonstrated their overall reliability, and have established a proven track record over the past 30 years of field experience. Current trends in their configuration from large, heavy, multiwell integrated drilling template and production/injection manifold systems to small, light-weight, {open_quotes}mini template{close_quotes} systems or clustered well manifolds with individual satellite wells-essentially a cost reduction trend-are expected to continue throughout the remainder of the decade. System configuration and equipment technology trends in the 1990s are now improving the profitability and capability of subsea production systems.

  3. Fiber coating method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Corman, Gregory Scot (Ballston Lake, NY)

    2001-01-01

    A coating is applied to reinforcing fibers arranged into a tow by coaxially aligning the tow with an adjacent separation layer and winding or wrapping the tow and separation layer onto a support structure in an interleaved manner so that the separation layer separates a wrap of the tow from an adjacent wrap of the tow. A coating can then be uniformly applied to the reinforcing fibers without defects caused by fiber tow to fiber tow contact. The separation layer can be a carbon fiber veil.

  4. Fiber coating method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Corman, Gregory Scot (Ballston Lake, NY)

    2003-04-15

    A coating is applied to reinforcing fibers arranged into a tow by coaxially aligning the tow with an adjacent separation layer and winding or wrapping the tow and separation layer onto a support structure in an interleaved manner so that the separation layer separates a wrap of the tow from an adjacent wrap of the tow. A coating can then be uniformly applied to the reinforcing fibers without defects caused by fiber tow to fiber tow contact. The separation layer can be a carbon fiber veil.

  5. SHARED TECHNOLOGY TRANSFER PROGRAM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    GRIFFIN, JOHN M. HAUT, RICHARD C.

    2008-03-07

    The program established a collaborative process with domestic industries for the purpose of sharing Navy-developed technology. Private sector businesses were educated so as to increase their awareness of the vast amount of technologies that are available, with an initial focus on technology applications that are related to the Hydrogen, Fuel Cells and Infrastructure Technologies (Hydrogen) Program of the U.S. Department of Energy. Specifically, the project worked to increase industry awareness of the vast technology resources available to them that have been developed with taxpayer funding. NAVSEA-Carderock and the Houston Advanced Research Center teamed with Nicholls State University to catalog NAVSEA-Carderock unclassified technologies, rated the level of readiness of the technologies and established a web based catalog of the technologies. In particular, the catalog contains technology descriptions, including testing summaries and overviews of related presentations.

  6. HFiTT - Higgs Factory in Tevatron Tunnel (Technical Report) ...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    science and technology. A paper copy of this document is also available for sale to the public from the National Technical Information Service, Springfield, VA at www.ntis.gov....

  7. Getting Traffic Lights Talking to Improve Topeka's Traffic Tunnel

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    By this winter, the 22 traffic signals within Topeka’s three major traffic corridors—21st Street, Wanamaker and Topeka Boulevard—will be resynchronized to help reduce driving time, gas consumption and emissions. These corridors see anywhere from 17,000 to 30,000 cars daily.

  8. A new technique to measure tunneling barrier height in solid...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    A 1 ; Dattelbaum, Andrew M 1 ; Mara, Nathan A 1 ; Kaschner, George C 1 ; Johnson, Oliver K 2 ; Seegmiller, Daniel 2 ; Fullwood, David T 2 + Show Author...

  9. MHK Technologies/Tunneled Wave Energy Converter TWEC | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Water Column Technology Readiness Level Click here TRL 1-3: Discovery Concept Definition Early Stage Development & Design & Engineering Technology Description The...

  10. Origin of the Magnetoresistance in Oxide Tunnel Junctions Determined...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Save Share this Record Citation Formats MLA APA Chicago Bibtex Export Metadata Endnote Excel CSV XML Send to Email Send to Email Email address: Content: Close Send ...

  11. Boundary conformal field theory and tunneling of edge quasiparticles...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    DOI: 10.1016j.aop.2009.03.005; PII: S0003-4916(09)00060-8; Copyright (c) 2009 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam, The Netherlands, All rights reserved; Country of input: ...

  12. Scanning tunneling spectroscopy of a magnetic atom on graphene...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    By using the non-equilibrium Green function method with the slave-boson mean field ... But for the undoped graphene, the Kondo phase only exists if the adatom's energy level is ...

  13. EECBG Success Story: Saving Money in Reno's Wind Tunnels

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    On the street level in Reno, it may be easy to forget that every time the breeze blows off the Truckee River and past the 17-story City Hall, the town is quietly saving money. Learn more.

  14. Wind tunnel performance data for the Darrieus wind turbine with...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    N.Mex. (USA) Country of Publication: United States Language: English Subject: 17 WIND ENERGY; DARRIEUS ROTORS; PERFORMANCE TESTING; AIR; CONFIGURATION; DESIGN; FLOW RATE;...

  15. Tunnel magnetoresistance and linear conductance of double quantum...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Authors: Weymann, Ireneusz, E-mail: weymann@amu.edu.pl 1 + Show Author Affiliations Faculty of Physics, Adam Mickiewicz University, 61-614 Pozna (Poland) Publication Date: ...

  16. Electrically tunable localized tunneling channels in silicene nanoribbons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Saari, Timo; Huang, Cheng-Yi; Tsai, Wei-Feng; Nieminen, Jouko; Lin, Hsin; Bansil, Arun

    2014-04-28

    The topological phase of a silicene nanoribbon holding edge states in the bulk energy gap can be easily broken by an external electric field. Here, we show through low-energy Green's function calculations that it is possible to localize conducting channels anywhere in a silicene nanoribbon by applying an inhomogeneous electric field. The spin degeneracy of these channels can also be broken in the same manner, allowing conduction of spin as well as charge. On this basis, we suggest design of a ternary logic device, which could be used in low-power circuits. Our study demonstrates that silicene and related group IV elements with honeycomb structure could provide a platform for efficient manipulation of spin currents via external electric fields, without the need to switch magnetic fields for spintronics applications.

  17. From: Tunnell, Andrew To: Congestion Study Comments Subject:

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Southern Companies" Comments to Draft National Electric Transmission Congestion Study Date: Monday, October 20, 2014 3:17:22 PM Attachments: balch_logof0638c DOE Congestion Comments.pdf In accordance with the Department of Energy's instructions provided at: http://www.energy.gov/oe/downloads/national-congestion-study-notice-public-comment-federal- register-notice-volume-79-no, find attached Southern Companies' comments regarding the draft Transmission National Electric Congestion Study that

  18. SAFL Channel | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    University of Minnesota Hydrodynamics Hydrodynamic Testing Facility Type Channel Length(m) 84.0 Beam(m) 2.8 Depth(m) 1.8 Cost(per day) Contact POC Towing Capabilities Towing...

  19. Property:Programmable Wavemaking | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Harbors Modeling Facility + Yes + Coastal Inlet Model Facility + Yes + Coastal Structures Modeling Complex + Yes + D Davidson Laboratory Tow Tank + Yes + DeFrees Large Wave...

  20. Property:Simulated Beach | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Coastal Harbors Modeling Facility + No + Coastal Inlet Model Facility + No + Coastal Structures Modeling Complex + No + D Davidson Laboratory Tow Tank + Yes + DeFrees Large Wave...

  1. Property:Testing Facilities Overseen | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    + Scripps Channel 1 +, Scripps Channel 2 +, Scripps Flume + University of Iowa + Sediment Basin Flume +, Small Towing Tank +, Environmental Flume +, ... University of Maine...

  2. MHK Technologies/Mi2 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Dimensions Device Testing Scale Test *Extensive technology development through computer modeling and prototype testing at the National Research Council towing tank facility...

  3. Property:Bandwidth(kHz) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Richmond Field Station Tow Tank + 200+ + S SAFL Channel + 2000 + Sandia Lake Facility + >1000 + (previous 25) (next 25) Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgw...

  4. Design and calibration of a scanning tunneling microscope for large machined surfaces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grigg, D.A.; Russell, P.E.; Dow, T.A.

    1988-12-01

    During the last year the large sample STM has been designed, built and used for the observation of several different samples. Calibration of the scanner for prope dimensional interpretation of surface features has been a chief concern, as well as corrections for non-linear effects such as hysteresis during scans. Several procedures used in calibration and correction of piezoelectric scanners used in the laboratorys STMs are described.

  5. Carbon Monoxide Dehydrogenases and Acetyl-CoA Synthases: Light at the End of the Tunnel?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paul A. Lindahl

    2002-02-19

    OAK-B135 Metalloenzymes seem to ''come of age'' when their structures are known at atomic resolution, spectroscopic and catalytic properties are basically understood, and genetic expression systems are available. Such foundations allow detailed mechanistic and spectroscopic properties to be probed and correlated to structure. The objective of this article is to summarize what is known about the title group of enzymes, and show that, to a large degree, they have come of age.

  6. Vital Alert's C1000 mine and tunnel radios use magnetic induction, advanced

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    digital communications techniques and ultra-low frequency transmission to wirelessly provide rs in cost reduction and advantageous diaper products result from LANL projects Millions in cost reduction and advantageous diaper products result from LANL projects Millions in cost reduction and advantageous diaper products result from LANL projects LANL technology successfully optimized diaper manufacturing and manufacturing design, permitting Laboratory scientists to validate and expand the

  7. Magnetization switching in a CoFeB/MgO magnetic tunnel junction...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    English Subject: 75 CONDENSED MATTER PHYSICS, SUPERCONDUCTIVITY AND SUPERFLUIDITY; BORON COMPOUNDS; COBALT COMPOUNDS; ELECTRIC FIELDS; IRON COMPOUNDS; MAGNESIUM OXIDES;...

  8. Interpretation of Scanning Tunneling Quasiparticle Interference and Impurity States in Cuprates

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Kreisel, A.; Choubey, P.; Berlijn, T.; Ku, W.; Andersen, B. M.; Hirschfeld, P. J.

    2015-05-27

    We apply a recently developed method combining first principles based Wannier functions with solutions to the Bogoliubov-de Gennes equations to the problem of interpreting STM data in cuprate superconductors. We show that the observed images of Zn on the surface of Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8 can only be understood by accounting for the tails of the Cu Wannier functions, which include significant weight on apical O sites in neighboring unit cells. This calculation thus puts earlier crude “filter” theories on a microscopic foundation and solves a long standing puzzle. We then study quasiparticle interference (QPI) phenomena induced by out-of-plane weak potential scatterers, andmore » show how patterns long observed in cuprates can be understood in terms of the interference of Wannier functions above the surface. Our results show excellent agreement with experiment and enable a better understanding of novel phenomena in the cuprates via STM imaging.« less

  9. Field emission spectroscopy evidence for dual-barrier electron tunnelling in nanographite

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bandurin, D. A.; Kleshch, V. I.; Mingels, S.; Ltzenkirchen-Hecht, D.; Mller, G.; Obraztsov, A. N.

    2015-06-08

    Nanocarbon films with upstanding flake-like graphite crystallites of nanometre thickness were fabricated by carbon condensation from a methanehydrogen gas mixture activated by a direct-current discharge. The nanographite (NG) crystallites are composed of a few graphene layers. The adjacent atomic layers are connected partially at the edges of the crystallites to form strongly curved graphene structures. The extraordinary field emission (FE) properties were revealed for the NG films with an average current density of a few mA/cm{sup 2}, reproducibly obtained at a macroscopic applied field of about 1?V/?m. The integral FE currentvoltage curves and electron spectra (FEES) of NG cathodes with multiple emitters were measured in a triode configuration. Most remarkably, above a threshold field, two peaks were revealed in FEES with different field-dependent shifts to lower energies. This behaviour evidences electron emission through a dual potential barrier, corresponding to carboncarbon heterostructure formed as a result of the graphene bending.

  10. Preliminary design for a 20 TeV Collider in a deep tunnel at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1985-01-12

    The Reference Design Study for a 20 TeV Collider demonstrated the technical and cost feasibility of a 20 TeV superconducting collider facility. Based on magnets of 3T, 5T, and 6.5T the Main Ring of the Collider would have a circumference of 164 km, 113 km, or 90 km. There would be six collision regions, of which four would be developed intially. The 5T and 6.5T rings would have twelve major refrigeration stations, while the 3T design would have 24 major refrigeration stations.

  11. Rainier Mesa Sub-CAU Model for N-Tunnel (Conference) | SciTech...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Have feedback or suggestions for a way to improve these results? Save Share this Record Citation Formats MLA APA Chicago Bibtex Export Metadata Endnote Excel CSV XML Save to My ...

  12. Vital Alert's C1000 mine and tunnel radios use magnetic induction...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    collaborated on 17 projects touching upon physics simulations, statistical modeling, new materials, surface science, chemistry, and bioscience. In one of these projects, LANL and...

  13. EECBG Success Story: Getting Traffic Lights Talking to Improve Topeka's Traffic Tunnel

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    To improve traffic and reduce emissions, Topeka, Kansas is implementing an "InSync" traffic system that resynchronizing lights to help reduce driving time, financed by an Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant (EECBG). Learn more.

  14. OTRC Wave Basin | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Physical Features 4.6m wide x 9.1m long x 16.8m deep pit with adjustable depth floor in test area Towing Capabilities Towing Capabilities Yes Maximum Velocity(ms) 0.6 Length of...

  15. Tunneling effects in the kinetics of helium and hydrogen isotopes desorption from single-walled carbon nanotube bundles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Danilchenko, B. A. Yaskovets, I. I.; Uvarova, I. Y.; Dolbin, A. V.; Esel'son, V. B.; Basnukaeva, R. M.; Vinnikov, N. A.

    2014-04-28

    The kinetics of desorption both helium isotopes and molecules of hydrogen and deuterium from open-ended or ?-irradiated single-walled carbon nanotube bundles was investigated in temperature range of 10300?K. The gases desorption rates obey the Arrhenius law at high temperatures, deviate from it with temperature reduction and become constant at low temperatures. These results indicate the quantum nature of gas outflow from carbon nanotube bundles. We had deduced the crossover temperature below which the quantum corrections to the effective activation energy of desorption become significant. This temperature follows linear dependence against the inverse mass of gas molecule and is consistent with theoretical prediction.

  16. Considerations for modeling small-particulate impacts from surface coal-mining operations based on wind-tunnel simulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Perry, S.G.; Petersen, W.B.; Thompson, R.S.

    1994-12-31

    The Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 provide for a reexamination of the current Environmental Protection Agency`s (USEPA) methods for modeling fugitive particulate (PM10) from open-pit, surface coal mines. The Industrial Source Complex Model (ISCST2) is specifically named as the method that needs further study. Title II, Part B, Section 234 of the Amendments states that {open_quotes}...the Administrator shall analyze the accuracy of such model and emission factors and make revisions as may be necessary to eliminate any significant over-predictions of air quality effect of fugitive particulate emissions from such sources.{close_quotes}

  17. Hyperfine-induced hysteretic funnel structure in spin blockaded tunneling current of coupled vertical quantum dots at low magnetic field

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leary, A.; Wicha, A.; Harack, B.; Coish, W. A.; Hilke, M.; Yu, G.; Gupta, J. A.; Payette, C.; Austing, D. G.

    2013-12-04

    We outline the properties of the hyperfine-induced funnel structure observed in the two-electron spin blockade region of a weakly coupled vertical double quantum dot device. Hysteretic steps in the leakage current occur due to dynamic nuclear polarization when either the bias voltage or the magnetic field is swept up and down. When the bias voltage is swept, an intriguing ?3 mT wide cusp near 0 T appears in the down-sweep position, and when the magnetic field is swept, the current at 0 T can be switched from 'low' to 'high' as the bias is increased.

  18. Tombs, tunnels, and terraces a cultural resources survey of a former ammunition supply point in Okinawa, Japan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Verhaaren, B. T.; Levenson, J. B.; Komine, G.

    2000-02-09

    U.S. forces serving at military bases on foreign soil are obligated to act as good stewards of the cultural and natural resources under their control. However, cultural resources management presents special challenges at U.S. bases in other countries where cultural properties laws differ in emphasis and detail from those in the United States and issues of land ownership and occupancy are not always clear. Where status of forces agreements (SOFAs) exist, environmental governing standards bridge the gap between U.S. and host nation cultural priorities. In Japan, the Department of Defense Japan Environmental Governing Standards (JEGS) fill this function. Under Criteria 12-4.2 and 12-4.3 of the JEGS, U.S. Forces Japan commit themselves to inventory and protect cultural properties found on the lands they control or use. Cultural properties include archaeological sites, tombs, historic buildings, and shrines. Natural monuments, such as landscape features or plant and animal species, may also be designated as cultural properties. As part of this commitment, in February 1999 a cultural resources inventory was conducted in Area 1, part of Kadena Air Base (AB), Okinawa, Japan. Area 1, the former U.S. army Ammunition Supply Point 1, is currently used primarily for training exercises and recreational paint ball.

  19. Development and performance of the nanoworkbench: A four tip...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    tunneling microscope (MTSTM) with a scanning electron microscope (SEM) for imaging and ... PERFORMANCE; SCANNING ELECTRON MICROSCOPY; SCANNING TUNNELING MICROSCOPY; ...

  20. Property:Data Comparison to Computational Models | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    studies. R Richmond Field Station Tow Tank + Numerous PhD theses involved experimental components that were carried out at the facility S SAFL Channel + Have in-house CFD...

  1. The Department of Energy Announces Major Cold War Legacy Waste...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    tires, was needed to transport the concrete hot cell structure to the landfill and a D9 Cat was used to tow the truck and trailer up a slight incline at the final end of the...

  2. Property:Utility Services Available | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) A Alden Large Flume + 110 V to 480 V, 3 phase Alden Small Flume + 110 V to 480 V, 3 phase Alden Tow Tank + 110 V to...

  3. Property:Integrated Display/Graphics | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    DisplayGraphics" Showing 22 pages using this property. A Alden Large Flume + Lab View, Test Point Alden Small Flume + Lab View, Test Point Alden Tow Tank + Lab View, Test Point...

  4. Penn Reverberant Tank | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    three 0.5x0.5 meter underwater viewing ports. Mechanical oscillation of a small-scale test unit-simulation of oscillating flow for wave or tidal excitation. Towing Capabilities...

  5. MHK Technologies/Atlantis AS 400 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    the first of the AS series has been designed from first principles using extensive computer modelling and following tow testing in August 2008 is recognized as the world s most...

  6. Property:Wave Direction | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Wave Basin + Uni-Directional + Lakefront Tow Tank + Uni-Directional + Los Angeles and Long Beach Harbors Model + Uni-Directional + M MHL 2D WindWave + Uni-Directional + MHL...

  7. Sensor assembly

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bennett, Thomas E.; Nelson, Drew V.

    2004-04-13

    A ribbon-like sensor assembly is described wherein a length of an optical fiber embedded within a similar lengths of a prepreg tow. The fiber is ""sandwiched"" by two layers of the prepreg tow which are merged to form a single consolidated ribbon. The consolidated ribbon achieving a generally uniform distribution of composite filaments near the embedded fiber such that excess resin does not ""pool"" around the periphery of the embedded fiber.

  8. Alden Wave Basin | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Beach Yes Description of Beach Designed as needed using commercially available sandsediment ChannelTunnelFlume ChannelTunnelFlume None Wind Capabilities Wind Capabilities...

  9. Los Angeles and Long Beach Harbors Model | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Direction Uni-Directional Simulated Beach Yes Description of Beach Point Fermin to Huntington Beach, CA ChannelTunnelFlume ChannelTunnelFlume None Wind Capabilities Wind...

  10. System to continuously produce carbon fiber via microwave assisted plasma processing

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    White, Terry L; Paulauskas, Felix L; Bigelow, Timothy S

    2014-03-25

    A method for continuously processing carbon fiber including establishing a microwave plasma in a selected atmosphere contained in an elongated chamber having a microwave power gradient along its length defined by a lower microwave power at one end and a higher microwave power at the opposite end of the elongated chamber. The elongated chamber having an opening in each of the ends of the chamber that are adapted to allow the passage of the fiber tow while limiting incidental gas flow into or out of said chamber. A continuous fiber tow is introduced into the end of the chamber having the lower microwave power. The fiber tow is withdrawn from the opposite end of the chamber having the higher microwave power. The fiber to is subjected to progressively higher microwave energy as the fiber is being traversed through the elongated chamber.

  11. Find Internships | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Internships Find Internships Internships in energy efficiency and renewable energy-related fields, such as solar and fuel cells, energy efficiency, atmospheric sciences, ecology, global carbon cycles, climatology, and more, include EERE's own student internship program. Featured Internships Clean Cities University Workforce Development Program Clean Cities logo Science Undergraduate Laboratory Internships (SULI) Fall 2013 Picture of tow people in a labratory working Minority Educational

  12. Two types of the relation between the intensity and the life time of photoluminescence of core/shell semiconductor quantum dots: Important role of Coulomb field and tunneling transitions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Osad'ko, I. S.

    2014-10-28

    It has been recently found [Gh. Galland, Y. Ghosh, A. Steinbrück, M. Sykora, J. A. Hollingsworth, and V. I. Klimov, Nature (London) 479, 203 (2011)] that semiconductor core/shell nanocrystals (NCs) with blinking photoluminescence (PL) can be of “A” or “B” type. NCs of A-type exhibit correlation between the intensity of PL and the life time. In NCs of B-type such correlation is absent. Simple model based on combination of the charging model and the two-level system model is proposed for describing emissive properties of NCs of both types. The model invokes fluctuations of emission ability γ{sub em} of NC to explain the emissive properties of NCs of B-type. Our combined model is also in agreement with anticorrelation between the duration τ{sub off} of off intervals and PL life time t{sub off} in off intervals found recently for NCs of A-type in the experiment [A. A. Cordones, T. J. Bixby, and S. R. Leone, Nano Lett. 11, 3366 (2011)].

  13. CFD Calculations of S809 Aerodynamic Characteristics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    pressure and aerodynamic coefficients were made with wind tunnel data from the Delft University 1.8m x 1.25m low-turbulence wind tunnel. This work highlights two areas in CFD...

  14. Collegiate Wind Competition Turbines go Blade-to-Blade in Wind...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Turbines go Blade-to-Blade in Wind Tunnel Tests at WINDPOWER Collegiate Wind Competition Turbines go Blade-to-Blade in Wind Tunnel Tests at WINDPOWER March 28, 2014 - 5:11pm ...

  15. Microsoft PowerPoint - 10 Lee LCLS Lessons Learned PM Workshop...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    however tunneling bids were on target competition; however, tunneling bids were on target - Project baseline set prior to the market volatility A d ti d i k i ti - Assessed...

  16. The state of art of shotcrete in Italy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pelizza, S.; Tesio, G.G.

    1995-12-31

    The paper reports the large experience of use of shotcrete in Italy, both in tunnels and above ground. In tunnelling, for more than 30 years, shotcrete has been used for many hundreds of kilometers of tunnel construction. Technical rules for shotcrete use in Italy do not yet exist. SIG-Italian Tunnelling Society- has formed the Working Group Use of Shotcrete. This working group, operating since 1988, has the specific task to adapt the use of shotcrete to international standards.

  17. Generation of a frequency comb and applications thereof

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hagmann, Mark J; Yarotski, Dmitry A

    2013-12-03

    Apparatus for generating a microwave frequency comb (MFC) in the DC tunneling current of a scanning tunneling microscope (STM) by fast optical rectification, cause by nonlinearity of the DC current vs. voltage curve for the tunneling junction, of regularly-spaced, short pulses of optical radiation from a focused mode-locked, ultrafast laser, directed onto the tunneling junction, is described. Application of the MFC to high resolution dopant profiling in semiconductors is simulated. Application of the MFC to other measurements is described.

  18. Electronic modulations in a single wall carbon nanotube induced...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    GENERAL PHYSICS; CARBON NANOTUBES; DENSITY OF STATES; DEPOSITS; ELECTRONIC STRUCTURE; GOLD; SCANNING TUNNELING MICROSCOPY; SEMICONDUCTOR DEVICES; SPECTROSCOPY; SURFACES Word ...

  19. The impact of disorder on charge transport in three dimensional quantum dot

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    resonant tunneling structures (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect The impact of disorder on charge transport in three dimensional quantum dot resonant tunneling structures Citation Details In-Document Search Title: The impact of disorder on charge transport in three dimensional quantum dot resonant tunneling structures Efficient iso-entropic energy filtering of electronic waves can be realized through nanostructures with three dimensional confinement, such as quantum dot resonant tunneling

  20. DRAFT PROPOSAL AND NOTES 6/14

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Tunnel PLA 10-01-12 thru 09-30-17 Page 1 of 57 CONSTRUCTION TUNNEL AND TUNNEL-SHAFT PROJECT LABOR AGREEMENT FOR THE NEVADA NATIONAL SECURITY SITE (NNSS) between NATIONAL SECURITY TECHNOLOGIES LLC (NSTec) and LABORERS' INTERNATIONAL UNION OF NORTH AMERICA, LOCAL UNION NO. 872 October 1, 2012 through September 30, 2017 Tunnel PLA 10-01-12 thru 09-30-17 Page 2 of 57 TABLE OF CONTENTS 1. PREAMBLE

  1. AVTA: Airport Ground Support Equipment Specifications and Test Procedures |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Airport Ground Support Equipment Specifications and Test Procedures AVTA: Airport Ground Support Equipment Specifications and Test Procedures PDF icon eGSE America Electric Baggage Tow Tractor (EBTT) Technical Specifications PDF icon eGSE America Electric Aircraft PushBack Tractor (EAPT) Technical Specifications PDF icon eGSE America Electric Aircraft Cargo Conveyor (EACC) Technical Specifications PDF icon ETA-GAC001 Control, Close-out, and Storage of Documentation PDF

  2. DE-FE0010144 | netl.doe.gov

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Mapping Permafrost and Gas Hydrate using Marine Controlled Source Electromagnetic Methods (CSEM) Last Reviewed 11/27/2015 DE-FE0010144 Goal The objective of this project is to develop and test a towed electromagnetic source and receiver system suitable for deployment from small coastal vessels to map near-surface electrical structure in shallow water. The system will be used to collect permafrost data in the shallow water of the U.S. Beaufort Inner Shelf at locations coincident with seismic

  3. Design and analysis of a vertical axis ocean current power plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Richard, C.C.; Hartzog, J.R.; Sorge, R.V.; Quigley, J.V.; Adams, G.R.

    1981-01-01

    This paper discusses a calculation of the power generated by a vertical axis ocean current power plant. An analytical model is presented and a computer solution described. Results of the calculation show the optimum angles of the blades about the vertical axis to maximize power output, as well as the total extractable power of the plant for various ocean current velocities. Tow tank tests are described for a scale model of the plant.

  4. Advanced Containment System

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kostelnik, Kevin M. (Idaho Falls, ID); Kawamura, Hideki (Tokyo, JP); Richardson, John G. (Idaho Falls, ID); Noda, Masaru (Tokyo, JP)

    2004-10-12

    An advanced containment system for containing buried waste and associated leachate. A trench is dug on either side of the zone of interest containing the buried waste so as to accommodate a micro tunnel boring machine. A series of small diameter tunnels are serially excavated underneath the buried waste. The tunnels are excavated by the micro tunnel boring machine at a consistent depth and are substantially parallel to each other. As tunneling progresses, steel casing sections are connected end to end in the excavated portion of the tunnel so that a steel tube is formed. Each casing section has complementary interlocking structure running its length that interlocks with complementary interlocking structure on the adjacent casing section. Thus, once the first tube is emplaced, placement of subsequent tubes is facilitated by the complementary interlocking structure on the adjacent, previously placed, casing sections.

  5. Advanced Containment System

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kostelnik, Kevin M. (Idaho Falls, ID); Kawamura, Hideki (Tokyo, JP); Richardson, John G. (Idaho Falls, ID); Noda, Masaru (Tokyo, JP)

    2005-05-24

    An advanced containment system for containing buried waste and associated leachate. A trench is dug on either side of the zone of interest containing the buried waste so as to accommodate a micro tunnel boring machine. A series of small diameter tunnels are serially excavated underneath the buried waste. The tunnels are excavated by the micro tunnel boring machine at a consistent depth and are substantially parallel to each other. As tunneling progresses, steel casing sections are connected end to end in the excavated portion of the tunnel so that a steel tube is formed. Each casing section has complementary interlocking structure running its length that interlocks with complementary interlocking structure on the adjacent casing section. Thus, once the first tube is emplaced, placement of subsequent tubes is facilitated by the complementary interlocking structure on the adjacent, previously placed, casing sections.

  6. Spintronics with graphene-hexagonal boron nitride van der Waals heterostructures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kamalakar, M. Venkata Dankert, André; Bergsten, Johan; Ive, Tommy; Dash, Saroj P.

    2014-11-24

    Hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) is a large bandgap insulating isomorph of graphene, ideal for atomically thin tunnel barrier applications. In this letter, we demonstrate large area chemical vapor deposited (CVD) h-BN as a promising spin tunnel barrier in graphene spin transport devices. In such structures, the ferromagnetic tunnel contacts with h-BN barrier are found to show robust tunneling characteristics over a large scale with resistances in the favorable range for efficient spin injection into graphene. The non-local spin transport and precession experiments reveal spin lifetime ≈500 ps and spin diffusion length ≈1.6 μm in graphene with tunnel spin polarization ≈11% at 100 K. The electrical and spin transport measurements at different injection bias current and gate voltages confirm tunnel spin injection through h-BN barrier. These results open up possibilities for implementation of large area CVD h-BN in spintronic technologies.

  7. Sandia National Laboratories: Research: Facilities: Technology Deployment

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Centers: Engineering Sciences Experimental Facilities (ESEF) Hypersonic Wind Tunnel Technical Characteristics Blowdown to vacuum M = 5, 8, 14 Re = 0.2 - 10 x 106/ft Run times: ~45 sec at 45 minute intervals Gases: air at Mach 5 N2 at Mach 8 and 14 18" diameter test section 4" - 5" maximum diameter model size Stagnation temperature to 2500°R Related Links Wind tunnel operation maps Overview briefing of the wind tunnels

  8. Local Imaging of High Mobility Two-Dimensional Electron Systems with

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Virtual Scanning Tunneling Microscopy (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Local Imaging of High Mobility Two-Dimensional Electron Systems with Virtual Scanning Tunneling Microscopy Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Local Imaging of High Mobility Two-Dimensional Electron Systems with Virtual Scanning Tunneling Microscopy Authors: Pelliccione, M. ; /Stanford U., Appl. Phys. Dept. /SLAC /UC, Santa Barbara ; Bartel, J. ; /SLAC /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. ; Sciambi, A. ; /Stanford U.,

  9. Development FD-SOI MOSFET Amplifiers for Integrated Read-Out Circuit of

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Superconducting-Tunnel-Junction Single-Photon-Detectors (Conference) | SciTech Connect Development FD-SOI MOSFET Amplifiers for Integrated Read-Out Circuit of Superconducting-Tunnel-Junction Single-Photon-Detectors Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Development FD-SOI MOSFET Amplifiers for Integrated Read-Out Circuit of Superconducting-Tunnel-Junction Single-Photon-Detectors Authors: Kiuchi, Kenji ; et al. Publication Date: 2015-07-27 OSTI Identifier: 1221323 Report Number(s):

  10. SAND2008-1782

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Design and Analysis of Flatback Airfoil Wind Tunnel Experiment C.P. "Case" van Dam, Edward A. Mayda, and David D. Chao Department of Mechanical and Aeronautical ...

  11. Think Outside the Box During Our Open Data by Design Contest...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    with a virtual wind tunnel. | Photo courtesy of the Energy Department. Patricia A. Hoffman Patricia A. Hoffman Assistant Secretary, Office of Electricity Delivery & Energy...

  12. CNMS User Newsletter

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and with Dr. Petro Maksymovych in probing the topological surface states of the Kondo insulator, samarium hexaboride, using low- temperature scanning tunneling...

  13. Best Management Practice #12: Laboratory and Medical Equipment...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... Use tunnel washers for small cage-cleaning operations. Sterilize and recirculate water used in automatic animal watering systems instead of discharging water to the drain. Consider ...

  14. SeWave | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    50:50 JV between UK's Wavegen and Faroese electricity company SEV to to design and build a tunnelled demonstration wave power plant in the Faroes Islands. References:...

  15. Potassium-induced effect on structure and chemical activity of...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    (x2) surface: A combined scanning tunneling microscopy and density functional theory ... in work function and leads to a strong electron polarization on the surface. ...

  16. Local Imaging of High Mobility Two-Dimensional Electron Systems...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Local Imaging of High Mobility Two-Dimensional Electron Systems with Virtual Scanning Tunneling Microscopy Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Local Imaging of High Mobility ...

  17. This manuscript has been authored ...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Letters Atomic-scale electrochemistry on the surface of a manganite by scanning tunneling microscopy ... is the competition between the electron localization and delocalization in ...

  18. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... Local Imaging of High Mobility Two-Dimensional Electron Systems with Virtual Scanning Tunneling Microscopy Pelliccione, M. ; Stanford U., Appl. Phys. Dept. SLAC UC, Santa ...

  19. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    (8) atoms (7) electrons (7) scanning tunneling microscopy (7) adsorption (6) bonding (6) ... Non-nuclear Electron Transport Channels in Hollow Molecules Zhao, Jin ; Petek, ...

  20. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    (2) periodicity (2) probes (2) scanning probe microscopy (2) scanning tunneling microscopy ... Sergei V Reflection high energy electron diffraction (RHEED) has by now ...

  1. Controlling orbital-selective Kondo effects in a single molecule...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    stimuli by using scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and density functional theory calculations. ... In contrast, an unpaired electron survives in the molecular orbital composed of ...

  2. Non-abelian fractional quantum hall effect for fault-resistant...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    We then describe the development and application of edge tunneling techniques to quantify and understand the quasiparticle physics of the 52 state. Authors: Pan, Wei ; Thalakulam, ...

  3. Periodic permanent magnet focused klystron

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ferguson, Patrick; Read, Michael; Ives, R Lawrence

    2015-04-21

    A periodic permanent magnet (PPM) klystron has beam transport structures and RF cavity structures, each of which has permanent magnets placed substantially equidistant from a beam tunnel formed about the central axis, and which are also outside the extent of a cooling chamber. The RF cavity sections also have permanent magnets which are placed substantially equidistant from the beam tunnel, but which include an RF cavity coupling to the beam tunnel for enhancement of RF carried by an electron beam in the beam tunnel.

  4. Whitfield County, Georgia: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Zone Subtype A. Registered Energy Companies in Whitfield County, Georgia Wilson and Dalton Places in Whitfield County, Georgia Cohutta, Georgia Dalton, Georgia Tunnel Hill,...

  5. Strain-assisted current-induced magnetization reversal in magnetic...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Strain-assisted current-induced magnetization reversal in magnetic tunnel junctions: A micromagnetic study with phase-field microelasticity Citation Details In-Document Search ...

  6. Jefferson Lab Weekly Briefs - November 5, 2015 | Jefferson Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of the tunnel air conditioning was performed the week of Oct. 12. During commissioning, a control programming issue with the chilled water temperature in relationship to the dew...

  7. Jefferson Lab Tech Associate Invents Lockout Device for Equipment...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1990s and building Jefferson Lab's Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator was in high gear. The Accelerator Division was busy installing some 30 vacuum ion pumps in the tunnel....

  8. The second-phase development of the China JinPing underground...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    away from the main water transport and auto traffic tunnels. ... well as for geophysicsengineering and other coupled ... Language: English Subject: deep underground laboratory; ...

  9. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    neutrinos (1) coupling (1) deep underground laboratory (1) ... away from the main water transport and auto traffic tunnels. ... well as for geophysicsengineering and other coupled ...

  10. High precision magnetic susceptibility of novel magnets and supercondu...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    resistance region due to the effect of quantum mechanical tunneling, one can make a high resolution resonator (fundamental frequency of about 10 MHz) with a noise level of...

  11. Development FD-SOI MOSFET Amplifiers for Integrated Read-Out...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Development FD-SOI MOSFET Amplifiers for Integrated Read-Out Circuit of Superconducting-Tunnel-Junction Single-Photon-Detectors Citation Details In-Document Search Title:...

  12. Slide 1

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    for existing imaging probes: 1. Improve size retrieval algorithms (e.g. use several grey levels) 2. Laboratory calibrations (e.g. spinning disc technique) 3. Wind tunnel...

  13. Daya Bay Reactor Neutrino Experiment

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Ao Nuclear Power Plant reactors. The experiment is being built by blasting three kilometers of tunnel through the granite rock under the mountains where the power plants are...

  14. Concrete Pour in NSLS-II Ring

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Bruno Semon

    2013-07-22

    The mezzanine floor of the ring building tunnel for NSLS-II was completed when the last concrete was placed in February 2011.

  15. Microscopy (XSD-MIC) | Advanced Photon Source

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    microdiffraction, fluorescence tomography, coherent diffraction, and synchrotron x-ray scanning tunneling microscopy (SX-STM) This website is intended to provide useful...

  16. SSRL HEADLINES April 2012

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    were called in to restore the control system, search and secure the accelerator tunnels, monitor the vacuum system, restart water systems and checkout accelerator power...

  17. David Lee, Douglas Osheroff, Superfluidity, and Helium 3

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    diagram of 3He - 4He mixtures, quasiparticle tunneling in superconductors, magnetic resonance and ultrasound techniques, cooling by adiabatic demagnetization and the Pomeranchuk...

  18. Buried Interface

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... Examples are giant magnetoresistance structures, spin tunnel junctions, as well as "spintronics" devices based on spin injection. A specific interfacial problem which is of ...

  19. Electronic & magnetic materials and devices at the CNM | Argonne...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Electronic & magnetic materials and devices at the CNM Graphene Micrograph 1 of 24 Graphene Micrograph Ultra-high vacuum scanning tunneling microscopy image of a point defect in...

  20. Jeffrey R. Guest | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    these nanoscale systems at these length scales, he is combining low temperature ultra-high-vacuum scanning tunneling microscopy (LT UHV STM) and confocal optical microscopy and...

  1. 1

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Vital Alert's C1000 mine and tunnel radios use magnetic induction, advanced digital communications techniques and ultra-low frequency transmission to wirelessly provide rs in cost...

  2. Surface Structures Far-from-Equilibrium | The Ames Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    tunneling microscopy experiments confirmed the predictions. Publications 2014 Liu X J ; Wang C Z ; Hupalo M ; Lin H Q ; Ho K M ; Tringides M C. Quantum confinement induced...

  3. Sandia Energy - Sandia-California Partners with Japanese National...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Dr. An is an internationally recognized expert on scanning probe microscopy, such as atomic force microscopy and scanning tunneling microscopy, and regularly visits...

  4. The impact of disorder on charge transport in three dimensional...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Title: The impact of disorder on charge transport in three dimensional quantum dot resonant tunneling structures Efficient iso-entropic energy filtering of electronic waves can be ...

  5. Numerical simulation of undersea cable dynamics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ablow, C.M.; Schechter, S.

    1983-01-01

    A fully three-dimensional code has been written to compute the motion of a towed cable. The code is based on a robust and stable finite difference approximation to the differential equations derived from basic dynamics. A 3500-ft cable pulled at 18.5 knots (hr/sup -1/) through a circular turn of 700 yd radius has been computed in about half of the real time of the maneuver. The computed displacements are close to the measured ones; the changes in depth are within 2%.

  6. 3610 Collins Ferry Road, P.O. Box 880, Morgantown, WV 26507

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    610 Collins Ferry Road, P.O. Box 880, Morgantown, WV 26507 cliff.whyte@netl.doe.gov  Voice (304) 285-2098  Fax (304) 285-4403  www.netl.doe.gov A l b a ny, O R * M o rg a n tow n , W V * Pi t t s b u rg h , PA February 24, 2015 Dear Reader: The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared a supplement analysis (SA) to the Texas Clean Energy Project (TCEP) Final Environmental Impact Statement (EIS). This document was prepared in accordance with the National Environmental Policy Act of

  7. Paducah Demolition Debris Shipped for Disposition | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Demolition Debris Shipped for Disposition Paducah Demolition Debris Shipped for Disposition August 27, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis The first five-car section of demolition debris from the C-340 Metals Plant leaves July 15 from the Paducah site. The first five-car section of demolition debris from the C-340 Metals Plant leaves July 15 from the Paducah site. A P&L locomotive travels near Woodville Road, south of the Paducah site, with the waste shipment in tow. A P&L locomotive travels near

  8. Parking

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Parking Print Finding a parking space at Berkeley Lab can be very difficult. Users are strongly encouraged to use the Berkeley Lab shuttles whenever possible (see Directions, Maps). Parking Permits Parking at Berkeley Lab and the ALS is by permit only. Signs in each parking lot designate the types of permit required for that area. Cars parked in no-parking areas or reserved spaces without appropriate permits may be cited or towed. A one-day permit must be obtained at the Berkeley Lab Main Gate

  9. Parking

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Parking Parking Print Finding a parking space at Berkeley Lab can be very difficult. Users are strongly encouraged to use the Berkeley Lab shuttles whenever possible (see Directions, Maps). Parking Permits Parking at Berkeley Lab and the ALS is by permit only. Signs in each parking lot designate the types of permit required for that area. Cars parked in no-parking areas or reserved spaces without appropriate permits may be cited or towed. A one-day permit must be obtained at the Berkeley Lab

  10. Microsoft Word - 12.18.13 NEPA UK FT DSEA draft DearReaderLtr.docx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    William.Gwilliam@netl.doe.gov  Voice (304) 285-4401  Fax (304) 285-4403  www.netl.doe.gov A l b a ny, O R * M o rg a n tow n , W V * Pi t t s b u rg h , PA December 18 , 2013 Dear Reader: The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) invites comments on the enclosed draft Supplemental Environmental Assessment (draft SEA) for the University of Kentucky Small-Scale Pilot Plant for the Gasification of Coal and Coal-Biomass Blends and Conversion of Derived Syngas to Liquid Fuels via Fischer-Tropsch

  11. Yuan Zhang | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Yuan Zhang Postdoctoral Appointee (Supervisor, Saw Wai Hla) Research Expertise UHV-LT-STM applications including single molecule imaging, tunneling spectroscopy, vibrational spectroscopy, and spectroscopic mapping. Single atom and single molecule manipulations with LT-STM; lateral manipulation, vertical manipulation, and inelastic electron tunneling (IET) induced manipulation. Molecular Rotors, Molecular Motion Dynamics, Molecular Self-Assembled Architectures, Dipolar Molecules, and Charge

  12. Sandia National Laboratories: Research: Facilities: Technology Deployment

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Centers: Engineering Sciences Experimental Facilities Engineering Sciences Experimental Facilities (ESEF) Technology Deployment Centers Ion Beam Lab Advanced Power Sources Laboratory Engineering Sciences Experimental Facilities (ESEF) Trisonic Wind Tunnel Hypersonic Wind Tunnel High Altitude Chamber Explosive Components Facility Materials Science and Engineering Center Pulsed Power and Systems Validation Facility Radiation Detection Materials Characterization Laboratory Shock Thermodynamic

  13. Electrochemical device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Grimes, Patrick G. (Westfield, NJ); Einstein, Harry (Springfield, NJ); Bellows, Richard J. (Westfield, NJ)

    1988-01-12

    A tunnel protected electrochemical device features channels fluidically communicating between manifold, tunnels and cells. The channels are designed to provide the most efficient use of auxiliary power. The channels have a greater hydraulic pressure drop and electrical resistance than the manifold. This will provide a design with the optimum auxiliary energy requirements.

  14. Combined Experiment Phase 1. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Butterfield, C.P.; Musial, W.P.; Simms, D.A.

    1992-10-01

    How does wind tunnel airfoil data differ from the airfoil performance on an operating horizontal axis wind turbine (HAWT)? The National Renewable Energy laboratory has been conducting a comprehensive test program focused on answering this question and understanding the basic fluid mechanics of rotating HAWT stall aerodynamics. The basic approach was to instrument a wind rotor, using an airfoil that was well documented by wind tunnel tests, and measure operating pressure distributions on the rotating blade. Based an the integrated values of the pressure data, airfoil performance coefficients were obtained, and comparisons were made between the rotating data and the wind tunnel data. Care was taken to the aerodynamic and geometric differences between the rotating and the wind tunnel models. This is the first of two reports describing the Combined Experiment Program and its results. This Phase I report covers background information such as test setup and instrumentation. It also includes wind tunnel test results and roughness testing.

  15. Melt Infiltrated Ceramic Composites (Hipercomp) for Gas Turbine Engine Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gregory Corman; Krishan Luthra

    2005-09-30

    This report covers work performed under the Continuous Fiber Ceramic Composites (CFCC) program by GE Global Research and its partners from 1994 through 2005. The processing of prepreg-derived, melt infiltrated (MI) composite systems based on monofilament and multifilament tow SiC fibers is described. Extensive mechanical and environmental exposure characterizations were performed on these systems, as well as on competing Ceramic Matrix Composite (CMC) systems. Although current monofilament SiC fibers have inherent oxidative stability limitations due to their carbon surface coatings, the MI CMC system based on multifilament tow (Hi-Nicalon ) proved to have excellent mechanical, thermal and time-dependent properties. The materials database generated from the material testing was used to design turbine hot gas path components, namely the shroud and combustor liner, utilizing the CMC materials. The feasibility of using such MI CMC materials in gas turbine engines was demonstrated via combustion rig testing of turbine shrouds and combustor liners, and through field engine tests of shrouds in a 2MW engine for >1000 hours. A unique combustion test facility was also developed that allowed coupons of the CMC materials to be exposed to high-pressure, high-velocity combustion gas environments for times up to {approx}4000 hours.

  16. Local Optical Spectroscopies for Subnanometer Spatial Resolution Chemical Imaging

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weiss, Paul

    2014-01-20

    The evanescently coupled photon scanning tunneling microscopes (STMs) have special requirements in terms of stability and optical access. We have made substantial improvements to the stability, resolution, and noise floor of our custom-built visible-photon STM, and will translate these advances to our infrared instrument. Double vibration isolation of the STM base with a damping system achieved increased rigidity, giving high tunneling junction stability for long-duration and high-power illumination. Light frequency modulation with an optical chopper and phase-sensitive detection now enhance the signal-to-noise ratio of the tunneling junction during irradiation.

  17. Selectable resistance-area product by dilute highly charged ion irradiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pomeroy, J. M.; Grube, H.; Perrella, A. C.; Gillaspy, J. D. [National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, Maryland 20899 (United States)

    2007-08-13

    Considerable effort worldwide has been invested in producing low resistance-area (RA) product magnetic tunnel junction sensors for future hard drive read heads. Here the authors present a method of producing tunnel barriers with a selectable RA value spanning orders of magnitude. A single process recipe is used with only the dose of highly charged ions (HCIs) varied. The HCIs reduce the tunnel barrier integrity, providing enhanced conduction that reduces the overall RA product. The final RA product is selected by appropriate choice of the HCI density; e.g., 100 HCIs/{mu}m{sup 2} typically results in the RA product being reduced by a factor of 100.

  18. H-Canyon Recovery Crawler

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kriikku, E. M.; Hera, K. R.; Marzolf, A. D.; Phillips, M. H.

    2015-08-01

    The Nuclear Material Disposition Project group asked the Savannah River National Lab (SRNL) Research and Development Engineering (R&DE) department to help procure, test, and deploy a remote crawler to recover the 2014 Inspection Crawler (IC) that tipped over in the H-Canyon Air Exhaust Tunnel. R&DE wrote a Procurement Specification for a Recovery Crawler (RC) and SRNS Procurement Department awarded the contract to Power Equipment Manufacturing Inc. (PEM). The PEM RC was based on their standard sewer inspection crawler with custom arms and forks added to the front. The arms and forks would be used to upright the 2014 Inspection Crawler. PEM delivered the RC and associated cable reel, 2014 Inspection Crawler mockup, and manuals in late April 2015. R&DE and the team tested the crawler in May of 2015 and made modifications based on test results and Savannah River Site (SRS) requirements. R&DE delivered the RC to H-Area at the end of May. The team deployed the RC on June 9, 10, and 11, 2015 in the H-Canyon Air Exhaust Tunnel. The RC struggled with some obstacles in the tunnel, but eventually made it to the IC. The team spent approximately five hours working to upright the IC and eventually got it on its wheels. The IC travelled approximately 20 feet and struggled to drive over debris on the air tunnel floor. Unfortunately the IC tripped over trying to pass this obstacle. The team decided to leave the IC in this location and inspect the tunnel with the RC. The RC passed the IC and inspected the tunnel as it travelled toward H-Canyon. The team turned the RC around when it was about 20 feet from the H-Canyon crossover tunnel. From that point, the team drove the RC past the manway towards the new sand filter and stopped approximately 20 feet from the new sand filter. The team removed the RC from the tunnel, decontaminated the RC, and stored it the manway building, 294-2H. The RC deployment confirmed the IC was not in a condition to perform useful tunnel inspections and would require significant maintenance to become inspection ready. The RC traveled approximately 660 feet in the tunnel and viewed the tunnel and ceiling wall surfaces that were not blocked by existing ducts. This deployment also documented the tunnel obstacles for future inspections. Overall, the RC deployment was a success.

  19. Design of a crystal extraction facility in the east utility straight

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dukes, E.C.; Murphy, C.T.; Parker, B.

    1993-09-01

    Parasitic extraction of a small fraction of the 20-TeV circulating beam of the Superconducting Super Collider can be done using a bent crystal situated in the halo of the orbiting beam. The authors present a design of a crystal extraction system that is compatible with current plans for momentum scraping in the east utility straight. The only modification to the collider tunnel is the addition of a 160-m-long alcove in the east utility straight to mate the extracted beam line microtunnel with the collider tunnel. No other changes to the east utility straight tunnel are needed.

  20. Spin and charge transport in double-junction Fe/MgO/GaAs/MgO/Fe heterostructures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wolski, S. Szczepa?ski, T.; Dugaev, V. K.; Barna?, J.; Landgraf, B.; Slobodskyy, T.; Hansen, W.

    2015-01-28

    We present theoretical and experimental results on tunneling current in single Fe/MgO/GaAs and double Fe/MgO/GaAs/MgO/Fe tunnel junctions. The charge and spin currents are calculated as a function of external voltage for different sets of parameters characterizing the semiconducting GaAs layer. Transport characteristics of a single Fe/MgO/GaAs junction reveal typical diode as well as spin diode features. The results of numerical calculations are compared with current-voltage characteristics measured experimentally for double tunnel junction structures, and a satisfactory agreement of the theoretical and experimental results has been achieved.

  1. Control Surveys for Underground Construction of the Superconducting Super Collider

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Greening, W.J.Trevor; Robinson, Gregory L.; Robbins, Jeffrey S.; Ruland, Robert E.; /SLAC

    2005-08-16

    Particular care had to be taken in the design and implementation of the geodetic control systems for the Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) due to stringent accuracy requirements, the demanding tunneling schedule, long duration and large size of the construction effort of the project. The surveying requirements and the design and implementation of the surface and underground control scheme for the precise location of facilities which include approximately 120 km of bored tunnel are discussed. The methodology used for the densification of the surface control networks, the technique used for the transfer of horizontal and vertical control into the underground facilities, and the control traverse scheme employed in the tunnels is described.

  2. SAND2008-2008

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    SAND2008-2008 Unlimited Release Printed April 2008 Flatback Airfoil Wind Tunnel Experiment Jonathon P. Baker, C.P. "Case" van Dam, and Benson L. Gilbert Department of Mechanical ...

  3. Optimized Active Aerodynamic Blade Control

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... loads and increased energy capture. van Dam et. al., 4-6 has investigated both ... In reference 9 van Dam, et.al. have developed a microtab wing section for wind tunnel ...

  4. Air-injection field tests to determine the effect of a heat cycle...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    preparation for site characterization of the potential nuclear-waste repository site at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, air-injection tests were conducted in the welded tuffs in G-Tunnel...

  5. Field air injection tests to determine the effect of a heat cycle...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    part of a series of prototype tests conducted in preparation for site characterization at Yucca Mountain, air-injection tests were conducted in the welded tuffs in G-Tunnel at the...

  6. REACTOR MONITORING

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bugbee, S.J.; Hanson, V.F.; Babcock, D.F.

    1959-02-01

    A neutron density inonitoring means for reactors is described. According to this invention a tunnel is provided beneath and spaced from the active portion of the reactor and extends beyond the opposite faces of the activc portion. Neutron beam holes are provided between the active portion and the tunnel and open into the tunnel near the middle thereof. A carriage operates back and forth in the tunnel and is adapted to convey a neutron detector, such as an ion chamber, and position it beneath one of the neutron beam holes. This arrangement affords convenient access of neutron density measuring instruments to a location wherein direct measurement of neutron density within the piles can be made and at the same time affords ample protection to operating personnel.

  7. Seven Traffic Signals in Two Minutes

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Topeka, Kansas has activated the first of three key traffic corridors to receive a "green light tunnel," a real-time adaptive traffic signal system that synchronizes signals to create a series of...

  8. EECBG Success Story: Getting Traffic Lights Talking to Improve...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    EECBG Success Story: Topeka's "Green Light Tunnel" Saves Fuel and Time An aerial shot of Oro Valley, Ariz.'s town hall campus shows proposed solar locations. | Photo courtesy of...

  9. Search for: All records | DOE PAGES

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Broken vertex symmetry and finite zero-point entropy in the artificial square ice ground ... Effect of annealing and applied bias on barrier shape in CoFeMgOCoFe tunnel junctions ...

  10. Natural Gas Weekly Update, Printer-Friendly Version

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    part of a 65 billion project to supply the United States with oil, natural gas, and electricity from Siberia. The tunnel, which would be the world's longest, would take 10 to 15...

  11. Natural Gas Weekly Update

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    part of a 65 billion project to supply the United States with oil, natural gas, and electricity from Siberia. The tunnel, which would be the world's longest, would take 10 to 15...

  12. Spatially separated excitons in 2D and 1D

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of Fermi surfaces Low SP tunneling rate between layers Picture credit: Kharitonov et al., Phys. Rev. B 78 Phase coherence between the two layers Transport of excitons can be...

  13. Josephson junction Q-spoiler

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Clarke, J.; Hilbert, C.; Hahn, E.L.; Sleator, T.

    1986-03-25

    An automatic Q-spoiler comprising at least one Josephson tunnel junction connected in an LC circuit for flow of resonant current therethrough. When in use in a system for detecting the magnetic resonance of a gyromagnetic particle system, a high energy pulse of high frequency energy irradiating the particle system will cause the critical current through the Josephson tunnel junctions to be exceeded, causing the tunnel junctions to act as resistors and thereby damp the ringing of the high-Q detection circuit after the pulse. When the current has damped to below the critical current, the Josephson tunnel junctions revert to their zero-resistance state, restoring the Q of the detection circuit and enabling the low energy magnetic resonance signals to be detected.

  14. Sandia National Laboratories: Research: Facilities: Technology...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Hypersonic Wind Tunnel Technical Characteristics Blowdown to vacuum M 5, 8, 14 Re 0.2 - 10 x 106ft Run times: 45 sec at 45 minute intervals Gases: air at Mach 5 N2 at Mach 8...

  15. Interband cascade (IC) photovoltaic (PV) architecture for PV devices

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Yang, Rui Q.; Tian, Zhaobing; Mishima, Tetsuya D.; Santos, Michael B.; Johnson, Matthew B.; Klem, John F.

    2015-10-20

    A photovoltaic (PV) device, comprising a PV interband cascade (IC) stage, wherein the IC PV stage comprises an absorption region with a band gap, the absorption region configured to absorb photons, an intraband transport region configured to act as a hole barrier, and an interband tunneling region configured to act as an electron barrier. An IC PV architecture for a photovoltaic device, the IC PV architecture comprising an absorption region, an intraband transport region coupled to the absorption region, and an interband tunneling region coupled to the intraband transport region and to the adjacent absorption region, wherein the absorption region, the intraband transport region, and the interband tunneling region are positioned such that electrons will flow from the absorption region to the intraband transport region to the interband tunneling region.

  16. B61

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    in the U.S. and abroad.

    B61-12 Life Extension Program Undergoes First Full-Scale Wind Tunnel Test http:www.nnsa.energy.govmediaroompressreleaseswindtunnel

  17. Life Extension Programs

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    in the U.S. and abroad.

    B61-12 Life Extension Program Undergoes First Full-Scale Wind Tunnel Test http:www.nnsa.energy.govmediaroompressreleaseswindtunnel

  18. Testing of the Modified Anomalous Diffraction Approximation with...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    (x D eff ) resulted in a wide variation in Q ext values, posing a challenging test of theory. Using a photon-tunneling factor around 0.6, the mean difference between...

  19. CX-012571: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Installation of H-Canyon 294-1H Process Air Supply Tunnel Manway Building CX(s) Applied: B1.15Date: 41862 Location(s): South CarolinaOffices(s): Savannah River Operations Office

  20. CX-012569: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Installation of H-Canyon 294-1H Process Air Supply Tunnel Manway Building CX(s) Applied: B1.15Date: 41863 Location(s): South CarolinaOffices(s): Savannah River Operations Office

  1. RAP Committee 3-Month Work Plan

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    100 Area RIFS and Proposed Plans (BC, 100-K, F, N, D-H, 300, Orchards) 2016 Potential site visits: N Reactor, 300 Area, 618-1011, C7 PUREX tunnels mortgage costs and risks No...

  2. RAP-Transcribed Flipcharts

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    to WIPP situation (Pollet) Page 10 August * RCRA Class III Mods * Briefing on PUREX tunnels (go thru EIC process to add to the HAB Work Plan) * Briefing in SW-2 Caissons *...

  3. CX-011342: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Installation of Manway to H-Canyon Exhaust Tunnel CX(s) Applied: B2.5 Date: 09/19/2013 Location(s): South Carolina Offices(s): Savannah River Operations Office

  4. Media Contact: For Immediate Release:

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    yards of grout will be placed inside the canyon cells and supporting galleries, rooms, tunnels and piping. Finally, the upper section of the canyon will be demolished prior to...

  5. The WIPP Underground Ventilation System

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the ventilation system provides a continuous flow of fresh air to the underground tunnels and rooms that make up the disposal facility at WIPP. Air is supplied to the...

  6. RAP Committee 3-Month Work Plan

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    moving forward with advice) Tour (K Basins? N Area?) Update on PFP Briefing on PUREX tunnels (currently not on HAB 2014 Work Plan; will need to go through EIC process to add to...

  7. 1

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Nanoscale engineering boosts performance of quantum dot light emitting diodes October 25, 2013 Making the light at the end of the tunnel more efficient LOS ALAMOS, N.M., Oct. 25,...

  8. NREL: Workforce Development and Education Programs - Boise State...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    their first test in the wind tunnel, Kansas State's turbine controller went up in smoke due to a faulty wiring configuration. This year there was the addition of a surprise...

  9. Fermilab | Newsroom | Press Releases | October 6, 2014: Fermilab?s...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    through the Earth, with no tunnel needed. The 14,000-ton far detector - constructed in Ash River, Minnesota, near the Canadian border - spots those neutrinos after their 500-mile...

  10. Virtual Tour | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Science Ed NSTX Health Physics 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 Locations 1 Lyman Spitzer Building 2 Theory Wing 3 The L-wing 4 The Tunnel 5 Science Ed 6 NSTX 7 Health Physics Lyman Spitzer Building ...

  11. Wind Energy Program: Top 10 Program Accomplishments

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Brochure on the top accomplishments of the Wind Energy Program, including the development of large wind machines, small machines for the residential market, wind tunnel testing, computer codes for modeling wind systems, high definition wind maps, and successful collaborations.

  12. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    have been tested in the LTV Aerospace Corporation 4.6- x 6.1-m (15- x 20-ft) Low Speed Wind Tunnel. The airfoil section for all configurations was NACA 0012. The parameters...

  13. 6MSD | Jefferson Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    external Hall D beamline into the accelerator tunnel proper. It also involved the refurbishment and modification of arc magnets to provide capability up to 12 GeV. You could also...

  14. Center for Nanophase Materials Sciences (CNMS) - CNMS User Research

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Achievement: The material of choice for spintronics device today is FeMgOFe tunnel ... by modi?cation of the interface is an important topic in spintronics research. ...

  15. CX-012568: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Installation of H-Canyon 294-1H Process Air Supply Tunnel Manway Building CX(s) Applied: B1.15Date: 41863 Location(s): South CarolinaOffices(s): Savannah River Operations Office

  16. ARM - Publications: Science Team Meeting Documents

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Properties, Including the First Estimates of Photon Tunneling Contributions to Absorption Mitchell, D.L.(a) and DeSlover, D.H.(b), Desert Research Institute (a), Cooperative...

  17. RANS simulations of a simplified tractor/trailer geometry. (Conference...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    results are compared to experimental data obtained at the NASA-Ames 7 x 10 ft wind tunnel. Quantities compared include vehicle drag, surface pressures, and time-averaged...

  18. Life Extension Programs | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Alvin Leung and Matt H. B61-12 Life Extension Program Undergoes First Full-Scale Wind Tunnel Test WASHINGTON, D.C. - The National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)...

  19. Shotcrete durability

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Palermo, G.; Sardinha, V.L.A.; Coutinho, P.T.

    1995-12-31

    This paper defends the use of shotcrete as a permanent structure based on scientific, technological and practical reasons. Special attention is given to the topic of lining design in tunnels and stations excavated in soil by the NATM method.

  20. NREL Combined Experimental Final Report--Phase II

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Butterfield, C. P.; Musial, W. P.; Scott, G. N.; Simms, D. A.

    1992-08-01

    Predicting peak power and loads on a fixed-pitch wind turbine. How does the performance of the airfoil in the wind tunnel differ from the performance of an operating horizontal-axis wind turbine (HAWT)?